WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced heavy water

  1. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  3. Advanced light and heavy water reactors for improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26-29 November 1984 the Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna the Technical Committee and Workshop on Advanced Light and Heavy Water Reactor Technology in order to provide an opportunity to review and discuss the current status and recent development in the lay-out and design of advanced water reactor and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from 16 nations and 2 international organizations presenting 25 papers. The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Advanced light water reactor programmes (6 papers); Advanced light water design, technology and physics (12 papers); Advanced heavy water reactors (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  4. A modern control room for Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a next generation nuclear power plant being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. AHWR is a vertical, pressure tube type, heavy-water-moderated, boiling light-water-cooled, innovative reactor, relying on natural circulation for core cooling in all operating and accident conditions. In addition, it incorporates various passive systems for decay heat removal, containment cooling and isolation. In addition to the many passive safety features, AHWR has state of the art I and C architecture based on extensive use of computers and networking. In tune with the many advanced features of the reactor, a centralized modern control room has been conceived for operation and monitoring of the plant. The I and C architecture enables the implementation of a fully computerised operator friendly control room with soft Human Machine Interfaces (HMI). While doing so, safety has been given due consideration. The control and monitoring of AHWR systems are carried out from the fully computer-based operator interfaces, except safety systems, for which only monitoring is provided from soft HMI. The control of the safety systems is performed from dedicated hardwired safety system panels. Soft HMI reduces the number of individual control devices and improves their reliability. The paper briefly describes the I and C architecture adopted for the AHWR plant along with the interfaces to the main and backup control rooms. There are many issues involved while introducing soft HMI based operator interfaces for Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) compared to the conventional plants. Besides discussing the implementation issues, the paper elaborates the design considerations that have undergone in the design of various components in the main control room especially operator workstations, shift supervisor console, safety system panels and large display panels. Mainly task based displays have been adopted for the routine operator interactions of the plant

  5. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  6. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  7. Experimental studies on in-bundle ECCS injection for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed at BARC is an innovative reactor with Thorium utilization as its major objective. It has many advanced passive safety features. One such feature is passive injection of emergency coolant after postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). A novel feature of this injection scheme is that the injection does not take place in the header/plenum as in other reactors, but directly in to the bundle. For this purpose, the fuel cluster incorporates a central water rod which communicates with the ECCS header. The water rod extends along full length of the fuel cluster. In event of LOCA in the Main Heat Transport (MHT) system, ECC water flows from the accumulator to the water rod through ECCS header. The water flows into the bundle through holes in the water rod. The AHWR fuel cluster has fuel pins arranged in three concentric rings (of 12, 18 and 24 pins) around the central rod. While it is ensured that water does reach the fuel cluster, whether it reaches the outer ring of pins is needs investigation as the pins are closely spaced (1-3 mm gap between adjacent rods). The objective of the present experiments is to determine under what conditions (ECC flow and decay heat), the ECC water is able to rewet and cool all the fuel pins. The experiments have been done in a short, instrumented fuel bundle simulating the geometry of the AHWR fuel cluster

  8. Analysis of transients in advanced heavy water reactor using lumped parameter models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manmohan Pandey; Venkata Ramana Eaga; Sankar Sastry, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati (India); Gupta, S.K.; Lele, H.G.; Chatterjee, B. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Analysis of transients occurring in nuclear power plants, arising from the complex interplay between core neutronics and thermal-hydraulics, is important for their operation and safety. Numerical simulations of such transients can be carried out extensively at very low computational cost by using lumped parameter mathematical models. The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), being developed in India, is a vertical pressure tube type reactor cooled by boiling light water under natural circulation, using thorium as fuel and heavy water as moderator. In the present work, nonlinear and linear lumped parameter dynamic models for AHWR have been developed and validated with a distributed parameter model. The nonlinear lumped model is based on point reactor kinetics equations and one-dimensional homogeneous equilibrium model of two-phase flow. The distributed model is built with RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. Various types of transients have been simulated numerically, using the lumped model as well as RELAP5. The results have been compared and parameters tuned to make the lumped model match the distributed model (RELAP5) in terms of steady state as well as dynamic behaviour. The linear model has been derived by linearizing the nonlinear model for small perturbations about the steady state. Numerical simulations of transients using the linear model have been compared with results obtained from the nonlinear model. Thus, the range of validity of the linear model has been determined. Stability characteristics of AHWR have been investigated using the lumped parameter models. (authors)

  9. Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S; Singh, K D S; Sharma, V K

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power reactor concept being developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The reactor retains many desirable features of the existing Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), while incorporating new, advanced safety features. The reactor aims to utilise the vast thorium resources available in India. The reactor core will use plutonium as the make-up fuel, while breeding (233)U in situ. On account of this unique combination of fuel materials, the operational characteristics of the fuel as determined by its radioactivity, decay heat and radio-toxicity are being viewed with great interest. Radio-toxicity of the spent fuel is a measure of potential radiological hazard to the members of the public and also important from the ecological point of view. The radio-toxicity of the AHWR fuel is extremely high to start with, being approximately 10(4) times that of the fresh natural U fuel used in a PHWR, and continues to remain relatively high during operation and subsequent cooling. A unique feature of this fuel is the peak observed in its radio-toxicity at approximately 10(5) y of decay cooling. The delayed increase in fuel toxicity has been traced primarily to a build-up of (229)Th, (230)Th and (226)Ra. This phenomenon has been observed earlier for thorium-based fuels and is confirmed for the AHWR fuel. This paper presents radio-toxicity data for AHWR spent fuel up to a period of 10(6) y and the results are compared with the radio-toxicity of PHWR. PMID:19776247

  10. Fuzzy-like PD controller for spatial control of advanced heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londhe, P.S., E-mail: pandurangl97@gmail.com [Research Scholar, SGGS Institute of Engineering and Technology, Vishnupuri, Nanded 431606 (India); Patre, B.M., E-mail: bmpatre@ieee.org [Department of Instrumentation Engineering, Shri Guru Gobind Singhji Institute of Engineering and Technology, Vishnupuri, Nanded 431 606 (India); Tiwari, A.P., E-mail: aptiwari@barc.gov.in [Reactor Control Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Highly non-linear model of AHWR is used for spatial power control. • A simple fuzzy-like PD (FZ-PD) control structure with robust rule base is developed. • Robust rule structure reduces the difficulties in design and tuning of controller. • Proposed FZ-PD structure shows robust and better transient performance. • Proposed FZ-PD controller is able to suppress spatial oscillations in AHWR. - Abstract: Spatial oscillations in the neutron flux distribution due to xenon reactivity feedback requires stringent control in large nuclear reactors, like advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). If the spatial oscillations in the power distribution are not controlled, power density and rate of change of power at some locations in the reactor core may exceed limits of fuel failure due to ‘flux tilting’. Further, situations such as on-line refueling might cause transient variations in flux-shape from the nominal flux-shape. For analysis and control of spatial oscillations in AHWR, it is necessary to design a suitable control strategy, which will stabilize these oscillations. In this paper, a simplified scheme to design a conventional fuzzy logic controller for spatial control of AHWR is presented. This scheme known as fuzzy-like proportional derivative (FZ-PD) controller, uses robust PD (proportional derivative) type rule base. Due to robust rule base structure, tuning of scaling factors is greatly reduced. The non-linear coupled core neutronics-thermal hydraulics model of AHWR considered here represented by 90 first order differential equations. Through the dynamic simulations, it is observed that the designed FZ-PD controller is able to suppress spatial oscillations developed in AHWR and its performance is found to be robust.

  11. Indian advanced heavy water reactor for thorium utilisation and nuclear data requirements and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARC is embarking on thorium utilisation program in a concerted and consistent manner to achieve all round capabilities in the entire Thorium cycle under the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) development program. Upgrading our nuclear data capability for thorium cycle is one of the main tasks of this program. This paper gives a brief overview of the physics design features of the AHWR. The basic starting point of the analysis has been the lattice simulation of the fuel cluster employing the WIMS-D4 code package with 1986 version of 69 group library. For the analysis of thorium cycle, the present multi group version contains the three major isotopes viz., 232Th, 233U and 233Pa. To correctly evaluate the fuel cycle we require many more isotopes of the Th burnup chain. With the help of NDS, IAEA, many other isotopes of interest in AHWR, actinides in the thorium burnup chain, burnable absorbers, etc., were generated. Some of them were added to the WIMS-D4 library and the results are discussed. The WIMS-D4 library is also being updated as part of the IAEA coordinated research project on Final Stage of WLUP with international cooperation. India is also taking part in CRP. The evaluation of AHWR lattice with this new library is presented. Some comments regarding the fission product data being used in WIMS libraries are given, which are tuned to U-Pu cycles. The measurements for 233U are rather old. Measurements in high energies are also very sparse. More attention by nuclear data community is required in this regard as well. India has also begun a modest program to assess the ADS concepts, with the aim of employing thermal reactor systems, such as AHWR. A one way coupled booster reactor concept is being analysed with available code systems and nuclear data. A brief summary of this concept is also being discussed in this paper. A general survey on the quality of the evaluated nuclear data of the major and minor isotopes of thorium cycle is also given. A major

  12. CFD analysis of flow and temperature distribution inside the calandria of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive systems are being examined for the future AHWR reactor designs. One of these systems is the passive moderator cooling system, which removes heat from the moderator in case of a Station Black Out (SBO). The heavy-water moderator gets heated due to the residual heat from the core structures and rises upward due to buoyancy. This is cooled down in a heat exchanger and returns back to Calandria, completing a natural circulation loop. The natural circulation should provide sufficient cooling to prevent the increase of moderator (Calandria) pressure beyond safe limits. In this paper CFD investigations are carried out to study the temperature distributions and flow distribution inside the Calandria using a three-dimensional CFD code, OpenFoam 2.2.0. The results provide a band of operable mass flow rates which are safe for operation by virtue of prediction of hot spots in the Calandria. (author)

  13. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of our research and development program on heavy water processes

  14. Heavy water and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report begins with a historical sketch of heavy water. The report next assesses the nonproliferation implications of the use of heavy water-moderated power reactors; several different reactor types are discussed, but the focus is on the natural uranium, on-power fueled, pressure tube reactor CANDU. The need for and development of on-power fueling safeguards is discussed. Also considered is the use of heavy water in plutonium production reactors as well as the broader issue of the relative nuclear leverage that suppliers can bring to bear on countries with natural uranium-fueled reactors as compared to those using enriched designs. The final chapter reviews heavy water production methods and analyzes the difficulties involved in implementing these on both a large and a small scale. It concludes with an overview of proprietary and nonproliferation constraints on heavy water technology transfer

  15. Advances in heavy water reactor technology. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This IAEA meeting addressed both the status of national programmes and technical topics including advances in plant and system design and new plant features, development of pressure tube technologies, fuel and fuel cycle options, computer code development and verification, and safety and accident analysis

  16. Advanced eddy current technique for measurement of annular gap between pressure tube and calandria tube in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), the PT (pressure tube) is designed to be nominally concentric with the encircling CT (calandria tube). Due to various factors PT becomes eccentric with respect to CT over the life of reactor. If this becomes excessive, hot PT will come in contact with cold CT. Such a cold spot could act as potential location for initiating blister formation and premature failure of PT. Hence it is important to periodically measure annular gap between PT and CT. An advanced eddy current technique has been successfully developed and incorporated in BARCIS (BARC Channel Inspection System) for measurement of PT-CT gap. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  17. Evaluation of N,N-dihexyl octanamide as an alternative extractant for the reprocessing of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being developed in India with the specific aim of utilizing thorium for power generation. AHWR sent fuel adds new dimensions to reprocessing by the presence of Pu along with 233U and Th in the spent fuel. This invokes the integration of PUREX and THOREX processes in some combination employing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as an extractant. However, separation scientists have identified certain problems with the use of TBP as extractant viz. third-phase formation and low separation factor (SF) values of U(VI) and Pu(VI) over Th, and poor decontamination factor (DF) values of U and Pu with respect to fission products. These problems are of particular concern in thorium fuel cycle

  18. Direction of Heavy Water Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary of the activities performed by the Heavy Water Projects Direction of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission from 1950 to 1983. It covers: historical data; industrial plant (based on ammonia-hydrogen isotopic exchange); experimental plant (utilizing hydrogen sulfides-water process); Module-80 plant (2-3 tons per year experimental plant with national technology) and other related tasks on research and development (E.A.C.)

  19. Heavy water. A production alternative for Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of heavy water production methods is made. Main facts about isotopic and distillation methods, reforming and coupling to a Hydrogen distillation plant are presented. A feasibility study on heavy water production in Venezuela is suggested

  20. Discovery of Interstellar Heavy Water

    OpenAIRE

    Butner, H. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Rodgers, S.D.; Pardo Carrión, Juan Ramón; Parise, B.; Cernicharo, José; Davis, G. R.

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of doubly deuterated water (D2O, heavy water) in the interstellar medium. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m telescope, we detected the 1_10–1_01 transition of para-D2O at 316.7998 GHz in both absorption and emission toward the protostellar binary system IRAS 16293-2422. Assuming that the D2O exists primarily in the warm regions where water ices have been evaporated (i.e., in a "hot corino" environment), we determi...

  1. Nonlinear stability analysis of a reduced order model of nuclear reactors: A parametric study relevant to the advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We model power oscillations in boiling water reactors using a lumped parameter model. → The nature and amplitudes of oscillations is obtained using a nonlinear analysis. → The method of multiple scales has been used for the analytical treatment. → Fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity determines the nature of oscillations. → The presented systematic method of analysis useful for reduced order reactor models. - Abstract: In this paper, we perform a parametric study of the nonlinear dynamics of a reduced order model for boiling water reactors (BWR) near the Hopf bifurcation point using the method of multiple scales (MMS). Analysis has been performed for general values of the parameters, but the results are demonstrated for parameter values of the model corresponding to the advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). The neutronics of the AHWR is modeled using point reactor kinetic equations while a one-node lumped parameter model is assumed both for the fuel and the coolant for modeling the thermal-hydraulics. Nonlinearities in the heat transfer process are ignored and attention is focused on the nonlinearity introduced by the reactivity feedback. It is found that the steady-state operation of the AHWR mathematical model looses stability via. a Hopf bifurcation resulting in power oscillations as some typical bifurcation parameter like the void coefficient of reactivity is varied. The bifurcation is found to be subcritical for the parameter values corresponding to the AHWR. However, with a decrease in the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity the bifurcation turns to supercritical implying global stability of the steady state operation in the linear stability regime. Moreover slight intrusion into the instability regime results in small-amplitude limit cycles leaving the possibility of retracting back to stable operation.

  2. Topical and working papers on heavy water requirements and availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The documents included in this report are: Heavy water requirements and availability; technological infrastructure for heavy water plants; heavy water plant siting; hydrogen and methane availability; economics of heavy water production; monothermal, water fed heavy water process based on the ammonia/hydrogen isotopic exchange; production strategies to meet demand projections; hydrogen availability; deuterium sources; the independent UHDE heavy water process

  3. Functional and performance evaluation of 28 bar hot shutdown passive valve (HSPV) at integral test loop (ITL) for advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reactor shutdown in advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR), core decay heat is removed by eight isolation condensers (IC) submerged in gravity driven water pool. Passive valves are provided on the down stream of each isolation condenser. On increase in steam drum pressure beyond a set value, these passive valves start opening and establish steam flow by natural circulation between the four steam drums and corresponding isolation condensers under hot shutdown and therefore they are termed as Hot Shut Down Passive Valves (HSPVs). The HSPV is a self acting type valve requiring no external energy, i.e. neither air nor electric supply for actuation. This feature makes the valve functioning independent of external systems such as compressed air supply or electric power supply, thereby providing inherent safety feature in line with reactor design philosophy. The high pressure and high temperature HSPV s for nuclear reactor use, are non-standard valves and therefore not manufactured by the valve industry worldwide. In the process of design and development of a prototype valve for AHWR, a 28 bar HSPV was configured and successfully tested at Integral Test Loop (ITL) at Engineering Hall No.7. During ten continuous experiments spread over 14 days, the HSPV has proved its functional capabilities and its intended use in decay heat removal system. The in-situ pressure setting and calibration aspect of HSPV has also been successfully established during these experiments. This report gives an insight into the HSPV's functional behavior and role in reactor decay heat removal system. The report not only provides the quantitative measure of performance for 28 bar HSPV in terms of valve characteristics, pressure controllability, linearity and hysteresis but also sets qualitative indicators for prototype 80 bar HSPV, being developed for AHWR. (author)

  4. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Heavy Metal Water Pollution in Transitional China

    OpenAIRE

    Huixuan Li; Yingru Li; Ming-Kuo Lee; Zhongwei Liu; Changhong Miao

    2015-01-01

    China’s socioeconomic transitions have dramatically accelerated its economic growth in last three decades, but also companioned with continuous environmental degradation. This study will advance the knowledge of heavy metal water pollution in China from a spatial–temporal perspective. Specifically, this study addressed the following: (1) spatial patterns of heavy metal water pollution levels were analyzed using data of prefecture-level cities from 2004 to 2011; and (2) spatial statistical...

  5. Heavy water: a distinctive and essential component of CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exceptional properties of heavy water as a neutron moderator provide one of the distinctive features of CANDU reactors. Although most of the chemical and physical properties of deuterium and protium (mass 1 hydrogen) are appreciably different, the low terrestrial abundance of deuterium makes the separation of heavy water a relatively costly process, and so of considerable importance to the CANDU system. World heavy-water supplies are currently provided by the Girdler-Sulphide process or processes based on ammonia-hydrogen exchange. Due to cost and hazard considerations, new processes will be required for the production of heavy water in and beyond the next decade. Through AECL's development and refinement of wetproofed catalysts for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between water and hydrogen, a family of new processes is expected to be deployed. Two monothermal processes, CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange, using water-to-hydrogen conversion by electrolysis) and CIRCE (Combined Industrially Reformed hydrogen and Catalytic Exchange, based on steam reforming of hydrocarbons), are furthest advanced. Besides its use for heavy-water production, the CECE process is a highly effective technology for heavy-water upgrading and for tritium separation from heavy (or light) water. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  6. Heavy water lattices: Second panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the laboratories engaged in the field of heavy water lattices throughout the world. The participants presented written contributions and status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of heavy-water reactors. Valuable discussions took place, during which recommendations for future work were formulated. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Nuclear power plant life management processes: Guidelines and practices for heavy water reactors. Report prepared within the framework of the Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors and on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time is right to address nuclear power plant life management and ageing management issues in terms of processes and refurbishments for long term operation and license renewal aspects of heavy water reactors (HWRs) because some HWRs are close to the design life. In general, HWR nuclear power plant (NPP) owners would like to keep their NPPs in service as long as they can be operated safely and economically. This involves the consideration of a number of factors, such as the material condition of the plant, comparison with current safety standards, the socio-political climate and asset management/ business planning considerations. This TECDOC deals with organizational and managerial means to implement effective plan life management (PLiM) into existing plant in operating HWR NPPs. This TECDOC discusses the current trend of PLiM observed in NPPs to date and an overview of PLiM programmes and considerations. This includes key objectives of such programs, regulatory considerations, an overall integrated approach, organizational and technology infrastructure considerations, importance of effective plant data management and finally, human issues related to ageing and finally integration of PLiM with economic planning. Also general approach to HWR PLiM, including the key PLiM processes, life assessment for critical structures and components, conditions assessment of structures and components and obsolescence is mentioned. Technical aspects are described on component specific technology considerations for condition assessment, example of a proactive ageing management programme, and Ontario power generation experiences in appendices. Also country reports from Argentina, Canada, India, the Republic of Korea and Romania are attached in the annex to share practices and experiences to PLiM programme. This TECDOC is primarily addressed to both the management (decision makers) and technical staff (engineers and scientists) of NPP owners/operators and technical support

  8. An Early History of Heavy Water

    CERN Document Server

    Waltham, C

    2002-01-01

    Since 1945 Canada has had a nuclear power industry based on reactor design which uses natural uranium and heavy water. The tortuous and improbable sequence of events which led to this situation is examined.

  9. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  10. Behavior of tritium in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the ATR Fugen power station, the radiation control regarding the tritium in heavy water has been carried out since the heavy water was filled in the system of the reactor in November, 1977. At first, the concentration of tritium in heavy water was about 60 μCi/cc, but in November, 1981, it increased to about 1.3 mCi/cc, and the saturation concentration after 30 years is estimated to become about 17 mCi/cc. In this report, on the transfer of tritium to the work environment and general environment, its barrier, recovery, measurement and the protection against it, the experience in the Fugen power station is described. The heavy water system was constructed as the perfectly closed circuit by welding stainless steel, and a canned heavy water circulating pump has been used. The leak of heavy water in the steady operation is negligible, but attention must be paid to the transfer of tritium to the environment when the system is disassembled for the regular inspection. The measurement of tritium for individual exposure control, environment and released radioactivity, the tritium-removing equipment and protective suits, and the release of tritium to general environment are reported. (Kako, I.)

  11. Technical status study of heavy water enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical status study of heavy water enrichment in Indonesia and also in the world has been done. Heavy water enrichment processes have been investigated were water distillation, hydrogen distillation, laser enrichment, electrolysis and isotop exchange. For the isotop exchange, the chemical pair can be used were water-hydrogen sulphite, ammonium-hydrogen, aminomethane-hydrogen, and water-hydrogen. For the isotope exchange, there was carried out by mono thermal or bi thermal. The highest producer of heavy water is Canada, and the other producer is USA, Norwegian and India. The processes be used in the world are isotope exchange Girdler Sulphide (GS), distillation and electrolysis. Research of heavy water carried out in Batan Yogyakarta, has a purpose to know the characteristic of heavy water purification. Several apparatus which has erected were 3 distillation column: Pyrex glass of 2 m tall, stainless steel column of 3 m tall and steel of 6 m tall. Electrolysis apparatus is 50 cell electrolysis and an isotope exchange unit which has catalyst: Ni- Cr2O3 and Pt-Carbon. These apparatus were not ready to operate. (author)

  12. Research advances in heavy metal biosorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption of heavy metal has wide applications. The mechanisms of heavy metal biosorption, including complexation, ion exchange, microprecipitation and oxidation reduction, are presented. Thermodynamics and dynamics of biosorption are also discussed. Key factors of influencing biosorption, such as pH values, coexistence ions and temperature are explained. The research directions are explored. (authors)

  13. Topical and working papers on heavy water accountability and safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the following papers: 1) Statement of IAEA concerning safeguarding of heavy water; 2) Preliminary Canadian Comments on IAEA document on heavy water safeguards; 3) Heavy water accountability 03.10.78; 4) Heavy water accountability 05.04.79

  14. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Heavy Metal Water Pollution in Transitional China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixuan Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available China’s socioeconomic transitions have dramatically accelerated its economic growth in last three decades, but also companioned with continuous environmental degradation. This study will advance the knowledge of heavy metal water pollution in China from a spatial–temporal perspective. Specifically, this study addressed the following: (1 spatial patterns of heavy metal water pollution levels were analyzed using data of prefecture-level cities from 2004 to 2011; and (2 spatial statistical methods were used to examine the underlying socioeconomic and physical factors behind water pollution including socioeconomic transitions (industrialization, urbanization, globalization and economic development, and environmental characteristic (natural resources, hydrology and vegetation coverage. The results show that only Cr pollution levels increased over the years. The individual pollution levels of the other four heavy metals, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb, declined. High heavy metal water pollution levels are closely associated with both anthropogenic activities and physical environments, in particular abundant mineral resources and industrialization prosperity. On the other hand, economic development and urbanization play important roles in controlling water pollution problems. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and strategies for protecting water sources and controlling water pollution; thus improving the quality of living environments.

  15. Heavy water cycle in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atom has two isotopes: deuterium 1H2 and tritium 1H3. The deuterium oxide D2O is called heavy water due to its density of 1105.2 Kg/m3. Another important physical property of the heavy water is the low neutron capture section, suitable to moderate the neutrons into natural uranium fission reactor as CANDU. Due to the fact that into this reactor the fuel is cooled into the pressure tubes surrounded by a moderator, the usage of D2O as primary heat transport (PHT) agent is mandatory. Therefore a large amount of heavy water (approx. 500 tons) is used in a CANDU reactor. Being a costly resource - it represents 20% of the initial plant capital cost, D2O management is required to preserve it. (author)

  16. Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor Fuel: Integrity, Performance and Advanced Concepts. Proceedings of the Technical Meetings held in Bucharest, 24-27 September 2012, and in Mumbai, 8-11 May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven Member States have operating pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), and some of them are also planning new reactors of this type. The current type of PHWR uses natural uranium as the fuel and has an average burnup of 7000 MWd/t (megawatt days per metric tonne). To make these reactors economically competitive with other reactor types, the discharge burnup of PHWR fuel will need to be increased without affecting the integrity of the fuel pin and bundle. A significant increase in the discharge burnup of fuel is possible with the use of advanced fuel cycles in PHWRs. The advanced fuels can be slightly enriched uranium, reprocessed uranium from light water reactors, mixed oxide or thorium based fuels. At the same time, substantial savings in natural uranium resources can also be achieved through the possible extension of the discharge burnup of advanced fuels used in PHWRs without changing reactor hardware. Following the recommendation of the Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology, two technical meetings were held: Technical Meeting on Fuel Integrity during Normal Operation and Accident Conditions in PHWRs, 24–27 September 2012, Bucharest, Romania; and Technical Meeting on Advanced Fuel Cycles in PHWRs, 8–11 April 2013, Mumbai, India. Their objective was to update information on the performance of PHWR fuels, the status and trends in the use of advanced fuels in PHWRs and the technical readiness for the deployment of such fuel cycles in these types of reactor. This publication contains the proceedings of the two technical meetings, including a record of the discussions held during the various technical sessions

  17. Recent advances in heavy quark theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Some recent developments in heavy quark theory are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing a b quark. The isospin violating hadronic decay D{sub s}* {yields} D{sub s}{sup pi}{sup 0} is also discussed.

  18. Ageing management in heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With proper design and construction ageing can be minimized. It is important to understand the mechanics of ageing specific to service, develop baseline data and monitor to ensure that there are no premature failures especially where the service conditions are extreme and media used is highly corrosive and hazardous such as in heavy water plants. The key lies in an effective in-service inspection and determination of residual life for decision making vis-a-vis upgrading and ensuring safety. While quite a bit of work in this direction has been done in the Heavy Water Board, a lot more ground needs to be covered. (author)

  19. Canadian heavy water production - 1970 to 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade, heavy water production in Canada has progressed from the commissioning of a single unit plant in Nova Scotia to a major production industry employing 2200 persons and operating three plants with an aggregate annual production capability in excess of 1800 Mg. The decade opened with an impending crisis in the supply of heavy water due to failure of the first Glace Bay Heavy Water Plant and difficulty in commissioning the second Canadian plant at Port Hawkesbury. Lessons learned at this latter plant were applied to the Bruce plant where the first two units were under construction. When the Bruce units were commissioned in 1973 the rate of approach to design production rates was much improved, renewing confidence in Canada's ability to succeed in large scale heavy water production. In the early 1970's a decision was made to rehabilitate the Glace Bay plant using a novel flowsheet and this rebuilt plant commenced production in 1976. The middle of the decade was marked by two main events: changes in ownership of the operating plants and initiation of a massive construction program to support the forecast of a rapidly expanding CANDU power station construction program. New production units embodying the best features of their predecessors were committed at Bruce by Ontario Hydro and at La Prade, Quebec, by AECL. The high growth rate in electrical demand did not continue and some new plant construction was curtailed. The present installed production capacity will now probably be adequate to meet anticipated demand for the next decade. Canadian plants have now produced more than 7800 Mg of heavy water at a commercially acceptable cost and with a high degree of safety and compliance with appropriate environmental regulations

  20. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  1. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  2. Heavy water at Trail, British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today Canada stands on the threshold of a nuclear renaissance, based on the CANDU reactor family, which depends on heavy water as a moderator and for cooling. Canada has a long history with heavy water, with commercial interests beginning in 1934, a mere two years after its discovery. At one time Canada was the world's largest producer of heavy water. The Second World War stimulated interest in this rather rare substance, such that the worlds largest supply (185 kg) ended up in Canada in 1942 to support nuclear research work at the Montreal Laboratories of the National Research Council. A year later commercial production began at Trail, British Columbia, to support work that later became known as the P-9 project, associated with the Manhattan Project. The Trail plant produced heavy water from 1943 until 1956, when it was shut down. During the war years the project was so secret that Lesslie Thomson, Special Liaison Officer reporting on nuclear matters to C.D. Howe, Minister of Munitions and Supply, was discouraged from visiting Trail operations. Thomson never did visit the Trail facility during the war. In 2005 the remaining large, tall concrete exchange tower was demolished at a cost of about $2.4 million, about the same as it cost to construct the facility about 60 years ago. Thus no physical evidence remains of this historic facility and another important artifact from Canada's nuclear history has disappeared forever. It is planned to place a plaque at the site at some point in the future. (author)

  3. Heavy metals in drinking water: Occurrences, implications, and future needs in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Mazumder, M A Jafar; Al-Attas, Omar; Husain, Tahir

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metals in drinking water pose a threat to human health. Populations are exposed to heavy metals primarily through water consumption, but few heavy metals can bioaccumulate in the human body (e.g., in lipids and the gastrointestinal system) and may induce cancer and other risks. To date, few thousand publications have reported various aspects of heavy metals in drinking water, including the types and quantities of metals in drinking water, their sources, factors affecting their concentrations at exposure points, human exposure, potential risks, and their removal from drinking water. Many developing countries are faced with the challenge of reducing human exposure to heavy metals, mainly due to their limited economic capacities to use advanced technologies for heavy metal removal. This paper aims to review the state of research on heavy metals in drinking water in developing countries; understand their types and variability, sources, exposure, possible health effects, and removal; and analyze the factors contributing to heavy metals in drinking water. This study identifies the current challenges in developing countries, and future research needs to reduce the levels of heavy metals in drinking water.

  4. Heavy metals in drinking water: Occurrences, implications, and future needs in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Mazumder, M A Jafar; Al-Attas, Omar; Husain, Tahir

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metals in drinking water pose a threat to human health. Populations are exposed to heavy metals primarily through water consumption, but few heavy metals can bioaccumulate in the human body (e.g., in lipids and the gastrointestinal system) and may induce cancer and other risks. To date, few thousand publications have reported various aspects of heavy metals in drinking water, including the types and quantities of metals in drinking water, their sources, factors affecting their concentrations at exposure points, human exposure, potential risks, and their removal from drinking water. Many developing countries are faced with the challenge of reducing human exposure to heavy metals, mainly due to their limited economic capacities to use advanced technologies for heavy metal removal. This paper aims to review the state of research on heavy metals in drinking water in developing countries; understand their types and variability, sources, exposure, possible health effects, and removal; and analyze the factors contributing to heavy metals in drinking water. This study identifies the current challenges in developing countries, and future research needs to reduce the levels of heavy metals in drinking water. PMID:27355520

  5. Water Management Applications of Advanced Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.; Braswell, G.; Delaney, C.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced precipitation sensors and numerical models track storms as they occur and forecast the likelihood of heavy rain for time frames ranging from 1 to 8 hours, 1 day, and extended outlooks out to 3 to 7 days. Forecast skill decreases at the extended time frames but the outlooks have been shown to provide "situational awareness" which aids in preparation for flood mitigation and water supply operations. In California the California-Nevada River Forecast Centers and local Weather Forecast Offices provide precipitation products that are widely used to support water management and flood response activities of various kinds. The Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT) program is being conducted to help advance the science of precipitation tracking and forecasting in support of the NWS. HMT high-resolution products have found applications for other non-federal water management activities as well. This presentation will describe water management applications of HMT advanced precipitation products, and characterization of benefits expected to accrue. Two case examples will be highlighted, 1) reservoir operations for flood control and water supply, and 2) urban stormwater management. Application of advanced precipitation products in support of reservoir operations is a focus of the Sonoma County Water Agency. Examples include: a) interfacing the high-resolution QPE products with a distributed hydrologic model for the Russian-Napa watersheds, b) providing early warning of in-coming storms for flood preparedness and water supply storage operations. For the stormwater case, San Francisco wastewater engineers are developing a plan to deploy high resolution gap-filling radars looking off shore to obtain longer lead times on approaching storms. A 4 to 8 hour lead time would provide opportunity to optimize stormwater capture and treatment operations, and minimize combined sewer overflows into the Bay.ussian River distributed hydrologic model.

  6. Heavy Metal Concentrations in Maltese Potable Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bugeja

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the levels of aluminum (Al, cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, iron (Fe, lead (Pb, nickel (Ni and zinc (Zn in tap water samples of forty localities from around the Maltese Islands together with their corresponding service supply reservoirs. The heavy metal concentrations obtained indicated that concentrations of the elements were generally below the maximum allowed concentration established by the Maltese legislation. In terms of the Maltese and EU water quality regulations, 17.5% of the localities sampled yielded water that failed the acceptance criteria for a single metal in drinking water. Higher concentrations of some metals were observed in samples obtained at the end of the distribution network, when compared to the concentrations at the source. The observed changes in metal concentrations between the localities’ samples and the corresponding supply reservoirs were significant. The higher metal concentrations obtained in the samples from the localities can be attributed to leaching in the distribution network.

  7. Advances in water resources management

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chih; Wang, Mu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides in-depth coverage of such topics as multi-reservoir system operation theory and practice, management of aquifer systems connected to streams using semi-analytical models, one-dimensional model of water quality and aquatic ecosystem-ecotoxicology in river systems, environmental and health impacts of hydraulic fracturing and shale gas, bioaugmentation for water resources protection, wastewater renovation by flotation for water pollution control, determination of receiving water’s reaeration coefficient in the presence of salinity for water quality management, sensitivity analysis for stream water quality management, river ice process, and computer-aided mathematical modeling of water properties. This critical volume will serve as a valuable reference work for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, designers of water resources systems, and scientists and researchers. The goals of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering series are: (1) to cover entire environmental fields, includin...

  8. Good practices in heavy water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value and importance of organizations in the nuclear industry engaged in the collection and analysis of operating experience and best practices has been clearly identified in various IAEA publications and exercises. Both facility safety and operational efficiency can benefit from such information sharing. Such sharing also benefits organizations engaged in the development of new nuclear power plants, as it provides information to assist in optimizing designs to deliver improved safety and power generation performance. In cooperation with Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd, the IAEA organized the workshop on best practices in Heavy Water Reactor Operation in Toronto, Canada from 16 to 19 September 2008, to assist interested Member States in sharing best practices and to provide a forum for the exchange of information among participating nuclear professionals. This workshop was organized under Technical Cooperation Project INT/4/141, on Status and Prospects of Development for and Applications of Innovative Reactor Concepts for Developing Countries. The workshop participants were experts actively engaged in various aspects of heavy water reactor operation. Participants presented information on activities and practices deemed by them to be best practices in a particular area for consideration by the workshop participants. Presentations by the participants covered a broad range of operational practices, including regulatory aspects, the reduction of occupational dose, performance improvements, and reducing operating and maintenance costs. This publication summarizes the material presented at the workshop, and includes session summaries prepared by the chair of each session and papers submitted by the presenters

  9. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  10. Advances in U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past two years, the US heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high-brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target physics for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression π of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2008, these results enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year. They are assessing how these new techniques apply to higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy

  11. Advances in water resources engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The Handbook of Environmental Engineering is a collection of methodologies that study the effects of pollution and waste in their three basic forms: gas, solid, and liquid. A sister volume to Volume 15: Modern Water Resources Engineering, this volume focuses on the theory and analysis of various water resources systems including watershed sediment dynamics and modeling, integrated simulation of interactive surface water and groundwater systems, river channel stabilization with submerged vanes, non-equilibrium sediment transport, reservoir sedimentation, and fluvial processes, minimum energy dissipation rate theory and applications, hydraulic modeling development and application, geophysical methods for assessment of earthen dams, soil erosion on upland areas by rainfall and overland flow, geofluvial modeling methodologies and applications, and an environmental water engineering glossary. This critical volume will serve as a valuable reference work for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, designers of...

  12. Piping installation for reactor heavy water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics and main installation steps for the piping of the reactor heavy water loop system were introduced in this paper. According to the system design, equipment accommodation and spot management, main issues with effect on the quality and schedule of pipeline installation were analyzed. Accordingly, some solutions were put forward, which included: work allocation should be made clear in documents; installation preparative such as design checkup and technology communication should be prepared completely; requirements of system cleaning, test items in every experiment, inspection in work and equipment maintenance should be considered in the system design; perfect documents distribution system and stock plan should be built; technology requirements and quality assurance should be claimed in contracts; quality should be controlled by way of external evidence, inspection in manufactory, exterior quality assurance examination, and test during consignment; series of management procedure should be established in detail. (authors)

  13. Dynamic modelling of Industrial Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic behavior of the isotopic enrichment unites of the Industrial Heavy Water Plant, located in Arroyito, Neuquen, Argentina, was modeled and simulated in the present work. Dynamic models of the chemical and isotopic interchange processes existent in the plant, were developed. This served as a base to obtain representative models of the different unit and control systems. The developed models were represented in a modular code for each unit. Each simulator consists of approximately one hundred non-linear-first-order differential equations and some other algebraic equation, which are time resolved by the code. The different simulators allow to change a big number of boundary conditions and the control systems set point for each simulation, so that the program become very versatile. The output of the code allows to see the evolution through time of the variables of interest. An interface which facilitates the use of the first enrichment stage simulator was developed. This interface allows an easy access to generate wished events during the simulation and includes the possibility to plot evolution of the variables involved. The obtained results agree with the expected tendencies. The calculated nominal steady state matches by the manufacturer. The different steady states obtained, agree with previous works. The times and tendencies involved in the transients generated by the program, are in good agreement with the experience obtained at the plant. Based in the obtained results, it is concluded that the characteristic times of the plant are determined by the masses involved in the process. Different characteristics in the system dynamic behavior were generated with the different simulators, and were validated by plant personnel. This work allowed to understand the different process involved in the heavy water manufacture, and to develop a very useful tool for the personnel of the plant. (author). 14 refs., figs., tabs. plant. (author). 14 refs., figs., tabs

  14. Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

  15. Safety systems of heavy water reactors and small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introductional descriptions of heavy water reactors and natural circulation boiling water reactors the safety philosophy and safety systems like ECCS, residual heat removal, protection systems etc., are described. (RW)

  16. Method and apparatus for enrichment or upgrading heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus for upgrading and final enrichment of heavy water are described, comprising means for contacting partially enriched heavy water feed in a catalyst column with hydrogen gas (essentially D2) originating in an electrolysis cell so as to enrich the feed water with deuterium extracted from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and means for passing the deuterium enriched water to the electrolysis cell. (author)

  17. Advanced light water reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giedraityte, Zivile [Helsinki University of Technology, Otaranta 8D-84, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  18. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  19. An optical dosimeter for monitoring heavy metal ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Regan, Fiona; Leamy, D.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ciaccheri, L.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an optochemical dosimeter for determining and discriminating nickel, copper, and cobalt ions in water that can be used as an early warning system for water pollution. An inexpensive fiber optic spectrophotometer monitors the sensor's spectral behavior under exposure to water solutions of heavy metal ions in the 1-10 mg/l concentration range. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method quantitatively determines the heavy metals and discriminates their type and combination.

  20. Best practices in management of heavy water and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water inventory of a typical HWR constitutes about 12% of the capital cost of the HWR. The typical tritium production in a single unit HWR is about 2 x 106 Ci/y.1 Heavy water and tritium control are important aspects of HWR operation, and this involves people, procedures, equipment and heavy water and tritium separation systems. Station personnel are trained to understand the importance of heavy water management and the economics and environmental impact of tritiated heavy water losses. The tritium and heavy water losses from a HWR are both airborne and waterborne in nature. Tritium is of particular concern in the HWR industry given the nature of heavy water reactors to build up high levels of tritium over time. Recent increased interest from regulators and the public has led more HWR utilities to pay increasing attention to occupational safety and environmental emissions of tritium at their power stations. As competing reactor technologies improve, a simple and economic means for tritium removal from heavy water in HWRs is essential for the long- term attractiveness of HWR technology. Tritium safety, occupational and environmental issues are of central importance in HWR licensing and operation. Building upon GE's extensive operational experience in tritium management in HWR reactors and its own tritium handling facility, GE2 has developed a large-scale diffusion-based isotope separation process as an alternative to conventional cryogenic distillation. Having a tritium inventory an order of magnitude lower than conventional cryogenic distillation, this process is very attractive for heavy water detritiation, applicable to single and multi-unit HWR and research reactors. Additionally, the new process has significant benefits to an operating HWR utility such as reducing environmental emissions and significantly lowering reactor vault tritium MPC(a) levels to a point where station capacity factors can be improved by shorter outages - representing best

  1. Process for the preparation of ammonia and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the production of ammonia and heavy water comprises the steps of enriching a flow of water with deuterium in a monothermal isotropic process; supplying a first portion of the deuterium-enriched water to a heavy water preparation plant to produce heavy water and hydrogen; storing a second portion of the deuterium-enriched water substantially without interruption during the colder half of a year; electrolytically dissociating the stored deuterium-enriched water substantially without interruption during the wamer half of a year to form hydrogen; storing a portion of the electrolytically-produced hydrogen during said warmer half of a year while supplying the remainder to a synthesis circuit of a synthesizing plant and subsequently supplying the stored hydrogen to the synthesis circuit during said colder half of a year; removing some of the synthesis gas mixture from the synthesis circuit of the synthesizing plant; burning the removed synthesis gas mixture with air to produce a mixture consisting mainly of water and nitrogen; thereafter condensing and separating the water from the mixture of water and nitrogen; supplying the nitrogen of the mixture of water and nitrogen, the hydrogen from the heavy water preparation plant and the electrolytically-produced hydrogen to the synthesis circuit of the synthesizing plant to produce ammonia; and collecting deuterium-depleted water resulting from said burning step and feeding the collected deuterium-depleted water into the monothermal process

  2. Magnetic filtration of heavy metals containing waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-intensity magnetic separation is applied above all in the beneficiation of fine-grained weakly magnetic ores, but also in the treatment of industrial, especially metallurgical and mining waters as well as of wastewaters from nuclear power stations. Similarly, it can be used in the field of geothermal energy supply and gases filtration. The magnetic separation or filtration respectively, directly enables the treatment of waters contaminated by solid ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. The magnetic filtration can remove heavy metals ions and even the oil substances by means of magnetic sorbents or special additives. The filtration of solid magnetic particles can be carried out in matrix-less and matrix separators. On the basis of mathematical description of particles dynamics and hydrodynamic conditions of suspension flow which resulted in the determination of geometrical parameters of separating zone the design of matrix-less magnetic separator was carried out. A strong, high-intensity magnetic field was created by means of a superconductive magnetic circuit. It was found out that for the achievement of optimal technological parameters during the magnetic separation of solid particles with grain size under 40 mm, the maximal solids concentration is to be 200 g/L. The design of matrix parameters and selection of inductive filling resides in theoretical considerations as well as in experimental works. Under laboratory condition the influence of following parameters on magnetic filtration process have been observed: the diameter of inductive ferromagnetic balls, the thickness of filtration layer, the intensity of magnetic field, the flow velocity of suspension, the density of suspension, the grain size of solids and the temperature of suspension. It was found that a spatial arrangement of inductive bodies in filtration layer influences not only the velocity of suspension flow but also a room size for catching of magnetic particles. The acting of magnetic

  3. SPECIATION OF HEAVY METALS AT WATER-SEDIMENT INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Ferronato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to understand the equilibrium relationship between the heavy metals concentrations in superficial water and pore water. At  water-sediment interface, the equilibrium rapidly changed and it is influenced by chemico-physical parameters of aquatic ecosystems. The hydraulic safety of Bologna plain (North Italy depends on network of artificial canals and they are related with natural rivers of Reno basin (Reno river and its tributaries. The natural and artificial water courses flowed in agricultural, urban and industrial land. The heavy metals concentration in water and sediment discriminated the human pressure on the land and their spatial distribution in sediment could predict the hazard of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. We compared the heavy metals concentrations in pore water and superficial water determined in natural rivers and artificial canals, and more pollution in artificial canals than natural rivers was found. Furthermore, the coefficient of partition (log Kd between water and sediments was calculated to evaluate the bioavailability of heavy metals adsorbed on the sediments. The heavy metals extracted in deionised water at equilibrium after 16 h showed higher concentrations than those determined directly on water samples.

  4. Alkali metal and ammonium chlorides in water and heavy water (binary systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Adad, R

    1991-01-01

    This volume surveys the data available in the literature for solid-fluid solubility equilibria plus selected solid-liquid-vapour equilibria, for binary systems containing alkali and ammonium chlorides in water or heavy water. Solubilities covered are lithium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, rubidium chloride, caesium chloride and ammonium chloride in water and heavy water.

  5. The Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program is a forward-looking program designed to produce viable nuclear generating system candidates to meet the very real, and perhaps imminent, need for new power generation capacity in the U. S. and around the world. The ALRR Program is an opportunity to move ahead with confidence, to confront problems today which must be confronted if the U. S. electrical utilities are to continue to meet their commitment to provide safe, reliable, economical electrical power to the nation in the years ahead. Light water reactor technology is today playing a vital role in the production of electricity to meet the world's needs. At present about 13% of the world's electricity is supplied by nuclear power plants, most of those light water reactors. Nevertheless, there is a clear need for expanded use of nuclear generation. Here in Korea and elsewhere in Asia, demand for electricity has continued to increase at a very high rate. In the United States demand growth has been more moderate, but a large number of existing stations will be ready for replacement in the next two decades, and all countries face the problem of dwindling fuel supplies and growing environmental impact of fossil-fired power plants. Despite the evident need for expanded nuclear generation capacity in the United States, there have been no new plants ordered in the past ten years and at present there are no immediate prospects for new plant orders. Concerns about safety, the high cost of recent nuclear stations, and the current excess of electrical generation capacity in the United States, have combined to interrupt completely the growth of this vital power supply system

  6. Analysis of thorium/U-233 lattices and cores in a breeder/burner heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the inevitable dwindling of uranium resources, advanced fuel cycles in the current generation of reactors stand to be of great benefit in the future. Heavy water moderated reactors have much potential to make use of thorium, a currently unexploited resource. Core fuelling configurations of a Heavy Water Reactor based on the self-sufficient thorium fuel cycle were simulated using the DRAGON and DONJON reactor physics codes. Three heterogeneously fuelled reactors and one homogeneously fuelled reactor were studied. (author)

  7. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1 Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS damage. (2 Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3 Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4 Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8 and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  8. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  9. SPECIATION OF HEAVY METALS AT WATER-SEDIMENT INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Ferronato; Livia Vittori Antisari; Monica Marianna Modesto; Gilmo Vianello

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to understand the equilibrium relationship between the heavy metals concentrations in superficial water and pore water. At  water-sediment interface, the equilibrium rapidly changed and it is influenced by chemico-physical parameters of aquatic ecosystems. The hydraulic safety of Bologna plain (North Italy) depends on network of artificial canals and they are related with natural rivers of Reno basin (Reno river and its tributaries). The natural and artificial w...

  10. Heavy water detritiation to support CANDU station maintenance activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy water and tritium control are important aspects of CANDU operation and have a major impact on station maintenance activities. Station personnel are trained to understand the importance of heavy water management and the economics and environmental impact of tritiated heavy water losses. This paper discusses new GE technology that can now make a major improvement in CANDU maintenance activities through significant reductions in station tritium levels. Tritium is of particular concern in the CANDU industry given the nature of heavy water reactors to build up high levels of tritium over time. High tritium levels in the reactor vault significantly slow down maintenance activities in the reactor vault due to the requirement for personnel protective equipment, including breathing apparatus and cumbersome plastic air suits. The difficulties increase as reactors age and tritium levels increase. Building upon GE's extensive operational experience in tritium management in CANDU reactors and its own tritium handling facility, GE. has developed a new large-scale diffusion based isotope separation process as an alternative to conventional cryogenic distillation. Having a tritium inventory an order of magnitude lower than conventional cryogenic distillation, this process is very attractive for heavy water detritiation, and applicable to single and multi-unit CANDU stations. This new process can now provide a step change reduction in CANDU heavy water tritium levels resulting in reduced environmental emissions and lowering reactor vault tritium MPC(a) levels. Reactor vault tritium can be reduced sufficiently for maintenance activities to be done without plastic suits, leading to shorter outages, improved station capacity factors, and improved station economics. (author)

  11. Energy conservation and management strategies in Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the competitive industrial environment it is essential that cost of the product is kept at the minimum possible. Energy conservation is an important aspect in achieving this as energy is one of the key recourses for growth and survival of industry. The process of heavy water production being very complex and energy intensive, Heavy Water board has given a focussed attention for initiating various measures for reducing the specific energy consumption in all the plants. The initiative resulted in substantial reduction in specific energy consumption and brought in savings in cost. The cumulative reduction of specific energy consumption has been over 30% over the last seven years and the total savings for the last three years on account of the same has been about Rs. 190 crore. The paper describes the strategies adopted in the heavy water plants for effecting the above achievements. The paper covers the details of some of the energy saving schemes carried out at different heavy water plants through case studies. The case studies of schemes implemented at HWPs are general in nature and is applicable for any other industry. The case studies cover the modifications with re-optimisation of the process parameters, improvements effected in utility units like refrigeration and cooling water systems, improvements in captive power plant cycle and improved recycle scheme for water leading to reduced consumptions. The paper also mentions the innovative ammonia absorption refrigeration with improved coefficient of performance and HWB's efforts in development of the system as an integrated unit of the ammonia water deuterium exchange process for heavy water production. HWB also has taken up R and D on various other schemes for improvements in energy consumption for future activities covering utilisation of low grade energy for generation of refrigeration. (author)

  12. Utilizing heavy metal-laden water hyacinth biomass in vermicomposting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, Natalya N; Akimova, Elena E; Pisarchuk, Anna D; Yunusova, Tatyana V; Minaeva, Oksana M

    2015-05-01

    We studied the efficiency of water treatment by water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) from heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu), as well as a possibility of using water hyacinth biomass obtained during treatment for vermicomposting by Eisenia fetida and the vermicompost quality in a model experiment. The results showed that the concentration of heavy metals in the trials with water hyacinth decreased within 35 days. We introduced water hyacinth biomass to the organic substrate for vermicomposting, which promoted a significant weight gain of earthworms and growth in their number, as well as a 1.5- to 3-fold increase in coprolite production. In the trial with 40 % of Eichhornia biomass in the mixture, we observed a 26-fold increase in the number and a 16-fold weight gain of big mature individuals with clitellum; an increase in the number of small individuals 40 times and in the number of cocoons 140 times, as compared to the initial substrate. The utilization of water hyacinth biomass containing heavy metals in the mixture led to a 10-fold increase in the number of adult individuals and cocoons, which was higher than in control. We found out that adding 10 % of Eichhornia biomass to the initial mixture affected slightly the number of microorganisms and their species diversity in the vermicompost. Adding Eichhornia biomass with heavy metals reduced the total number of microorganisms and sharply diminished their species diversity. In all trials, adding water hyacinth in the mixture for vermicomposting had a positive impact on wheat biometric parameters in a 14-day laboratory experiment, even in the trial with heavy metals. PMID:25501861

  13. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  14. Selected bibliography on deuterium isotope effects and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in using deuterium and heavy water not only in nuclear industry but also in various fields of basic as well as applied research in physics, chemistry and biology. As a result, the literature is being enriched with a large number of research papers and technical reports published each year. Thus, to enable the scientists to have an easy reference to these works, an endeavour has been made in this selected bibliography, to enlist the publications related to these fields. Since the interest is concerned mainly with heavy water production processes, deuterium isotope effects etc., several aspects (e.g. nuclear) of deuterium have not been covered here. The material in this bibliography which cites 2388 references has been classified under six broad headings, viz. (1) Production of heavy water, (2) Study of deuterium isotope effects, (3) Analysis and Properties of heavy water, (4) Laser Separation of deuterium, (5) Isotopic exchange reactions, and (6) Miscellaneous. The sources of information used for this compilation are chemical abstracts, nuclear science abstracts, INIS Atomindex and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in the B.A.R.C. library. However, in spite of sincere attempts for a wide coverage, no claim is being made towards the exhaustiveness of this bibliography. (author)

  15. Valuation of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant and of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the Nuclear Power Plant characteristics, the building work, the heavy water valuation criteria and the reasons why he considers that any capital good can be valuated by means of cash-flow. The value of replacement of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant is of U$S 1.593.538.000 (authors)

  16. Embalse nuclear power plant and heavy water valuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the nuclear power plant characteristics, the building work, the heavy water valuation criteria and the reasons why he considers that any capital good can be valued by the cash-flow method. The Embalse nuclear power plant replacement value is of U$S 1.593.538.000. (author)

  17. Long term assurance of supply of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The answer of Switzerland and Great Britain to a number of questions concerning the long-term assurance of the supply of heavy water are presented. The original problems are seen in the wider context of raw materials supply and its assurance in general. Non-proliferation aspects are touched

  18. Nuclear generating station and heavy water plant cost estimates for strategy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear generating station capital, operating and maintenance costs are basic input data for strategy analyses of alternate nuclear fuel cycles. This report presents estimates of these costs for natural uranium CANDU stations, CANDU stations operating on advanced fuel cycles, and liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Cost estimates for heavy water plants are also presented. The results show that station capital costs for advanced fuel cycles are not expected to be significantly greater than those for natural uranium stations. LMFBR capital costs are expected to be 25-30 percent greater than for CANDU's. (auth)

  19. Novel biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite foams for removing heavy-metals from polluted water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, M.; Sanchez-Salcedo, S.; Cicuendez, M.; Izquierdo-Barba, I. [Inorganic and BioInorganic Chemistry Department, Pharmacy Faculty, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ramon y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain); Vallet-Regi, Maria, E-mail: vallet@farm.ucm.es [Inorganic and BioInorganic Chemistry Department, Pharmacy Faculty, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ramon y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} 3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams as potential devices for the treatment of heavy metal ions. {yields} HA stable foams coated with biopolymers. {yields} Feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods. - Abstract: 3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams have been developed as potential devices for the treatment of lead, cadmium and copper contamination of consumable waters. These foams have exhibited a fast and effective ion metal immobilization into the HA structure after an in vitro treatment mimicking a serious water contamination case. To improve HA foam stability at contaminated aqueous solutions pH, as well as its handling and shape integrity the 3D-macroporous foams have been coated with biopolymers polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatine cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (G/Glu). Metal ion immobilization tests have shown higher and fast heavy metals captured as function of hydrophilicity rate of biopolymer used. After an in vitro treatment, foam morphology integrity is guaranteed and the uptake of heavy metal ions rises up to 405 {mu}mol/g in the case of Pb{sup 2+}, 378 {mu}mol/g of Cu{sup 2+} and 316 {mu}mol/g of Cd{sup 2+}. These novel materials promise a feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods.

  20. Measuring the pD of heavy water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analogously to the chemistry of aqueous solutions, a chemistry of heavy water solutions can be developed and, correspondingly, by measuring the pD value - the activity of deuterium ions - the behavior of these solutions can be characterized. The cells for measurement of pD can be achieved similarly to the cell for pH, by using Ag/AgCl electrodes and thus a device for measuring the acid-basic balance in a heavy water solution can be made by measuring the electromotive force and establishing a corresponding pD scale. A strict comparison between pD and pH is not possible since both scales are conventional. Values of paD and paH for phosphate solutions of the same molar concentration in heavy and light water, respectively, differs constantly between them by 0.6 units. Such differences in various solutions, using glass electrodes and control calomel electrodes, allowed getting a more exact value (0.41 pH units) for solutions of molar concentration, with a standard deviation of 0.031. Thus, a pD value can be obtained with a pH-meter with glass and control calomel electrodes by applying the correction relation, plus 0,41 units. We have done such determinations by using a domestic made control electrode of the type HC Ag/AgCl pH=7. Determinations with sodium carbonate and iron and sodium chloride solutions in light and heavy water, at the same concentrations, were carried out. The values recorded from the pH-meter for heavy water solutions are lower than the pH values by 0.407 units, so that this value must be added to the pH readings to get the pD values. The standard deviation of these determinations was 0.012 pH units

  1. Heavy water technology and its contribution to energy sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As the global nuclear industry expands several markets are exploring avenues and technologies to underpin energy security. Heavy water reactors are the most versatile power reactors in the world. They have the potential to extend resource utilization significantly, to allow countries with developing industrial infrastructures access to clean and abundant energy, and to destroy long-lived nuclear waste. These benefits are available by choosing from an array of possible fuel cycles. Several factors, including Canada's early focus on heavy-water technology, limited heavy-industry infrastructure at the time, and a desire for both technological autonomy and energy self-sufficiency, contributed to the creation of the first commercial heavy water reactor in 1962. With the maturation of the industry, the unique design features of the now-familiar product-on-power refuelling, high neutron economy, and simple fuel design-make possible the realization of its potential fuel-cycle versatility. As resource constrains apply pressure on world markets, the feasibility of these options have become more attractive and closer to entering widespread commercial application

  2. Removal and recovery of tritium from light and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus for removing tritium from light water are described, comprising contacting tritiated feed water in a catalyst column in countercurrent flow with hydrogen gas originating from an electrolysis cell so as to enrich this feed water with tritium from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and passing the tritium enriched water to an electrolysis cell wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed upwards through the catalyst column or recovered as product. The tritium content of the hydrogen gas leaving the top of the enricher catalyst column is further reduced in a stripper column containing catalyst which transfers the tritium to a countercurrent flow of liquid water. Anodic oxygen and water vapour from the anode compartment may be fed to a drier and condensed electrolyte recycled with a slip stream or recovered as a further tritium product stream. A similar method involving heavy water is also described. (author)

  3. Solubility of carbohydrates in heavy water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcus V C; Carvalho, Larissa V C; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2012-05-15

    The solubility of several mono-(glucose and xylose), di-(sucrose and maltose), tri-(raffinose) and cyclic (α-cyclodextrin) saccharides in H(2)O and in D(2)O were measured over a range of temperatures. The solution enthalpies for the different carbohydrates in the two solvents were determined using the vant' Hoff equation and the values in D(2)O are presented here for the first time. Our findings indicate that the replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O remarkably decreases the solubilities of the less soluble carbohydrates, such as maltose, raffinose and α-cyclodextrin. On the other hand, the more soluble saccharides, glucose, xylose, and sucrose, are practically insensitive to the H/D replacement in water. PMID:22480785

  4. Conceptual design of a large heavy water reactor for US siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, N L; Jesick, J F

    1979-09-01

    Information is presented concerning fuel management and safety and licensing assessment of the pressurized heavy water reactor; and commercial introduction of the pressurized heavy water reactor in the United States.

  5. Conceptual design of a large heavy water reactor for US siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning fuel management and safety and licensing assessment of the pressurized heavy water reactor; and commercial introduction of the pressurized heavy water reactor in the United States

  6. Thorium utilization in heavy water moderated Accelerator Driven Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) is being carried out around the world primarily with the objective of waste transmutation. Presently, the volume of waste in India is small and therefore there is little incentive to develop ADS based waste transmutation technology immediately. With limited indigenous U availability and the presence of large Th deposits in the country, there is a clear incentive to develop Th related technologies. India also has vast experience in design, construction and operation of heavy water moderated reactors. Heavy water moderated reactors employing solid Th fuels can be self sustaining, but the discharge burnups are too low to be economical. A possible way to improve the performance such reactors is to use an external neutron source as is done in ADS. This paper discusses our studies on Th utilization in heavy water moderated ADSs. The study is carried out at the lattice level. The time averaged k-infinity of the Th bundle from zero burnup up to the discharge burnup is taken to be the same as the core (ensemble) averaged k-infinity. For the purpose of the analysis we have chosen standard PHWR and AHWR assemblies. Variation of the pitch and coolant (H2O/D2O) are studied. Both, the once through cycle and the recycling option are studied. In the latter case the study is carried out for various enrichments (% 233U in Th) of the recycled Th fuel bundles. The code DTF as modified for lattice and burnup calculations (BURNTRAN) was used for carrying out the study. The once through cycle represents the most attractive ADS concept (Th burner ADS) possible for Th utilization. It avoids reprocessing of Th spent fuel and in the ideal situation the use of any fissile material either initially or for sustaining itself. The gain in this system is however rather low requiring a high power accelerator and a substantial fraction of the power generated to be fed back to the accelerator. The self sustaining Th-U cycle in a heavy moderated ADS is a

  7. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  8. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  9. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Peel Ross; Van Den Durpel Luc; Ogden Mark Daniel; Whittle Karl Rhys

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mix...

  10. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Peel, R.; Van Den Derpel, L.; Whittle, K.; Ogden, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mix...

  11. Influence of Agriculture on Water Quality: Significance of Heavy Metals Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Nusreta Đonlagić; Amra Odobašić; Amra Bratovčić

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural activities directly influence the quality of water systems. Investigations showed that application of various agro-technical measures results with the pollution of water streams with heavy metals and other polluters. Increased concentrations of heavy metals result with intake of heavy metals and their transfer to food chains, and for that reason it is necessary to monitor the content of heavy metals regularly. Broad investigations of bio-geochemical cycling of heavy metals in the...

  12. Freeze-out dynamics in heavy-ion collisions: Recent advances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Francesco Becattini

    2015-05-01

    We briefly review recent advances in the subject of hadron production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We focus on the issues of chemical freeze-out, chemical equilibration and the role of post-hadronization inelastic collisions. From the observations collected in elementary and heavy-ion collisions, a picture emerges in which hadrons are born in chemical equilibrium at hadronization, thereafter undergoing inelastic and elastic collisions whose impact on the primordial distribution depends on the system size.

  13. [Heavy metal pollution ecology of macro-fungi: research advances and expectation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi-xing; An, Xin-long; Wei, Shu-he

    2008-08-01

    Macro-fungi are the main component of biosphere and one of the ecological resources, and play very important roles in matter cycling and in maintaining ecological balances. This paper summarized and reviewed the research advances in the eco-toxicological effects of heavy metals on macro-fungi, the bioaccumulation function of macro-fungi on heavy metals, the ecological adaptation mechanisms of macro-fungi to heavy metal pollution, the role of macro-fungi as a bio-indicator of heavy metal pollution, and the potential of macro-fungi in the ecological remediation of contaminated environment. To strengthen the researches on the heavy metal pollution ecology of macro-fungi would be of practical significance in the reasonable utilization of macro-fungi resources and in the ecological remediation of contaminated environment.

  14. [Effect of heavy water on the viability of bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronova, N V; Parkhomenko, T V; Popov, V G; Sventitskiĭ, E N; Iakovleva, L Iu

    1988-01-01

    Influence of heavy water (D2O) on the membrane energization, the efflux of hydrogen ions and the respiration of bacteria E. coli M-17 was studied. As has been shown, heavy water of a low concentration (0.05-0.20% v/v) activates and of a high concentration (above 10%) inhibits the absorption of lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) and of oxygen by cells. The return of these characteristics to the initial levels after the removal of D2O points to a reversible action of D2O. A protective effect of D2O towards membrane energization and rate of respiration on dried cells was observed. This fact is in agreement with the data on viability of bacteria. The indicated protective action increases at the stage of rehydration in the presence of D2O. PMID:3390482

  15. Integrated inspection programs at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality pressure boundary maintenance and an excellent loss prevention record at Bruce Heavy Water Plant are the results of the Material and Inspection Unit's five inspection programs. Experienced inspectors are responsible for the integrity of the pressure boundary in their own operating area. Inspectors are part of the Technical Section, and along with unit engineering staff, they provide technical input before, during, and after the job. How these programs are completed, and the results achieved, are discussed. 5 figs., 1 appendix

  16. Environmental health scoping study at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are concerns that hydrogen sulfide released from the Heavy Water Plant near Kincardine, Ontario may be the cause of the mortalities and morbidities observed in a nearby flock of sheep. The Philosopher's Wool sheep farm is about four kilometres south-southeast of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant. Ontario Hydro, the owner and operator of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant, claims that hydrogen sulphide emissions from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant are within regulatory limits and well below levels that cause harm. Accordingly, the Atomic Energy Control Board commissioned the Alberta Environmental Centre, Alberta Department of Environmental Protection, to develop a scoping study for this environmental health issue. The first objective was to describe a field investigation model to define clearly the environmental health and operation of the sheep farm. The second objective was to describe possible exposure patterns and develop a holistic environmental pathway model. If appropriate, the third study objective was to describe animal models of the actual situation to elucidate specific aspects of the environmental health concerns. It was not the objective of this report to provide a definitive answer to the present environmental health issue. Ontario Hydro provided data to the Alberta Environmental Centre, as di the sheep farmer, the attending veterinarian, the University of Guelph study team, and the Atomic Energy Control Board. A six-tiered strategy of sequential evaluations of the ovine health problem is based on the multiple-response paradigm. It assumes the observed ovine health results are the result of multiple effector events. Each tier constitutes a separate, but inter-related, study. Sequential evaluation and feedback of each tier allow sound scientific judgements and efficient use of resources. (author). 59 refs., 11 tabs., 22 figs

  17. The Battle for Heavy Water Three physicists' heroic exploits

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Up until the end of the 1970s you could still catch a glimpse of his massive silhouette in the corridors of CERN. Lew Kowarksi, one of the pioneers of the Laboratory, was not only a great physicist; he was also a genuine hero of World War II. In 1940, along with Frédéric Joliot and Hans von Halban, Lew Kowarski managed to get the entire world supply of heavy water away to safety from the Nazis after a fantastic escape from occupied France. At the end of the war, the three physicists played themselves in a film about their adventures entitled 'la Bataille de l'eau lourde'. This film, which has been loaned to us by the French National Film Library, will be shown at CERN for the first time next Thursday. At the beginning of the war, heavy water (D20, two atoms of deuterium and one oxygen atom) was of strategic importance. In 1939 Frédéric Joliot, aided by Hans von Halban and Lew Kowarski, demonstrated the nuclear chain reaction and the moderator role that heavy water plays in it. A few weeks before the inv...

  18. DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

    2009-07-31

    Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

  19. Advancing Water Science through Data Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Troy, T.

    2014-12-01

    As water scientists, we are increasingly handling larger and larger datasets with many variables, making it easy to lose ourselves in the details. Advanced data visualization will play an increasingly significant role in propelling the development of water science in research, economy, policy and education. It can enable analysis within research and further data scientists' understanding of behavior and processes and can potentially affect how the public, whom we often want to inform, understands our work. Unfortunately for water scientists, data visualization is approached in an ad hoc manner when a more formal methodology or understanding could potentially significantly improve both research within the academy and outreach to the public. Firstly to broaden and deepen scientific understanding, data visualization can allow for more analyzed targets to be processed simultaneously and can represent the variables effectively, finding patterns, trends and relationships; thus it can even explores the new research direction or branch of water science. Depending on visualization, we can detect and separate the pivotal and trivial influential factors more clearly to assume and abstract the original complex target system. Providing direct visual perception of the differences between observation data and prediction results of models, data visualization allows researchers to quickly examine the quality of models in water science. Secondly data visualization can also improve public awareness and perhaps influence behavior. Offering decision makers clearer perspectives of potential profits of water, data visualization can amplify the economic value of water science and also increase relevant employment rates. Providing policymakers compelling visuals of the role of water for social and natural systems, data visualization can advance the water management and legislation of water conservation. By building the publics' own data visualization through apps and games about water

  20. Graphene-based sensors for detection of heavy metals in water: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jingbo; Zhou, Guihua; Christensen, Erik R; Heideman, Robert; Chen, Junhong

    2014-06-01

    Graphene (G) is attracting significant attention because of its unique physical and electronic properties. The production of graphene through the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a low-cost method. The reduction of GO can further lead to electrically conductive reduced GO. These graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive for high-performance water sensors due to their unique properties, such as high specific surface areas, high electron mobilities, and exceptionally low electronic noise. Because of potential risks to the environment and human health arising from heavy-metal pollution in water, G-/GO-based water sensors are being developed for rapid and sensitive detection of heavy-metal ions. In this review, a general introduction to graphene and GO properties, as well as their syntheses, is provided. Recent advances in optical, electrochemical, and electrical detection of heavy-metal ions using graphene or GO are then highlighted. Finally, challenges facing G/GO-based water sensor development and outlook for future research are discussed. PMID:24740529

  1. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  2. On the Effect of Lengthening Circadian Rhythm by Heavy Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmedov T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of time sensor of biological clock (BC attracts interest of many scientists, and a great number of experiments are being conducted to stud y the influence of vari- ous physical and chemical factors on functioning of BC. Special attention is drawn to studying the influence of heavy water (D 2 O on functioning of BC that always leads to lengthening of circadian rhythms (CR. This work presents theoretical consideration of lengthening of CR, when hydrogen (H 2 in water is replaced by deuterium (D 2 , that is based on spacial difference of energy levels with similar principle quantum numbers.

  3. Advances in Chevron RDS technology for heavy oil upgrading flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuerman, G.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Reynolds, B.E.; Bachtel, R.W.; Threlkel, R.S. (Chevron Research and Technology Company, Richmond, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Over the last 20 years, environmental and market forces have not only increased the demand for residuum hydrotreating technology but have also changed it from a technology which simply desulfurizes to one which provides maximum conversion. Simultaneously greater feed flexibility was also being demanded. Chevron has been active throughout this period developing RDS/VRDS technology and the catalysts that go with that technology. Currently, Chevron provides a whole range of RDS catalysts from HDM catalysts which can handle heavy, high metals feeds to active residuum HDN catalysts which can produce RFCC feed. In addition, Chevron has developed a new technology called Onstream Catalyst Replacement (OCR) which allows refiners to handle very high metals feeds without shutting down their residuum hydrotreater for catalyst changeouts. 14 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Elementary Analyses and Heavy Metal Contents of Tap Waters in Konuralp District: Comparison of Mains Water, Spring Water and Zamzam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammer Yılmaz 1

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We meet our water needs such as city water supply, natural spring water, Zamzam water was aimed to compare in terms of chemical ion concentration and heavy metal content. Methods: City water from the four regions with different source, Zamzam water and bottled natural spring water in samples, ions and heavy metal values measured. Results have been assessed according to the criteria specified in the United States environmental protection agency (EPA and the World Health Organization (WHO. Results: In the sample of tap water taken from Konuralp, Al and Fe values were found over the EPA-WHO limit value. In the sample of bottled natural spring water, heavy metals are within the limits established. In the sample of Zamzam water Ca+2, Mg+2 values were higher than other samples but not exceeding the limits. In the sample of Zamzam water nitrate (NO3-, and vanadium (V values is very high from samples taken of the city water. Conclusion: Water content may be different with the water supply and environmental effects. More extensive analysis should be done by municipalities to drinking water that contains ions and heavy metal and citizens to know the measurements of the water they drink should be informed periodically of local authority’s websites.

  5. Measurement of the purity of graphite and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical methods used by the C.E.A. are described, I -- Graphite. The determination of the change in the neutron capture cross section from sample to sample is determined by, an oscillation method in the Zoe reactor, or by measuring the attenuation of a neutron flux in the subcritical system Mireille. Methods of analysing total ash, B, H, Cl, Na, Ca. Fe, Mo, Ti, V, Sm, Eu, Dy, S, Co and Cd are described and mean results are given. The methods for sampling are indicated. II -- Heavy crater. The isotopic analysis of heavy water is carried out by infra-red absorption measurements. Chemical purity is evaluated by electrical conductivity measurements, B, Na, Mg, K, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cd, are determined by spectrographic methods, and Cl-, NO3-, SO4--, NH4+ by chemical methods; finally, sensitive pH measurements are described

  6. Advancing Water Science through Improved Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B. J.; Miles, B.; Rai, A.; Ahalt, S.; Band, L. E.; Minsker, B.; Palmer, M.; Williams, M. R.; Idaszak, R.; Whitton, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Major scientific advances are needed to help address impacts of climate change and increasing human-mediated environmental modification on the water cycle at global and local scales. However, such advances within the water sciences are limited in part by inadequate information infrastructures. For example, cyberinfrastructure (CI) includes the integrated computer hardware, software, networks, sensors, data, and human capital that enable scientific workflows to be carried out within and among individual research efforts and across varied disciplines. A coordinated transformation of existing CI and development of new CI could accelerate the productivity of water science by enabling greater discovery, access, and interoperability of data and models, and by freeing scientists to do science rather than create and manage technological tools. To elucidate specific ways in which improved CI could advance water science, three challenges confronting the water science community were evaluated: 1) How does ecohydrologic patch structure affect nitrogen transport and fate in watersheds?, 2) How can human-modified environments emulate natural water and nutrient cycling to enhance both human and ecosystem well-being?, 3) How do changes in climate affect water availability to support biodiversity and human needs? We assessed the approaches used by researchers to address components of these challenges, identified barriers imposed by limitations of current CI, and interviewed leaders in various water science subdisciplines to determine the most recent CI tools employed. Our preliminary findings revealed four areas where CI improvements are likely to stimulate scientific advances: 1) sensor networks, 2) data quality assurance/quality control, 3) data and modeling standards, 4) high performance computing. In addition, the full potential of a re-envisioned water science CI cannot be realized without a substantial training component. In light of these findings, we suggest that CI

  7. Cooling water treatment for heavy water project (Paper No. 6.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With minor exceptions, water is the preferred industrial medium for the removal of unwanted heat from process systems. The application of various chemical treatments is required to protect the system from water related and process related problems of corrosion, scale and deposition and biofouling. The paper discusses the cooling water problems for heavy water industries along with the impact caused by associated fertilizer units. (author). 6 figs

  8. BUCKLING ANALYSES OF A HEAVY COLUMN CONSIDERATED IN WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz PEKBEY

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1744, the critical buckling load with the assumption of uniform cross-section without weight of column were computed by Euler. Whenever an economical solution is required, the weight of column must be considered for solution of buckling analyses. In literature, the critical buckling load and asymptotic behaviour of heavy column in condition of atmosphere have inverstigated for ten different support types. When this literature is examined, it is stated that the differential equations of for four different suppport types in condition of water is similar to condition of atmosphere. However, the differential equations of other four different suppport types in condition of water is different from to condition of atmosphere. And it is stated that the critical buckling load these different suppport types in condition of water is not calculated from condition of atmosphere. The goals of this paper are to develop self weight buckling of column at its top fixed and lower end fixed-roller supported in condition of water. This paper, presents a analytical method for calculating the critical buckling load of the heavy column.

  9. Sonication for advanced drinking water treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guang-ming; WEI Xi-zhu; LI Xiang-kun; ZHANG Jie; DOU Zi-bo

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of sonication as an advanced treatment method for drinking water production and used comprehensive indexes of water quality to examine its efficiency. Results show that sonication significantly reduces the toxicity of water. Sonication with 5 W/L at 90 kHz lasting for 30 min decreases he water SUVA and the disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBPFP) by 38.7% and 27.2% respective ly. Sonieation also decreases the UV254 by more than 50% through destroying unsaturated chemical bonds.Higher sound intensity and higher frequency benefit the reduction of TOC and UV254, Besides, sonication significantly increases the affinity of organics with granular activated carbon (GAC), and thus the hybrid sonication-GAC method reduces the water TOC, COD, UV254, and DBPFP by 78. 3%, 69.4%, 75.7%, and 70. 0% respectively. Therefore, sonieation and the hybrid sonieation-GAC method are proposed as advanced treatment methods for drinking water.

  10. Stage 1 decommissioning of the steam generating heavy water reactor - current achievements (Winfrith)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SGHWR) is located at Winfrith, Dorset, UK. It was a Nuclear Power Plant rated at 100MW(e) and operated successfully from 1968 to 1990. Decommissioning is funded by the Department of Trade and Industry and is the responsibility of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, which has contracted AEA Technology to manage the project. Decommissioning is now well advanced in accordance with a cost-effective three stage strategy. This paper introduces SGHWR, outlines the economic basis of the decommissioning strategy, summarises the practical achievements and uses the containment strategy to provide an example of environmental considerations. (Author)

  11. Deposition of heavy water on soil and reemission to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments using heavy water as a tracer instead of tritiated water (HTO) were carried out in November 1995 and August 1996 in Japan. The objective of these experiments was to estimate the behavior of HTO in the environment when HTO was released to the atmosphere. We measured the evolution of depth profiles of heavy water concentrations in soil water and compared the reemission rates with the evaporation velocities to study the deposition and reemission of heavy water to/from soil. The depth profiles of heavy water concentrations in soil were expressed by exponential functions of which the gradient depended on the deposition period. The initial reemission rates of heavy water from the soil were the highest, regardless of the meteorological conditions. The reemission occurred not only during the day but also at night, suggesting that the exchange of heavy water in the soil surface layer with H2O in air played a dominant role during nighttime. (orig.)

  12. Consequence of potential accidents in heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy water plants realize the primary isotopic concentrations of water using H2O-H2S chemical exchange and they are chemical plants. As these plants are handling and spreading large quantities of hydrogen sulphide (high toxic, corrosive, flammable and explosive as) maintained in the process at relative high temperatures and pressures, it is required an assessing of risks associated with the potential accidents. The H2S released in atmosphere as a result of an accident will have negative consequences to property, population and environment. This paper presents a model of consequences quantitative assessment and its outcome for the most dangerous accident in heavy water plants. Several states of the art risk based methods were modified and linked together to form a proper model for this analyse. Five basic steps to identify the risks involved in operating the plants are followed: hazard identification, accident sequence development, H2S emissions calculus, dispersion analyses and consequences determination. A brief description of each step and some information of analysis results are provided. The accident proportions, the atmospheric conditions and the population density in the respective area were accounted for consequences calculus. The specific results of the consequences analysis allow to develop the plant's operating safety requirements so that the risk remain at an acceptable level. (authors)

  13. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  14. Topical papers on heavy water, fuel fabrication and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of four papers is presented. The first contribution of the Federal Republic of Germany reviews the market situation for reactors and the relations between reactor producers and buyers as reflected in sales agreements. The second West German contribution gives a world-wide survey of fuel element production as well as of fuel and fuel element demand up to the year 2000. The Canadian paper discusses the future prospects of heavy-water production, while the Ecuador contribution deals with small and medium-sized nuclear power plants

  15. Recent Advances in GEO Water Cycle Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Over the past few years GEO (Group on Earth Observations) efforts within the Water Societal Benefit Area (SBA) have been coordinated by the Science Committee of the former Integrated Global Observing Strategy Partnership (IGOS-P) IGWCO (Integrated Global Water Cycle Observations) theme. Within this framework a number of projects related to data system design, product development, and capacity building are being carried out. GEO has recently consolidated the Water SBA activities into three tasks, namely Droughts, Floods and Water Resource Management; Capacity Building for Water Resource Management (in Asia, Africa and the Americas); and Integrated Products for Water Resource Management and Research. In order to strengthen interactions with the GEO and its User Interface Committee, a Water Cycle Community of Practice (COP) was initiated. In addition, within the past year, the IGWCO Science Committee has decided to also function as a Community of Practice in collaboration with the existing Water Cycle COP. This overview will provide background and an update on the GEO Water SBA activities with an emphasis of the way in which these activities are being integrated within the three tasks. It will also describe activities that are planned for 2010 to facilitate this integration. Recent advances related to drought monitoring, capacity and network building, and observational and data systems will be highlighted. New water-related activities arising from collaborations between US GEO and Canada GEO, and through activities within the GEO Architecture and Data Committee, will also be described. This presentation will conclude with a longer-term outlook for water within the GEO framework and provide some guidance for interested experts on how they can become involved in helping to implement these plans.

  16. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 16% of the world's electricity. By the end of 1997, over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience had been accumulated. Global environmental change, and the continuing increase in global energy supply required to provide increasing populations with an improving standard of living, make the contribution from nuclear energy even more important for the next century. For nuclear power to achieve its full potential and make its needed contribution, it must be safe, economical, reliable and sustainable. All of these factors can be enhanced by judicious choice and development of advanced fuel cycle options. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Fuel Cycle Options for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on behalf of the Canadian Government and was jointly conducted within the frame of activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (IWG-LWR) and the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (IWG-HWR). The TCM provided the opportunity to have in-depth discussions on important technical topics which were highlighted in the International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies: Adjusting to New Realities, held in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. The main results and conclusions of the TCM were presented as input for discussion at the first meeting of the IAEA newly formed International Working Group on Fuel Cycle Options

  17. Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

    2007-10-31

    The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional

  18. Water and Heavy Metal Transport in Roadside Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. KOCHER; G. WESSOLEK; H. STOFFREGEN

    2005-01-01

    Roads with very high traffic loads in regions where soils are low in both pH and sorption capacity might be a source of percolation water loaded with heavy metals. Looking at some "worst case" scenarios, this study focused on the input of traffic related pollutants and on Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr concentrations in the soil matrix and soil solution, respectively.The analysis also included pH and electrical conductivity and at some sites DOC. The investigations were carried out on sandy soils with more or less low pH values at four motorway sites in Germany. The average of daily traffic was about 50 000 up to 90 000 vehicles. Soil pore water was collected in two soil depths and at four distances from the road. The pH in general decreased with increasing distance from the roadside. The elevated pH near the roadside was presumably caused by deposition of dust and weathering residues of the road asphalt, as well as by infiltration of salt that was used during winter time. At these road sites, increased heavy metal concentrations in the soil matrix as well as in the soil solution were found. However, the concentrations seldom exceeded reference values of the German Soil Protection Act. The soil solution concentrations tended to increase from the road edge to 10 m distance, whereas the concentration in the soil matrix decreased. Elevated DOC concentrations corresponded with elevated Cu concentrations but did not substantially change this tendency. High soil water percolation rates were found near the roads. Thus, even low metal concentrations of percolation water could yield high metal loads in a narrow area beside the road.

  19. Treatment of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water stored at Darlington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) has accumulated over 48 drums of chemistry laboratory waste arising from analysis of heavy water (D2O). Several organic, including Arsenazo III, and inorganic contaminants present in these drums results in high total organic carbon (TOC) and conductivity. These drums have not been processed due to uncertainties related to clean-up of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water. This paper provides details of chemical characterization as well as bench scale studies performed to demonstrate the feasibility of treating the downgraded D2O to the stringent target specifications of <1 ppm TOC and <0.1mS/m conductivity, required for feed to the Station Upgrading Plant (SUP). Both ionic organic species such as glycolate, acetate and formate as well as neutral organics such as acetone, methanol and ethylene glycol were detected in all the samples. Morpholine and propylene glycol were detected in one sample. Arsenazo III was determined to be not a major contaminant (maximum 8.4 ppm) in these waste drums, compared to the other organic contaminants present. Various unit processes such as pH adjustment, granular activated carbon (GAC), ion exchange resin (IX), UV-peroxide oxidation (UV-H2O2) treatments, nanofiltration (NF) as well as reverse osmosis (RO) were tested on a bench scale both singly as well as in various combinations to evaluate their ability to achieve the stringent target conductivity and TOC specifications. Among the various bench scale tests evaluated, the successive processing train used at DNGS and consisting of GAC+IX+UV/H2O2+IX (polishing) unit operations was found to meet target specifications for both conductivity and TOC. Unit processes comprising (GAC+IX) and (RO-double pass + GAC+IX) met conductivity targets but failed to meet TOC specifications. The results of GAC+IX tests clearly emphasize the importance of using low flow rates for successful reduction in both conductivity as well as TOC. Detailed assessment of

  20. Treatment of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water stored at Darlington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanarayan, S.; Husain, A., E-mail: sriram.s@kinectrics.com [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Williams, D., E-mail: denny.williams@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, Bowmanville, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) has accumulated over 48 drums of chemistry laboratory waste arising from analysis of heavy water (D{sub 2}O). Several organic, including Arsenazo III, and inorganic contaminants present in these drums results in high total organic carbon (TOC) and conductivity. These drums have not been processed due to uncertainties related to clean-up of Arsenazo III contaminated heavy water. This paper provides details of chemical characterization as well as bench scale studies performed to demonstrate the feasibility of treating the downgraded D{sub 2}O to the stringent target specifications of <1 ppm TOC and <0.1mS/m conductivity, required for feed to the Station Upgrading Plant (SUP). Both ionic organic species such as glycolate, acetate and formate as well as neutral organics such as acetone, methanol and ethylene glycol were detected in all the samples. Morpholine and propylene glycol were detected in one sample. Arsenazo III was determined to be not a major contaminant (maximum 8.4 ppm) in these waste drums, compared to the other organic contaminants present. Various unit processes such as pH adjustment, granular activated carbon (GAC), ion exchange resin (IX), UV-peroxide oxidation (UV-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatments, nanofiltration (NF) as well as reverse osmosis (RO) were tested on a bench scale both singly as well as in various combinations to evaluate their ability to achieve the stringent target conductivity and TOC specifications. Among the various bench scale tests evaluated, the successive processing train used at DNGS and consisting of GAC+IX+UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}+IX (polishing) unit operations was found to meet target specifications for both conductivity and TOC. Unit processes comprising (GAC+IX) and (RO-double pass + GAC+IX) met conductivity targets but failed to meet TOC specifications. The results of GAC+IX tests clearly emphasize the importance of using low flow rates for successful reduction in both conductivity as

  1. Pollution Status of Pakistan: A Retrospective Review on Heavy Metal Contamination of Water, Soil, and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Waseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water, soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health.

  2. Pollution status of Pakistan: a retrospective review on heavy metal contamination of water, soil, and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Amir; Arshad, Jahanzaib; Iqbal, Farhat; Sajjad, Ashif; Mehmood, Zahid; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water), soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health. PMID:25276818

  3. Heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several countries have heavy-water-moderated, pressure-tube reactors either in commercial operation or in late prototype stages. The supporting safety research and development includes such areas as the thermohydraulics of circuit depressurization, heat transfer from the fuel, heat rejection to the moderator from dry fuel, fuel and sheath behaviour, and fuel channel integrity. We review the work done in Canada, Great Britain, Italy and Japan, and describe some of the experimental tests underlaying the methods of accident analysis. The reactors have safety systems which, in the event of an accident, are able to shut down the reactor, keep the fuel cooled, and contain any released radioactivity. We summarize the characteristics of these safety systems (shutdown, emergency core cooling, and containment) in the various reactors, and discuss other reactor characteristics which either prevent accidents or reduce their potential demand on the safety systems. (author)

  4. Reliability analysis of Indian pressurized heavy water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a probabilistic analysis of primary heat transport of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water reactor is presented. The probability of failure of the straight pipes with through wall circumferential flaws subjected to bending moment is calculated. The failure criteria considered is net section collapse and R6 method. Probability of failure is obtained with crack growth initiation as the limiting condition. The variability in the crack size and material properties (tensile and fracture) is considered. The probability of failure is calculated at different levels of applied load. Various methods of probability estimation are presented and their equivalence is demonstrated. The probability of failure is obtained using classical Monte Carlo method, Monte Carlo with importance sampling, First Order Reliability Method (FORM), Second Order Reliability Method (SORM) and by numerical integration of the failure integral using Lepage's VEGAS algorithm. The results are utilized for demonstrating that for the leakage size crack, the pipe design has high probability for leak before break. (orig.)

  5. Antineutrino monitoring for the Iranian heavy water reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Eric; Jaffke, Patrick; Shea, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In this note we discuss the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak, the IR-40, as a non-proliferation measure. We demonstrate that an above ground detector positioned right outside the IR-40 reactor building could meet and in some cases significantly exceed the verification goals identified by IAEA for plutonium production or diversion from declared inventories. In addition to monitoring the reactor during operation, observing antineutrino emissions from long-lived fission products could also allow monitoring the reactor when it is shutdown. Antineutrino monitoring could also be used to distinguish different levels of fuel enrichment. Most importantly, these capabilities would not require a complete reactor operational history and could provide a means to re-establish continuity of knowledge in safeguards conclusions should this become necessary.

  6. Accounting Systems for Heavy Water and Fissionable Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed accounting and reporting procedures used by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) for maintaining adequate records and control of heavy water supplies and stocks of fissionable materials are described, along with the duties and responsibilities of those administering the system. An appraisal is made of these procedures with respect to their adaptability for use in rapidly expanding research and power programmes. In particular the use of electronic data processing equipment is evaluated. A senior management committee is responsible for ensuring that there is a proper system for recording, reporting and controlling fissionable materials. The Production Planning and Control Branch (Pp and C B) of the Operations Division at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) is responsible to the committee for keeping the over-all records and for the general administration of the system. The duties involved are detailed in the report. The system for fissionable materials is segregated into several accountability units 15 of which are allocated to AECL departments and the others to Canadian industries and research organizations. A control ledger is kept by PP and CB for each of the units; however, the units are responsible for preparing detailed accounts of all material under their jurisdiction. The basic recording procedures covering the movement Of materials between units, the changing of forms within units, the handling of gains and losses, and disposals, are outlined in the report. The transfer of this data to IBM cards, the ultimate processing through an IBM 1401 computer and the preparation of reports for management approval are described. The heavy-water accounting system based on the same principles as used for the fissionable materials is explained. In this case the control ledger lists the pounds of D2O allocated to each of the 15 accountability units. Again the basic recording methods and the use of a computer system are outlined. (author)

  7. HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATION OF WATER IN NEGOMBO LAGOON AND INTERCONNECTED WATER SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Kanchana.N.K.CHANDRASEKARA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Water quality in natural lagoons that are located within close proximity to human settlements is generally at contamination risk due to increasing anthropogenic activities. The Negombo lagoon situated in the Gampaha District in Sri Lanka is a lagoonal estuary. It receives surface water runoff mainly from Dandugamoya, Ja-ela, Hamilton and Dutch canals. During the recent past, it has been noted by several researches that there is increasing evidence in anthropogenic activities in Negombo lagoon and surrounding areas. The present study was carried out to assess the contamination levels of heavy metals of water in the Negombo lagoon and interconnected water sources. Sampling was carried out in 19 locations; 6 in the Negombo lagoon and 13 from the interconnected sources (5 samples from Hamilton canal, 2 samples each from Dutch canal, Dandugamoya and Ja-Ela and one sample each from Kelani estuary and Ocean-Negombo. The data collection was conducted during relatively wet (May and relatively dry (September months in 2013. Water samples were analysed in the laboratory as per the standards methods of American Public Health Association (APHA manual by using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The tests were carried out to detect heavy metals: cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, Lead (Pb, manganese (Mn, and zinc (Zn in water. Data analysis was accomplished using ArcGIS (version 9.3 software package along with Microsoft Excel. Standards for inland water and drinking water of Sri Lanka were used to determine the threshold levels of heavy metals. The results show that concentrations of Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn of all water bodies were below the threshold level of human consumption and quality standards for inland waters in Sri Lanka. The Cd and Pb levels of water in Negombo lagoon and Hamilton canal were comparatively high. Furthermore the Cd and Pb levels of Dandugamoya, Ja-ela and Dutch canals were below the maximum permissible levels in both relatively wet

  8. Experimental study of flow patterns and pressure drops of heavy oil-water-gas vertical flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-mao; ZHONG Hai-quan; LI Ying-chuan; LIU Zhong-neng; WANG Qi

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel apparatus of 18.5 m high and 0.05 m in inner diameter is developed, with the heavy oil from Lukeqin Xinjiang oil field as the test medium, to carry out the orthogonal experiments for the interactions between heavy oil-water and heavy oil-water-gas. With the aid of observation windows, the pressure drop signal can be collected and the general multiple flow patterns of heavy oil-water-gas can be observed, including the bubble, slug, churn and annular ones. Compared with the conventional oil, the bubble flows are identified in three specific flow patterns which are the dispersed bubble (DB), the bubble gas-bubble heavy oil go(B-B), and the bubble gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(B-I). The slug flows are identified in two specific flow patterns which are the intermittent gas-bubble heavy oilgo(I-B)and the intermittent gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(I-I). Compared with the observa- tions in the heavy oil-water experiment, it is found that the conventional models can not accurately predict the pressure gradient. And it is not water but heavy oil and water mixed phase that is in contact with the tube wall. So, based on the principle of the energy con- servation and the kinematic wave theory, a new method is proposed to calculate the frictional pressure gradient. Furthermore, with the new friction gradient calculation method and a due consideration of the flow characteristics of the heavy oil-water-gas high speed flow, a new model is built to predict the heavy oil-water-gas pressure gradient. The predictions are compared with the experiment data and the field data. The accuracy of the predictions shows the rationality and the applicability of the new model.

  9. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  10. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  11. Advanced applications of water cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By August 2007, there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation worldwide, with a total capacity of 371.7 GW(e). Further, 31 units, totaling 24.1 GW(e), were under construction. During 2006 nuclear power produced 2659.7 billion kWh of electricity, which was 15.2% of the world's total. The vast majority of these plants use water-cooled reactors. Based on information provided by its Member States, the IAEA projects that nuclear power will grow significantly, producing between 2760 and 2810 billion kWh annually by 2010, between 3120 and 3840 billion kWh annually by 2020, and between 3325 and 5040 billion kWh annually by 2030. There are several reasons for these rising expectations for nuclear power: - Nuclear power's lengthening experience and good performance: The industry now has more than 12 000 reactor years of experience, and the global average nuclear plant availability during 2006 reached 83%; - Growing energy needs: All forecasts project increases in world energy demand, especially as population and economic productivity grow. The strategies are country dependent, but usually involve a mix of energy sources; - Interest in advanced applications of nuclear energy, such as seawater desalination, steam for heavy oil recovery and heat and electricity for hydrogen production; - Environmental concerns and constraints: The Kyoto Protocol has been in force since February 2005, and for many countries (most OECD countries, the Russian Federation, the Baltics and some countries of the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) greenhouse gas emission limits are imposed; - Security of energy supply is a national priority in essentially every country; and - Nuclear power is economically competitive and provides stability of electricity price. In the near term most new nuclear plants will be evolutionary water cooled reactors (Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), often pursuing economies of scale. In the longer term, innovative designs that

  12. 76 FR 52994 - Application for a License To Export Heavy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... FR 49139 (Aug. 28, 2007). Information about filing electronically is available on the NRC's public... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Heavy Water Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public Notice of... end-use for China. (D2O--heavy (liters). producing an active water). pharmaceutical ingredient...

  13. Biogenic metals in advanced water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebel, Tom; De Gusseme, Bart; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms can change the oxidation state of metals and concomitantly deposit metal oxides and zerovalent metals on or into their cells. The microbial mechanisms involved in these processes have been extensively studied in natural environments, and researchers have recently gained interest in the applications of microbe-metal interactions in biotechnology. Because of their specific characteristics, such as high specific surface areas and high catalytic reactivity, biogenic metals offer promising perspectives for the sorption and (bio)degradation of contaminants. In this review, the precipitation of biogenic manganese and iron species and the microbial reduction of precious metals, such as palladium, platinum, silver and gold, are discussed with specific attention to the application of these biogenic metals in innovative remediation technologies in advanced water treatment.

  14. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm-2, and at 35 to 900C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm-2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 900C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H2O at 0.2 A cm-2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H2O at 0.5 A cm-2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H2O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  15. Heavy water in the context of hydrogen economy. Prospects for cheaper production by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is an extremely important material. It is commonly used in many industrial processes. It can also be used as the key medium in 'hydrogen energy philosophy' due to its unique energetic properties (production for storage, gas-line transport). Its heavy isotopes, deuterium (D) and tritium (T), are very important nuclear materials. Deuterium, in the form of heavy water, is an excellent moderator in fission reactors, while both D and T are now seen as fuel components in fusion reactors in the future. Thus, improvements of production processes for hydrogen and its isotopes are always actual. Electrolysis (sometimes in combination with other methods) is often used for heavy water production or re-enrichment or for tritium removal from 'nuclear waters', mostly because of high D/H (T/H, T/D) isotope separation factors, although the electrolysis consumes great amounts of energy (about 4.5 to 5 kWh/m3 H2 in industrial electrolyzers). There were various attempts to improve this process: zero-gap cell geometry, development of new diaphragm materials, development of new electrocatalytic materials for electrodes, using so-called ionic activators etc. We investigated the use of catalytic cathode materials made from hypo-hyper-d-electronic combinations of transition metals as well as in situ activation of electrodes. Many intermetallic combinations were tried. Two types of ionic activators were used: tris-(ethylenediamine)-Co(III)-chloride complex and tris-(trimethylenediamine)-Co(III)-chloride complex. Some significant increases of the separation factors were obtained. Dependence of isotope enrichment on the amount of water that must be electrolysed for was estimated for different values of the separation factor. It was concluded that this a good way to increase the efficiency of the process by achieving an energy saving and an increase of the separation factors simultaneously. The method is discussed in a context that assumes heavy water as a by-product of the hydrogen

  16. Increasing the reliability of electric energy supply to consumers in ROMAG-PROD Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This work aims at achieving an analysis of time evolution of the status of electrical installations, their performances and reliability, at describing the refurbishment measures adopted, at assessing the efficiency of these measures and also to suggest solutions for improving the reliability in the electric energy supply of ROMAG-PROD Heavy Water Plant. The analysis started from the original design, the manner the electrical installations were mounted, the technological level of this equipment and gives an evaluation of the deficiencies and the evolution of incidents occurred during the operation period. On the basis of the experience gathered one advances new items for equipment renewing and refurbishment of electric installations which together with the existing ones would ensure an electric energy supply more secure and efficient, leading directly to a more safe and efficient operation of the ROMAG-PROD Heavy Water Plant. In this work the incidents of electric energy nature which occurred are analyzed, the equipment which generated events identified and measures to solve these problems proposed

  17. Production of heavy water. An analysis from export control point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main use for heavy water is in heavy water moderated nuclear reactors. This type of reactor is optimal for producing plutonium and therefore countries with nuclear weapons ambitions show interest for such reactors. Most equipment used in heavy water production facilities are under export control to prevent clandestine heavy water production. Heavy water is produced by increasing the concentration of deuterium in the water relative to natural hydrogen. For use in nuclear reactors the deuterium content has to be increased from 0,0155 % to more than 99,75 %. The enrichment can be achieved by several different processes where the GS-process (hydrogen-sulphide exchange) and ammonia-hydrogen exchange process are the two most cost efficient. The energy consumption for these processes is however relatively high. This is due to low separation efficiency which is caused by the relatively small difference in chemical properties between heavy water and natural water. FOI has, under contract work financed by SKI, performed a study of different production processes for heavy water and identified equipment used in the processes. The identified equipment includes both equipment under export control and other sensitive equipment which is important to prevent countries with nuclear weapons ambitions to acquire

  18. Plant life management processes and practices for heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, heavy water reactor (HWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) owners would like to keep their NPPs in service as long as they can be operated safely and economically. Their decisions are depending on essentially business model. They involve the consideration of a number of factors, such as the material condition of the plant, comparison with current safety standards, the socio-political climate and asset management/ business planning considerations. Continued plant operation, including operation beyond design life, called 'long term operation, depends, among other things, on the material condition of the plant. This is influenced significantly by the effectiveness of ageing management. Key attributes of an effective plant life management program include a focus on important systems, structure and components (SSCs) which are susceptible to ageing degradation, a balance of proactive and reactive ageing management programmes, and a team approach that ensures the co-ordination of and communication between all relevant nuclear power plant and external programmes. Most HWR NPP owners/operators use a mix of maintenance, surveillance and inspection (MSI) programs as the primary means of managing ageing. Often these programs are experienced-based and/or time-based and may not be optimised for detecting and/or managing ageing effects. From time-to-time, operational history has shown that this practice can be too reactive, as it leads to dealing with ageing effects (degradation of SSCs) after they have been detected. In many cases premature and/or undetected ageing cannot be traced back to one specific reason or an explicit error. The root cause is often a lack of communication, documentation and/or co-ordination between design, commissioning, operation or maintenance organizations. This lack of effective communication and interfacing frequently arises because, with the exception of major SSCs, such as the fuel channels or steam generators, there is a lack of explicit

  19. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition

  20. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems--including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells--and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  1. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems?including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells?and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  2. Pulse radiolysis studies of liquid heavy water at temperatures up to 250 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, C.R.; Ouellette, D.C.; Elliot, A.J

    2002-09-01

    This report documents the rate constants and associated activation energies for the reactions of the primary radical species, e{sub aq}{sup -}, {center_dot}OD and {center_dot}D, which are formed during the radiolysis of heavy water within the temperature range 20 to 250 {sup o}C. These heavy-water data have been compared with the corresponding information for light water. These kinetic data form part of the database that is required to model the aqueous radiation chemistry that occurs within the core of the heavy water cooled and moderated CANDU reactor. (author)

  3. Surface Water Modeling Using an EPA Computer Code for Tritiated Waste Water Discharge from the heavy Water Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium releases from the D-Area Heavy Water Facilities to the Savannah River have been analyzed. The U.S. EPA WASP5 computer code was used to simulate surface water transport for tritium releases from the D-Area Drum Wash, Rework, and DW facilities. The WASP5 model was qualified with the 1993 tritium measurements at U.S. Highway 301. At the maximum tritiated waste water concentrations, the calculated tritium concentration in the Savannah River at U.S. Highway 301 due to concurrent releases from D-Area Heavy Water Facilities varies from 5.9 to 18.0 pCi/ml as a function of the operation conditions of these facilities. The calculated concentration becomes the lowest when the batch releases method for the Drum Wash Waste Tanks is adopted

  4. Studying of Phenomenon of Biological Adaptation to Heavy Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological influence of deuterium on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eucaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates (methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, chemoheterotrophic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, photo-organotrophic halobacteria Halobacterium halobium, and green micro algae Chlorella vulgaris was investigated at the growth on media with heavy water (2H2O. For investigated microorganisms are submitted the data on growth and adaptation on the growth media containing as sources of deuterated substrates 2H2O, [2H]methanol and hydrolisates of deutero-biomass of methylotrophic bacteria B. methylicum, obtained after multistage adaptation to 2H2O. The qualitative and quantitative composition of intra- and endocellular amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and fatty acids in conditions of adaptation to 2H2O is investigated. It is shown, that the effects observed at adaptation to 2H2O, possess a complex multifactorial character and connected to cytological, morphological and physiological changes – the magnitude of the lag- period, time of cellular generation, output of biomass, a parity ratio of synthesized amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, and also with an evolutionary level of the organization of the investigated object and the pathways of assimilation of carbon substrates as well.

  5. Asymmetric Modeling of the Industrial Heavy Water Plant (PIAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Software of asymmetric stationary simulation for the Industrial Heavy Water Plant (PIAP) was developed, based on an existing symmetric simulator (Brigitte 2.0).This software allows to turn off some of the isotopic enrichment twin units present in the plant and to simulate them asymmetrically, in other words, with different selection of parameters between twins.Other incorporations were done, such as passing flows between units and entering flows in strategic points of the plant.The iterative system in which the symmetric simulator is based was insufficient to develop the asymmetric simulator, so the system was modeled according to an implicit scheme for the units that form the simulator.This type of resolution resulted in a simulator that supports a big range of boundary conditions and internal parameters.Moreover, the time of calculus is short (∼3 minutes), making it actually useful.The asymmetric simulator is at the PIAP now, for its study and validation. It shows expected tendencies and results according to the symmetric simulator already validated

  6. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage, (2) isotope exchange, 3) isotope analysis, (4) properties and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762. (author)

  7. Selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes (1981-1992)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, V. T.; Sutawane, U. B.; Rathi, B. N.

    A selected bibliography on heavy water, tritiated water and hydrogen isotopes is presented. This bibliography covers the period 1981-1992 and is in continuation to Division's earlier report BARC-1192 (1983). The sources of information for this compilation are Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atom Index and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in our library. No claim is made towards exhaustiveness of this bibliography even though sincere attempts have been made for a wide coverage. The bibliography is arranged under the headings: (1) production, purification, recovery, reprocessing and storage; (2) isotope exchange; (3) isotope analysis; (4) properties; and (5) miscellaneous. Total number of references in the bibliography are 1762.

  8. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  9. Pollution Status of Pakistan: A Retrospective Review on Heavy Metal Contamination of Water, Soil, and Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Waseem; Jahanzaib Arshad; Farhat Iqbal; Ashif Sajjad; Zahid Mehmood; Ghulam Murtaza

    2014-01-01

    Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food c...

  10. Heavy metal ions adsorption from mine waters by sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bogdanović

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the results on the batch and column adsorption of copper and some associated ions by employing linden and poplar sawdust as a low-cost adsorbent are presented. The mine water from a local abandoned copper mine, as well as synthetic solutions of those ions which are the main constituents of the mine water were both used as a model-system in this study. The adsorption ability of the chosen sawdust to adsorb heavy metal ions is considered as a function of the initial pH of the solution and kind of metal ions. At lower pH of solutions the adsorption percentage (AD % decreases leading to a zero AD % at pH < 1.1. Maximum AD % is achieved at 3.5 < pH < 5. It was found that poplar and linden sawdust have both almost equal adsorption capacities against copper ions. The highest AD % ( ≈80% was achieved for Cu2+, while for Fe2+ it was slightly above 10%. The other considered ions (Zn2+ and Mn2+ were within this interval. The results obtained in the batch mode were verified through the column test by using the real mine water originating from an acid mine drainage (AMD of the copper mine „Cerovo“, RTB Bor. The breakthrough curves are presented as a function of the aqueous phase volume passed through the column allowing having an insight into the column adsorption features. Breakthrough points were determined for copper, manganese and zinc ions. A very high adsorption degree – higher than 99% was achieved in these experiments for all mentioned ions. After completing the adsorption, instead of desorption, the loaded sawdust was drained, dried and burned; the copper bearing ash was then leached with a controlled volume of sulphuric acid solution to concentrate copper therein. The obtained leach solution had the concentration of copper higher than 15 g dm-3 and the amount of H2SO4 high enough to serve as a supporting electrolyte suitable to be treated by the electrowinning for recovery of copper. The technology process based on the column

  11. Achieving safety through the design process for the heavy water new product reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is presently completing the Conceptual Design Phase (CDP) for a heavy water new production reactor (NPR). In undertaking the development of requirements for the heavy water NPR, the DOE defined as a principal requirement that the reactor would be designed such that it would meet or exceed the level of safety and safety assurance achieved by modern commercial nuclear power plants. This paper discusses the strategy and methodology of implementing the line responsibilities for achieving safety in the design of the heavy water NPR

  12. A Management Strategy for the Heavy Water Reflector Cooling System of HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. S.; Park, Y. C.; Lim, S. P. (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Heavy water is used as the reflector and the moderator of the HANARO research reactor. After over 10 years operation since first criticality in 1995 there arose some operational issues related with the tritium. A task force team(TFT) has been operated for 1 year since September 2006 to study and deduce resolutions of the issues concerning the tritium and the degradation of heavy water in the HANARO reflector system. The TFT drew many recommendations on the hardware upgrade, tritium containing air control, heavy water quality management, waste management, and tritium measurement system upgrade.

  13. Containment for Heavy-Water Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety principles applicable to heavy-water, gas-cooled reactors are outlined, with a view to establishing containment specifications adapted to the sites available in Switzerland for the construction of nuclear plants. These specifications are derived from dose rates considered acceptable, in the event of a serious reactor accident, for persons living near the plant, and are based on-meteorological and demographic conditions representative of the majority of the country's sites. The authors consider various designs for the containment shell, taking into account the conditions which would exist in the shell after the maximum credible accident. The following types of shell are studied: pre-stressed concrete; pre-stressed concrete with steel dome; pre-stressed concrete with inner, leakproof steel lining; steel with concrete side shield to protect against radiation; double shell. The degree of leak proofing of the shells studied is regarded as a feature of the particular design and not as a fixed constructional specification. The authors assess the leak proofing properties of each type of shell and establish building costs for each of them on the basis of precise plans, with the collaboration of various specialized firms. They estimate the effectiveness of the various shells from a safety standpoint, in relation to different emergency procedures, in particular release into the atmosphere through appropriate filters and decontamination of the air within the shell by recycling through batteries of filters. The paper contains a very detailed comparison of about 10 cases corresponding to various combinations of design and emergency procedure; the comparison was made using a computer programme specially established for the purpose. The results are compared with those for a reactor of the same type and power, but assembled together with the heat exchangers in a pre-stressed concrete shell. (author)

  14. Heavy metal contamination of soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site: implications for dissemination of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qihang; Leung, Jonathan Y S; Geng, Xinhua; Chen, Shejun; Huang, Xuexia; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Zhuying; Zhu, Libin; Chen, Jiahao; Lu, Yayin

    2015-02-15

    Illegal e-waste recycling activity has caused heavy metal pollution in many developing countries, including China. In recent years, the Chinese government has strengthened enforcement to impede such activity; however, the heavy metals remaining in the abandoned e-waste recycling site can still pose ecological risk. The present study aimed to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site in Longtang, South China. Results showed that the surface soil of the former burning and acid-leaching sites was still heavily contaminated with Cd (>0.39 mg kg(-1)) and Cu (>1981 mg kg(-1)), which exceeded their respective guideline levels. The concentration of heavy metals generally decreased with depth in both burning site and paddy field, which is related to the elevated pH and reduced TOM along the depth gradient. The pond water was seriously acidified and contaminated with heavy metals, while the well water was slightly contaminated since heavy metals were mostly retained in the surface soil. The use of pond water for irrigation resulted in considerable heavy metal contamination in the paddy soil. Compared with previous studies, the reduced heavy metal concentrations in the surface soil imply that heavy metals were transported to the other areas, such as pond. Therefore, immediate remediation of the contaminated soil and water is necessary to prevent dissemination of heavy metals and potential ecological disaster.

  15. A Better Method for Evaluating Heavy Metal Water Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Hering, Janet

    2002-01-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, and even trace amounts of some, can be harmful to both plants and animals. The toxicity of heavy metal contamination, however, is highly dependent on the chemical form of the metal in question. Metals that are bound in particles or to organic (carbon-containing) compounds are less toxic than dissolved free ions, less toxic meaning that the metals are less readily available for uptake by marine organisms.

  16. A Review of Laboratory-Scale Research on Upgrading Heavy Oil in Supercritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand for energy and the depletion of conventional crude oil, heavy oil in huge reserve has attracted extensive attention. However, heavy oil cannot be directly refined by existing processes unless they are upgraded due to its complex composition and high concentration of heteroatoms (N, S, Ni, V, etc.. Of the variety of techniques for heavy oil upgrading, supercritical water (SCW is gaining popularity because of its excellent ability to convert heavy oil into valued, clean light oil by the suppression of coke formation and the removal of heteroatoms. Based on the current status of this research around the world, heavy oil upgrading in SCW is summarized from three aspects: Transformation of hydrocarbons, suppression of coke, and removal of heteroatoms. In this work, the challenge and future development of the orientation of upgrading heavy oil in SCW are pointed out.

  17. Adsorption Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Ions from Drinking Water by Weakly Basic Anion Exchange Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵璇; 何仕均; 杨磊

    2002-01-01

    Heavy metal micro-contaminants can be removed from water sources technologies. Weakly basic anion exchange resins offer the best ability to remove trace amounts of heavy metals with high selectivity. This paper discusses how weakly basic resins adsorb heavy metals using two different approaches. The removal of mercury, cadmium, and lead ions is based on the fundamental theory of coordination chemistry. The mechanism is not ion exchange but extractive adsorption of heavy metal salts. However, the marked preferential adsorption of chromate by weakly basic anion exchange can be explained using the traditional theory of ion exchange. A lab-scale study produced positive results for the removal of trace amounts of heavy metal ions from drinking water.

  18. A study on the establishment of component/equipment performance criteria considering Heavy Water Reactor characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Keun Sun; Kwon, Young Chul; Lee, Min Kyu; Lee, Yun Soo [Sunmoon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Seong Hoong; Ryo, Chang Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soong Pyung; Hwnag, Jung Rye; Chung, Chul Kee [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Foreign and domestic technology trends, regulatory requirements, design and researches for heavy water reactors are analyzed. Safety design guides of Canada industry and regulatory documents and consultative documents of Canada regulatory agency are reviewed. Applicability of MOST guidance 16 Revision 'guidance for technical criteria of nuclear reactor facility' is reviewed. Specific performance criteria are established for components and facilities for heavy water reactor.

  19. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO2/Al2O3 over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  20. Hydrothermally modified fly ash for heavy metals and dyes removal in advanced wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visa, Maria; Chelaru, Andreea-Maria

    2014-06-01

    Fly ash resulted from coal burning is a waste that can be used in wastewater treatment for removal of dyes and heavy metals by adsorption. Class “F” fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO2/Al2O3 over 2.4 was used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for dyes and heavy metals from wastewater. A new material was obtained from modified fly ash with NaOH and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) a cationic surfactant. Contact time, optimum amount of substrate and the pH corresponding to 50 mL solution of pollutants were the parameters optimized for obtaining the maximum efficiency in the adsorption process. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The adsorption kinetic mechanisms, and the substrate capacities are further discussed correlated with the surface structure (XRD), composition (EDS, FTIR), and morphology (SEM, AFM). The results indicate that the novel nano-substrate composite with fly ash modified can be used as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for simultaneous removal of dyes and heavy metals, the resulted water respects the discharge regulations.

  1. [Advance in the bioavailability monitoring of heavy metal based on microbial whole-cell sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qi-Hui; Ma, An-Shou; Zhuang, Xiu-Liang; Zhuang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microbial whole-cell biosensor is an excellent tool to assess the bioavailability of heavy metal in soil and water. However, the traditional physicochemical instruments are applied to detect the total metal. Furthermore, microbial whole-cell biosensor is simple, rapid and economical in manipulating, and is thus a highly qualified candidate for emergency detection of pollution incidents. The biological component of microbial whole-cell biosensor mostly consists of metalloregulatory proteins and reporter genes. In detail, metalloregulatory proteins mainly include the MerR family, ArsR family and RS family, and reporter genes mainly include gfp, lux and luc. Metalloregulatory protein and reporter gene are related to the sensitivity, specificity and properties in monitoring. The bioavailability of heavy metals is alterable under different conditions, influenced by pH, chelate and detection methods and so on. Increasing the accumulation of intracellular heavy metal, modifying the metalloregulatory proteins and optimizing the detecting conditions are important for improving the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the microbial whole-cell biosensor. The future direction of microbial whole-cell biosensor is to realize the monitoring of pollutions in situ and on line. PMID:23487961

  2. Selective Extraction of Heavy and Light Lanthanides from Aqueous Solution by Advanced Magnetic Nanosorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijin; McDowell, Rocklan G; Martin, Leigh R; Qiang, You

    2016-04-13

    Rare earth elements (REEs) make unique and vital contributions to our current world of technology. Separating and recycling REEs is of great importance to diversify the sources of REEs and advance the efficient use of REE resources when the supply is limited. In light of separation nanotechnology, diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) functionalized magnetic nanosorbents have been synthesized and investigated for the highly selective extraction of heavy (Sm-Ho) and light (La-Nd) lanthanides (Ln) from aqueous solutions. The results demonstrated that the separation factor (SF) between heavy-Ln and light-Ln groups reached the maximal value of 11.5 at low pH value of 2.0 in 30 min. For example, the SFs of Gd/La and Dy/La pairs were up to 10 times higher than that reported by other studies. Besides the excellent selectivity, our double-coated magnetic nanoparticles coupled with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (dMNP-DTPA) nanosorbents are more advantageous in that the Ln(III) sorption was effectively and quickly (in 30 min) achieved in acid solutions with pH values as low as 2.0. Such attributes ensure a stronger adaptability to the harsh environments of REE recycling processes. Displacement phenomena were subsequently observed between the heavy-Ln and light-Ln ions that were coexisting in solution and competing for the same sorption sites, causing the increase in sorption capacity of heavy Ln on the surface of nanosorbents with time. The order of affinity of Ln(III) to DTPA-functionalized magnetic nanosorbents perfectly followed the corresponding stability constants between Ln(III) and nonimmobilized DTPA. Displacement phenomena and lanthanide contraction, as well as the surface nanostructures of DTPA-functionalized nanosorbents, significantly improved the separation factors of heavy-Ln/light-Ln pairs. The Ln(III) interaction with DTPA-functionalized magnetic nanosorbents followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics with a correlation coefficient extremely high and

  3. Technology breakthrough by Heavy Water Board in material support to Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy Water Board (HWB) is the sole agency in the country for production and sustained supply of heavy water, nuclear grade solvents and enriched elemental boron which are the key input material for Indian Nuclear Power Programme. DAE has ventured to develop heavy water technology indigenously starting from scratch. H2S-H2O bi-thermal process was developed starting from laboratory studies to pilot plant and breakthrough was achieved by setting up first industrial plant at Kota and double capacity plant at Manuguru. In early 1960's, NH3-H2 mono-thermal process was at nascent stage of development. The rich experience from first industrial plant set up at Baroda has led to success story in second generation plants at Thal and Hazira, totally with indigenous efforts. NH3-H2O front-end process had also been developed for ammonia based Heavy Water Plants (HWPs) making them independent of fertilizer plants. Performance indicators of operating HWPs have reached the zenith level. India is the largest global producer of heavy water and is the only country using multiple technologies. HWB is also fulfilling the global demand of high quality heavy water. HWB has diversified into other activities like industrial production of other nuclear materials and development of spin off technologies. (author)

  4. Comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water and heavy water under pulsed power conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Saurabh, K.; Nasir,; Anitha, V. P.; Chowdhuri, M. B.; Shyam, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2016-01-15

    A comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water (H{sub 2}O) and heavy water (D{sub 2}O) is presented with two different electrode materials (stainless steel (SS) and brass) and polarity (positive and negative) combinations. The pulsed (∼a few tens of nanoseconds) discharges are conducted by applying high voltage (∼a few hundred kV) pulse between two hemisphere electrodes of the same material, spaced 3 mm apart, at room temperature (∼26-28 °C) with the help of Tesla based pulse generator. It is observed that breakdown occurred in heavy water at lesser voltage and in short duration compared to deionized water irrespective of the electrode material and applied voltage polarity chosen. SS electrodes are seen to perform better in terms of the voltage withstanding capacity of the liquid dielectric as compared to brass electrodes. Further, discharges with negative polarity are found to give slightly enhanced discharge breakdown voltage when compared with those with positive polarity. The observations corroborate well with conductivity measurements carried out on original and post-treated liquid samples. An interpretation of the observations is attempted using Fourier transform infrared measurements on original and post-treated liquids as well as in situ emission spectra studies. A yet another important observation from the emission spectra has been that even short (nanosecond) duration discharges result in the formation of a considerable amount of ions injected into the liquid from the electrodes in a similar manner as reported for long (microseconds) discharges. The experimental observations show that deionised water is better suited for high voltage applications and also offer a comparison of the discharge behaviour with different electrodes and polarities.

  5. Comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water and heavy water under pulsed power conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veda Prakash, G.; Kumar, R.; Saurabh, K.; Nasir, Anitha, V. P.; Chowdhuri, M. B.; Shyam, A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O) is presented with two different electrode materials (stainless steel (SS) and brass) and polarity (positive and negative) combinations. The pulsed (˜a few tens of nanoseconds) discharges are conducted by applying high voltage (˜a few hundred kV) pulse between two hemisphere electrodes of the same material, spaced 3 mm apart, at room temperature (˜26-28 °C) with the help of Tesla based pulse generator. It is observed that breakdown occurred in heavy water at lesser voltage and in short duration compared to deionized water irrespective of the electrode material and applied voltage polarity chosen. SS electrodes are seen to perform better in terms of the voltage withstanding capacity of the liquid dielectric as compared to brass electrodes. Further, discharges with negative polarity are found to give slightly enhanced discharge breakdown voltage when compared with those with positive polarity. The observations corroborate well with conductivity measurements carried out on original and post-treated liquid samples. An interpretation of the observations is attempted using Fourier transform infrared measurements on original and post-treated liquids as well as in situ emission spectra studies. A yet another important observation from the emission spectra has been that even short (nanosecond) duration discharges result in the formation of a considerable amount of ions injected into the liquid from the electrodes in a similar manner as reported for long (microseconds) discharges. The experimental observations show that deionised water is better suited for high voltage applications and also offer a comparison of the discharge behaviour with different electrodes and polarities.

  6. Comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water and heavy water under pulsed power conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study of electrical breakdown properties of deionized water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O) is presented with two different electrode materials (stainless steel (SS) and brass) and polarity (positive and negative) combinations. The pulsed (∼a few tens of nanoseconds) discharges are conducted by applying high voltage (∼a few hundred kV) pulse between two hemisphere electrodes of the same material, spaced 3 mm apart, at room temperature (∼26-28 °C) with the help of Tesla based pulse generator. It is observed that breakdown occurred in heavy water at lesser voltage and in short duration compared to deionized water irrespective of the electrode material and applied voltage polarity chosen. SS electrodes are seen to perform better in terms of the voltage withstanding capacity of the liquid dielectric as compared to brass electrodes. Further, discharges with negative polarity are found to give slightly enhanced discharge breakdown voltage when compared with those with positive polarity. The observations corroborate well with conductivity measurements carried out on original and post-treated liquid samples. An interpretation of the observations is attempted using Fourier transform infrared measurements on original and post-treated liquids as well as in situ emission spectra studies. A yet another important observation from the emission spectra has been that even short (nanosecond) duration discharges result in the formation of a considerable amount of ions injected into the liquid from the electrodes in a similar manner as reported for long (microseconds) discharges. The experimental observations show that deionised water is better suited for high voltage applications and also offer a comparison of the discharge behaviour with different electrodes and polarities

  7. Heavy water reactor user requirement document status and path forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a Power Point presentation containing: -1. Outline; - 2. Background - Stages and the HWR-URD; - 3. Background - What do we have now?; - 4. Draft 'D0' of the HWR-URD; - 5. The 2001 April Consultancy; - 6. The Path Forward. - 7. Summary. The 2001 April consultancy addressed the following items: - 1. Status of the URD: - The document structure is substantially complete. Appendices or paragraphs need to be added on some topics; - The URD covers the overall requirements for the design of the nuclear island (NI) and interfaces to the BOP for future HWRs. It contains policies, high-level requirements and important requirements for key areas that are of interest to HWR users; - The draft focuses on horizontal-pressure-tube, heavy water moderated and cooled HWRs. When and if other types need to be considered, the TWG will identify these and direct how they are to be addressed; - The level of detail in the draft and its treatment of the international aspects of the topic are appropriate; - 2. Areas needing further consideration: - While intended for future reactors, it is recognized that regulators may wish to use the URD as a benchmark for evaluating existing or replicate reactors; - The international aspects of the URD require detailed review at each stage of its development; - The EUR and EPRI-URD have had targeted reviews by the regulators. This may be appropriate for the HWR-URD but would add 6 to 12 months to the schedule; - These items will be the focus of the AGM planned for 2002 January. The Path Forward section pinpoints the terms: - 2001 August, implying the task, incorporate comments from April Consultancy, producing draft D1; - 2002 January, implying AGM in Vienna, namely, focus on areas needing further consideration: - Ensure requirements are clearly differentiated from desirable features; - Confirm international aspects are appropriately considered; - Establish need for additional step - regulatory review; - 2002, implying revise URD to reflect

  8. Advanced feed water distributing system for WWER 440 steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J. [Energovyzkum Ltd, Brno (Switzerland); Grazl, K. [Vitkovice s.c., Ostrava (Switzerland); Tischler, J.; Mihalik, M. [SEP Atomove Elektrarne Bohunice (Slovakia)

    1995-12-31

    The original designed feed water distributing system was replaced by an advanced one. The characteristics of both feed water distributing systems have been measured and evaluated. The paper deals with the problems of measurement and evaluation of both feed water distributing system characteristics and comparison of statistical data obtained. (orig.). 3 refs.

  9. Investigation of Toxic Heavy Metals in Drinking Water of Agra City, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Susan Verghese

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water quality of Agra city is impaired by the presence of large number of industries in the city. From the observed data it is found that drinking water of Agra city is contaminated with toxic heavy metals like chromium, copper, cadmium, lead, and nickel. Among all these heavy metals, chromium is found to be in comparatively large amounts because most of the leather industries located in Agra city adopt chrome tanning procedure as their basic step for dehairing and dehiding. Presence of high concentration of chromium and other heavy metals in drinking water pose deleterious effects on the health of human beings therefore it becomes necessary to employ certain technological methods to keep the concentration of such toxic heavy metals within their desirable limits.

  10. USING BIOPOLYMERS TO REMOVE HEAVY METALS FROM SOIL AND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy me...

  11. Studying of Phenomenon of Biological Adaptation to Heavy Water

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Mosin; Ignat Ignatov; Dmitry Skladnev; Vitaly Shvets

    2014-01-01

    Biological influence of deuterium on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eucaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates (methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, chemoheterotrophic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, photo-organotrophic halobacteria Halobacterium halobium, and green micro algae Chlorella vulgaris) was investigated at the growth on media with heavy wate...

  12. DETERMINATION OF HEAVY METALS IN FISH, WATER AND SEDIMENTS OF AVSAR DAM LAKE IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Öztürk ، G. Özözen ، O. Minareci ، E. Minareci

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, some heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni and Pb were seasonally determined in water, sediment and some tissues of Cyprinus carpio from Avsar Dam Lake, which is an important water source for irrigation and drinking in Turkey. Heavy metal levels in water, sediment and fish samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP/AES. The obtained results showed that the average values of Fe in water samples were higher than the respective reference values for fresh water. Results for levels in water were compared with national and international water quality guidelines, as well as literature data reported for the lakes. The analysis of heavy metals in sediments indicated that among the six heavy metals tested, Fe was maximally accumulated, followed by Ni, Cu, Cr, Pb and Cd. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in sequence of the Cyprinus carpio samples, in the muscle and stomach-intestine as Fe > Cu > Pb> Ni > Cr > Cd; in the gill, heart and liver as Fe > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr > Cd and in the air sac as Fe > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cd >Cr. In the fish samples, cadmium, chromium, nickel and lead concentrations exceeded the tolerable values provided by international institutions.

  13. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  14. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2003-06-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  15. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2003-09-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  16. Advanced Methods for Treatment of Organic Compounds Contamined Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDESCU Andra

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The progress recorded in the field of science and advanced engineering at nanometric scale supplies largeopportunities for more efficient (from the point of view of the costs and more ecological approach of the processes ofwater purifying. This paper delivers a short description of the possibilities of using advanced materials in purifying thecontamined water with toxic metallic ions, organic and anorganic compounds. The opportunities and challenges werealso emphasized when nanomaterials were used for the surface, underground and industrial used waters treatment.

  17. Study of Advanced Oxidation System for Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hygiene water is still a big problem globally as well as energy and food, especially in Indonesia where more than 70 % lived in Java island. One of the efforts in treating hygiene water is to recycle the used water. In this case it is needed clean water technology. Many methods have been done, this paper describes the advanced oxidation technology system based on ozone, titania and plasma discharge. (author)

  18. Using biopolymers to remove heavy metals from soil and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Frederick, R.M.

    1993-11-19

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy metals. The biopolymers discussed are chitin and chitosan, modified starch, cellulose, and polymer-containing algae. (Copyright (c) Remediation 1994.)

  19. [Pollution Characteristics and Potential Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals in Urban Surface Water Sediments from Yongkang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peng; Yu, Shu-quan; Zhang, Chao; Liang, Li-cheng; Che, Ji-lu

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the pollution characteristics of heavy metals in surface water sediments of Yongkang, we analyzed the concentrations of 10 heavy metals including Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Fe in 122 sediment samples, explored the underlying source of heavy metals and then assessed the potential ecological risks of those metals by methods of the index of geo-accumulation and the potential ecological risk. The study results showed that: 10 heavy metal contents followed the order: Fe > Ti > Mn > Zn > Cr > Cu > Ph > Ni > As > Co, all heavy metals except for Ti were 1. 17 to 3.78 times higher than those of Zhejiang Jinhua- Quzhou basin natural soils background values; The concentrations of all heavy metals had a significantly correlation between each other, indicating that those heavy metals had similar sources of pollution, and it mainly came from industrial and vehicle pollutions; The pollution extent of heavy metals in sediments by geo-accumulation index (Igeo) followed the order: Cr > Zn > Ni > Cu > Fe > As > Pb >Mn > Ti, thereinto, Cr, Zn, Cu and Ni were moderately polluted or heavily polluted at some sampling sites; The potential ecological risk of 9 heavy metals in sediments were in the following order: Cu > As > Ni > Cr > Pb > Co > Zn > Mn > Ti, Cu and As contributed the most to the total potential ecological risk, accounting for 22.84% and 21. 62% , others had a total of 55.54% , through the ecological risk assessment, 89. 34% of the potential ecological risk indexes ( RI) were low and 10. 66% were higher. The contamination level of heavy metals in Yongkang was slight in total, but was heavy in local areas.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water based on graphite conch method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlong; Liu, Jianguo; Zhao, Nanjing; Shi, Huan; Liu, Lituo; Ma, Mingjun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Wenqing

    2012-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission characteristics of trace heavy metal lead in water is studied based on graphite conch method, with a 1064nm wavelength Nd: YAG laser as excitation source, the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector are used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. The delay time 900ns and gate time 1600ns are determined in the experiment. The calibration curve of Pb is plotted based on the different concentration measurement results, and a limit of detection of 0.0138mg / L is obtained for Pb in water. Graphite conch method effectively overcomes the current problems on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy detection of heavy metal in water. The detection limits and stability are improved. The reference data is provided for further study on the fast measurement of trace heavy metals in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique.

  1. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats. PMID:27506174

  2. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site.

  3. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site

  4. Toenail as a biomarker of heavy metal exposure via drinking water: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Razak, Nurul Hafiza; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Hashim, Zailina

    2015-01-01

    Toenail is metabolic end product of the skin, which can provide information about heavy metal accumulation in human cells. Slow growth rates of toenail can represent heavy metal exposure from 2 to 12 months before the clipping. The toenail is a non-invasive biomarker that is easy to collect and store and is stable over time. In this systematic review, the suitability of toenail as a long-term biomarker was reviewed, along with the analysis and validation of toenail and confounders to heavy metal. This systematic review has included 30 articles chosen from a total of 132 articles searched from online electronic databases like Pubmed, Proquest, Science Direct, and SCOPUS. Keywords used in the search included "toenail", "biomarker", "heavy metal", and "drinking water". Heavy metal in toenail can be accurately analyzed using an ICP-MS instrument. The validation of toenail heavy metal concentration data is very crucial; however, the Certified Reference Material (CRM) for toenail is still unavailable. Usually, CRM for hair is used in toenail studies. Confounders that have major effects on heavy metal accumulation in toenail are dietary intake of food and supplement, smoking habit, and overall health condition. This review has identified the advantages and limitations of using toenail as a biomarker for long-term exposure, which can help future researchers design a study on heavy metal exposure using toenail.

  5. Reduction of bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals during vermicomposting of water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jiwan; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2013-12-01

    Vermicomposting of water hyacinth is a good alternative for the treatment of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and subsequentially, beneficial for agriculture purposes. The bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd, and Cr) were evaluated during vermicomposting of E. crassipes employing Eisenia fetida earthworm. Five different proportions (trials 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of cattle manure, water hyacinth, and sawdust were prepared for the vermicomposting process. Results show that very poor biomass growth of earthworms was observed in the highest proportion of water hyacinth (trial 1). The water soluble, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable, and leachable heavy metals concentration (percentage of total heavy metals) were reduced significantly in all trials except trial 1. The total concentration of some metals was low but its water soluble and DTPA extractable fractions were similar or more than other metals which were present in higher concentration. This study revealed that the toxicity of metals depends on bioavailable fraction rather than total metal concentration. Bioavailable fraction of metals may be toxic for plants and soil microorganisms. The vermicomposting of water hyacinth by E. fetida was very effective for reduction of bioavailability and leachability of selected heavy metals. Leachability test confirmed that prepared vermicompost is not hazardous for soil, plants, and human health. The feasibility of earthworms to mitigate the metal toxicity and to enhance the nutrient profile in water hyacinth vermicompost might be useful in sustainable land renovation practices at low-input basis. PMID:23757026

  6. Water Quality and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Sediment of Sungai Kelantan, Kelantan, Malaysia: A Baseline Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on water quality and heavy metal concentration in sediment at selected sites of Sungai Kelantan was carried out. Ten water samples were collected along the river for physical and chemical analysis and twenty-six water and sediment samples were collected for heavy metal analysis. Water was sampled at three different dates throughout the study period whereas sediments were collected once. In addition to heavy metal analysis, sediment samples were also analysed for texture, ph and organic content. The physical and chemical water quality analyses were carried out according to the ALPHA procedures. Result of water quality analysis (physico-chemical) indicated that Sungai Kelantan is characterised by excellent water quality and comparable to pristine ecosystems such as the National Park and Kenyir Lake. This river was classified into class I - class III based on Malaysian interim water quality standard criteria (INWQS). Heavy metals Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd was detected at low concentration in sediment samples, except for Fe and Mn. The presence of Fe and Mn in sediment samples was though to be of natural origin from the soil. Anthropogenic metal concentrations in sediment were low indicating that Sungai Kelantan has not experienced extreme pollution. (author)

  7. The possibility for application of zeolite in the treatment of water contaminated with heavy metals

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Mirjana; Krstev, Boris; Golomeov, Blagoj; Blažev, Krsto; Krstev, Aleksandar; Zendelska, Afrodita

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals are one of the most serious threats to the aquatic environment. Mine drainage, which present complex of elements may cause various harmful effects on wildlife, but unfortunately are treat rare. There are many technologies for treating water contaminated with heavy metals, mainly divided into two broad categories: passive and active treatment. Passive treatments are cheaper and do not require special equipment or chemicals, while the active treatment are more complex and higher...

  8. Assessment of irradiation effects on beryllium reflector and heavy water tank of JRR-3M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Yoji; Kakehuda, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    The JRR-3M, a swimming pool type research reactor with beryllium and heavy water reflectors, has been operated since 1990. Since the beryllium reflectors are close to fuel and receive high fast neutron fluence in a relatively short time, they may be subject to change their dimensions by swelling due mostly to entrapped helium gaseous. This may bend the reflectors to the outside and narrow gaps between the reflectors and the fuel elements. The gaps have been measured with an ultrasonic thickness gage in an annual inspection. The results in 1996 show that the maximum of expansion in the diametral directions was 0.6 mm against 1.6 mm of a managed value for replacement of the reflector. A heavy water tank of the JRR-3M is made of aluminum alloy A5052. Surveillance tests of the alloy have been conducted to evaluate irradiation effects of the heavy water tank. Five sets of specimens of the alloy have been irradiated in the beryllium reflectors where fast neutron flux is higher than that in the heavy water tank. In 1994, one set of specimens had been unloaded and carried out the post-irradiation tests. The results show that the heavy water tank preserved satisfactory mechanical properties. (author)

  9. Advanced control of a water supply system: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Rajewicz, T.; Kien, H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional automatic production flow control and pump pressure control of water supply systems are robust and simple: production flow is controlled based on the level in the clear water reservoir and pump pressure is controlled on a static set-point. Recently, more advanced computer-based control

  10. Hot functional testing of the pressurized heavy water reactor plant Atucha II with light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two pressurized heavy water reactors PHWR Atucha I (designed and built by S/KWU, now AREVA), and Atucha II (designed by S/KWU and plant construction now completed by NA-SA) are owned by Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NA-SA). Atucha II was designed in the 1980'ies in parallel to the two most recent S/KWU PWR generations Prekonvoi and Konvoi. Its basic design has been updated and optimized including also backfitting of components and systems for severe accident management. The gross electric power of the plant is 745 MWe. Construction and commissioning of Atucha II has been resumed by NA-SA after a work stop in the 1990'ies and is now almost completed. Hot functional testing HFT was performed in two phases in September and October 2013 and in March and April 2014. Hot functional testing was performed with light water and the fuel assemblies loaded. The chemistry program for the HFT was derived from practices and experience gathered at other S/KWU designed PWRs during HFTs and consisted of the following main targets and requirements: (1) Low chloride and sulfate concentrations close to normal operation values specified in the VGB water chemistry guideline for power operation of PWR plants; (2) Thorough oxygen removal during heat-up and reducing conditions through N2H4 dosing; (3) High pH value (target range 1.5 to 2 ppm Li); (4) Passivation treatment of the nuclear steam supply system NSSS at temperatures of at least 260°C for a time period of at least 120 hours; (5) Zinc addition at a constant rate of 20 g Zn per day throughout the various HFT phases. Zinc dosing was begun during the first heat-up of the plant at temperatures above approx. 150°C. Daily measurement of the zinc concentration for process control was not necessary and not required due to the elaborated zinc application procedure. The main results of the chemistry program for the HFT of plant are described and evaluated in this contribution. Data shows that all chemistry targets were met

  11. Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on further concept and technology development and verification at the pilot scale of an MSE technology developed by 3M. The technology shows great promise to substantially decrease energy and water consumption in bioethanol production.

  12. Contribution of Heavy Water Board in nuclear fuel cycle technologies. Contributed Paper IT-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three stage Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilization as its mainstay for long term energy security on sustainable basis. India is committed to realize this objective through the development and deployment of frontier technologies pertaining to all aspects of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Comprehensive indigenous capabilities have been developed in all aspects of nuclear power and associated fuel cycles. Heavy Water Board (HWB), with its abiding objective of fulfilling demand of heavy water for India's flourishing nuclear power program, is one of the frontrunner in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology. HWB is now engaged in wide spectrum of activities in various facets of fuel cycle covering all the three stages of Indian Nuclear Power Programme. HWB is contributing to Nuclear Fuel Cycle through large scale production and sustained supply of key input materials including heavy water, solvents for nuclear hydrometallurgy, 10B enriched boron etc

  13. Antifoaming materials in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Thermical stability. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). About twenty commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their thermical stability. (Author)

  14. The study heavy metals in water,soil and Vegatable in Shahroud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saied Nazemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The arrival of toxic metals by human activities has lead to the contamination of soil. Heavy metals are among the most important pollutants in the environment. This study aimed at determining the concentration of heavy metals in soils, water and vegetables of Shhnama region in Shahroud. Methods: Vegetables studied included parsley, leek, leaf beet, fenugreek, cress, basil, radish and the coriander. The sampling was performed during 3 months, from September to October, 2008. The collected 180 samples of vegetables, water, soil, after preparation by atomic absorption Spectrophotometers, were analyzed according to standard methods. Results: Mean concentration values of lead, cadmium, chromium, arsenic and zinc in vegetable samples were, respectively 23.99, 2.09, 5.4, 5.26, 168.4 micrograms per gram of plant tissue. Mean concentrations of heavy metals in water were, respectively, 7.55, 4.85, 0.78, 12.83 and 347.99 mg per liter in water samples. Mean concentrations of heavy metals in soil were, respectively, 81.12, 14.43, 134.32, 19.08 and 435 micrograms, per gram of soil sample. Comparing the mean concentration values for heavy metals available in vegetables, water and soil with standard values, significant differences are observed except for Zn. Concentration values of lead, cadmium, chromium and arsenic in vegetables were higher than the common values. Conclusion: The results indicate that due to the use of synthetic fertilizers, unsanitary disposal of sewage and fossil fuel combustion, water, soil and plants of the region are polluted with heavy metals.

  15. Concentration of heavy metals in water and chub, Leuciscus cephalus (Linn.) from the river Yildiz, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agtas, Semsettin; Gey, Huseyin; Gul, Suleyman

    2007-10-01

    The concentration of heavy metals (Cu, Fe and Zn) were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in the river water and the edible muscle tissues of chub, Leuciscus cephalus, from river Yildiz, Turkey, and in the waste water The following results were found in the water of the river Yildiz: Cu 0.03-0.53, Fe 0.91-1.96 and Zn, 053-1.49 microgl(-1), in the waste water Cu 0.20-0.52, Fe 1.22-2.29 and Zn 0.92-1.46 microgl(-1) and in the edible muscle of chub: Cu 1.00-3.79, Fe 7.21-17.04 and Zn 4.12-18.33 microg g(-1) wet weight respectively. Among the heavy metals studied Pb, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni and Mn were not detected in the river water, waste water and chub samples. Heavy metal contents in these samples were evaluated and the highest concentrations of Cu, Fe and Zn were found in the muscle tissue. The levels of the heavy metals were detected in decreasing order as iron> zinc> copper. All the samples contained comparatively lower amounts of metals as suggested by international and national regulatory bodies. Thus, we recommend periodic monitoring of these metals in the fish consumed by local people.

  16. Hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes handling experience in heavy water production and related industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprea, J.L. [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Comahue Univ., Neuquen (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    Beyond the conventional applications in the chemical, petrochemical, food and other process industries, hydrogen is also used in nuclear-related industries, where it is required as an active ingredient in large-scale processes to produce heavy water. The experience obtained during the design, construction and operation of such industrial installations, which use hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogen-containing compounds can contribute in favor of the development of safer hydrogen energy facilities. Thus, material selection, properties degradation studies and preventing technologies applied in the heavy water operations are useful tools that will help to overtake the transition towards the hydrogen civilization. (Author)

  17. Selection of the process for the heavy water production using isotopic exchange amonia-hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of the Petroleos Mexicanos ammonia plants for heavy water production by the isotopic exchange NH3-H2 process is presented, in addition a description of the other heavy water production processes was presented. In the ammonia hydrogen process exist two possible alternatives for the operation of the system, one of them is to carry out the enrichment to the same temperature, the second consists in making the enrichment at two different temperatures (dual temperature process), an analysis was made to select the best alternative. The conclusion was that the best operation is the dual temperature process, which presents higher advantages according to the thermodynamics and engineering of the process. (author)

  18. HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN WASTE WATER SAMPLES FROM VALEA ŞESEI TAILING POND

    OpenAIRE

    I. L. MELENTI; E. MAGYAR; T. RUSU

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metal analysis in waste water samples from Valea Şesei tailing pond. The mining of ore deposits and the processing and smelting of copper at Roşia Poieni have resulted in an increase of the toxic elements concentration within all components of the environment in the area. Valea Şesei tailing pond is a waste deposit for the Roşia Poieni open-pit and is the biggest tailing pond in Romania. In October 2009, we determined 8 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) in 10 waste water ...

  19. Water-soluble organophosphorus reagents for mineralization of heavy metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K. L.

    1999-02-26

    In this report, we have described the principal stages of a two-step process for the in-situ stabilization of actinide ions in the environment. The combination of cation exchange and mineralization appears likely to provide a long-term solution to environments contaminated with heavy metals. Relying on a naturally occurring sequestering agent has obvious potential advantages from a regulatory standpoint. There are additional aspects of this technology requiring further elucidation, including the demonstration of the effect of these treatment protocols on the geohydrology of soil columns, further examination of the influence of humates and other colloidal species on cation uptake, and microbiological studies of phytate hydrolysis. We have learned during the course of this investigation that phytic acid is potentially available in large quantities. In the US alone, phytic acid is produced at an annual rate of several hundred thousand metric tons as a byproduct of fermentation processes (11). This material presently is not isolated for use. Instead, most of the insoluble phyate (as phytin) is being recycled along with the other solid fermentation residues for animal feed. This material is in fact considered undesirable in animal feed. The details of possible separation processes for phytate from these residues would have to be worked out before this untapped resource would be available for application to heavy metal sequestration. The results described emphasize the behavior of actinide and trivalent lanthanide metal ions, as these species are of primary interest to the Department of Energy for the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons production complex. While the specific demonstration includes this limited selection of metal ions, the technique should be readily applicable to any class of metal ions that form insoluble phosphate compounds under appropriate conditions. Further, though this demonstration has been conducted in the pH 5-8 range, it is conceivable that

  20. Recent Advances in Point-of-Access Water Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Velusamy, V.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Clean water is one of our most valuable natural resources. In addition to providing safe drinking water it assures functional ecosystems that support fisheries and recreation. Human population growth and its associated increased demands on water pose risks to maintaining acceptable water quality. It is vital to assess source waters and the aquatic systems that receive inputs from industrial waste and sewage treatment plants, storm water systems, and runoff from urban and agricultural lands. Rapid and confident assessments of aquatic resources form the basis for sound environmental management. Current methods engaged in tracing the presence of various bacteria in water employ bulky laboratory equipment and are time consuming. Thus, real-time water quality monitoring is essential for National and International Health and Safety. Environmental water monitoring includes measurements of physical characteristics (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity), chemical parameters (e.g. oxygen, alkalinity, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds), and abundance of certain biological taxa. Monitoring could also include assays of biological activity such as alkaline phosphatase, tests for toxins such as microcystins and direct measurements of pollutants such as heavy metals or hydrocarbons. Real time detection can significantly reduce the level of damage and also the cost to remedy the problem. This paper presents overview of state-of-the-art methods and devices used for point-of-access water quality monitoring and suggest further developments in this area.

  1. Advances in Understanding of Swift Heavy-Ion Tracks in Complex Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Maik; Devanathan, Ram; Toulemonde, Marcel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Tracks produced by swift heavy ions in ceramics are of interest for fundamental science as well as for applications covering different fields such as nanotechnology or fission-track dating of minerals. In the case of pyrochlores with general formula A2B2O7, the track structure and radiation sensitivity shows a clear dependence on the composition. Ion irradiated Gd2Zr2O7, e.g., retains its crystallinity while amorphous tracks are produced in Gd2Ti2O7. Tracks in Ti-containing compositions have a complex morphology consisting of an amorphous core surrounded by a shell of a disordered, defect-fluorite phase. The size of the amorphous core decreases with decreasing energy loss and with increasing Zr content, while the shell thickness seems to be similar over a wide range of energy loss values. The large data set and the complex track structure has made pyrochlore an interesting model system for a general theoretical description of track formation including thermal spike calculations (providing the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature around the ion trajectory) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (describing the response of the atomic system).Recent MD advances consider the sudden temperature increase by inserting data from the thermal spike. The combination allows the reproduction of the core-shell track characteristic and sheds light on the early stages of track formation including recrystallization of the molten material produced by the thermal spike.

  2. Metals emitted from heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with advanced PM and NO X emission controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaohua; Herner, Jorn D.; Shafer, Martin; Robertson, William; Schauer, James J.; Dwyer, Harry; Collins, John; Huai, Tao; Ayala, Alberto

    Emission factors for elemental metals were determined from several heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) of 1998-2007 vintage, operating with advanced PM and/or NO X emissions control retrofits on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, under steady state cruise, transient, and idle conditions. The emission control retrofits included diesel particulate filters (DPF): catalyzed and uncatalyzed, passive and active prototype vanadium- or zeolite-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems, and a catalyzed DPF fitted on a hybrid diesel electric drive vehicle. The prototype SCR systems in combination with DPF retrofits are of particular interest because they represent the expected emissions controls for compliance with PM and NO X regulations in 2010. PM samples from a full-exhaust dilution tunnel were collected on bulk filters, and on a Personal Cascade Impactor Sampler (PCIS) for total and water-soluble elemental analysis. All the DPFs significantly reduced emissions of total trace elements (>85% and >95% for cruise and for the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS), respectively). However, we observed differences in the post-retrofit metals emissions due to driving cycle effects (i.e., exhaust temperature) and type of retrofit. In general, the metals emissions over cruise conditions (which leads to higher exhaust temperatures) were substantially different from the emissions over a transient cycle or while idling. For instance, during cruise, we observed higher levels of platinum (1.1 ± 0.6-4.2 ± 3.6 ng km -1) for most of the retrofit-equipped vehicle tests compared to the baseline configuration (0.3 ± 0.1 ng km -1). The vanadium-based DPF + SCR vehicle during cruise operation exhibited emissions of vanadium (562 ± 265 ng km -1) and titanium (5841 ± 3050 ng km -1), suggesting the possible release of actual SCR wash-coat (V 2O 5/TiO 2) from the catalyst under the higher temperatures characteristic of cruise operation. The vanadium emissions exhibited a bi

  3. Advanced Methods for Treatment of Organic Compounds Contamined Water

    OpenAIRE

    PREDESCU Andra; A.Predescu; Ecaterina MATEI

    2009-01-01

    The progress recorded in the field of science and advanced engineering at nanometric scale supplies largeopportunities for more efficient (from the point of view of the costs) and more ecological approach of the processes ofwater purifying. This paper delivers a short description of the possibilities of using advanced materials in purifying thecontamined water with toxic metallic ions, organic and anorganic compounds. The opportunities and challenges werealso emphasized when nanomaterials wer...

  4. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  5. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.

    1991-12-31

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  6. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE WATER DEPLETED OF HEAVY ISOTOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V. Goncharuk

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on physicochemical properties of the light water (deuterium concentration is reduced to the ratio D/H = 4 ppm and that of the isotope of oxygen 18 – to the ratio 18O/16O = 750 ppm have been obtained. They include the melting and boiling points, kinematic viscosity, density, the spin-spin proton relaxation time, self-diffusion coefficients, and the small-angle laser light scattering. An explanation was proposed for the detected significant changes of the light water as compared with the high-resistivity water having geochemically ordinary isotope composition.

  7. Phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated water and sediment by eleocharis acicularis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakibara, Masayuki; Ha, Nguyen Thi Hoang [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama (Japan); Ohmori, Yuko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama (Japan); Taisei Kiso Sekkei Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sano, Sakae [Faculty of Education, Ehime University, Matsuyama (Japan); Sera, Koichiro [Cyclotron Center, Iwate Medical University, Takizawa-mura (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Phytoremediation is an environmental remediation technique that takes advantage of plant physiology and metabolism. The unique property of heavy metal hyperaccumulation by the macrophyte Eleocharis acicularis is of great significance in the phytoremediation of water and sediments contaminated by heavy metals at mine sites. In this study, a field cultivation experiment was performed to examine the applicability of E. acicularis to the remediation of water contaminated by heavy metals. The highest concentrations of heavy metals in the shoots of E. acicularis were 20 200 mg Cu/kg, 14 200 mg Zn/kg, 1740 mg As/kg, 894 mg Pb/kg, and 239 mg Cd/kg. The concentrations of Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb in the shoots correlate with their concentrations in the soil in a log-linear fashion. The bioconcentration factor for these elements decreases log-linearly with increasing concentration in the soil. The results indicate the ability of E. acicularis to hyperaccumulate Cu, Zn, As, and Cd under natural conditions, making it a good candidate species for the phytoremediation of water contaminated by heavy metals. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Physical and water properties of selected Polish heavy soils of various origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Zbigniew

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of selected physical, chemical, and water properties of four mineral arable soils characterized with heavy and very heavy texture. Soil samples from genetic horizons of black earths from areas near Kętrzyn, Gniew and Kujawy, and alluvial soils from Żuławy were used. The following properties were determined in the samples of undisturbed and disturbed structure: texture, particle density, bulk density, porosity, natural and hygroscopic moistures, maximal hygroscopic capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, potential of water bonding in soil, total and readily available water, total retention in the horizon of 0–50 cm, drainage porosity, content of organic carbon and total nitrogen Parent rocks of these soils were clays, silts and loams of various origin. High content of clay fraction strongly influenced the values of all the analyzed properties. All the examined soils had high content of organic carbon and total nitrogen and reaction close to neutral or alkaline. High content of mineral and organic colloids and, what follows, beneficial state of top horizons’ structure, determined – apart from heavy texture – low soil bulk density and high porosity. The investigated soils were characterized by high field water capacity and wide scopes of total and readily available water. The saturated hydraulic conductivity was low and characteristic to heavy mineral arable soils. The parameter which influenced the variability of analyzed parameters most was texture.

  9. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  10. Lysimeter Study of Plant Water Uptake in a Model Forest Ecosystem on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, M.; Abbaspour, K.; Schulin, R.; Oswald, S.

    2003-04-01

    We have been investigating the impact of heavy metal stress on the water regime of young forest ecosystems grown in 32 open top lysimeters (3 m in diameter and 1 m deep). The factorial treatments of the lysimeters include variations of rainwater acidity (acidic, ambient rain), subsoil type (acidic, calcareous), and soil contamination (with and without copper, zinc and cadmium in the top 20 cm). Each lysimeter was planted in spring of 2000 with the same selection of trees and herbaceous plants. All lysimeters are equipped with tensiometers for monitoring of pressure head and time domain reflectometry for measuring of water content. Irrigation was applied equally to all lysimeters through sprinkler devices. Drainage water was collected by means of canisters installed at the bottom of the lysimeters, and thus evapotranspiration could be calculated through water balancing. We monitored the water regime for two years including an imposed drought period. Significantly more water was extracted from the calcareous than the acidic subsoil. The water potential measurements show that also the heavy metal polluted topsoil had a significant influence on the water regime. Metal stress was particularly evident under reduced irrigation. We suspect that the roots were damaged in the contaminated topsoil. In contrast to the subsoil type, heavy metal pollution did not produce a significant effect on evapotranspiration (ET) though, and neither did acidic rain. Pot experiments confirmed that in presence of clean subsoil plants compensated for metal stress in contaminated topsoil by shifting their root activity from contaminated to uncontaminated zones.

  11. [Heavy metals in environmental media around drinking water conservation area of Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Gui-Tao; Chen, Zhen-Lou; Zhang, Cui; Bi, Chun-Juan; Cheng, Chen; Teng, Ji-Yan; Shen, Jun; Wang, Dong-Qi; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2008-07-01

    The levels of heavy metals in Shanghai drinking water conservation area were determined, and the spatial distributions and main sources of heavy metals were investigated. Moreover, the ecological risk assessment of heavy metals was conducted. Some conclusions can be drawn as follows: (1) The average concentrations of Cd, Hg, Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr and As in road dust were 0.80, 0.23, 148.45, 127.52, 380.57, 63.17, 250.38 and 10.37 mg x kg(-1) respectively. In terms of the pollution level, the values of soils were relatively lower, with the mean contents of 0.16 (Cd), 0.33 (Hg), 30.14 (Pb), 30.66 (Cu), 103.79 (Zn), 24.04 (Ni), 65.75 (Cr) and 6.31 mg x kg(-1) (As) severally; meanwhile the average levels of heavy metals in vegetables were 0.010 (Cd), 0.016 (Hg), 0.36 (Pb), 12.80 (Cu), 61.69 (Zn), 2.04 (Ni), 2.41 (Cr) and 0.039 mg x kg(-1) (As) respectively. (2) Semivariogram and multivariate analysis indicated that heavy metals pollution of soils was induced by anthropogenic activities mostly, and the pollutants produced by traffic were the major source of heavy metals in road dust. (3) The order for heavy metal enrichment coefficients of vegetables was as following: Zn (0.589) > Cu (0.412) > 0.102 (Ni) > Cd (0.059) > Cr (0.061) > Hg (0.056) > Pb (0.012) > As (0.007), and the results indicated that Cd and Zn in vegetables were mainly from the soils, and the other metals were probably from the pollutants in the atmosphere. (4) Sediments in drinking water conservation area were probably derived from soils around; however, there was no significant relationship between heavy metals contents of them. (5) The results of ecological risk assessment of heavy metals showed that heavy metals in soils were in no-warning to warning situation, and warning to light-warning situation for road dust and vegetables. The fuzzy synthesis judgment for all the environmental media around drinking water conservation area was warning to light-warning.

  12. Study on the Effects of Irrigation with Reclaimed Water on the Content and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibao Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reclaimed water is an important resource for irrigation, and exploration in making full use of it is an important way to alleviate water shortage. This paper analyzes the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water through field trials on the content and distribution of heavy metals in both tomatoes and the soil. By exploring the effects of reclaimed water after secondary treatment on the content and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in tomatoes and the heavy metal balance in the soil-crop system under different conditions, the study shows that there are no significant differences in the heavy metal content when the quantity of reclaimed water for irrigation varies. Reclaimed water for short-term irrigation does not cause pollution to either the soil environment or the crops. Nor will it cause the accumulation of heavy metals, and the index for the heavy metal content is far below the critical value of the national standard, which indicates that the vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water during their growth turn out to be free of pollutants. The heavy metals brought into the soil by reclaimed water are less than that taken away by the crops. The input and output quantities have only small effects on the heavy metal balance in the soil. This paper provides a reference for the evaluation and safety control of irrigation with reclaimed water.

  13. Study on the Effects of Irrigation with Reclaimed Water on the Content and Distribution of Heavy Metals in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shibao; Wang, Jianhua; Pei, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for irrigation, and exploration in making full use of it is an important way to alleviate water shortage. This paper analyzes the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water through field trials on the content and distribution of heavy metals in both tomatoes and the soil. By exploring the effects of reclaimed water after secondary treatment on the content and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in tomatoes and the heavy metal balance in the soil-crop system under different conditions, the study shows that there are no significant differences in the heavy metal content when the quantity of reclaimed water for irrigation varies. Reclaimed water for short-term irrigation does not cause pollution to either the soil environment or the crops. Nor will it cause the accumulation of heavy metals, and the index for the heavy metal content is far below the critical value of the national standard, which indicates that the vegetables irrigated with reclaimed water during their growth turn out to be free of pollutants. The heavy metals brought into the soil by reclaimed water are less than that taken away by the crops. The input and output quantities have only small effects on the heavy metal balance in the soil. This paper provides a reference for the evaluation and safety control of irrigation with reclaimed water.

  14. Life cycle assessment of advanced waste water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto

    The EU FP6 NEPTUNE project is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and the main goal is to develop new and optimize existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling methods for municipal waste water. Besides nutrients, a special focus area is micropollutants (e....... In total more that 20 different waste water and sludge treatment technologies are to be assessed. This paper will present the preliminary LCA results from running the induced versus avoided impact approach (mainly based on existing LCIA methodology) on one of the advanced treatment technologies, i...

  15. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  16. Water and Sediment Heavy Metal Pollution in Ereniku River of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FATON MALOKU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil, water and sediment samples were collected in 13 sampling stations along Erenik River, in the western part of Kosovo in order to assess heavy metal pollution. The concentration of hevy metals as Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr, Cu and Zn were determinated in water, soil and sediment samples. The concentration of heavy metals in water samples was measured using the flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS, while for sediment and soil samples was used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Obtained results showed that the concentrations in soil of heavy metals Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn were under the proposed limit values by the European guideline for “soil background", while the obtained values of Cr in all stations were higher than proposed limit values. The concentrations of heavy metals in sediment were often higher than the values determined with low action on the biological systems of the river ecosystem (ERL Effect Range Low but smaller than the values that negatively affecting the extent > 50% of organisms on core Effect Medium Range - ERM (Cu, Pb and Ni. The total values of Cr were higher than ERM but its origin is mainly geological more than human activities, thus the biological effect of this element can be probably low. Our results indicated that heavy metals as Pb, Zn and Cu were found in high portion in fine sediment fraction (<0.2 mm, while Cr, Ni and Co were in low amount in this sediment fraction. The concentrations of all analyzed heavy metals in the water were generally low at the beginning of the flow, average in middle stations and higher in secondary stations. Furthermore, the values for Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn were higher than international standards in some stations, showing the influence of highly polluted streams that join Erenik River flow in these stations.

  17. Evaluation of surface water quality indices and ecological risk assessment for heavy metals in scrap yard neighbourhood

    OpenAIRE

    Ojekunle, Olusheyi Z.; Ojekunle, Olurotimi V.; Adeyemi, Azeem A.; Taiwo, Abayomi G.; Sangowusi, Opeyemi R.; Taiwo, Adewale M.; Adekitan, Adetoun A.

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of surface water with heavy metals from industrial activities especially those from scrap yard has caused a major threat to human life exposing man to series of hazard, diseases, disability and consequently death. This study focuses on water quality indices of Owode-Onirin and Lafenwa scrap yard with respect to its physicochemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations by evaluating Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI), Metal Index (MI) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI). Fi...

  18. [Studies on toxicity of four kinds of heavy metals in water by synchronous-scan fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jing-Bo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Yin, Gao-Fang; Fang, Li; Liu, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Spectrofluorometry of chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied by three dimensional excitation-emission (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy with Delta gamma = 20 nm in the stress of Hg+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The conclusion from two kinds of Spectrofluorometry was the same: after 96h stress by heavy metals, the maximum fluorescence values reduced obviously, chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b in the photosynthetic system were seriously damaged by heavy metal. Further analysis of the correlations between heavy metal concentration and fluorescence quenching efficiency I0/I can conclude that the toxicity of heavy metal and the fluorescence quenching efficiency I0/I were positively correlated, and they all increased with the heavy metal concentration and stress time. For one kind of heavy metals, synchronous scan fluorometry is a sensitive method for its toxicity assessment. Compared to 3DEEM fluorescence spectroscopy, synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy is less time consuming and of higher selectivity. It is suitable to assess the toxicity of pollutions in water.

  19. Calculations on heavy-water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the codes that the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) has for the nuclear reactors design calculations is the LEOPARD code. This work studies the reliability of this code in reactors design calculations which component materials are the same of the heavy water moderated and cooled, natural uranium fuelled power reactors. (author)

  20. Influence of silver nanoparticles on heavy metals of pore water in contaminated river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei; Chen, Guiqiu; Zeng, Guangming; Yan, Ming; Chen, Anwei; Guo, Zhi; Huang, Zhenzhen; He, Kai; Hu, Liang; Wang, Lichao

    2016-11-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge on the discharge of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the environment and their potential toxicity to microorganisms, the interaction of AgNPs with heavy metals remains poorly understood. This study focused on the effect of AgNPs on heavy metal concentration and form in sediment contaminated with heavy metals from the Xiangjiang River. The results showed that the concentration of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd decreased and then increased with a change in form. The changes in form and concentrations of heavy metals in pore water suggested that Cu and Zn were more likely to be affected compared to Pb and Cd. The concentrations of Hg in sediment pore water in three AgNPs-dosed containers, increased greatly until they reached their peaks at 4.468 ± 0.133, 4.589 ± 0.235, and 5.083 ± 0.084 μg L(-1) in Bare AgNPs, Citrate AgNPs and Tween 80 AgNPs, respectively. The measurements of Hg concentrations in the sediment pore water, combined with SEM and EDX analysis, demonstrated that added AgNPs stabilized in pore water and formed an amalgam with Hg(0), which can affect Hg transportation over long distance.

  1. Measures to diminish leaching of heavy metals to surface waters from agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, P.N.M.; Bonten, L.T.C.; Plette, A.C.C.; Moolenaar, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    Historical accumulation of heavy metals in agricultural soils has caused an increased leaching to shallow groundwater in the Netherlands. The elevated concentrations of metals like copper and zinc in shallow groundwater, causes problems to meet target levels in surface waters. Important sources for

  2. Study of thermal neutron currents near cylindrical absorbers located in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments reported involved determining the angular response of detectors to neutrons exterior to the surface of long cylindrical absorbers immersed in a scattering medium. The absorbers consisted of solid cylinders of copper, cadmium, or natural uranium in a fuel lattice, and combinations of copper and cadmium, as well as voided cylinders. The scattering (moderating) medium consisted of heavy water. (author)

  3. Benchmarking Severe Accident Computer Codes for Heavy Water Reactor Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requests for severe accident investigations and assurance of mitigation measures have increased for operating nuclear power plants and the design of advanced nuclear power plants. Severe accident analysis investigations necessitate the analysis of the very complex physical phenomena that occur sequentially during various stages of accident progression. Computer codes are essential tools for understanding how the reactor and its containment might respond under severe accident conditions. The IAEA organizes coordinated research projects (CRPs) to facilitate technology development through international collaboration among Member States. The CRP on Benchmarking Severe Accident Computer Codes for HWR Applications was planned on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for HWRs (the TWG-HWR). This publication summarizes the results from the CRP participants. The CRP promoted international collaboration among Member States to improve the phenomenological understanding of severe core damage accidents and the capability to analyse them. The CRP scope included the identification and selection of a severe accident sequence, selection of appropriate geometrical and boundary conditions, conduct of benchmark analyses, comparison of the results of all code outputs, evaluation of the capabilities of computer codes to predict important severe accident phenomena, and the proposal of necessary code improvements and/or new experiments to reduce uncertainties. Seven institutes from five countries with HWRs participated in this CRP

  4. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a

  5. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  6. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  7. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs

  8. Monitoring of heavy metal pollution in surface waters from Aries River, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levei, E. A.; Moldovan, O.; Senila, M.; Miclean, M.; Tanaselia, C.; Roman, C.; Abraham, B.; Cordos, E. A.

    2009-04-01

    Mining activities have a long history in the Aries catchment. The extraction of precious metals containing ores culminated in the mid 20th century and then decreased continuously. The mining industry created a beneficial economic development of the region but the negative environmental impact due to acid mine drainage combined with heavy metal pollution of surface waters still remains, after most of the mining operations were closed. This study presents the results of a monitoring surveillance of heavy metal concentrations in surface waters from 12 monitoring stations along the Aries River, during March-October 2008. The results showed that downstream of mining activities an increase of all metal concentrations in surface waters was observed, but the water quality improved with the distance from contaminant sources due to the dilution effect of less polluted tributaries.

  9. Advanced water treatment as a tool in water scarcity management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoes, Poul

    2000-01-01

    degree of purity - except zero. The challenge of future reuse will be to account for the attitudes related to trace chemicals in water. How precautious is it prudent to be? Risk analysis is no longer an elitist business. It will involve the perception of the public, politicians (and the press)....

  10. Waste minimization through process optimization/integration and resource management at eco-friendly Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy Water Board has celebrated 2003 as Environmental Conservation Year captivating a range of enviro-friendly measures. This article attempts to give a brief overview of the outcome of systems and adapted procedures for waste minimization through process integration and resource management at Heavy Water Plants

  11. 重水的氢同位素组成分析%Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of Heavy Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立武; 杜晓宁

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen gas was prepared from heavy water by using the H/Device, which was based on reduction with hot chromium. The H/Device was connected to a mass spectrometer. The hydrogen isotopic composition of heavy water was analyzed. It is shown that hydrogen isotopic composition can be analyzed conveniently, little sample is used and the results are reliable.

  12. Neutronic calculations in heavy water moderated multiplying media using GGC-3 library nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in obtaining transference matrices between GGC-3 code and the system to produce multigroup cross sections using GGC-3 library, recently implemented at the Neutrons and Reactors Division, have been analized. Neutronic calculations in multiplicative systems containing heavy water have been made using both methods. From the obtained results, it is concluded that the new method is more appropriate to deal with systems including moderators other than light water. (author)

  13. Responses to Oxidative and Heavy Metal Stresses in Cyanobacteria: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Cassier-Chauvat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk.

  14. Responses to oxidative and heavy metal stresses in cyanobacteria: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk.

  15. Ultra deep water minimum production riser system for heavy fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Marcoux, Jean-Francois; Wu, Mason [Acergy M.S. Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the intricacies of a reservoir is a lengthy process. Deep water reservoirs are often compartmented. The access to the various areas of production requires drilling from several locations. As each of these zones is being brought to production, additional riser facilities are required. Therefore, the concept of a standardized minimum production riser system that is capable of being installed phase after phase is appealing. The minimum functions required for oil production are two-looped production lines, and one or two injection lines, fitting with a riser system dedicated to an isolated oil field. Such a concept is presented in this paper. Acergy has designed, built and installed the large bundled Hybrid Riser Towers of Girassol and Greater Plutonio, and has further streamlined its design and construction methods. Such project requires not only the capacity to engineer the facilities but also to source the material, manage the fabrication in country and execute the complex operations. This requires project management capacities to be able to ensure consistent interfaces, maintain schedule and budget accordingly. The proposed ultra deep water Minimum Production System incorporates lessons learned from all aspects of the Greater Plutonio and Girassol projects to further enhance the ability to handle a wide range of water depths and well fluids (from low to high GOR), including elevated pressure and temperature. The proposed Minimum Production Hybrid Riser Tower (MPHRT) lends itself to be decommissioned and reused if cost-efficient for the field development. (author)

  16. Timing of advanced water flooding in low permeability reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiao-qing; JIANG Han-qiao; CHEN Min-feng; LIU Tong-jing; ZHANG Wei

    2009-01-01

    It is very important to design the optimum starting time of water injection for the development of low permeability res-ervoirs. In this type of reservoir the starting time of water injection will be affected by a reservoir pressure-sensitive effect. In order to optimize the starting time of water injection in low permeability reservoirs, this effect of pressure change on rock permeability of low permeability reservoirs was, at first, studied by physical simulation. It was shown that the rock permeability decreases expo-nentially with an increase in formation pressure. Secondly, we conducted a reservoir engineering study, from which we obtained analytic relationships between formation pressure, oil production rate, water production rate and water injection rate. After our physical, theoretical and economical analyses, we proposed an approach which takes the pressure-sensitive effect into consideration and designed the optimum starting time of water injection, based on the principle of material balance. Finally, the corresponding software was developed and applied to one block of the Jiangsu Oilfield. It is shown that water injection, in advance of production, can decrease the adverse impact of the pressure-sensitive effect on low permeability reservoir development. A water-flooding pro-ject should be preferably initiated in advance of production for no more than one year and the optimum ratio of formation pressure to initial formation pressure should be maintained at a level between 1.05 and 1.2.

  17. Water quality management of aquifer recharge using advanced tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Valentina; Emsellem, Yves; Paille, Julie; Glucina, Karl; Gislette, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with recycled water or other alternative resources is one of the most rapidly growing techniques that is viewed as a necessity in water-short areas. In order to better control health and environmental effects of MAR, this paper presents two case studies demonstrating how to improve water quality, enable reliable tracing of injected water and better control and manage MAR operation in the case of indirect and direct aquifer recharge. Two water quality management strategies are illustrated on two full-scale case studies, including the results of the combination of non conventional and advanced technologies for water quality improvement, comprehensive sampling and monitoring programs including emerging pollutants, tracer studies using boron isotopes and integrative aquifer 3D GIS hydraulic and hydrodispersive modelling.

  18. Modeling Adsorption Kinetics (Bio-remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Water)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Chris

    My talk will focus on modeling the kinetics of the adsorption and filtering process using differential equations, stochastic methods, and recursive functions. The models have been developed in support of our interdisciplinary lab group which is conducting research into bio-remediation of heavy metal contaminated water via filtration through biomass such as spent tea leaves. The spent tea leaves are available in large quantities as a result of the industrial production of tea beverages. The heavy metals bond with the surfaces of the tea leaves (adsorption). Funding: CUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant.

  19. Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Diana; Parmar, Jemish; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhao, Yanli; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-04-13

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes. Microbots' structure consists of nanosized multilayers of graphene oxide, nickel, and platinum, providing different functionalities. The outer layer of graphene oxide captures lead on the surface, and the inner layer of platinum functions as the engine decomposing hydrogen peroxide fuel for self-propulsion, while the middle layer of nickel enables external magnetic control of the microbots. Mobile GOx-microbots remove lead 10 times more efficiently than nonmotile GOx-microbots, cleaning water from 1000 ppb down to below 50 ppb in 60 min. Furthermore, after chemical detachment of lead from the surface of GOx-microbots, the microbots can be reused. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic control of the GOx-microbots inside a microfluidic system as a proof-of-concept for automatic microbots-based system to remove and recover heavy metals.

  20. Quantitative analysis of water heavy by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has been applied to a wide variety of quantitative problems. A typical example has been the determination of isotopic composition. In this paper two different analytical methods for the determination of water in deuterium oxide are described. The first one, employs acetonitril as an internal standard compound and in the second one calibration curve of signal integral curve versus amount of D2O is constructed. Both methods give results comparable to those of mass spectrometry of IR spectroscopy. (Author) 5 refs

  1. Heavy water reactors: Status and projected development. Part I. Final draft of a report to be published in the IAEA technical reports series. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, the 40th General Conference of the IAEA approved the establishment of a new International Working Group (IWG) on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (HWR). At its first meeting, held in June 1997, the IWG-HWR advised the Agency to prepare a TECDOC to present: a) the status of HWR advanced technology in the areas of economics, safety and fuel cycle flexibility and sustainable development; and b) the advanced technology developments needed in the following two decades to achieve the vision of the advanced HWR. The IAEA convened two consultancies and two Advisory Group Meetings to prepare the TECDOC. One of the consultancies was on 'Fuel Cycle Flexibility and Sustainable Development'; the second was on 'Passive Safety Features of HWRs Status and Projected Advances'. The members of the IWG-HWR collectively agreed on the essential features that the development of HWRs must emphasize. These 'drivers' are: improved economics: the fundamental requirement for all successful high technology developments to advance, is real economic improvements, consistent with improved quality; enhanced safety: to meet increasingly stringent requirements to satisfy the regulatory authorities, the public and the operators, an evolutionary safety path will be followed, incorporating advanced passive safety concepts where it is feasible and sensible to do so; sustainable development: the high neutron economy of HWRs results in a reactor that can burn natural uranium at high utilization, utilize spent fuel from other reactor types, and, through various recycle strategies including use of thorium, extend fissile fuel resources into the indefinite future. The objectives of this document are: to present the status of HWR technology; to document the safety characteristics of current HWR designs and the potential enhancements; to present a 'vision' of the long-term development of the HWR for use into the next century as an electricity source that is sustainable and flexible and

  2. Heavy water reactors: Status and projected development. Part II. Final draft of a report to be published in the IAEA technical reports series. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, the 40th General Conference of the IAEA approved the establishment of a new International Working Group (IWG) on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (HWR). At its first meeting, held in June 1997, the IWG-HWR advised the Agency to prepare a TECDOC to present: a) the status of HWR advanced technology in the areas of economics, safety and fuel cycle flexibility and sustainable development; and b) the advanced technology developments needed in the following two decades to achieve the vision of the advanced HWR. The IAEA convened two consultancies and two Advisory Group Meetings to prepare the TECDOC. One of the consultancies was on 'Fuel Cycle Flexibility and Sustainable Development'; the second was on 'Passive Safety Features of HWRs Status and Projected Advances'. The members of the IWG-HWR collectively agreed on the essential features that the development of HWRs must emphasize. These 'drivers' are: improved economics: the fundamental requirement for all successful high technology developments to advance, is real economic improvements, consistent with improved quality; enhanced safety: to meet increasingly stringent requirements to satisfy the regulatory authorities, the public and the operators, an evolutionary safety path will be followed, incorporating advanced passive safety concepts where it is feasible and sensible to do so; sustainable development: the high neutron economy of HWRs results in a reactor that can burn natural uranium at high utilization, utilize spent fuel from other reactor types, and, through various recycle strategies including use of thorium, extend fissile fuel resources into the indefinite future. The objectives of this document are: to present the status of HWR technology; to document the safety characteristics of current HWR designs and the potential enhancements; to present a 'vision' of the long-term development of the HWR for use into the next century as an electricity source that is sustainable and flexible and

  3. Prolong Restoration of the Water Quality of River Ganga Effect of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tare, Vinod; Basu, Subhankar

    2014-04-01

    The genesis of the present research was the belief since ages and the observations made through some studies that the water of river Ganga has unique characteristics, which allows storage of water quality even on prolong storage. Very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the contention that the Ganga water indeed has some special composition that could be attributed to its unique storage capacity. It was postulated that prolong restoration of water quality depends on the ability to arrest microbial activity that is generally responsible for deterioration in water quality on prolong storage. Hence, attempt has been made to identify the parameters that are likely to influence the prolong storage of river water. Along with Ganga river water, other three major rivers, viz. Yamuna, Godavari and Narmada, were selected for comparison. Emphasis was made on estimation of heavy metals, radioactive elements, dissolved carbon and other physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, hardness and dissolved organic carbon. Based on the available information regarding the impact of heavy metals, radioactive elements vis-à-vis the chemical composition of water on microorganisms in the aquatic environment, an overall impact score for the waters of the four Indian rivers selected in the study has been assigned.

  4. Prolong Restoration of the Water Quality of River Ganga Effect of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tare, Vinod; Basu, Subhankar

    2014-04-01

    The genesis of the present research was the belief since ages and the observations made through some studies that the water of river Ganga has unique characteristics, which allows storage of water quality even on prolong storage. Very few systematic studies have been conducted to support the contention that the Ganga water indeed has some special composition that could be attributed to its unique storage capacity. It was postulated that prolong restoration of water quality depends on the ability to arrest microbial activity that is generally responsible for deterioration in water quality on prolong storage. Hence, attempt has been made to identify the parameters that are likely to influence the prolong storage of river water. Along with Ganga river water, other three major rivers, viz. Yamuna, Godavari and Narmada, were selected for comparison. Emphasis was made on estimation of heavy metals, radioactive elements, dissolved carbon and other physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, hardness and dissolved organic carbon. Based on the available information regarding the impact of heavy metals, radioactive elements vis-à-vis the chemical composition of water on microorganisms in the aquatic environment, an overall impact score for the waters of the four Indian rivers selected in the study has been assigned. PMID:26563059

  5. Red cabbage yield, heavy metal content, water use and soil chemical characteristics under wastewater irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Talip; Sahin, Ustun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this 2-year field study was to evaluate the effects of drip irrigation with urban wastewaters reclaimed using primary (filtration) and secondary (filtration and aeration) processes on red cabbage growth and fresh yield, heavy metal content, water use and efficiency and soil chemical properties. Filtered wastewater (WW1), filtered and aerated wastewater (WW2), freshwater and filtered wastewater mix (1:1 by volume) (WW3) and freshwater (FW) were investigated as irrigation water treatments. Crop evapotranspiration decreased significantly, while water use efficiency increased under wastewater treatments compared to FW. WW1 treatment had the lowest value (474.2 mm), while FW treatments had the highest value (556.7 mm). The highest water use efficiency was found in the WW1 treatment as 8.41 kg m(-3), and there was a twofold increase with regard to the FW. Wastewater irrigation increased soil fertility and therefore red cabbage yield. WW2 treatment produced the highest total fresh yield (40.02 Mg ha(-1)). However, wastewater irrigation increased the heavy metal content in crops and soil. Cd content in red cabbage heads was above the safe limit, and WW1 treatment had the highest value (0.168 mg kg(-1)). WW3 treatment among wastewater treatments is less risky in terms of soil and crop heavy metal pollution and faecal coliform contamination. Therefore, WW3 wastewater irrigation for red cabbage could be recommended for higher yield and water efficiency with regard to freshwater irrigation.

  6. Treatment of waters polluted with crude oil and heavy metals by means of a natural wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groudeva, V I; Groudev, S N; Doycheva, A S

    2003-01-01

    In the Dolni Dubnik oil deposit, Northern Bulgaria, waters polluted with crude oil and heavy metals (iron, manganese, zinc, cadmium, lead, copper) were treated by means of a natural wetland located in the deposit. The waters had a pH in the range of about 4.5-6.5 and contained about 1-5 mg/l oil. The concentrations of heavy metals usually were about 2-4 times higher than the relevant permissible levels for waters intended for use in the agriculture and industry. The watercourse through the wetland covered a distance of about 100 m and the water flow rate varied in the range of about 0.2-0.8 l/s. The wetland was characterized by an abundant water and emergent vegetation and a diverse microflora, including different oil-degrading bacteria and fungi. The treatment of the polluted waters by means of the above-mentioned wetland markedly depended on the temperature but was efficient during the different climatic seasons, even during the cold winter months at temperatures close to 0 degrees C. The oil content in the wetland effluents in most cases was decreased to less than 0.2 mg/l, and the concentrations of heavy metals were decreased below the relevant permissible levels. The removal of oil was connected with its microbial degradation. The removal of heavy metals was due to different processes but the microbial dissimilatory sulphate reduction and the sorption of metals on the organic matter and clay minerals present in the wetland played the main role.

  7. Uses of Plutonium Fuel in Pressure-Tube-Type, Heavy-Water-Moderated Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1962, a feasibility study was begun in the JAERI on the uses of various nuclear fuels for pressure-tube-type, heavy-water-moderated thermal reactors. This study began with analysis of the use of uranium in heavy-water-moderated thermal reactors such as the CANDU-PHW, CANDU-BLW, SGHW, EL-4, and Ref. 15, D and E lattices, which is designed in the JAERI, from the standpoint of the core design. Then, the ways of using plutonium fuel in the same types were investigated using WATCHTOWER, FLARE and VENUS codes, including: (1) direct substitution of the plutonium from light-water reactors or Magnox reactors, (2) recycle use of the plutonium from heavy-water-moderated reactors, (3) plutonium self-sustaining cycle, and (4) plutonium phoenix fuel. The following conclusions are reported: (1) In the direct substitution of plutonium, somewhat depleted plutonium is more suitable for core design than the plutonium from Magnox reactors or light-water reactors, because the increase in the initial reactivity due to large plutonium absorption cross-section must be prevented. (2) In the plutonium self-sustaining cycle, the fuel burn-up of about 15 000 ∼20000 MWd/t would be expected from natural uranium, and the positive void reactivity which always occurs in the uraniumloaded SGHW or CANDU-BLW lattices is greatly reduced, the latter property giving some margin to bum-out heat flux. (3) It may be concluded from the fuel cycle analysis that the plutonium self-sustaining cycle is equivalent to using slightly enriched uranium (about 1.0 at.%). It may be concluded that the use of plutonium in heavy-water-moderated reactors is technologically feasible and economically advantageous. (author)

  8. HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATIONS IN SAGAR LAKE AND DRINKING WATER SOURCES OF SAGAR CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid Parveen; Y. Rohan

    2012-01-01

    There are various toxic elements present in our surroundings out of that the toxic heavy metals Pb,Cd, As, Se, Cr and Cu can cause several harms to human these metals enter in humans by water. The all kind ofwaste materials are thrown into natural water bodies in each city, this makes the all ground and natural watersources contaminated. The all six metals have determined by Atomic absorption spectrophotometer(AAS) inselected water samples from Sagar Lake and dug wells, hand pumps, tube wells...

  9. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  10. Recent Advances in Heavy Metals Induced Effect on Male Reproductive Function—A Retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Roy Chowdhury

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive hazards from metal exposure in males are one of the fastest growing areas of concern in toxicology today. Exposure to different heavy metals causes irreversible toxic insult to male reproductive system. Heavy metals produce cellular impairments at structural and functional level in male reproductive system. The effect of heavy metals, such as lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium and arsenic on male reproduction has been studied in details in various experimental species. But data on humans are steadily building up. Metals could interfere with the gametogenic cells or Leydig cell or spermatozoa directly in semen. These effects may results in reduced fertility or associated with pregnancy wastage, congenital malformation associated with genetic diseases. Moreover, the features of heat stress protein (hsp, Androgen-Binding Protein (ABP, Cadherin and many other stressor protein along with reactive oxygen species (ROS and neuro-endocrine mechanism are highly affected by these heavy metals exposure. Still the data are inadequate and need confirmation.

  11. Water flooding to displace heavy oil with electromagnetic resistive heating (ERH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliverira, H.J.M.; Barillas, J.L.M.; Mata, W.; Dutra, T.V.Jr. [Federal Univ. of Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova (Brazil). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The viscosity of heavy oil can be effectively reduced by increasing its temperature, thus providing better mobility in the reservoir. Steam flooding is a commonly used technique to improve oil recovery, but may not be technically possible or economically feasible in situations such as permafrost, deep formations, thin pay zones and low permeability formations. Therefore, alternative methods are needed to produce this heavy oil. This paper proposed the use of electromagnetic resistive heating (ERH), a thermal stimulation technique in which an electrical current passes through a formation to increase the original temperature by Joule effect. The reservoir temperatures increases proportionally as the electrical current intensity increases. This paper demonstrated the results of computational simulations using water injection, with or without ERH in a reservoir of heavy oil with similar characteristics to those found in northeastern Brazilian basins. The paper outlined the reservoir and fluids characteristics used to model the ERH process and waterflooding. It was concluded that using water flooding, without ERH to displace heavy oil can enhance oil recovery. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Heavy metals in water bodies purified by suspended substrate of rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The equations, which are used to describe the relationships of adsorption quantity(s), adsorption percent(Pa),aqueous equilibrium concentration(c) of heavy metal on river suspended substrates and the ratio of adsorbent to water(j), are developed when heavy metal adsorption on river suspended substrate satisfies with linear adsorption equation. The results, according to the simulation from heavy metal adsorption on suspended substrates of several main Chinese rivers from a previous research report, indicated that these developed equations could describe the linear adsorption processes in practice very well, meanwhile, the adsorption equilibrium constant of adsorbent for heavy metal was an intensity factor regardless of ratio of suspended substrates to water but strongly depended on media's pH. Furthermore, the suspended substrates of Yellow River gave stronger purification ability for Pb than for Cd and Cu. When Cd was purified by different river suspended substrates, it exhibited that the order of their purification ability for Cd was that of Songhuajiang> Zhujiang>Yellow River, which was consistent with their contents of cation exchange capacity(CEC). In addition, we estimated and compared the purification ability of river suspended substrates for cadmium, and the resulting purification percent was 37.64%, 64.58% and 50.98% for Songhuajiang River, Yangtze River and Zhujiang River, respectively.

  13. Heavy snow: IR spectroscopy of isotope mixed crystalline water ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andy; Shi, Liang; Auchettl, Rebecca; McNaughton, Don; Appadoo, Dominique R T; Robertson, Evan G

    2016-02-14

    Mid-infrared spectra have been measured for crystalline water ice aerosols of widely varied H/D isotopic composition. Particles with diameters ranging from 10-200 nm were generated via rapid collisional cooling with a cold buffer gas over a range of temperatures from 7-200 K. In near isotopically pure ices, the νL band position is slightly red-shifted with increasing temperature whilst in the ν2 region apparently anomalous shifts in peak maxima are explained by the contribution of a broad 2νL band of H2O and a 3νL band of D2O together with ν2 intensity that is particularly weak in low temperature crystalline ice. The hydrogen bonded OH (or OD) oscillator bands of near pure H2O (or D2O) ices are blue-shifted with temperature, with a gradient very similar to that of the corresponding band in isotope diluted samples, HOD in D2O (or H2O). It implies that this observed temperature trend is predominantly due to the intrinsic change in local hydride stretch potential energy, rather than to changes in intermolecular coupling. However, it is also observed that the narrow hydride stretch bands of an isotope diluted sample rapidly develop sub-band structure as the oscillator concentration increases, evidence of strong intermolecular coupling and a high degree of delocalisation. Anomalous blue-shifts in the OD stretch profile as D2O concentration grows is attributable to Fermi resonance with 2ν2 of D2O, in much closer proximity than the corresponding H2O levels. Theoretical results from a mixed quantum/classical approach are used to validate these findings in the hydride stretching region. Theory qualitatively reproduces the experimental trends as a function of temperature and isotopic variance. PMID:26812598

  14. Recent advances in biosorption of heavy metals: support tools for biosorption equilibrium, kinetics and mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Hlihor, Raluca Maria; Bulgariu, Laura; Sobariu, Dana Luminita; Diaconu, Mariana; Tavares, T.; Gavrilescu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are increasingly present in industrial wastes and effluents, which can generate serious concerns for environmental quality and human health. Consequently, there is a continuous expansion of researches for new approaches and developments to guarantee environmental cleaning-up. Although there are some physico-chemical established methods for the removal of heavy metals from various environmental compartments, biosorption gains further confidence as a reliable a...

  15. Analysis of heavy metals concentration in water and sediment in the Hara biosphere reserve, southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, Mohsen; Mansouri, Borhan; Nabizadeh, Sahar; Pourkhabbaz, Alireza

    2014-02-01

    This study determined the concentration of heavy metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn) in water and sediments at nine sites in the Hara biosphere reserve of southern Iran during the summer and winter 2010. Determination of Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn in water was carried out by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (Shimadzu, AA 610s) and in sediment by flame atomic absorption spectrometer (Perkin Elmer, AA3030). Results showed that the heavy metal concentrations in the water samples decreased in the sequence of Zn > Al > Cu > Cr, while in sediment samples were Cr > Zn > Cu > Al. Data analysis indicated that with the exception of Al, there was a Pearson's correlation coefficient between pH and Cu, Zn, and Cr at α = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.001 in sediment (in winter), respectively. There were also significant differences between heavy metals of Cr, Cu, and Zn during the two seasons (p < 0.001) in the water and sediment.

  16. Heavy metal contamination of drinking water in Kamrup district, Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Sutapa; Sarma, Hari Prasad

    2011-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the heavy metal concentration of the drinking water with respect to zinc, copper, cadmium, manganese, lead and arsenic in Kamrup district of Assam, India. Ground water samples were collected from tube wells, deep tube wells and ring wells covering all the major hydrogeological environs. Heavy metals in groundwater are estimated by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer, Perkin Elmer Analyst 200. Data were assessed statistically to find the distribution pattern and other related information for each metal. The study revealed that a good number of the drinking water sources were contaminated with cadmium, manganese and lead. Arsenic concentrations although did not exceeded WHO limits but was found to be slightly elevated. Copper and zinc concentrations were found to be within the prescribed WHO limits. An attempt has also been made to ascertain the possible source of origin of the metals. Positive and significant correlation existing between manganese with zinc and copper indicates towards their similar source of origin and mobility. In view of the present study and the level of heavy metal contamination, it could be suggested to test the potability of the water sources before using it for drinking purpose. PMID:20976545

  17. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-12-20

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene < ethylbenzene < toluene < xylene. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and benzene were higher than the permissible limits of Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON) and World Health Organization (WHO) respectively. Rats exposed to Osun river water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats.

  18. An advanced field experimental design to assess plant tolerance to heavy metal pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łopata, Barbara; Szarek-Łukaszewska, Grażyna; Babst-Kostecka, Alicja

    2016-04-01

    Only a limited number of vascular plant species can survive and reproduce in toxic metalliferous environments. Among these species, pseudometallophytes are particularly interesting, as their metallicolous (M) populations on metalliferous soils and non-metallicolous (NM) populations on non-metalliferous soils show very pronounced ecological differences. Pseudometallophytes thus provide excellent opportunities for multidisciplinary research to improve phytoremediation and phytomining. Numerous methods have been developed to investigate plant adaptation to metal pollution, the majority of which has been conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. Although these efforts have significantly advanced our understanding of mechanisms underlying metal tolerance in plants, populations must be reciprocally transplanted to clearly identify natural selection. Only then is it possible to test, whether the fitness of native plants is higher than that of nonnative populations and thereby prove local adaptation. Here, we present an enhanced field experimental design aimed at verification of local adaptation to habitats with different levels of heavy metal soil contamination. At two M and two NM sites, we established a total of 12 plots (4 sites x 3 plots each), removed the existing local vegetation, and collected soil samples for chemical analyses (5 samples per plot). Plant collection (N= 480) from all four selected populations was established under laboratory conditions prior to the transplant experiment. Genotypes were randomly distributed within each plot (240 x 270 cm) and planted along a regulary spaced grid (30x30cm cell size) in spring 2015. Measurements will start in spring 2016, by which time plants are expected to have acclimatized to the local conditions. For the two subsiquent years, growth, survival, fitness, life cycle and herbivory consumption will be monitored for each transplant. On a weekly basis, we will record: 1) pictures of each transplant to determine

  19. Water chemistry control to meet the advanced design and operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The road maps on R and D plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems in Japan have been proposed along with promotion of R and D related water chemistry improvement for the advanced application of light water reactors (LWRs). The technical trends were divided into four categories, dose rate reduction, structural integrity, fuel integrity and radioactive waste reduction, and latest technical break through for each category was shown for the advanced application of LWRs. At the same time, the technical break through and the latest movements for regulation of water chemistry were introduced for each of major organizations related to nuclear engineering in the world. The conclusions were summarized as follows; 1. Water chemistry improvements might contribute to achieve the advanced application of LWRs, while water chemistry should be often changed to achieve the advanced application of LWRs. 2. Only one solution for water chemistry control was not obtained for achieving the advanced application of LWRs, but miscellaneous solutions were possible for achieving one. Optimal water chemistry control was desired for having the good practices for satisfying multi-targets at the same time and it was much affected by the plant unique systems and operational history. 3. That meant it was difficult to determine water chemistry regulation targets for achieving application of LWRs but it was necessary to prepare suitable guideline for good achievement of application of LWRs. That meant the guideline should be recommendation for good practice in the plant. 4. The water chemistry guide line should be modified along with progress of plant operation and water chemistry and related technologies. (author)

  20. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  1. Advances in Membrane Distillation for Water Desalination and Purification Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation is a process that utilizes differences in vapor pressure to permeate water through a macro-porous membrane and reject other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. This review considers the fundamental heat and mass transfer processes in membrane distillation, recent advances in membrane technology, module configurations, and the applications and economics of membrane distillation, and identifies areas that may lead to technological improvements in membrane distillation as well as the application characteristics required for commercial deployment.

  2. Economics of advanced light water reactors - Recent update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes recently updated analyses of the economic prospects of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) during the decade of the 1990s. United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) has performed engineering economic analyses related to ALWRs over the last 5 yr using both target economics and detailed cost-estimating methodologies. It has been found through such cost comparisons that properly designed and constructed ALWRs should cost less than the target cost figures listed above and significantly less than the pressurized water reactor better experience reference LWR plant cost

  3. Studies on heavy charged particle interaction, water equivalence and Monte Carlo simulation in some gel dosimeters, water, human tissues and water phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2015-09-01

    Some gel dosimeters, water, human tissues and water phantoms were investigated with respect to their radiological properties in the energy region 10 keV-10 MeV. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) for some heavy charged particles such as protons, He ions, B ions and C ions have been calculated for the first time for Fricke, MAGIC, MAGAT, PAGAT, PRESAGE, water, adipose tissue, muscle skeletal (ICRP), muscle striated (ICRU), plastic water, WT1 and RW3 using mass stopping powers from SRIM Monte Carlo software. The ranges and straggling were also calculated for the given materials. Two different set of mass stopping powers were used to calculate Zeff for comparison. The water equivalence of the given materials was also determined based on the results obtained. The Monte Carlo simulation of the charged particle transport was also done using SRIM code. The heavy ion distribution along with its parameters were shown for the given materials for different heavy ions. Also the energy loss and damage events in water when irradiated with 100 keV heavy ions were studied in detail.

  4. Acidification of Harbour sediment and removal of heavy metals induced by water splitting in electrodialytic remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrøm, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Harbor sediments are often contaminated with heavy metals, which can be removed by electrodialytic remediation. Water splitting at the anion exchange membrane in contact with the contaminated material in electrodialytic remediation is highly important for the removal of heavy metals. Here...... it was investigated how acidification caused by water splitting at the anion exchange membrane during electrodialytic remediation of contaminated harbor sediment and hence the metal removal, was influenced by different experimental conditions. Two different experimental cells were tested, where the number...... the sediment was acidified, the voltage decreased and electrical conductivity increased. After 5 days of remediation the sediment was acidified at the chosen current density (1 mA/cm(2)) and the main metal removal was observed shortly after. Thus it was crucial for the metal removal that the sediment was fully...

  5. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of work carried out on behalf of the Atomic Energy Control Board, concerned with the consequences of accidental releases to the atmosphere of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) at a heavy water plant. In this study, assessments of consequences are made in terms of the probabilities of a range of possible outcomes, i.e., numbers of fatalities, given a certain release scenario. The report describes the major features of a computer model which was developed to calculate the consequences and their associated probabilities, and the major input data used in applying the model to a consequence assessment of the Bruce heavy water plant (HWP) in Ontario. The results of the sensitivity analyses of the model are summarized. Finally, the results of the consequence assessments of 43 accidental release scenarios at the Bruce HWP are summarized, together with a number of conclusions which were drawn from these results regarding the predicted consequences and the factors which influence them

  6. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status of national programmes, the progress achieved since the last meeting held in June 1988 in the field of advanced technologies and design trends for existing and future water cooled reactors. 24 specialists from 14 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting and 12 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was attended by 20 participants from 12 countries who reviewed and discussed the status and progress of national programmes on advanced water-cooled reactors and recommended to the Scientific Secretary a comprehensive programme for 1991/1992 which would support technology development programmes in IWGATWR Member States. This summary report outlines the activities of IWGATWR since its Second Meeting in June 1988 and main results of the Third Meeting

  8. National symposium on commissioning and operating experiences in heavy water plants and associated chemical industries [Preprint volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A symposium on commissioning and operating experiences in heavy water plants and associated chemical industries (SCOPEX-92) was organised to share the experience and exchange the ideas among plant operators, designers, consultants and vendors in the areas of operation, commissioning and equipment performance. This pre-print volume has been brought out as an integrated source of information on commissioning and operation of heavy water plants. The following aspects of heavy water plants are covered: commissioning and operation, instrumentation and control, and safety and environment. (V.R.)

  9. Neutronic challenges of advanced boiling water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of Boiling Water Reactor technology has been under investigation at the Center for Advance Nuclear Energy Systems at MIT. The advanced concepts under study provide economic incentives through enabling further power uprates (i.e. increasing vessel power density) or better fuel cycle uranium utilization. The challenges in modeling of three advanced concepts with focus on neutronics are presented. First, the Helical Cruciform Fuel rod has been used in some Russian reactors, and studied at MIT for uprating the power in LWRs through increased heat transfer area per unit core volume. The HCF design requires high fidelity 3D tools to assess its reactor physics behavior as well as thermal and fuel performance. Second, an advanced core design, the BWR-HD, was found to promise 65% higher power density over existing BWRs, while using current licensing tools and existing technology. Its larger assembly size requires stronger coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics compared to the current practice. Third is the reduced moderation BWRs, which had been proposed in Japan to enable breeding and burning of fuel as an alternative to sodium fast reactors. Such technology suffers from stronger sensitivity of its neutronics to the void fraction than the traditional BWRs, thus requiring exact modeling of the core conditions such as bypass voiding, to correctly characterize its performance. (author)

  10. Possibilities for use of natural raw materials in treatment of mine water contaminated with heavy metals

    OpenAIRE

    Zendelska, Afrodita

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation examines the possibility of applying natural raw materials such as clinoptilolite, stilbite and opalitized tuff in removing heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Mn и Cu) from contaminated mine water. The basic examination of these natural raw materials led to the conclusion that the stilbite gives best results, a little lower efficiency is noted for the clinoptilolite, while the opalitized tuff shows the smallest power of absorption compared to that of the stilbite and the clin...

  11. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides and Heavy Metals in Surface Waters of Konya Closed Basin, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Emin Aydin; Senar Ozcan; Fatma Beduk; Ali Tor

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α -, β -, γ -, and δ -hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, p,p′-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among al...

  12. The response time analysis of high log neutron flux rate for heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water reactor such as Wolssung no. 1 has a protection/safety system named special safety system. The system has four safety systems ; shutdown no. 1, shutdown no. 2, emergency core cooling system and containment system. In this paper, the response time of high log neutron flux rate, one of the reactor trip loops of shutdown no.1/no.2, was analysed based on the description of final safety analysis report and compared to the plant measurement

  13. Innovation in laboratory analysis in heavy water plants (Paper No. 6.7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy Water Plant (Baroda) is operated with the laboratory's analytical support averaging 50,000 measurements on 22,000 samples per annum apart from various experiments and tests for problem solving and for indigenisation of process parameters. Each measurement has its own importance in attaining the optimised process and quality controls for sustained operation of the plant. This paper attempts to discuss the importance of laboratory analysis. (author). 7 refs

  14. Preparation Before Signature of Upgrade of Algeria Heavy Water Research Reactor Contract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Song; ZAN; Huai-qi; XU; Qi-guo; JIA; Yu-wen

    2012-01-01

    <正>Algeria heavy water research reactor (Birine) is a multiple-purpose research reactor, which was constructed with the help of China more than 20 years ago. By request of Algeria, China will upgrade the research reactor; so as to improve the status of current reactor such as equipment ageing, shortage of spare parts, several systems do not meet requirements of current standards and criteria etc.

  15. Water and nutrient transport on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Salm, Caroline; van den Toorn, Antonie; Chardon, Wim J; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2012-01-01

    In flat areas, transport of dissolved nutrients by water through the soil matrix to groundwater and drains is assumed to be the dominant pathway for nutrient losses to ground- and surface waters. However, long-term data on the losses of nutrients to surface water and the contribution of various pathways is limited. We studied nutrient losses and pathways on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in The Netherlands during a 5-yr period. Average annual nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses to surface water were 15.1 and 3.0 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. Losses were dominated by particulate N (50%) and P (70%) forms. Rapid discharge through trenches was the dominant pathway (60-90%) for water and nutrient transport. The contribution of pipe drains to the total discharge of water and nutrients was strongly related to the length of the dry period in the preceding summer. This relationship can be explained by the very low conductivity of the soil matrix and the formation of shrinkage cracks during summer. Losses of dissolved reactive P through pipe drains appear to be dominated by preferential flow based on the low dissolved reactive P concentration in the soil matrix at this depth. Rainfall occurring after manure application played an important role with respect to the annual losses of N and P in spring when heavy rainfall occurred within 2 wk after manure application. PMID:22218191

  16. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides and Heavy Metals in Surface Waters of Konya Closed Basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Aydin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs, including α-, β-, γ-, and δ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, p,p′-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β-HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015–0.065 μg/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μg/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μg/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mn < Cu < Ni < As < Cr < Fe. In some samples, As, Fe, and Cr concentrations exceeded the drinking water quality recommended by EU, US EPA, WHO, and Turkish Regulation, while Cu, Ni, and Mn concentrations are below the guideline values. The levels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data.

  17. Seasonal assessment, treatment and removal of heavy metal concentrations in a tropical drinking water reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Moshood Keke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are present in low concentrations in reservoirs, but seasonal anthropogenic activities usually elevate the concentrations to a level that could become a health hazard. The dry season concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, mercury, nickel and zinc were assessed from three sites for 12 weeks in Oyun reservoir, Offa, Nigeria. Triplicate surface water samples were collected and analysed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The trend in the level of concentrations in the three sites is site C > B > A, while the trend in the levels of the concentrations in the reservoir is Ni > Fe > Zn > Pb > Cd > Cu > Hg. Ni, Cd, Pb and Hg were found to be higher than the WHO guidelines for the metals in drinking water. The high concentration of these metals was from anthropogenic watershed run-off of industrial effluents, domestic sewages and agricultural materials into the reservoir coming from several human activities such as washing, bathing, fish smoking, especially in site C. The health effects of high concentration of these metals in the reservoir were highlighted. Methods for the treatment and removal of the heavy metals from the reservoir during water purification such as active carbon adsorption, coagulation-flocculation, oxidation-filtration, softening treatment and reverse osmosis process were highlighted. Other methods that could be used include phytoremediation, rhizofiltration, bisorption and bioremediation. Watershed best management practices (BMP remains the best solution to reduce the intrusion of the heavy metals from the watershed into the reservoir.

  18. Production of a New Emulsifier Material for the Formation Heavy Hydrocarbon/Water Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Farahbakhsh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emulsifiers are a unique class of compounds that have proved to have a variety of potential applications in formation of hydrocarbon in water emulsion, in enhancement of oil recovery and in the reduction of heavy oil viscosity. In this paper, a bio emulsifier was synthesized by a strain of Bacillus licheniformis and was separated by an autoclave and centrifugal process; the purification of bio emulsifier and the increase quality of product was done by adding sulfuric acid (H2SO4 (98% to the solution and centrifuging this compound again. This bio emulsifier has the property of emulsification to a wide range of heavy hydrocarbon to form a stable hydrocarbon-water emulsion. This bio emulsifier could reduce Iranian Nuroze high viscosity oil of about 10000 cP down to 250 cP. This means about 97% decreases in the viscosity. The emulsion stable this condition for 48 hr and the viscosity slowly increases to 4000cp until 192 hr. The stability of the oil in water emulsion during 48hr allows the heavy oil to be transported practically over lengthy distances or remain stable for long periods of time prior to utilization.

  19. Heavy water production benefits of a supporting r and d program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable economic benefit was obtained from an active R and D program while the Canadian heavy water plants were brought to mature operation during the 1970s. The introduction to Canada of this new chemical processing industry led to unexpected process, equipment and materials problems. Having a small team of technical experts already working on heavy water processes and a much larger R and D team working in related fields allowed a rapid response to the problems that limited production. The number of engineers and scientists working on the GS process rose rapidly from a skeleton team in 1970 to 54 during 1974. Effort declined steadily as the major problems were solved and reached 22 by 1980. Cumulative effort over the decade was 264 man-years at a cost of 3.3 percent of the value of the heavy water produced. The new production benefits have lagged behind the R and D expenditure by a few years and the current spending rate is 1.2 percent of product value. Important contributions were made in the areas of process simulation, process chemistry, materials of construction, sieve trays, and mechanical equipment

  20. Technologies for tritium control in fission reactors moderated with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to analyze the possible strategies and technologies, to be applied to HWR at Argentine nuclear power plants, for tritium control. The high contribution of tritium to the total dose has given rise to the need by the operators and/or designers to carry out developments and improvements to try to optimize tritium control technologies. Within a tritium control program, only that one which includes the heavy water detritiation will allow to reduce the tritium concentrations at optimum levels for safety and cost-effective power plant operation. The technology chosen to be applied should depend not only on the technical feasibility but also on the analysis of economic and juncture factors such as, among others, the quantity of heavy water to be treated. It is the authors' belief that AECL tendency concerning heavy water treatment in its future reactors would be to employ the CECE technology complemented with immobilization on titanium beds, with the 'on-line' detritiation in each nuclear power plant. This would not be of immediate application since our analysis suggests that AECL would assume that the process is under development and needs to be tested. (author). 21 refs

  1. HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN WASTE WATER SAMPLES FROM VALEA ŞESEI TAILING POND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. MELENTI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal analysis in waste water samples from Valea Şesei tailing pond. The mining of ore deposits and the processing and smelting of copper at Roşia Poieni have resulted in an increase of the toxic elements concentration within all components of the environment in the area. Valea Şesei tailing pond is a waste deposit for the Roşia Poieni open-pit and is the biggest tailing pond in Romania. In October 2009, we determined 8 heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in 10 waste water samples. This water flows under the tailing dam, through the Valea Şesei stream, into the Arieş River, the water’s pH varies between 3 and 4. The heavy metals concentration exceeds with orders of magnitude. In the stream the concentrations are much lower, but still exceed the admitted levels. The results show that the tailing pond is a pollution hot spot in the area affecting the environment.

  2. Irrigation water quality influences heavy metal uptake by willows in biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, W Scott; Baker, Alan J M; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2015-05-15

    Phytoextraction is an effective method to remediate heavy metal contaminated landscapes but is often applied for single metal contaminants. Plants used for phytoextraction may not always be able to grow in drier environments without irrigation. This study investigated if willows (Salix x reichardtii A. Kerner) can be used for phytoextraction of multiple metals in biosolids, an end-product of the wastewater treatment process, and if irrigation with reclaimed and freshwater influences the extraction process. A plantation of willows was established directly onto a tilled stockpile of metal-contaminated biosolids and irrigated with slightly saline reclaimed water (EC ∼2 dS/cm) at a wastewater processing plant in Victoria, Australia. Biomass was harvested annually and analysed for heavy metal content. Phytoextraction of cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc was benchmarked against freshwater irrigated willows. The minimum irrigation rate of 700 mm per growing season was sufficient for willows to grow and extract metals. Increasing irrigation rates produced no differences in total biomass and also no differences in the extraction of heavy metals. The reclaimed water reduced both the salinity and the acidity of the biosolids significantly within the first 12 months after irrigation commenced and after three seasons the salinity of the biosolids had dropped to metal extraction. Reclaimed water irrigation reduced the biosolid pH and this was associated with reductions of the extraction of Ni and Zn, it did not influence the extraction of Cu and enhanced the phytoextraction of Cd, which was probably related to the high chloride content of the reclaimed water. Our results demonstrate that flood-irrigation with reclaimed water was a successful treatment to grow willows in a dry climate. However, the reclaimed water can also change biosolids properties, which will influence the effectiveness of willows to extract different metals.

  3. Assessment of toxicity in waters due to heavy metals derived from atmospheric deposition using Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukurluoglu, Sibel; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2013-01-01

    Water toxicity originating from the atmospheric deposition of six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) was investigated on Vibrio fischeri activity in Izmir, Turkey. A LUMIStox® test was applied to dry and wet deposition samples and metal solutions. The inhibition levels and effective toxicity concentrations of these samples and solutions were determined. Interactive toxicity effects among the metals were investigated. When the impacts of the synthetic single heavy metal solutions were compared with each other, a toxicity ranking of Cr>Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Ni was obtained in order of decreasing severity. The total effective concentrations of these six metals were in the ranges of 0.074-0.221 mg/L and 0.071-0.225 mg/L for receiving aqueous solutions of dry and wet atmospheric depositions, respectively. The toxicity data showed that the wet deposition samples were 15% more toxic than the dry deposition samples. The interactive toxicity effects of the heavy metals in both dry and wet deposition samples were classified as antagonistic. High levels of heavy metals deposited in dissolved form may constitute an important input in the biochemical cycle and may have significant impacts. PMID:23030388

  4. Embedded optical fibers for PDV measurements in shock-loaded, light and heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Patrick; Benier, Jacky; Frugier, Pierre Antoine; Debruyne, Michel; Bolis, Cyril

    2012-03-01

    In order to study the shock-detonation transition, we propose to characterize the shock loading of a high explosive plane wave generator into a nitromethane cell. To eliminate the reactive behaviour, we replace the nitromethane by an inert liquid compound. Light water (H2O) has been first employed; eventually heavy water (D2O) has been chosen for its better infrared spectral properties. We present the PDV results of different embedded optical fibers which sense the medium with two different approaches: a non intrusive optical observation of phenomena coming in front of them (interface, shock wave, detonation wave) followed by their mechanical interaction with the fiber.

  5. Heavy metals in the surrounding water and sediments of tailing dam of Sasa mine

    OpenAIRE

    Zendelska, Afrodita; Golomeova, Mirjana; Krstev, Boris; Golomeov, Blagoj; Krstev, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows results of tests on water and sediments quality in the Sasa Mine, along the Kamenicka and Bregalnica rivers flows into the Vardar River. The investigation results showed high concentrations of certain heavy metals (Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu) in water and sediments that pass or derived from the vicinity of the mine Sasa. The concentrations of these metals are highest near tailing dam of SASA mine. Going to the inflow into the Lake Kalimanci concentration of these metals are reduced...

  6. Separation of heavy metal from water samples--The study of the synthesis of complex compounds of heavy metal with dithiocarbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sonila; Lazo, Pranvera; Ylli, Fatos; Stafilov, Trajce; Qarri, Flora; Marku, Elda

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity and persistence of heavy metal (HM) ions may cause several problems to marine organisms and human beings. For this reason, it is growing the interest in the chemistry of sulphur donor ligands such as dithiocarbamates (DDTC), due to their applications particularly in analytical chemistry sciences. The aim of this work has been the study of heavy metal complexes with DDTC and their application in separation techniques for the preconcentration and/or removing of heavy metals from the water solutions or the water ecosystems prior to their analysis. The HM-DDTC complexes were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopic methods. The elemental analysis and the yield of the synthesis (97.5-99.9%) revealed a good purity of the complexes. High values of complex formation yields of HM-DDTC complexes is an important parameter for quantitatively removing/and or preconcentration of heavy metal ions from water solution even at low concentration of heavy metals. Significant differences founded between the characteristic parameters of UV/Vis (λmax and ϵmax) and FTIR absorption spectra of the parent DDTC and HM-DDTC complexes revealed the complex formation. The presence of the peaks at the visible spectral zone is important to M(nd(10-m))-L electron charge transfer of the new complexes. The (C=N) (1450-1500 cm(-1)) and the un-splitting (C-S) band (950-1002 cm(-1)) in HM-DDTC FTIR spectra are important to the identification of their bidentate mode (HM[S2CNC4H10]2). The total CHCl3 extraction of trace level heavy metals from water samples after their complex formation with DDTC is reported in this article. PMID:26761072

  7. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors..., ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors.''...

  8. Heavy metals in the waste and in the water discharge area of municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ermindo Cavallet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The county of Paranaguá discards 80 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW daily in the Embocuí landfill without proper treatment. The present study aimed to evaluate the concentration of arsenic (As, cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, lead (Pb and mercury (Hg in the dump area and to compare it with reference values for soil and water quality stipulated by CETESB (2005. The methodology of the study involved the collection of waste samples (organic waste mixed with soil from a depth of 1 m deep at 12 points of the dump, and the collection of water samples from a depth of 3 m at 3 points in the deposited waste. Extraction of heavy metals in the water samples was performed according to the USEPA (1999 method and analysis followed ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Analysis of the solid waste samples showed the following concentrations: (mg kg -1: As < 10; Cd < 1; Cr = 26; Pb = 52; e Hg = 0.2. The water samples showed the following concentrations: (mg L- 1: As < 5; Cd < 5; Cr =29 e Pb = 10. The amounts of heavy metals in samples of tailings and water from the landfill area fall below the values considered to create a risk of contamination.

  9. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  10. INFLUENCE OF HEAVY METALS HYDROXIDES ON WATER DISSOCIATION IN BIPOLAR MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheldeshov N. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of bipolar membrane – analogue of MB-2, modified with chemically introduced chromium (III, iron (III and nickel (II hydroxides by the method of frequency spectrum of electrochemical impedance, by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy in combination with X-ray spectrum analysis are presented. It is shown, that sequential treatment of cation-exchanger, contained in cationexchange membrane, with metal salt solution and alkali solution does not result in formation of complex compounds of these metals with ionic groups of ion exchanger. It was found that in these conditions the presence of heavy metals in the phase of cationexchanger confirmed by X-ray analysis, however, crystals of hydroxides of heavy metals are not detected in the size range of 1000 nm to 20 nm. These heavy metal compounds are thermally unstable and their catalytic activity in the reaction of dissociation of water molecules decreases with increasing temperature during heat treatment. The introduction of low-soluble hydroxides of d-metals (chromium (III, iron (III, nickel(II by chemical method can significantly improve the electrochemical characteristics of a bipolar membrane. The most effective catalysts in water dissociation reaction are the hydroxides of chromium (III and iron (III and, as a consequence, membranes with these hydroxides have a lower value of overpotential compared with original membrane at the same current density

  11. Speciation of heavy metals in environmental water by ion chromatography coupled to ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, A.A. [Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (EAWAG), Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2002-02-01

    Biogenic (e.g. phytochelatins, porphyrins, DOM) as well as anthropogenic (e.g. NTA, EDTA, phosphonates) chelators affect the mobility and cycling of heavy metals in environmental waters. Since such chelators can form strongly bound anionic heavy metal complexes that are stable and highly mobile, anion-exchange chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was investigated. A narrow bore HPLC system was connected to a micro concentric nebuliser for in-line sample introduction. A new chromatographic procedure based on a synthetic hydrophilic quaternary ammonium anion exchanger in combination with nitrate as a strong eluent anion, and gradient elution, provided high separation selectivity and a large analytical window. Low detection limits (nmol L{sup -1}) were achieved by on-column matrix removal and sample preconcentration. This allowed the method to be successfully applied to different environmental research areas. In ecotoxicological studies of heavy metal effects on algae low concentrations of metal EDTA complexes were determined in nutrient solutions without interference from high (buffer) salt concentrations. In groundwater, infiltrated by a polluted river, mobile metal EDTA species were observed. In river water of different pollution levels beside CuEDTA other anionic Cu-complexes were found in nmol L{sup -1} concentrations. (orig.)

  12. Heavy metals in a degraded soil treated with sludge from water treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Sandra Tereza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of water treatment sludge (WTS to degraded soil is an alternative for both residue disposal and degraded soil reclaim. This study evaluated effects of the application of water treatment sludge to a Typic Hapludox soil degraded by tin mining in the National Forest of Jamari, State of Rondonia, Brazil, on the content of heavy metals. A completely randomized experimental design with five treatments was used: control (n = 4; chemical control, which received only liming (n = 4; and rates D100, D150 and D200, which corresponded to 100, 150 and 200 mg of N-sludge kg-1 soil (n = 20, respectively. Thirty days after liming, period in which soil moisture was kept at 70% of the retention capacity, soil samples were taken and analyzed for total and extractable Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, and Cr. The application of WTS increased heavy-metal contents in the degraded soil. Although heavy metals were below their respective critical limits, sludge application onto degraded areas may cause hazardous environmental impact and thus must be monitored.

  13. High efficiency of heavy metal removal in mine water by limestone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Zhigang; ZHOU Lifa; BAO Zhengyu; GAO Pu; SUN Xingwang

    2009-01-01

    The removal of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn from dilute mine water by using several geological materials including pure limestone, sand, carbonaceous limestone and brecciated limestone was performed on a laboratory scale. The results showed that to add geological materials in combination with sodium carbonate injection would notably enhance the efficiency of heavy metal removal to varying degrees. Pure limestone was found the best one among the four materials mentioned above for removing heavy metals from mine water. The removal efficiencies of pure limestone when it is ground as fine as 30-60 meshes are 58.6% for Cd, 100% for Cu, 47.8% for Ni, and 36.8% for Zn at 20℃. The optimum pH is about 8.9 to 9.1. The mechanism of higher effective removal, perhaps, is primarily due to co-precipitation under the control of calcite-related pH value. According to this research, Na2CO3 injection manners, including slug dosing and drip-wise, seemed to have little impact on the efficiency of heavy metal removal.

  14. HEAVY METALS IN WATERS, PENETRATING THE FOOD, ECOSYSTEMS AND THE ECONOMY OF KOSOVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dreshaj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The waters of the oceans and seas play an important role in the hydrological cycle of the Earth. With Kosovo's economic development, increasing population developed many branches of industry, which caused pollution of rivers with heavy metals such as mine "Trepça", the treatment of agriculture products with pesticides and herbicides, eutrophication of lakes, transition metal in agricultural products, coming up ecological balance disorders. Uncontrolled exploitation of natural resources, irresponsible treatment (industrial waste and sewage, has caused contamination above the permitted ecosystem with toxic elements such as: Hg, Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ni, Mn, etc. Heavy metals in natural waters unpolluted behave low concentration (approximately 1μg / l; some of them are essential for enzymatic reactions. Increase their concentration as a result of industrial activities, often exceeds the allowed limit, causing serious changes to cosystems and tourist areas, to living organisms in natural aquatic systems. Ecological preservation of ecosystems from heavy metals is vital for the environment, food security and the preservation of ecological habitats which represents an economic cost in R. Kosovo.

  15. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design... the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis...

  16. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the

  17. Fast removal of heavy metal ions and phytic acids from water using new modified chelating fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Jin Nan Wang; Ying Meng; Ai Min Li

    2012-01-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto polyethylene glycol terephthalate (PET) fiber initiated by benzoy peroxide (BPO) was carried out in heterogeneous media.Moreover,modification of the grafted PET fiber (PET-AA) was done by changing the carboxyl group into acylamino group through the reaction with dimethylamine.The modified chelating fiber (NDWJN 1) was characterized using elementary analysis,SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy.Adsorption kinetic curves indicated that NDWJN1 could fast remove heavy metal ions and phytic acids from water effectively.Furthermore,batch kinetic studies indicated that heavy metal ions adsorbed to NDWJN1 could be fitted well by both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order adsorption equations,but the intra-particle diffusion plaved a dominant role in the adsorption of phvtic acids.

  18. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Luca; Evrard, David; Groenen-Serrano, Karine; Freyssinier, Mathilde; Ruffien-Ciszak, Audrey; Gros, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic “on line” monitoring devices are also evoked.

  19. Composition of Heavy Metals in the Water of the River Lopota and Floating Silt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Mchedluri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Like other small rivers in Georgia, the river Lopota, which is one of the most important left tributaries of the river Alazani, is ecologically less studied. Although, phosphorus - potassium fertilizers containing heavy metals from agricultural lands, leaching sediment , composts made of municipal and household waste are systematically leached into the river Lopota, the composition of heavy metals, copper, zinc, iron, lead, nickel, manganese is lower than it is accepted. This fact is promoted by water pH, under which these metals are hydrolyzed and their main mass is accumulated at the bottom, and the rest of it is absorbed in the floating silt. Therefore, they cannot have a negative impact on self-scouring and ecological condition of the river.

  20. Electrochemical sensors and devices for heavy metals assay in water: the French groups' contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca ePUJOL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge in the area of heavy metal trace detection is the development of electrochemical techniques and devices which are user-friendly, robust, selective, with low detection limits and allowing fast analyses. This review presents the major contribution of the French scientific academic community in the field of electrochemical sensors and electroanalytical methods within the last 20 years. From the well-known polarography to the up-to-date generation of functionalized interfaces, the different strategies dedicated to analytical performances improvement are exposed: stripping voltammetry, solid mercury-free electrode, ion selective sensor, carbon based materials, chemically modified electrodes, nano-structured surfaces. The paper particularly emphasizes their advantages and limits face to the last Water Frame Directive devoted to the Environmental Quality Standards for heavy metals. Recent trends on trace metal speciation as well as on automatic on line monitoring devices are also evoked.

  1. Physico-Chemical Characteristics and Heavy Metal Contents of Water from Karavasta lagoon, Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMINA KOTO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted on physico-chemical parameters and heavy metal contents of water from the Karavasta Lagoon(40º56’ N and 19º29’ E. Karavasta Lagoon is one of the largest lagoons in the Mediterranean Seaand one of the most important economic and ecological areas in the southern part of Albania. The overall complex is composed of four lagoons, sand dunes, and a river mouth has a surface of 10000 ha. It is situated in the central part of western region, between Shkumbini River in the north and Semani River in the south, 40 km west of the city of Lushnja, by the Adriatic coast. The study aimed to determine (i the water quality in the lagoon of Karavasta using physico-chemical parameters and the level of heavy metals, (2 its status to support living life in the aquatic ecosystem. Data on temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen were obtained in-situ using Hanna multi-parameters instruments. Surface water of the lagoon was analyzed for heavy metals: Pb, Cr, Cu, Cd, As.The results showed that water temperature varies depending on the seasons. The highest temperatures were in July from 26 to 28.6 ºC depending on the sampling station.The results showed that water temperature varies depending on the seasons. Highest values of pH in the water of the lagoon are verified in December from 10.72 to11.98. The values of salinity in the lagoon of Karavasta are higher in Dajlani station SS1 ranging 42.31% in July to 40.83 %in December, depending from the connection with Adriatic Sea. Also it varies considerably from one area to another, and between seasons, depending on the degree of isolationThe heavy metals Cr, Pb, Cu in some stations are found to be close or higher than the values allowed by the EU and pose a potential health risk to humans and the aquatic life of the lagoon’s ecosystem.

  2. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  3. [New methodology for heavy metals measurement in water samples by PGNAA-XRF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wen-Bao; Zhang, Yan; Hei, Da-Qian; Ling, Yong-Sheng; Shan, Qing; Cheng, Can

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper, a new combined detection method was proposed using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) and characteristic X-ray fluorescence to improve the heavy metals measurement accuracy for in-situ environmental water rejects analysis by PGNAA technology. Especially, the characteristic X-ray fluorescence (XRF) of heavy metals is induced by prompt gamma-ray directly instead of the traditional excitation sources. Thus, a combined measurement facility with an 241 AmBe neutron source, a BGO detector and a NaI-Be detector was developed to analyze the pollutants in water. The two detectors were respectively used to record prompt gamma-ray and characteristic X-ray fluorescence of heavy metals. The prompt gamma-ray intensity (I(γ)) and characteristic X-ray fluorescence intensity (I(x)) was determined by MCNP calculations for different concentration (c(i)) of chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb), respectively. The simulation results showed that there was a good linear relationship between I(γ), I(x) and (c(i)), respectively. The empirical formula of combined detection method was given based on the above calculations. It was found that the combined detection method was more sensitive for high atomic number heavy metals like Hg and Pb measurement than low atomic number like Cr and Cd by comparing and analyzing I(γ) and I(x). The limits of detection for Hg and Pb by the combined measurement instrument were 17.4 and 24.2 mg x kg(-1), respectively. PMID:25752071

  4. Physico chemical characteristics and heavy metal contents of water from Butrinti lagoon, Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Topi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted between May 2010 and January 20011 in the Butrinti Lagoon, an important ecological and economical area in the south of Albania. The study aimed to determine (i the water quality in the lagoon of Butrint using physico-chemical parameters and level of heavy metals, (2 its status to support living life in the aquatic ecosystem. Data on temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, EC were obtained in - situ using multiparameter portable instrument. Surface and bottom water of the lagoon were analyzed for heavy metals: Pb, Cr, Cu, Cd, Hg. The results showed that water temperature varies depending on the seasons. The highest temperatures were in August from 26 to 27.3 0C depending on the sampling station. pH in the water of the lagoon is basic, its values ranged from 8.12 to 8.49, and were optimal for the production of mussels. The values of salinity in the lagoon of Butrint are smaller than those of the Ionian sea influenced by rivers Bistrica, Pavlo and groundwater resources. Lower values of DO in the depth of the lagoon were recorded in August at stations SS2 (1.4 mg L-1 and SS5 (1.9 mg L-1, and therefore a damage was noticed in the growth of mussels in the lagoon. The heavy metals Cr, Pb, in some stations are found in higher levels than the values allowed by the EU and pose a potential health risk to humans and the aquatic life of the lagoon’s ecosystem.

  5. Recent technological advances in the application of nano-catalytic technology to the enhanced recovery and upgrading of bitumen and heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Almao, P. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering

    2013-11-01

    Advances in Nanotechnology, such as manufacturing of nano-catalysts allow the online (during processing) and on site production of nano-catalysts for heavy oils upgrading. These inventions have also facilitated the development of two lines of heavy oils upgrading processes that make use of nano-catalysts for producing upgraded oil: In Situ Upgrading and Field Upgrading. Producing chemical upgrading of heavy oils is achievable and economically viable at lower temperatures and lower pressures than used in most upgraders if the use of nano-catalysts were implemented. The spontaneity of thermal, steam and hydro processing reactions for converting the different chemical families of hydrocarbons present in the heaviest fractions of heavy oils and bitumen (HO-B) into lighter products was shown recently. Spontaneity was measured by the value of the change of free energy at low pressure. These undesirable paths are spontaneous and uncontrollable under thermal cracking conditions, and require providing years of residence time for intermolecular hydrogen redistribution to minimize olefins polymerization, if at all possible. Instead, hydroprocessing in the presence of hydrogen activating catalysts would create an abundance of hydrogen radicals impeding large molecules condensation and olefins proliferation. In Situ Upgrading: performs coupled Enhanced Oil Recovery with In Reservoir Upgrading via Hot Fluid Injection (HFI). The heat handling of this HFI process and the production of transportable oil with no need of diluent from the start of operation completes the originality of it. This technology uses heavy fractions separated from produced oil to reintroduce heat into the reservoir along with suspended nano-catalysts and hydrogen. These components react in the well bore and inside the reservoir to release more heat (hydroprocessing reactions are exothermic) producing light gases and volatile hydrocarbons that contribute to increase oil detachment from the rock resulting in

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of rotating shallow water methods and advances

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitlin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    The rotating shallow water (RSW) model is of wide use as a conceptual tool in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD), because, in spite of its simplicity, it contains all essential ingredients of atmosphere and ocean dynamics at the synoptic scale, especially in its two- (or multi-) layer version. The book describes recent advances in understanding (in the framework of RSW and related models) of some fundamental GFD problems, such as existence of the slow manifold, dynamical splitting of fast (inertia-gravity waves) and slow (vortices, Rossby waves) motions, nonlinear geostrophic adjustment and wa

  7. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h)-1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  8. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  9. The Influence of Industrial Waste on Pesticide and Heavy Metal Conetnts in Cipinang-Sunter River Water Jakarta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of pesticide and heavy metal contents of river water in upperstream (around some factories), and downstream (housing area), along Cipinang-Sunter river Jakarta, on February-June 1996 had been done. The aim of the measurement was to get information about the influence of factories waste on pesticide and heavy metal contents in the Cipinang river water. Gas and liquid chromatographis were used to measure the pesticide content and X-ray fluorecence spectrometry was used to measure the heavy metals content. Result of the measurements showed that Cipinang river water has contained some organochlorin pesticides, i.e., BHC, a and b endosulfan, dieldrin, pp-DDE, and heavy metals, i.e., Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb

  10. Computer code for the analyses of reactivity initiated accident of heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor 'EUREKA-2D'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codes, such as EUREKA and EUREKA-2 have been developed to analyze the reactivity initiated accident for light water reactor. These codes could not be applied directly for the analyses of heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor which are different from light water reactor not only on operation condition but also on reactor kinetic constants. EUREKA-2D which is modified EUREKA-2 is a code for the analyses of reactivity initiated accident of heavy water research reactors. Following items are modified: 1) reactor kinetic constants. 2) thermodynamic properties of coolant. 3) heat transfer equations. The feature of EUREKA-2D and an example of analysis are described in this report. (author)

  11. Treatment of gasoline-contaminated waters by advanced oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiburtius, Elaine Regina Lopes [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19081, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Peralta-Zamora, Patricio [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19081, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: zamora@quimica.ufpr.br; Emmel, Alexandre [Centro Integrado de Tecnologia e Educacao Profissional, 81310-010 Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2005-11-11

    In this study, the efficiency of advanced oxidative processes (AOPs) was investigated toward the degradation of aqueous solutions containing benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) and gasoline-contaminated waters. The results indicated that BTX can be effectively oxidized by near UV-assisted photo-Fenton process. The treatment permits almost total degradation of BTX and removal of more than 80% of the phenolic intermediates at reaction times of about 30 min. Preliminary investigations using water contaminated by gasoline suggest a good potentiality of the process for the treatment of large volumes of aqueous samples containing these polluting species. Heterogeneous photocatalysis and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV system show lower degradation efficiency, probably due to the heterogeneous character of the TiO{sub 2}-mediated system and lost of photonic efficiency of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV system in the presence of highly colored intermediated.

  12. Increasing Heavy Oil in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies. Annual Report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs

  13. HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATIONS IN SAGAR LAKE AND DRINKING WATER SOURCES OF SAGAR CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Parveen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There are various toxic elements present in our surroundings out of that the toxic heavy metals Pb,Cd, As, Se, Cr and Cu can cause several harms to human these metals enter in humans by water. The all kind ofwaste materials are thrown into natural water bodies in each city, this makes the all ground and natural watersources contaminated. The all six metals have determined by Atomic absorption spectrophotometer(AAS inselected water samples from Sagar Lake and dug wells, hand pumps, tube wells etc. during Jan.2009 to June 2010 inevery month the all most all sample have higher metal concentrations than their prescribed permissible limits byWHO.

  14. PIXE analysis of heavy metals in water samples from a mining area in Mongolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolormaa, Oyuntsetseg [Department of Environment Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: bolormaa@n.cc.titech.ac.jp; Baasansuren, Jamsranjav [Department of Environment Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kawasaki, Katsunori [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Watanabe, Makiko [Department of Environment Science and Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiyuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    The affect of mining activity on the environment has been long of public concern. The present paper deals with chemical analysis of the Boroo River water samples collected in mining area of Mongolia focusing the determination of heavy metal contents by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. The samples were prepared by preconcentration method (water samples treated to form metal-dibenzyldithiocarbamate (DBDTC) complexes and collected on a nuclepore track-etch membrane filter) and irradiated by 2.5 MeV proton beam from the single-end type Van de Graaff accelerator. The accuracy of the results was proved by using certified river water samples. The total dispersions of experimental procedure were evaluated by variance analysis.

  15. Multi-functional electrospun nanofibres for advances in tissue regeneration, energy conversion & storage, and water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shengjie; Jin, Guorui; Li, Linlin; Li, Kai; Srinivasan, Madhavi; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Tissue regeneration, energy conversion & storage, and water treatment are some of the most critical challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. In order to address such challenges, one-dimensional (1D) materials are projected to play a key role in developing emerging solutions for the increasingly complex problems. Eletrospinning technology has been demonstrated to be a simple, versatile, and cost-effective method in fabricating a rich variety of materials with 1D nanostructures. These include polymers, composites, and inorganic materials with unique chemical and physical properties. In this tutorial review, we first give a brief introduction to electrospun materials with a special emphasis on the design, fabrication, and modification of 1D functional materials. Adopting the perspective of chemists and materials scientists, we then focus on the recent significant progress made in the domains of tissue regeneration (e.g., skin, nerve, heart and bone) and conversion & storage of clean energy (e.g., solar cells, fuel cells, batteries, and supercapacitors), where nanofibres have been used as active nanomaterials. Furthermore, this review's scope also includes the advances in the use of electrospun materials for the removal of heavy metal ions, organic pollutants, gas and bacteria in water treatment applications. Finally a conclusion and perspective is provided, in which we discuss the remaining challenges for 1D electrospun nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, energy conversion & storage, and water treatment. PMID:26727278

  16. Study of the developmental status and operational features of heavy water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Heavy Water Reactor System, CANDU, and future plans for it as reported in a number of recent Canadian papers, are briefly reviewed. This has been done recognizing several leading observers of the nuclear industry suggest CANDU may represent a promising longer term route to nuclear fuel self sufficiency. It now appears that the concept is well established with a demonstrated performance comparable to the best LWR installations, but it presently has fuel utilization efficiency which is of the same order as that of the current LWRs. It should also be noted that CANDU is designed to a different set of safety and regulatory criteria; a point having potential for at least a second order economic significance to many non-Canadian markets. The feature of particular interest, however, is that the system is indicated by the Canadian Government Corporation-Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.- to be capable of upgrading to a thermal near breeder. As such, this is a point of substantial import, given that system hardware is already proven, of demonstrated safety, reliability and economy, and one for which some supply industry capability is now in place. Remaining areas of uncertainty in the planned CANDU program are those related to the near breeder fuel cycle with its implied fuel processing and recycling requirements, the economics of future heavy water supply, and the actual demonstration of the physics of a unity converter/near breeder. It is noted that recently a variant of this LWBR using heavy water coolant, has been proposed by U.S. workers. Thus LWBR related efforts may be a more appropriate direction for U.S. investigations than a direct focus on CANDU itself. It is recommended that further investigation of such improved conversion developments for existing LWRs be conducted; they could represent a potential addition to the present U.S. program for a 100 percent LMFBR future

  17. Heavy metal content of alfalfa irrigated with waste and tubewell water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jamal Khan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of wastewater on yield and heavy metal uptake of alfalfa along with a tubewell irrigated crop as control at the Agricultural University Peshawar during 2009. The experiment was conducted in small plots (2 x 1m replicated thrice with fertilizer additions. The crop was either irrigated with Hayatabad Industrial Estate (HIE wastewater or tubewell water. The yield data revealed that shoot dry weight was significantly affected by the irrigation water supplies and higher yield was recorded in wastewater irrigated plots and the increase was consistent with time (different cutting. By comparing the total dry biomass of the two treatments, it was observed that there was about 37% increase in yield over control with application of wastewater. The shoot dry weight increased by a factor of about two to three times from first cutting to third cutting in both the treatment plots and the magnitude of increase in yield was higher in wastewater irrigated plots. The heavy metal uptake by the crop was much higher in wastewater irrigated plots compared to tubewell water. The order of metal uptake was Fe> Mn>Zn>Cu>Pb>Ni>Cr>Cd. Shoot analysis showed no metal toxicity because the concentration of the metal was less than phytotoxic level and all the metals were within the permissible limits.

  18. Health-risk market garden production linked to heavy metals in irrigation water in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumolou, Luc; Edorh, Patrick; Montcho, Sabine; Aklikokou, Kodjo; Loko, Frédéric; Boko, Michel; Creppy, Edmond E

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals in the Benin market garden products: is irrigation water the first factor in question, and what is the level of health risk linked to the consumption of these vegetables? Such are the essential problems that this survey attempts to solve. Comparison of the level of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) pollution shows that all the vegetables taken from three market sites are differently contaminated, as well as their irrigation water and the soil. But establishing that water is the first factor responsible for the presence of heavy metals in market garden products is not so obvious. Otherwise, the health risk assessment revealed that the total daily exposure dose (DED) of Cd, namely 8.05μg/kg/day, is high compared to the daily dose defined by the WHO, which is 1μg/kg/day. Also, the ensuing quotient of danger (QD) is 8.05; such a value poses public health risks for the consumer.

  19. Nuclear fragmentation of high-energy heavy-ion beams in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, D; Schall, I; Geissel, H; Irnich, H; Kraft, G; Magel, A; Mohar, M F; Munzenberg, G; Nickel, F; Scheidenberger, C; Schwab, W; Sihver, L

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the physical-technical program of the heavy-ion therapy project at GSI we have investigated the nuclear fragmentation of high-energy ion beams delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS, using water as a tissue-equivalent target. For a direct comparison of fragmentation properties, beams of 10B, 12C, 14N, and 16O were produced simultaneously as secondary beams from a primary 18O beam and separated in flight by magnetic beam analysis. The Z-distributions of beam fragments produced in the water target were measured via energy loss in a large ionisation chamber and a scintillator telescope. From these data we obtained both total and partial charge-changing cross sections. In addition we have performed Bragg measurements using two parallel-plate ionization chambers and a water target of variable length. The detailed shape of the measured Bragg curves and the measured cross sections are in good agreement with model calculations based on semi-empirical formulae.

  20. Heavy metals concentration in water and sediments of the Prut River lower sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matache M. L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 120 km sector of the Prut River, Eastern Romania, was surveyed for the concentration of four heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in water and sediments samples. The analysed sector is located on the border between Romania and Moldova and it is part of the Lower Prut Floodplain Natural Park. The most important steel-producing factory in Romania is located in the park vicinity. Four campaigns have been performed for water collection during different river regimes (both flooding and drought. The water quality is an essential condition for the wetland ecosystems within the park area and the aquatic biota they support, as trace elements bioaccumulation along the food webs might appear (David et al., 2012. Sediments can provide useful information regarding mid- and long-term pollution of the aquatic bodies, being capable of sequestering and releasing important amounts of heavy metals depending on the river regime and extreme situations (van Gestel, 2008; Verhoeven, 2009. For the sediments samples, there is an ascendant trend from upstream to the junction with the Danube River, as the distance to the main urban pole approaches, consequence of a strong human insertion. Romanian standards were used for comparison (MEWM, 2006.

  1. Comparative Studies of the Phytoextraction Capacity of Five Aquatic Plants in Heavy Metal Contaminated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet BUTA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The uptake capacity of the aquatic plants (Salvinia natans Kunth., Eichhornia crassipes Mart., Lemna minor L., Elodea canadensis Michx., Pistia stratiotes L. was analyzed in phytoextraction of Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. It was attend to study the plants capacity comparatively using mono and multimetallic systems. In particular, the chlorophyll, protein and carotenoids contents were studied during heavy metals uptake, in order to observe the stress effect on plants. The results obtained for the monometallic system showed that Salvinia natans Kunth. accumulated the highest quantity of Cu2+ (4.72 mg/g, Zn2+ (2.23 mg/g and Cd2+ (1.90 mg/g. The leaves of Lemna minor L. accumulated the highest concentration of Cu2+ (10.80 mg/g and Cd2+ (2.78 mg/g in multimetallic system. The water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L. translocated the highest quantity of Zn2+ in its roots (4.80 mg/g. The chlorophyll and the carotenoids levels decreased under the stress of heavy metals in both systems, while protein content increased under the influence of Cu2+ and Cd2+, but decreased for Zn2+.  The studied hydrophytes proved to be useful in the uptake of heavy metals in monometallic system and much more effective in the multimetallic system and showed great potential for further applications in the industrial and commercial wastewater treatments.

  2. Oil flow in deep waters: comparative study between light oils and heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreolli, Ivanilto [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Ultra deeper waters fields are being exploited due to technological development. Under this scenario, the flow design is accomplished through pipelines subjected to low temperature and high pressure. Moreover, these flow lines are usually long causing a fast fluid cooling, which may affect flow assurance in some cases. Problems during topsides production plant's restart might occur if the oil is viscous and even in steady state a significant different behavior can be noticed, if compared to a less viscous oil. A comparison between light and heavy oil through a case study with the objective to show some heavy oil flow particularities is the purpose of this paper. Permanent and transient analyses for a specific geometry are presented. The results showed that thermal and proper viscosity modeling are required for heavy oil flow, differently from that of light oil flow, due to the exponential viscosity dependence to temperature and because the predominant laminar regime. In addition, on heavier and heavier oil flow systems, it is essential to consider exportation system's restart. (author)

  3. Development of green belt for Heavy Water Plant (Manuguru) (Paper No. 4.4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been an awakening worldwide regarding environmental degradation. So there is an urgent need of a policy on conservation of ecology while planning projects. Provision for suitable tree plantation as a green belt around a chemical industrial plant is a proven remedy to minimise the impact of gaseous effluents in addition to retain a green cover in the area. This paper describes the steps taken at Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru for providing green belt from a very early stage of execution of the project. (author)

  4. Implementation of requirements of environmental management (ISO 14000) for the decommissioning of the heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentina has a project of decommissioning in the heavy water plant (Planta Experimental de Agua Pesada - PEAP). The aim of this project is to get some experience for decommissioning of nuclear plants and to achieve knowledge about the application of the requirements in environmental management. The project is being carried out according to ISO 14001 standards 'Environmental Management Systems'. The objectives were taken from the model without any expectation of achieving the complete implementation or certification of the system. This report is a description of the acts that have been done. (author)

  5. Decommissioning of the A-1 NPP heavy water evaporator facility - 59225

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with experience and techniques in the application of remotely controlled robotic devices for the dismantling of the A-1 NPP technological equipment during undergoing decommissioning process of the A-1 NPP, which is characterized by high level of radioactivity and contamination. For liquidation of the heavy water evaporator has been applied a mobile robotic system MT 80, which had been developed, designed and constructed as a general-purpose decommissioning equipment. The heavy water evaporator as a part of the NPP heavy water system is located inside the main production unit building in Room No. 220 where the inner surface contamination is from 101 Bq/cm2 to the level of 103 Bq/cm2, dose rate up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained LRAW with high tritium content. The first step was the development of a work procedure with special focus on the elimination of activity and aerosols leaking into the environment. Special tooling was developed for application with the robot, such as hydraulic shears, circular saw, reciprocating saw, circular pipe cutter and a system for quick tool-change without direct intervention of the operators. Then, civil engineering modifications were made to the workplace and new technology was installed, including an efficient exhaust system. After draining-off the remains of LRAW and rinsing the pipeline, fragmentation of the pieces of equipment was started. The fragments are being deposited into drums which are transported in shielded containers to the decontamination facility, where their activity is reduced prior to their storage or further use. All operations are remotely controlled on basis of visual information from four cameras, with consistent radiation protection of the operators. This experience will be exploited in the continuation of work in Room No. 219, where the second identical heavy water evaporator is located. Nuclear Power Plant A-1 is situated in the locality of Jaslovske Bohunice. The A-1 NPP

  6. Study relating to the physico-chemical behaviour of heavy water in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and isotope pollution, and radiolytic decomposition are the two most important ways in which heavy water becomes degraded in nuclear reactors. Chemical pollution has led to the creation of ion exchange purification loops specially designed for reactors: the report contains a description in detail of the application of this purification method in CEA research reactors, including the analysis required, results obtained, and their interpretation. The intelligence obtained on radiolytic decomposition with the same facilities is also discussed, as well as the recombination apparatus and control equipment utilized. Finally, investigation to date in the CEA on recombination circuits for power reactors is also discussed. (author)

  7. A review of qualitative inspection aspects of end fittings in an Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urva Pancholi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a summarized description of the current state of knowledge and practices used in India, in the qualitative inspection of end fittings – a key component of the fuel channel assembly of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR, generally of a Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU type. Further it discusses various quality inspection techniques; and the high standards and mechanical precision of the job required, to be accepted as viable nuclear reactor component. The techniques, instruments and specific data for such components mentioned here are synthesized results from primary research and knowledge available in this area, in order to produce coherent argument focused on quality control of end fittings.

  8. Integration of a heavy water industry to the NH3 national industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water production in Mexico is one of the problems which need an immediate solution, according to an analysis of the studies mentioned in the bibliography, among the production processes which can be introduced in Mexico, the hydrogen-amine one presents the greatest technical and economical advantages. The adoption of such a process will pose different problems: coupling to synthesis plant and selection of the kind of amine which will be used in the process (ammonia or methylamine)with the respective implications that the present work has given. (author)

  9. Fission product release phenomena during core melt accidents in metal fueled heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, P G; Hyder, M L; Monson, P R; Randolph, H W [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Hagrman, D L [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); McClure, P R; Leonard, M T [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1990-01-01

    The phenomena that determine fission product release rates from a core melting accident in a metal-fueled, heavy water reactor are described in this paper. This information is obtained from the analysis of the current metal fuel experimental data base and from the results of analytical calculations. Experimental programs in place at the Savannah River Site are described that will provide information to resolve uncertainties in the data base. The results of the experiments will be incorporated into new severe accident computer codes recently developed for this reactor design. 47 refs., 4 figs.

  10. [Recent advance in solidification/stabilization technology for the remediation of heavy metals-contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Han-zhou; Chen, Tong-bin; Jin, Meng-gui; Lei, Mei; Liu, Cheng-wu; Zu, Wen-pu; Huang, Li-mi

    2011-03-01

    Remediation of heavy metals-contaminated soil is still a difficulty and a hotspot of international research projects. At present, the technologies commonly adopted for the remediation of contaminated sites mainly include excavation, solidification/stabilization (S/S), soil washing, soil vapor extraction (SVE), thermal treatment, and bioremediation. Based on the S/S technical guidelines of Unite State Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and United Kingdom Environment Agency (EA) and the domestic and foreign patents, this paper introduced the concepts of S/S and its development status at home and abroad, and discussed its future development directions. Solidification refers to a process that binds contaminated media with a reagent, changing the media's physical properties via increasing its compressive strength, decreasing its permeability, and encapsulating the contaminants to form a solid material. Stabilization refers to the process that involves a chemical reaction which reduces the leachability of a waste, chemically immobilizes the waste and reduces its solubility, making the waste become less harmful or less mobile. S/S technology includes cement solidification, lime pozzolanic solidification, plastic materials stabilization, vitrification, and regent-based stabilization. Stabilization (or immobilization) treatment processes convert contaminants to less mobile forms through chemical or thermal interactions. In stabilization technology, the aim of adding agents is to change the soil physical and chemical properties through pH control technology, redox potential technology, precipitation techniques, adsorption technology, and ion-exchange technology that change the existing forms of heavy metals in soil, and thus, reduce the heavy metals bioavailability and mobility. This review also discussed the S/S evaluation methods, highlighted the need to enhance S/S technology in the molecular bonding, soil polymers, and formulation of China's S/S technical guidelines.

  11. Evaluation of surface water quality indices and ecological risk assessment for heavy metals in scrap yard neighbourhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojekunle, Olusheyi Z; Ojekunle, Olurotimi V; Adeyemi, Azeem A; Taiwo, Abayomi G; Sangowusi, Opeyemi R; Taiwo, Adewale M; Adekitan, Adetoun A

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of surface water with heavy metals from industrial activities especially those from scrap yard has caused a major threat to human life exposing man to series of hazard, diseases, disability and consequently death. This study focuses on water quality indices of Owode-Onirin and Lafenwa scrap yard with respect to its physicochemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations by evaluating Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI), Metal Index (MI) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI). Fifteen water samples were selected randomly from two locations by purposive sampling methods. Five heavy metals which includes Nickel (Ni), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb) were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and standard analytical procedure were follow to ensure accuracy. One way analysis of variance was carried out to analyse the data. The concentrations of the heavy metals were significantly different between sampling locations. However, the mean concentrations of Cd (0.0121 mg/L) were found to be above the highest permissible value of Standard Organization of Nigeria standards for drinking water (SON 2007) and WHO (Guidelines for drinking water quality: incorporating 1st and 2nd Addlenda. World Health Organization, Geneva, 2004) for drinking water. Although Pb was present in two out of the fifteen water samples with a mean value of (0.0324 mg/L) which was also above the highest permissible value. The mean concentrations of Zn (0.2149 mg/L) and Cu (0.0341 mg/L) are found to be below the highest permissible value of the mentioned guideline while no trace of Ni was found in the water samples across the two sampling locations. The mean HPI 518.55 is far above the critical value of 100, indicates that selected water samples are critically polluted with heavy metals. MI revealed low quality water with mean value 4.83, suggests that the selected water is seriously affected with the present of heavy metal. The Hakanson PERI indicated that of the

  12. Evaluation of surface water quality indices and ecological risk assessment for heavy metals in scrap yard neighbourhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojekunle, Olusheyi Z; Ojekunle, Olurotimi V; Adeyemi, Azeem A; Taiwo, Abayomi G; Sangowusi, Opeyemi R; Taiwo, Adewale M; Adekitan, Adetoun A

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of surface water with heavy metals from industrial activities especially those from scrap yard has caused a major threat to human life exposing man to series of hazard, diseases, disability and consequently death. This study focuses on water quality indices of Owode-Onirin and Lafenwa scrap yard with respect to its physicochemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations by evaluating Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI), Metal Index (MI) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI). Fifteen water samples were selected randomly from two locations by purposive sampling methods. Five heavy metals which includes Nickel (Ni), Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), Cadmium (Cd), Lead (Pb) were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and standard analytical procedure were follow to ensure accuracy. One way analysis of variance was carried out to analyse the data. The concentrations of the heavy metals were significantly different between sampling locations. However, the mean concentrations of Cd (0.0121 mg/L) were found to be above the highest permissible value of Standard Organization of Nigeria standards for drinking water (SON 2007) and WHO (Guidelines for drinking water quality: incorporating 1st and 2nd Addlenda. World Health Organization, Geneva, 2004) for drinking water. Although Pb was present in two out of the fifteen water samples with a mean value of (0.0324 mg/L) which was also above the highest permissible value. The mean concentrations of Zn (0.2149 mg/L) and Cu (0.0341 mg/L) are found to be below the highest permissible value of the mentioned guideline while no trace of Ni was found in the water samples across the two sampling locations. The mean HPI 518.55 is far above the critical value of 100, indicates that selected water samples are critically polluted with heavy metals. MI revealed low quality water with mean value 4.83, suggests that the selected water is seriously affected with the present of heavy metal. The Hakanson PERI indicated that of the

  13. Core Design and Deployment Strategy of Heavy Water Cooled Sustainable Thorium Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Takaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies on water cooled thorium breeder reactor based on matured pressurized water reactor (PWR plant technology concluded that reduced moderated core by arranging fuel pins in a triangular tight lattice array and using heavy water as coolant is appropriate for achieving better breeding performance and higher burn-up simultaneously [1–6]. One optimum core that produces 3.5 GW thermal energy using Th-233U oxide fuel shows a breeding ratio of 1.07 and averaged burn-up of about 80 GWd/t with long cycle length of 1300 days. The moderator to fuel volume ratio is 0.6 and required enrichment of 233U for the fresh fuel is about 7%. The coolant reactivity coefficient is negative during all cycles despite it being a large scale breeder reactor. In order to introduce this sustainable thorium reactor, three-step deployment scenario, with intermediate transition phase between current light water reactor (LWR phase and future sustainer phase, is proposed. Both in transition phase and sustainer phase, almost the same core design can be applicable only by changing fissile materials mixed with thorium from plutonium to 233U with slight modification in the fuel assembly design. Assuming total capacity of 60 GWe in current LWR phase and reprocessing capacity of 800 ton/y with further extensions to 1600 ton/y, all LWRs will be replaced by heavy water cooled thorium reactors within about one century then thorium reactors will be kept operational owing to its potential to sustain fissile fuels while reprocessing all spent fuels until exhaustion of massive thorium resource.

  14. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  15. Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossiter, Helfrid M.A. [School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Owusu, Peter A.; Awuah, Esi [Department of Civil Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); MacDonald, Alan M. [British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA (United Kingdom); Schaefer, Andrea I., E-mail: Andrea.Schaefer@ed.ac.uk [School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGO's and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a water source has been improved. Water supplies were sampled across Ghana from mostly boreholes, wells and rivers as well as some piped water from the different regions and analysed for the chemical quality. Chemical water quality was found to exceed the WHO guidelines in 38% of samples, while pH varied from 3.7 to 8.9. Excess levels of nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) were found in 21% of the samples, manganese (Mn) and fluoride (F{sup -}) in 11% and 6.7%, respectively. Heavy metals such as lead (Pb), arsenic (As) and uranium (U) were localised to mining areas. Elements without health based guideline values such as aluminium (Al, 95%) and chloride (Cl, 5.7%) were found above the provisional guideline value. Economic information was gathered to identify water costs and ability to pay. Capital costs of wells and boreholes are about Pounds 1200 and Pounds 3800 respectively. The majority of installation costs are generally paid by the government or NGO's, while the maintenance is expected to be covered by the community. At least 58% of the communities had a water payment system in place, either an annual fee/one-off fee or 'pay-as-you-fetch'. The annual fee was between Pounds 0.3-21, while the boreholes had a water collection fee of Pounds 0.07-0.7/m{sup 3}, many wells were free. Interestingly, the most expensive water ( Pounds 2.9-3.5/m{sup 3}) was brought by truck. Many groundwater sources were not used due to poor chemical water quality. Considering the cost of unsuccessful borehole development, the potential for integrating suitable water treatment into the capital and maintenance costs of water sources is discussed. Additionally, many sources were not in use due to lack of water capacity, equipment malfunction or lack of economic

  16. Magnetite–hematite nanoparticles prepared by green methods for heavy metal ions removal from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The negatively charged cubic magnetite nanoparticles, prepared by the coprecipitation method in N2 atmosphere, can adsorb up to 99% of the positively charged toxic heavy metal ions at a proper pH value. -- Highlights: • Mixed magnetite–hematite nanoparticles were synthesized via different routes. • Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, HRTEM, BET and magnetic hysteresis. • The material was employed as a sorbent for removal of some heavy metal ions from water. • The effects of pH and the contact time on the adsorption process were studied and optimized. -- Abstract: Mixed magnetite–hematite nanoparticles were synthesized via different routes such as, coprecipitation in air and N2 atmosphere, citrate–nitrate, glycine–nitrate and microwave-assisted citrate methods. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), BET measurements and magnetic hysteresis. XRD data showed the formation of magnetite–hematite mixture with different compositions according to the synthesis method. The particle size was in the range of 4–52 nm for all the prepared samples. From HRTEM micrographs, it was found that, the synthesis method affects the moropholgy of the prepared samples in terms of crystallinity and porosity. The magnetite–hematite mixture was employed as a sorbent material for removal of some heavy metal ions from water such as lead(II), cadmium(II) and chromium(III). The effects of pH value and the contact time on the adsorption process were studied and optimized in order to obtain the highest possible adsorption efficiency of the magnetite–hematite mixture. The effect of the synthesis method of the magnetite–hematite mixture on the adsorption process was also investigated. It was found that samples prepared by the coprecipitation method had better adsorption efficiency than those prepared by other combustion methods

  17. Study on the heavy metals having effect on the water biocenoses in the backwaters at Alpar and Lakitelek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekete, E.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy metals which have an effect on the water biocenosis were determined monthly during 1982 in the Tisza backwaters at Alpar and Lakitelek, Hungary. Copper, cadmium, zinc, chromium, and mercury contents of the water were determined. Organic matter, ammonium, nitrate, pH, sodium and potassium content were determined jointly with the studies of the heavy metals. On the basis of water quality indexes, the water quality of Lakitelek backwater is more stable than that of the Alpar backwater. Correlations were observed between the zinc and copper content and aquatic life. The two backwaters have significant mercury content, which is due to agricultural runoff. It is striking that cadmium does not occur in significant concentrations in the backwaters. Samples originating from the bottom sediments should be included in the studies on heavy metals, to obtain complete information on equilibrium and transport process taking place in the backwaters. 13 references, 12 figures.

  18. STUDIES ON ANTIBIOTICS AND HEAVY METAL RESISTANCE PROFILING OF ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM DRINKING WATER AND CLINICAL SPECIMENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Kawane

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals is an increasing problem in today’s society. Antibiotics resistances in the clinical isolates were high as compare to E.coli from drinking water. The drinking water and clinical E.coli showed more or less equal resistance to antibiotic: metronidazole, penicillin, clindamycin, cephoxithin and heavy metals; copper, mercury and lead, except cadmium metal ions. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR indices in the clinical isolates were high as compare to MAR indices of drinking water. E.coli isolates showed higher MAR indices to cephalothin, cephoxithin, clindamycin, metronidazole, penicillin and vancomycin indicated its human origin in drinking water. No significant variation in heavy metal tolerance (HMT was recorded from both types of isolated. Thus MAR indices were much more reliable indicator to differentiate origin of E.coli.

  19. Study of the prospects for heavy water production via laser isotope separation. Final report, 1 April--30 September 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rationale for ''cheap'' heavy water is discussed with emphasis on the economic, safety, and arms control implications of the widespread adoption of pressure-tube, heavy water moderated and cooled CANDU reactors, and variations thereof. Three classes of vibrational-photochemical laser processes are considered in detail, i.e., hydrogen halide-unsaturated hydrocarbon addition reactions, isotopically selective photoadsorption and photodesorption, and selective two-step molecular dissociation. General remarks are made concerning the economic viability of these techniques vis a vis hydrogen sulfide/water chemical exchange

  20. Effect of polluted water on soil and plant contamination by heavy metals in El-Mahla El-Kobra, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Esawy Kasem; Ghoneim, Adel Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of untreated waste water in Zefta drain and drain no. 5 is becoming a problem for many farmers in the El-Mahla El-Kobra area, Egypt. The discharged water contains high levels of contaminants considered hazardous to the ecosystem. Some plants, soil, water, and sediment samples were collected from the El-Mahla El-Kobra area to evaluate the contamination by heavy metals. The results showed that the heavy metals, pH, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), biochemical oxyge...

  1. Comparative study of the folding/unfolding dynamics of poly(glutamic acid) in light and heavy water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Lucille; Steinbacher, Andreas; Bouganne, Raphaël; Hache, François

    2014-05-22

    The folding/unfolding equilibrium is investigated in poly(glutamic acid) (PGA) by two complementary sets of experiments: temperature-dependent steady-state circular dichroism spectra on the one hand and time-resolved circular dichroism measurements coupled with a T-jump experiment on the other hand. The experiments are performed for PGA dissolved in water for various pH values, as well as in heavy water. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters extracted from these measurements are shown to be markedly different between light and heavy water, which is assigned to the difference in hydrogen bond energies in both solvents.

  2. Advanced Water Recovery Technologies for Long Duration Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Scan X.

    2005-01-01

    Extended-duration space travel and habitation require recovering water from wastewater generated in spacecrafts and extraterrestrial outposts since the largest consumable for human life support is water. Many wastewater treatment technologies used for terrestrial applications are adoptable to extraterrestrial situations but challenges remain as constraints of space flights and habitation impose severe limitations of these technologies. Membrane-based technologies, particularly membrane filtration, have been widely studied by NASA and NASA-funded research groups for possible applications in space wastewater treatment. The advantages of membrane filtration are apparent: it is energy-efficient and compact, needs little consumable other than replacement membranes and cleaning agents, and doesn't involve multiphase flow, which is big plus for operations under microgravity environment. However, membrane lifespan and performance are affected by the phenomena of concentration polarization and membrane fouling. This article attempts to survey current status of membrane technologies related to wastewater treatment and desalination in the context of space exploration and quantify them in terms of readiness level for space exploration. This paper also makes specific recommendations and predictions on how scientist and engineers involving designing, testing, and developing space-certified membrane-based advanced water recovery technologies can improve the likelihood of successful development of an effective regenerative human life support system for long-duration space missions.

  3. Recent advances and future perspectives of nanosized zero- valent iron for extraction of heavy elements from metallurgical sludges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, I. Yu; Levina, V. V.; Kolesnikov, E. A.; Chuprunov, K. O.; Gusev, A. A.; Godymchuk, A. Yu; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes with nanosized zero-valent iron have presented great potential in wastewater treatment technology and now experience both increasing popularity and reliable technical improvements. Besides wastewater treatment, there is another promising application for an emerging technology of iron nanoparticles - as Fenton-like catalyst for extraction of valuable elements from poor and secondary raw materials such as metallurgical sludges. In present research, we carried out a set of experiments with emphasis on the physicochemical mechanisms and their relationship to the performance. In particular, we examined complex acidic - hydrogen peroxide leaching of zinc from blast furnace sludge with nanosized zero-valent iron as Fenton-like catalyst. Results of the experiments showed promising potential for subsequent application in extraction of heavy and rare-earth elements.

  4. Report of the consultancy on review of thermophysical properties of materials for advanced water-cooled reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990 the IAEA's Nuclear Power Technology Development Section has carried out a coordinated research programme on thermophysical properties of materials for advanced water cooled reactors. The objective of this activity has been to collect and systematize a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating and transient conditions. This activity has been organized within the frame of IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-cooled Reactors. The important thermophysical properties include thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, thermal expansion and others. Several organizations involved in this CRP have suggested establishment of a new programme to extend the database to include properties in the liquid region applicable to severe accidents, to critically assess and peer review the property data and correlations, and to recommend the most appropriate data. The purpose of the consultancy was to examine the interest in further cooperation, and, if appropriate, to prepare the scope and approach for a potential new international collaborative programme to collect and review thermophysical properties data for advanced water cooled reactors and to recommend the most appropriate data. Figs

  5. BIOSORPTION AND RECOVERY OF HEAVY METALS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY EICHHORNIA CRASSIPES (WATER HYACINTH ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Mahmood

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal’s release without treatment poses a significant threat to the environment. Heavy metals are non-biodegradable and persistent. In the present study the ash of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, was used to remove six metals from aqueous solutions through biosorption. Results of batch and column experiments showed excellent adsorption capacity. Removal of lead, chromium, zinc, cadmium, copper, and nickel was 29.83, 1.263, 1.575, 3.323, 2.984 and 1.978 µgg-1, respectively. The biosorptive capacity was maximum with pH >8.00. Desorption in µgg-1 of ash for lead, chromium, zinc, cadmium, copper, and nickel was 18.10, 9.99, 11.99, 27.54, 21.09, and 3.71 respectively. Adsorption/desorption of these metals from ash showed the potential of this technology for recovery of metals for further usages. Hydrogen adsorption was also studied with a Sievert-type apparatus. Hydrogen adsorption experiments showed significant storage capacity of water hyacinth ash.

  6. Volume holographic gratings as optical sensor for heavy metal in bathing waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Borbone, F.; Zuppardi, F.; Roviello, A.; Striano, V.; Coppola, G.

    2015-05-01

    Sensor holograms utilize the diffraction principle of transmitting volume holographic grating (VHG) recorded within a photopolymer appositely functionalized to detect a specific stimulus or analyte. A change in the swelling or shrinking state or cross-linking density of the polymer can be caused by the hologram interaction with an analyte. This leads to a change in the recorded hologram sensor and thus, considering an incident monochromatic light and the VHG angular selectivity, to an angle shift of the diffracted maximum intensity. In this work, two new photopolymers based on a sol-gel matrix opportunely functionalized to be sensitive to transition metals or heavy metals were used as sensitive material to record VHGs. An interferometric set up with a laser source at 532nm was used to record VHGs and gratings of 1000 lines/mm were realized. When exposed to a solution of water and lead, an angle shift of about 3° of the first order diffraction of the grating was measured, demonstrating its capability to reveal the presence of heavy metal in water.

  7. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with the evaluation of the consequences to the public of an accidental release of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) to the atmosphere following a pipe or pressure envelope failure, or some other process upset, at a heavy water plant. It covers the first stage of a programme in which the nature of the problem was analyzed and recommendations made for the implementation of a computer model. The concepts of risk assessment and consequence assessment are discussed and a methodology proposed for combining the various elements of the problem into an overall consequence model. These elements are identified as the 'Initiating Events', 'Route to Receptor' and 'Receptor Response' and each is studied in detail in the report. Such phenomena as the blowdown of H2S from a rupture, the initial gas cloud behaviour, atmospheric dispersion and the toxicity of H2S and sulphur dioxide (SO2) are addressed. Critical factors are identified and modelling requirements specified, with special reference to the Bruce heavy water plant. Finally, an overall model is recommended for implementation at the next stage of the programme, together with detailed terms of reference for the remaining work

  8. Definition and Analysis of Heavy Water Reactor Benchmarks for Testing New Wims-D Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of the IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP). A group of heavy water reactor benchmarks have been selected for testing new WIMS-D libraries, including calculations with WIMSD5B program and the analysis of results.These benchmarks cover a wide variety of reactors and conditions, from fresh fuels to high burnup, and from natural to enriched uranium.Besides, each benchmark includes variations in lattice pitch and in coolants (normally heavy water and void).Multiplication factors with critical experimental bucklings and other parameters are calculated and compared with experimental reference values.The WIMS libraries used for the calculations were generated with basic data from JEF-2.2 Rev.3 (JEF) and ENDF/B-VI iNReleaseln 5 (E6) Results obtained with WIMS-86 (W86) library, included with WIMSD5B package, from Windfrith, UK with adjusted data, are included also, for showing the improvements obtained with the new -not adjusted- libraries.The calculations with WIMSD5B were made with two methods (input program options): PIJ (two-dimension collision probability method) and DSN (one-dimension Sn method, with homogenization of materials by ring).The general conclusions are: the library based on JEF data and the DSN meted give the best results, that in average are acceptable

  9. Simulation of water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a heavy clay soil using the MACRO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Besien

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dual-porosity MACRO model has been used to investigate methods of reducing leaching of isoproturon from a structured heavy clay soil. The MACRO model was applied to a pesticide leaching data-set generated from a plot scale experiment on a heavy clay soil at the Oxford University Farm, Wytham, England. The field drain was found to be the most important outflow from the plot in terms of pesticide removal. Therefore, this modelling exercise concentrated on simulating field drain flow. With calibration of field-saturated and micropore saturated hydraulic conductivity, the drain flow hydrographs were simulated during extended periods of above average rainfall, with both the hydrograph shape and peak flows agreeing well. Over the whole field season, the observed drain flow water budget was well simulated. However, the first and second drain flow events after pesticide application were not simulated satisfactorily. This is believed to be due to a poor simulation of evapotranspiration during a period of low rainfall around the pesticide application day. Apart from an initial rapid drop in the observed isoproturon soil residue, the model simulated isoproturon residues during the 100 days after pesticide application reasonably well. Finally, the calibrated model was used to show that changes in agricultural practice (deep ploughing, creating fine consolidated seed beds and organic matter applications could potentially reduce pesticide leaching to surface waters by up to 60%.

  10. Seismic re-evaluation of piping systems of heavy water plant, Kota

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, R; Soni, R S; Venkat-Raj, V

    2002-01-01

    Heavy Water Plant, Kota is the first indigenous heavy water plant built in India. The plant started operation in the year 1985 and it is approaching the completion of its originally stipulated design life. In view of the excellent record of plant operation for the past so many years, it has been planned to carry out various exercises for the life extension of the plant. In the first stage, evaluation of operation stresses was carried out for the process critical piping layouts and equipment, which are connected with 25 process critical nozzle locations, identified based on past history of the plant performance. Fatigue life evaluation has been carried out to fmd out the Cumulative Usage Factor, which helps in arriving at a decision regarding the life extension of the plant. The results of these exercises have been already reported separately vide BARC/200I /E/O04. In the second stage, seismic reevaluation of the plant has been carried out to assess its ability to maintain its integ:rity in case of a seismic e...

  11. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sediments of the luan river source water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, B.; Cao, J.; Cao, Z.; Domagalski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Distribution and characteristics of heavy metals enrichment in sediment were surveyed including the bio-available form analyzed for assessment of the Luan River source water quality. The approaches of sediment quality guidelines (SQG), risk assessment code and Hakanson potential ecological risk index were used for the ecological risk assessment. According to SQG, The results show that in animal bodies, Hg at the sampling site of Wuliehexia was 1.39 mg/kg, Cr at Sandaohezi was 152.37 mg/kg and Cu at Hanjiaying was 178.61 mg/kg exceeding the severe effect screening level. There were 90% of sampling sites of Cr and Pb and 50% sites of Cu exceeded the lowest effect screening level. At Boluonuo and Wuliehexia, the exchangeable and carbonate fractions for above 50% of sites were at high risk levels and that for above 30% of sites at Xiahenan and Wulieheshang were also at high risk levels. Other sites were at medium risk level. Compared to soil background values of China, Hg and Cd showed very strong ecological risk, and the seven heavy metals of Hg, Cd, Cu, As, Pb, Cr, Zn at ecological risk levels were in the descending order. The results could give insight into risk assessment of environmental pollution and decision-making for water source security. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  12. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  13. Technical and economical feasibility studies and preliminary plan of a heavy water plant by the criogenic distillation method of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the pre-feasibility study of a heavy water production plant, both from the technical and economical point of view. Criogenic distillation of hydrogen is used as the final enrichment stage. The deuterium source is water treated previously by a process of enrichment based on the water-hydrogen isotopic exchange. The economical analysis is aimed at the study of the feasibility of the installation of a heavy water moderated reaction in Chile. General properties of heavy water are presented and also the various materials of its enrichment at the industrial scale. The plant itself has a first stage based on the water-hydrogen isotopic exchange procesS, where deuterium is extracted from the water by the hydrogen which is subsequently treated in a criogenic distillation stage. An important fact of the plant analysis is the calculation of heat exchangers mainly in relation to the problem posed by tHe hydrogen's low point of liquifaction. The distillation units are also treated and designed. The economic evaluation produces project diScount rates of 15.71% and 21.97%, for 25 tons/year and 40 tons/year of production capacity. The heavy water price used for these evaluation was 600 $/Kg

  14. Phytoremediation of Heavy Metals in Contaminated Water and Soil Using Miscanthus sp. Goedae-Uksae 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihye; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Cho, Min; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young-Jin; Bae, Jong-Hyang; Kim, Kyong-Ho; Myung, Hyun; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the heavy metal phytoremediation potential of Miscanthus sp. Goedae-Uksae 1, a hybrid, perennial, bio-energy crop developed in South Korea. Six different metals (As, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Zn) were used for the study. The hybrid grass effectively absorbed all the metals from contaminated soil. The maximum removal was observed for As (97.7%), and minimum removal was observed for Zn (42.9%). Similarly, Goedae-Uksae 1 absorbed all the metals from contaminated water except As. Cd, Pb, and Zn were completely (100%) removed from contaminated water samples. Generally, the concentration of metals in roots was several folds higher than in shoots. Initial concentration of metals highly influenced the phytoremediation rate. The results of the bioconcentration factor, translocation factor, and enrichment coefficient tests indicate that Goedae-Uksae 1 could be used for phytoremediation in a marginally contaminated ecosystem.

  15. SPECIATION OF HEAVY METALS IN SURFACE WATERS POLLUTED BY ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Luca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the results of a methodological research on the chemical speciation of heavy metals found in surface waters of an area polluted by mining activities (in the Western Carpathians. The surface water samples were collected in two seasons (summer and fall. Each time were performed in situ physical-chemical measurements (pH, Eh, conductivity, temperature and analytical determination of total concentrations of some metals (manganese, copper, zinc, iron, cadmium and anions (SO42-, Cl-, PO43-, NO3-. Analyze of chemical speciation of these metals was made using the PHREEQC program which allowed us to determine the distribution of studied elements. The concordance of the results obtained with this program with thermodynamic predictions arising from potential - pH equilibrium diagrams - Pourbaix type justify the compatibility between the program calculation and experimental data.

  16. Chitosan membrane development and design of equipment for the removal of heavy metals from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A filtration technique has compared with 1,75% m/v chitosan membranes, crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (0,08% m/v) and without cross link, to quantify the removal capacity of chromium, copper and cadmium ions of model solutions. In addition, a simple and low cost equipment was developed to use with prepared membranes. The main goal has been to use biodegradable materials for removing heavy metals from water, through a low energy consumption, cheap, and applicable to specific problems. Two data sheets were prepared for the membranes and was found that chromium was the metal with the highest removal from water, by using a crosslinked membrane. Metal adsorption was best adjusted to the Freundlich isotherm model, better than Langmuir isotherm model. However, no correlation has been found between pore size of the membranes and crosslinking degree. (author)

  17. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui.

  18. Advances in DCC Process and Catalyst for Propylene Production from Heavy Oils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Chaogang; Gao Yongcan

    2008-01-01

    Deep Catalytic Cracking (DCC) developed by RIPP (Research Institute of Petroleum Processing),SINOPEC is a catalytic conversion process derived from the FCC process using heavy feedstocks for producing raw materials used in the petrochemical industry,such as ethylene and propylene.It was firstly demonstrated in 1990 and has been commercialized since 1994.Up to now,seven units have been put into production inside and outside China,and many other DCC units are under construction and in the phase of design now.Products of propylene and ethylene from DCCU have been used as feedstock for manufacturing high quality polypropylene,polyethylene and acrylonitrile.Many innovations on technological process,and preparation of catalytic materials used in the DCC process will be presented in this paper.

  19. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  20. Experimental Study on the Heavy Metal Pollution in the Soil Irrigated by Reclaimed Water from Sewage Treatment Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing; YAN; Gang; LUO; Jian; CAO; Jiawen; XU; Shuang; WANG; Weihai; YE; Yicheng; LIANG

    2015-01-01

    Reclaimed water irrigation is one of the potential ways of solving the shortage of water resources,and the pollution risk on migration behavior of heavy metals in the soil which are irrigated by reclaimed water and the related soil surface is still short of research. Through the experimental study of different kinds of water irrigation methods on vegetable,it can be concluded that compared with sewage irrigation and tap water irrigation,reclaimed water irrigation does not pollute the soil,and it greatly saves the cost of water resources,and even provides a large number of growth elements for vegetables. The results show that after leaching by reclaimed water for 60 days,Cr,Cd,As,Hg,Pb,Ni,Zn and Cu from reclaimed water are enriched in soil to a certain degree,but with the leaching time extending,concentrations of the heavy metal remain stable. The variation of heavy metal content in soil irrigated by reclaimed water is small in vertical depth,basically showing a horizontal trend. According to Soil Environmental Quality Standards( GB15618- 1995),soil irrigated by reclaimed water does not exceed the standard,better than soil quality standard of planting vegetables.

  1. SURFACE WATER POLLUTION WITH HEAVY METALS IN THE LOWER CATCHMENT OF JIU RIVER BASIN, ACCORDING TO THE WATER FRAMEWORK DIRECTIVE (2000/60/EC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADINA SANDA ŞERBAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface water pollution with heavy metals in the lower catchment of Jiu river basin, according to the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC. The Water Framework Directive establishes a single transparent, effective and coherent water policy by defining a strategy to combat pollution by requiring specific action programs.Chemical pollution of surface water presents a threat to the aquatic environment with acute and chronic toxicity to aquatic organisms, accumulation in the ecosystem and losses of habitats and biodiversity, as well as a threat to human health (art.1 from Directive 2008/105/EC regarding the environmental quality standards for water policy.The purpose of this study is to evaluate the chemical status for surface water bodies in the lower catchment of Jiu river basin. The assessment was made taking into account the water impact of four heavy metals: cadmium (Cd, nickel (Ni, mercury (Hg and lead (Pb.

  2. Advancing Water and Water-Energy-Food Cluster Activities within Future Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, R. G.; Bhaduri, A.; Pahl-Wostl, C.

    2014-12-01

    In building its emerging program, Future Earth has encouraged former Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) projects to redefine their objectives, priorities and problem approaches so they are aligned with those of Future Earth. These new projects will be characterized by more integrated applications of natural and social sciences as well as dialogue and science integrated across disciplinary boundaries to address a wide range of environmental and social issues. The Global Water System Project (GWSP) has had a heritage of integrating natural and social sciences, and recently started to also look at issues within the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) cluster using similar integrated approaches. As part of the growth of the scientific elements of this cluster, GWSP has approached Future Earth opportunities by addressing the sustainability for Water, Energy, and Food through integrated water information and improved governance.In this presentation the approaches being considered for promoting integration in both water and the WEF cluster will be discussed. In particular, potential contributions of Future Earth to research related to the use and management of water and to issues and science underpinning the W-E-F nexus deliberations will be identified. In both cases the increasing ability to utilize Earth observations and big data will advance this research agenda. In addition, the better understanding of the implications of governance structures in addressing these issues and the options for harmonizing the use of scientific knowledge and technological advances will be explored. For example, insights gained from water management studies undertaken within the GWSP are helping to focus plans for a "sustainable water futures" project and a WEF cluster within Future Earth. The potential role of the Sustainable Development Goals in bringing together the monitoring and science capabilities, and understanding of governance approaches, will be discussed as a framework for facilitating

  3. Advanced grid-stiffened composite shells for applications in heavy-lift helicopter rotor blade spars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan Nampy, Sreenivas

    Modern rotor blades are constructed using composite materials to exploit their superior structural performance compared to metals. Helicopter rotor blade spars are conventionally designed as monocoque structures. Blades of the proposed Heavy Lift Helicopter are envisioned to be as heavy as 800 lbs when designed using the monocoque spar design. A new and innovative design is proposed to replace the conventional spar designs with light weight grid-stiffened composite shell. Composite stiffened shells have been known to provide excellent strength to weight ratio and damage tolerance with an excellent potential to reduce weight. Conventional stringer--rib stiffened construction is not suitable for rotor blade spars since they are limited in generating high torsion stiffness that is required for aeroelastic stability of the rotor. As a result, off-axis (helical) stiffeners must be provided. This is a new design space where innovative modeling techniques are needed. The structural behavior of grid-stiffened structures under axial, bending, and torsion loads, typically experienced by rotor blades need to be accurately predicted. The overall objective of the present research is to develop and integrate the necessary design analysis tools to conduct a feasibility study in employing grid-stiffened shells for heavy-lift rotor blade spars. Upon evaluating the limitations in state-of-the-art analytical models in predicting the axial, bending, and torsion stiffness coefficients of grid and grid-stiffened structures, a new analytical model was developed. The new analytical model based on the smeared stiffness approach was developed employing the stiffness matrices of the constituent members of the grid structure such as an arch, helical, or straight beam representing circumferential, helical, and longitudinal stiffeners. This analysis has the capability to model various stiffening configurations such as angle-grid, ortho-grid, and general-grid. Analyses were performed using an

  4. Radiological consequence analyses of loss of coolant accidents of various break sizes of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For any advanced technology, it is essential to ensure that the consequences associated with the accident sequences arising, if any, from the operation of the plant are as low as possible and certainly below the guidelines/limits set by the regulatory bodies. Nuclear power is no exception to this. In this paper consequences of the events arising from Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) sequences in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), are analysed. The sequences correspond to different break sizes of LOCA followed by the operation or otherwise of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). Operation or otherwise of the containment safety systems has also been considered. It has been found that there are no releases to the environment when ECCS is available. The releases, when ECCS is not available, arise from the slack and the ground. The radionuclides considered include noble gases, iodine, and cesium. The hourly meteorological parameters (wind speed, wind direction, precipitation and stability category), considered for this study, correspond to those of Kakrapar site. The consequences evaluated are the thyroid dose and the bone marrow dose received by a person located at various distances from the release point. Isodose curves are generated. From these evaluations, it has been found that the doses are very low. The complementary cumulative frequency distributions (CCFD) for thyroid and bone marrow doses have also been presented for the cases analysed. (author)

  5. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  6. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously

  7. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  8. Evaluation of water quality in El-Sadat city, Egypt, using nitrogen isotopes and heavy metal pollution indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater pollution by heavy metals and nitrogen compounds are a serious problem for human health. Waste water accumulation in the oxidation ponds could be threat the groundwater of the Pleistocene aquifer where it is used for bottling drinking water. Groundwater was collected from El-Sadat city, Egypt, to asses its suitability for drinking water. Also, surface water from oxidation ponds and industrial drainage water were sampled to detect the levels of heavy metals and nitrate pollution in these contamination sources. Four methods have been taken to evaluate the contamination level based on heavy metal concentration: (1) contamination index (Cd), (2) the heavy metal potential index (HPI), (3) heavy metal evaluation index (HEI) and (4) pollution load index (PLI). The output calculation of these methods gave a better classification of the pollution indices which straddle the groundwater samples to 3 classes via low, medium and high. The out put results show that 82% of industrial drainage samples and 67% of ponds water lie in the high class. About 62.5% of shallow groundwater at depth below 100 m and 89% of deep groundwater at depth up to 100 m lie in the low class (non-contaminated water) indicating the suitability of water for drinking purpose, whereas the rest of groundwater at the north-eastern border of the city was polluted by trace metals due to the effect of seepage from irrigation and drainage water. This was confirmed with the relatively high concentrations of nitrate obtained in 78 % of the shallow wells. Nitrogen isotope analysis δ 15NNO3 delineated the sources and mechanisms of nitrate pollution, where low values of δ 15N represent that nitrogen fertilizers and mineralized soil nitrogen were the dominant sources of NO3-N contamination in the shallow part of the aquifer

  9. An Investigation into Water Chemistry in Primary Coolant Circuit of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure operation safety, an optimization on the coolant chemistry in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor is essential no matter what type or generation the reactor belongs to. For a better understanding toward the water chemistry in an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), such as the one being constructed in the northern part of Taiwan, and for a safer operation of this ABWR, we conducted a proactive, thorough water chemistry analysis prior to the completion of this reactor in this study. A numerical simulation model for water chemistry analyses in ABWRs has been developed, based upon the core technology we established in the past. This core technology for water chemistry modeling is basically an integration of water radiolysis, thermal-hydraulics, and reactor physics. The model, by the name of DEMACE-ABWR, is an improved version of the original DEMACE model and was used for radiolysis and water chemistry prediction in the Longmen ABWR in Taiwan. Predicted results pertinent to the water chemistry variation and the corrosion behavior of structure materials in the primary coolant circuit of this ABWR under rated-power operation were reported in this paper. (authors)

  10. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  11. ANALYSIS ON EFFLUENT WATER QUALITY AND ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION AFTER INTRODUCING ADVANCED SEWAGE TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiojiri, Yasuo; Maekawa, Shunich

    We analyze effluent water quality and electricity consumption after in troducing advanced treatment in sewage treatment plant. We define 'advanced treatment ratio' as volume of treated water through advanced treatment processes divided by total volume of treated water in plant. Advanced treatment ratio represents degree of introducing advanced treatment. We build two types of equation. One represents relation between effluent water quality and advanced treatment ratio, the other between electricity consumption and advanced treatment ratio. Each equation is fitted by least squares on 808 samples: 8 fiscal years operation data of 101 plants working in Kanagawa, Tokyo, Saitama and Chiba areas, and coefficient of advanced treatment ratio is estimated. The result is as follows. (1) After introducing advanced treatment aimed at nitrogen removal, T-N in effluent water decreases by 51.3% and electricity consum ption increases by 52.2%. (2) After introducing advanced treatment aimed at phosphorus removal, T-P in effluent water decreases by 27.8%. Using the above result, we try prioritizing 71 plants in Tokyo Bay watershed about raising advanced treatment ratio, so that, in total, pollutant in effluent water decreases with minimized increase of electricity consumption.

  12. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  13. Influence on shallow ground water by heavy metal in polluted river

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-ping; HAO Shi-long; CHEN Xiao-gang; SHEN Zhao-li; ZHONG Zuo-xin

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the influence on shallow ground water by heavy metaI in polluted river.In the lab-scale experiment polluted rivers were simulated by domestic sewage.and three kinds of natural sand were chosen as infiltration medium,it was found that Cr(Ⅵ)penetrated on the 13th day and then had a removal ratio of 77%~99%in coarse sand.over 91%and 96%in two kinds of medium sand.From beginning to end in column 2 and column 3 the removal ratio of lead were greater than 97%.It is difficult for Cr(Ⅵ)and lead to enter ground water,In on-site test it indicates that the concentration of Cr(Ⅵ)in No.1~3 and coal yard well along the bank of Liangshui River is not greater than background concentration in groundwater.so Cr(Ⅵ)in Liangshui River has a little influence on ground water.The mechanism of Cr(Ⅵ) removal is reducing action and sedimentation.The removal mechanism of lead primarily is chemicaI adsorption and generation deposit.Cr(Ⅵ) mainly is transformed to precipitation by reducing action because of abundant reduction agent in the infiltration media.so the tests indicat that polluted river is not the source of Cr(Ⅵ) pollution in ground water.Generally lead may polluted soil,but not groundwater.

  14. Trace elements and heavy metals in mineral and bottled drinking waters on the Iranian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiani, Mohammad Rasoul; Dezfooli-Manesh, Shirin; Shoeibi, Shahram; Ziarati, Parisa; Mousavi Khaneghah, Amin

    2015-01-01

    A survey of Iranian waters, sampled from 2010 to 2013, is presented. A total of 128 water samples from 42 different brands of bottled mineral and drinking water were collected and analysed for contamination levels of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg). Determinations were performed using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer for Pb, Cd and Cu, a hydride vapour generation as well as an Arsenator digital kit (Wagtech WTD, Tyne and Wear, UK) for As and a direct mercury analyser for Hg. Arsenic concentration in six bottled gaseous mineral samples was higher than the related limit. Regardless of these, mean concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, As and Hg in all types of water samples were 4.50 ± 0.49, 1.08 ± 0.09, 16.11 ± 2.77, 5.80 ± 1.63 and 0.52 ± 0.03 µg L⁻¹, respectively. Values obtained for analysed heavy metals in all samples were permissible according to the limits of national and international standards.

  15. Trace elements and heavy metals in mineral and bottled drinking waters on the Iranian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiani, Mohammad Rasoul; Dezfooli-Manesh, Shirin; Shoeibi, Shahram; Ziarati, Parisa; Mousavi Khaneghah, Amin

    2015-01-01

    A survey of Iranian waters, sampled from 2010 to 2013, is presented. A total of 128 water samples from 42 different brands of bottled mineral and drinking water were collected and analysed for contamination levels of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg). Determinations were performed using a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer for Pb, Cd and Cu, a hydride vapour generation as well as an Arsenator digital kit (Wagtech WTD, Tyne and Wear, UK) for As and a direct mercury analyser for Hg. Arsenic concentration in six bottled gaseous mineral samples was higher than the related limit. Regardless of these, mean concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, As and Hg in all types of water samples were 4.50 ± 0.49, 1.08 ± 0.09, 16.11 ± 2.77, 5.80 ± 1.63 and 0.52 ± 0.03 µg L⁻¹, respectively. Values obtained for analysed heavy metals in all samples were permissible according to the limits of national and international standards. PMID:25174358

  16. Antifoaming materials studies in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Chemical and thermical stability. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). Five commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their chemical and thermical stability in order to select the most suitable. (Author)

  17. Studies on silicone based antifoaming agents to be used in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2MPa, up to 230 deg C). Six commercial silicone based antifoaming agents were studied from the point of view of their chemical and thermical stability in order to select the most suitable. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of heavy metals (Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg) in water, sediments and water lily (Eichornia crassipes) from Jose Antonio Alzate dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water, sediments and water lily (Eichornia crassipes) from the Jose Antonio Alzate Dam were analyzed in order to determine concentrations of chromium, iron, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium, lead and mercury. Mercury, lead, chromium and iron were found in concentrations above permissible limits in water, and in high concentrations in sediments. Cadmium, nickel, copper and zinc never were found in concentrations above permissible limits in water. The highest concentrations of heavy metals in water lily were found in the root. Accumulation factors decreased in the following order: Zn> Cr> Fe> Ni> Cu> Pb> Hg and Cd. Statistical differences (α < 0.5) between the collection samples dates was observed. High correlations between metals concentrations in superficial water, sediment and water hyacinth were also observed. These correlations could indicate that the heavy metals studied here, are originated from a natural source such as sediments or from an industrial source. (Author)

  19. Physiological and Metagenomic Analyses of Microbial Mats Involved in Self-Purification of Mine Waters Contaminated with Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Krawczyk, Pawel S; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Adamska, Dorota; Sobczak, Adam; Lipinski, Leszek; Burec-Drewniak, Weronika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Two microbial mats found inside two old (gold and uranium) mines in Zloty Stok and Kowary located in SW Poland seem to form a natural barrier that traps heavy metals leaking from dewatering systems. We performed complex physiological and metagenomic analyses to determine which microorganisms are the main driving agents responsible for self-purification of the mine waters and identify metabolic processes responsible for the observed features. SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed accumulation of heavy metals on the mat surface, whereas, sorption experiments showed that neither microbial mats were completely saturated with heavy metals present in the mine waters, indicating that they have a large potential to absorb significant quantities of metal. The metagenomic analysis revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae families were the most abundant in both communities, moreover, it strongly suggest that backbones of both mats were formed by filamentous bacteria, such as Leptothrix, Thiothrix, and Beggiatoa. The Kowary bacterial community was enriched with the Helicobacteraceae family, whereas the Zloty Stok community consist mainly of Sphingomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Caulobacteraceae families. Functional (culture-based) and metagenome (sequence-based) analyses showed that bacteria involved in immobilization of heavy metals, rather than those engaged in mobilization, were the main driving force within the analyzed communities. In turn, a comparison of functional genes revealed that the biofilm formation and heavy metal resistance (HMR) functions are more desirable in microorganisms engaged in water purification than the ability to utilize heavy metals in the respiratory process (oxidation-reduction). These findings provide insight on the activity of bacteria leading, from biofilm formation to self-purification, of mine waters contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:27559332

  20. Physiological and Metagenomic Analyses of Microbial Mats Involved in Self-Purification of Mine Waters Contaminated with Heavy Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Krawczyk, Pawel S.; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Adamska, Dorota; Sobczak, Adam; Lipinski, Leszek; Burec-Drewniak, Weronika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Two microbial mats found inside two old (gold and uranium) mines in Zloty Stok and Kowary located in SW Poland seem to form a natural barrier that traps heavy metals leaking from dewatering systems. We performed complex physiological and metagenomic analyses to determine which microorganisms are the main driving agents responsible for self-purification of the mine waters and identify metabolic processes responsible for the observed features. SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis showed accumulation of heavy metals on the mat surface, whereas, sorption experiments showed that neither microbial mats were completely saturated with heavy metals present in the mine waters, indicating that they have a large potential to absorb significant quantities of metal. The metagenomic analysis revealed that Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae families were the most abundant in both communities, moreover, it strongly suggest that backbones of both mats were formed by filamentous bacteria, such as Leptothrix, Thiothrix, and Beggiatoa. The Kowary bacterial community was enriched with the Helicobacteraceae family, whereas the Zloty Stok community consist mainly of Sphingomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Caulobacteraceae families. Functional (culture-based) and metagenome (sequence-based) analyses showed that bacteria involved in immobilization of heavy metals, rather than those engaged in mobilization, were the main driving force within the analyzed communities. In turn, a comparison of functional genes revealed that the biofilm formation and heavy metal resistance (HMR) functions are more desirable in microorganisms engaged in water purification than the ability to utilize heavy metals in the respiratory process (oxidation-reduction). These findings provide insight on the activity of bacteria leading, from biofilm formation to self-purification, of mine waters contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:27559332

  1. Drinking water studies: a review on heavy metal, application of biomarker and health risk assessment (a special focus in Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Razak, Nurul Hafiza; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Hashim, Zailina

    2015-12-01

    Malaysia has abundant sources of drinking water from river and groundwater. However, rapid developments have deteriorated quality of drinking water sources in Malaysia. Heavy metal studies in terms of drinking water, applications of health risk assessment and bio-monitoring in Malaysia were reviewed from 2003 to 2013. Studies on heavy metal in drinking water showed the levels are under the permissible limits as suggested by World Health Organization and Malaysian Ministry of Health. Future studies on the applications of health risk assessment are crucial in order to understand the risk of heavy metal exposure through drinking water to Malaysian population. Among the biomarkers that have been reviewed, toenail is the most useful tool to evaluate body burden of heavy metal. Toenails are easy to collect, store, transport and analysed. This review will give a clear guidance for future studies of Malaysian drinking water. In this way, it will help risk managers to minimize the exposure at optimum level as well as the government to formulate policies in safe guarding the population.

  2. Effect of polluted water on soil and plant contamination by heavy metals in El-Mahla El-Kobra, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasem Mahmoud, Esawy; Ghoneim, Adel Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The discharge of untreated waste water in Zefta drain and drain no. 5 is becoming a problem for many farmers in the El-Mahla El-Kobra area, Egypt. The discharged water contains high levels of contaminants considered hazardous to the ecosystem. Some plants, soil, water, and sediment samples were collected from the El-Mahla El-Kobra area to evaluate the contamination by heavy metals. The results showed that the heavy metals, pH, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the water of Zefta drain and drain no. 5 exceeded permissible limits for irrigation. In rice and maize shoots grown in soils irrigated by contaminated water from Zefta drain and drain no. 5, the bioaccumulation factors for Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, and Mn were higher than 1.0. The heavy metals content of irrigated soils from Zefta drain and drain no. 5 exceeded the upper limit of background heavy metals. In this study, the mean contaminant factor values of the drain no. 5 sediments revealed that Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Ni > 6, indicating very high contamination. The bioaccumulation coefficient values of Cynodon dactylon, Phragmites australis, and Typha domingensis aquatic plants growing in Zefta drain are high. These species can be considered as hyperaccumulators for the decontamination of contaminated water.

  3. Variations in heavy metal contamination of stream water and groundwater affected by an abandoned lead-zinc mine in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Choi, Jung-Chan; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2005-09-01

    This study evaluated variations in heavy metal contamination of stream waters and groundwaters affected by an abandoned lead-zinc mine, where a rockfill dam for water storage will be built 11 km downstream. For these purposes, a total of 10 rounds of stream and groundwater samplings and subsequent chemical analyses were performed during 2002-2003. Results of an exploratory investigation of stream waters in 2000 indicated substantial contamination with heavy metals including zinc (Zn), iron (Fe) and arsenic (As) for at least 6 km downstream from the mine. Stream waters near the mine showed metal contamination as high as arsenic (As) 8,923 microg L(-1), copper (Cu) 616 microg L(-1), cadmium (Cd) 223 microg L(-1) and lead (Pb) 10,590 microg L(-1), which greatly exceeded the Korean stream water guidelines. Remediation focused on the mine tailing piles largely improved the stream water qualities. However, there have still been quality problems for the waters containing relatively high concentrations of As (6-174 microg L(-1)), Cd (1-46 microg L(-1)) and Pb (2-26 microg L(-1)). Rainfall infiltration into the mine tailing piles resulted in an increase of heavy metals in the stream waters due to direct discharge of waste effluent, while dilution of the contaminated stream waters improved the water quality due to mixing with metal free rain waters. Levels of As, Cu and chromium (Cr) largely decreased after heavy rain but that of Pb was rather elevated. The stream waters were characterized by high concentrations of calcium (Ca) and sulfate (SO(4)), which were derived from dissolution and leaching of carbonate and sulfide minerals. It was observed that the proportions of Ca and SO(4) increased while those of bicarbonate (HCO(3)) and sodium and potassium (Na+K) decreased after a light rainfall event. Most interestingly, the reverse was generally detected for the groundwaters. The zinc, being the metal mined, was the most dominant heavy metal in the groundwaters (1758

  4. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danial Salehi; Dariush Sardari; M.Salehi Jozani

    2013-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors.Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head,patient's body,and treatment room ambient.Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons,the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy.By varying the target thickness,an optimum thickness exists for which,at the given electron energy,maximum photon flux is achievable.If a source of high-energy photons i.e.bremsstrahlung,is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target,a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible.This study consists of two parts.1.Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data.2.Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  5. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  6. Radiochemical tecniques applied to laboratory studies of water leaching of heavy metals from coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of the potential environmental impact of heavy metals (HM) mobilized by coal-fired plants showed that water leaching of HM from pulverized fuel ash may for certain HM constitute an important pathway to the aquatic environment. This process was therefore investigated in more detail by laboratory experiments. Batch experiments were performed in order to simulate ash pond conditions, whereas column experiments were carried out to represent water leaching from fly ash deposits. Using highly sensitive radiochemical techniques such as radioactive tracers and neutron activation of fly ash the fate of a single HM could be easily followed even in very low concentration experiments. Employing radioisotopic tracers the distribution coefficients of simple ionic forms of As, Sb, Bi, Se, Te, Cr, Mo, W, Ni, Cd in a coal fly ash/water system could be determined as a function of pH. Results obtained on the absorption and desorption behaviour of HM on coal fly ash can be explained in part on the basis of the surface predominance and the aqueous chemistry of single ionic, mainly anionic, forms of the relative elements. But ion exchange and coprecipitation phenomena also seem to be important processes. The nature and concentration of ions contained originally in the water used (distilled water, fly ash leachate and seawater) were found to have a strong influence on the sorptive behaviour of HM on coal ashes. The high degree of applicability of radiochemical and nuclear techniques to coal ash water leaching problems has been demonstrated and further points for subsequent research in this field possibly using nuclear techniques are indicated. (author)

  7. Advanced interlocking systems to improve heavy-load-bearing characteristics of flexible intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Leopold; Eichler, Johannes; Ryll, E Jonathan S; Fischerauer, Stefan; Raschke, Michael J; Kolbitsch, Andreas; Castellani, Christoph; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2016-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) is a minimally invasive and widespread standard method for osteosynthesis of pediatric long bone fractures. In the case of unstable fractures of the lower extremity, interlocking systems need to be used to prevent axial shortening and subsequent perforation of the nail at its insertion site. In the present study, four different screw-fixed interlocking systems for FINs (Hofer TwinPlug with two 3-mm titanium interlocking screws, Hofer FixPlug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw, Hofer Plug with 3.5-mm titanium interlocking screw, and Hofer Plug with 3-mm titanium interlocking screw) in comparison with the commonly used Ender stainless steel nails (locked with 3.5-mm screw) were experimentally investigated in cadaveric lamb tibiae, regarding their load characteristics and failure modes in the case of heavy loading. The specimens were subjected to sequential axial cyclic loading of 5000cycles with stepwise increase of the load amplitude until failure. Migration of locking screws and internal damage of bone tissue was quantified by micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Ender nails failed on average at a peak load of 800 N, TwinPlugs at 1367 N, FixPlugs at 1222 N, Plugs 3.5mm at 1225 N and Plugs 3.0mm at 971 N. TwinPlugs, FixPlugs, and Plugs 3.5mm failed in a slow manner over several hundred loading cycles, whereas Ender nails and Plugs 3.0mm exhibited abrupt failure without any prior indication. Our results confirm that axial stability of FIN can be further improved by screw-fixed plugs by simultaneously avoiding shortcomings of an eye-locked system, which the Ender nails are. Considering biomechanical results, plug interlocking systems with 3.5-mm screws should be favored over conventional Ender nails and plugs with 3-mm screws. PMID:27524031

  8. Reactivity impact of deuterium cross sections for heavy-water benchmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kozier, K.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Lab., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Campbell, J.M.; Little, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The final release of version 6 of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (Endf/B-6) was distributed in October 2001. During post-release testing, it was discovered that calculated eigenvalues for a set of heavy-water solution benchmarks had decreased substantially relative to earlier interim versions of Endf/B-6. Revisions to the angular scattering distribution for deuterium were determined to be the cause of the reactivity change. These changes improve the calculated results for some high-leakage benchmarks but degrade the results for others. The reactivity impact on low-leakage cases was found to be essentially negligible. It is recommended that the differences between the two sets of angular distributions should be reviewed and, if possible, reconciled before the initial version of Endf/B-6 is issued. (authors)

  9. Status of deuterium nuclear data for the simulation of heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S.; Roubtsov, D.; Rao, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Svenne, J.P. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Winnipeg Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Canton, L. [Inst. Nazionale de Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Univ. di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova (Italy); Plompen, A.J.M. [EC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg, Geel (Belgium); Stanoiu, M. [Horia Hulubei National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Nankov, N.; Rouki, C. [EC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurement, Retieseweg, Geel (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    An overview is presented of the status of the deuterium nuclear data used in reactor physics simulations of heavy water (D{sub 2}O) reactors and of ongoing activities to improve their accuracy. The main subjects having noticeable reactivity impact for critical systems involving D{sub 2}O are the degree of backscatter in D(n,n)D elastic scattering at neutron energies <3.2 MeV, the value of the elastic scattering cross section at thermal neutron energies and the adequacy of their numerical representation in evaluated nuclear data libraries. The scope includes fundamental nuclear-data measurements; three-body nuclear-theory calculations; and MCNP5 simulations of experiments involving D{sub 2}O or deuterated targets. (author)

  10. Failure analysis of the stud bolt of a canned motor pump of heavy water plant, Talcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed investigations have been carried out on the failed stud bolts (made of DIN 1.4021 X 20Cr 13) of a canned motor pump of Heavy Water Plant, Talcher, using metallographic, microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe micro-analysis(EPMA) techniques. The studs had failed in a brittle manner in the mid-length portion. The origin of the fracture has been identified to be a corroded region on the stud surface. Branching cracks propagating through silicon rich inclusions have been noted. Two types of inclusions, one containing Mn and S and other containing S, Mn and O2 have been found in the material. Clusters of large and small inclusions of the above types have been found near the origin of the fracture. It has been concluded that the fracture was caused by corrosion fatigue, initiating at the cluster of inclusions present on the surface of the stud bolts. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs

  11. Effect of processing on properties of thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, K.; Padmaprabu, C.; Ramana Rao, S. V.; Sanyal, T.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2003-02-01

    Thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactors are manufactured either by seam welding of Zircaloy-4 sheets or by seamless route. In the present study, the effect of processing on the critical properties such as texture, microstructure, hydriding behaviour and residual stress for both the routes as well as the mechanical anisotropy developed due to seam welding are investigated. The properties of the seam welded tube in the fusion and adjoining region are markedly different from the base material and from the seamless tube. Residual stress measurements indicate that heat affected zone (HAZ) of seam welded tubes have longitudinal tensile residual stress and the seamless tubes have uniform compressive stress along the circumference. The phase transition in the presence of residual stresses due to thermal gradient is found to modify the texture in the HAZ. The hydride orientation and mechanical anisotropy in these regions are found to be dependent on the texture of the material.

  12. Biomarkers and heavy metal bioaccumulation in mussels transplanted to coastal waters of the Beagle Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratano, Erica; Duarte, Claudia A; Amin, Oscar A

    2010-03-01

    Mussels coming from a mussel farm at Brown Bay (Beagle Channel) were transplanted to four sites inside Ushuaia Bay for 2 and 4 weeks. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of coastal waters of Ushuaia Bay by measuring catalase activity, lipid peroxidation, total lipid content, bioaccumulation of heavy metals and condition index in transplanted mussel Mytilus edulis chilensis. Biomarkers except condition index showed significant differences among exposure times as well as among tissues. Digestive gland presented the highest catalase activity, malondialdehyde level and total lipid content. Digestive gland also was the main target tissue of accumulation of iron and copper, while gill accumulated the highest levels of zinc. A principal component analyzes with the whole set of data allowed to separate stations based on physicochemical conditions and biochemical responses of each studied area. PMID:19913913

  13. Effect of processing on properties of thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactors are manufactured either by seam welding of Zircaloy-4 sheets or by seamless route. In the present study, the effect of processing on the critical properties such as texture, microstructure, hydriding behaviour and residual stress for both the routes as well as the mechanical anisotropy developed due to seam welding are investigated. The properties of the seam welded tube in the fusion and adjoining region are markedly different from the base material and from the seamless tube. Residual stress measurements indicate that heat affected zone (HAZ) of seam welded tubes have longitudinal tensile residual stress and the seamless tubes have uniform compressive stress along the circumference. The phase transition in the presence of residual stresses due to thermal gradient is found to modify the texture in the HAZ. The hydride orientation and mechanical anisotropy in these regions are found to be dependent on the texture of the material

  14. The status of improved pressurized heavy water reactor development - A new option for PHWR -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the 900 MWe class Improved Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), which is a type of CANDU reactor based on the systems and components of operating CANDU plants, is under development. The improved PHWR has a 480 fuel channel calandria, uses 37 element natural uranium fuel bundles and has a single unit containment. Adaptation of a steel-lined containment structure and improved containment isolation systems permit a reduced exclusion area boundary (EAB) compared to the existing larger capacity CANDU reactors (Darlington, Bruce B). The improved PHWR buildings are arranged to achieve minimum spacing between reactor units. Plant safety and economy are increased through various design changes based on the operating experience of existing CANDU plants. 4 refs. (Author)

  15. Multidrug and heavy metal-resistant Raoultella planticola isolated from surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Serkan; Kabatas, Burak; Icgen, Bulent

    2013-08-01

    A surface water isolate of Raoultella sp. having both multidrug- and multimetal-resistant ability was isolated and identified as Raoultella planticola. R. planticola displayed resistance to 15 drugs like ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, aztreonam, erythromycin, imipenem, oxacillin, pefloxacin, penicillin, piperacillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, rifampin, sulbactam/cefoperazone, ticarsillin, ticarsillin/clavulanic acid, vancomycin, and to 11 heavy metals like aluminum, barium, copper, iron, lead, lithium, manganese, nickel, silver, strontium, and tin. The multidrug and multi-metal-resistant R. planticola may remain present in the environment for a long time. Due to a possible health risk of these pathogenic bacteria, a need exists for an accurate assessment of their acquired resistance to multiple drugs and metals.

  16. The performance of alloy 625 in the high temperature application of Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrought and centrifugally cast alloy 625 tubes are used in the cracker units of ammonia based Heavy Water Plants (HWP). During the service of about 100,000 h, the ammonia cracker tubes, predictably, have been exposed to temperatures below 600degC to above 765degC and have undergone several hundreds of start-shutdown cycles, producing several ordered phases in the alloy. To understand the effect of the ordered phases on the structure properties, Alloy 625 samples were aged at 540degC, 700degC and 850degC temperatures, for duration up to 1200 h. Results were compared with that of cast and wrought Alloy 625 samples, which aged during the service of 100,000 h and that failed during the service after about 24,000 h along with that of aged samples, which were resolutionised at 1170degC for 2h. (author)

  17. Status of persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals in surface water of Arctic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Trace pollutants in the surface water of the Arctic region have been analyzed by the capillary gas chromatography with the micro-electron capture detector (GC- μECD), the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC- MS) and the inductively coupled plasmas-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Compared with previously reported studies, concentrations of OCPs in these regions are much lower than those in the last decades. The ratio of α-/γ-HCH indicates the different pesticide composition between these two regions and is the potential marker for the source of the OCPs. Many other OCPs with different residue patterns have also been found for the first time in the two regions. No heavy metal contaminant was found in the investigation regions.

  18. Examination of the isotopic exchange columns used in heavy water fabrication by nondestructive metallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the results are presented of an investigation using nondestructive metallography of the isotopic exchange columns used for heavy water fabrication in ROMAG PROD plant at Drobeta Turnu Severin. The nondestructive metallography is based on the examination of the surface moulds. Thus the corroded areas on the inner walls of the isotopic exchange columns are investigated with metallographic replicas to observe microstructures in steel G 52/28 and reveal possible microcracks. Finally, metallographic structures of the investigated areas were determined but structural modifications with respect to the control ones were not observed. Only, in the tray 30 in the C 1106 column microcracks were evidenced in the characteristic areas at the welded joins were the tray attached to the column. So a new intervention was needed

  19. Study on hydrodynamically induced dryout and post dryout important to heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the safety of low pressure liquid cooled nuclear reactors has become a very important issue with reference to the operation of the heavy water reactors at Savannah River Plant. Under accident conditions such as loss-of-flow or loss-of-coolant, these reactors typically encounter unstable two-phase flow which may lead to the occurrence of dryout and subsequent fuel failure. An analytical study using the one-dimensional drift flux model was carried out to investigate the two-phase flow instability for Westinghouse Savannah River Site reactor. The analysis indicates that the first and higher order instabilities exist in the possible transient operational conditions. The instabilities are encountered at higher heat fluxes or lower flow rates. The subcooling has a stabilizing effect except at very low subcooling. An experimental loop has been designed and constructed. A study was conducted on the CHF induced by various flow instabilities. Details of this test loop are presented

  20. The ISS Water Processor Catalytic Reactor as a Post Processor for Advanced Water Reclamation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalette, Tim; Snowdon, Doug; Pickering, Karen D.; Callahan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Advanced water processors being developed for NASA s Exploration Initiative rely on phase change technologies and/or biological processes as the primary means of water reclamation. As a result of the phase change, volatile compounds will also be transported into the distillate product stream. The catalytic reactor assembly used in the International Space Station (ISS) water processor assembly, referred to as Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA), has demonstrated high efficiency oxidation of many of these volatile contaminants, such as low molecular weight alcohols and acetic acid, and is considered a viable post treatment system for all advanced water processors. To support this investigation, two ersatz solutions were defined to be used for further evaluation of the VRA. The first solution was developed as part of an internal research and development project at Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) and is based primarily on ISS experience related to the development of the VRA. The second ersatz solution was defined by NASA in support of a study contract to Hamilton Sundstrand to evaluate the VRA as a potential post processor for the Cascade Distillation system being developed by Honeywell. This second ersatz solution contains several low molecular weight alcohols, organic acids, and several inorganic species. A range of residence times, oxygen concentrations and operating temperatures have been studied with both ersatz solutions to provide addition performance capability of the VRA catalyst.

  1. Analysis of some heavy metals in the riverine water, sediments and fish from river Ganges at Allahabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aradhna; Rai, Devendra K; Pandey, Ravi S; Sharma, Bechan

    2009-10-01

    The river Ganges has been one of the major recipients of industrial effluents in India. The present paper deals with the study related to occurrence and bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb, Zn) in the riverine water, sediment, and the muscles of two cat fish species, Channa punctatus (C. punctatus) and Aorichthys aor (A. aor) procured from the river Ganges at Allahabad. The data obtained after water analysis reflected the order of occurrence of heavy metals to be Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd, respectively. The analysis of heavy metals in sediment indicated that among the five heavy metals tested; Zn was maximally accumulated followed by Pb, Cr, Cu and Cd. The trend of heavy metals accumulation in fish muscles was found to be similar to that observed in sediment and water such as Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd. Data indicated that Zn accumulated maximally in the sediment as well as muscles of both of the fish species in comparison to other metals. PMID:18850290

  2. Measurement of internal diameter of pressure tubes in pressurized heavy water reactors using ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pressure Tube in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) undergoes dimensional changes due to the effects of creep and growth as it is subjected to high pressure and temperature, which causes Pressure Tubes to permanently increase in length and diameter and to sag because of weight of fuel and coolant (heavy water) contained in it. These dimensional changes are due to prolonged stresses under high temperature and radiation. Pressure Tube stresses are evaluated for both beginning and end of life for accounting the Pressure Tube dimensional changes that occur during its design life. At the beginning of life, the initial wall thickness and un-irradiated material properties are applied. At the end of life, Pressure Tube diameter and length increases, while wall thickness decreases. Material strength also increases during that period. The increase in Pressure Tube diameter results in squeezing of garter spring spacer between the pressure and calandria Tubes. It also causes unacceptable heat removal from the fuel due to an increased amount of primary coolant that bypasses the fuel bundles. This reduces the critical channel power at constant flow. Hence the periodic monitoring of pressure Tube diameter is important for these reasons. This is also required as per the applicable codes and standards for In-Service Inspection of PHWRs. Mechanical measurement from ID of the Tube during periodic monitoring is not practically feasible due to high radiation and inaccessibility. This necessitates the development of NDT technique using Ultrasonics for periodic in-situ measurement of ID of pressure Tubes with a BARC made remotely operated drive system called BARCIS (BARC Channel Inspection system). The development of Ultrasonic based ID measurement techniques and their actual applications in PHWRs Pressure tubes are being discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  4. Health risk assessment of heavy metals and bacterial contamination in drinking water sources: a case study of Malakand Agency, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Ali, Sharafat; Sher, Hassan; Rahman, Ziaur; Khan, Kifayatullah; Tang, Jianfeng; Ahmad, Aziz

    2016-05-01

    Human beings are frequently exposed to pathogens and heavy metals through ingestion of contaminated drinking water throughout the world particularly in developing countries. The present study aimed to assess the quality of water used for drinking purposes in Malakand Agency, Pakistan. Water samples were collected from different sources (dug wells, bore wells, tube wells, springs, and hand pumps) and analyzed for different physico-chemical parameters and bacterial pathogens (fecal coliform bacteria) using standard methods, while heavy metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-PEA-700). In the study area, 70 % of water sources were contaminated with F. coliform representing high bacterial contamination. The heavy metals, such as Cd (29 and 8 %), Ni (16 and 78 %), and Cr (7 %), exceeded their respective safe limits of WHO (2006) and Pak-EPA (2008), respectively, in water sources, while Pb (9 %) only exceeded from WHO safe limit. The risk assessment tools such as daily intake of metals (DIMs) and health risk indexes (HRIs) were used for health risk estimation and were observed in the order of Ni > Cr > Mn > Pb > Cd and Cd > Ni > Pb > Mn > Cr, respectively. The HRI values of heavy metals for both children and adults were <1, showing lack of potential health risk to the local inhabitants of the study area. PMID:27075311

  5. Phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soils and water: Progresses and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Iqbal LONE; Zhen-li HE; Peter J. STOFFELLA; Xiao-e YANG

    2008-01-01

    Environmental pollution affects the quality of pedosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. Great efforts have been made in the last two decades to reduce pollution sources and remedy the polluted soil and water resources. Phytoremediation, being more cost-effective and fewer side effects than physical and chemical approaches, has gained increasing popularity in both academic and practical circles. More than 400 plant species have been identified to have potential for soil and water remediation. Among them, Thlaspi, Brassica, Sedum alfredii H., and Arabidopsis species have been mostly studied. It is also expected that recent advances in biotechnology will play a promising role in the development of new hyperaccumulators by transferring metal hyperaccumulating genes from low biomass wild species to the higher biomass producing cultivated species in the times to come. This paper attempted to provide a brief review on recent progresses in research and practical applications of phytoremediation for soil and water resources.

  6. Heavy metal in water and aquatic organisms from different intertidal ecosystems, Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanpour, Shirin; Ghorghani, Nasrin Farzaneh; Lotfi Ashtiyani, Seyede Masoumeh

    2014-09-01

    Intertidal ecosystems are being damaged by anthropogenic activities, particularly in the developing countries. In this study, the load of heavy metals was determined in water, fish, shrimp, and crab collected from four intertidal ecosystems, including coral reef, rocky shore, mangrove forest, and muddy habitat along the Persian Gulf coasts. Generally, the sequence of metal accumulation in the water of coral reef and mangrove forest was Ni > Pb > V > Cd > As > Hg, whereas in muddy habitats and rocky shores, the sequence was Ni > Pb > V > Cd > Hg > As and Ni > V > Pb > As > Hg > Cd, respectively. Water of the coral reef had the highest level of Ni (97.44 μg l(-1)), Pb (3.92 μg l(-1)), V (10.42 μg l(-1)), Cd (3.92 μg l(-1)), As (1.87 μg l(-1)), and Hg (0.74 μg l(-1)). For the most part, the highest concentrations of the studied metals were found in the liver and the gills of Johnius belangerii and the hepatopancreas of Portunus pelagicus and Metapenaus affinis collected from the coral reef ecosystem. PMID:24802589

  7. Water movement and isoproturon behaviour in a drained heavy clay soil: 1. Preferential flow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haria, A. H.; Johnson, A. C.; Bell, J. P.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1994-12-01

    The processes and mechanisms that control pesticide transport from drained heavy clay catchments are being studied at Wytham Farm (Oxford University) in southern England. In the first field season field-drain water contained high concentrations of pesticide. Soil studies demonstrated that the main mechanism for pesticide translocation was by preferential flow processes, both over the soil surface and through the soil profile via a macropore system that effectively by-passed the soil matrix. This macropore system included worm holes, shrinkage cracks and cracks resulting from ploughing. Rainfall events in early winter rapidly created a layer of saturation in the A horizon perched above a B horizon of very low hydraulic conductivity. Drain flow was initiated when the saturated layer in the A horizon extended into the upper 0.06m of the soil profile; thereafter water moved down slope via horizontal macropores possibly through a band of incorporated straw residues. These horizontal pathways for water movement connected with the fracture system of the mole drains, thus feeding the drains. Overland flow occurred infrequently during the season.

  8. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in Alginate Microspheres for Monitoring Heavy Metal Toxicity in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Futra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II, Cd(II, Pb(II, Zn(II, Cr(VI, Co(II, Ni(II, Ag(I and Fe(II were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD range of 2.4–5.7% (n = 8. The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD for Cu(II (6.40 μg/L, Cd(II (1.56 μg/L, Pb(II (47 μg/L, Ag(I (18 μg/L than Zn(II (320 μg/L, Cr(VI (1,000 μg/L, Co(II (1700 μg/L, Ni(II (2800 μg/L, and Fe(III (3100 μg/L. Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  9. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas...

  10. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  11. Destruction of estrogenic activity in water using UV advanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeldt, Erik J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Chen, P.J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Kullman, Seth [Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Linden, Karl G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Box 90287, 121 Hudson Hall Engineering Building, Durham, NC 27708-0287 (United States)]. E-mail: kglinden@duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    The transformation of the steroidal Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) and 17-{alpha}-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) by direct UV photolysis and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} advanced oxidation was studied from the perspective of the removal of estrogenic activity associated with the compounds. First, experiments were performed to link the oxidation of E2 and EE2 with subsequent reduction in estrogenic activity. No statistically significant difference between removal rates was observed, implying that the oxidation products of E2 and EE2 are not as estrogenic (measured by the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES)) as the parent compounds. Utilizing the YES, 90% removal of estrogenic activity of E2 and EE2 at environmentally relevant concentrations ({approx} 3 {mu}g L{sup -1}) was achieved using a combination of 5 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a UV fluence of less than 350 mJ cm{sup -2}. Thus, these compounds, when considered at environmentally relevant levels, are significantly degraded at much lower UV fluences than previously thought. A steady state OH radical model was used to predict oxidation of EE2 in laboratory and natural waters.

  12. Immobilization biological activated carbon used in advanced drinking water treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria separated from a mature filter bed of groundwater treatment plants were incubated in a culture media containing iron and manganese. A consortium of 5 strains of bacteria removing iron and manganese were obtained by repeated enrichment culturing. It was shown from the experiments of effect factors that ironmanganese removal bacteria in the culture media containing both Fe and Mn grew better than in that containing only Fe, however, they were unable to grow in the culture media containing only Mn. When comparing the bacteria biomass in the case ofρ (DO) =2.8 mg/L andρ (DO) =9.0 mg/L, no significant difference was found.The engineering bacteria removing the organic and the bacteria removing iron and manganese were simultaneously inoculated into activated carbon reactor to treat the effluent of distribution network. The experimental results showed that by using IBAC ( Immobilization Biological Activated Carbon) treatment, the removal efficiency of iron, manganese and permanganate index was more than 98% , 96% and 55% , respectively. After the influent with turbidity of 1.5 NTU, color of 25 degree and offensive odor was treated, the turbidity and color of effluence were less than 0.5 NTU and 15 degree, respectively, and it was odorless. It is determined that the cooperation function of engineering bacteria and activated carbon achieved advanced drinking water treatment.

  13. Utility Leadership in Defining Requirements for Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is appropriate, based on twenty five years of operating experience, that utilities take a position of leadership in developing the technical design and performance requirements for the next generations of nuclear electric generating plants. The U. S. utilities, through the Electric Power Research Institute, began an initiative in 1985 to develop such Utility requirements. Many international Utility organizations, including Korea Electric Power Corporation, have joined as full participants in this important Utility industry initiative. In light of the closer linkage among countries of the world due to rapid travel and telecommunications, it is also appropriate that there be international dialogue and agreement on the principal standards for nuclear power plant acceptability and performance. The Utility/EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Program guided by the ALRR Utility Steering Committee has been very successful in developing these Utility requirements. This paper will summarize the state of development of the ALRR Utility Requirements for Evolutionary Plants, recent developments in their review by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, resolution of open issues, and the extension of this effort to develop a companion set of ALRR Utility Requirements for plants employing passive safety features

  14. Economics of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited natural uranium resources together with their low utilization in current lightwater reactors (LWR) on the one hand and the high capital investments for a LWR and fast breeder reactor system resulting in a high fuel utilization are the most important reasons for research and development (R+D) work related to a high converting APWR system. It is the main task of this analysis to study the economic behaviour of an APWR combining its technical and physical parameters with an economic data base. After introductional remarks chapter II presents the potential improvements of the uranium utilization and their importance for a whole national economy. Chapter III shows the micro-economic aspects for an electricity producing utility using such an APWR plant. The chapter is restricted to the fuel cycle costs and their dependence on various parameters. The corresponding costs of other nuclear power plants are described in chapter IV and compared to those of the APWR in chapter V. Finally a cost comparison on the basis of the electricity generating costs will complete the economic picture of an advanced pressurized water reactor. (orig./UA)

  15. Comparison Of The Worth Of Critical And Exponential Measurements For Heavy-Water-Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical and exponential experiments in general produce overlapping information on reactor lattices. Over the past ten years the Savannah River Laboratory has been operating a heavy-water critical, the PDP, and an exponential, the SE, in parallel. This paper summarizes SRL experience to give results and recommendations as to the applicability of the two kinds of facilities in different experiments. Six types of experiments are considered below: (1) Buckling measurements in uniform isotropic lattices Here Savannah River has made extensive comparisons between single-region criticals, exponentials, substitution criticals, and PCTR type measurements. The only difficulties in the exponentials seem to lie in the radial-buckling determinations. If these can be made successfully, the exponentials can offer good competition to the criticals. Material requirements are greatest for the single-region criticals, roughly comparable for the substitution criticals and exponentials, and least for the PCTR measurements. (2) Anisotropic and void effects SRL experiments with the criticals and with critical-exponential comparisons are reviewed briefly here and at greater length in a companion paper. (3) Evaluation of control systems Adequately analysed exponential experiments appear to give good results for total-worth measurements. However, for adequate study of overall flux shaping, flux tilts, etc. a full-sized critical such as the PDP is required. (4) Temperature coefficients Exponential experiments provide an excellent method for determining the temperature coefficient of buckling for uniform lattice heating. A special facility, the PSE, at Savannah River permits such measurements up to temperatures of 215°C. For non-uniform lattice heating criticals are generally preferred. (5) Mixed lattices Actual reactors rarely use the simple uniform lattices to which the exponentials basically apply. Critical experiments with mixed loadings are used at SRL both in measuring direct effects

  16. The evaluation and determination of heavy metals pollution in edible vegetables, water and soil in the south of Tehran province by GIS

    OpenAIRE

    Shirkhanloo Hamid; Mirzahosseini Seyed Alireza Hajiseyed; Shirkhanloo Nasrin; Moussavi-Najarkola Seyyed Ali; Farahani Hadi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, heavy metals pollutions in waters, soils and vegetables were investigated from farms, near oil refinery in south of Tehran city, Iran (Shahre Ray). The most important heavy metals in Iranian oil are vanadium, cobalt, nickel, arsenic and mercury (V, Co, Ni, As, Hg). In this region, the concentration of heavy metals in soils, well waters and leafy edible vegetables were evaluated in ten different points of farms. Geographic information systems (GIS) were used to estimate the leve...

  17. The Prospective Toxic Effects of Some Heavy Metals Overload in Surface Drinking Water of Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YA Azab

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concentration of heavy metals in drinking water is very important.Objectives: To to evaluate the chemistry of some heavy metals in surface drinking water of Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt.Methods: 51 surface drinking water samples were collected from the main surface water stations and compact units in October 2009 and analyzed chemically. 26 water samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer for iron, manganese, lead, nickel, chromium, zinc, copper, cobalt, aluminum, and cadmium concentrations.Results: Aluminum concentration was slightly high in water sample of Bosat network. Cadmium concentration in samples of up-streams of shark and Mit-Khamis stations, networks of Mit-Antar, Demera, Bosat, Bilqas, El-satamony, El-Gamalia, Mit-asim and Bilqas station exceeded the permissible limits of Egyptian Ministry of Health (EMH, 2007 and World Health Organization (WHO, 2008. The nickel concentration in the network samples taken from Shoha, Bosat and El-Gamalia as well as up-stream of Bosat station exceeded the permissible limits. Also, lead concentrations of the network samples of Shoha, Mit-Antar, Demera and Nabaru exceeded the permissible limits.Conclusion: Regular chemical analysis of surface drinking water is required. Since these heavy metals are most likely originate from steel, plastics and batteries industries working in the region, we believe that activities of these industries must be stopped or at least limited in urban zones.

  18. Heavy Metal Concentrations in Water, Sediments and Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio Fish Species from Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Ogendi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are potentially toxic to organisms causing lethal and sub lethal effects. Above threshold levels, these metals have been shown to adversely affect both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Human health may also be impacted negatively through consumption of metal-contaminated foods and water. Lake Naivasha, Kenya, like many freshwater bodies in developing countries is a source of fish and water for human consumption in Naivasha town and its environs. Ironically, the lake receives untreated floricultural, agricultural and industrial effluents from its catchment area. In the recent past, there have been unconfirmed reports that fish from this lake are contaminated with heavy metals mainly Cu, Hg, Cd and Pb to levels that are harmful to humans. It is against this background that this study was conducted to determine the sources of the aforementioned heavy metals in the lake, their concentrations in water and sediments and in common carp (Cyprinus carpio that constitutes a major portion of the Lake Naivasha fishery. Water, sediment and fish samples were collected from purposefully selected sites in six sampling occasions during both the dry and wet seasons. Analyses for heavy metals in fish, sediment and water samples were done using an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS. The study findings indicate that the heavy metal concentrations in the water and sediments collected from impacted sites were significantly higher (p<0.05 compared to those from unexpected sites. In spite of this, the metal concentrations in water were significantly lower than those recommended by the WHO and USEPA as drinking water guideline values. Metal concentrations in C. carpio were also significantly lower (p<0.05 than the World Health Organization (WHO recommended levels for fish intended for human consumption. Based on these findings, it is safe to conclude that drinking water and fish collected from Lake Naivasha do not pose immediate health risks to human

  19. Sustainable sources of biomass for bioremediation of heavy metals in waste water derived from coal-fired power generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Saunders

    Full Text Available Biosorption of heavy metals using dried algal biomass has been extensively described but rarely implemented. We contend this is because available algal biomass is a valuable product with a ready market. Therefore, we considered an alternative and practical approach to algal bioremediation in which algae were cultured directly in the waste water stream. We cultured three species of algae with and without nutrient addition in water that was contaminated with heavy metals from an Ash Dam associated with coal-fired power generation and tested metal uptake and bioremediation potential. All species achieved high concentrations of heavy metals (to 8% dry mass. Two key elements, V and As, reached concentrations in the biomass of 1543 mg.kg(-1 DW and 137 mg.kg(-1 DW. Growth rates were reduced by more than half in neat Ash Dam water than when nutrients were supplied in excess. Growth rate and bioconcentration were positively correlated for most elements, but some elements (e.g. Cd, Zn were concentrated more when growth rates were lower, indicating the potential to tailor bioremediation depending on the pollutant. The cosmopolitan nature of the macroalgae studied, and their ability to grow and concentrate a suite of heavy metals from industrial wastes, highlights a clear benefit in the practical application of waste water bioremediation.

  20. A neutron diffraction study of the structure of heavy water at pressure using a new high-pressure cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction measurements have been made at pressures up to 1 kbar on heavy water contained in a high-pressure cell manufactured from titanium zirconium alloy. The results have been used to test the degree to which the microscopic structure is susceptible to isothermal compression. The likely future progress in this field is commented on. (author)

  1. An Experimental Investigation of the Process of Isotope Exchange that Takes Place when Heavy Water Is Exposed to the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the recently developed method for rapid measurement of maximum density temperature to determine the rate at which hydrogen and deuterium isotope exchange takes place when a sample of heavy water is exposed to the atmosphere. We also provide a simple explanation for the observed linear rate of transition. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Meta-Analysis of the Copper, Zinc, and Cadmium Absorption Capacities of Aquatic Plants in Heavy Metal-Polluted Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Haixin; Luan, Yaning

    2015-12-01

    The use of aquatic plants for phytoremediation is an important method for restoring polluted ecosystems. We sought to analyze the capacity of different aquatic plant species to absorb heavy metals and to summarize available relevant scientific data on this topic. We present a meta-analysis of Cu, Zn, and Cd absorption capacities of aquatic plants to provide a scientific basis for the selection of aquatic plants suitable for remediation of heavy-metal pollution. Plants from the Gramineae, Pontederiaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Typhaceae and Haloragaceae showed relatively strong abilities to absorb these metals. The ability of a particular plant species to absorb a given metal was strongly correlated with its ability to absorb the other metals. However, the absorption abilities varied with the plant organ, with the following trend: roots > stems > leaves. The pH of the water and the life habits of aquatic plants (submerged and emerged) also affect the plant's ability to absorb elements. Acidic water aids the uptake of heavy metals by plants. The correlation observed between element concentrations in plants with different aquatic life habits suggested that the enrichment mechanism is related to the surface area of the plant exposed to water. We argue that this meta-analysis would aid the selection of aquatic plants suitable for heavy-metal absorption from polluted waters.

  3. The temperature dependence of the rate constants and yields for the simulation of the radiolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Chalk River Laboratories, a computer code is being developed to model the radiolysis of the heavy water in the moderator and the heat-transport system in CANDU reactors. This report collects together, for heavy water, the current knowledge regarding the rate constants, pKa's, yields and diffusion coefficients based on measurements in this laboratory and reports in the literature. The latest data available for the radiolysis of light water are generally included for comparison, which forms a partial update to the report on the radiolysis of light water (Elliot, AECL- 11073, COG-94-167, 1994). There are some reactions where little or no data are available at ambient or elevated temperatures; in these cases, an indication is given of the approach that will be taken to measure or estimate the required parameters. (author)

  4. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors; Reactores de moderador solido controlados por desplazamiento espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-07-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs.

  5. Fast reactors and advanced light water reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: The importance of nuclear energy, as a realistic option to solve the issues of the depletion of energy resources and the global environment, has been re-acknowledged worldwide. In response to this international movement, the papers compiling the most recent findings in the fields of fast reactors (FR) and advanced light water reactors (LWR) were gathered and published in this special issue. This special issue compiles six articles, most of which are very meticulously performed studies of the multi year development of design and assessment methods for large sodium-cooled FRs (SFRs), and two are related to the fuel cycle options that are leading to a greater understanding on the efficient utilization of energy resources. The Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is addressed in two manuscripts. H. Yamano et al. reviewed the current design which adopts a number of innovative technologies in order to achieve economic competitiveness, enhanced reliability, and safety. Their safety assessments of both design basis accidents and severe accidents indicate that the devised JSFR satisfies well their risk target. T. Takeda et al. discussed the improvement of the modeling accuracy for the detailed calculation of JSFR's features in three areas: neutronics, fuel materials, and thermal hydraulics. The verification studies which partly use the measured data from the prototype FBR Monju are also described. Two of these manuscripts deal with those aspects of advanced design of SFR that have hitherto not been explored in great depth. The paper by G. Palmiotti et al. explored the possibility of using the sensitivity methodologies in the reactor physics field. A review of the methods used is provided, and several examples illustrate the success of the methodology in reactor physics. A new application as the improvement of nuclear basic parameters using integral experiments is also described. F. Baque et al. reviewed the evolution of the in

  6. Effect of flooding of annulus space between CT and PT with light water coolant and heavy water moderator on AHWR reactor physics parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In AHWR lattice, the pressure tube (PT) contains light water coolant which carries away heat generated in the fuel pins. The pressure tube (PT) and calandria tube (CT) are separated by air (density=0.0014 g/cc) of wall thickness 1.79 cm. Air between pressure tube and calandria tube acts as insulator and minimize the heat transfer from coolant to moderator which is outside the calandria tube. In case of flooding or under any unforeseeable circumstances, the air gap between the coolant tube and calandria tube may be filled with the light water coolant or heavy water moderator. This paper gives the details of effect of filling the annulus space between CT and PT with light water or heavy water moderator on reactor physics parameters. (author)

  7. Preliminary assessment of heavy metal contamination in surface water and sediments from Honghu Lake,East Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying HU; Shihua QI; Chenxi WU; Yanping KE; Jing CHEN; Wei CHEN; Xiangyi GONG

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal concentrations in surface water and sediments collected from Honghu Lake in Hubei Province,China were analyzed,and ecological risks were evaluated according to the sediment quality guidelines.The results showed that the average concentrations of heavy metals in surface water were ranked as:As > Zn >Cu > Cr > Pb > Ni > Cd > Hg.In comparison with results reported in other rivers and the background values,The Honghu Lake was polluted by As,Cr,Pb,Cu and Ni.Most of metals might be mainly from fertilizers,industrial effluent and domestic wastewater around the lake.Heavy metals concentrations were relatively higher in the inlet area than in other areas.Negative correlations were observed between most heavy metals and pH,while a significant positive correlation was present between Zn,Cd and Pb.In the sediment core,Cu,Zn,Cr and Ni showed a decreasing trend while Cd present an increasing trend.The decrease of As,Cu,Zn,Cr and Ni in the 1990s might due to the flood event in 1998.The analysis of ecological risk assessment based on sediment quality guidelines suggested that heavy metals in most sediments from the Honghu Lake had moderate toxicity,with Cr being the highest priority pollutant.

  8. Preliminary assessment of heavy metal contamination in surface water and sediments from Honghu Lake, East Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Qi, Shihua; Wu, Chenxi; Ke, Yanping; Chen, Jing; Chen, Wei; Gong, Xiangyi

    2012-03-01

    Heavy metal concentrations in surface water and sediments collected from Honghu Lake in Hubei Province, China were analyzed, and ecological risks were evaluated according to the sediment quality guidelines. The results showed that the average concentrations of heavy metals in surface water were ranked as: As>Zn> Cu>Cr>Pb>Ni>Cd>Hg. In comparison with results reported in other rivers and the background values, The Honghu Lake was polluted by As, Cr, Pb, Cu and Ni. Most of metals might be mainly from fertilizers, industrial effluent and domestic wastewater around the lake. Heavy metals concentrations were relatively higher in the inlet area than in other areas. Negative correlations were observed between most heavy metals and pH, while a significant positive correlation was present between Zn, Cd and Pb. In the sediment core, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni showed a decreasing trend while Cd present an increasing trend. The decrease of As, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni in the 1990s might due to the flood event in 1998. The analysis of ecological risk assessment based on sediment quality guidelines suggested that heavy metals in most sediments from the Honghu Lake had moderate toxicity, with Cr being the highest priority pollutant.

  9. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2 (TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 3; Program Cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. The basic period of performance of the TA-2 contract was from May 1992 through May 1993. No-cost extensions were exercised on the contract from June 1993 through July 1995. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 3, provides a work breakdown structure dictionary, user's guide for the parametric life cycle cost estimation tool, and final report developed by ECON, Inc., under subcontract to Lockheed Martin on TA-2 for the analysis of heavy lift launch vehicle concepts.

  10. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  11. Pulsed Neutron Measurements on a Heavy Water Power Reactor (MZFR) at Zero Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulsed neutron method was used for zero-power measurements in the core of a heavy water reactor. Various methods were used for the evaluation of the pulsed measurements. The so-called ''integral'' evaluation methods are based on theories published by Sjöstrand and Gozani; so far they have been applied mainly to light water reactors. These methods use not only the prompt neutron decay constant but also the information contained in the delayed neutron tails to determine the reactivity. For measurements on the heavy water reactor, however, the methods had to be modified so as to adequately take into account the time dependence of the delayed neutrons. The fraction of the delayed neutrons was calculated using a reasonable assumption for its time dependence. All the information needed could be obtained from the measurements. These methods are well suited for hand calculations to yield the reactivity with proper accuracy. An analytical procedure was applied to check the results of the integral methods. This essentially involves the exact calculation of the time dependence of the delayed neutron fraction by an iteration procedure. The results of the different evaluation methods mentioned above are compared by plotting them as functions of the D2O level and of the boron concentration. Due to the inclined control rods the flux distribution is distorted in a rather complicated manner when the rods are inserted. Therefore the time dependence of this distribution was measured for different positions of the pulsed neutron source. It was possible to find one position for which the influence of higher modes on the measurements of the shutdown reactivity was sufficiently small. Finally it is shown that the values of (δρ(H, ci)/δ(l/H2)) H = Hi and (δρ(Hi, c)/δc) c = ci (ρ reactivity, Hi critical D2O level for boron concentration c1) obtained by period measurements in the slightly supercritical state and pulsed measurements in the subcritical state are in excellent

  12. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Water, Sediment, and Fishes of a Large Tropical Hydroelectric Dam in Sarawak, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Siong Fong Sim; Teck Yee Ling; Lee Nyanti; Norliza Gerunsin; Yiew Ee Wong; Liang Ping Kho

    2016-01-01

    Bakun Hydroelectric Dam in Sarawak is one of the world highest concrete rock filled dams. This paper reports the heavy metals concentrations in water, sediment, and fishes of Bakun Dam. Water and sediment samples were collected from 11 stations and 6 fish species were caught. The samples were digested with open acid digestion and the metals contents were analysed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and mercury analyser. The method was validated based on certified reference materials....

  13. Spatio-temporal impacts of dairy lagoon water reuse on soil: heavy metals and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Dennis L; Ahmad, Hamaad Raza

    2015-10-01

    Diminishing freshwater resources have brought attention to the reuse of degraded water as a water resource rather than a disposal problem. The spatial impact and sustainability of dairy lagoon water reuse from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) has not been evaluated at field scale. The objective of this study is to monitor the impact of dairy lagoon water blended with recycled water on a 32 ha field near San Jacinto, CA from 2007 to 2011. Spatial monitoring was based on soil samples collected at locations identified from apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) directed sampling. Soil samples were taken at depth increments of 0-0.15, 0.15-0.3, 0.3-0.6, 0.6-0.9, 0.9-1.2, 1.2-1.5, and 1.5-1.8 m at 28 sample sites on 7-11 May 2007 and again on 31 May - 2 June 2011 after 4 years of irrigation with the blended waters. Chemical analyses included salinity (electrical conductivity of the saturation extract, ECe), pHe (pH of the saturation extract), SAR (sodium adsorption ratio), trace elements (As, B, Mo, Se), and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn). Results indicate a decrease in mean values of pHe at all depth increments; a decrease in ECe and SAR above a depth of 0.15 m, but an increase below 0.15 m; a decrease in all trace elements except B, which increased throughout the 1.8 m profile; and the accumulation of Cd, Mn, and Ni at all depth increments, while Cu was readily leached from the 1.8 m profile. Zinc showed little change. The results focused concern on the potential long-term agronomic effect of salinity, SAR, and B, and the long-term environmental threat of salinity and Cu to detrimentally impact groundwater. The accumulation of Cd, Mn, and Ni in the soil profile raised concern since it provided a potential future source of metals for leaching. The long-term sustainability of dairy lagoon water reuse hinges on regular monitoring to provide spatial feedback for site-specific management. PMID:26294000

  14. Pelletized ponderosa pine bark for adsorption of toxic heavy metals from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshabalala, M. A.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Bark flour from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa was consolidated into pellets using citric acid as cross-linking agent. The pellets were evaluated for removal of toxic heavy metals from synthetic aqueous solutions. When soaked in water, pellets did not leach tannins, and they showed high adsorption capacity for Cu(II, Zn(II, Cd(II, and Ni(II under both equilibrium and dynamic adsorption conditions. The experimental data for Cd(II and Zn(II showed a better fit to the Langmuir than to the Freundlich isotherm. The Cu(II data best fit the Freundlich isotherm, and the Ni(II data fitted both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms equally. According to the Freundlich constant KF, adsorption capacity of pelletized bark for the metal ions in aqueous solution, pH 5.1 ± 0.2, followed the order Cd(II > Cu(II > Zn(II >> Ni(II; according to the Langmuir constant b, adsorption affinity followed the order Cd(II >> Cu(II ≈ Zn(II >> Ni(II. Although data from dynamic column adsorption experiments did not show a good fit to the Thomas kinetic adsorption model, estimates of sorption affinity series of the metal ions on pelletized bark derived from this model were not consistent with the series derived from the Langmuir or Freundlich isotherms and followed the order Cu(II > Zn(II ≈ Cd(II > Ni(II. According to the Thomas kinetic model, the theoretical maximum amounts of metal that can be sorbed on the pelletized bark in a column at influent concentration of ≈10 mg/L and flow rate = 5 mL/min were estimated to be 57, 53, 50, and 27 mg/g for copper, zinc, cadmium, and nickel, respectively. This study demonstrated the potential for converting low-cost bark residues to value-added sorbents using starting materials and chemicals derived from renewable resources. These sorbents can be applied in the removal of toxic heavy metals from waste streams with heavy metal ion concentrations of up to 100 mg/L in the case of Cu(II.

  15. Modelling of NO{sub x} emission factors from heavy and light-duty vehicles equipped with advanced aftertreatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.L.M., E-mail: monalisa@unifor.br [IDMEC - Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, C.M. [IDMEC - Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Moreno-Tost, R. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Unidad Asociada al Instituto de Catalisis, CSIC, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Farias, T.L. [IDMEC - Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [IDMEC - Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Unidad Asociada al Instituto de Catalisis, CSIC, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Rodriguez-Castellon, E. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Unidad Asociada al Instituto de Catalisis, CSIC, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Alternative SCR materials. {yields} Catalysts used in heavy-duty vehicles are based on V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}. {yields}Zeolites containing transition metal ions as catalysts for urea SCR has increased. {yields} FeZSM5 catalyst can be a possible candidate as far as pollutants regulation is considered. {yields} Regarding N{sub 2}O emissions mordenite based SCR do not emit this pollutant. - Abstract: NO{sub x} emission standards are becoming stringiest over the world especially for heavy-duty vehicles. To comply with current and future regulations some vehicle manufacturers are adopting exhaust aftertreatment systems known as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). The catalysts are based on Vanadium (Va) and the reductant agent based on ammonia. However, Va is listed on the California Proposition 65 List as potentially causing cancer and alternatives are being studied. This paper presents a model based on neural networks that integrated with a road vehicle simulator allows to estimate NO{sub x} emission factors for different powertrain configurations, along different driving conditions, and covering commercial, zeolite and mordenite alternatives as the base monolith for SCR. The research included the experimental study of copper based and iron based zeolites (ZSM5 and Cuban natural mordenite). The response of NO{sub x} conversion efficiency was monitored in a laboratory for varying space velocity, oxygen, sulfur, water, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emulating the conditions of a Diesel engine exhaust along a trip. The experimental data was used for training neural networks and obtaining a mathematical correlation between the outputs and inputs of the SCR system. The developed correlation was integrated with ADVISOR road vehicle simulator to obtain NO{sub x} emission factors and to test each SCR system installed on light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles for standardized driving cycles and real measured driving cycles. Despite having lower NO

  16. Response of forestland soil water content to heavy rainfall on Beijing Mountain, northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Jia; Xinxiao Yu; Yitao Li

    2016-01-01

    Continuous recording of precipitation and soil water content (SWC), especially during long periods of tor-rential rainfall, has proven challenging. Over a 16 h period spanning 21–22 July, 2012, Beijing experienced historic rainfall that totaled 164.4 mm. We used large lysimeter technology in four forested plots to record precipitation and variation in SWC at 10-min intervals to quantify the response of forestland SWC to heavy rainfall in a semi-arid area. Mean, maximum and minimum rainfall intensities were 23.4, 46.8 and 12.0 mm/h, respectively. Rainfall was concentrated in 2–6 mm bursts that accounted for 67.32%of the total rainfall event. Soil moisture conditions in this region are strongly dependent on patterns of precipitation. Water infiltration into 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 cm soil layers required 1, 5, 20, 37, 46, 52 and 61 mm of precipitation, respectively, and to fully saturate these soil layers required 80, 120, 140, 150, 180, 200 and 220 mm of precipitation, respectively.

  17. Heavy metal concentrations and toxicity in water and sediment from stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Kristin; Viklander, Maria; Scholes, Lian; Revitt, Mike

    2010-06-15

    Sedimentation is a widely used technique in structural best management practices to remove pollutants from stormwater. However, concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants. This study has concentrated on stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks and reports on the accumulated metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and the associated toxicity to the bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The metal concentrations are compared with guidelines and the toxicity results are assessed in relation to samples for which metal concentrations either exceed or conform to these values. The water phase metal concentrations were highest in the ponds whereas the sedimentation tanks exhibited a distinct decrease towards the outlet. However, none of the water samples demonstrated toxicity even though the concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn exceeded the threshold values for the compared guidelines. The facilities with higher traffic intensities had elevated sediment concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn which increased towards the outlet for the sedimentation tanks in agreement with the highest percentage of fine particles. The sediments in both treatment facilities exhibited the expected toxic responses in line with their affinity for heavy metals but the role of organic carbon content is highlighted.

  18. Advances in implosion physics, alternative targets design, and neutron effects on heavy ion fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of a new radiation transport (RT) solver with an existing multimaterial fluid dynamics code (ARWEN) using Adaptive Mesh Refinement named DAFNE, has been completed. In addition, improvements were made to ARWEN in order to work properly with the RT code, and to make it user-friendlier, including new treatment of Equations of State, and graphical tools for visualization. The evaluation of the code has been performed, comparing it with other existing RT codes (including the one used in DAFNE, but in the single-grid version). These comparisons consist in problems with real input parameters (mainly opacities and geometry parameters). Important advances in Atomic Physics, Opacity calculations and NLTE atomic physics calculations, with participation in significant experiments in this area, have been obtained. Early published calculations showed that a DTx fuel with a small tritium initial content (xe and to enhance radiation losses, reducing the plasma temperature, Ti. The neutron activation of all natural elements in First Structural Wall (FSW) component of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactor for waste management, and the analysis of activation of target debris in NIF-type facilities has been completed. Using an original efficient modeling for pulse activation, the FSW behavior in inertial fusion has been studied. A radiological dose library coupled to the ACAB code is being generated for assessing impact of environmental releases, and atmospheric dispersion analysis from HIF reactors indicate the uncertainty in tritium release parameters. The first recognition of recombination barriers in SiC, modify the understanding of the calculation of displacement per atom, dpa, to quantify the collisional damage. An important analysis has been the confirmation, using Molecular Dynamics (MD) with an astonishing agreement, of the experimental evidence of low-temperature amorphization by damage accumulation in SiC, which could modify extensively its viability as a

  19. Heavy metal baseline data for Kura water and harmonization of monitoring methodology along Kura river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The river the Kura is main water artery of Azerbaijan Republic. In republic, the Kura river water are widely used for drinking and industrial water supply of a number of cities and large occupied items, irrigation pisciculture and fishery, cultural - improving purposes. The basic part of need of branches of a national economy of republic is satisfied with water of the Transit Rivers, main of which the Kura and her inflows are. Increased risk of pollution of waters pool the Kura realizes by the large economic project, such as the construction oil pipe line to a Baku - Supsa, Baku -Tbilisi-Ceyhan in connection with constant growth of a level oil producing shows, that the basic research of an ecological condition the Kura, is a urgent task now. As is known these pipelines there passes by pool the river the Kura and some times cross it. The disputed situation between Azerbaijan and Armenia, seismic activity of region and further periodic clearing inside of the pipeline once again requires the regular ecological control above ecosystem of Kura river pool. For the baseline data creation, in present work were investigated of trace heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn) and major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) in water of the river Kura. Identification and quantification of trace metals sources in river Kura, as well as fate of those trace metals in that ecosystem are important environmental scientific issues. The samples for measurement were taken from the predefined stations at expedition executed in the period 2003-2005 y y. The dissolved metals and major cations were defined from samples filtered through membranous the filter pore size 0.45 micro m, without preliminary sample preparation. The analysis of trace heavy metals in the filtered samples, carried out in Perkin Elmer model, Analyst 800 atomic absorption spectrometer with Zeeman background corrector by electrothermal atomization. The Analyst 800 has auto sampler such as AS 800 and due

  20. The Use of Water Vapor for Detecting Environments that Lead to Convectively Produced Heavy Precipitation and Flash Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Rod; Vicente, Gilberto; Hodges, Mike

    2000-01-01

    This Tech Report summarizes years of study and experiences on using GOES Water vapor (6.7 micron and precipitable water) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) derived Precipitable Water (PNAI) for detecting environments favorable for convectively produced flash floods. An emphasis is on the moisture. upper air flow, and equivalent potential temperature (Theta(sub e)) patterns that lead to devastating flood events. The 15 minute 6.7 micron water vapor imagery is essential for tracking middle to upper tropospheric disturbances that produce upward vertical motion and initiate flash flood producing systems. Water vapor imagery at 6.7 micron is also used to detect surges of upper level moisture (called tropical water vapor plumes) that have been associated with extremely heavy rainfall. Since the water vapor readily depicts lifting mechanisms and upper level moisture, water vapor imagery is often an excellent source of data for recognizing patterns of heavy precipitation and flash floods. In order to analyze the depth of the moisture, the PW aspects of the troposphere must be measured. The collocation (or nearby location) of high values ofP\\V and instability are antecedent conditions prior to the flash flood or heavy rainfall events. Knowledge of PW magnitudes have been used as thresholds for impending flash flood events, PW trends are essential in flash flood prediction. Conceptual models and water vapor products are used to study some of the characteristics of convective systems that occurred over the United States of America (USA) during the summer of 1997 and the 1997-1998 El Nino. P\\V plumes were associated with most of the \\vest coast heavy precipitation events examined during the winter season of 1997 - 1998, In another study, conducted during the summer season of 1997. results showed that the collocation of water vapor (6.7 micron) and P\\N' plumes possessed higher correlations with predicted

  1. Advanced Oxidation Technology for Potable Water Disinfection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The availability of high-quality potable water is essential in crewed space missions. Closed loop water recycling systems as well as potable water holding tanks and...

  2. Monitoring of heavy water flow in a 'cannelloni' spallation target through fluctuation analysis of measured temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and reliable technique of heavy water flow rate monitoring in a 'cannelloni' spallation target is described in this paper. The Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) is a large scale facility for matter scattering at Paul Scherrer Institute; neutrons are produced in the spallation target composed of a bundle of zircaloy rods filled with lead. A beam of high speed protons strikes the rods. Neutrons and a large amount of thermal power (up to 800 kW) are produced by spallation reaction. Cooling is essential for safe and proper work of the target. Redundancy of all the monitoring systems is considered beneficial for overall safety of the facility. The paper below introduces an alternative way for coolant (heavy water, D2O) flow monitoring by measurement of propagation of thermal transient fronts in the target. Several data processing methods are analyzed. The heavy water (D2O) circulates between the bundle of rods and a heat exchanger. The proton beam current is not fully stable - as a rule there are at least 4 – 6 beam trips occurring during one hour of the target operation. These proton beam trips lead to a rapid change in heat release in the target spallation zone and corresponding change in the cooling water temperature. Such temperature fluctuation front arise in the water flow from the target's spallation zone towards the heat exchanger. The target cooling loop is equipped with several thermocouples placed along the heavy water flow path; the thermocouples are connected to a data acquisition system, which records the signals. The thermocouples placed at different distances downstream the target spallation zone react one by one to the passage of a temperature fluctuation front. Thus the water flow rate can be calculated based on time difference between the moments this temperature front been detected at different time by sequently placed thermocouples. (author)

  3. Simultaneous removal of oil and grease, and heavy metals from artificial bilge water using electro-coagulation/flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Guillermo J; La Motta, Enrique J

    2014-11-01

    US and international regulations pertaining to the control of bilge water discharges from ships have concentrated their attention to the levels of oil and grease rather than to the heavy metal concentrations. The consensus is that any discharge of bilge water (and oily water emulsion within 12 nautical miles from the nearest land cannot exceed 15 parts per million (ppm). Since there is no specific regulation for metal pollutants under the bilge water section, reference standards regulating heavy metal concentrations are taken from the ambient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life. The research herein presented discusses electro-coagulation (EC) as a method to treat bilge water, with a focus on oily emulsions and heavy metals (copper, nickel and zinc) removal efficiency. Experiments were run using a continuous flow reactor, manufactured by Ecolotron, Inc., and a synthetic emulsion as artificial bilge water. The synthetic emulsion contained 5000 mg/L of oil and grease, 5 mg/L of copper, 1.5 mg/L of nickel, and 2.5 mg/l of zinc. The experimental results demonstrate that EC is very efficient in removing oil and grease. For oil and grease removal, the best treatment and cost efficiency was obtained when using a combination of carbon steel and aluminum electrodes, at a detention time less than one minute, a flow rate of 1 L/min and 0.6 A/cm(2) of current density. The final effluent oil and grease concentration, before filtration, was always less than 10 mg/L. For heavy metal removal, the combination of aluminum and carbon steel electrodes, flow rate of 1 L/min, effluent recycling, and 7.5 amps produced 99% zinc removal efficiency. Copper and nickel are harder to remove, and a removal efficiency of 70% was achieved.

  4. The Influence of Heavy Metals on Growth and Development of Eichhornia crassipes Species, Cultivated in Contaminated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsebet BUTA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many plants are capable of accumulating heavy metals (called hyperacumulators, one of which is the water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes Mart. The roots of this water plant naturally absorb pollutants, including heavy metals such as Pb, Hg, Zn, Co, Cd, and Cu and can be used for wastewater treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of heavy metals on growth and development of water hyacinth and to determinate the uptake capacity of heavy metals of this species. It was evaluated for its effectiveness in reducing pollution potential in wastewater. From the combination of experimental factors 11 variants resulted. The results showed that Eichhornia absorbed a high quantity of Pb (504 mg/kg dry matter and Cu (561 mg/kg dry matter in their roots. More Cu accumulated in the root compared to Pb. The level of Zn absorption was lower in roots (84 mg/kg dry matter and also in stem plus leaves (51 mg/kg dry matter. A high quantity of Cd (281 mg/kg dry matter was removed from stem plus leaves of Eichhornia while the level of Co was very low (45 mg/kg dry matter. Regarding the growth and development of this plant it was found that in tanks with Pb plants had a better development and had flowers also, and in the case of Cd, Co, Cu at a double dose of maximum admissible limits, the plants died and the growing period was shorter.

  5. Water Quality Assessment Using Physico-Chemical Parameters and Heavy Metals of Gobind Sagar Lake, Himachal Pradesh (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Today the environment has become harmful for the health of living organisms due to excessive pollution and contamination of natural resources. The present investigation has been carried out with the objective to assess the water quality of the Gobind Sagar Lake, Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh (India using physico-chemical parameters with heavy metals of the lake. For this study, three sampling sites were identified and samples from different sites were collected in summer season and important parameters [Water Temperature , pH, Total Hardness, Dissolved Carbon Dioxide (CO2, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD, Chloride, Total Alkalinity, Total Dissolved Solid (TDS] with heavy metals [ Lead (P, Copper (Co, Iron (Fe, Cadmium (Cd, Nickel (Ni and Manganese (Mn, Chromium (Cr were analyzed. The results revealed that the different conditions of Gobind Sagar Lake in different sampling stations showed fluctuations in some physico-chemical parameters and also in heavy metals. These result depicted that water of lake was polluted in the form of nutrient enrichment which is due to agricultural activities and its runoff in and around catchment area of the lake. There are other many ways that things can end up in the lake as the free style way of disposal of industrial and domestic effluents etc. Results of studies on heavy metals in pollution are well documented revealing the toxic effects of these metals on aquatic organisms.

  6. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, M.B. Smith, R.; McNeil, J.

    1997-04-01

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. N2O and NO2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks with Advanced Emission Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, C.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2014-12-01

    Diesel engines are the largest source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions nationally, and also a major contributor to the black carbon (BC) fraction of fine particulate matter (PM). Recently, diesel particle filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) emission control systems that target exhaust PM and NOx have become standard equipment on new heavy-duty diesel trucks. However, the deliberate catalytic oxidation of engine-out nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in continuously regenerating DPFs leads to increased tailpipe emission of NO2. This is of potential concern due to the toxicity of NO2 and the resulting increases in atmospheric formation of other air pollutants such as ozone, nitric acid, and fine PM. While use of SCR reduces emissions of both NO and NO2, it may lead to increased emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Here we report results from on-road measurements of heavy-duty diesel truck emissions conducted at the Port of Oakland and the Caldecott Tunnel in the San Francisco Bay Area. Emission factors (g pollutant per kg of diesel) were linked via recorded license plates to individual truck attributes, including engine model year and installed emission control equipment. Between 2009 and 2013, the fraction of DPF-equipped trucks at the Port of Oakland increased from 2 to 99%, and median engine age decreased from 11 to 6 years. Over the same period, fleet-average emission factors for black carbon and NOx decreased by 76 ± 22% and 53 ± 8%, respectively. However, direct emissions of NO2 increased, and consequently the NO2/NOx emission ratio increased from 0.03 ± 0.02 to 0.18 ± 0.03. Older trucks retrofitted with DPFs emitted approximately 3.5 times more NO2 than newer trucks equipped with both DPF and SCR. Preliminary data from summer 2014 measurements at the Caldecott Tunnel suggest that some older trucks have negative emission factors for N2O, and that for newer trucks, N2O emission factors have changed sign and

  8. Water mutagenic potential assessment on a semiarid aquatic ecosystem under influence of heavy metals and natural radioactivity using micronuclei test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Luiz Cláudio Cardozo; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Morais Ferreira, Douglisnilson; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia; Ferreira da Costa, Thomas; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Souza do Amaral, Viviane

    2016-04-01

    The contamination of water bodies by heavy metals and ionizing radiation is a critical environmental issue, which can affect water quality and, thus, human health. This study aimed to evaluate the water quality of the Boqueirão de Parelhas Dam in the Brazilian semiarid region. A 1-year study (2013-2014) was performed through the assessment of physicochemical parameters, heavy metal content, and radioactivity along with the mutagenicity potential of water using micronuclei test in Orechromis niloticus (in vivo) and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human lymphocytes (in vitro). A deterioration of water organoleptics characteristics by the presence of high levels of sulfate and total solids was observed. High concentrations of aluminum, nickel, silver, and lead along with the alpha particle content were higher than the limits suggested by the World Health Organization and Brazilian legislation for drinking water. An increase in the frequency of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities was observed in both experimental models. The results obtained confirmed the mutagenic potential present in water samples. This study highlights that geogenic agents affect water quality becoming a human health concern to be taken into account due to the relevance that this water reservoir has in the region. PMID:26732704

  9. Advances in the Coupled Soil Water and Groundwater Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉峥; 王志敏

    2014-01-01

    Models simulating the reciprocal transformation between the soil water and groundwater are of great practical importance to the development and utilization of water resources and prevention and remedy of water pollution. In this paper, popular coupled models of soil water and groundwater will be analyzed. Besides, advantages and disadvantages of different models will be summarized as a reference for the numerical model of soil water and groundwater.

  10. Research advances on thereasonable water resources allocation in irrigation district

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xuebin, Qi; Zhongdong, Huang; Dongmei, Qiao;

    2015-01-01

    resources optimal allocation model and④The hydrological ecosystem analysis in irrigation district. Our analysis showed that there are four major problems in domestic irrigation water resources allocation:Policies for rational water resources allocation and protection are not in place, unified management......The rational allocation of water resources for irrigation is important to improve the efficiency in utilization of water resources and ensuring food security, but also effective control measures need to be in place for the sustainable utilization of water resources in an irrigation area....... The progress of research on the rational allocation of water resources in irrigation districts both at home and abroad may be summarized in four key aspects of the policy regarding water re?sources management:① The mechanism of water resource cycle and ② Transformation in irrigation district, ③ The water...

  11. Trace incorporation of heavy water reveals slow and heterogeneous pathogen growth rates in cystic fibrosis sputum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Sebastian H.; Sessions, Alex L.; Cowley, Elise S.; Reyes, Carmen; Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Hu, Yang; Orphan, Victoria J.; Kato, Roberta; Newman, Dianne K.

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment for chronic infections is undermined by a significant gap in understanding of the physiological state of pathogens at the site of infection. Chronic pulmonary infections are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of millions of immunocompromised individuals worldwide, yet drugs that are successful in laboratory culture are far less effective against pathogen populations persisting in vivo. Laboratory models, upon which preclinical development of new drugs is based, can only replicate host conditions when we understand the metabolic state of the pathogens and the degree of heterogeneity within the population. In this study, we measured the anabolic activity of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus directly in the sputum of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), by combining the high sensitivity of isotope ratio mass spectrometry with a heavy water labeling approach to capture the full range of in situ growth rates. Our results reveal S. aureus generation times with a median of 2.1 d, with extensive growth rate heterogeneity at the single-cell level. These growth rates are far below the detection limit of previous estimates of CF pathogen growth rates, and the rates are slowest in acutely sick patients undergoing pulmonary exacerbations; nevertheless, they are accessible to experimental replication within laboratory models. Treatment regimens that include specific antibiotics (vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tobramycin) further appear to correlate with slow growth of S. aureus on average, but follow-up longitudinal studies must be performed to determine whether this effect holds for individual patients.

  12. The mechanisms of removal of heavy metals from water by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of heavy metal ions from water using electron beam and gamma irradiation has been investigated for the cases of Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions. These metal ions are reduced by hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms to lower or zero valence state and eventually precipitate out of solution. Ethanol is applied as a relatively non-toxic additive to scavenge ·OH radicals, to enhance reduction and inhibit oxidation. Mercury can be completely (>99.9%) removed from aqueous solution of 1x10-3 mol L-1 mercury (II) chloride by using a 3 kGy dose. However, a 40 kGy dose is required to remove 96% of lead ions from a 1x10-3 mol L-1 of PbCl2 solution. The effect of dissolved oxygen and carbonate were also investigated. E-beam irradiation of 1x10-3 mol L-1 lead ions complexed with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) in deoxygenated as well as air-saturated solutions in the absence of ethanol resulted in removal of about 97% of the lead

  13. Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Squid (Loligo Spp.) Tissues of Kedah-Perlis Waters, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to determine the concentration of selected heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in three different tissues collected from the ink-sac, head, and muscle of the squid. Squid samples were caught off the coastal waters of Kedah-Perlis, where only mature squids within the maturity size-range of 13 to 15 cm were used. From this study, the concentration of Zn (35.06 ± 4.06 mg/ kg in dry weight) was found significantly higher in all of the tissues, followed by Cu (15.10 ± 13.28 mg/ kg in dry weight), Cd (4.76 ± 3.77 mg/ kg in dry weight), and Pb with an average value of 4.01 ± 0.08 mg/ kg in dry weight. From this study, it was discovered that Zn and Cu concentrations in the tissues were lower than the maximum limit recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization, Malaysian Food Regulation (1985), as well as other countries. Meanwhile, both non-essential elements namely Cd and Pb recorded higher values than that of the recommended concentrations. According to the Metal Pollution Index (MPI), the ink-sac indicated medium-range contamination, while the head and muscle tissues showed low contamination levels. (author)

  14. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  15. Impact of ultrasonic time on hot water elution of severely biodegraded heavy oil from weathered soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasound-enhanced elution system employing water at a temperature of 70 deg. C was used to remedy weathered soils contaminated with severely biodegraded heavy oil (SBHO). The effect of varying the ultrasonic irradiation time from 0 to 1800 s on the elution of SBHO and three characteristic biomarkers (C26-34 17α 25-norhopanes, C26-28 TAS, and C27-29 MTAS) was analyzed using GC/MS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Elution of the three biomarkers was closely related to the carbon number of the marker. C26-34 17α 25-norhopanes and C26-28 TAS species with higher carbon numbers and C27-29 MTAS species with lower carbon numbers were more readily eluted using sonication times of 1080-1800 s, while smaller TAS homologs were more readily eluted after sonication times of 0-360 s. SEM images of samples treated for longer periods revealed larger 'bare patches' on the soil surface. The results of XRD and energy spectroscopy experiments indicated that ultrasound irradiation for 1080 s negatively affected the deposition of CaCO3, but overall improved the mineral and chemical compositions of treated soils and removal of SBHO.

  16. Level-1 probability safety assessment of the Iranian heavy water reactor using SAPHIRE software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this review paper is to analyze the total frequency of the core damage of the Iranian Heavy Water Research Reactor (IHWRR) compared with standard criteria and to determine the strengths and the weaknesses of the reactor safety systems towards improving its design and operation. The PSA has been considered for full-power state of the reactor and this article represents a level-1 PSA analysis using System Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) software. It is specifically designed to permit a listing of the potential accident sequences, compute their frequencies of occurrence and assign each sequence to a consequence. The method used for modeling the systems and accident sequences, is Large Fault Tree/Small Event Tree method. This PSA level-1 for IHWRR indicates that, based on conservative assumptions, the total frequency of accidents that would lead to core damage from internal initiating events is 4.44E-05 per year of reactor operation

  17. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300 degrees C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered

  18. Application of lactic acid bacteria in removing heavy metals and aflatoxin B1 from contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsanhoty, Rafaat M; Al-Turki, I A; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    In this study selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantrium and Streptococcus thermophiles) and probiotic bacteria (Bifidobacterium angulatum) were tested for their ability in removing heavy metals (HM) including cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) as well as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from contaminated water. The biosorption parameters (pH, bacterial concentration, contact time and temperature) of removal using individual as well as mixed LAB and probiotic bacteria were studied. Removal of HM and AFB1 depended on the strain, wherein the process was strongly pH-dependent with high removal ability at a pH close to neutral. The increase in bacterial concentration enhanced the removal of Cd, Pb and As. Also, increasing of contact time and temperature increased the ability of LAB to remove HM. The effect of contact time on Cd removal was slightly different when freshly cultured cells were used. The removal of Cd, Pb and As decreased with the increase in the initial metal concentration. The most effective HM removers were Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium angulatum. The system was found to be adequate for concentrations of HM under investigation. At the end of the operation, the concentration of HM reached the level allowed by the World Health Organization regulations. PMID:27508367

  19. Measurement of material buckling in a large heavy water moderated exponential assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exponential measurements of material buckling have been made in a number of Steam Generating Heavy Water lattices, in the large exponential assembly known as SGHW I, at AEE Winfrith. The procedures adopted for the optimum adjustment of neutron source positions, for the analysis of harmonic effects and for the investigation and minimising of random and systematic errors are described in detail in this report. It is believed that these methods are adequate to determine a typical material buckling of 3 m-2 to a statistical accuracy of ± 0.030 m-2 and that the additional contribution from systematic errors is not greater than ± 0.036 m-2. It has been shown that the positions of flux peaks caused by cluster end plates in the axial distributions in these cores are moved vertically by about 2 cm by the interaction with the macroscopic exponential flux distribution. Radial reflector savings have been shown to vary with core composition in a manner which is well predicted by a relatively simple theoretical calculation. This suggests that statistical errors in individual radial buckling determinations in lattices of this type could be reduced from ± 0.016 m-2 to ± 0.005 m-2 by collating radial reflector saving data from similar lattices. (author)

  20. Computation and measurement of calandria tube sag in pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calandria tubes and liquid injection shutdown system nozzles in a pressurized heavy water reactor are to sag due to irradiation creep and growth during plant operation. When the sag of calandria tube becomes bigger, the calandria tube possibly comes in contact with liquid injection shutdown system tube crossing beneath the calandria tube. The contact subsequently may cause the damage on the calandria tube resulting in unpredicted outage of the plant. It is therefore necessary to check the gap between the two tubes in order to periodically confirm no contact by using a proper measure during the plant life. An ultrasonic gap measurement probe assembly which can be inserted into two viewing ports of the calandria was developed in Korea and utilized to measure the sag between both tubes in the reactor. It was found that the centerlines of calandria tubes and liquid injection shutdown system tubes can be precisely detected by ultrasonic wave. The gaps between two tubes were easily obtained from the relative distance of the measured centerline elevations of the tubes. Based on the irradiation creep equation and the measurement data, a computer program to calculate the sags was also developed. With the computer program, the sag at the end of plant life was predicted

  1. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ−n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies

  2. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  3. Intercomparison of techniques for inspection and diagnostics of heavy water reactor pressure tubes: Flaw detection and characterization [Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants with heavy water reactors (HWRs) comprise nine percent of today's operating nuclear units, and more are under construction. Efficient and accurate inspection and diagnostic techniques for various reactor components and systems are an important factor in assuring reliable and safe plant operation. To foster international collaboration in the efficient and safe use of nuclear power, the IAEA conducted a Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Inter-comparison of Techniques for HWR Pressure Tube Inspection and Diagnostics. This CRP was carried out within the frame of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for HWRs (the TWG-HWR). The TWG-HWR is a group of experts nominated by their governments and designated by the IAEA to provide advice and to support implementation of the IAEA's project on advanced technologies for HWRs. The objective of the CRP was to inter-compare non-destructive inspection and diagnostic techniques, in use and being developed, for structural integrity assessment of HWR pressure tubes. During the first phase of this CRP, participants have investigated the capability of different techniques to detect and characterize flaws. During the second phase of this CRP, participants collaborated to detect and characterize hydride blisters and to determine the hydrogen concentration in Zirconium alloys. The intent was to identify the most effective pressure tube inspection and diagnostic methods, and to identify further development needs. The organizations that have participated in this CRP are: - The Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Argentina; - Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL); Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), Canada; - The Research Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (RINPO), China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), China; - Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India; - The Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI), Republic of Korea; - The Korea Atomic Energy

  4. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a heavy-water reactor moderator tank using the CUPID Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Su Ryong; Jeong, Jae Jun [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Han Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a preliminary analysis is performed for the CANDU moderator tank. The calculation results using the basic case input showed a unrealistic, thermal stratification in the upper region, which was caused by the lack of the momentum of the cooling water from the inlet nozzle. To increase the flow momentum from the inlet nozzle, the cross-section area of each inlet nozzle was reduced by half and, then, the calculation showed very realistic results. It is clear that the modeling of the inlet nozzle affects the calculation result significantly. Further studies are needed for a realistic and efficient simulation of the flow in the Calandria tank. When the core cooling system fails to remove the decay heat from the fuel channels during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the pressure tube (PT) could strain to contact its surrounding Calandria tube (CT), which leads to sustained CTs dry out, finally resulting in damages to nuclear fuel. This situation can occur when the degree of the subcooling of the moderator inside the Calandria vessel is insufficient. In this regard, to estimate the local subcooling of the moderator inside the Calandria vessel is very important. However, the local temperature is measured at the inlet and outlet of the vessel only. Therefore, we need to accurately predict the local temperature inside the Calandria vessel.In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the real-scale heavy-water reactor moderator is carried out using the CUPID code. The applicability of the CUPID code to the analysis of the flow in the Calandria vessel has been assessed in the previous studies.

  5. An Advanced Microturbine System with Water-Lubricated Bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Susumu Nakano; Tadaharu Kishibe; Tomoaki Inoue; Hiroyuki Shiraiwa

    2009-01-01

    A prototype of the next-generation, high-performance microturbine system was developed for laboratory evaluation. Its unique feature is its utilization of water. Water is the lubricant for the bearings in this first reported application of water-lubricated bearings in gas turbines. Bearing losses and limitations under usage conditions were found from component tests done on the bearings and load tests done on the prototype microturbine. The rotor system using the water-lubricated bearings ach...

  6. Advances in Biological Water-saving Research: Challenge and Perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun Shan; Xiping Deng; Suiqi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the efficiency of water use by crops continues to escalate as a topic of concern because drought is a restrictive environmental factor for crop productivity worldwide. Greater yield per unit rainfall is one of the most important challenges in water-saving agriculture. Besides water-saving by irrigation engineering and conservation tillage, a good understanding of factors limiting and/or regulating yield now provides us with an opportunity to identify and then precisely select for physiological and breeding traits that increase the efficiency of water use and drought tolerance under water-limited conditions, biological water-saving is one means of achieving this goat. A definition of biological water-saving measures is proposed which embraces improvements in water-use efficiency (WUE) and drought tolerance, by genetic improvement and physiological regulation. The preponderance of biological water-saving measures is discussed and strategies identified for working within natural resource constraints. The technology and future perspectives of biological water saving could provide not only new water-saving techniques but also a scientific base for application of water-saving irrigation and conservation tillage.

  7. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors, and the role of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors was carried out from 1995-1999. It was included into the IAEA's Programme following endorsement in 1995 by the IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The overall goal was to promote international information exchange and cooperation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships that are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. (authors)

  8. The evaluation and determination of heavy metals pollution in edible vegetables, water and soil in the south of Tehran province by GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkhanloo Hamid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, heavy metals pollutions in waters, soils and vegetables were investigated from farms, near oil refinery in south of Tehran city, Iran (Shahre Ray. The most important heavy metals in Iranian oil are vanadium, cobalt, nickel, arsenic and mercury (V, Co, Ni, As, Hg. In this region, the concentration of heavy metals in soils, well waters and leafy edible vegetables were evaluated in ten different points of farms. Geographic information systems (GIS were used to estimate the levels of heavy metals concentration at unmeasured locations. After sample preparation, concentrations of heavy metals in vegetables, soils and waters were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. Five different leafy edible vegetables from farms, i.e., Persian leek, dill, parsley, spinach and radish were sampled in spring, summer and autumn 2012. In vegetables and well water samples, the concentrations of V, Ni and Co were above the permissible limit of heavy metals as compared to WHO guidelines and the concentrations of these metals in agricultural soils were found to be lower in accordance to soil references. The industrial waste waters had high concentration of heavy metals in this area. In consequence, the results of this study indicate that industrial waste water can cause pollution in well waters and edible vegetables. So, this region is not suitable for cultivation and growing vegetables.

  9. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    1998-03-03

    The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and

  10. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    1997-08-08

    The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and

  11. Identification of improvements of advanced light water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this report is to identify the improvement of reactor developments with respect to reactor safety. This includes the collection of non-proprietary information on the description of the advanced design characteristics, especially summary design descriptions and general publications. This documentation is not intended to include a safety evaluation of the advanced concepts; however, it is structured in such a way that it can serve as a basis for a future safety evaluation. This is taken into account in the structure of the information regarding the distinction of the various concepts with respect to their 'advancement' and the classification of design characteristics according to some basic safety aspects. The overall description concentrates on those features which are relevant to safety. Other aspects, such as economy, operational features, maintenance, the construction period, etc...are not considered explicitly in this report

  12. Study on recycle of materials and components from waste streams during decommissioning for heavy water research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recycle of valuable materials from potential waste streams is one of important elements of waste minimization, and it can minimize the environment impact. The recycle of the arising was researched with taking the decommissioning of heavy water research reactor (HWRR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy as an example. By analyzing all the possible wastes that could generate during the decommissioning of HWRR, some amount of materials have potential values to recycle and may be used either directly or after appropriate treatment for other purposes. The research results show that in HWRR decommissioning at least tons of irons, 10 tons of aluminum and 5 tons of heavy water can be recycled by carrying out the waste minimization control measures (eg. waste classification and waste stream segregation), adopting appropriate decontamination technologies, and performing the requirements of clearance. (authors)

  13. Amperometric detection of heavy metal ions in ion pair chromatography at an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, S; Wang, H; Muraczewska, M; Müller, H

    1996-09-01

    A novel amperometric detector for heavy metal ions has been developed and successfully applied for ion pair chromatography. The detector is based on the electrochemical transfer of the metal ions across an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces. The ion transfer is facilitated by the neutral ionophores methylenebis(diphenylphosphineoxide) and methylenebis(di- phenylphosphinesulfide). More than eight metals are separated in less than 15 min on an RP18 column using octyl sulfonate as ion pair reagent. For the heavy metals, the limits of decision are 19(Pb(2+)), 9(Zn(2+)), 9l (Co(2+)), 8(Cd(2+)) and 1.6(Mn(2+)) microg/L. The applicability of the new method for water samples is demonstrated. PMID:15048359

  14. An Advanced Microturbine System with Water-Lubricated Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Nakano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of the next-generation, high-performance microturbine system was developed for laboratory evaluation. Its unique feature is its utilization of water. Water is the lubricant for the bearings in this first reported application of water-lubricated bearings in gas turbines. Bearing losses and limitations under usage conditions were found from component tests done on the bearings and load tests done on the prototype microturbine. The rotor system using the water-lubricated bearings achieved stable rotating conditions at a rated rotational speed of 51,000 rpm. An electrical output of 135 kW with an efficiency of more than 33% was obtained. Water was also utilized to improve electrical output and efficiency through water atomizing inlet air cooling (WAC and a humid air turbine (HAT. The operation test results for the WAC and HAT revealed the WAC and HAT operations had significant effects on both electrical output and electrical efficiency.

  15. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The NRC seeks public...- Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' This area includes a revised......

  16. Water on Mediterranean Islands:Advanced Study Course SUSTAINIS

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Water is a scarce resource today and even more so in the near future. On many of the Mediterranean Islands the demand for water exceeds the supply, a tendency that is going to worsen in view of anticipated climate change. How is this scarce resource going to be distributed among the many user groups: agriculture, tourism, private households and industry? How did previous generations deal with this problem, and what would be strategies for a sustainable and equitable water management in the fu...

  17. Trend of R&D publications in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors: A Study using INIS and Other Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Vijai Kumar, *; Kalyane, V. L.; Prakasan, E.R.; Anil Kumar; Anil Sagar, *; Lalit Mohan

    2004-01-01

    Digital databases INIS (1970-2002), INSPEC (1969-2002), Chemical Abstracts (1977-2002), ISMEC (1973-June2002), Web of Sciences (1974-2002), and Science Citation Index (1982-2002), were used for comprehensive retrieval of bibliographic details of research publications on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) research. Among the countries contributing to PHWR research, India (having 1737 papers) is the forerunner followed by Canada (1492), Romania (508) and Argentina (334). Collaboration of Ca...

  18. Ultrasonic evaluation of end cap weld joints of fuel elements of pressurized heavy water reactors using signal analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the application of ultrasonic digital signal analysis for the detection of fine defects of the order of 10% or lower of wall thickness (WT) of 370 microns in the resistance welded end cap-cladding tube joints of fuel elements used in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR s). The results obtained for the detection of such defects, have confirmed the sensitivity and reliability of this approach, and were further validated by destructive metallography. (author)

  19. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    OpenAIRE

    Htet Htet Kyaw; Sakoolkan Boonruang; Waleed S. Mohammed; Joydeep Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an extern...

  20. Method for heavy-water production by H2S--H2O chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses a heavy water production stage in a bithermal H2S gas H2O liquid exchange plant wherein the cold tower is operated under temperature and pressure conditions such that H2S in the liquid phase is formed and is maintained in the separation units (sieve trays or plates) of the cold tower. It has been found that the presence of liquid H2S acts as an efficient anti-foaming agent

  1. Assessment of an ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA) sensor for the determination of trace concentrations of heavy metals in water [online

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xudong

    2004-01-01

    The main objectives of this book are (i) to investigate the electrochemical behavior and the analytical performance of a novel ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA); (ii) to assess the analytical parameters of square-wave anodic stripping voltammetric measurements (SWASV) using the UMEA; and (iii) to estimate the potential of the UMEA in developing decentralised analytical equipments for the determination of trace concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters. Surface analytical techniques ...

  2. Advanced Water Purification System For In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prior to electrolysis, the water generated as an intermediate product must be treated to remove absorbed hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, byproducts derived...

  3. Analysis of heavy metals from water, sediment, and tissues of Labeo angra (Hamilton, 1822), from an Ox-box lake- an wetland site from Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suchismita; Choudhury, Shamim Sultana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the regional impacts of heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) on water, sediment and a native, teleost fish species, Labeo angra, inhabiting a flood plain wetland of Barak River in Assam, India. Heavy metal concentrations in the water, sediments and fish were measured; bioaccumulation factor, metal pollution index as well as condition indices were calculated, to assess the pollution load and health status of the fish. Multivariate statistical analysis was used on wetland water and sediment heavy metals to ascertain the possible sources and seasonal variations of the pollutants. Results showed that most heavy metals in the wetland water and sediments exceeded the water (drinking and irrigation) and sediment quality guidelines, respectively. Seasonal variations were observed for geogenic heavy metals, Mn, Fe, Mg and Ca while no seasonal variations were observed for anthropogenic heavy metals, Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that there was strong correlation between geogenic and anthropogenic heavy metals in water and sediment, both originating from the common anthropogenic sources. Accumulation of most of the metals in all the tissues was above the safe limits as recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. High bioaccumulation factors and metal pollution index for these metals in the different tissues revealed that metals were extensively bio-accumulated and bioconcentrated. Condition indices in fish from the wetland suggested metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26422176

  4. Analysis of heavy metals from water, sediment, and tissues of Labeo angra (Hamilton, 1822), from an Ox-box lake- an wetland site from Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suchismita; Choudhury, Shamim Sultana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the regional impacts of heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) on water, sediment and a native, teleost fish species, Labeo angra, inhabiting a flood plain wetland of Barak River in Assam, India. Heavy metal concentrations in the water, sediments and fish were measured; bioaccumulation factor, metal pollution index as well as condition indices were calculated, to assess the pollution load and health status of the fish. Multivariate statistical analysis was used on wetland water and sediment heavy metals to ascertain the possible sources and seasonal variations of the pollutants. Results showed that most heavy metals in the wetland water and sediments exceeded the water (drinking and irrigation) and sediment quality guidelines, respectively. Seasonal variations were observed for geogenic heavy metals, Mn, Fe, Mg and Ca while no seasonal variations were observed for anthropogenic heavy metals, Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that there was strong correlation between geogenic and anthropogenic heavy metals in water and sediment, both originating from the common anthropogenic sources. Accumulation of most of the metals in all the tissues was above the safe limits as recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. High bioaccumulation factors and metal pollution index for these metals in the different tissues revealed that metals were extensively bio-accumulated and bioconcentrated. Condition indices in fish from the wetland suggested metabolic abnormalities.

  5. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal (APWR) system for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)...

  6. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal and management (APWR) system for incorporation into...

  7. Advanced Air Evaporation System with Reusable Wicks for Water Recovery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Advanced Air Evaporation System (AAES) is proposed for recovering nearly 100% of water from highly contaminated wastewater without concern...

  8. Overview of advances in water management in agricultural production:Sensor based irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technological advances in irrigated agriculture are crucial to meeting the challenge of increasing demand for agricultural products given limited quality and quantity of water resources for irrigation, impacts of climate variability, and the need to reduce environmental impacts. Multidisciplinary ap...

  9. Reactivity Impact of 2H and 16O Elastic Scattering Nuclear Data on Critical Systems with Heavy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubtsov, D.; Kozier, K. S.; Chow, J. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.; Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of deuterium nuclear data is important for reactor physics simulations of heavy water (D2O) reactors. The elastic neutron scattering cross section data at thermal energies, σs,th, have been observed to have noticeable impact on the reactivity values in simulations of critical systems involving D2O. We discuss how the uncertainties in the thermal scattering cross sections of 2H(n,n)2H and 16O(n,n)16O propagate to the uncertainty of the calculated neutron multiplication factor, keff, in thermal critical assemblies with heavy water neutron moderator/reflector. The method of trial evaluated nuclear data files, in which specific cross sections are individually perturbed, is used to calculate the sensitivity coefficients of keff to the microscopic nuclear data, such as σs(E) characterized by σs,th. Large reactivity differences of up to ≃ 5-10 mk (500-1000 pcm) were observed using 2H and 16O data files with different elastic scattering data in MCNP5 simulations of the LANL HEU heavy-water solution thermal critical experiments included in the ICSBEP handbook.

  10. The major species of heavy metal aerosol resulting from water cooling systems and spray dryer systems during incineration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey; Yang; Wei

    1998-11-01

    Trace toxic metals in municipal solid waste may escape from the incineration process in flue gas, in dry collected ash, in wet scrubbed ash, or as a suspended aerosol. Therefore, understanding the behavior of heavy metals in the flue gas and the best controls in the air pollution control equipment are important and necessary. The control conditions of water cooling and spray dryer systems during incineration processes significantly influence the formation of heavy metal compounds. The formation of chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) species under various control conditions (water cooling tower and spray dryer reactor) was investigated in this study. The object of the experiment is to understand the effects of water cooling and spray dryer systems individually on the formation of heavy metal species. The operating parameters that are evaluated include different control systems, control temperatures, and chlorine content. A thermodynamic equilibrium model was also used to evaluate experimental data. In order to match real incineration conditions, a two-stage simulation was performed in this experiment. The results showed that the relationship of speciation between the simulation prediction and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is consistent for Cr compounds; both indicated that Cr2O3 is the major species. The relationship is almost the same for Cd compounds, but not for Pb compounds. PMID:9846130

  11. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    OpenAIRE

    Kulesza Joel A.; Franceschini Fausto; Evans Thomas M.; Gehin Jess C.

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR) operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a fir...

  12. The possible use of cermet fuel in the DIDO and PLUTO heavy-water research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International restrictions on the supply of highly enriched uranium have resulted in the requirement to fuel research reactors with a lower-enrichment uranium fuel. A study has been made of the feasibility of using low-enrichment fuels of a new type in the DIDO and PLUTO reactors. This work has been done as a contribution to the studies currently being carried out internationally on the implications of using lower-enrichment fuels in heavy-water-moderated research reactors. The uranium content of the U/Al alloy at present used cannot be increased sufficiently to maintain the requisite U235 content without undesirable effects on the physical properties of the alloy. A different type of fuel will therefore be required to maintain the desired nuclear characteristics. A possible solution to the problem is the use of a cermet (U3O8/Al) fuel material. Cermet fuel has poorer thermal conductivity than metallic fuel, and may also contain particles of the ceramic of a size that approaches the total thickness of the cermet core. We therefore have to consider both the average temperature of the centre of the fuel and whether large particles of the ceramic may be significantly hotter than the average. This paper describes a preliminary study of the feasibility of this concept from the heat-transfer and safety viewpoints. Calculations have been made for a cermet of 20%-enrichment 2.3g U/cm3, used in a high-power element in a DIDO-type reactor. To accommodate the cermet, the cladding has been reduced in thickness to 0.318mm (0.0125 in) the core increasing to 1.044mm, but the fuel geometry is otherwise unchanged. It is concluded that from the heat-transfer viewpoint there is no problem during normal operation or the maximum credible power transient in these reactors. (author). 10 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Evaluation of concentration of some heavy metals in ground water resources of Qahavand Plain-Hamedan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Sobhan Ardakani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the increasing pollution and decreasing quality of water resources due to agricultural, industrial and urban development activities, this study was conducted to evaluate the concentration of As, Zn, Pb and Cu in groundwater resources of Qahavand Plain and to prepare the zoning map using GIS. Methods: Groundwater samples were collected from 20 selected wells during two spring and summer in 2012. The concentrations of elements in the samples were determined by ICP after laboratory preparations. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical package. Also, spatial distribution map of elements was prepared by ArcGIS software using Kriging Method. Results: The results showed that mean concentrations of As, Zn, Pb and Cu in groundwater samples in the spring were 7.5±1.2, 13.7±2.1, 2.5±0.4 and 9.2±2 ppb, respectively, and mean concentrations of these elements in groundwater samples in the summer were 9±1.2, 7.1±1.9, 2.8±0.65 and 9.3±1.2 ppb, respectively. Also, the results of one-sample t-test, comparing the mean concentrations of evaluated metals in groundwater samples with WHO and ISIRI showed a significant difference with permissible limit (P<0.001, so that the mean concentration of all metals was lower than the standard limit. The mean concentration of Zn was significantly lower in the summer than in the spring (P=0.003. Conclusion: Although, the current groundwater resources of Qahavand Plain are not exceedingly polluted with heavy metals, long-term and excessive use of agricultural inputs and construction of polluting industries can threaten the groundwater resources of this area, followed by irreversible consequences such as health-related risks for consumers.

  14. Assessment of Water Quality and Heavy Metal Levels in Water and Bottom Sediment Samples from Mokwé Lagoon, Accra, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Addo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study deals with the physicochemical characteristics of water samples from the Mokwé Lagoon in addition to trace heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn in the lagoon water and bottom sediments. The results indicated relatively high ionic content which was reflected in high conductivity, total dissolved Solids, alkalinity, hardness and chloride levels; and low nutrient content. The trace heavy metal levels in the lagoon water were found within good range of international guideline limits for natural waters. In contrast, the metallic levels in the sediment were high. The levels of metal contamination and distribution in the sediment samples were assessed using geoaccumulation index, enrichment factor, contamination factor and pollution load factor. The metal index analysis indicated high enrichment of the metals (especially Cr and Ni which reflected anthropogenic effects of contamination attributable to several sources. The study calls for constant environmental monitoring to forestall any heavy metal hazard which could be detrimental to the aquatic ecosystem of the lagoon.

  15. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval

  16. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  17. Validity of manganese as a surrogate of heavy metals removal in constructed wetlands treating acidic mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of manganese as a surrogate for heavy metal behavior in two wetland treatment systems receiving acidic coal mine drainage in central Pennsylvania was investigated. The use of manganese as an indicator is based on physical/chemical treatment processes quite different from wetland treatment. The treatment systems represented one anoxic, subsurface flow system and one oxic surface flow system. Water quality parameters measured included pH, alkalinity, acidity, and a suite of metals. Correlation and linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the ability of a candidate predictor variable (indicator) to predict heavy metal concentrations and removal. The use of manganese as a predictor of effluent quality proved to be poor in both wetland treatment systems, as evidenced by low linear R2 values and negative correlations. Zinc emerged as the best predictor of the detectable heavy metals at the anoxic wetland. Zinc exhibited positive strong linear correlations with copper, cobalt, and nickel (R2 values of 0.843, 0.881, and 0.970, respectively). Effluent pH was a slightly better predictor of effluent copper levels in the anoxic wetland. Iron and cobalt effluent concentrations showed the only strong relationship (R2 value = 0.778) in the oxic system. The lack of good correlations with manganese strongly challenges its appropriateness as a surrogate for heavy metals in these systems

  18. Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Water from Pristine Environments and Major Mining Areas in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yaw Hadzi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions. The concentrations of heavy metals in the Nyam, Subri, Bonsa and Birim Rivers from the mining sites and the Atiwa Range, Oda, Ankasa and Bosomkese Rivers from the pristine sites were found to be either below or within the USEPA and WHO's recommended limits for surface water. The health risk assessment values for the hazard quotient for ingestion of water (HQing, dermal contact (HQderm and chronic daily intake (CDI indicated no adverse effects as a result of ingestion or dermal contact from the rivers. However, arsenic (As in both the pristine and mining sites and chromium (Cr in the pristine sites pose a carcinogenic threat to the local residents.

  19. Procedure and equipment for the separation of isotopes for deuterium upgrading and for the production of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns a simple procedure for the separation of isotopes for the enrichment of deuterium and for the production of heavy water as well as the equipment necessary for carrying out the process. Methane is conducted over bacterial cultures oxidizing methane to water and carbon dioxide. An enrichment of deuterium takes place in non-oxidized methane. The bacterial cultures are placed on carriers that are arranged in oxidation columns as baffle plates. Several oxidation towers of this kind can be arranged in series. (orig./RW)

  20. Quantitative analysis of heavy metals in water samples of the Chapala lake by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven samples of water from Chapala Lake were sent to the ININ X-Ray Fluorescence Laboratory. The presence of Fe, Ni, Cu, Hg and Pb in general could be observed, The results for Pb and Hg were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption in laboratories at the SARH (Ministry of Agriculture and Hydraulic Resources). Corrections had to be made in order to quantify the amount of mercury. There are good working conditions to perform routine analyses of heavy metals ions in water. (author)