WorldWideScience

Sample records for advance disease treatments

  1. Surgical treatment of advanced stage Freiberg disease

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    Emin Özkul

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Freiberg disesase is an avascular necrosis of the 2nd and 3rd metatarsal head and which kind of surgical option to be used is controversial in symptomatic patients. In this study the results of the advanced stage Freiberg’s disease patients, who were treated with surgery were evaluated. Methods: 12 patients (8 female, 4 male whose pain could not be solved with conservative method and underwent surgery (6 debridement, 3 osteotomy, 3 excision of the metatarsal head were included in this study. Themean age of the patients 19.1 (range 13- 31 and the mean follow-up 30.8(range 25-94 months. According to the Smillie classification 3 patients had type 5, 8 patients had type 4 and 1 patient had type 3 osteonecrosis. The results of the patients were evaluated according to Lesser Metatarsophalangeal-Interphalangeal Scale. Results: According to Lesser MetatarsophalangealInterphalangeal Scale 3 patients (%25 had excellent, 6 patients (%50 had good and 3 patients had poor results were obtained. 2 of 3 patients with poor results were type 5, and 1 patient was type 4 and all three patients underwent joint debridement. Conclusion:The method of surgical treatment of Freiberg disease determined according to the stage of the disease. Debridement alone in the treatment of patients with late stage is not enough, it should be combined with other methods.

  2. Duodopa pump treatment in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Korbo, Lise; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump. Monothe......Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump...

  3. [Advanced Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and treatment (part 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisevsky, J; Luquin, M R; Arbelo, J M; Burguera, J A; Carrillo, F; Castro, A; Chacón, J; García-Ruiz, P J; Lezcano, E; Mir, P; Martinez-Castrillo, J C; Martínez-Torres, I; Puente, V; Sesar, A; Valldeoriola-Serra, F; Yañez, R

    2013-10-01

    A large percentage of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop motor fluctuations, dyskinesias, and severe non-motor symptoms within 3 to 5 years of starting dopaminergic therapy, and these motor complications are refractory to treatment. Several authors refer to this stage of the disease as advanced Parkinson's disease. To define the clinical manifestations of advanced PD and the risk factors for reaching this stage of the disease. This consensus document has been prepared by using an exhaustive literature search and by discussion of the contents by an expert group on movement disorders of the Sociedad Española de Neurología (Spanish Neurology Society), coordinated by two of the authors (JK and MRL). Severe motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, axial motor symptoms resistant to levodopa, and cognitive decline are the main signs in the clinical phenotype of advanced PD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in non-dopaminergic pharmacological treatments of Parkinson's disease

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    Sandy eStayte

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960’s treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD have traditionally been directed to effectively restore or replace dopamine, with L-Dopa the gold standard. However, chronic L-Dopa use is associated with debilitating dyskinesias, limiting its effectiveness. This has created a need to develop new therapies that work in ways other than restoring or replacing dopamine. We provide a comprehensive overview of the emerging non-dopaminergic pharmacological treatments including drugs targeting adenosine, glutamate, adrenergic, and serotonin receptors, as well as GLP-1 agonists, calcium channel blockers, iron chelators, anti-inflammatories, neurotrophic factors and gene therapy, with a detailed overview of their success in animal models and their translation to human clinical trials. We suggest that further developments in the identification of novel therapeutics, particularly those offering disease-modifying effects, will consistently be met with challenges until improvements in clinical trial design and advances in understanding the basic science of PD are made. We consider how developments in genetics, the possibility that PD may consist of multiple disease states, and potential etiology in non-dopaminergic regions will influence drug development. We conclude that despite the challenges ahead patients have much cause for optimism that novel therapeutics that offer better disease management and/or which slow disease progression are inevitable.

  5. Advanced Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and treatment. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisevsky, J; Luquin, M R; Arbelo, J M; Burguera, J A; Carrillo, F; Castro, A; Chacón, J; García-Ruiz, P J; Lezcano, E; Mir, P; Martinez-Castrillo, J C; Martínez-Torres, I; Puente, V; Sesar, A; Valldeoriola-Serra, F; Yañez, R

    2013-01-01

    Many patients who have had Parkinson's disease (PD) for several years will present severe motor fluctuations and dyskinesias which require more aggressive therapies. The different approaches which are now available include deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or medial globus pallidus, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine, and intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa. To define the indications and results for the 3 available therapies for advanced PD. Exhaustive review of the literature concerning the indications and results of deep brain stimulation, subcutaneous apomorphine infusion and duodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa gel to treat patients with advanced Parkinson disease. Although numerous studies have confirmed the efficacy of the 3 different therapies in advanced PD, there are no comparative studies that would allow us to define the best candidate for each technique. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabry disease: recent advances in pathology, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring

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    Hoffmann Björn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Fabry disease (α-galactosidase A deficiency accumulation of Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 leads to progressive organ failure and premature death. The introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT was the beginning of a new era in this disorder, and has prompted a broad range of research activities. This review aims to summarize recent developments and progress with high impact for Fabry disease. Methods A Pubmed analysis was performed using the search terms "Fabry disease", "Anderson-Fabry disease", "alpha-galactosidase A" and "Gb3". Of the given publications by 31st January 2009 only original articles recently published in peer reviewed journals were included for this review. Case reports were included only when they comprised a new aspect. In addition we included relevant conference abstracts when the results had not already been published as original articles. Results Apart from Gb3-accumulation cellular and organ specific damages may be related also to inflammatory and immunological consequences. It will be interesting whether this may lead to new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Fabry disease. Since newborn screening is still difficult in Fabry disease, detection of patients in populations at risk is of great importance. Undiagnosed patients with Fabry disease may still be found in cohorts of subjects with renal diseases, cardiomyopathy and TIA or stroke. Efforts should be undertaken to identify these individuals and initialise ERT in order to hault disease progression. It has also been demonstrated that Gb3-accumulation leads to pre-clinical damages and it is believed that early treatment may be the only possibility so far to prevent irreversible organ damage.

  7. Disease-modifying treatments for early and advanced multiple sclerosis: a new treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Gavin

    2018-06-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis is evolving rapidly with 11 classes of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). This article provides an overview of a new classification system for DMTs and treatment paradigm for using these DMTs effectively and safely. A summary of research into the use of more active approaches to early and effective treatment of multiple sclerosis with defined treatment targets of no evident disease activity (NEDA). New insights are discussed that is allowing the field to begin to tackle more advanced multiple sclerosis, including people with multiple sclerosis using wheelchairs. However, the need to modify expectations of what can be achieved in more advanced multiple sclerosis are discussed; in particular, the focus on neuronal systems with reserve capacity, for example, upper limb, bulbar and visual function. The review describes a new more active way of managing multiple sclerosis and concludes with a call to action in solving the problem of slow adoption of innovations and the global problem of untreated, or undertreated, multiple sclerosis.

  8. Treatment decisions for older adults with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J; Schell, Jane; Shega, Joseph; Scherer, Jennifer; Jacobs, Laurie; Couchoud, Cecile; Crews, Deidra; McNabney, Matthew

    2017-06-19

    Dialysis initiation rates among older adults, aged 75 years or greater, are increasing at a faster rate than for younger age groups. Older adults with advanced CKD (eGFR start dialysis, initiate treatment "early", at an estimated glomerulofiltration rate (eGFR) >10 ml/min/1.73 m 2 and many initiate dialysis in hospital, often in association with an episode of acute renal failure. In the US older adults start dialysis at a mean e GFR of 12.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 and 20.6% die within six months of dialysis initiation. In both the acute in hospital and outpatient settings, many older adults appear to be initiating dialysis for non-specific, non-life threatening symptoms and clinical contexts. Observational data suggests that dialysis does not provide a survival benefit for older adults with poor mobility and high levels of comorbidity. To optimize the care of this population, early and repeat shared decision making conversations by health care providers, patients, and their families should consider the risks, burdens, and benefits of dialysis versus conservative management, as well as the patient specific symptoms and clinical situations that could justify dialysis initiation. The potential advantages and disadvantages of dialysis therapy should be considered in conjunction with each patient's unique goals and priorities.In conclusion, when considering the morbidity and quality of life impact associated with dialysis, many older adults may prefer to delay dialysis until there is a definitive indication or may opt for conservative management without dialysis. This approach can incorporate all CKD treatments other than dialysis, provide psychosocial and spiritual support and active symptom management and may also incorporate a palliative care approach with less medical monitoring of lab parameters and more focus on the use of drug therapies directed to relief of a patient's symptoms.

  9. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly & Cushing Disease Paradigms

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    Michael Anthony Mooney

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  10. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  11. Therapeutic Potential and Recent Advances of Curcumin in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases

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    Sathish Sundar Dhilip Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a low molecular weight, lipophilic, major yellow natural polyphenolic, and the most well-known plant-derived compound, is extracted from the rhizomes of the turmeric (Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic agent in traditional medicine for the treatment and prevention of different diseases. It has also shown a wide range of biological and pharmacological effects in drug delivery, and has actively been used for the treatment of aging-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, ocular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney diseases, chronic inflammation and infection. The functional application and therapeutic potential of curcumin in the treatment of aging-associated diseases is well documented in the literature. This review article focuses mainly on the potential role of plant-derived natural compounds such as curcumin, their mechanism of action and recent advances in the treatment of aging-associated diseases. Moreover, the review briefly recaps on the recent progress made in the preparation of nanocurcumins and their therapeutic potential in clinical research for the treatment of aging-associated diseases.

  12. Therapeutic Potential and Recent Advances of Curcumin in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar Dhilip Kumar, Sathish; Houreld, Nicolette Nadene; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2018-04-05

    Curcumin, a low molecular weight, lipophilic, major yellow natural polyphenolic, and the most well-known plant-derived compound, is extracted from the rhizomes of the turmeric ( Curcuma longa ) plant. Curcumin has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic agent in traditional medicine for the treatment and prevention of different diseases. It has also shown a wide range of biological and pharmacological effects in drug delivery, and has actively been used for the treatment of aging-associated diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, ocular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney diseases, chronic inflammation and infection. The functional application and therapeutic potential of curcumin in the treatment of aging-associated diseases is well documented in the literature. This review article focuses mainly on the potential role of plant-derived natural compounds such as curcumin, their mechanism of action and recent advances in the treatment of aging-associated diseases. Moreover, the review briefly recaps on the recent progress made in the preparation of nanocurcumins and their therapeutic potential in clinical research for the treatment of aging-associated diseases.

  13. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed.

  14. Systemic Sunitinib Malate Treatment for Advanced Juxtapapillary Retinal Hemangioblastomas Associated with von Hippel-Lindau Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Jacobs-El, Naima; Wong, Wai T; Wiley, Henry E; Cukras, Catherine A; Meyerle, Catherine B; Chew, Emily Y

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical course of advanced juxtapapillary retinal capillary hemangioblastomas (RCH) associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease treated with systemic sunitinib malate, an agent that inhibits both anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-platelet-derived growth factor signaling. Observational case review. Three patients with advanced VHL-related juxtapapillary RCH treated with systemic sunitinib malate. Patient 1 was followed routinely every 4 months while on systemic sunitinib prescribed by her oncologist for metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine and kidney tumors. Patients 2 and 3 were part of a prospective clinical trial evaluating the use of systemic sunitinib for ocular VHL lesions during a period of 9 months. Visual acuity, size of RCH, and degree of exudation were recorded at each visit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography were also obtained at some visits. Visual acuity, size of RCH, and degree of exudation. Three patients with advanced VHL-associated juxtapapillary RCH were treated with systemic sunitinib malate. While none of the patients lost vision during therapy, treatment with sunitinib malate did not improve visual acuity or reduce the size of RCH. Improvements in RCH-associated retinal edema were observed in two patients. All patients experienced multiple adverse effects, including thyroid toxicity, thrombocytopenia, nausea, fatigue, jaundice, and muscle aches. Two of the three patients had to discontinue treatment prematurely and the third required dose reduction. Systemic sunitinib malate may be useful in slowing progression of ocular disease from VHL-associated RCH. However, significant systemic adverse effects limited its use in this small series, and systemic sunitinib malate may not be safe for treatment of RCH when used at the doses described in this report. Further studies are required to determine if this medication used at lower doses with different treatment strategies, other

  15. Research advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease with polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine.

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    Liu, Qin; Wang, Shun-Chun; Ding, Kan

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of patients' memory and their cognitive abilities and the mechanism is not completely clear. Although a variety of drugs have been approved for the AD treatment, substances which can prevent and cure AD are still in great need. The effect of polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on anti-AD has gained great progress and attained more and more attention in recent years. In this review, research advances in TCM-polysaccharides on AD made in this decade are summarized. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Advance of study on the influence of different drugs on the efficacy of 131I treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Tan Jian

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. 131 I treatment is one main treatment method for Graves' disease, and being used on an increasing scale in China recently. During the peritherapeutic period, however, the application of other drugs may affect the efficacy of 131 I treatment. In this review, the advances of study were summarized on the influence of different drugs on the efficacy of 131 I treatment in recent years. (authors)

  17. An update on dry eye disease molecular treatment: advances in drug pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colligris, Basilio; Crooke, Almudena; Huete-Toral, Fernando; Pintor, Jesus

    2014-07-01

    Dry eye disease is a common disorder provoking changes in tear film and ocular surface. Untreated dry eye could cause ocular infections, corneal ulcer and blindness. Only a few drugs are authorized so far for the treatment of dry eye disease and the possibilities of evolution in this sector are immense. Consequently, a significant number of new potential solutions are under development or placed in the pharmaceutical pipeline, promising better results and lesser side effects. In this article, the corresponding literature and recent Phase III clinical trial data and the corresponding literature, for dry eye disease treatment are reviewed, revealing the new strategic movements in drug pipelines. From the clinical trial results, the advancement in tear substitutes and secretagogues in addressing specific deficiencies of tear components even though not resolving the underlying conditions of the disease is evident. The vast majority of new compounds under development are anti-inflammatories, steroids, non-steroids and antibiotics; however, there are also some novel lubricating drops and mucin-tear secretagogues. A future aggressive therapy for dry eye, depending on the severity of the symptoms, would include combinations of soft steroids, anti-inflammatories, such as cyclosporine A, with the addition of the new polyvalent mucin and tear secretagogues.

  18. Apomorphine subcutaneous infusion, duodenal infusion of levodopa and deep brain stimulation – three advanced treatment options for the advanced Parkinson’s disease

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    Dušan Flisar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced stage of Parkinson's disease is associated with motor complications: motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. The disease can no longer be satisfactorily treated with oral therapy that is based on treatment with levodopa. Dying of dopamine neurons, a short half-life of levodopa and pulsatile stimulation of dopamine receptors are the main reasons for these complications. Currently, there are three options available to treat the advanced stage of Parkinson's disease: subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine, intrajejunal infusion of levodopa and deep brain stimulation. It is necessary to choose the optimal method of treatment that is most suitable for the individual patient.

  19. Patient Preferences for Device-Aided Treatments Indicated for Advanced Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Thomas; Pugh, Amy; Fairchild, Angelyn; Hass, Steven

    2017-12-01

    Effective treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD) uncontrolled with oral medication includes device-aided therapies such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and continuous levodopa-carbidopa infusion to the duodenum via a portable pump. Our objective was to quantify patient preferences for attributes of these device-aided treatments. We administered a Web-enabled survey to 401 patients in the United States. A discrete-choice experiment (DCE) was used to evaluate patients' willingness to accept tradeoffs among efficacy, tolerability, and convenience of alternative treatments. DCE data were analyzed using random-parameters logit. Best-worst scaling (BWS) was used to elicit the relative importance of device-specific attributes. Conditional logit was used to analyze the BWS data. We tested for differences in preferences among subgroups of patients. Improving ability to think clearly was twice as important as a 6-hour-per-day improvement in control of movement symptoms. After controlling for efficacy, treatment delivered via portable infusion pump was preferred over DBS, and both devices were preferred to oral therapy with poor symptom control. Patients were most concerned about device attributes relating to risk of stroke, difficulty thinking, and neurosurgery. Avoiding surgery to insert a wire in the brain was more important than avoiding surgery to insert a tube into the small intestine. Some differences in preferences among subgroups were statistically, but not qualitatively, significant. This study clarifies the patient perspective in therapeutic choices for advanced PD. These findings may help improve communication between patients and providers and also provide evidence on patient preferences to inform regulatory and access decisions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Advances in invasive evaluation and treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, Barend Leendert van der

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate new developments in the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease, with special focus to the invasive evaluation of plaque characteristics in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and treatment of STEMI patients with

  1. Recent advances in the treatment of colonic diverticular disease and prevention of acute diverticulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisei, Walter; Tursi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of diverticulosis and diverticular disease of the colon is increasing worldwide. Although the majority of patients remains asymptomatic long-life, the prevalence of diverticular disease of the colon, including acute diverticulitis, is substantial and is becoming a significant burden on National Health Systems in terms of direct and indirect costs. Focus is now being drawn on identifying the correct therapeutic approach by testing various treatments. Fiber, non-absorbable antibiotics and probiotics seem to be effective in treating symptomatic and uncomplicated patients, and 5-aminosalicylic acid might help prevent acute diverticulitis. Unfortunately, robust evidence on the effectiveness of a medical strategy to prevent acute diverticulitis recurrence is still lacking. We herein provide a concise review on the effectiveness and future perspectives of these treatments. PMID:26752946

  2. AIR: Advances in Respiration - Music therapy in the treatment of chronic pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canga, Bernardo; Azoulay, Ronit; Raskin, Jonathan; Loewy, Joanne

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized control study is to examine the effect of a multimodal psycho-music therapy intervention on respiratory symptoms, psychological well-being and quality of life of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and other lung diseases as adjunct to Pulmonary Rehabilitation with a design of music therapy plus PR compared to Pulmonary Rehabilitation alone. Music therapy group treatment including music visualization, wind playing and singing was provided weekly. This was compared with standard care treatment. Adults ages 48 to 88 (mean 70.1) with moderate to severe GOLD stage II-IV lung disease as well as other diseases processes that lead to chronic airflow limitations were included (n = 98). Participants in both conditions were followed from baseline enrollment to six weeks post control/treatment. Outcome measures included the Beck Depression Inventory Scale 2nd edition-Fast Screen (BDI-FS), Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire Self-Reported (CRQ-SR), and Dyspnea Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results showed improvement in symptoms of depression (LS mean -0.2) in the music therapy group with statistical divergence between groups (p = 0.007). The CRQ-SR demonstrated improvement in dyspnea (p = 0.01 LS mean 0.5) and mastery (p = 0.06 LS mean 0.5) in the music therapy group and fatigue (p = 0.01 LS mean 0.3). VAS demonstrated highly significant effect in the music therapy group between weeks 5 and 6 (p music therapy combined with standard PR may prove to be an effective modality in the management of pulmonary disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Review of Recent Advances Using Tocilizumab in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Furst, Daniel E; Nebesky, Jan Michael; Jin, Angela; Berber, Erhan

    2018-06-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is the first humanized anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Castleman's disease, polyarticular and systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and, most recently, giant cell arteritis as well as for the treatment of chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy-induced cytokine release syndrome. The global clinical development program for TCZ provides a wealth of clinical data on intravenous TCZ, and more recent studies in patients with RA have provided evidence characterizing the role of intravenous TCZ as monotherapy in early disease and led to the introduction of a subcutaneous formulation of TCZ. In addition, recently published open-label extension and observational studies continue to support the long-term efficacy and safety of TCZ in both clinical trial and real-world settings. Given the involvement of IL-6-mediated signaling in inflammatory disorders, TCZ is also being investigated in other immunological diseases. In particular, a phase 2 trial on the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous TCZ in adults with systemic sclerosis shows clinically relevant improvements in skin sclerosis and lung function in these patients. Another anti-IL-6 receptor agent, sarilumab, targeting the IL6 receptor alpha subunit, was recently approved for the treatment of patients with RA, although long-term data for this biologic are not yet published. In this article we review the placement of TCZ in current treatment guidelines; recent clinical trial data, including quality of life in patients with RA; recent updates to the TCZ safety profile; recent investigations of TCZ in other immunological diseases; and the clinical development of other novel IL-6-targeted agents.

  4. Current Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nonerosive Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Lin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD is a distinct pattern of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. It is defined as a subcategory of GERD characterized by troublesome reflux-related symptoms in the absence of esophageal mucosal erosions/breaks at conventional endoscopy. In clinical practice, patients with reflux symptoms and negative endoscopic findings are markedly heterogeneous. The potential explanations for the symptom generation in NERD include microscopic inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity (stress and sleep, and sustained esophageal contractions. The use of 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring gives further insight into reflux characteristics and symptom association relevant to NERD. The treatment choice of NERD still relies on acid-suppression therapy. Initially, patients can be treated by a proton pump inhibitor (PPI; standard dose, once daily for 2–4 weeks. If initial treatment fails to elicit adequate symptom control, increasing the PPI dose (standard dose PPI twice daily is recommended. In patients with poor response to appropriate PPI treatment, 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring is indicated to differentiate acid-reflux-related NERD, weakly acid-reflux-related NERD (hypersensitive esophagus, nonacid-reflux-related NERD, and functional heartburn. The response is less effective in NERD as compared with erosive esophagitis.

  5. Classical and recent advances in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases

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    H. Sales-Campos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are intestinal disorders that comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. These disorders have a significant effect on the quality of life of affected patients and the increasing number of IBD cases worldwide is a growing concern. Because of the overall burden of IBD and its multifactorial etiology, efforts have been made to improve the medical management of these inflammatory conditions. The classical therapeutic strategies aim to control the exacerbated host immune response with aminosalicylates, antibiotics, corticosteroids, thiopurines, methotrexate and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF biological agents. Although successful in the treatment of several CD or UC conditions, these drugs have limited effectiveness, and variable responses may culminate in unpredictable outcomes. The ideal therapy should reduce inflammation without inducing immunosuppression, and remains a challenge to health care personnel. Recently, a number of additional approaches to IBD therapy, such as new target molecules for biological agents and cellular therapy, have shown promising results. A deeper understanding of IBD pathogenesis and the availability of novel therapies are needed to improve therapeutic success. This review describes the overall key features of therapies currently employed in clinical practice as well as novel and future alternative IBD treatment methods.

  6. Recent Advances in the Inhibition of p38 MAPK as a Potential Strategy for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Kil; Kim, Nam-Jung

    2017-08-02

    P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a crucial target for chronic inflammatory diseases. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, as well as neurodegeneration, and there is no known cure. Recent studies on the underlying biology of AD in cellular and animal models have indicated that p38 MAPK is capable of orchestrating diverse events related to AD, such as tau phosphorylation, neurotoxicity, neuroinflammation and synaptic dysfunction. Thus, the inhibition of p38 MAPK is considered a promising strategy for the treatment of AD. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the targeting of p38 MAPK as a potential strategy for the treatment of AD and envision possibilities of p38 MAPK inhibitors as a fundamental therapeutics for AD.

  7. Cost-utility model of rasagiline in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Joumana; Rinne, Juha O; Keränen, Tapani; Eckert, Laurent; Cochran, John M

    2006-04-01

    The economic burden of Parkinson's disease (PD) is high, especially in patients experiencing motor fluctuations. Rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy against symptoms of PD in early and advanced stages of the disease. To assess the cost-utility of rasagiline and entacapone as adjunctive therapies to levodopa versus standard levodopa care in PD patients with motor fluctuations in Finland. A 2 year probabilistic Markov model with 3 health states: "25% or less off-time/day," "greater than 25% off-time/day," and "dead" was used. Off-time represents time awake with poor or absent motor function. Model inputs included transition probabilities from randomized clinical trials, utilities from a preference measurement study, and costs and resources from a Finnish cost-of-illness study. Effectiveness measures were quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and number of months spent with 25% or less off-time/day. Uncertainty around parameters was taken into account by Monte Carlo simulations. Over 2 years from a societal perspective, rasagiline or entacapone as adjunctive therapies to levodopa showed greater effectiveness than levodopa alone at no additional costs. Benefits after 2 years were 0.13 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.17) additional QALYs and 5.2 (3.6 to 6.7) additional months for rasagiline and 0.12 (0.08 to 0.17) QALYs and 5.1 (3.5 to 6.6) months for entacapone, both in adjunct to levodopa compared with levodopa alone. The results of this study support the use of rasagiline and entacapone as adjunctive cost-effective alternatives to levodopa alone in PD patients with motor fluctuations in Finland. With a different mode of action, rasagiline is a valuable therapeutic alternative to entacapone at no additional charge to society.

  8. Current advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: focused on considerations targeting Aβ and tau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Qi Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs mainly the memory and cognitive function in elderly. Extracellular beta amyloid deposition and intracellular tau hyperphosphorylation are the two pathological events that are thought to cause neuronal dysfunction in AD. Since the detailed mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of AD are still not clear, the current treatments are those drugs that can alleviate the symptoms of AD patients. Recent studies have indicated that these symptom-reliving drugs also have the ability of regulating amyloid precursor protein processing and tau phosphorylation. Thus the pharmacological mechanism of these drugs may be too simply-evaluated. This review summarizes the current status of AD therapy and some potential preclinical considerations that target beta amyloid and tau protein are also discussed.

  9. Delirium in advanced disease

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Dylan

    2007-01-01

    Delirium in advanced disease, while common, is often not recognised or poorly treated. The aim of management of delirium is to assess and treat reversible causes in combination with environmental, psychological and pharmacological intervention to control symptoms. Delirium presents significant distress and impedes communication between patients and their families at the end of life. A structured approach to recognise, assess and manage delirium is essential for all clinicians caring for patie...

  10. Advances in Integrative Nanomedicine for Improving Infectious Disease Treatment in Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Iris R; Schwartz, Gary E; Boyer, Nancy N; Koithan, Mary; Brooks, Audrey J

    2013-04-01

    Infectious diseases present public health challenges worldwide. An emerging integrative approach to treating infectious diseases is using nanoparticle (NP) forms of traditional and alternative medicines. Advantages of nanomedicine delivery methods include better disease targeting, especially for intracellular pathogens, ability to cross membranes and enter cells, longer duration drug action, reduced side effects, and cost savings from lower doses. We searched Pubmed articles in English with keywords related to nanoparticles and nanomedicine. Nanotechnology terms were also combined with keywords for drug delivery, infectious diseases, herbs, antioxidants, homeopathy, and adaptation. NPs are very small forms of material substances, measuring 1-100 nanometers along at least one dimension. Compared with bulk forms, NPs' large ratio of surface-area-to-volume confers increased reactivity and adsorptive capacity, with unique electromagnetic, chemical, biological, and quantum properties. Nanotechnology uses natural botanical agents for green manufacturing of less toxic NPs. Nanoparticle herbs and nutriceuticals can treat infections via improved bioavailability and antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines may contain source and/or silica nanoparticles because of their traditional manufacturing processes. Homeopathy, as a form of nanomedicine, has a promising history of treating epidemic infectious diseases, including malaria, leptospirosis and HIV/AIDS, in addition to acute upper respiratory infections. Adaptive changes in the host's complex networks underlie effects. Nanomedicine is integrative, blending modern technology with natural products to reduce toxicity and support immune function. Nanomedicine using traditional agents from alternative systems of medicine can facilitate progress in integrative public health approaches to infectious diseases.

  11. Feasibility of combined treatment with enalapril and candesartan in advanced chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Marie; Høj Nielsen, Arne; Strandgaard, Svend

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been claimed to have a specific renal protective effect in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The present short-term study reports on the feasibility of dual blockade in a consecutive group of patients with CKD stage 3-5. METHODS: Forty...

  12. The curability of breast cancer and the treatment of advanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pier Franco [Department of Oncology and Hematology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2004-06-01

    Breast cancer represents a major health problem, with more than 1,000,000 new cases and 370,000 deaths yearly worldwide. In the last decade, in spite of an increasing incidence, breast cancer mortality has been declining in the majority of developed countries. This is the combined result of better education, widespread screening programmes and more efficacious adjuvant treatments. Better knowledge of breast cancer biology now allows the cosmetic, physical and psychological consequences of radical mastectomy to be spared in the majority of breast cancer patients. Use of the sentinel node technique is rapidly expanding and this will further reduce the extent and the consequences of surgery. Several clinico-pathological factors are used to discriminate between patients at low (<10%), average (10-40%) and high risk of relapse. Nodal status, tumour size, tumour grade and age are accepted universally as important factors to define risk categories. Newer factors such as uPA/PAI-1, HERer2-neu, proliferative indices and gene expression profile are promising and will allow better discrimination between patients at different risk. Endocrine manipulation with tamoxifen, ovarian ablation or both is the preferred option in the case of endocrine-responsive tumours. Tamoxifen administered for 5 years is the standard treatment for postmenopausal patients; tamoxifen plus ovarian ablation is more effective than tamoxifen alone for premenopausal women. Recent data demonstrate that, for postmenopausal patients, the aromatase inhibitors are superior to tamoxifen, with a different safety profile. At present, anastrozole can be used in the adjuvant setting in cases of tamoxifen intolerance or toxicity. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for steroid receptor-negative tumours. Polychemotherapy is superior to single agents and anthracycline-containing regimens are superior to CMF. Six courses of FEC or FAC or the sequential administration of four doses of anthracycline followed by four

  13. The curability of breast cancer and the treatment of advanced disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pier Franco

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer represents a major health problem, with more than 1,000,000 new cases and 370,000 deaths yearly worldwide. In the last decade, in spite of an increasing incidence, breast cancer mortality has been declining in the majority of developed countries. This is the combined result of better education, widespread screening programmes and more efficacious adjuvant treatments. Better knowledge of breast cancer biology now allows the cosmetic, physical and psychological consequences of radical mastectomy to be spared in the majority of breast cancer patients. Use of the sentinel node technique is rapidly expanding and this will further reduce the extent and the consequences of surgery. Several clinico-pathological factors are used to discriminate between patients at low (<10%), average (10-40%) and high risk of relapse. Nodal status, tumour size, tumour grade and age are accepted universally as important factors to define risk categories. Newer factors such as uPA/PAI-1, HERer2-neu, proliferative indices and gene expression profile are promising and will allow better discrimination between patients at different risk. Endocrine manipulation with tamoxifen, ovarian ablation or both is the preferred option in the case of endocrine-responsive tumours. Tamoxifen administered for 5 years is the standard treatment for postmenopausal patients; tamoxifen plus ovarian ablation is more effective than tamoxifen alone for premenopausal women. Recent data demonstrate that, for postmenopausal patients, the aromatase inhibitors are superior to tamoxifen, with a different safety profile. At present, anastrozole can be used in the adjuvant setting in cases of tamoxifen intolerance or toxicity. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for steroid receptor-negative tumours. Polychemotherapy is superior to single agents and anthracycline-containing regimens are superior to CMF. Six courses of FEC or FAC or the sequential administration of four doses of anthracycline followed by four

  14. Recent advancements in liposomes targeting strategies to cross blood-brain barrier (BBB) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mukta; Ajazuddin; Tripathi, Dulal K; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra; Antimisiaris, Sophia G; Mourtas, Spyridon; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Alexander, Amit

    2017-08-28

    In this modern era, with the help of various advanced technologies, medical science has overcome most of the health-related issues successfully. Though, some diseases still remain unresolved due to various physiological barriers. One such condition is Alzheimer; a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory impairment, behavioral abnormalities, mood swing and disturbed routine activities of the person suffering from. It is well known to all that the brain is entirely covered by a protective layer commonly known as blood brain barrier (BBB) which is responsible to maintain the homeostasis of brain by restricting the entry of toxic substances, drug molecules, various proteins and peptides, small hydrophilic molecules, large lipophilic substances and so many other peripheral components to protect the brain from any harmful stimuli. This functionally essential structure creates a major hurdle for delivery of any drug into the brain. Still, there are some provisions on BBB which facilitate the entry of useful substances in the brain via specific mechanisms like passive diffusion, receptor-mediated transcytosis, carrier-mediated transcytosis etc. Another important factor for drug transport is the selection of a suitable drug delivery systems like, liposome, which is a novel drug carrier system offering a potential approach to resolving this problem. Its unique phospholipid bilayer structure (similar to physiological membrane) had made it more compatible with the lipoidal layer of BBB and helps the drug to enter the brain. The present review work focused on various surface modifications with functional ligand (like lactoferrin, transferrin etc.) and carrier molecules (such as glutathione, glucose etc.) on the liposomal structure to enhance its brain targeting ability towards the successful treatment of Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... Landis What are the risk factors for developing Parkinson's? The clearest risk factor is age. In addition, ...

  16. Bazedoxifene exhibits antiestrogenic activity in animal models of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer: implications for treatment of advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Suzanne E; Nelson, Erik R; Chao, Christina A; McDonnell, Donald P

    2013-05-01

    There is compelling evidence to suggest that drugs that function as pure estrogen receptor (ER-α) antagonists, or that downregulate the expression of ER-α, would have clinical use in the treatment of advanced tamoxifen- and aromatase-resistant breast cancer. Although such compounds are currently in development, we reasoned, based on our understanding of ER-α pharmacology, that there may already exist among the most recently developed selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) compounds that would have usage as breast cancer therapeutics. Thus, our objective was to identify among available SERMs those with unique pharmacologic activities and to evaluate their potential clinical use with predictive models of advanced breast cancer. A validated molecular profiling technology was used to classify clinically relevant SERMs based on their impact on ER-α conformation. The functional consequences of these observed mechanistic differences on (i) gene expression, (ii) receptor stability, and (iii) activity in cellular and animal models of advanced endocrine-resistant breast cancer were assessed. The high-affinity SERM bazedoxifene was shown to function as a pure ER-α antagonist in cellular models of breast cancer and effectively inhibited the growth of both tamoxifen-sensitive and -resistant breast tumor xenografts. Interestingly, bazedoxifene induced a unique conformational change in ER-α that resulted in its proteasomal degradation, although the latter activity was dispensable for its antagonist efficacy. Bazedoxifene was recently approved for use in the European Union for the treatment of osteoporosis and thus may represent a near-term therapeutic option for patients with advanced breast cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  17. Research advances in treatment of neurological and psychological diseases by acupuncture at the Acupuncture Meridian Science Research Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombi Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic intervention that can be traced back at least 2100 years and is emerging worldwide as one of the most widely used therapies in the field of complementary and alternative medicine. Due to limitations associated with Western medicine's focus on the treatment of diseases rather than on their causes, interests are shifting to complementary and alternative medicines. The Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center (AMSRC was established in 2005 to elucidate the neurophysiological mechanisms of acupuncture for neurological diseases based on multidisciplinary research supported by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. In the AMSRC, resultant research articles have shown that acupuncture can improve neurological and psychological problems, including Parkinson's disease, pain, and depression, in animal models. Basic research studies suggest its effectiveness in treating various problems such as depression, drug addiction, epilepsy, ischemia, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and pain. We strongly believe that these effects, evident from the AMSRC research results, can play leading roles in the use of acupuncture for treating neurological diseases, based on collaboration among various academic fields such as neurophysiology, molecular genetics, and traditional Korean medicine.

  18. Treatment for non-thyroidal illness syndrome in advanced chronic kidney disease: a single-blind controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Lijuan; Huang, Tianlun; Xu, Gaosi

    2017-08-01

    Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is common among patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with poor prognosis. However, it remains unclear in how to correct this disorder and this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) for correcting NTIS status. Patients with CKD stage 3-4 were single-blind, placebo-controlled treated with placebo, SB, or NAC for 18 weeks. The primary end points were the correction of NTIS and the occurrence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The secondary point was the change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after the follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significant lower correcting ratio of NTIS in control group compared with SB group [Hazard ratio (HR) 0.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.89, p = 0.035] and NAC group (HR 0.09, 95 % CI 0.02-0.38, p = 0.001), and increased ESRD risk in control group than in SB group (HR 1.97, 95 % CI 1.02-3.84, p = 0.045) and NAC group (HR 5.50, 95 % CI 2.23-13.57, p < 0.001). The Cox regression analysis demonstrated significantly different effectiveness of placebo, SB and NAC on NTIS correction and ESRD risk, p < 0.05, respectively. Variance analysis displayed a greater reduction in eGFR in controls than in SB (p = 0.044) and NAC group (p < 0.001). SB and NAC are effective in promoting the recovery from NTIS status and delaying the deterioration of renal function in advanced CKD patients.

  19. Advance price or purchase commitments to create markets for treatments for diseases of poverty: lessons from three policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towse, Adrian; Kettler, Hannah

    2005-01-01

    New drugs and vaccines are needed for tackling diseases of poverty in low- and middle-income countries. The lack of effective demand or market for these products translates into insufficient investment being made in research and development to meet the need for them. Many have advocated cost-reducing (push) and market-enhancing (pull) incentives to tackle this problem. Advance price or purchase commitments (APPCs) funded by international agencies and governments offer one way forward. This paper looks at design issues for APPCs for drugs and vaccines for diseases of poverty drawing on experience and lessons from three case studies: the introduction of the meningitis C vaccine in the United Kingdom; the Orphan Drug Act (ODA) in the United States of America (US); and the newly legislated US Project BioShield for bioterrorist interventions. Our key conclusion is that that APPCs have the potential to be a powerful tool and should be tried. The correct structure and design may only be determined through the process of taking action to set one up. PMID:15868022

  20. Patients' understanding of treatment goals and disease course and their relationship with optimism, hope, and quality of life: a preliminary study among advanced breast cancer outpatients before receiving palliative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Cem; Babacan, Taner; Sever, Ali R; Altundag, Kadri

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to explore advanced breast cancer patients' knowledge of treatment intent and expectation of illness course and to evaluate their relationship with optimism, hope, and quality of life (QoL). Patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 55) who were treated in the ambulatory clinic of the University of Hacettepe were included in the study. They completed Life Orientation Scale, The Hope Scale, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life questionnaires. The data regarding the knowledge of illness progression and the perceptions of therapy intent were assessed using self-administered open-ended questionnaires that were answered by the patients. The data revealed that 58.2 % of the patients had an inaccurate perception of treatment intent, believing the aim of treatment was cure, whereas only 38.2 % of the patients had a realistic expectation that their disease may remain stable or may progress over a year. In addition, the awareness of disease progression and perception of goals of treatment was significantly related to hope and optimism scores but not to QoL. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with advanced breast cancer believed that their treatment was "curative", and they would improve within a year. Findings of our study suggest that patients with inaccurate perception of treatment intent and unrealistic expectation of prognosis have higher hope and optimism scores than those who do not, but there were no significant differences in terms of global health status.

  1. Advanced wastewater treatment system (SEADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, J.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' This presentation will describe the nature, scope, and findings of a third-party evaluation of a wastewater treatment technology identified as the Advanced Wastewater Treatment System Inc.'s Superior Extended Aerobic Digester System (SEADS). SEADS is an advanced miniaturized wastewater treatment plant that can meet advanced wastewater treatment standards for effluent public reuse. SEADS goes beyond primary and secondary treatment operations to reduce nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, which are typically found in excessive quantities in traditional wastewater treatment effluent. The objective of this evaluation will be to verify the performance and reliability of the SEADS to treat wastewater from a variety of sources, including domestic wastewater and commercial industrial wastewater. SEADS utilizes remote telemetry equipment to achieve added reliability and reduces monitoring costs as compared to many package wastewater treatment plants. The evaluation process will be overseen and coordinated by the Environmental Technology Evaluation Center (EvTEC), a program of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF), the research and technology transfer arm of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). EvTEC is a pilot program evaluating innovative environmental technologies under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. Among other performance issues, the SEADS technology evaluation will address its ability to treat low flows-from remote individual and clustered housing applications, and individual commercial applications in lieu of a main station conventional wastewater treatment plant. The unneeded reliance on particular soil types for percolation and the improved effluent water quality over septic systems alone look to make these types of package treatment plants a viable option for rural communities, small farms, and other low-flow remote settings. Added benefits to be examined

  2. of chronic kidney disease advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Szeliga-Król

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Chronic kidney disease (CKD is at present a worldwide health problem. According to the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI, chronic kidney disease has five stages of advancement based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. The formulas that are most frequently used in determining eGFR are the Cockroft–Gault (CG formula, the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula, and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI Collaboration formula, which is considered the most accurate formula. Objectives . The aim of our study was to compare the CG, simplified MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas for determining eGFR and thus CKD advancement. Material and methods. The study was conducted on a group of 202 patients with previously diagnosed CKD. To calculate the eGFR, the CG, simplified MDRD, and CKD-EPI formulas were used. Patients were assigned a disease stage (from 1 to 5 according to the NKF KDOQI guidelines. Results . The calculated eGFR values varied depending on the formula, which resulted different assignations of patients to CKD stages. The largest difference regarded the qualification of the patients to the first and the fifth stage. A similar number of patients were classed as stage three by all formulas. Differences were also seen in how the formulas classified patients to the second and fourth stages. Conclusions . GFR estimation remains a problematic clinical concern. The CKD stage assigned to patients varies depending on the formula used, a fact which may be particularly significant for general practitioners. Laboratories should apply the CKD-EPI formula for eGFR calculation, as it gives the least false results.

  3. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is an Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Advanced Disease or Failing Treatment with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anish P; Barnett, Michael J; Broady, Raewyn C; Hogge, Donna E; Song, Kevin W; Toze, Cynthia L; Nantel, Stephen H; Power, Maryse M; Sutherland, Heather J; Nevill, Thomas J; Abou Mourad, Yasser; Narayanan, Sujaatha; Gerrie, Alina S; Forrest, Donna L

    2015-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only known curative therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, it is rarely utilized given the excellent long-term results with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine HSCT outcomes for patients with CML who failed TKI therapy or presented in advanced phase and to identify predictors of survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Fifty-one patients with CML underwent HSCT for advanced disease at diagnosis (n = 15), TKI resistance as defined by the European LeukemiaNet guidelines (n = 30), TKI intolerance (n = 2), or physician preference (n = 4). At a median follow-up of 71.9 months, the 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), relapse, and NRM were 68%, 46%, 41%, and 23%, respectively. In univariate analysis, predictors of OS included first chronic phase (CP1) disease status at HSCT (P = .0005), European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation score 1 to 4 (P = .04), and complete molecular response (CMR) to HSCT (P treatment to optimize transplantation outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  5. Communication in Medicine: A Study of How Family Doctors Obtain Information on Recent Advances in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Lyon, N.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a questionnaire on how 131 family doctors in Glasgow and the West of Scotland obtain information regarding recent advances are described, indicating that medical journals and formal lectures and symposia are still popular. Tape/slide and television presentations were not considered of much value. (Author/LBH)

  6. 40 CFR 35.2101 - Advanced treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advanced treatment. 35.2101 Section 35... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2101 Advanced treatment. Projects proposing advanced treatment shall be awarded grant assistance only after the project has been...

  7. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, G. S.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits.

  8. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, G S; Thwaites, D I

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits

  9. Cytopenias among ART-naive patients with advanced HIV disease on enrolment to care and treatment services at a tertiary hospital in Tanzania: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Daniel W; Godfrey, Kahamba G; Kilonzo, Semvua B; Mpondo, Bonaventura C

    2017-03-01

    HIV/AIDS causes high morbidity and mortality through both immunosuppression and complications not directly related to immunosuppression. Haematological abnormalities, including various cytopenias, occur commonly in HIV through immune and non-immune pathways. Though these complications could potentially cause serious clinical implications, published literature on the magnitude of this problem and its associated factors in Tanzania is scarce. This study aimed at determining the prevalence and risk factors of HIV-associated cytopenias among ART-naive patients enrolling for care and treatment services at Bugando Care and Treatment Centre (CTC) in Mwanza, Tanzania. This was a cross-sectional clinic-based study done between March 2015 and February 2016, involving all antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive adult HIV-positive patients enrolling for care and treatment services at Bugando CTC. Patients younger than 18 years and those with missing data were excluded. Data were analysed using Stata version 11 to determine the prevalence and risk factors of cytopenias. A total of 1205 ART-naive patients were included. Median age was 41 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32 to 48). Most participants were female (n = 789; 65.6%), with a female-to-male ratio of 2:1. The median baseline CD4 count was 200 cells/µL (IQR 113 to 439). About half (49%) of the study participants had baseline CD4 counts less than 200 cells/µL. Anaemia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia were found in 704 (58.4%), 285 (23.6%), and 174 (14.4%) participants, respectively, and these were strongly associated with advanced HIV infection. The magnitude of cytopenias is high among ART-naive HIV-positive adults, and cytopenias are more marked with advanced HIV infection. Early diagnosis of HIV and timely initiation of ART could potentially reduce the number of people living with advanced HIV disease and its associated complications, including the cytopenias investigated in this study. Patients with cytopenias should

  10. Treatment of autoinflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ter Haar, Nienke; Lachmann, Helen; Özen, Seza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response to treatment of autoinflammatory diseases from an international registry and an up-to-date literature review. METHODS: The response to treatment was studied in a web-based registry in which clinical information on anonymised patients with autoinflammatory...... diseases was collected retrospectively as part of the Eurofever initiative. Participating hospitals included paediatric rheumatology centres of the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organisation network and adult centres with a specific interest in autoinflammatory diseases. The following...... diseases were included: familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), pyogenic arthritis pustulosis acne (PAPA) syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1...

  11. Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and cholestasis: Novel advances in pathomechanisms-based prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orso, Giuseppe; Mandato, Claudia; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Cecchi, Nicola; Garzi, Alfredo; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition constitutes a life-saving therapeutic tool in patients unable to ingest/absorb oral or enteral delivered nutrients. Liver function tests abnormalities are a common therapy-related complication, thus configuring the so-called Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD) or cholestasis (PNAC). Although the damage is frequently mild, and resolves after discontinuation of parenteral nutrition, in some cases it progresses into cirrhotic changes, especially in neonates and infants. We present a literature review focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms-driven prevention and therapies for the cases where parenteral nutrition cannot be discontinued. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been proposed in patients with cholestatic hepatopathy, but its efficacy needs to be better established. Little evidence is available on efficacy of anti-oxidants, antibiotics, probiotics and anti TNFα. Lipid emulsions based on fish oil with a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 appear effective both in decreasing intrahepatic inflammation and in improving biliary flow. Most recent promising variations such as soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion [third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)] are under investigation. In conclusion, we remark the emergence of a number of novel pathomechanisms underlying the severe liver impairment damage (PNALD and PNAC) in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. Only few traditional and innovative therapeutic strategies have hitherto been shown promising. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Story ... Photo courtesy of NIH Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research Story Landis, Ph.D., has been Director of ...

  13. Treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Bradford T; Onysko, Mary K; Stob, Christian M; Hazlewood, Kathleen A

    2011-06-15

    Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting nearly one-half [corrected] of Americans older than 85 years. It is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Amyloid plaque accumulation, neurofibrillary tau tangles, and depletion of acetylcholine are among the pathologic manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Although there are no proven modalities for preventing Alzheimer disease, hypertension treatment, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, physical activity, and cognitive engagement demonstrate modest potential. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are first-line medications for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, and are associated with mild improvements in cognitive function, behavior, and activities of daily living; however, the clinical relevance of these effects is unclear. The most common adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, confusion, and cardiac arrhythmias. Short-term use of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine can modestly improve measures of cognition, behavior, and activities of daily living in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer disease. Memantine can also be used in combination with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Memantine is generally well tolerated, but whether its benefits produce clinically meaningful improvement is controversial. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can slow the progression of Alzheimer disease, no pharmacologic agents can reverse the progression. Atypical antipsychotics can improve some behavioral symptoms, but have been associated with increased mortality rates in older patients with dementia. There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of selegiline, testosterone, and ginkgo for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. There is no evidence supporting the beneficial effects of vitamin E, estrogen, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy.

  14. Advances in endovascular treatment of critical limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yan, Bryan P

    2011-04-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) represents the most severe clinical manifestation of peripheral arterial disease. In the absence of timely revascularization, CLI carries high risk of mortality and amputation. Over the past decade, endovascular revascularization has rapidly become the preferred primary treatment strategy for CLI, especially for the treatment of below-the-knee disease. Advances in percutaneous devices and techniques have expanded the spectrum of patients with CLI who are deemed candidates for revascularization. This review will focus on advances in endovascular options for the treatment of CLI, in particular for below-the-knee disease.

  15. Systemic treatment of advanced, persistent or recurrent cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reckova, M.

    2015-01-01

    The cervical cancer is the third most common malignancy in women in the world. Despite advances in screening and treatment there are a relatively large number of patients who are diagnosed with advanced stage of disease, or who have inoperable recurrence. In this group of patients, the main aim of a treatment is palliative intent. The main cytotoxic agent is cisplatin, but the responses are also observed with other chemotherapy agents. Improved therapeutic results are observed with combined platinum-based chemotherapy regimens as compared to cisplatin monotherapy. Overall, however, the treatment results in advanced, persistent and recurrent cervical cancer are unfavorable and disease is considered to be relatively chemo resistant. The new treatment approaches are searched and a significant therapeutic benefit, as far as progression-free and overall survival, has been recently demonstrated when adding bevacizumab to systemic chemotherapy. The current article is a review of systemic treatment in advanced, persistent and recurrent metastatic carcinoma of the cervix. (author)

  16. Recent advances in oesophageal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dulaimi, David

    2014-01-01

    -quadrant biopsy protocol which may have led to an underestimation of BE prevalence. The review highlights an increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West but unclear disease trend in Asia with inter-country variability. Similarly in Asian and Western countries BE is associated with the presence of hiatus hernia, advancing age, male gender, alcohol consumption, smoking, abdominal obesity and longer duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The authors postulate that Helicobacter pylori infection, more prevalent in Asia than the West, may have a protective effect on BE. There is a need for larger, prospective studies to further clarify the disease pattern of BE in Asian countries. Clearly standardisation of the diagnostic process for BE is important to validate the differences in disease trends between Asian and Western countries. Kiadaliri AA. Gender and social disparities in esophagus cancer incidence in Iran, 2003-2009: a time trend province-level study.Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014;15(2):623-7 Esophageal cancer (EC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality particuarly in Iran where the incidence rate exceeds the global average. An understanding of the factors influencing the province-specific incidence of EC in Iran is important to inform disease-prevention strategies and address health inequalities. This ecological study used cancer registry data to investigate the relationship between gender and social class and the incidence of EC in Iran at province-level between 2003 and 2009. The age standardised incidence rates (ASIR) of EC were greatest in the Northern provinces of Iran, specifically Razavi Khorasan in males and Kordestan in females. Overall the EC incidence did not significantly differ according to gender. Interestingly, during the study period the ASIR increased by 4.6% per year in females (p=0.08) and 6.5% per year in males (p=0.02). This may reflect increasing rates of establised risk factors for EC including obsesity and gastro

  17. A case report of locally advanced triple negative breast cancer showing pathological complete response to weekly paclitaxel with bevacizumab treatment following disease progression during anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Shigematsu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the addition of bevacizumab to standard adjuvant chemotherapy is not recommended in unselected triple negative breast cancer, the potent effect on tumor shrinkage should be considered in the treatment of locally advanced triple negative breast cancer showing disease progression during standard NAC.

  18. Living with advanced Parkinson's disease: a constant struggle with unpredictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Anita; Kirkevold, Marit; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Ostergaard, Karen

    2011-02-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of patients' lifeworld and way of managing life with advanced Parkinson's disease prior to Deep Brain Stimulation and what they expect from life following this treatment. Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, which is initially well-treated with L-dopa. Living with Parkinson's disease means living with the experience of continuous loss of independence and self-esteem and unpredictable ON/OFF phenomena. Thus, in the advanced stage of the disease, treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation may become relevant. Eleven patients eligible for Deep Brain Stimulation were interviewed prior to treatment. Data were collected in 2007 and analysed according to the hermeneutic phenomenological methodology of van Manen, using the four existentials as analytic tools. Living with advanced Parkinson's disease can be described as the experience of living with and managing unpredictability. The disease gradually took over, and participants had to struggle with unpredictability on a daily basis. Themes in relation to this were: The body - setting the agenda, Always a struggle to be on time, Living in dependence and compromise - being a burden, and Living with restrained space and changes in social life. Parkinson's disease leads to profound bodily restrictions. Living with an unpredictable body affects all aspects of life, and nurses need to be aware of the impact the disease has on the entire lifeworld, and how this may affect the way treatment is perceived. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Multimodal treatment of perianal fistulas in Crohn's disease: seton versus anti-TNF versus advancement plasty (PISA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Groof, E Joline

    2015-08-20

    Currently there is no guideline for the treatment of patients with Crohn\\'s disease and high perianal fistulas. Most patients receive anti-TNF medication, but no long-term results of this expensive medication have been described, nor has its efficiency been compared to surgical strategies. With this study, we hope to provide treatment consensus for daily clinical practice with reduction in costs.

  20. Radiation treatment of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitan, J.B.; Flatby, J.; Backe, S.; Lundgren, L.

    1984-01-01

    The report deals with an estimation of the volume of radiation treatment of benign diseases in Norway and gives a survey of the subjective opinion of patients regarding the result of the treatment. Reported subjective recovery after radiation treatment seems to be at the same level as recovery without treatment. For an indication of the objective effect of radiation treatment of benign diseases, the subjective effect of this treatment has to be compared with objective findings

  1. Treatment of advanced breast cancer. An experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoni, G; Corcione, S; Api, P

    1984-01-01

    The Authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotherapy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  2. Chemo-radiation in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a case report of a patient with advanced nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, (T4 N2 MO) who had chemo-radiation with Cisplatin based chemotherapy and total midplane dose of 60 Gray external beam radiation. Six years after treatment patient has remained disease free and the primary site histologically confirmed ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2014 ... live productive lives and maintain mobility. How is Parkinson's Diagnosed? There are no blood or laboratory tests ...

  4. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  5. Treatment for Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free diet. In recent years, grocery stores and restaurants have added many more gluten-free foods and ... Process Research Training & Career Development Funded Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer ...

  6. Sustainability assessment of advanced wastewater treatment technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høibye, Linda; Clauson-Kaas, Jes; Wenzel, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    , which includes technical, economical and environmental aspects. The technical and economical assessment is performed on 5 advanced treatment technologies: sand filtration, ozone treatment, UV exclusively for disinfection of pathogenic microorganisms, membrane bioreactor (MBR) and UV in combination......As a consequence of the EU Water Framework Directive more focus is now on discharges of hazardous substances from wastewater treatment plants and sewers. Thus, many municipalities in Denmark may have to adopt to future advanced treatment technologies. This paper describes a holistic assessment...... with advanced oxidation. The technical assessment is based on 12 hazardous substances comprising heavy metals, organic pollutants, endocrine disruptors as well as pathogenic microorganisms. The environmental assessment is performed by life cycle assessment (LCA) comprising 9 of the specific hazardous substances...

  7. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  8. Sustainability assessment of advanced wastewater treatment technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høibye, Linda; Clauson-Kaas, Jes; Wenzel, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    , which includes technical, economic and environmental aspects. The technical and economic assessment is performed on 5 advanced treatment technologies: sand filtration, ozone treatment, UV exclusively for disinfection of pathogenic microorganisms, Membrane Bioreactor (MBR), and UV in combination......As a consequence of the EU Water Framwork Directive, more focus is now on discharges of hazardous substances from wastewater treatment plants and sewers. Thus, many municipalities in Denmark may have to adopt to future advenced treatment technologies. This paper describes a holistic assessment...... with advanced oxidation. The technical assessment is based on 12 hazardous substances comprising heavy metals, organic pollutants, endocrine disruptors as well as pathogenic microorganisms. The environmental assessment is performed by life cycle assessment (LCA) comprising 9 of the specific hazardous substances...

  9. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  10. Advances in genetic detection of kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosekun, Akinsan K.; Foringer, John R.; Kone, Bruce C.

    2003-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has provided a vast amount of molecular genetic information for the analysis of normal and diseased genes. This new information provides new opportunities for precise diagnosis, assessment of predisposition and risk factors and novel therapeutic strategies. At the same time, this constantly expanding knowledge base represents on e of the most difficult challenges in molecular medicine. For monogenic disease nearly 2000 human disease genes have thus for been identified. Most of these conditions are characterized by large mutational variation and even greater phenotypic variation. In nephrology, several genetic diseases have been elucidated that provide new insight into the structure, function and developmental biology of the glomerulus, tubules and urogenital tracts, as well as renal cell tumors. Great improvements in the diagnostic resolution of genetic diseases have been achieved, such that single base pair mutations can be readily detected. Because of accurate diagnosis and risk assessment, genetic testing may be valuable in improving disease management and preventive care when genotype-specific therapies are available. Moreover, such testing may identify de novo mutations and potentially aid in understanding the disease process. This review summarizes recent advances in the renal genetic database and methods for genetic testing of renal diseases. (author)

  11. Lewy Body Disease Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may experience severe neuroleptic sensitivity, such as worsening cognition, heavy sedation, increased or possibly irreversible parkinsonism, or ... addition to these forms of therapy and treatment, music and aroma therapy can also reduce anxiety and ...

  12. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced medical interventions in pleural disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhatnagar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The burden of a number of pleural diseases continues to increase internationally. Although many pleural procedures have historically been the domain of interventional radiologists or thoracic surgeons, in recent years, there has been a marked expansion in the techniques available to the pulmonologist. This has been due in part to both technological advancements and a greater recognition that pleural disease is an important subspecialty of respiratory medicine. This article summarises the important literature relating to a number of advanced pleural interventions, including medical thoracoscopy, the insertion and use of indwelling pleural catheters, pleural manometry, point-of-care thoracic ultrasound, and image-guided closed pleural biopsy. We also aim to inform the reader regarding the latest updates to more established procedures such as chemical pleurodesis, thoracentesis and the management of chest drains, drawing on contemporary data from recent randomised trials. Finally, we shall look to explore the challenges faced by those practicing pleural medicine, especially relating to training, as well as possible future directions for the use and expansion of advanced medical interventions in pleural disease.

  14. Recent advances in imaging in Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Toru; Takeda, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent knowledge on the pathophysiology of Parkinson disease, the precise and early diagnosis of this condition remains difficult. Advances in imaging techniques have enabled the assessment of in vivo structural, neurometabolic, and neurochemical changes in Parkinson disease, and their role as biomarkers have assumed greater importance in recent years. We presently review the various approaches with these imaging techniques for the study of Parkinson disease. Voxel-based morphometry studies with structural MRI showed a characteristic pattern of gray matter loss, and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies have indicated latent network abnormalities in Parkinson disease. Moreover, radiotracer imaging with dopaminergic markers facilitates the assessment of pre- and postsynaptic nigro-striatal integrity, and other radiotracers have been used in the studies of nondopaminergic neurotransmitter systems, such as the cholinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic systems. These imaging techniques can be used to detect presymptomatic disease and to monitor disease progression. Thus, imaging data provide meaningful insights into the pathological process in Parkinson disease. (author)

  15. Advances in the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kate; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent advances in the management strategies of polyarticular course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify unanswered questions and avenues for further research. Recent findings There is evidence for an early, aggressive, treat-to-target approach for polyarticular JIA. Clinical disease activity criteria have been recently defined and validated, including criteria for inactive disease and the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS). There is a need for evidence-based, defined disease targets and biomarkers for prediction of response, including targets for remission induction, and guidelines on drug withdrawal. Recent treatment consensus plans and guidelines are discussed and compared, including the 2015 NHS England clinical policy statement, the 2014 Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) treatment plans and the 2011 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines. Evidence for new agents such as tocilizumab, rituximab, golimumab, ustekinumab, certolizumab and tofacitinib is promising: the recent clinical trials are summarized here. Stratification of individual patient treatment remains a goal, and predictive biomarkers have been shown to predict success in the withdrawal of methotrexate therapy. Summary There are promising advances in the treatment approaches, disease activity criteria, clinical guidelines, pharmaceutical choices and individually stratified therapy choices for polyarticular JIA. PMID:26147756

  16. Treatment planning and delivery of involved field radiotherapy in advanced Hodgkin's disease: results from a questionnaire-based audit for the UK Stanford V regimen vs ABVD clinical trial quality assurance programme (ISRCTN 64141244).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, P; Hoskin, P J; Aird, E G A

    2007-10-01

    This questionnaire forms the basis of the quality assurance (QA) programme for the UK randomized Phase III study of the Stanford V regimen versus ABVD for treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease to assess differences between participating centres in treatment planning and delivery of involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma The questionnaire, which was circulated amongst 42 participating centres, consisted of seven sections: target volume definition and dose prescription; critical structures; patient positioning and irradiation techniques; planning; dose calculation; verification; and future developments The results are based on 25 responses. One-third plan using CT alone, one-third use solely the simulator and the rest individualize, depending on disease site. Eleven centres determine a dose distribution for each patient. Technique depends on disease site and whether CT or simulator planning is employed. Most departments apply isocentric techniques and use immobilization and customized shielding. In vivo dosimetry is performed in 7 centres and treatment verification occurs in 24 hospitals. In conclusion, the planning and delivery of treatment for lymphoma patients varies across the country. Conventional planning is still widespread but most centres are moving to CT-based planning and virtual simulation with extended use of immobilization, customized shielding and compensation.

  17. Systems medicine advances in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffo, Flavia R; Eickelberg, Oliver; Fernandez, Isis E

    2017-09-30

    Fibrotic lung diseases involve subject-environment interactions, together with dysregulated homeostatic processes, impaired DNA repair and distorted immune functions. Systems medicine-based approaches are used to analyse diseases in a holistic manner, by integrating systems biology platforms along with clinical parameters, for the purpose of understanding disease origin, progression, exacerbation and remission.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) refer to a heterogeneous group of complex fibrotic diseases. The increase of systems medicine-based approaches in the understanding of ILDs provides exceptional advantages by improving diagnostics, unravelling phenotypical differences, and stratifying patient populations by predictable outcomes and personalised treatments. This review discusses the state-of-the-art contributions of systems medicine-based approaches in ILDs over the past 5 years. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  18. Advances in the heat treatment of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Kim, J.I.; Syn, C.K.

    1978-06-01

    A number of important recent advances in the processing of steels have resulted from the sophisticated uses of heat treatment to tailor the microstructure of the steels so that desirable properties are established. These new heat treatments often involve the tempering or annealing of the steel to accompish a partial or complete reversion from martensite to austenite. The influence of these reversion heat treatments on the product microstructure and its properties may be systematically discussed in terms of the heat treating temperature in relation to the phase diagram. From this perspective, four characteristic heat treatments are defined: (1) normal tempering, (2) inter-critical tempering, (3) intercritical annealing, and (4) austenite reversion. The reactions occurring during each of these treatments are described and the nature and properties of typical product microstructures discussed, with specific reference to new commercial or laboratory steels having useful and exceptional properties

  19. RECENT ADVANCES IN LEATHER TANNERY WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LOFRANO Giusy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The tannery industry is one of the most important economic sectors in many countries, representing an important economic field also in developing countries. Leather tannery industry is water intensive and originates highly polluted wastewater that contain various micropollutants raising environmental and health concerns. Tannery wastewater is difficult to treat biologically because of complex characteristics like high salinity e high content of xenobiotics compounds. After conventional treatment (i.e., chromium precipitation–primary sedimentation–biological oxidation–secondary sedimentation, effluents still do not meet the required limits, at least for some parameters such as BOD, COD, salinity, ammonia and surfactants. The leather industry is being pressured to search cleaner, economically as well as environmentally friendly wastewater treatment technologies alternative or integrative to the conventional treatment in order to face the challenge of sustainability. The most spread approach to manage tannery wastewater is the steam segregation before conveying wastewaters to in treatment plants that typically include pre-treatment, mechanical and physico-chemical treatment, biological treatment, and treatment of the generated sludge. Thus proper treatment technologies are needed to handle tannery wastewater to remove effectively the environmental benign pollutants. However among various processes applied or proposed the sustainable technologies are emerging concern. This paper, as the-state-of-the-art, attempts to revise the over world trends of treatment technologies and advances for pollution prevention from tannery chemicals and wastewater.

  20. Monitoring and treatment of diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronyai, A.; Gielen, M.; Philipsen, E.; Kamstra, A.

    2003-01-01

    Early recognition and efficient treatment of diseases are important factors for the success of any fish farming operation. Experience learns that during the culture of a new species like pikeperch (partly in new systems) new disease problems will be encountered. The subtask on monitoring and

  1. Translational Medicine Advances in von Willebrand Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillicrap, David

    2014-01-01

    Following the recognition of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in 1926 and the cloning of the gene for von Willebrand factor (VWF) in 1985, significant advances have been made in our fundamental knowledge of both the disease and the protein. Some of this new knowledge has also begun to impact the clinical management of VWD. First, the progressive increase in our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of VWD has resulted in rational applications of molecular testing to complement the current range of phenotypic tests for VWD. These molecular genetic strategies are most effectively directed at the prenatal diagnosis of type 3 VWD and confirmatory testing for types 2B and 2N disease. In contrast, the use of molecular testing to clarify the diagnosis of type 1 VWD is of marginal benefit, at best. In terms of VWD therapies, a new recombinant VWF concentrate has recently completed successful clinical trials and is now awaiting more widespread application. There have even been some pre-clinical successes with VWF gene transfer although the clinical rationale for this therapeutic strategy needs careful consideration. Much more remains to be learnt about the biology of VWF and further translational advances for the enhancement of VWD care will inevitably be realized. PMID:23809112

  2. Treatment preferences in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Marieke Geertruida Maria

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation was to investigate the influence of process-utility (which is the value attached to the process and convenience of care without reference to the outcome) on the relative value of treatments in Parkinson’s Disease (PD). The main treatment modalities (processes) in

  3. Electrocatalysis in wastewater treatment: recent mechanism advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Martínez-Huitle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50 years, several scientists and industries have developed new alternatives for wastewater treatment and remediation. Recently, electrochemical technology has been largely developed mainly because of its versatility and environmental compatibility. Scientific contributions about role of the electrode material have allowed determining that the influence of material in the selectivity is an important parameter. However, to interpret this behavior, comprehensive physical chemistry models for organics destruction, related to electrochemical phenomena and material surfaces, were proposed in the last decades. So, this paper presents a critical and comprehensive review about the principles and recent mechanism advances in electrocatalysis for wastewater treatment.

  4. Advances in multidisciplinary individualized treatment of refractory hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABUDUAINI Abulizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE is a zoonotic parasitic disease that seriously threatens the population in western China and compromises patients′ quality of life. With the continuous improvement in radical resection rate in recent years, late-stage HAE patients that were incurable in the past now have the opportunity for radical resection. However, patients who are not suitable candidates for radical resection still suffer from various complications and poor quality of life. Therefore, HAE is still considered a refractory and complex disease. The simple empirical treatment model provided by traditional professional discussion is unable to satisfy the treatment of advanced refractory HAE as it is unable to integrate specialized, standardized clinical skills for diagnosis and treatment. Multidisciplinary individualized treatment (MDT organically integrates the advantages of the available treatment into a reasonable individualized comprehensive treatment regimen. This review summarizes the advances in MDT for HAE as the best option to increase long-term survival, and suggests MDT as the first-line treatment for late-stage refractory hepatic alveolar echinococcosis.

  5. Advances in Diagnosis of Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of aetiology, infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats contribute to 5.6 percent of the total diseases of small ruminants. These infectious respiratory disorders are divided into two groups: the diseases of upper respiratory tract, namely, nasal myiasis and enzootic nasal tumors, and diseases of lower respiratory tract, namely, peste des petits ruminants (PPR, parainfluenza, Pasteurellosis, Ovine progressive pneumonia, mycoplasmosis, caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, caseous lymphadenitis, verminous pneumonia, and many others. Depending upon aetiology, many of them are acute and fatal in nature. Early, rapid, and specific diagnosis of such diseases holds great importance to reduce the losses. The advanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs for the detection of antigen as well as antibodies directly from the samples and molecular diagnostic assays along with microsatellites comprehensively assist in diagnosis as well as treatment and epidemiological studies. The present review discusses the advancements made in the diagnosis of common infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats. It would update the knowledge and help in adapting and implementing appropriate, timely, and confirmatory diagnostic procedures. Moreover, it would assist in designing appropriate prevention protocols and devising suitable control strategies to overcome respiratory diseases and alleviate the economic losses.

  6. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  7. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in treatment of bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Thwaites, Guy E.; Tunkel, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis kills or maims about a fifth of people with the disease. Early antibiotic treatment improves outcomes, but the effectiveness of widely available antibiotics is threatened by global emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. New antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, could have a

  9. Evaluation of advanced wastewater treatment systems for water reuse in the era of advanced wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Hisao; Watanabe, Masahiro

    This study focuses on effluent COD concentration from wastewater treatment in regards to the reduction of pathogenic bacteria and trace substances in public waters. The main types of secondary wastewater treatment were conventional activated sludge processes. Recently, however, advance wastewater treatment processes have been developed aimed at the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus, and the effluent quality of these processes was analyzed in this study. Treatment processes for water reclamation that make effluent to meet the target water quality for reuse purposes were selected and also optimum design parameters for these processes were proposed. It was found that the treatment cost to water reclamation was greatly affected by the effluent COD of the secondary treatment. It is important to maintain low COD concentration in the secondary treated effluent. Therefore, it is considered that adequate cost benefits would be obtained by achieving target COD quality through shifting from a conventional activated sludge process to an advanced treatment process.

  10. Management of pain in advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is common in advanced malignancy but also prevalent in other non-malignant life-limiting diseases such as advanced heart disease; end stage renal failure and multiple sclerosis. Patients with renal or liver impairment need specific consideration, as most analgesics rely on either or both for their metabolism and excretion. Recent evidence-based guidelines and the systematic reviews that have informed their recommendations. The principles of the WHO (World Health Organisation) analgesic ladder are commonly endorsed as a structured approach to the management of pain. For neuropathic pain, the efficacy of different agents is similar and choice of drug more guided by side effects, drug interactions and cost. Evidence supporting the WHO analgesic ladder is disputed and alternatives suggested, but no overwhelming evidence for an alternative approach exists to date. Alternative approaches to the WHO analgesic ladder, new analgesic agents, e.g. rapid onset oral/intranasal fentanyl. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Vittorio Scagliotti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is an aggressive but relatively rare malignancy with median survival ranging from 8 to 14 months depending on stage and presentation of disease. New diagnostic procedures are urgently needed, selecting patients in earlier stages to evaluate therapeutic approaches which combine chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. Combination chemotherapy represents the only resource available for advanced disease.The combination of cisplatin and pemetrexed is the treatment of choice. This review summarizes the latest developments in diagnostic techniques and the available therapeutic options for the management of MPM. Particular attention is given to the molecular basis of biologically targeted therapies to be used in the future.

  12. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references

  13. Biological treatment of Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of biological agents for the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) has led to a transformation of the treatment paradigm. Several biological compounds have been approved for patients with CD refractory to conventional treatment: infliximab, adalimumab and certolizumab pegol (and...... natalizumab in several countries outside the European Union). However, despite the use of biologics for more than a decade, questions still remain about the true efficacy and the best treatment regimens - especially about when to discontinue treatment. Furthermore, a need for optimizing treatment...... with biologics still exists, as 20-40% of patients with CD (depending on selection criteria) do not have any relevant response to the current biological agents (i.e. primary failures). A better patient selection might maximize the clinical outcome while minimizing the complications associated with this type...

  14. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  15. The treatment of Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, S.W.J.; Lange, S.A. de; Singh, R.; Fermin, H.; Klijn, J.G.M.; Jong, F.H. de; Birkenhaeger, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    This study compares the results of transsphenoidal operation in 11 consecutive patients with Cushing's disease with those obtained in 29 patients by unilateral adrenalectomy followed by external pituitary irradiation (4500 rad). It is concluded that transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice but if no transient adrenal insufficiency develops after removal of the pituitary (micro)adenoma, then additional external pituitary irradiation seems suitable treatment. (Auth.)

  16. Advances in HTGR spent fuel treatment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.D.; Lessig, W.S.

    1984-08-01

    GA Technologies, Inc. has been investigating the burning of spent reactor graphite under Department of Energy sponsorship since 1969. Several deep fluidized bed burners have been used at the GA pilot plant to develop graphite burning techniques for both spent fuel recovery and volume reduction for waste disposal. Since 1982 this technology has been extended to include more efficient circulating bed burners. This paper includes updates on high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel cycle options and current results of spent fuel treatment testing for fluidized and advanced circulating bed burners

  17. Vitreoretinal surgery in advanced coats disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamar, Yasemin; Berker, Nilufer; Batman, Cosar; Zilelioglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    To report the outcomes of vitreoretinal surgery for a patient with total retinal detachment and a subretinal nodule associated with Coats disease (CD). A 20-year-old woman stage 3B CD underwent vitreoretinal surgery with triamcinolone acetonide-assisted pars plana vitrectomy, limited retinotomy, removal of the subretinal nodule and membrane, endolaser photocoagulation, and silicone oil tamponade. The surgical outcomes were observed. Retinal attachment was achieved after vitreoretinal surgery, removal of the subretinal membrane, and endoresection of the subretinal fibrous nodule. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred due to the surgical technique. The retina remained attached during the postoperative follow-up period of 6 months. Vitreoretinal surgery is an effective surgical technique that provides successful reattachment of the retina and enables endoresection of the subretinal fibrous nodule in eyes with advanced CD. It also prevents the devastating intraocular complications leading to enucleation.

  18. Doppler-Guided Hemorrhoid Artery Ligation with Recto-Anal-Repair Modification: Functional Evaluation and Safety Assessment of a New Minimally Invasive Method of Treatment of Advanced Hemorrhoidal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Walega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present 12-month followup results of functional evaluation and safety assessment of a modification of hemorrhoidal artery ligation (DGHAL called Recto-Anal-Repair (RAR in treatment of advanced hemorrhoidal disease (HD. Methods: Patients with grade III and IV HD underwent the RAR procedure (DGHAL combined with restoration of prolapsed hemorrhoids to their anatomical position with longitudinal sutures. Each patient had rectal examination, anorectal manometry, and QoL questionnaire performed before 3 months, and 12 months after RAR procedure. Results: 20 patients completed 12-month followup. There were no major complications. 3 months after RAR, 5 cases of residual mucosal prolapse were detected (25%, while only 3 patients (15% reported persistence of symptoms. 12 months after RAR, another 3 HD recurrences were detected, to a total of 8 patients (40% with HD recurrence. Anal pressures after RAR were significantly lower than before (P<0.05, and the effect was persistent 12 months after RAR. One patient (5% reported occasional soiling 3 months after RAR. Conclusions: RAR seems to be a safe method of treatment of advanced HD with no major complications. The procedure has a significant influence on anal pressures, with no evidence of risk of fecal incontinence after the operation.

  19. Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2014-12-04

    The present invention includes embodiments for treatment and/or prevention of sickle cell disease that employ Hydroxyfasudil or Isocoronarin D alone or either in conjunction with each other or an inducer of HbF production. The compounds may act synergistically, and the compounds employed circumvent the side effects seen with Hydroxyurea.

  20. Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Radovanovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    The present invention includes embodiments for treatment and/or prevention of sickle cell disease that employ Hydroxyfasudil or Isocoronarin D alone or either in conjunction with each other or an inducer of HbF production. The compounds may act synergistically, and the compounds employed circumvent the side effects seen with Hydroxyurea.

  1. Treatment of Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leisa L; Roach, J Michael

    2016-02-01

    Review of the etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of dry eye disease (DED). Articles indexed in PubMed (National Library of Medicine), Iowa Drug Information Service (IDIS), and the Cochrane Reviews and Trials in the last 10 years using the key words "dry eye disease," "dry eye syndrome," "dry eye and treatment." Primary sources were used to locate additional resources. Sixty-eight publications were reviewed, and criteria supporting the primary objective were used to identify useful resources. The literature included practice guidelines, book chapters, review articles, original research articles, and product prescribing information for the etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of DED. DED is one of the most common ophthalmic disorders. Signs and symptoms of DED vary by patient, but may include ocular irritation, redness, itching, photosensitivity, visual blurring, mucous discharge, and decreased tear meniscus or break-up time. Symptoms improve with treatment, but the condition is not completely curable. Treatment includes reducing environmental causes, discontinuing medications that cause or worsen dry eye, and managing contributing ocular or systemic conditions. Most patients use nonprescription tear substitutes, and if these are not sufficient, other treatment is prescribed. These treatments include the ophthalmic anti-inflammatory agent cyclosporine, punctal occlusion, eye side shields, systemic cholinergic agents, and autologous serum tears. This article reviews the etiology, symptoms, and current therapy for DED.

  2. Recent Treatment Advances and New Trials in Adult Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Königshausen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of nephrotic syndrome is complex and ranges from primary glomerulonephritis to secondary forms. Patients with nephrotic syndrome often need immunosuppressive treatment with its side effects and may progress to end stage renal disease. This review focuses on recent advances in the treatment of primary causes of nephrotic syndrome (idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN, minimal change disease (MCD, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS since the publication of the KDIGO guidelines in 2012. Current treatment recommendations are mostly based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs in children, small RCTs, or case series in adults. Recently, only a few new RCTs have been published, such as the Gemritux trial evaluating rituximab treatment versus supportive antiproteinuric and antihypertensive therapy in iMN. Many RCTs are ongoing for iMN, MCD, and FSGS that will provide further information on the effectiveness of different treatment options for the causative disease. In addition to reviewing recent clinical studies, we provide insight into potential new targets for the treatment of nephrotic syndrome from recent basic science publications.

  3. Treatment of advanced rectal cancer after renal transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Liu; Xiao-Bo Liang; Yao-Ping Li; Yi Feng; Dong-Bo Liu; Wen-Da Wang

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplantation is a standard procedure for end-stage renal disease today. Due to immunosuppressive drugs and increasing survival time after renal trans-plantation, patients with transplanted kidneys carry an increased risk of developing malignant tumors. In this case report, 3 patients with advanced rectal can-cer after renal transplantation for renal failure were treated with anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection plus total mesorectal excision, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. One patient eventually died of metastasized cancer 31 mo after therapy, although his organ grafts functioned well until his death. The other 2 patients were well during the 8 and 21 mo follow-up periods after rectal resection. We therefore strongly argue that patients with advanced rectal cancer should receive standard oncology treatment, including opera-tion and adjuvant treatment after renal transplantation. Colorectal cancer screening in such patients appears justified.

  4. The Treatment of Cushing's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Monica; Cozzolino, Alessia; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD), or pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome, is a severe endocrine disease caused by a corticotroph pituitary tumor and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The first-line treatment for CD is pituitary surgery, which is followed by disease remission in around 78% and relapse in around 13% of patients during the 10-year period after surgery, so that nearly one third of patients experience in the long-term a failure of surgery and require an additional second-line treatment. Patients with persistent or recurrent CD require additional treatments, including pituitary radiotherapy, adrenal surgery, and/or medical therapy. Pituitary radiotherapy is effective in controlling cortisol excess in a large percentage of patients, but it is associated with a considerable risk of hypopituitarism. Adrenal surgery is followed by a rapid and definitive control of cortisol excess in nearly all patients, but it induces adrenal insufficiency. Medical therapy has recently acquired a more important role compared to the past, due to the recent employment of novel compounds able to control cortisol secretion or action. Currently, medical therapy is used as a presurgical treatment, particularly for severe disease; or as postsurgical treatment, in cases of failure or incomplete surgical tumor resection; or as bridging therapy before, during, and after radiotherapy while waiting for disease control; or, in selected cases, as primary therapy, mainly when surgery is not an option. The adrenal-directed drug ketoconazole is the most commonly used drug, mainly because of its rapid action, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, mifepristone, is highly effective in controlling clinical comorbidities, mainly glucose intolerance, thus being a useful treatment for CD when it is associated with diabetes mellitus. Pituitary-directed drugs have the advantage of acting at the site responsible for CD, the pituitary tumor. Among this group of drugs, the dopamine

  5. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Children: A Guide to Early Diagnosis for the General Pediatrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Alobaidy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease (NP-C is a lysosomal storage disease in which impaired intracellular lipid transport leads to accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in various neurovisceral tissues. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 genes. The clinical spectrum is grouped by the age of onset and onset of neurological manifestation: pre/perinatal; early infantile; late infantile; and juvenile periods. The NP-C Suspicion Index (SI screening tool was developed to identify suspected patients with this disease. It is especially good at recognizing the disease in patients older than four years of age. Biochemical tests involving genetic markers and Filipin staining of skin fibroblast are being employed to assist diagnosis. Therapy is mostly supportive and since 2009, the first specific therapy approved for use was Miglustat (Zavesca aimed at stabilizing the rate of progression of neurological manifestation. The prognosis correlates with age at onset of neurological signs; patients with early onset form progress faster. The NP-C disease has heterogeneous neurovisceral manifestations. A SI is a screening tool that helps in diagnostic process. Filipin staining test is a specific biomarker diagnostic test. Miglustat is the first disease-specific therapy.

  6. Advances in endovascular therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases has developed rapidly in recent years. The latest clinical trials of acute ischemic stroke have shown promising results with the continued advancement of concepts, techniques, and materials. Mechanical thrombectomy is recommended in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation, according to the guidelines updated in Europe, USA, and China. The long-term therapeutic efficacy of endovascular stenting for carotid artery stenosis has also been proved noninferior to that of carotid endarterectomy. However, the latest clinical trials have shown that the efficacy of stenting for intracranial artery and vertebral artery stenosis is inferior to that of medical treatment alone, which needs urgent attention through further development and studies. Keywords: Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, Interventional surgery, Progress

  7. Recent advances in treatment of aplastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA) made most of patients to expect to achieve a long-term survival. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) from HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD-SCT) is a preferred first-line treatment option for younger patients with severe or very severe AA, whereas immunosuppressive treatment (IST) is an alternative option for others. Horse anti-thymocyte globuline (ATG) with cyclosporin A (CsA) had been a standard IST regimen with acceptable response rate. Recently, horse ATG had been not available and replaced with rabbit ATG in most countries. Subsequently, recent comparative studies showed that the outcomes of patients who received rabbit ATG/CsA were similar or inferior compared to those who received horse ATG/CsA. Therefore, further studies to improve the outcomes of IST, including additional eltrombopag, are necessary. On the other hand, the upper age limit of patients who are able to receive MSD-SCT as first-line treatment is a current issue because of favorable outcomes of MSD-SCT of older patients using fludarabine-based conditioning. In addition, further studies to improve the outcomes of patients who receive allogeneic SCT from alternative donors are needed. In this review, current issues and the newly emerging trends that may improve their outcomes in near futures will be discussed focusing the management of patients with AA. PMID:25378968

  8. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  9. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa

    2015-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of cancer are currently on the top of disease pattern and the number is increasing and increasing worldwide. The impact of screening program for early diagnosis has been proved their important roles in the war against cancer because it helps increase the cure rates, decrease the mortality and morbidity rates, and therefore reduces the economic-social burden. Advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, especially the hybrid imaging (X-ray and Nuclear Medicine) such as PET/CT, SPECT/CT, PET/MRI, is important in accurate staging and these help choose the optimized treatment options to prolong survival while improve the quality of life. The treatment outcomes of cancer has certain remarkable advances based on variety of research to modify, promote and strengthen the traditional treatments (surgery-chemotherapy-radiation) such as laparoscopic surgery, combined chemo-regimens, intensity modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, stereotactic radiation therapy, radio surgery, PET/CT simulation, radioactive seeds implant, selective internal radiation therapy, intra-operative radiation therapy, etc. as well as the emerge of new methods such as targeted therapy, immune therapy, radio immunotherapy, proton therapy and heavy ion. Treatment of cancer is now the “individualized treatment” with the advances of biochemistry and histopathology. To achieve the most optimal outcomes, cancer should be approached by a multi professional team including biochemistry, immunology, histopathology, surgical oncology, medical oncology and radiation oncology. (author)

  10. Successful treatment with chemotherapy and subsequent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for myeloid blastic crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia following advanced Hodgkin's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C. J.; Rozenberg-Arska, M.; Verdonck, L. F.

    1987-01-01

    A 33-year-old man was treated with intensive chemotherapy for myeloid blastic crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), which developed after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. After achieving a second chronic phase, he underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT).

  11. Advances in treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a type of chronic pancreatitis characterized by an autoimmune inflammatory process. Treatment protocols for AIP are still evolving. According to the articles about AIP treatment in recent years, the indications for steroid therapy include specific clinical manifestations (jaundice, abdominal pain, etc., markedly abnormal imaging findings, and extrapancreatic organ involvement. The initial dose of steroid (prednisone is usually 0.6 mg·kg-1·d-1 or 30-40 mg/d; after 3 weeks to 1 month of treatment with the initial dose, the dose is decreased by 5-10 mg every 1-2 weeks until it drops to 2.5-5 mg/d; this dose is maintained for 6 months to 3 years. No consensus has been reached on the adverse effect of steroid on diabetes mellitus complicating AIP. Immunosuppressive agents should be used for the patients with disease relapses or with important extrapancreatic organs involved. Rituximab might become one of the therapies for refractory AIP. Although some patients achieved remission after surgical treatment, surgery is still not recommended as a routine treatment protocol due to the complications after surgery.

  12. Kidney disease and obesity: epidemiology, mechanisms and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Kramer, Holly; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Sharma, Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The theme of World Kidney Day 2017 is 'kidney disease and obesity: healthy lifestyle for healthy kidneys'. To mark this event, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited five leading researchers to describe changes in the epidemiology of obesity-related kidney disease, advances in current understanding of the mechanisms and current approaches to the management of affected patients. The researchers also highlight new advances that could lead to the development of novel treatments and identify areas in which further basic and clinical studies are needed.

  13. Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease: Early Detection and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... called a "urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio." Treating Kidney Disease Kidney disease is usually a progressive disease, ...

  14. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in the treatment of acute liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Ling

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure (ALF is a rare life-threatening disease with rapid progression and a low survival rate and affects the function of multiple organ systems. Early identification of cause and protection of vital organs are critical for patients' survival. With the development in artificial liver, stem cell transplantation, and liver transplantation in recent years, the outcome of ALF has been greatly improved. This article elaborates on the treatment of ALF from the aspects of the etiology of ALF and major organ systems involved and introduces the latest advances in artificial liver and stem cell transplantation.

  16. Advances in the classification and treatment of mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem; Hartmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a term used to denote a heterogeneous group of conditions defined by the expansion and accumulation of clonal (neoplastic) tissue mast cells in various organs. The classification of the World Health Organization (WHO) divides the disease into cutaneous mastocytosis, systemic...... leukemia. The clinical impact and prognostic value of this classification has been confirmed in numerous studies, and its basic concept remains valid. However, refinements have recently been proposed by the consensus group, the WHO, and the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis. In addition, new...... of mastocytosis, with emphasis on classification, prognostication, and emerging new treatment options in advanced systemic mastocytosis....

  17. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative

  18. Regorafenib in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): considerations for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung; Jha, Reena; Prins, Petra A; Wang, Hongkun; Chacha, Monica; Hartley, Marion L; He, Aiwu Ruth

    2017-11-01

    We report our institutional observations of ten patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (seven and three were Child-Pugh class A and B, respectively) who received compassionate regorafenib therapy between June 2016 and January 2017. These patients did not fit the rigid criteria of a clinical trial and represented the use of regorafenib in an everyday clinic situation. Regorafenib (160 mg P.O. daily) was administered to patients on a 4-week cycle (3 weeks on, 1 week off) until disease progression (assessed using mRECIST criteria) or discontinuation secondary to toxicity (assessed using CTCAE criteria). Relevant clinical data were abstracted from patient medical records and reviewed retrospectively. The median duration of patient treatment was 6.6 weeks, and the median time to disease progression was 12.5 weeks. Most common treatment emergent adverse events were fatigue, diarrhea, and hand-foot skin reaction. Elevated AST and ALT were the most commonly observed laboratory-assessed adverse events, which reached grade 3 status in the Child-Pugh class B patients only. We observed intolerance to regorafenib treatment in one patient who had previously received a liver transplant. We also saw lithium toxicity in one patient receiving long-term lithium treatment, suggesting a potential and unexpected drug-drug interaction with regorafenib. Taken together, our observations indicate that regorafenib is beneficial in the treatment of patients with advanced HCC who progressed on or demonstrated intolerance to sorafenib therapy; however, careful selection and close monitoring of patients is necessary to maximize the benefit while minimizing the toxicities of regorafenib treatment.

  19. A New Multi-Ingredient Recipe for the Treatment of Localized Advanced Periodontal Disease following the Surgical Removal of Impacted Wisdom Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Khzam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammation of the tooth supporting structures. It leads to bone and attachment loss which is irreversible. Extraction of horizontally impacted lower third molar (L3M teeth may result in localized periodontal pockets at the distal aspect of the adjacent lower second molars (L2M. We present a case of a 21-year-old male who suffered from a swelling and pain around his lower right second molar following surgical removal of a mesioangular impacted lower right third molar. We showed that oral hygiene measures, surgical access, mixture of autogenous and synthetic bone graft, and guided tissue regeneration (GTR were enough to control the problem.

  20. Therapeutic effects of intensive inpatient rehabilitation in advanced Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kaseda, Yumiko; Ikeda, Junko; Sugihara, Katsunobu; Yamawaki, Takemori; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of rehabilitation therapy in Parkinson's disease is well recognized. However, the effects of an inpatient rehabilitation program for advanced Parkinson's disease have not been fully investigated. Aim To assess the effects of intensive inpatient rehabilitation. Methods We enrolled 31 patients (mean age 69.5 ? 9.4 years; mean disease duration 8.8 ? 6.4 years) with advanced Parkinson's disease, without severe cognitive impairment. The median Hoehn?Yahr stage wa...

  1. Initial treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    Initial treatment of early idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) begins with diagnosis based on clinical evaluation supplemented by laboratory studies and brain imaging to exclude causes of secondary parkinsonism. In most cases, testing is normal and the diagnosis of PD rests on clinical criteria. In patients with mild symptoms and signs, the diagnosis of PD may not initially be apparent, and follow-up evaluation is needed to arrive at a diagnosis. Once the diagnosis is made, pharmacologic treatment may not be the first step. First, patient education is essential, especially because PD is a high-profile disease for which information and misinformation are readily available to patients and families. Counseling concerning prognosis, future symptoms, future disability, and treatment must be provided. Questions from patients concerning diet, lifestyle, and exercise are especially common at this point. The decision of when to initiate treatment is the next major consideration. Much controversy but relatively little light has been brought to bear on this issue. L-dopa was the first major antiparkinson medication to be introduced and remains the "gold standard" of treatment. Next in efficacy are the dopamine agonists (DAs). A debate has raged concerning whether initial dopaminergic treatment should be with L-dopa or DAs. Physicians have been concerned about forestalling the appearance of dyskinesias and motor fluctuations, whereas patients have incorrectly understood that L-dopa and possibly other antiparkinson drugs have a finite duration of usefulness, making it important to defer treatment for as long as possible. This has created "L-dopa phobia," which may stand in the way of useful treatment. In spite of this controversy, there is uniform agreement that the appropriate time to treat is when the patient is beginning to be disabled. This varies from patient to patient and depends on age, employment status, nature of job, level of physical activity, concern about

  2. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, A A

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  3. Urolithiasis: Advances in diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaric, Z.L.; Le Roy, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    This course addresses radiologic aspects of diagnosis and treatment of renal calculi. The combined clinical experience from two institutions (UCLA and Mayo Clinic) of over 3,000 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatments is presented, as is the new developmental designs and socioeconomic impact. ESWL has radically altered the management of renal and ureteral calculi. An underwater shock wave is concentrated on a calculus, which shatters after being subjected to a number of shocks. Small fragments are usually passed spontaneously, making the patient stone free and eliminating the need for surgery. Radiology plays an important role in this patient population. The presence of radiopaque and radiolucent calculi - their size, number, and location; the anatomic appearance of the kidneys, pelvocalyceal system, and ureter; anatomic variants; and pathologic conditions such as horseshoe kidneys, ureteropelvic junction narrowing, polycystic kidney disease, calyceal diverticuli, infundibular stenosis, ureteral obstruction, and medullary sponge kidney are best imaged with excretory urography and occasionally retrograde pyelography and US. Follow-up examinations usually consist of abdominal radiography and US if obstruction is suspected. The percutaneous approach still plays a major albeit obviously diminished role in treatment and may be used for a number of specific indications, which is discussed

  4. Urogenital disease: current medical need and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoboski, M

    1998-11-01

    The Medicinal Chemistry Division session on Urogenital Disease began with an overview by Dr P-O Andersson (Pharmacia and Upjohn, MI, USA) of current medical need and recent advances in the field. Dr Andersson drew attention to the limited interest that pharmaceutical companies have historically shown in the area of non-malignant diseases of the urogenital tract. Conditions such as bladder overactivity and urinary incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and erectile dysfunction have been poorly understood and have been regarded as unavoidable consequences of old age. One factor, which further compounds the problem, is that many people do not seek treatment, a practice which tends to lower the awareness of these conditions.

  5. Potential mechanisms of disease progression and management of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Cortés, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in treatment of Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP), advanced stages of CML, accelerated phase or blast crisis, remain notoriously difficult to treat. Treatments that are highly effective against CML-CP produce disappointing results against advanced disease. Therefore, a primary goal of therapy should be to maintain patients in CP for as long as possible, by (1) striving for deep, early molecular response to treatment; (2) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors that lower risk of disease progression; and (3) more closely observing patients who demonstrate cytogenetic risk factors at diagnosis or during treatment. PMID:24050507

  6. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy W. S. Tong

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy in women. It is classified into a few major molecular subtypes according to hormone and growth factor receptor expression. Over the past few years, substantial advances have been made in the discovery of new drugs for treating BC. Improved understanding of the biologic heterogeneity of BC has allowed the development of more effective and individualized approach to treatment. In this review, we provide an update about the current treatment strategy and discuss the various emerging novel therapies for the major molecular subtypes of BC. A brief account of the clinical development of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, histone deacetylation, multi-targeting tyrosine kinases, and immune checkpoints for personalized treatment of BC is included. However, no targeted drug has been approved for the most aggressive subtype—triple negative breast cancer (TNBC. Thus, we discuss the heterogeneity of TNBC and how molecular subtyping of TNBC may help drug discovery for this deadly disease. The emergence of drug resistance also poses threat to the successful development of targeted therapy in various molecular subtypes of BC. New clinical trials should incorporate advanced methods to identify changes induced by drug treatment, which may be associated with the upregulation of compensatory signaling pathways in drug resistant cancer cells.

  7. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  8. Advanced Asymptomatic Carotid Disease and Cognitive Impairment: An Understated Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Martinić-Popović

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced carotid disease is known to be associated with symptomatic cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA, as well as with poststroke cognitive impairment. However, cognitive decline often occurs in patients with advanced carotid stenosis without clinically evident stroke or TIA, so it is also suspected to be an independent risk factor for dementia. Neurosonological methods enable simple and noninvasive assessment of carotid stenosis in patients at risk of advanced atherosclerosis. Cognitive status in patients diagnosed with advanced carotid stenosis is routinely not taken into consideration, although if cognitive impairment is present, such patients should probably be called symptomatic. In this paper, we discuss results of some most important studies that investigated cognitive status of patients with asymptomatic advanced carotid disease and possible mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between asymptomatic advanced carotid disease and cognitive decline.

  9. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity h...

  10. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease

  11. Advancements in stem cells treatment of skeletal muscle wasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mirella emeregalli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, in which progressive muscle wasting and weakness is often associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. Although physiological properties of skeletal muscle tissue are now well known, no treatments are effective for these diseases. Muscle regeneration was attempted by means transplantation of myogenic cells (from myoblast to embryonic stem cells and also by interfering with the malignant processes that originate in pathological tissues, such as uncontrolled fibrosis and inflammation. Taking into account the advances in the isolation of new subpopulation of stem cells and in the creation of artificial stem cell niches, we discuss how these emerging technologies offer great promises for therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting associated with aging.

  12. Degarelix 240/80 mg: a new treatment option for patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccon-Gibod, Laurent; Iversen, Peter; Persson, Bo-Eric

    2009-01-01

    levels that can lead to clinical flare in patients with advanced disease. Degarelix (Firmagon is a new GnRH blocker that has recently been approved by the EMEA and US FDA for the treatment of men with hormone-sensitive advanced prostate cancer. In this article, we briefly review the Phase III trial data...

  13. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  14. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  15. Alzheimer's disease therapies: Selected advances and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alexandria Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 51, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, Antonio; Segovia, Cristina; Gabán, Aline S

    2012-12-13

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression.

  17. Advance in Targeted Immunotherapy for Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is a serious and deadly complication of patients, who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Despite prophylactic treatment with immunosuppressive agents, 20–80% of recipients develop acute GVHD after HSCT. And the incidence rates of chronic GVHD range from 6 to 80%. Standard therapeutic strategies are still lacking, although considerable advances have been gained in knowing of the predisposing factors, pathology, and diagnosis of GVHD. Targeting immune cells, such as regulatory T cells, as well as tolerogenic dendritic cells or mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs display considerable benefit in the relief of GVHD through the deletion of alloactivated T cells. Monoclonal antibodies targeting cytokines or signaling molecules have been demonstrated to be beneficial for the prevention of GVHD. However, these remain to be verified in clinical therapy. It is also important and necessary to consider adopting individualized treatment based on GVHD subtypes, pathological mechanisms involved and stages. In the future, it is hoped that the identification of novel therapeutic targets and systematic research strategies may yield novel safe and effective approaches in clinic to improve outcomes of GVHD further. In this article, we reviewed the current advances in targeted immunotherapy for the prevention of GVHD.

  18. Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandlal, Vikesh; Moodley, Dhayendre; Grobler, Anneke; Bagratee, Jayanthilall; Maharaj, Niren R; Richardson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia is a common clinical finding in HIV infected women and has been associated with advanced disease. The use of antiretroviral drugs such as Zidovudine (ZDV) either for prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV or used in combination with other antiretrovirals have been implicated in the development or increased severity of anaemia. We report the prevalence, type, severity and incidence of anaemia in a cohort of HIV infected women who initiated antiretroviral prophylaxis or treatment during pregnancy. This is a retrospective cohort data analysis of 408 HIV infected pregnant women who participated in a breastfeeding intervention study (HPTN 046 Study, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00074412) in South Africa. Women initiated zidovudine prophylaxis for PMTCT or triple antiretroviral treatment in pregnancy according to the standard of care. Laboratory and clinical data in pregnancy, anaemia (Hbpregnancy, 48/146 (32.9%) subsequently developed anaemia intrapartum or postpartum and 89/310 (28.7%) of all cases of anaemia remained unresolved by 2 weeks postdelivery. In a univariate analysis, CD4 count and gravidity were significant risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy, RR 1.41; 1.23-1.61 (panaemia in pregnancy and postdelivery. In conclusion, anaemia was most common among women in the advanced stage of HIV infection (CD4anaemia.

  19. Gastrointestinal cancer after treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdwell, Sandra H.; Hancock, Steven L.; Varghese, Anna; Cox, Richard S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the risk of gastrointestinal cancer following Hodgkin's disease treatment according to age at treatment, type of treatment, and anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Cases were identified from the records of 2,441 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease between 1961 and 1994. Follow-up averaged 10.9 years, representing 26,590 person-years of observation. Relative risks (RR) for gastrointestinal cancer incidence and mortality were computed by comparison with expected annualized rates for a general population matched for age, sex, and race. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers developed in 25 patients. The incidence RR was 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-3.5] and mortality RR was 3.8 (CI, 2.4-4.7). Sites associated with significantly increased risks included the stomach [RR 7.3 (CI, 3.4-13.8)], small intestine [RR 11.6 (CI, 1.9-38.3)], and pancreas [RR 3.5 (CI, 1.1-8.5)]. Risk was significantly elevated after combined modality therapy, RR 3.9 (CI, 2.2-5.6). The risk after radiotherapy alone was 2.0 (CI, 1.0-3.4), not a statistically significant elevation. The RR for gastrointestinal cancer was greatest after treatment at young age and decreased with advancing age. It was significantly elevated within 10 years after treatment [RR 2.0 (CI, 1.1-3.5)] and increased further after 20 years [RR 6.1 (CI, 2.5-12.7)]. Risk assessed by attained age paralleled risk according to age at treatment. Fifteen cases of gastrointestinal cancers arose within the irradiation fields. Conclusion: Patients treated for Hodgkin's disease are at modestly increased risk for secondary gastrointestinal cancer, especially after combined modality therapy and treatment at a young age. Risk was highest more than 20 years after treatment, but was significantly elevated within 10 years. Gastrointestinal sites with increased risk included the stomach, pancreas, and small intestine

  20. [Advances in the treatment of secondary osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo Zavala, R; Núñez Cuadros, E; Díaz Cordovés-Rego, G; Urda Cardona, A L

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is being increasingly recognised in paediatric practice as a consequence of the increasing life expectancy of children who suffer from chronic diseases and other factors. There are many non-pharmacological measures that can improve children' bone health, for example, avoiding inflammatory activity and osteotoxic treatments; increasing sun exposure and weight-bearing exercise, and maintaining an adequate nutritional status. Vitamin D and calcium supplements have been proposed as a measure to increase bone mass, but their effect and therapeutic indications are not completely clear. On the other hand, bisphosphonates are currently the only pharmacological alternative for the patients with infantile secondary osteoporosis. However, more studies are required on the therapeutic indications, posology, and long term secondary effects of biphosphonates. The aim of this article is to analyze the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of the therapeutic alternatives for childhood secondary osteoporosis and their safety in children. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Paul E; Grabenstein, John D; Salim, Abdulbaset M; Rybak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014, the largest Ebola outbreak in history exploded across West Africa. As of November 14, 2014, the World Health Organization has reported a total of 21,296 Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases, including 13,427 laboratory-confirmed EVD cases reported from the three most affected countries (Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone). As the outbreak of EVD has spread, clinical disease severity and national EVD case-fatality rates have remained high (21.2-60.8%). Prior to 2013, several EVD outbreaks were controlled by using routine public health interventions; however, the widespread nature of the current EVD outbreak as well as cultural practices in the affected countries have challenged even the most active case identification efforts. In addition, although treatment centers provide supportive care, no effective therapeutic agents are available for EVD-endemic countries. The ongoing EVD outbreak has stimulated investigation of several different therapeutic strategies that target specific viral structures and mechanisms of Ebola viruses. Six to eight putative pharmacotherapies or immunologically based treatments have demonstrated promising results in animal studies. In addition, agents composed of small interfering RNAs targeting specific proteins of Ebola viruses, traditional hyperimmune globulin isolated from Ebola animal models, monoclonal antibodies, and morpholino oligomers (small molecules used to block viral gene expression). A number of EVD therapeutic agents are now entering accelerated human trials in EVD-endemic countries. The goal of therapeutic agent development includes postexposure prevention and EVD cure. As knowledge of Ebola virus virology and pathogenesis grows, it is likely that new therapeutic tools will be developed. Deployment of novel Ebola therapies will require unprecedented cooperation as well as investment to ensure that therapeutic tools become available to populations at greatest risk for EVD and its complications. In this article, we

  2. Optimal primary surgical treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, Ahmed; Bryant, Andrew; Winter-Roach, Brett A; Hatem, Mohamed; Naik, Raj

    2011-08-10

    -based chemotherapy. We only included studies that defined optimal cytoreduction as surgery leading to residual tumours with a maximum diameter of any threshold up to 2 cm. Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible, the data were synthesised in a meta-analysis. There were no RCTs or prospective non-RCTs identified that were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of surgery when performed as a primary procedure in advanced stage ovarian cancer.We found 11 retrospective studies that included a multivariate analysis that met our inclusion criteria. Analyses showed the prognostic importance of complete cytoreduction, where the residual disease was microscopic that is no visible disease, as overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were significantly prolonged in these groups of women. PFS was not reported in all of the studies but was sufficiently documented to allow firm conclusions to be drawn.When we compared suboptimal (> 1 cm) versus optimal ( 2 cm and factors, selection bias was still likely to be of particular concern.Adverse events, quality of life (QoL) and cost-effectiveness were not reported by treatment arm or to a satisfactory level in any of the studies. During primary surgery for advanced stage epithelial ovarian cancer all attempts should be made to achieve complete cytoreduction. When this is not achievable, the surgical goal should be optimal (related and disease-related factors that are associated with the improved survival in these groups of women. The findings of this review that women with residual disease 1 cm should prompt the surgical community to retain this category and consider re-defining it as 'near optimal' cytoreduction, reserving the term 'suboptimal' cytoreduction to cases where the residual disease is > 1 cm (optimal/near optimal/suboptimal instead of complete/optimal/suboptimal).

  3. Nivolumab-Based Treatments for Advanced Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international, double-blind, randomized phase III trial testing the combination of nivolumab (Opdivo®) and ipilimumab (Yervoy®) against nivolumab alone and ipilimumab alone in patients with advanced melanoma.

  4. Alzheimer's disease therapies: Selected advances and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents one of the biggest challenges that the modern health care system has to deal with. The lack of data about the etiology and the complexity of the underlying pathogenesis constitute the biggest struggle facing the development of new therapeutical ...

  5. Bladder dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian; Nielsen, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms. Seventy-four percent of patients with early-to-moderate disease report more than one bladder disturbance symptom. Severe bladder symptoms are reported in 27-39% of PD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  6. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  7. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not feel ... skin rash with blisters slowed growth Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Researchers are studying the reasons celiac ...

  8. Anisoft - Advanced Treatment of Magnetic Anisotropy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadima, M.

    2017-12-01

    Since its first release, Anisoft (Anisotropy Data Browser) has gained a wide popularity in magnetic fabric community mainly due to its simple and user-friendly interface enabling very fast visualization of magnetic anisotropy tensors. Here, a major Anisoft update is presented transforming a rather simple data viewer into a platform offering an advanced treatment of magnetic anisotropy data. The updated software introduces new enlarged binary data format which stores both in-phase and out-of-phase (if measured) susceptibility tensors (AMS) or tensors of anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AMR) together with their respective confidence ellipses and values of F-tests for anisotropy. In addition to the tensor data, a whole array of specimen orientation angles, orientation of mesoscopic foliation(s) and lineation(s) is stored for each record enabling later editing or corrections. The input data may be directly acquired by AGICO Kappabridges (AMS) or Spinner Magnetometers (AMR); imported from various data formats, including the long-time standard binary ran-format; or manually created. Multiple anisotropy files can be combined together or split into several files by manual data selection or data filtering according to their values. Anisotropy tensors are conventionally visualized as principal directions (eigenvectors) in equal-area projection (stereoplot) together with a wide array of quantitative anisotropy parameters presented in histograms or in color-coded scatter plots showing mutual relationship of up to three quantitative parameters. When dealing with AMS in variable low fields, field-independent and field-dependent components of anisotropy can be determined (Hrouda 2009). For a group of specimens, individual principal directions can be contoured, or a mean tensor and respective confidence ellipses of its principal directions can be calculated using either the Hext-Jelinek (Jelinek 1978) statistics or the Bootstrap method (Constable & Tauxe 1990). Each graphical

  9. Pertussis: Microbiology, Disease, Treatment, and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Abdulbaset M.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Pertussis is a severe respiratory infection caused by Bordetella pertussis, and in 2008, pertussis was associated with an estimated 16 million cases and 195,000 deaths globally. Sizeable outbreaks of pertussis have been reported over the past 5 years, and disease reemergence has been the focus of international attention to develop a deeper understanding of pathogen virulence and genetic evolution of B. pertussis strains. During the past 20 years, the scientific community has recognized pertussis among adults as well as infants and children. Increased recognition that older children and adolescents are at risk for disease and may transmit B. pertussis to younger siblings has underscored the need to better understand the role of innate, humoral, and cell-mediated immunity, including the role of waning immunity. Although recognition of adult pertussis has increased in tandem with a better understanding of B. pertussis pathogenesis, pertussis in neonates and adults can manifest with atypical clinical presentations. Such disease patterns make pertussis recognition difficult and lead to delays in treatment. Ongoing research using newer tools for molecular analysis holds promise for improved understanding of pertussis epidemiology, bacterial pathogenesis, bioinformatics, and immunology. Together, these advances provide a foundation for the development of new-generation diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. PMID:27029594

  10. Treatment with docetaxel and cisplatin in advanced adrenocortical carcinoma, a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Pawlak, W Z; Petersen, P M

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with a poor response to chemotherapy. Cisplatin is the most widely investigated drug in the treatment of ACC and in vitro studies have indicated activity of taxanes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin...... combined with docetaxel as first-line treatment of advanced ACC....

  11. Advances in the genetically complex autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombrello, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet's disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases-namely, the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically complex autoinflammatory phenotypes.

  12. Research Advances: DNA Computing Targets West Nile Virus, Other Deadly Diseases, and Tic-Tac-Toe; Marijuana Component May Offer Hope for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment; New Wound Dressing May Lead to Maggot Therapy--Without the Maggots

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents three reports of research advances. The first report describes a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based computer that could lead to faster, more accurate tests for diagnosing West Nile Virus and bird flu. Representing the first "medium-scale integrated molecular circuit," it is the most powerful computing device of its type to…

  13. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the therapeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, maintenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett’s esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any future development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the aforementioned areas of unmet need. PMID:26130628

  14. Soil aquifer treatment using advanced primary effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Saroj K.; Hussen, Mustefa; Amy, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluent (PE) is an attractive option for wastewater treatment and reuse in many developing countries with no or minimal wastewater treatment. One of the main limitations of SAT of PE is rapid clogging of the infiltration basin due to high suspended solid concentrations. Some pre-treatment of PE before infiltration is likely to reduce this limitation, improve performance of SAT and help to implement this technology effectively. The effects of three pre-treatment options namely sedimentation (SED), coagulation (COAG) and horizontal roughing filtration (HRF) on SAT were analyzed by conducting laboratory-scale batch and soil column experiments. The sedimentation and coagulation pre-treatments led to less head loss development and reduction of clogging effect. The head loss development in soil column using PE + COAG and PE + SED was reduced by 85 and 72%, respectively, compared to PE alone without any pretreatment. The overall dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal of pre-treatments and soil column collectively were 34, 44, 51 and 43.5% for PE without any pre-treatment, PE + SED, PE+ COAG and PE + HRF, respectively. Coagulation pre-treatment of PE was found to be the most effective option in terms of suspended solids, DOC and nitrogen removal. Sedimentation pre-treatment of PE could be attractive where land is relatively less expensive for the construction of sedimentation basins. © IWA Publishing 2011.

  15. Soil aquifer treatment using advanced primary effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Saroj K.

    2011-08-01

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) using primary effluent (PE) is an attractive option for wastewater treatment and reuse in many developing countries with no or minimal wastewater treatment. One of the main limitations of SAT of PE is rapid clogging of the infiltration basin due to high suspended solid concentrations. Some pre-treatment of PE before infiltration is likely to reduce this limitation, improve performance of SAT and help to implement this technology effectively. The effects of three pre-treatment options namely sedimentation (SED), coagulation (COAG) and horizontal roughing filtration (HRF) on SAT were analyzed by conducting laboratory-scale batch and soil column experiments. The sedimentation and coagulation pre-treatments led to less head loss development and reduction of clogging effect. The head loss development in soil column using PE + COAG and PE + SED was reduced by 85 and 72%, respectively, compared to PE alone without any pretreatment. The overall dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal of pre-treatments and soil column collectively were 34, 44, 51 and 43.5% for PE without any pre-treatment, PE + SED, PE+ COAG and PE + HRF, respectively. Coagulation pre-treatment of PE was found to be the most effective option in terms of suspended solids, DOC and nitrogen removal. Sedimentation pre-treatment of PE could be attractive where land is relatively less expensive for the construction of sedimentation basins. © IWA Publishing 2011.

  16. Fluctuating Cotard syndrome in a patient with advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solla, Paolo; Cannas, Antonino; Orofino, Gianni; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Nonmotor fluctuations of psychiatric symptoms in patients suffering from Parkinson disease (PD) represent a very disabling condition, which may seriously interfere with the quality of life of patients and caregivers. In this regard, these disturbances are present with a higher frequency in advanced PD patients with associated motor complications and can appear both in "on" and in "off" period. Here we report on a case of fluctuating Cotard syndrome clearly related to "wearing-off" deterioration and responsive to levodopa treatment in a patient affected by advanced PD. A 76-year-old woman presented with a 13-year history of PD. Her caregivers reported that, in the last 2 months, she has developed a sudden onset of nihilistic delusion (Cotard syndrome), mainly during the "wearing-off" condition and associated with end of dose dyskinesias and akathisia.As Cotard syndrome clearly improved with the administration of levodopa, the patient was successfully treated changing the levodopa schedule with the shortening of intervals between levodopa intakes in small doses. Both the appearance of the Cotard syndrome in this patient during the "off" state and the subsequent improvement of psychotic symptoms after levodopa administration strongly suggest an important correlation with the dopaminergic dysregulation.This finding suggests that dopaminergic deficit might play a key factor in the development of Cotard syndrome.

  17. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  18. Rare genetic diseases: update on diagnosis, treatment and online resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Robert E; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Shanker, Shreya; Andrade, Rosangela V; Aguiar, Lana R; de Carvalho, Juliana L; Costa, Fabrício F

    2018-01-01

    Rare genetic diseases collectively impact a significant portion of the world's population. For many diseases there is limited information available, and clinicians can find difficulty in differentiating between clinically similar conditions. This leads to problems in genetic counseling and patient treatment. The biomedical market is affected because pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries do not see advantages in addressing rare disease treatments, or because the cost of the treatments is too high. By contrast, technological advances including DNA sequencing and analysis, together with computer-aided tools and online resources, are allowing a more thorough understanding of rare disorders. Here, we discuss how the collection of various types of information together with the use of new technologies is facilitating diagnosis and, consequently, treatment of rare diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Millimeter wave therapy in hypertonic disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter wave therapy in hypertonic disease treatment promotes disappearance of negative clinical symptoms, normalization of arterial pressure indicators, improvement of system and cerebral hemodynamic. In spite of active using of wideband equipment in treatment for cardiovascular diseases, particularly hypertonic disease, the procedures generalizing experience in their use are not enough. Thus further investigation, searching of new treatment methods using up-to-date physiotherapy technology seem to be actual.

  20. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements...... in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  1. Treatment results of incomplete chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Gao,1,* Fei Gao,2,* Zi Liu,1 Li-ping Song1 1Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 2Second Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Regimens that combine chemotherapy and radiotherapy increase toxicity and compromise a patient’s ability to adhere to the treatment plan. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a partially completed chemoradiation regimen prescribed for locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix. Methods: Medical records of 156 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer stage IIB–IVA who received chemoradiation with cisplatin (40 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 from October 2006 to October 2008 were collected. The treatment protocol called for two cycles of chemotherapy. External beam radiation therapy was administered using a 10-MeV electron beam. Local control, disease free survival, overall survival, and toxicities were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, 89 patients (57% completed the planned protocol. Sixty seven patients (43% completed fewer than two cycles. The 3-year local control rate was significantly better in the patient group that completed the prescribed plan (92.1% compared to 80.6%; P = 0.033. No statistical significance was observed between the groups that completed or did not complete the two cycle protocol with regard to disease free survival (80.9% and 73.2%, respectively; P = 0.250, overall survival (84.3% and 79.1%; P = 0.405, and progression survival (3.4% and 3.0%; P = 0.892. Differences in acute hematologic toxicity and subcutaneous toxicity were observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Completion of two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin with radiotherapy was effective, safe, and responsible for better local control

  2. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    This Ph.d. project describes the development of a workflow for Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for clinical radiotherapy plans. The workflow may be utilized to perform an independent dose verification of treatment plans. Modern radiotherapy treatment delivery is often conducted by dynamically...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...... and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...

  3. Pulpal changes associated with advanced periodontal disease: A histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Siddharth; Galgali, Sushama R; Sheethal, H S; Priya, N S

    2017-01-01

    Over the past century, the dental literature has consistently reflected a controversy related to the effect of periodontal disease on the dental pulp. Nonetheless, practitioners are of the opinion that teeth having deep periodontal pockets show variable pulpal response, which may necessitate root canal treatment. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the changes in pulp due to advanced periodontal disease. Forty caries-free teeth affected with severe periodontitis were collected from patients aged between 18 and 55 years. The collected teeth were stored in formalin for 24 h and were then decalcified and examined histologically after staining with hematoxylin and eosin to note the changes that occurred in pulp. Pulpal calcification (52.62%) and partial necrosis of pulp (52.62%) were found to be the most common findings. Inflammation, which was found in 47.38% of the cases, ranged from mild to severe in most sections and was always chronic. Pulp with complete necrosis was seen in 26.32% of cases. Fibrosis and pulpal edema were seen in 36.84% of cases. In the presence of moderate to severe chronic periodontitis, degenerative changes such as inflammation, fibrosis, edema, calcification and necrosis were observed to variable degree.

  4. Correlation of advanced glycation end products to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-yan MA

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a common retrograde neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system, as well as the most common type of dementia in the aged, the main manifestations of AD are progressive decline of cognitive function and daily life ability. AD seriously affects the quality of life and physical and mental health of the aged, and increased the burden of family and society. The etiology and pathogenesis of AD remain unclear nowadays, and there is no objective and specific biological marker to help the early diagnosis and effective treatment. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are stable end products formed by non enzymatic reaction between the free amino groups of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids macromolecules and the carbonyls of glucose or other reduced sugars. Recent years, more and more studies have focused on the correlation between AGEs and its receptors (RAGE in patients with cognitive impairment, however, the role played by AGEs in the pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. The present paper will give an overview from three aspects: the structure and characteristics of AGEs, the relationship between the occurrence and development of AD and AGEs and the relationship between AGEs and prognosis of cognitive impairment which we've known so far. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2018.01.16

  5. Advances in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Dushant S; Wang, Andrew Y

    2015-06-25

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignancy of the bile ducts that carries high morbidity and mortality. Patients with CCA typically present with obstructive jaundice, and associated complications of CCA include cholangitis and biliary sepsis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a valuable treatment modality for patients with CCA, as it enables internal drainage of blocked bile ducts and hepatic segments by using plastic or metal stents. While there remains debate as to if bilateral (or multi-segmental) hepatic drainage is required and/or superior to unilateral drainage, the underlying tenant of draining any persistently opacified bile ducts is paramount to good ERCP practice and good clinical outcomes. Endoscopic therapy for malignant biliary strictures from CCA has advanced to include ablative therapies via ERCP-directed photodynamic therapy (PDT) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). While ERCP techniques cannot cure CCA, advancements in the field of ERCP have enabled us to improve upon the quality of life of patients with inoperable and incurable disease. ERCP-directed PDT has been used in lieu of brachytherapy to provide neoadjuvant local tumor control in patients with CCA who are awaiting liver transplantation. Lastly, mounting evidence suggests that palliative ERCP-directed PDT, and probably ERCP-directed RFA as well, offer a survival advantage to patients with this difficult-to-treat malignancy.

  6. Multidisciplinary treatment including chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Fukuda, Kazuhiro; Kikkawa, Nobuteru; Kobayashi, Tetsurou; Yagyu, Toshio; Hasuike, Yasunori; Mishima, Hideyuki; Shin, Eisei [Osaka National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Over 3 years, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed in 16 patients with advanced esophageal cancer (clinical Stage IV) and suspected noncurative resection. The subjects were {>=}A3 or N3, or were stage IV with distant metastasis on preoperative diagnosis. Two courses of 5FU and CDDP were given with concurrent radiotherapy. The predominant side effects were nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Mild or moderate leukopenia also occurred. The response was complete remission (CR) in two patients, partial remission (PR) in eight, minor response (MR) in two, no change (NC) in two and progressive disease (PD) in two. The overall response rate was 62.5%. Esophagectomy was performed in four patients (histological stage II in one, stage III in one, and stage IV in two). Two of 4 resected patients are alive (33.8 months), while the other died of unrelated causes. One of the 6 non-resected PR patients has survived for 18 months, but all other patients died of cancer within nine months of starting treatment. The survival rate of 16 patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy was 16.7% at one and two years. Thus, chemoradiotherapy may improve the prognosis of advanced esophageal cancer with suspected noncurative resection by increasing the response rate and the curative resection rate. (author)

  7. Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with advanced HIV disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikesh Nandlal

    Full Text Available Anaemia is a common clinical finding in HIV infected women and has been associated with advanced disease. The use of antiretroviral drugs such as Zidovudine (ZDV either for prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT of HIV or used in combination with other antiretrovirals have been implicated in the development or increased severity of anaemia. We report the prevalence, type, severity and incidence of anaemia in a cohort of HIV infected women who initiated antiretroviral prophylaxis or treatment during pregnancy.This is a retrospective cohort data analysis of 408 HIV infected pregnant women who participated in a breastfeeding intervention study (HPTN 046 Study, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00074412 in South Africa. Women initiated zidovudine prophylaxis for PMTCT or triple antiretroviral treatment in pregnancy according to the standard of care. Laboratory and clinical data in pregnancy, <72 hours and 2 weeks postdelivery were extracted from the main database and analysed.The mean Hb concentration was 10.6 g/dL at baseline and 262/408 (64.2% women were diagnosed with anaemia (Hb<11 g/dL in pregnancy, 48/146 (32.9% subsequently developed anaemia intrapartum or postpartum and 89/310 (28.7% of all cases of anaemia remained unresolved by 2 weeks postdelivery. In a univariate analysis, CD4 count and gravidity were significant risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy, RR 1.41; 1.23-1.61 (p<0.001 and 1.10; 1.01-1.18 (p = 0.02 respectively. After adjusting for antiretroviral regimen, age and gravidity in a multivariable analysis, only the CD4 count remains a significant risk factor for anaemia in pregnancy and postdelivery.In conclusion, anaemia was most common among women in the advanced stage of HIV infection (CD4<200 cells/mm3. There was no evidence of an association between ZDV or triple ARVs and anaemia.

  8. Advances in clinical application of optical coherence tomography in vitreomacular interface disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Xing

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vitreous macular interface disease mainly includes vitreomacular traction syndrome, idiopathic macular epiretinal membrane and idiopathic macular hole. Optical coherence tomography(OCTas a new tool that provides high resolution biopsy cross section image non traumatic imaging inspection, has a unique high resolution, no damage characteristics, and hence clinical widely used, vitreous macular interface for clinical disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and condition monitoring and quantitative evaluation, treatment options, etc provides important information and reference value. Vitreous macular interface disease in OCT image of anatomical morphology characteristics, improve the clinical on disease occurrence and development of knowledge. We reviewed the advances in the application of OCT in vitreomacular interface disease.

  9. Experience about the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotheraphy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  10. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Yhee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cystic fibrosis (CF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed.

  11. PAGET'S DISEASE: CURRENT TREATMENT MODALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Leonidovna Korsakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Paget's disease is a chronic local bone disease included into a group of metabolic osteopathies in which rearrangement foci emerge in one or several bones. The disease is characterized by the appearance of ostealgia, skeletal deformity, or, for example, hearing loss occurring with skull lesion or hip or knee arthrosis and, less frequently, sarcoma or giant cell tumor. There is evidence that bisphosphonates may control the activity of Paget's disease as they inhibit the function of osteoclasts. The use of these drugs reduces the intensity of osteoalgia and the level of biochemical markers for bone resorption and osteogenesis and can decelerate or reverse the early osteolytic phase of the disease. It is promising to use of zolendronic acid (Aclasta, 5 mg, a new heterocyclic amino-containing bisphosphonate that has a significantly higher efficacy than previously used antiresorptive agents.

  12. Advances In Neuroblastoma Diagnostics And Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazanek, P.; Bajciova, V.; Sterba, J.; Kuglik, P.; Veselsky, R.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of a childhood. Neuroblastoma is well known for its variability in clinical behavioral and distinct biological features. In a history of pediatric oncology it is a first disease, where the biological marker (NMYC amplification) was used for a prospective therapeutical randomisation. Current research is focused on detection of a new biological prognostic markers in neuroblastoma and implementation of a new therapeutical approaches into a clinical practise (eg. antiangiogenic therapies, metronomic chemotherapy, biotherapy, immunotherapy. (author)

  13. Advances in surface treatments: Technology, applications, effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niku-Lari, A.

    1987-01-01

    An international handbook has been produced to include all aspects of residual stresses, including the theoretical background, effects of residual stresses, measurement and calculation and quantitative assessment of residual stress effects. Techniques for altering residual stresses, particularly surface treatments, are discussed. Up to date information on the state of the art is presented. (UK)

  14. Advanced oxidation technologies : photocatalytic treatment of wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.

    1997-01-01

    7.1. Summary and conclusions

    The last two decennia have shown a growing interest in the photocatalytic treatment of wastewater, and more and more research has been carried out into the various aspects of photocatalysis, varying from highly fundamental aspects to practical application.

  15. Advances in surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingqiang; Yun, Lin; Roy, Manish; Shang, Dong

    2015-02-08

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is between 2 and 200 per 100,000 persons and shows an increasing trend year by year. India has the highest incidence of CP in the world at approximately 114 to 200 per 100,000 persons. The incidence of CP in China is approximately 13 per 100,000 persons. The aim of this review is to assist surgeons in managing patients with CP in surgical treatment. We conducted a PubMed search for "chronic pancreatitis" and "surgical treatment" and reviewed relevant articles. On the basis of our review of the literature, we found that CP cannot be completely cured. The purpose of surgical therapy for CP is to relieve symptoms, especially pain; to improve the patient's quality of life; and to treat complications. Decompression (drainage), resection, neuroablation and decompression combined with resection are commonly used methods for the surgical treatment of CP. Before developing a surgical regimen, surgeons should comprehensively evaluate the patient's clinical manifestations, auxiliary examination results and medical history to develop an individualized surgical treatment regimen.

  16. Sarcopenia in Alcoholic Liver Disease: Clinical and Molecular Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Jaividhya; McCullough, Arthur J; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2017-08-01

    Despite advances in treatment of alcohol use disorders that focus on increasing abstinence and reducing recidivism, alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is projected to be the major cause of cirrhosis and its complications. Malnutrition is recognized as the most frequent complication in ALD, and despite the high clinical significance, there are no effective therapies to reverse malnutrition in ALD. Malnutrition is a relatively imprecise term, and sarcopenia or skeletal muscle loss, the major component of malnutrition, is primarily responsible for the adverse clinical consequences in patients with liver disease. It is, therefore, critical to define the specific abnormality (sarcopenia) rather than malnutrition in ALD, so that therapies targeting sarcopenia can be developed. Skeletal muscle mass is maintained by a balance between protein synthesis and proteolysis. Both direct effects of ethanol (EtOH) and its metabolites on the skeletal muscle and the consequences of liver disease result in disturbed proteostasis (protein homeostasis) and consequent sarcopenia. Once cirrhosis develops in patients with ALD, abstinence is unlikely to be effective in completely reversing sarcopenia, as other contributors including hyperammonemia, hormonal, and cytokine abnormalities aggravate sarcopenia and maintain a state of anabolic resistance initiated by EtOH. Cirrhosis is also a state of accelerated starvation, with increased gluconeogenesis that requires amino acid diversion from signaling and substrate functions. Novel therapeutic options are being recognized that are likely to supplant the current "deficiency replacement" approach and instead focus on specific molecular perturbations, given the increasing availability of small molecules that can target specific signaling components. Myostatin antagonists, leucine supplementation, and mitochondrial protective agents are currently in various stages of evaluation in preclinical studies to prevent and reverse sarcopenia, in cirrhosis in

  17. Research advances in regorafenib in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Weibo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common malignant liver tumor, and there are limited systemic treatments for patients with advanced HCC. Regorafenib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor, and phase III clinical trial has shown that regorafenib can significantly extend the median survival of patients with advanced HCC by 2.8 months, which makes it a second-line drug approved by FDA for the treatment of advanced HCC, just after sorafenib. This article reviews the basic and clinical research on regorafenib in the field of HCC.

  18. Advances in environmental and occupational diseases 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Anthony J

    2005-06-01

    2004 was another good year for publications on environmental and occupational disorders in our journal. The major focus is clearly on the environment and particularly on environmental risk factors for sensitization and asthma. There is a growing consensus that exposure to pets is good, provided there is enough of it. Low levels enhance sensitization, and higher levels protect against the consequences of that sensitization. Following on from previous work on cockroaches, we now see allergy to feral mice as an emergent problem--at least we now have the tools to study this properly. Emphasis seems to be swinging away from the outdoor environment as a cause of allergic disease and toward the indoor environment, which is, after all, where most of us spend most of our lives. New techniques for studying isocyanate allergy might kindle a revival of interest in the mechanisms of occupational asthma caused by low-molecular-weight compounds. But for all types of occupational allergy, prevention remains key, and it is good to see that comprehensive programs of allergen reduction can pay off in reduced rates of latex allergy in health care workers. Further work in the area of recombinant allergens is welcome but needs soon to be translated into new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. This sector of allergy research remains vibrant, and the editors will continue to welcome outstanding contributions in this area.

  19. Present trends in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.; Iskandrani, A.

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths all over the world. As most patients present with advanced disease, major efforts have been made in the treatment of such disease with systemic chemotherapy. Several new agents and new combinations of chemotherapy have been developed recently. This article reviews the randomized clinical trials investigating chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in relapse or progressive disease while being treated and in elderly patients. Therapies that incorporate new biological agents to target specific defects in lung cancer are also discussed. Several clinical trials have demonstrated improvement in overall survival as well as quality of life with presently available chemotherapy treatment of advanced NSCLC. Better options are available for the elderly as well as those having relapse after first line chemotherapy. Despite all this progress the 5-year survival rate still remains at a dismal 14%. New therapies with good results are still desired. (author)

  20. Advanced oxidation technologies : photocatalytic treatment of wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J.

    1997-01-01

    7.1. Summary and conclusions

    The last two decennia have shown a growing interest in the photocatalytic treatment of wastewater, and more and more research has been carried out into the various aspects of photocatalysis, varying from highly fundamental aspects to practical application. However, despite all this research, there is still much to investigate. Suggested photocatalytic mechanisms, such as those for oxidation by hydroxyl radicals and for oxidation at the surface of photocata...

  1. The Treatment Effect of an ACE-Inhibitor Based Regimen with Perindopril in Relation to Beta-Blocker use in 29,463 Patients with Vascular Disease: a Combined Analysis of Individual Data of ADVANCE, EUROPA and PROGRESS Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Brugts (Jasper); M. Bertrand (Michel); W.J. Remme (Willem); R. Ferrari (Roberto); K.A.A. Fox (Keith); S. MacMahon (Stephen); J. Chalmers (John); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); H. Boersma (Eric)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In everyday practice, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers are cornerstone treatments in patients with (cardio-)vascular disease. Clear data that evaluate the effects of the combination of these agents on morbidity and mortality are lacking. Methods:

  2. Advances in HTGR Wastewater Treatment System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng; Qiu Yu; Wang Jianlong; Jia Fei

    2014-01-01

    The source terms of radioactive wastewater from HTR-PM were introduced. Concentration process should be used to reduce volume. A radioactive wastewater treatment system was designed by using Disc tubular reverse osmosis (DTRO) membrane system. The pretreatment system was simplify by using a cartridge filter. A three-stage membrane system was built. The operated characters to treat low and intermediate radioactive waste water were studied. A concentration rates of 25-50 is reached. The decontamination factor of the membrane system can reach 30-100. (author)

  3. Advances in Tourette syndrome: diagnoses and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serajee, Fatema J; Mahbubul Huq, A H M

    2015-06-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal or phonic tic, and often one or more comorbid psychiatric disorders. Premonitory sensory urges before tic execution and desire for "just-right" perception are central features. The pathophysiology involves cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits and possibly dopaminergic system. TS is considered a genetic disorder but the genetics is complex and likely involves rare mutations, common variants, and environmental and epigenetic factors. Treatment is multimodal and includes education and reassurance, behavioral interventions, pharmacologic, and rarely, surgical interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Procedural Pain in Palliative Care: Is It Breakthrough Pain? A Multicenter National Prospective Study to Assess Prevalence, Intensity, and Treatment of Procedure-related Pain in Patients With Advanced Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Caterina; Giannarelli, Diana; Casale, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of breakthrough pain (BTP) provoked by 6 common procedures in patients with advanced disease. A prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter, national study was performed in 23 palliative care units in Italy. Patients were recruited if they were undergoing one of the following procedures as part of normal care: turning, personal hygiene care, transfer from bed to chair, bladder catheterization, pressure ulcer care, and subcutaneous drug administration. The Numerical Rating Scale was used to measure pain intensity before, during, and after the procedure. One thousand seventy-nine eligible patients were enrolled: 49.7% were male and their mean age was 78.0±11.2 years. Of all patients, 20.9% had experienced a BTP episode within the 24 hours before recruitment. The overall prevalence of procedure-induced BTP was 11.8%, and the mean intensity score (Numeric Rating Scale) was 4.72±1.81. Notably, patients experienced a significant increase in pain intensity during all procedures (Ppatients (12.7%) received analgesics before undergoing any of the procedures, and almost none (1.7%) received analgesics during the procedures to alleviate acute pain. Our findings highlight that simple daily care procedures can lead to BTP among patients with advanced disease. Because such procedures are performed very often during palliative care, more individualized attention to procedural pain control is necessary. Additional research on procedural pain in patients with advanced disease should be encouraged to provide further evidence-based guidance on the use of the available medication for predictable pain flares.

  5. Advances in treatment of achondroplasia and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klag, Kendra A; Horton, William A

    2016-04-15

    Achondroplasia (ACH) is the prototype and most common of the human chondrodysplasias. It results from gain-of-function mutations that exaggerate the signal output of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase that negatively regulates growth plate activity and linear bone growth. Several approaches to reduce FGFR3 signaling by blocking receptor activation or inhibiting downstream signals have been proposed. Five show promise in preclinical mouse studies. Two candidate therapies target the extracellular domain of FGFR3. The first is a decoy receptor that competes for activating ligands. The second is a synthetic blocking peptide that prevents ligands from binding and activating FGFR3. Two established drugs, statins and meclozine, improve growth of ACH mice. The strongest candidate therapy employs an analog of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which antagonizes the mitogen-activated-protein (MAP) kinase pathway downstream of the FGFR3 receptor and may also act independently in the growth plate. Only the CNP analog has reached clinical trials. Preliminary results of Phase 2 studies show a substantial increase in growth rate of ACH children after six months of therapy with no serious adverse effects. A challenge for drug therapy in ACH is targeting agents to the avascular growth plate. The application of gene therapy in osteoarthritis offers insights because it faces similar technical obstacles. Major advances in gene therapy include the emergence of recombinant adeno-associated virus as the vector of choice, capsid engineering to target vectors to specific tissues, and development of methods to direct vectors to articular chondrocytes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. New coeliac disease treatments and their complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Luis; Rodríguez-Martín, Laura; León, Francisco; Jorquera, Francisco; Vivas, Santiago

    2018-03-01

    The only accepted treatment for coeliac disease is strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. This type of diet may give rise to reduced patient quality of life with economic and social repercussions. For this reason, dietary transgressions are common and may elicit intestinal damage. Several treatments aimed at different pathogenic targets of coeliac disease have been developed in recent years: modification of gluten to produce non-immunogenic gluten, endoluminal therapies to degrade gluten in the intestinal lumen, increased gluten tolerance, modulation of intestinal permeability and regulation of the adaptive immune response. This review evaluates these coeliac disease treatment lines that are being researched and the treatments that aim to control disease complications like refractory coeliac disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [Advance in the methods of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for single gene diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yixin; Qiao, Jie; Yan, Liying

    2017-06-10

    More than 7000 single gene diseases have been identified and most of them lack effective treatment. As an early form of prenatal diagnosis, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a combination of in vitro fertilization and genetic diagnosis. PGD has been applied in clinics for more than 20 years to avoid the transmission of genetic defects through analysis of embryos at early stages of development. In this paper, a review for the recent advances in PGD for single gene diseases is provided.

  8. Diagnostic and treatment difficulties in Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Păunică

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases are related to a special pathology having a great psychosocial and economic impact, being represented by chronic diseases which often affects the adult/ active population and that require a long-term treatment. The incidence of Crohn's disease has recorded an increasing trend amongst the general population. However, the incidence of regional enteritis is somewhat lower than in the case of ulcerohemorrhagic rectocolitis. The highest prevalence of Crohn's disease is encountered among the populations with a high standard of living; the onset of the disease occurs between 15 and 35 years, but there are also rare cases with onset in childbirth or over 60 years of age. Men and women are approximate equally affected by Crohn's disease. The main purpose of the treatment is to keep under control the disease, and to increase the quality of life with the following goals: diminishing intestinal inflammatory lesions, relieving symptoms and inducing remission, preventing relapses and complications, as well as maintaining proper nutrition. Appropriate treatment should be adapted to the different clinical-evolutionary forms of Crohn's disease, the succession of different treatment methods being therefore different. Surgical treatment plays a much more limited role in Crohn's disease than in ulcerhemorrhagic rectocolitis. Operational interventions are frequently followed by relapses, and surgical resections should be limited to macroscopically affected segments.

  9. Pneumococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the cause. In the case of pneumococcal disease, antibiotics can help prevent severe illness. Diagnosis If doctors suspect invasive ... In addition to the vaccine, appropriate use of antibiotics may also slow or reverse drug-resistant pneumococcal infections. Related Links ... Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, ...

  10. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahousen, Theresa; Hegenbarth, Karin; Ille, Rottraut; Lipp, Rainer W.; Krause, Robert; Little, Randie R.; Schnedl, Wolfgang J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c) determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin. METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods. Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium. RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis) had HbA1c results below the non -diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods. CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA 1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA 1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment. PMID:15259084

  11. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Current approaches to the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jankovic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Jankovic, L Giselle AguilarParkinson’s Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of MedicineAbstract: Enormous progress has been made in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD. As a result of advances in experimental therapeutics, many promising therapies for PD are emerging. Levodopa remains the most potent drug for controlling PD symptoms, yet is associated with significant complications such as the “wearing off” effect, levodopa-induced dyskinesias and other motor complications. Catechol-o-methyl-transferase inhibitors, dopamine agonists and nondopaminergic therapy are alternative modalities in the management of PD and may be used concomitantly with levodopa or one another. The neurosurgical treatment, focusing on deep brain stimulation, is reviewed briefly. Although this review has attempted to highlight the most recent advances in the treatment of PD, it is important to note that new treatments are not necessarily better than the established conventional therapy and that the treatment options must be individualized and tailored to the needs of each individual patient.Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, levodopa, medical treatment, pallidotomy, deep brain stimulation

  13. Advanced Role of Neutrophils in Common Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory diseases, always being a threat towards the health of people all over the world, are most tightly associated with immune system. Neutrophils serve as an important component of immune defense barrier linking innate and adaptive immunity. They participate in the clearance of exogenous pathogens and endogenous cell debris and play an essential role in the pathogenesis of many respiratory diseases. However, the pathological mechanism of neutrophils remains complex and obscure. The traditional roles of neutrophils in severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD, pneumonia, lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, bronchitis, and bronchiolitis had already been reviewed. With the development of scientific research, the involvement of neutrophils in respiratory diseases is being brought to light with emerging data on neutrophil subsets, trafficking, and cell death mechanism (e.g., NETosis, apoptosis in diseases. We reviewed all these recent studies here to provide you with the latest advances about the role of neutrophils in respiratory diseases.

  14. Recent advances in treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rij, Simon; Gilling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), often identified as a worsening ability of a male to pass urine, is a significant problem for men in our society. In 2015, the use of personalised medicine is tailoring treatment to individual patient needs and to genetic characteristics. Technological advances in surgical treatment are changing the way BPH is treated and are resulting in less morbidity. The future of BPH treatments is exciting, and a number of novel techniques are currently under clinical trial.

  15. Recent advances in treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    van Rij, Simon; Gilling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), often identified as a worsening ability of a male to pass urine, is a significant problem for men in our society. In 2015, the use of personalised medicine is tailoring treatment to individual patient needs and to genetic characteristics. Technological advances in surgical treatment are changing the way BPH is treated and are resulting in less morbidity. The future of BPH treatments is exciting, and a number of novel techniques are currently under ...

  16. Recent advances in cell-based therapy for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Cooper, Oliver; Vinuela, Angel

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss recent advances in the field of cell therapy for Parkinson disease (PD). They compare and contrast recent clinical trials using fetal dopaminergic neurons. They attribute differences in cell preparation techniques, cell type specification, and immunosuppression...

  17. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solomon, A.; Mangialasche, F.; Richard, E.; Andrieu, S.; Bennett, D. A.; Breteler, M.; Fratiglioni, L.; Hooshmand, B.; Khachaturian, A. S.; Schneider, L. S.; Skoog, I.; Kivipelto, M.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundDefinitions and diagnostic criteria for all medical conditions are regularly subjected to reviews and revisions as knowledge advances. In the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) research, it has taken almost three decades for diagnostic nomenclature to undergo major re-examination. The shift

  18. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease and dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solomon, A.; Mangialasche, F.; Richard, E.; Andrieu, S.; Bennett, D.A.; Breteler, M.; Fratiglioni, L.; Hooshmand, B.; Khachaturian, A.S.; Schneider, L.S.; Skoog, I.; Kivipelto, M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Definitions and diagnostic criteria for all medical conditions are regularly subjected to reviews and revisions as knowledge advances. In the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) research, it has taken almost three decades for diagnostic nomenclature to undergo major re-examination. The

  19. Cetuximab with radiotherapy as an alternative treatment for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the temporal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisumoto, Koji; Okami, Kenji; Hamada, Masashi; Maki, Daisuke; Sakai, Akihiro; Saito, Kosuke; Shimizu, Fukuko; Kaneda, Shoji; Iida, Masahiro

    2018-06-01

    The prognosis of advanced temporal bone cancer is poor, because complete surgical resection is difficult to achieve. Chemoradiotherapy is one of the available curative treatment options; however, its systemic effects on the patient restrict the use of this treatment. A 69-year-old female (who needed peritoneal dialysis) presented at our clinic with T4 left external auditory canal cancer and was treated with cetuximab plus radiotherapy (RT). The primary lesion showed complete response. The patient is currently alive with no evidence of disease two years after completion of the treatment and does not show any late toxicity. This is the first advanced temporal bone cancer patient treated with RT plus cetuximab. Cetuximab plus RT might be a treatment alternative for patients with advanced temporal bone cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Advanced Parkinson's or "complex phase" Parkinson's disease? Re-evaluation is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Nataliya; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Katunina, Elena; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2017-12-01

    Holistic management of Parkinson's disease, now recognised as a combined motor and nonmotor disorder, remains a key unmet need. Such management needs relatively accurate definition of the various stages of Parkinson's from early untreated to late palliative as each stage calls for personalised therapies. Management also needs to have a robust knowledge of the progression pattern and clinical heterogeneity of the presentation of Parkinson's which may manifest in a motor dominant or nonmotor dominant manner. The "advanced" stages of Parkinson's disease qualify for advanced treatments such as with continuous infusion or stereotactic surgery yet the concept of "advanced Parkinson's disease" (APD) remains controversial in spite of growing knowledge of the natural history of the motor syndrome of PD. Advanced PD is currently largely defined on the basis of consensus opinion and thus with several caveats. Nonmotor aspects of PD may also reflect advancing course of the disorder, so far not reflected in usual scale based assessments which are largely focussed on motor symptoms. In this paper, we discuss the problems with current definitions of "advanced" PD and also propose the term "complex phase" Parkinson's disease as an alternative which takes into account a multimodal symptoms and biomarker based approach in addition to patient preference.

  1. Protein Innovations Advance Drug Treatments, Skin Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Dan Carter carefully layered the sheets of tracing paper on the light box. On each sheet were renderings of the atomic components of an essential human protein, one whose structure had long been a mystery. With each layer Carter laid down, a never-before-seen image became clearer. Carter joined NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center in 1985 and began exploring processes of protein crystal growth in space. By bouncing intense X-rays off the crystals, researchers can determine the electron densities around the thousands of atoms forming the protein molecules, unveiling their atomic structures. Cultivating crystals of sufficient quality on Earth was problematic; the microgravity conditions of space were far more accommodating. At the time, only a few hundred protein structures had been mapped, and the methods were time consuming and tedious. Carter hoped his work would help reveal the structure of human serum albumin, a major protein in the human circulatory system responsible for ferrying numerous small molecules in the blood. More was at stake than scientific curiosity. Albumin has a high affinity for most of the world s pharmaceuticals, Carter explains, and its interaction with drugs can change their safety and efficacy. When a medication enters the bloodstream a cancer chemotherapy drug, for example a majority of it can bind with albumin, leaving only a small percentage active for treatment. How a drug interacts with albumin can influence considerations like the necessary effective dosage, playing a significant role in the design and application of therapeutic measures. In spite of numerous difficulties, including having no access to microgravity following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, the image Carter had hoped to see was finally clarifying. In 1988, his lab had acquired specialized X-ray and detection equipment a tipping point. Carter and his colleagues began to piece together albumin s portrait, the formation of its electron densities coalescing on

  2. Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii-Trebi, Nicholas Israel

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a significant burden on public health and economic stability of societies all over the world. They have for centuries been among the leading causes of death and disability and presented growing challenges to health security and human progress. The threat posed by infectious diseases is further deepened by the continued emergence of new, unrecognized, and old infectious disease epidemics of global impact. Over the past three and half decades at least 30 new infectious agents affecting humans have emerged, most of which are zoonotic and their origins have been shown to correlate significantly with socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological factors. As these factors continue to increase, putting people in increased contact with the disease causing pathogens, there is concern that infectious diseases may continue to present a formidable challenge. Constant awareness and pursuance of effective strategies for controlling infectious diseases and disease emergence thus remain crucial. This review presents current updates on emerging and neglected infectious diseases and highlights the scope, dynamics, and advances in infectious disease management with particular focus on WHO top priority emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and neglected tropical infectious diseases.

  3. Use of advanced treatment technologies among men at low risk of dying from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bruce L; Zhang, Yun; Schroeck, Florian R; Skolarus, Ted A; Wei, John T; Montie, James E; Gilbert, Scott M; Strope, Seth A; Dunn, Rodney L; Miller, David C; Hollenbeck, Brent K

    2013-06-26

    The use of advanced treatment technologies (ie, intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT] and robotic prostatectomy) for prostate cancer is increasing. The extent to which these advanced treatment technologies have disseminated among patients at low risk of dying from prostate cancer is uncertain. To assess the use of advanced treatment technologies, compared with prior standards (ie, traditional external beam radiation treatment [EBRT] and open radical prostatectomy) and observation, among men with a low risk of dying from prostate cancer. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified a retrospective cohort of men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2004 and 2009 who underwent IMRT (n = 23,633), EBRT (n = 3926), robotic prostatectomy (n = 5881), open radical prostatectomy (n = 6123), or observation (n = 16,384). Follow-up data were available through December 31, 2010. The use of advanced treatment technologies among men unlikely to die from prostate cancer, as assessed by low-risk disease (clinical stage ≤T2a, biopsy Gleason score ≤6, and prostate-specific antigen level ≤10 ng/mL), high risk of noncancer mortality (based on the predicted probability of death within 10 years in the absence of a cancer diagnosis), or both. In our cohort, the use of advanced treatment technologies increased from 32% (95% CI, 30%-33%) to 44% (95% CI, 43%-46%) among men with low-risk disease (P risk of noncancer mortality (P use of these advanced treatment technologies among men with both low-risk disease and high risk of noncancer mortality increased from 25% (95% CI, 23%-28%) to 34% (95% CI, 31%-37%) (P use of advanced treatment technologies for men unlikely to die from prostate cancer increased from 13% (95% CI, 12%-14%), or 129.2 per 1000 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, to 24% (95% CI, 24%-25%), or 244.2 per 1000 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (P risk disease, high risk of noncancer mortality, or both, the use of

  4. Lyme disease: clinical diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchette, TF; Davis, I; Johnston, BL

    2014-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is an emerging zoonotic infection in Canada. As the Ixodes tick expands its range, more Canadians will be exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. Objective To review the clinical diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease for front-line clinicians. Methods A literature search using PubMed and restricted to articles published in English between 1977 and 2014. Results Individuals in Lyme-endemic areas are at greatest risk, but not all tick bites transmit Lyme disease. The diagnosis is predominantly clinical. Patients with Lyme disease may present with early disease that is characterized by a “bull’s eye rash”, fever and myalgias or with early disseminated disease that can manifest with arthralgias, cardiac conduction abnormalities or neurologic symptoms. Late Lyme disease in North America typically manifests with oligoarticular arthritis but can present with a subacute encephalopathy. Antibiotic treatment is effective against Lyme disease and works best when given early in the infection. Prophylaxis with doxycyline may be indicated in certain circumstances. While a minority of patients may have persistent symptoms, evidence does not demonstrate that prolonged courses of antibiotics improve outcome. Conclusion Clinicians need to be aware of the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease. Knowing the regions where Borrelia infection is endemic in North America is important for recognizing patients at risk and informing the need for treatment. PMID:29769842

  5. Vertebroplasty in the Treatment of Spine Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosanio, G.; Lavanga, A.; Vassallo, P.; Izzo, R.; Diano, A.A.; Muto, M.

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in the treatment of thoracic and lumbosacral spinal pain due to vertebral bone fractures. This pathology can be related to osteoporosis but also to metastatic disease and less frequently vertebral haemangioma.

  6. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  7. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gertrud [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-12-15

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided.

  8. Induced vasodilation as treatment for Raynaud's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobe, J B; Sampson, J B; Roberts, D E; Beetham, W P

    1982-11-01

    We examined the efficacy of induced vasodilation as a treatment of idiopathic Raynaud's disease. Eight persons with Raynaud's disease and seven normal persons each received 27 simultaneous pairings of hand immersion in warm water (43 degrees C) for 10 minutes with exposure of the whole body to cold (0 degrees C). A second group of seven normal persons and nine persons with Raynaud's disease received no treatments. All subjects had cold test exposures (0 degrees C) at the start and end of the study. Subjects with Raynaud's disease who received treatments showed significant increases in digital temperatures (2.2 degrees C) during the cold test compared with the values of untreated subjects with Raynaud's disease (p less than 0.05); normal subjects who had received treatments showed no difference from those who had not. Digital temperatures of subjects with Raynaud's disease after treatment increased to levels approaching those of normal subjects, although they showed lower digital temperatures during initial exposure to cold (p less than 0.01). This therapy offers a practical alternative to traditional treatments.

  9. Clinical Manifestations and Treatment of Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Joyce L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and is also seen in areas of Europe and Asia. The growing deer and Ixodes species tick populations in many areas underscore the importance of clinicians to properly recognize and treat the different stages of Lyme disease. Controversy regarding the cause and management of persistent symptoms following treatment of Lyme disease persists and is highlighted in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  11. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  12. Frontier of Advanced Accelerator Applications and Medical Treatments Using Nuclear Techniques. Abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenges of research-based practice, developing advanced accelerator applications, and medical treatments using nuclear tecniqoes, researchers from Rajamakala University of Technology Lanna, Office of Atoms for Peace, and Chiang Mai University have joined in hosting this conference. Nuclear medicine, amedical specialty, diagnoses and treats diseases in a safe and painless way. Nuclear techniques can determine medical information that may otherwise be unavailable, require surgery, or necessitate more expensive and invasive diagnostic tests. Advance in nuclear techniques also offer the potential to detect abnormalities at earlier stages, leasding to earlier treatment and a more successful prognosis.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of fistulising Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius

    2011-01-01

    . Definitive surgical closure of perianal fistulas using an advancement flap may be attempted, but this procedure is associated with a high risk of relapse. Colostomy and proctectomy are the ultimate surgical treatment options for fistulas. Intestinal resection is almost always needed for the closure...

  14. Oncology of Reptiles: Diseases, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jane; Devau, Michael; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Hoppes, Sharman; Rech, Raquel; Russell, Karen E; Heatley, J Jill

    2017-01-01

    Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Choosing an Advanced Therapy in Parkinson's Disease; is it an Evidence-Based Decision in Current Practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, F.A.; Heek, J. van; Bloem, B.R.; Post, B.; Faber, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), neurologists and patients face a complex decision for an advanced therapy. When choosing a treatment, the best available evidence should be combined with the professional's expertise and the patient's preferences. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this

  16. Research advances in surgical treatment of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimaiti Wasili

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE is a parasitic disease characterized by invasive growth. Major treatment methods include pharmacotherapy and surgical treatment, and surgical treatment mainly includes radical hepatectomy and palliative surgery. Radical hepatectomy is the first choice, and palliative surgery is mainly used to alleviate disease conditions and complications. Pharmacotherapy also plays an important role in the delay and control of HAE. In recent years, autologous liver transplantation has been used in the treatment of HAE and has become an effective therapy for end-stage HAE patients who cannot be cured by routine surgery. This article introduces the indications and advantages/disadvantages of radical hepatectomy and palliative surgery, as well as the experience in the application of multidisciplinary treatment, the concept of fast-track surgery, and autologous liver transplantation in the treatment of HAE patients, in order to provide a reference for the treatment of HAE.

  17. Treatment of Advanced Glaucoma Study: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing primary medical treatment with primary trabeculectomy for people with newly diagnosed advanced glaucoma-study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony J; Fernie, Gordon; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto; Burr, Jennifer M; Garway-Heath, Ted; Sparrow, John M; Vale, Luke; Hudson, Jemma; MacLennan, Graeme; McDonald, Alison; Barton, Keith; Norrie, John

    2017-10-26

    Presentation with advanced glaucoma is the major risk factor for lifetime blindness. Effective intervention at diagnosis is expected to minimise risk of further visual loss in this group of patients. To compare clinical and cost-effectiveness of primary medical management compared with primary surgery for people presenting with advanced open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Design : A prospective, pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT). Twenty-seven UK hospital eye services. Four hundred and forty patients presenting with advanced OAG, according to the Hodapp-Parish-Anderson classification of visual field loss. Participants will be randomised to medical treatment or augmented trabeculectomy (1:1 allocation minimised by centre and presence of advanced disease in both eyes). The primary outcome is vision-related quality of life measured by the National Eye Institute-Visual Function Questionnaire-25 at 24 months. Secondary outcomes include generic EQ-5D-5L, Health Utility Index-3 and glaucoma-related health status (Glaucoma Utility Index), patient experience, visual field measured by mean deviation value, logarithm of the mean angle of resolution visual acuity, intraocular pressure, adverse events, standards for driving and eligibility for blind certification. Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) based on EQ-5D-5L and glaucoma profile instrument will be estimated. The study will report the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medical treatment against augmented trabeculectomy in patients presenting with advanced glaucoma in terms of patient-reported health and visual function, clinical outcomes and incremental cost per QALY at 2 years. Treatment of Advanced Glaucoma Study will be the first RCT reporting outcomes from the perspective of those with advanced glaucoma. ISRCTN56878850, Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial

  18. Advancing the management of Obstructive Airways Diseases through Translational Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Sverrild, Asger; Baines, Katherine J

    2018-01-01

    Obstructive airways diseases (OAD) represent a huge burden of illness worldwide, and in spite of the development of effective therapies, significant morbidity and mortality related to asthma and COPD still remains. Over the past decade, our understanding of OAD has improved vastly, and novel...... treatments have evolved. This evolution is the result of successful translational research, which has connected clinical presentations of OAD and underlying disease mechanisms, thereby enabling the development of targeted treatments. The next challenge of translational research will be to position...... these novel treatments for OAD for optimal clinical use. At the same time, there is great potential in these treatments providing even better insights into disease mechanisms in OAD, by studying the effects of blocking individual immunological pathways. To optimise this potential, there is a need to ensure...

  19. Advances in disease control of tick and tick-borne diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.nfection and treatment method ofimmunisation has been devised ... providing research and training and in extension work on. TBDs. ... systems, cattle types, level of disease risk, disease control policies ... This paper highlights tick .control,.

  20. The role of rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegwater-Kim, Julie; Bortan, Elena

    2010-05-25

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1% to 2% of people older than 60 years. Treatment of PD consists of symptomatic therapies while neuroprotective strategies have remained elusive. Rasagiline is a novel, potent, and irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor which has been approved for treatment of PD. Rasagiline inhibits MAO-B more potently than selegiline and has the advantage of once-daily dosing. In several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy as monotherapy in early PD and as adjunctive therapy in advanced PD. In addition, rasagiline has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo studies. The recently completed delayed-start ADAGIO (Attenuation of Disease Progression with Azilect Given Once-daily) trial suggests a potential disease-modifying effect for rasagiline 1 mg/day, though the clinical import of this finding has yet to be established.

  1. Current advances in the treatment of medial and lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Lian, Jayson; Rashidi, Sina

    2018-03-01

    Despite advances elucidating the causes of lateral and medial epicondylitis, the standard of care remains conservative management with NSAIDs, physical therapy, bracing, and rest. Scar tissue formation provoked by conservative management creates a tendon lacking the biomechanical properties and mechanical strength of normal tendon. The following review analyzes novel therapies to regenerate tendon and regain function in patients with epicondylitis. These treatments include PRP injection, BMAC, collagen-producing cell injection, and stem cell treatments. While these treatments are in early stages of investigation, they may warrant further consideration based on prospects of pain alleviation, function enhancement, and improved healing.

  2. Life cycle assessment of advanced waste water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto

    The EU FP6 NEPTUNE project is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and the main goal is to develop new and optimize existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling methods for municipal waste water. Besides nutrients, a special focus area is micropollutants (e....... In total more that 20 different waste water and sludge treatment technologies are to be assessed. This paper will present the preliminary LCA results from running the induced versus avoided impact approach (mainly based on existing LCIA methodology) on one of the advanced treatment technologies, i...

  3. [Mandibular advancement devices in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyński, Piotr; Górska, Katarzyna; Wilk, Krzysztof; Bielicki, Piotr; Byśkiniewicz, Krzysztof; Baczkowski, Tadeusz

    2004-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects approximately 450,000 people in Poland. Use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) devices and laryngeal surgery are widely accepted OSA treatment methods. In 1995 ASDA approved oral devices for treatment of OSA patients. The aim of the study was to determine efficiency of mandibular advancement devices (MAD) in OSA therapy. The study group included 20 patients with OSA, all of whom did not tolerate nCPAP and did not have indications or did not agree for surgical treatment. Control polysomnography was carried out in 11 patients using MAD. In 64% of patients AHI was lower then 10. No correlation between MAD use and AHI values was found. 45% of patients declared improvement of sleep quality and life comfort. Use of mandibular advancement devices is an important alternative therapy of OSA.

  4. Pharmacological treatments and infectious diseases in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, Valeria; Romano, Claudio

    2018-03-01

    The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rising, as is the employment of immunosuppressive and biological drugs. Most patients with IBD receive immunosuppressive therapies during the course of the disease. These molecules are a double-edged sword; while they can help control disease activity, they also increase the risk of infections. Therefore, it is important that pediatricians involved in primary care, pediatric gastroenterologists, and infectious disease physicians have a thorough knowledge of the infections that can affect patients with IBD. Areas covered: A broad review of the major infectious diseases that have been reported in children and adolescents with IBD was performed, and information regarding surveillance, diagnosis and management were updated. The possible correlations with IBD pharmacological tools are discussed. Expert commentary: Opportunistic infections are possible in pediatric IBD, and immunosuppressive and immunomodulator therapy seems to play a causative role. Heightened awareness and vigilant surveillance leading to prompt diagnosis and treatment are important for optimal management.

  5. Strategic planning of treatment for hyperthyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Strategic planning of treatment of hyperthyroid disease must correspond to the pathophysiological mechanism of elevation of thyroid hormone serum concentration, i.e. excess stimulation, autonomous thyroid function, destruction induced hyperthyoroxinemia. In cases of excess stimulation one should go to extremes to save the essentially 'normal' thyroid gland and life-long antithyroid drug treatment confronts with total ablation of the thyroid gland in non remitting disease. Size and quantity of regions of autonomously functioning follicles/cells will be the determinant of therapeutic strategy in cases of autonomous thyroid function. Selective surgery confronts with radioiodine treatment aiming at 'restitutio ad integrum'. In destruction induced hyperthyroxinemia antiintlammatory and symptomatic measures may help to bridge the time to the return of normal hormone concentrations. Based on these considerations a detailed therapeutic strategy for hyperthyroid disease can be designed. (author)

  6. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  8. Advanced-stage III/IV follicular lymphoma. Treatment strategies for individual patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzelmann, Frank; Bamberg, Michael; Weinmann, Martin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Ottinger, Hellmut [Dept. of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Univ. of Essen (Germany); Engelhard, Marianne [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Essen (Germany); Soekler, Martin [Dept. of Internal Medicine II, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Background: in patients with advanced-stage III/IV follicular lymphoma (FL), there are many treatment options available. The current challenge is to choose the optimal strategy for the individual patient. Methods: the literature was reviewed with respect to treatment strategies in patients with advanced FL by screening the PubMed databank. Results: in advanced-stage III/IV FL, median survival may approach 8-10 years. Treatment strategies include a watch-and-wait strategy, chemoimmunotherapy, monotherapy with rituximab, and - as an experimental approach so far - radioimmunotherapy. The use of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for patients in first remission or chemosensitive relapse prolongs progression-free survival while the effect on overall survival remains unclear compared to standard chemotherapy. However, long-term results are flawed by high relapse rates and risk of secondary malignancies. In patients with relapsed/chemoresistant disease, allogeneic HSCT constitutes the only curative approach but is associated with high treatment-related mortality. In the palliative setting, low-dose involved-field irradiation constitutes an effective treatment option in order to control local symptoms with potential long-lasting response. Conclusion: in case of advanced-disease FL, asymptomatic patients can be managed expectantly. In symptomatic patients, chemoimmunotherapy is regarded as standard therapy. In symptomatic elderly patients with relevant comorbidities, rituximab {+-} single-agent chemotherapy, or low-dose involved-field radiotherapy might be appropriate. For younger patients with chemoresistant/relapsed disease, allogeneic HSCT might be considered, since advances in supportive care and better patient selection have resulted in improved outcomes. (orig.)

  9. The Financial Impact of Advanced Kidney Disease on Canada Pension Plan and Private Disability Insurance Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braden Manns

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many working-age individuals with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD are unable to work, or are only able to work at a reduced capacity and/or with a reduction in time at work, and receive disability payments, either from the Canadian government or from private insurers, but the magnitude of those payments is unknown. Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit and private disability insurance benefits paid to Canadians with advanced kidney failure, and how feasible improvements in prevention, identification, and early treatment of CKD and increased use of kidney transplantation might mitigate those costs. Design: This study used an analytical model combining Canadian data from various sources. Setting and Patients: This study included all patients with advanced CKD in Canada, including those with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <30 mL/min/m 2 and those on dialysis. Measurements: We combined disability estimates from a provincial kidney care program with the prevalence of advanced CKD and estimated disability payments from the Canada Pension Plan and private insurance plans to estimate overall disability benefit payments for Canadians with advanced CKD. Results: We estimate that Canadians with advanced kidney failure are receiving disability benefit payments of at least Can$217 million annually. These estimates are sensitive to the proportion of individuals with advanced kidney disease who are unable to work, and plausible variation in this estimate could mean patients with advanced kidney disease are receiving up to Can$260 million per year. Feasible strategies to reduce the proportion of individuals with advanced kidney disease, either through prevention, delay or reduction in severity, or increasing the rate of transplantation, could result in reductions in the cost of Canada Pension Plan and private disability insurance payments by Can$13.8 million per year within 5

  10. Research advances in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been developing rapidly in recent years and has become one of the most common liver diseases. However, its pathogenesis remains unclear, and there are no widely accepted therapeutic regimens. NAFLD has a complex pathogenesis with multiple factors involved, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, bile acid metabolic disorders, and autophagy. This article reviews the pathogenesis of NAFLD in order to provide a reference for further research and clinical treatment in the future.

  11. Prodrugs for the Treatment of Neglected Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Blau

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, World Health Organization (WHO and Medicins San Frontieres (MSF proposed a classification of diseases as global, neglected and extremely neglected. Global diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular and mental (CNS diseases represent the targets of the majority of the R&D efforts of pharmaceutical companies. Neglected diseases affect millions of people in the world yet existing drug therapy is limited and often inappropriate. Furthermore, extremely neglected diseases affect people living under miserable conditions who barely have access to the bare necessities for survival. Most of these diseases are excluded from the goals of the R&D programs in the pharmaceutical industry and therefore fall outside the pharmaceutical market. About 14 million people, mainly in developing countries, die each year from infectious diseases. From 1975 to 1999, 1393 new drugs were approved yet only 1% were for the treatment of neglected diseases [3]. These numbers have not changed until now, so in those countries there is an urgent need for the design and synthesis of new drugs and in this area the prodrug approach is a very interesting field. It provides, among other effects, activity improvements and toxicity decreases for current and new drugs, improving market availability. It is worth noting that it is essential in drug design to save time and money, and prodrug approaches can be considered of high interest in this respect. The present review covers 20 years of research on the design of prodrugs for the treatment of neglected and extremely neglected diseases such as Chagas’ disease (American trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis, malaria, sickle cell disease, tuberculosis, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis.

  12. Treatment of persistent organic pollutants in wastewater using hydrodynamic cavitation in synergy with advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmus, Kassim Olasunkanmi; Tijani, Jimoh Oladejo; Massima, Emile; Petrik, Leslie

    2018-03-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are very tenacious wastewater contaminants. The consequences of their existence have been acknowledged for negatively affecting the ecosystem with specific impact upon endocrine disruption and hormonal diseases in humans. Their recalcitrance and circumvention of nearly all the known wastewater treatment procedures are also well documented. The reported successes of POPs treatment using various advanced technologies are not without setbacks such as low degradation efficiency, generation of toxic intermediates, massive sludge production, and high energy expenditure and operational cost. However, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have recently recorded successes in the treatment of POPs in wastewater. AOPs are technologies which involve the generation of OH radicals for the purpose of oxidising recalcitrant organic contaminants to their inert end products. This review provides information on the existence of POPs and their effects on humans. Besides, the merits and demerits of various advanced treatment technologies as well as the synergistic efficiency of combined AOPs in the treatment of wastewater containing POPs was reported. A concise review of recently published studies on successful treatment of POPs in wastewater using hydrodynamic cavitation technology in combination with other advanced oxidation processes is presented with the highlight of direction for future research focus.

  13. Traditional Chinese medicine treatment of liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Rongbing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM treatment of liver diseases is derived from the regulation of liver function including storing blood and governing the free flow of qi, in which functional systems such as modern digestion, endocrine, and the gut-liver axis are involved, and is established on modern hepatic physiology, pathology, and etiology. To objectively reveal the characteristics and advantages of modern TCM treatment of liver diseases, we analyzed the clinical and research situation of TCM therapy for liver diseases in the last decade and collected major achievements that have been applied in clinical treatment of diseases, published in core journals, and confirmed by major scientific research programs. The results showed TCM combined with antiviral therapy can improve the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis B. TCM can help HBV carriers prevent disease progression. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy for acute-on-chronic liver failure can block the deterioration induced by endotoxin. TCM has been widely applied in protecting the liver through nonspecific anti-inflammation, alleviating hepatic fibrosis, and preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver. TCM plays an important role in treating some currently untreatable liver diseases. Therefore, it is our common responsibility to inherit and develop effective principle-method-recipe-medicines and create a better medical care system.

  14. Management of cancer-associated thrombosis in people with advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Simon; Johnson, Miriam J

    2012-06-01

    The management of venous thromboembolism in the cancer population is clearly established. Low molecular weight heparin has a greater efficacy than warfarin in the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis and is recommended as the preferred therapy. However, the evidence informing these recommendations excluded patients with poor prognosis or performance status, thrombocytopenia, bleeding or brain metastases. Furthermore, there is limited data on the management of venous thromboembolism resistant to anticoagulation, a phenomenon frequently encountered in the advanced cancer population. This paper will review the management of cancer-associated thrombosis with a particular focus on challenging clinical situations faced by palliative care teams looking after patients with advanced disease.

  15. Treatment related changes of the serum epidermal growth factor receptor in advanced colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, K G; Aalund Olsen, Dorte; Brandslund, I

    2009-01-01

    ) in rectal cancer patients and third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan (CETIRI) in advanced disease, to elucidate the predictive or prognostic value in these settings. METHODS: We included 126 healthy controls and 118 patients with chemorefractory mCRC treated with cetuximab (initial 400/m(2) mg...... followed by weekly 250mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (350 mg/m(2) q3w). Response was evaluated according to RECIST. Furthermore, 114 patients with locally advanced rectal tumours were treated with CRT (60 Gy/30 fractions and concomitant uftoral (300 mg/m(2))/leukovorin (22.5 mg) on treatment days, followed...... by surgery 8 weeks post-treatment and pathological tumour regression evaluation. Pre-treatment and consecutive samples were drawn at each visit. sEGFR was measured by ELISA. Median statistics and Kaplain-Mayer curves with log-rank testing for comparison of survival rates were performed. RESULTS: There were...

  16. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...... with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  17. Bile acids in treatment of ocular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.; Moring, Anisha G.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2009-01-01

    Bear bile has been included in Asian pharmacopeias for thousands of years in treatment of several diseases, ranging from sore throat to hemorrhoids. The hydrophilic bile acids tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) are the major bile acids of bear bile. Both of these are available as synthetic formulations and are approved by the health administrations of several countries for treatment of cirrhosis and gallstones. This review briefly covers the use of bear bile in ...

  18. Locally advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Barriers related to effective treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Lakshmaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral cavity cancer is a significant health problem in India. Majority of patients present with locally advanced disease requiring multimodality treatment. Compliance to recommended treatment is an important factor affecting outcome. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients with regards to treatment adherence and to assess reasons of noncompliance. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. We included patients referred to Department of Medical Oncology for induction chemotherapy in view of locally advanced oral cavity cancer. Results: Only 15 (26% patients completed planned treatment schedule. Their 1 year overall survival was 93%. The remaining 43 patients who received inadequate treatment had a dismal 21% 1 year overall survival. Illiteracy, poverty, long waiting list for surgery, prolonged delay for health scheme treatment plan approval and dissatisfaction with attitude of hospital staffs are major barriers related to effective treatment of these patients. Conclusions: A detailed discussion with patient and their relatives regarding recommended treatment, proper implementation of health schemes, increasing trained manpower to avoid long waiting list for surgery, provision of additional financial support for family member accompanying the patient and a sympathetic approach toward patients are needed to help these patients overcome the battle.

  19. [Current status and future prospect of internal medicine treatment for advanced esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Fan, Q X

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is one of common malignant tumors, and the incidence and mortality of EC in China rank the first place in the world. Because of the occult onset, the early atypical symptoms, and the lack of effective early diagnostic methods, most of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease and lost the chance of surgery. Comprehensive treatment including palliative medical treatment, molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy and so on is appropriate for these patients. How to choose the chemotherapy regimen and formulate reasonable treatment plan has become a hot spot in clinical research. Molecular targeted drugs have become a new developmental direction in cancer treatment because of their high specificity and antitumor activity, but the effects on esophageal cancer remain controversial. With the development of immune check point blockade treatment, breakthrough has been made in tumor immunotherapy, which has become an important means in cancer comprehensive treatment and shown a good prospect of treatment.

  20. 'Shovel-Ready' applications of stem cell advances for pediatric heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Matthew D; Boucek, Robert J

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the field of stem cell biology. Many new technologies and applications are passing the translational phase and likely will soon be relevant for the clinical pediatric cardiologist. This review will focus on two advances in basic science that are now translating into clinical trials. The first advance is the recognition, characterization, and recent therapeutic application of resident cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Early results of adult trials and scattered case reports in pediatric patients support expanding CPC-based trials for end-stage heart failure in pediatric patients. The relative abundance of CPCs in the neonate and young child offers greater potential benefits in heart failure treatment than has been realized to date. The second advance is the technology of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which reprograms differentiated somatic cells to an undifferentiated embryonic-like state. When iPSCs are differentiated into cardiomyocytes, they model a patient's specific disease, test pharmaceuticals, and potentially provide an autologous source for cell-based therapy. The therapeutic recruitment and/or replacement of CPCs has potential for enhancing cardiac repair and regeneration in children with heart failure. Use of iPSCs to model heart disease holds great potential to gain new insights into diagnosis, pathophysiology, and disease-specific management for genetic-based cardiovascular diseases that are prevalent in pediatric patients.

  1. Protein and energy intake in advanced chronic kidney disease: how much is too much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikizler, T Alp

    2007-01-01

    Uremic wasting is strongly associated with increased risk of death and hospitalization events in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent evidence indicates that patients with advanced chronic kidney disease are prone to uremic wasting due to several factors, which include the dialysis procedure and certain comorbid conditions, especially chronic inflammation and insulin resistance or deficiency. While the catabolic effects of dialysis can be readily avoided with intradialytic nutritional supplementation, there are no established alternative strategies to avoid the catabolic consequences of comorbid conditions other than treatment of their primary etiology. To this end, there is no indication that simply increasing dietary protein and energy intake above the required levels based on level of kidney disease is beneficial in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. However, aside from the potential adverse effects such as uremic toxin production, dietary protein and energy intake in excess of actual needs might be beneficial in maintenance dialysis patients as it may lead to weight gain over time. Clearly, the role of obesity in advanced uremia needs to be examined in detail prior to making any clinically applicable recommendations, both in terms of ''low'' and ''high'' dietary protein and energy intake.

  2. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  3. The Financial Impact of Advanced Kidney Disease on Canada Pension Plan and Private Disability Insurance Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Braden; McKenzie, Susan Q; Au, Flora; Gignac, Pamela M; Geller, Lawrence Ian

    2017-01-01

    Many working-age individuals with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) are unable to work, or are only able to work at a reduced capacity and/or with a reduction in time at work, and receive disability payments, either from the Canadian government or from private insurers, but the magnitude of those payments is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit and private disability insurance benefits paid to Canadians with advanced kidney failure, and how feasible improvements in prevention, identification, and early treatment of CKD and increased use of kidney transplantation might mitigate those costs. This study used an analytical model combining Canadian data from various sources. This study included all patients with advanced CKD in Canada, including those with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) Canada Pension Plan and private insurance plans to estimate overall disability benefit payments for Canadians with advanced CKD. We estimate that Canadians with advanced kidney failure are receiving disability benefit payments of at least Can$217 million annually. These estimates are sensitive to the proportion of individuals with advanced kidney disease who are unable to work, and plausible variation in this estimate could mean patients with advanced kidney disease are receiving up to Can$260 million per year. Feasible strategies to reduce the proportion of individuals with advanced kidney disease, either through prevention, delay or reduction in severity, or increasing the rate of transplantation, could result in reductions in the cost of Canada Pension Plan and private disability insurance payments by Can$13.8 million per year within 5 years. This study does not estimate how CKD prevention or increasing the rate of kidney transplantation might influence health care cost savings more broadly, and does not include the cost to provincial governments for programs that provide income for individuals without private

  4. Degarelix 240/80 mg: a new treatment option for patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccon-Gibod, L.; Iversen, P.; Persson, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor blockers (antagonists) are the latest addition to the hormonal therapy armamentarium for patients with prostate cancer. In contrast to the GnRH agonists, GnRH blockers have an immediate onset of action and do not cause an initial surge in testosterone...... levels that can lead to clinical flare in patients with advanced disease. Degarelix (Firmagon is a new GnRH blocker that has recently been approved by the EMEA and US FDA for the treatment of men with hormone-sensitive advanced prostate cancer. In this article, we briefly review the Phase III trial data...

  5. Predialytic treatment of chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... in high turnover bone disease. Note the poor outline of the femurs. Fig. 4. Severe calciphylaxis in a patient with CKD. Note the extensive skin and subcutaneous infarc- tion with underlying muscle clearly visible. Predialytic treatment of CKD. 392. CME August 2007 Vol.25 No.8 pg389-394.indd 392. 8/16/07 ...

  6. Aripiprazole in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deyn, P.P.; Drenth, Annemieke F. J.; Kremer, B.P.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Van Dam, D.

    Introduction: Psychosis is a common and difficult to treat symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is a cause of diminished quality of life and care-giver distress. Atypical antipsychotics are frequently used for the treatment of dementia-related psychosis, despite FDA warnings because of increased

  7. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  8. Bone hydatid disease refractory to nitazoxanide treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Hans G.; Simsek, Suat; van Agtmael, Michiel A.; van Lienden, Krijn P.

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with bone hydatid disease that was refractory to both long-term daily treatment with albendazole, combined with cimetidine or administered as monotherapy ( approximately 15 years) and a relatively short course of nitazoxanide combined with albendazole (3 months). Despite

  9. Recent advances in antisense oligonucleotide therapy in genetic neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic neuromuscular diseases are caused by defective expression of nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mutant genes may reduce expression of wild-type proteins, and strategies to activate expression of the wild-type proteins might provide therapeutic benefits. Also, a toxic mutant protein may cause cell death, and strategies that reduce mutant gene expression may provide therapeutic benefit. Synthetic antisense oligonucleotide (ASO can recognize cellular RNA and control gene expression. In recent years, advances in ASO chemistry, creation of designer ASO molecules to enhance their safety and target delivery, and scientific controlled clinical trials to ascertain their therapeutic safety and efficacy have led to an era of plausible application of ASO technology to treat currently incurable neuromuscular diseases. Over the past 1 year, for the first time, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved two ASO therapies in genetic neuromuscular diseases. This overview summarizes the recent advances in ASO technology, evolution and use of synthetic ASOs as a therapeutic platform, and the mechanism of ASO action by exon-skipping in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and exon-inclusion in spinal muscular atrophy, with comments on their advantages and limitations.

  10. Fast neutron therapy in advanced malignant tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinc, A.

    1998-01-01

    In this report the fast neutron therapy applications were examined by thoroughly consideration of the fast neutron sources and the interactions of the fast neutron by the medium. The efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy with that of patients with locally advanced tumours were compared. Radiological data indicate that fast neutrons could bring benefit in the treatment of some tumour types especially salivary glands, paranasal sinuses, soft tissue sarcomas, prostatic adenocarcinomas, palliative treatment of melanoma and rectum. There is a significant improvement in local/regional control for the neutron group, but no improvement in the survival. The neutron therapy is suggested through which this benefit could be achieved

  11. Gastric cancer: a primer on the epidemiology and biology of the disease and an overview of the medical management of advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish A; Kelsen, David P

    2010-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite recent advances in targeted therapy and understanding of the biology and development of the malignancy, progress in the treatment of gastric cancer has been limited. Most newly diagnosed patients will present with incurable disease, and have a median survival of less than 1 year. Although the disease has widespread ethnic and epidemiologic differences, medical management of gastric cancer does not distinguish among the various disease subtypes. The recent report of the ToGA phase III study has validated Her2 as a molecular target in this disease, supporting the concept that a greater understanding of the biology of gastric cancer subsets may improve treatment selection and overall outcome of individual patients. This article summarizes the epidemiology and ethnic variation of this disease to crystalize subtypes of gastric cancer in the context of current and future medical management of advanced disease.

  12. Esophageal motor disease and reflux patterns in patients with advanced pulmonary disease undergoing lung transplant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccombe, J; Mirza, F; Hachem, R; Gyawali, C P

    2013-08-01

    Advanced pulmonary disorders are linked to esophageal hypomotility and reflux disease. However, characterization of esophageal function using high resolution manometry (HRM) and ambulatory pH monitoring, segregation by pulmonary pathology, and comparison to traditional reflux disease are all limited in the literature. Over a 4 year period, 73 patients (55.2 ± 1.3 years, 44F) were identified who underwent esophageal function testing as part of lung transplant evaluation for advanced pulmonary disease (interstitial lung disease, ILD = 47, obstructive lung disease, OLD = 24, other = 2). Proportions of patients with motor dysfunction (≥ 80% failed sequences = severe hypomotility) and/or abnormal reflux parameters (acid exposure time, AET ≥ 4%) were determined, and compared to a cohort of 1081 patients (48.4 ± 0.4 years, 613F) referred for esophageal function testing prior to antireflux surgery (ARS). The proportion of esophageal body hypomotility was significantly higher within advanced pulmonary disease categories (35.6%), particularly ILD (44.7%), compared to ARS patients (12.1%, P esophageal motor pattern or reflux evidence. Interstitial lung disease has a highly significant association with esophageal body hypomotility. Consequently, prevalence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure is high, but implications for post lung transplant chronic rejection remain unclear. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Eyeball salvage treatment or enucleation for advanced retinoblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, J; Xue, K

    2016-10-11

    The management of retinoblastoma (RB) has dramatically changed over the past two decades. The introduction of chemotherapy has transformed treatment algorithms completely. Chemotherapy is currently used as a first line approach for children with RB and can be delivered by intravenous, intra-arterial and intravitreal routes. However, there still remains some controversy on the treatment of advanced RB, especially in eyeball salvage. This article described domestic and international approaches to eyeball salvage treatment. We would like to further discuss our opinion on the management of advanced RB based on our clinical experience for attracting more clinical concern on this issue. Many factors should be considered when choosing the appropriate conservative therapy. The choice of eyeball salvage treatment not only depends upon the tumor staging and laterality but also upon compliance and economic factors. Doctors and parents should not blindly pursue eye saving. However, there are still cases where enucleation is definitely the treatment of choice. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 728-732) .

  14. Advances in treatment of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada(VKHsyndrome is an autoimmune disease attacking against pigmented cells, resulting in blindness and usually affecting multiple organs including ears, meninges, hair and skin. Correct diagnosis and immediate treatment in the early stage is vital to visual prognosis. Currently, corticosteroids is first-line drug. In addition, VKH patients refractory to corticosteroids can choose other treatment such as immunosuppressive agents and biological agents.

  15. Stem cell treatment for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Ntolios, Paschalis; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a considerable human, societal and financial burden. In view of the current disappointing status of available pharmaceutical agents, there is an urgent need for alternative more effective therapeutic approaches that will not only help to relieve patient symptoms but will also affect the natural course of the respective disease. Regenerative medicine represents a promising option with several fruitful therapeutic applications in patients suffering from chronic lung diseases. Nevertheless, despite relative enthusiasm arising from experimental data, application of stem cell therapy in the clinical setting has been severely hampered by several safety concerns arising from the major lack of knowledge on the fate of exogenously administered stem cells within chronically injured lung as well as the mechanisms regulating the activation of resident progenitor cells. On the other hand, salient data arising from few 'brave' pilot investigations of the safety of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases seem promising. The main scope of this review article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the application status of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases, address important safety and efficacy issues and present future challenges and perspectives. In this review, we argue in favor of large multicenter clinical trials setting realistic goals to assess treatment efficacy. We propose the use of biomarkers that reflect clinically inconspicuous alterations of the disease molecular phenotype before rigid conclusions can be safely drawn. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. TREATMENT OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE- ASSOCIATED DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Antic-Mladenovic

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus that is widely distributed in the environment, but is found as a part of a normal large bowel flora in approximately 3% of normal adults. C. difficile produces two protein exotoxins: toxin A and toxin B. Both toxins are responsible for causing the sings and symptoms of disease.C. difficile is now thought to be responsible for a spectrum of diseases, ranging from asymptomatic colonization to diarrhea of varying severity, life-threatening colitis, often as a consequence of long-term antibiotic exposure. This spectrum has become known as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD.Treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease demand administration of effi-cient antibiotics (vancomycin, metronidazole, anion exchange resins and probiotics (Lactobacillus spp., Saccharomyces boulardii.

  17. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workowski, Kimberly A.; Bolan, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary These guidelines for the treatment of persons who have or are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were updated by CDC after consultation with a group of professionals knowledgeable in the field of STDs who met in Atlanta on April 30–May 2, 2013. The information in this report updates the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2010 (MMWR Recomm Rep 2010;59 [No. RR–12]). These updated guidelines discuss 1) alternative treatment regimens for Neisseria gonorrhoeae; 2) the use of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of trichomoniasis; 3) alternative treatment options for genital warts; 4) the role of Mycoplasma genitalium in urethritis/cervicitis and treatment-related implications; 5) updated HPV vaccine recommendations and counseling messages; 6) the management of persons who are transgender; 7) annual testing for hepatitis C in persons with HIV infection; 8) updated recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of urethritis; and 9) retesting to detect repeat infection. Physicians and other health-care providers can use these guidelines to assist in the prevention and treatment of STDs. PMID:26042815

  18. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  20. Hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; Issa, Mario; Izukawa, Nilo Mitsuru; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas J.; Spina Neto, Domingos; Kambara, Antônio Massamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The management of thoracic aortic disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta are technically challenging and is an area in constant development and innovation. Objective To analyze early and midterm results of hybrid treatment of arch aortic disease. Methods Retrospective study of procedures performed from January 2010 to December 2012. The end points were the technical success, therapeutic success, morbidity and mortality, neurologic outcomes, the rate of endoleaks and reinterventions. Results A total of 95 patients treated for thoracic aortic diseases in this period, 18 underwent hybrid treatment and entered in this study. The average ages were 62.3 years. The male was present in 66.7%. The technical and therapeutic success was 94.5% e 83.3%. The perioperative mortality rate of 11.1%. There is any death during one-year follow- up. The reoperation rates were 16.6% due 2 cases of endoleak Ia and one case of endoleak II. There is any occlusion of anatomic or extra anatomic bypass during follow up. Conclusion In our study, the hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease proved to be a feasible alternative of conventional surgery. The therapeutic success rates and re- interventions obtained demonstrate the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up of these patients in a long time. PMID:25714205

  1. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A H; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Technological advances in the surgical treatment of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Robert E; McDougal, Margaret E

    2013-08-01

    Technological innovations have driven the advancement of the surgical treatment of movement disorders, from the invention of the stereotactic frame to the adaptation of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Along these lines, this review will describe recent advances in inserting neuromodulation modalities, including DBS, to the target, and in the delivery of therapy at the target. Recent radiological advances are altering the way that DBS leads are targeted and inserted, by refining the ability to visualize the subcortical targets using high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging and other innovations, such as diffusion tensor imaging, and the development of novel targeting devices enabling purely anatomical implantations without the need for neurophysiological monitoring. New portable computed tomography scanners also are facilitating lead implantation without monitoring, as well as improving radiological verification of DBS lead location. Advances in neurophysiological mapping include efforts to develop automatic target verification algorithms, and probabilistic maps to guide target selection. The delivery of therapy at the target is being improved by the development of the next generation of internal pulse generators (IPGs). These include constant current devices that mitigate the variability introduced by impedance changes of the stimulated tissue and, in the near future, devices that deliver novel stimulation patterns with improved efficiency. Closed-loop adaptive IPGs are being tested, which may tailor stimulation to ongoing changes in the nervous system, reflected in biomarkers continuously recorded by the devices. Finer-grained DBS leads, in conjunction with new IPGs and advanced programming tools, may offer improved outcomes via current steering algorithms. Finally, even thermocoagulation-essentially replaced by DBS-is being advanced by new minimally-invasive approaches that may improve this therapy for selected patients in whom it may be preferred. Functional

  3. Recent advances in delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy during pediatric respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue'E; Zhang, Chonglin; Zhen, Qing

    2018-04-01

    The treatment of pediatric surgery diseases via utilization of aerosol delivery mechanisms is in progress for the betterment of pediatric care. Over the years, aerosol therapy has come to play an integral role in the treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases. Inhaled aerosol agents such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and mucolytics are commonly delivered to spontaneously breathing pediatric patients with a tracheostomy. Administering therapeutic inhaled aerosols to pediatric patients is challenging. The pediatric population ranges in age, which means patients with different airway sizes, breathing patterns, and cooperation levels. These patient-related factors impact the deposition of aerosol drugs in the lungs. The present review article will discuss the recent advancements in the delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy in pediatric patients with respiratory diseases.

  4. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M; Ebersbach, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Humanistic burden of disease for patients with advanced melanoma in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Winson Y; Bayliss, Martha S; White, Michelle K; Stroupe, Angela; Lovley, Andrew; King-Kallimanis, Bellinda L; Lasch, Kathryn

    2018-06-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer, often striking in the prime of life. This study provides new information directly from advanced melanoma (stage III and IV) patients on how their disease impacts their health-related quality of life (HRQL). Twenty-nine in-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted with adult patients with advanced melanoma in Canada. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and key concepts were identified using a grounded theory analytic approach. Many patients' journeys began with the startling diagnosis of an invasive disease and a vastly shortened life expectancy. By the time they reached an advanced stage of melanoma, these patients' overall functioning and quality of life had been greatly diminished by this quickly progressing cancer. The impact was described in terms of physical pain and disability, emotional distress, diminished interactions with friends and family, and burden on caregivers. Our findings provide evidence of signs, symptoms, and functional impacts of advanced melanoma. Signs and symptoms reported (physical, mental, and social) confirm and expand on those reported in the existing clinical literature. Primary care physicians should be better trained to identify melanomas early. Oncology care teams can improve on their current approaches for helping patients navigate treatment options, with information about ancillary services to mitigate disease impacts on HRQL, such as mental health and social supports, as well as employment or financial support services.

  6. Personalized treatment for advanced colorectal cancer: KRAS and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Gargi Surendra; Karapetis, Christos S

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapies have improved the survival of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, further improvements in patient outcomes may be gained by the development of predictive biomarkers in order to select individuals who are most likely to benefit from treatment, thus personalizing treatment. Using the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we discuss the existing and potential predictive biomarkers in clinical development for use with EGFR-targeted agents in metastatic CRC. The data and technological issues surrounding such biomarkers as expression of EGFR or its family members or ligands, KRAS-, NRAS-, and BRAF-mutation status, PI3K/PTEN expression, and imaging and clinical biomarkers, such as rash and hypomagnesemia, are summarized. Although the discovery of KRAS mutations has improved patient selection for EGFR-targeted treatments, further biomarkers are required, especially for those patients who exhibit KRAS mutations rather than the wild-type gene

  7. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered.

  8. Advanced biotherapy for the treatment of sulfur mustard poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxue; Yang, Yuyan; Meng, Wenqi; Xu, Qingqiang; Lin, Fengwu; Chen, Yongchun; Zhao, Jie; Xiao, Kai

    2018-04-25

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a bifunctional alkylating agent, can react with a variety of biochemical molecules (DNA, RNA, proteins and other cell components) to cause a series of serious health issues or even death. Although a plethora of research has been done, the pathogenesis of SM poisoning has yet to be fully understood due to its high complexity. As a consequence, a specific antidote has not yet been developed and the treatment of SM poisoning remains a medical challenge. In recent years, various biological products and cell transplantation in the treatment of SM poisoning offered a significant clinical treatment progress. By highlighting these and other research studies, we hereby summarize the progress in this field in an effort to provide useful information on the clinical treatment of SM poisoning. This review summarizes the major advances of SM poisoning therapy by means of biological products (peptide and protein drugs, polysaccharides drugs, nucleic acid drugs, etc.), and cell transplantation (e.g., bone marrow, limbal stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells), as well as other relevant biotherapeutic approaches. We searched the database PubMed for published domestic and international articles using web based resources for information on histological, immunochemical, ultrastructural, and treatment features of SM-induced manifestations in both animal models and human tissues. To this end, we applied keywords containing mustard gas, chemical warfare, SM, eye, lung and skin. Our review provides a comprehensive understanding of the advances of available biotherapies in SM poisoning, and its potential for the treatment of SM-induced injuries. Potentially, our review will provide new insights for future research studies in this field. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. New Perspectives in the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahlberg, Rolf; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Thuss-Patience, Peter

    2017-01-01

    available in non-Asia countries until recently. In Japan, S-1 in combination with cisplatin is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with gastric cancer. In Europe, the first trials with S-1 were disappointing due to high unacceptable incidences of adverse events. Pharmacokinetic studies showed...... differences in Asian and Caucasian patients; therefore, a new non-Asian study program was initiated, which led to the pivotal phase 3 trial First-Line Advanced Gastric Cancer Study (FLAGS). In FLAGS, 1,053 patients with advanced gastric cancer from 24 non-Asian countries were enrolled. S-1 plus cisplatin...... safety profile. This led to the approval of S-1 in combination with cisplatin in gastric cancer in Europe in 2011. This article reviews the mode of action of S-1, pivotal study results from an EU point of view, and future perspectives....

  10. Advances in vaccine research against economically important viral diseases of food animals: Infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2017-07-01

    Numerous reviews have been published on infectious bursal disease (IBD) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Many high quality vaccines are commercially available for the control of IBD that, when used correctly, provide solid protection against infection and disease caused by IBDV. Viruses are not static however; they continue to evolve and vaccines need to keep pace with them. The evolution of IBDV has resulted in very virulent strains and new antigenic types of the virus. This review will discuss some of the limitations associated with existing vaccines, potential solutions to these problems and advances in new vaccines for the control of IBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robottom, Bradley J

    2011-01-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.

  12. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thuy Trang Nguyen; Vo Van Giau; Tuong Kha Vo

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the...

  13. Crohn's disease in adolescence: presentation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Mick; Barnes, Claire

    2015-05-13

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel condition that affects more than 115,000 people in the UK. This article focuses on Crohn's disease in adolescents. Management of the condition in this group should address adolescent-specific characteristics and treatment goals. Key elements include optimising growth, pubertal development and social functioning, including education. The condition can affect an individual's mental and emotional wellbeing significantly, as well as their physical health. As adolescence is a time of great change, the additional burden of a chronic illness can prove difficult to manage. The authors provide information on the presentation of Crohn's disease in adolescence and insights into the particular issues encountered by this group.

  14. Research advances in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has increased gradually along with the rising prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia, and NAFLD has become one of the most common chronic liver diseases in the world and the second major liver disease after chronic viral hepatitis in China. However, its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified. Animal models are playing an important role in researches on NAFLD due to the facts that the development and progression of NAFLD require a long period of time, and ethical limitations exist in conducting drug trials in patients or collecting liver tissues from patients. The animal models with histopathology similar to that of NAFLD patients are reviewed, and their modeling principle, as well as the advantages and disadvantages, are compared. Animal models provide a powerful tool for further studies of NAFLD pathogenesis and drug screening for prevention and treatment of NAFLD.

  15. Comprehensive treatment in a case with advanced chronic periodontitis: a 15-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George; Rebbe, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the comprehensive treatment of generalized, advanced periodontal disease and full-mouth rehabilitation in an adult patient. Given the extensive periodontal tissue destruction, a systematic approach was needed to determine restoration possibilities and patient expectations. Subsequent oral rehabilitation was accomplished with fixed dentures in the mandible and a removable denture in the maxilla. In the maxilla, strategically important anchor teeth were replaced with implants and a palate-free horseshoe-shaped removable denture was fabricated, using telescopic crowns as abutments. This case indicates that long-term post-treatment periodontal stability can be ensured only by full patient cooperation and consistent periodontal maintenance.

  16. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  17. l-Dopa responsiveness is associated with distinctive connectivity patterns in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Harith; Wu, Chengyuan; Hyam, Jonathan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; De Vita, Enrico; Yousry, Tarek; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Hariz, Marwan; Behrens, Timothy; Ashburner, John; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2017-06-01

    Neuronal loss and dopamine depletion alter motor signal processing between cortical motor areas, basal ganglia, and the thalamus, resulting in the motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Dopamine replacement therapy can reverse these manifestations with varying degrees of improvement. To evaluate functional connectivity in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and changes in functional connectivity in relation to the degree of response to l-dopa, 19 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in the on-medication state. Scans were obtained on a 3-Tesla scanner in 3 × 3 × 2.5 mm 3 voxels. Seed-based bivariate regression analyses were carried out with atlas-defined basal ganglia regions as seeds, to explore relationships between functional connectivity and improvement in the motor section of the UPDRS-III following an l-dopa challenge. False discovery rate-corrected P was set at basal ganglia resting-state functional connectivity patterns associated with different degrees of l-dopa responsiveness in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. l-Dopa exerts a graduated influence on remapping connectivity in distinct motor control networks, potentially explaining some of the variance in treatment response. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Recent Advances in Prostate Cancer Treatment and Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Nevedomskaya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel drugs, drug sequences and combinations have improved the outcome of prostate cancer in recent years. The latest approvals include abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and apalutamide which target androgen receptor (AR signaling, radium-223 dichloride for reduction of bone metastases, sipuleucel-T immunotherapy and taxane-based chemotherapy. Adding abiraterone acetate to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in order to achieve complete androgen blockade has proven highly beneficial for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer and metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC. Also, ADT together with docetaxel treatment showed significant benefit in mHSPC. Ongoing clinical trials for different subgroups of prostate cancer patients include the evaluation of the second-generation AR antagonists enzalutamide, apalutamide and darolutamide, of inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K pathway, of inhibitors of DNA damage response, of targeted alpha therapy and of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA targeting approaches. Advanced clinical studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown limited benefits in prostate cancer and more trials are needed to demonstrate efficacy. The identification of improved, personalized treatments will be much supported by the major progress recently made in the molecular characterization of early- and late-stage prostate cancer using “omics” technologies. This has already led to novel classifications of prostate tumors based on gene expression profiles and mutation status, and should greatly help in the choice of novel targeted therapies best tailored to the needs of patients.

  19. Excessive visceral fat accumulation in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furutate R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ryuko Furutate1, Takeo Ishii1,2, Ritsuko Wakabayashi1, Takashi Motegi1,2, Kouichi Yamada1,2, Akihiko Gemma2, Kozui Kida1,21Respiratory Care Clinic, Nippon Medical School, Kudan-Minami, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Oncology, Nippon Medical School, Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Previous studies have suggested links between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cardiovascular disease, and abdominal obesity. Although abdominal visceral fat is thought to be associated with cardiovascular risk factors, the degree of visceral fat accumulation in patients with COPD has not been directly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the abdominal visceral fat accumulation and the association between visceral fat and the severity and changes in emphysema in COPD patients.Methods: We performed clinical and laboratory tests, including pulmonary function, dyspnea score, and the six-minute walking test in COPD patients (n = 101 and control, which included subjects with a smoking history but without airflow obstruction (n = 62. We used computed tomography to evaluate the abdominal visceral fat area (VFA, subcutaneous fat area (SFA, and the extent of emphysema.Results: The COPD group had a larger VFA than the control group. The prevalence of non-obese subjects with an increased VFA was greater in the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease Stages III and IV than in the other stages of COPD. The extent of emphysema was inversely correlated with waist circumference and SFA. However, VFA did not decrease with the severity of emphysema. VFA was positively correlated with the degree of dyspnea.Conclusion: COPD patients have excessive visceral fat, which is retained in patients with more advanced stages of COPD or severe emphysema despite the absence of obesity.Keywords: abdominal obesity, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema

  20. Advances in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of hyperthyroidism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Kim Siarkowski

    2005-04-01

    The thyroid gland is responsible for regulating multiple complex metabolic processes that affect most organs. Physical growth and cognitive development are dependent on proper levels of thyroid hormone. This article will review common challenges in the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in children, the approaches to treatment, and the nursing interventions guided toward child and family responses to thyroid disease. A comparison of signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism is also included. The nursing interventions addressed in the article integrate the biological, psychological, social, and environmental stresses and adaptations necessary to cope with hyperthyroid disease.

  1. Efficacy of Icotinib Hydrochloride in the Treatment of Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglei Ma

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe and evaluate the efficacy and adverse responses of icotinib hydrochloride in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and analyze the relative factors impacting its efficacy and prognosis. Methods: The clinical data of 260 patients with advanced NSCLC treated with icotinib hydrochloride in Jiangsu Cancer Hospital was retrospectively analyzed. Results: Four weeks after initial administration, 256 patients were evaluable for efficacy except 4 who withdrew the drug due to intolerable adverse responses. Among the 256 patients, there were 0 complete response (CR, 96 partial response (PR, 37.5%, 97 stable disease (SD, 37.9% and 63 progression disease (PD, 24.6%, with the objective remission rate (ORR and disease control rate (DCR being 37.6% and 75.4% respectively. However, in all patients, the median progression-free survival (PFS was 7 (0.4 - 16.3 months, and were 11 (1 - 16.3, 6 (0.4 - 11.3 and 5 (1 - 13.5 months in those treated with first-line, second-line, and ≥third-line treatments, respectively. Conclusion: Icotinib hydrochloride has significant efficiency and better safety for treating advanced NSCLC.

  2. Advanced smart-photosensitizers for more effective cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wooram; Cho, Soojeong; Han, Jieun; Shin, Heejun; Na, Kun; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2017-12-19

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) based upon the use of light and photosensitizers (PSs) has been used as a novel treatment approach for a variety of tumors. It, however, has several major limitations in the clinic: poor water solubility, long-term phototoxicity, low tumor targeting efficacy, and limited light penetration. With advances in nanotechnology, materials science, and clinical interventional imaging procedures, various smart-PSs have been developed for improving their cancer-therapeutic efficacy while reducing the adverse effects. Here, we briefly review state-of-the-art smart-PSs and discuss the future directions of PDT technology.

  3. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Mehta, Arpan R; Hallett, Mark

    2011-08-01

    The aim is to review the recent advances in the epidemiology and pathophysiology of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease. Large cross-sectional and case-control multicentre studies show that ICDs in Parkinson's disease are common, with a frequency of 13.6%. These behaviours are associated with impaired functioning and with depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms, novelty seeking and impulsivity. Behavioural subtypes demonstrate differences in novelty seeking and impulsivity, suggesting pathophysiological differences. Observational and neurophysiological studies point towards a potential mechanistic overlap between behavioural (ICDs) and motor (dyskinesias) dopaminergic sequelae. Converging data suggest dopamine agonists in ICDs appear to enhance learning from rewarding outcomes and impulsive choice. ICD patients also have enhanced risk preference and impaired working memory. Neuroimaging data point towards enhanced bottom-up ventral striatal dopamine release to incentive cues, gambling tasks and reward prediction, and possible inhibition of top-down orbitofrontal influences. Dopamine agonist-related ventral striatal hypoactivity to risk is consistent with impaired risk evaluation. Recent large-scale studies and converging findings are beginning to provide an understanding of mechanisms underlying ICDs in Parkinson's disease, which can guide prevention of these behaviours and optimize therapeutic approaches.

  4. Adaptive deep brain stimulation in advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alex; Neal, Spencer; Zavala, Baltazar; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Ashkan, Keyoumars; FitzGerald, James; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Brown, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) could potentially be used to interact with pathological brain signals to intervene and ameliorate their effects in disease states. Here, we provide proof-of-principle of this approach by using a BCI to interpret pathological brain activity in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) and to use this feedback to control when therapeutic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is delivered. Our goal was to demonstrate that by personalizing and optimizing stimulation in real time, we could improve on both the efficacy and efficiency of conventional continuous DBS. We tested BCI-controlled adaptive DBS (aDBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in 8 PD patients. Feedback was provided by processing of the local field potentials recorded directly from the stimulation electrodes. The results were compared to no stimulation, conventional continuous stimulation (cDBS), and random intermittent stimulation. Both unblinded and blinded clinical assessments of motor effect were performed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Motor scores improved by 66% (unblinded) and 50% (blinded) during aDBS, which were 29% (p = 0.03) and 27% (p = 0.005) better than cDBS, respectively. These improvements were achieved with a 56% reduction in stimulation time compared to cDBS, and a corresponding reduction in energy requirements (p random intermittent stimulation. BCI-controlled DBS is tractable and can be more efficient and efficacious than conventional continuous neuromodulation for PD. Copyright © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  5. Technological Advances in Huanglongbing (HLB or Citrus Greening Disease Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Prasad Paudyal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB, previously citrus greening disease, is the most destructive of citrus species causing major threat to the world citrus industry. The disease was reported from China in 1919 and now known to occur in more than 40 different countries of Asia, Africa, South and North America. Three species of gram negative bacterium namely Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, Candidatus Liberibacter africanus and Candidatus Liberibacter americanus are the casual organisms of HLB, respectively prevailing in the continent of Asia, Africa and South America. It is one of the most extensively researched subjects in citriculture world. HLB was detected in 2004 and 2005, respectively in San Paulo of Brazil and Florida of USA: the two leading citrus production hub of the world causing huge economic loss within 5 years of first detection. Since then research on HLB detection and management was further accelerated in American continents. This paper presents the scientific advancement made on detection, spread, economic losses caused by HLB in different parts of the world and controlling management strategies. Remarkable achievements have been made on HLB detection techniques including iodine test, qPCR and more recently in spectroscopy. While efforts are being made to develop resistance varieties using conventional and biotechnological tools management strategy which includes reduction of inoculums source, vector control and replant with disease-free planting materials still remains major option for HLB control. Citrus intercropping with guava have shown promising results for vector reduction.

  6. Recent advances in the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kushal; Kumar, Ashwani; Keegan, Richard M; Deshmukh, Rahul

    2018-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive functions. The pathological hallmarks are extracellular deposits of amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein. The cognitive deficits seen are thought to be due to synaptic dysfunction and neurochemical deficiencies. Various neurochemical abnormalities have been observed during progressive ageing, and are linked to cognitive abnormalities as seen with the sporadic form of AD. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are one of the major therapeutic strategies used for the treatment of AD. During the last decade, various new therapeutic strategies have shown beneficial effects in preclinical studies and under clinical development for the treatment of AD. The present review is aimed at discussing the neurobiology of AD and association of neurochemical abnormalities associated with cognitive deterioration and new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  8. Parkinson's disease therapy: treatment of early and late disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To summarize the current strategies for the treatment of early and late Parkinson's disease (PD). Data sources The presented guidelines are based on the review of the literature as well as the author's extensive experience with the treatment of 7000 patients with PD over the past 25 years. Results An analysis of reported data as well as personal experience suggest that while young patients seem to have a slower progression of the disease, they are at a higher risk for developing levodopa induced complications, such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. It is, therefore, prudent practice to delay levodopa therapy, particularly in younger patients, until the PD symptoms become troublesome and interfere with social or occupational functioning. Other strategies, such as the use of deprenyl, amantadine, trihexyphenidyl and dopamine agonists, should be employed before instituting levodopa therapy. Entacopone and dopamine agonists are useful in smoothing out levodopa related motor fluctuations. Surgical interventions, such as pallidotomy and pallidal or subthalamic deep brain stimulation, are effective therapeutic strategies, but should be reserved only for patients in whom optimal medical therapy fails to provide satisfactory control of symptoms. Conclusion The medical and surgical treatment of patients with PD must be individualized and tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  9. Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aristides, M.; Maase, Hans von der; Roberts, T.

    2005-01-01

    Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer Conventional treatment for advanced bladder cancer is methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin plus cisplatin (MVAC), with a median survival of 1 year but significant toxicity. The newer combinat...

  10. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael W Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy(DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered. The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema(DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation(PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era. Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients, but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision. New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies.

  11. Treatment of diabetic retinopathy: Recent advances and unresolved challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; W; Stewart[1

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in industrialized countries. Remarkable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of DR have been made during the past 30 years, but several important management questions and treatment deficiencies remain unanswered.The global diabetes epidemic threatens to overwhelm resources and increase the incidence of blindness, necessitating the development of innovative programs to diagnose and treat patients. The introduction and rapid adoption of intravitreal pharmacologic agents, particularly drugs that block the actions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and corticosteroids, have changed the goal of DR treatment from stabilization of vision to improvement. Anti-VEGF injections improve visual acuity in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) from 8-12 letters and improvements with corticosteroids are only slightly less. Unfortunately, a third of patients have an incomplete response to anti-VEGF therapy, but the best second-line therapy remains unknown. Current first-line therapy requires monthly visits and injections; longer acting therapies are needed to free up healthcare resources and improve patient compliance. VEGF suppression may be as effective as panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, but more studies are needed before PRP is abandoned. For over 30 years laser was the mainstay for the treatment of DME, but recent studies question its role in the pharmacologic era.Aggressive treatment improves vision in most patients,but many still do not achieve reading and driving vision.New drugs are needed to add to gains achieved with available therapies.

  12. [Modern aspects of surgical treatment of locally advanced pelvic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyov, I A; Vasilchenko, M V; Lychev, A B; Ambartsumyan, S V; Alekseev, V V

    2015-09-01

    The aim of investigation is to improve surgical treatment of patients with locally advanced pelvic cancer. The basis of investigation is 186 patients with locally advanced pelvic cancer. The average age of patients is 65.2 ± 5.2 years (from 43.7 to 88.4 years). Among them are 112 women and 74 men. In the period from 2007 to 2015 they were carried out combined (101 patients) and expanded (85 patients) surgical intervention in the department of naval surgery of the Military medical academy after S.M.Kirov. Pelvic evisceration was performed in 63 cases. Both patients were performed isolated vascular hyperthermic chemical pelvic perfusion. Indications for plastic surgery of peritoneum pelvic were: total infralitoral pelvic evisceration (9 patients), dorsal infralitoral pelvic evisceration (11 cases) and expanded abdominoperineal rectum extirpation (34 patients). Plastic surgery with autogenouse tissues was performed to 43 patients, with reticulate explants--to 11 patients. The rate of postoperative complications was 40.2%. The rate of postoperative lethality was 8%. Expanded and combined operations of pelvic at patients with locally advanced cancer without absolute contra-indications can be performed irrespective of age. Plastic surgery of peritoneum pelvic after total and dorsal infralitoral pelvic evisceration and expanded abdominoperineal rectum extirpation indicated in all cases. The easiest method is plastic surgery with greater omentum or peritoneum pelvic. Plastic surgery with reticulate explants is performed when autoplastic is impossible.

  13. Current status of gastroesophageal reflux disease : diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tang-Wei; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous studies were searched using the terms "gastroesophageal reflux disease" and "diagnosis" or "treatment" in Medline and Pubmed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, reviews, meta-analysis, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After a preliminary screening, all of the articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of the contemporary approaches to GERD. GERD has a variety of symptomatic manifestations, which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of other alarming symptoms, these symptoms allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis of GERD and initiate empiric therapy. GERD-associated complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modifications, medical and surgical therapy. Medical therapy involves acid suppression, which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The management of this disease requires a complex approach. Maintenance therapy of GERD after using anti-secretory drugs should be continuously monitored. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  14. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Huangying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms (g-NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors arising from the endocrine cells of stomach. Most g-NENs progresses slowly and have a long disease course; however, some other g-NENs grow rapidly, similar to the progression of gastric adenocarcinoma. g-NENs have complex and diverse clinical manifestations and their prognosis and treatment strategies depend highly on clinical subtype, pathological grade, tumour stage, and other factors. Due to their low prevalence,...

  15. Advanced treatment and reuse system developed for oilfield process water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Kevin

    2011-01-15

    An innovative plant to treat oilfield produced wastewater is being constructed in Trinidad and Tobago following recent regulations and industrial water supply challenges. The 4,100m3/day treatment system, developed by Golder Associates, will produce water for industrial reuse and effluent that meets new regulations. The treatment stages include: oil-water separation by gravity, equalization with a two-day capacity basin, dissolved air flotation, cooling, biotreatment/settling with immobilized cell bioreactors (ICB) technology, prefiltration/reverse osmosis and effluent storage/transfer. This advanced system will provide several important benefits including the elimination of inland discharge of minimally-treated water and the reduction of environmental and public health concerns. In addition, it will provide a new source of industrial water, resulting in a decrease in demand for fresh water. The success of this plant could lead to additional facilities in other oil field locations, expanding economic and environmental benefits of water reuse.

  16. USHERING IN THE STUDY AND TREATMENT OF PRECLINICAL ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopera, Francisco; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Caselli, Richard J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have begun to characterize the subtle biological and cognitive processes that precede the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), and to set the stage for accelerated evaluation of experimental treatments to delay the onset, reduce the risk of or completely prevent clinical decline. Here, we provide an overview of the experimental strategies, and brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarker measures that are used in early detection and tracking of AD, highlighting at-risk individuals who could be suitable for preclinical monitoring. We discuss how these advances have contributed to reconceptualization of AD as a sequence of biological changes that occur during progression from preclinical AD, to mild cognitive impairment and finally dementia, and we review recently proposed research criteria for preclinical AD. Advances in the study of preclinical AD have driven the recognition that efficacy of at least some AD therapies may depend on initiation of treatment before clinical manifestation of disease, leading to a new era of AD prevention research. PMID:23752908

  17. Ocular inserts - Advancement in therapy of eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kumari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocular insert represents a significant advancement in the therapy of eye disease. Ocular inserts are defined as sterile, thin, multilayered, drug-impregnated, solid or semisolid consistency devices placed into the cul-de-sac or conjuctival sac, whose size and shape are especially designed for ophthalmic application. They are composed of a polymeric support that may or may not contain a drug. The drug can later be incorporated as dispersion or a solution in the polymeric support. They offer several advantages as increased ocular residence and sustained release of medication into the eye. The insert includes a body portion sized to position within a lachrymal canaliculus of the eyelid. The inserts are classified according to their solubility as insoluble, soluble, or bioerodible inserts. The release of drug from the insert depends upon the diffusion, osmosis, and bioerosion of the drug, and this article is an attempt to present a brief about this newer drug delivery system.

  18. Making a measurable difference in advanced Huntington disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Carol Brown; Rao, Ashwini K

    2017-01-01

    Neurologists' role in the care of people with advanced Huntington disease (HD) (total functional capacity speech and language pathology), behavioral and psychiatric professionals for problem-solving strategies, which must be reviewed with direct care staff before implementation; (3) encourage and support qualitative and quantitative interdisciplinary research studies, and randomized controlled studies of nonpharmacologic interventions; and (4) assist in the development of meaningful measures to further document what works to provide a good quality of life for the patient and family and a comfortable thoughtful approach to a good death. Collaborative models of care depend on: (1) clear communication; (2) ongoing education and support programs; with (3) pharmacologic and rehabilitation interventions, always in the context of respect for the person with HD, a preservation of the individuals' dignity, autonomy, and individual preferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Andrew B; Joseph Woo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is in the midst of a practice revolution. Traditionally, surgery for valvular heart disease consisted of valve replacement via conventional sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the past 20 years, the increasing popularity of less-invasive procedures, accompanied by advancements in imaging, surgical instrumentation, and robotic technology, has motivated and enabled surgeons to develop and perform complex cardiac surgical procedures through small incisions, often eliminating the need for sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. In addition to the benefits of improved cosmesis, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery was pioneered with the intent of reducing morbidity, postoperative pain, blood loss, hospital length of stay, and time to return to normal activity. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art of minimally invasive approaches to the surgical treatment of valvular heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a large economic burden with important complications that include esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Despite endoscopy, validated patient questionnaires, and traditional ambulatory pH monitoring, the diagnosis of GERD continues to be challenging. Areas covered: This review will explore the difficulties in diagnosing GERD with a focus on new developments, ranging from basic fundamental changes (histology and immunohistochemistry) to direct patient care (narrow-band imaging, impedance, and response to anti-reflux surgery). We searched PubMed using the noted keywords. We included data from full-text articles published in English. Further relevant articles were identified from the reference lists of review articles. Expert commentary: Important advances in novel parameters in intraluminal impedance monitoring such as baseline impedance monitoring has created some insight into alternative diagnostic strategies in GERD. Recent advances in endoscopic assessment of esophageal epithelial integrity via mucosal impedance measurement is questioning the paradigm of prolonged ambulatory testing for GERD. The future of reflux diagnosis may very well be without the need for currently employed technologies and could be as simple as assessing changes in epithelia integrity as a surrogate marker for GERD. However, future studies must validate such an approach.

  1. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  2. Treatments Results and Prognostic Factors in Locally Advanced Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mee-Sun; Chung, Woong-Ki; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Nam, Taek-Keun; Song, Ju-Young; Nah, Byung-Sik; Lim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Joon Kyoo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the treatment results and to identify possible prognostic indicators in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between October 1985 to December 2000, 90 patients who had locally advanced stage IV hypopharyngeal carcinoma were studied retrospectively. Twelve patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 65 patients were treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and 13 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Total radiation dose ranged from 59.0 to 88.2 Gy (median 70 Gy) for radiotherapy alone. Most patients had ciplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and others had cisplatin and peplomycin or vincristin. Median follow-up period was 15 months. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival rate and Cox proportional hazard model for multivariate analysis of prognostic factors. Results: Overall 3- and 5-year survival rates were 27% and 17%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional control rates were 33% for radiotherapy alone, 32% for combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and 81% for combined surgery and radiotherapy (p=0.006). The prognostic factors affecting overall survival were T stage, concurrent chemo radiation and treatment response. Overall 3- and 5-year laryngeal preservation rates in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy were 26% and 22%, respectively. Of these, the 5-year laryngeal preservation rates were 52% for concurrent chemo radiation group (n=11), and 16% for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (n=54, p=0.012). Conclusion: Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy showed better results than radiotherapy alone or with chemotherapy. Radiotherapy combined with concurrent chemotherapy is an effective modality to achieve organ preservation in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. Further prospective randomized studies will be required

  3. Garlic for Cardiovascular Disease: Prevention or Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Feras Q; El-Elimat, Tamam; Khalid, Lila; Hudaib, Reema; Al-Shehabi, Tuqa Saleh; Eid, Ali H

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of global mortality with a substantial economic impact. The annual deaths are expected to increase in the next decade. An array of dietary supplements is being used by people worldwide to ameliorate cardiovascular risk factors. Garlic (Allium sativum L.), a top-selling herbal dietary supplement, is renowned for its wide range beneficial effects, particularly in the treatment and prevention of CVD. This review aims to present a thorough discussion of the available evidence-based data which support the use of garlic in the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are dissected as well. This review supports the notion that garlic has the potential to treat mild hypertension, to decrease hypercholesterolemia, and to prevent atherosclerosis. More clinical studies are essential to unequivocally understand the mechanisms underlying treatment or prevention of these cardiovascular conditions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Medical Treatment of Diverticular Disease: Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lué, Alberto; Laredo, Viviana; Lanas, Angel

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon represents the most common disease affecting the large bowel in western countries. Its prevalence is increasing. Recent studies suggest that changes in gut microbiota could contribute to development of symptoms and complication. For this reason antibiotics play a key role in the management of both uncomplicated and complicated DD. Rifaximin has demonstrated to be effective in obtaining symptoms relief at 1 year in patients with uncomplicated DD and to improve symptoms and maintain periods of remission following acute colonic diverticulitis (AD). Despite absence of data that supports the routine use of antibiotic in uncomplicated AD, they are recommended in selected patients. In patients with AD that develop an abscess, conservative treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics is successful in up to 70% of cases. In patients on conservative treatment where percutaneous drainage fails or peritonitis develops, surgery is considered the standard therapy. In conclusion antibiotics seem to remain the mainstay of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated DD and AD. Inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated AD, while outpatient management is considered the best strategy in the majority of uncomplicated patients.

  5. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of Pompe disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; de la Fuente-Cortez, Beatriz; Molina-García, Avril; Romero-Díaz, Víktor; Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Esmer-Sánchez, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare, progressive and often fatal neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. Among glycogen storage disorders, it is one of the most common. Its clinical manifestations can start at any moment of life, with a very variable symptomatology. In this article, we show an extended revision of the literature in regards to the main medical aspects of Pompe disease: etiology, psychopathology, epidemiology, clinical variants, pathological diagnosis, and enzyme replacement therapy. With this information, we created a diagnostic and therapeutic guide, which is addressed to specialists and to first-level physicians, in order to let them identify both the classic and the late forms of this disease. We describe as well the best, timely, multidisciplinary treatment in use. Also, we show some suggestions to the proper functioning of health institutions, and routes to diagnosis. We conclude that Pompe disease may be properly diagnosed and treated if health care professionals follow the internationally approved recommendations.

  7. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of portal hypertensive biliopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WENG Ningna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the progress in research on portal hypertension in recent years, portal hypertensive biliopathy (PHB has attracted more and more attention. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of PHB, as well as the main methods for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, are briefly described. The pathogenesis of PHB remains unclear, and it has been postulated that the external pressure of portal cavernoma and the ischemic stricture of the bile duct may play a role. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is the primary diagnostic tool for PHB. Currently, it is thought that asymptomatic PHB patients do not require any treatment, and symptomatic PHB patients should receive individualized treatment, which mainly included reducing portal pressure and relieving biliary obstruction. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has become the first-line therapy for symptomatic PHB. More research and practice are needed for further understanding of PHB.

  8. Advanced oxidation-based treatment of furniture industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichonovas, Martynas; Krugly, Edvinas; Grybauskas, Arturas; Jankūnaitė, Dalia; Račys, Viktoras; Martuzevičius, Dainius

    2017-07-16

    The paper presents a study on the treatment of the furniture industry wastewater in a bench scale advanced oxidation reactor. The researched technology utilized a simultaneous application of ozone, ultraviolet radiation and surface-immobilized TiO 2 nanoparticle catalyst. Various combinations of processes were tested, including photolysis, photocatalysis, ozonation, catalytic ozonation, photolytic ozonation and photocatalytic ozonation were tested against the efficiency of degradation. The efficiency of the processes was primarily characterized by the total organic carbon (TOC) analysis, indicating the remaining organic material in the wastewater after the treatment, while the toxicity changes in wastewater were researched by Daphnia magna toxicity tests. Photocatalytic ozonation was confirmed as the most effective combination of processes (99.3% of TOC reduction during 180 min of treatment), also being the most energy efficient (4.49-7.83 MJ/g). Photocatalytic ozonation and photolytic ozonation remained efficient across a wide range of pH (3-9), but the pH was an important factor in photocatalysis. The toxicity of wastewater depended on the duration of the treatment: half treated water was highly toxic, while fully treated water did not possess any toxicity. Our results indicate that photocatalytic ozonation has a high potential for the upscaling and application in industrial settings.

  9. Advances in Risk Classification and Treatment Strategies for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Navin R.; Applebaum, Mark A.; Volchenboum, Samuel L.; Matthay, Katherine K.; London, Wendy B.; Ambros, Peter F.; Nakagawara, Akira; Berthold, Frank; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Park, Julie R.; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Pearson, Andrew D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Risk-based treatment approaches for neuroblastoma have been ongoing for decades. However, the criteria used to define risk in various institutional and cooperative groups were disparate, limiting the ability to compare clinical trial results. To mitigate this problem and enhance collaborative research, homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts have been defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group classification system. During the past 30 years, increasingly intensive, multimodality approaches have been developed to treat patients who are classified as high risk, whereas patients with low- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma have received reduced therapy. This treatment approach has resulted in improved outcome, although survival for high-risk patients remains poor, emphasizing the need for more effective treatments. Increased knowledge regarding the biology and genetic basis of neuroblastoma has led to the discovery of druggable targets and promising, new therapeutic approaches. Collaborative efforts of institutions and international cooperative groups have led to advances in our understanding of neuroblastoma biology, refinements in risk classification, and stratified treatment strategies, resulting in improved outcome. International collaboration will be even more critical when evaluating therapies designed to treat small cohorts of patients with rare actionable mutations. PMID:26304901

  10. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Vandetanib for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic hereditary medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Samuel A; Gosnell, Jessica E; Gagel, Robert F; Moley, Jeffrey; Pfister, David; Sosa, Julie A; Skinner, Michael; Krebs, Annetta; Vasselli, James; Schlumberger, Martin

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE There is no effective therapy for patients with distant metastasis of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Activating mutations in the RET proto-oncogene cause hereditary MTC, which provides a strong therapeutic rationale for targeting RET kinase activity. This open-label, phase II study assessed the efficacy of vandetanib, a selective oral inhibitor of RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, in patients with advanced hereditary MTC. METHODS Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic hereditary MTC received initial treatment with once-daily oral vandetanib 300 mg. The dose was adjusted additionally in some patients on the basis of observed toxicity until disease progression or any other withdrawal criterion was met. The primary assessment was objective tumor response (by RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors]). Results Thirty patients received initial treatment with vandetanib 300 mg/d. On the basis of investigator assessments, 20% of patients (ie, six of 30 patients) experienced a confirmed partial response (median duration of response at data cutoff, 10.2 months). An additional 53% of patients (ie, 16 of 30 patients) experienced stable disease at >/= 24 weeks, which yielded a disease control rate of 73% (ie, 22 of 30 patients). In 24 patients, serum calcitonin levels showed a 50% or greater decrease from baseline that was maintained for at least 4 weeks; 16 patients showed a similar reduction in serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. The most common adverse events were diarrhea (70%), rash (67%), fatigue (63%), and nausea (63%). CONCLUSION In this study, vandetanib demonstrated durable objective partial responses and disease control with a manageable adverse event profile. These results demonstrate that vandetanib may provide an effective therapeutic option in patients with advanced hereditary MTC, a rare disease for which there has been no effective therapy.

  12. Second-line treatments: moving towards an opportunity to improve survival in advanced gastric cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salati, Massimiliano; Di Emidio, Katia; Tarantino, Vittoria; Cascinu, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death globally with approximately 723 000 deaths every year. Most patients present with advanced unresectable or metastatic disease, only amenable to palliative systemic treatment and a median survival uncommonly exceeding 12 months. Over the last years, the efficacy of chemotherapy combination has plateaued and the introduction of the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 trastuzumab has resulted in a limited survival gain in the upfront setting. After this positive experience, first-line treatment with new targeted therapies failed to improve the outcome of advanced gastric cancer. On the contrary, second-line options, including monochemotherapy with taxanes or irinotecan and the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 ramucirumab, either alone or combined with paclitaxel, opened new therapeutic rooms for an ever-increasing number of patients who maintain an acceptable performance status across multiple lines. This article provides an updated overview on the current management of advanced gastric cancer and discusses how the different treatment options available may be best combined to favourably impact the outcome of patients following the logic of a treatment strategy.

  13. Recent advances on nontuberculous mycobacteria diseases in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ren Hsueh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation rate of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM species and the prevalence of NTM-associated diseases are on the rise worldwide; however, the species distribution of NTM isolates and the types of diseases caused by NTM species vary from region to region. Treatment of a NTM disease is complicated, and there is no comprehensive guideline regarding the in vitro susceptibility of each antimicrobial agent against NTM. Therefore, appropriate anti-NTM treatment can only be recommended based on individual NTM species and local surveillance studies of anti-NTM resistance. Previous studies on the in vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC to clarithromycin in some Asian countries have revealed a low rate of resistance to that antimicrobial agent. Thus, a clarithromycin-based anti-MAC regimen should be effective for MAC infections. However, clarithromycin resistance due to the mutation of the 23S rRNA gene in MAC strains has been detected in many countries. Therefore, physicians should avoid monotherapy with clarithromycin and consider the possibility of clarithromycin resistance in patients who do not respond to clarithromycin-based regimens. Rifampicin is the critical component of successful management of Mycobacterium kansasii diseases. Although most M. kansasii isolates are susceptible to rifampicin in Western countries and in Japan, this agent may not work well in Taiwan. Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM is a prevalent NTM group worldwide, particularly in Asia; however, each NTM species in this group may have its own distinct antibiotic susceptibility pattern, and close monitoring of the antibiotic-resistance patterns of RGM is necessary. Most important of all, the in vitro susceptibility may not represent the in vivo activity until the confirmation of the clinical study. Therefore, further investigation of the clinical effectiveness of the anti-NTM agents is warranted.

  14. Treatment and prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Alegría, A R; Pintado, V; Barbolla, I

    2018-02-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a severe infection that mainly affects patients with associated comorbidity. The paediatric conjugate vaccination has resulted in a change in the adult vaccination strategy. The antibiotic resistance of pneumococcus is not currently a severe problem. Nevertheless, the World Health Organisation has included pneumococcus among the bacteria whose treatment requires the introduction of new drugs, such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole. Although the scientific evidence is still limited, the combination of beta-lactams and macrolides is recommended as empiric therapy for bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. The advancement in Alzheimer disease of imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinyan; Guan Yihui

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative disorders that deteriorate the life quality of the elderly in China and developed countries. Prevention and treatment of AD are the focal point in the study of brain science. In recent years,the rapid development of medical imaging technology enables us to get functional orientation and structure description of brain noninvasively and provides a substantial basis for studies of cognition, cognitive impairment, and pathogenesis.It also makes such multi-tiered research and trans-subject combination possible. The progress in AD of imaging technology is briefly reviewed in this article. (authors)

  16. Nanotherapies for the treatment of ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimondez-Troitiño, S; Csaba, N; Alonso, M J; de la Fuente, M

    2015-09-01

    The topical route is the most frequent and preferred way to deliver drugs to the eye. Unfortunately, the very low ocular drug bioavailability (less than 5%) associated with this modality of administration, makes the efficient treatment of several ocular diseases a significant challenge. In the last decades, it has been shown that specific nanocarriers can interact with the ocular mucosa, thereby increasing the retention time of the associated drug onto the eye, as well as its permeability across the corneal and conjunctival epithelium. In this review, we comparatively analyze the mechanism of action and specific potential of the most studied nano-drug delivery carriers. In addition, we present the success achieved until now using a number of nanotherapies for the treatment of the most prevalent ocular pathologies, such as infections, inflammation, dry eye, glaucoma, and retinopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of advanced electrochemical oxidation for radiochemical concentrate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velin, Anna; Bengtsson, Bernt; Lundblad, Magnus

    2012-09-01

    Water treatments in Nuclear Power Plants include ion exchange, evaporation and mechanical filtration techniques. These technologies are used to control the chemical release and to treat coolant in light water reactor types from chemicals and most importantly, from radioactive nuclides. Most of the conventional methods are efficient, but at the same time producing aqueous concentrates with high organic load. Before final storage, the level of organic content of those concentrates must be reduced. Advanced electrochemical oxidation with Boron Doped Diamond (BDD) electrodes are being investigated in laboratory- and pilot scale for treatment of dilute and concentrated aqueous waste streams at Vattenfall-Ringhals NPP. BDD anodes and cathodes are having high over potential against water electrolysis, and therefore well suitable for oxidation of organics. Dilute wastewater, such as laundry water, which has an initial COD level of around 500 mg/l, was reduced to a level of < 20 mg/l in the laboratory. Evaporator concentrates, with a TS content of 3% and pH of 7-8, were treated in pilot scale of 800 liters, working in batch operation mode, at temperatures between 25-50 deg. C. Initial COD levels between 2500 and 8000 mg/l in concentrate was reduced to < 100 mg/l at the first tests and later to < 300 mg/l. The advanced electrochemical oxidation is proven to be a promising technique for radioactive concentrate treatment. Long-term operation is still ongoing to evaluate the performance of the electrodes, cell components and overall process efficiency. (authors)

  18. Prognosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy: Recent advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Peter; Persson, Frederik; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2018-04-01

    Approximately 20 to 40% of patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes develop diabetic kidney disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria (>300mg/24h, or 300mg/g creatinine), a relentless decline in glomerular filtration rate, raised arterial blood pressure and enhanced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The natural course of classical diabetic nephropathy is initially microalbuminuria or moderately increased urine albumin excretion (30-300mg/g creatinine). Untreated microalbuminuria may then rise gradually, reaching severely increased albuminuric (macroalbuminuria) over 5 to 15 years. Glomerular filtration rate then begins to decline and end-stage renal failure is reached without treatment in 5 to 7 years. Regular, systematic screening for diabetic kidney disease is needed to identify patients at risk for, or with presymptomatic stages of diabetic kidney disease. Multifactorial intervention targeting glucose, lipids and blood pressure including blockade of renin angiotensin system and lifestyle, has improved renal and cardiovascular prognosis and reduced mortality with 50%. Recent data suggest beneficial pleiotropic effects on renal endpoint with new glucose lowering agents. It is also being investigated if blocking aldosterone could be an option as a potential new treatment. Thus, although diabetic nephropathy remains a major burden, prognosis has improved and new options for further improvements are currently tested in phase 3 clinical renal outcome studies. Copyright © 2018 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Deep RF-hyperthermia: an effective treatment of advanced gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahinbas, H.; Groenemeyer, D.H.W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Contrary to the enormous efforts, results of conventional treatments of high-grade malignant gliomas are unsatisfactory. The prognosis of that tumor type is poor, its overall median survival time (MST) less than a year. Most of the cases are inoperable or only partially resectable, and their response to the various chemotherapies and/or radiotherapy is poor. The chemo-therapies which are successful for other locations often fail due to the effective brain-blood barrier (BBB). Probably the modification of the BBB by electromagnetic fields together with the direct electromagnetic-field heating are the main factors for the success of electro-hyperthermia. Primary aim of this study was to present the therapy tolerance for patients of electro-hyperthermia (EHY) for advanced malignant gliomas and as main intention to show the increase of the median survival time (MST). Our study was performed between 2000 - 2004; for patients with inoperable, partially resected or recurrent gliomas (WHO grade III and IV) with progression after radio- and/or chemotherapy and a Karnofsky Performance Score ≤30-40 %. 105 pts were involved in this study: 38 astrocytoma pts, 56 glioblastoma pts and 12 pts with other brain malignancies. All patients were heavily and unsatisfactory pretreated. EHY was applied over 4 weeks, 3 times a week over 1 hour in average by 100 Watt, as mono- or combined therapy (chemotherapy, irradiation therapy). The set of patients as well as the frequency of EHY was well documented for future evaluations. The historic reference of the MST from the first diagnosis for gliomas grade III and IV in our institute is 11.42 months (range 1-62), which is in good agreement with the relevant literature. The median survival time (MST) in our institute with EHY increases to 44.2 m, 23.2 m and 61.0 m for astrocytoma, glioblastoma and other brain malignancies, respectively. The therapy results were controlled by MRI images. EHY is a feasible treatment for advanced

  20. Advances in the Classification and Treatment of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Inas H; DiMeglio, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare disorder of type 1 collagen with 13 currently identified types attributable to inherited abnormalities in type 1 collagen amount, structure, or processing. The disease is characterized by an increased susceptibility to bony fracture. In addition to the skeletal phenotype, common additional extraskeletal manifestations include blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, vascular fragility, and hearing loss. Medical management is focused on minimizing the morbidity of fractures, pain, and bone deformities by maximizing bone health. Along with optimizing Vitamin D status and calcium intake and physical/occupational therapy, individualized surgical treatment may be indicated. Pharmacological therapy with bisphosphonate medications is now routinely utilized for moderate to severe forms and appears to have a good safety profile and bone health benefits. New therapies with other anti-resorptives as well as anabolic agents and transforming growth factor (TGF)β antibodies are in development. Other potential treatment modalities could include gene therapy or mesenchymal cell transplant. In the future, treatment choices will be further individualized in order to reduce disease morbidity and mortality.

  1. Intravenous Milrinone in Treatment of Advanced Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewail, Aly M.; Nawar, Mohammad; Vrtovec, Bojan; Eastwood, Cathy; Kar, Biswajit; Delgado, Reynolds M.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as milrinone can relieve symptoms and improve hemodynamics in patients with advanced congestive heart failure. We retrospectively evaluated the hemodynamic and clinical outcomes of long-term combination therapy with intravenous milrinone and oral β-blockers in 65 patients with severe congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association class IV function and ejection fraction milrinone. Oral medical therapy was maximized when possible. The mean duration of milrinone treatment in this combination-treatment group was 269 days (range, 14–1,026 days). Functional class improved from IV to II–III with milrinone therapy. Twenty-four such patients tolerated β-blocker up-titration and were successfully weaned from milrinone. Sixteen patients (31%) died while receiving combination therapy; one died of sudden cardiac death (on treatment day 116); the other 15 died of progressive heart failure or other complications. Hospital admissions during the previous 6 months and admissions within 6 months after milrinone initiation stayed the same. Meanwhile, the total number of hospital days decreased from 450 to 380 (a 15.6% reduction), and the mean length of stay decreased by 1.4 days (a 14.7% reduction). We conclude that 1) milrinone plus β-blocker combination therapy is an effective treatment for heart failure even with β-blocker up-titration, 2) weaning from milrinone may be possible once medications are maximized, 3) patients' functional status improves on the combination regimen, and 4) treatment-related sudden death is relatively infrequent during the combination regimen. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:109–13) PMID:12809251

  2. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  3. AN ADVANCED LEAKAGE SCHEME FOR NEUTRINO TREATMENT IN ASTROPHYSICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perego, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 2, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Cabezón, R. M. [Physics Department, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Käppeli, R., E-mail: albino.perego@physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Seminar for Applied Mathematics, ETH Zürich, Rämistrasse 101, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively) separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of CCSNe. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL scheme, coupling it to an axisymmetric Eulerian and to a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to simulate core collapse. Therefore, the neutrino treatment presented here is ideal for large parameter-space explorations, parametric studies, high-resolution tests, code developments, and long-term modeling of asymmetric configurations, where more detailed neutrino treatments are not available or are currently computationally too expensive.

  4. Pain in Fabry Disease: Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politei, Juan M; Bouhassira, Didier; Germain, Dominique P; Goizet, Cyril; Guerrero-Sola, Antonio; Hilz, Max J; Hutton, Elspeth J; Karaa, Amel; Liguori, Rocco; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Burlina, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Fabry disease (FD) characteristically develop peripheral neuropathy at an early age, with pain being a crucial symptom of underlying pathology. However, the diagnosis of pain is challenging due to the heterogeneous and nonspecific symptoms. Practical guidance on the diagnosis and management of pain in FD is needed. In 2014, experts met to discuss recent advances on this topic and update clinical guidance. Emerging disease-specific tools, including FabryScan, Fabry-specific Pediatric Health and Pain Questionnaire, and Würzburg Fabry Pain Questionnaire, and more general tools like the Total Symptom Score can aid diagnosis, characterization, and monitoring of pain in patients with FD. These tools can be complemented by more objective and quantifiable sensory testing. In male and female patients of any age, pain related to FD can be an early indication to start disease-specific enzyme replacement therapy before potentially irreversible organ damage to the kidneys, heart, or brain occurs. To improve treatment outcomes, pain should be diagnosed early in unrecognized or newly identified FD patients. Treatment should include: (a) enzyme replacement therapy controlling the progression of underlying pathology; (b) adjunctive, symptomatic pain management with analgesics for chronic neuropathic and acute nociceptive, and inflammatory or mixed pain; and (c) lifestyle modifications. © 2016 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Chronic Inflammatory Disease, Lifestyle and Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Autoimmune Diseases; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Crohn Disease (CD); Colitis, Ulcerative (UC); Arthritis, Rheumatoid (RA); Spondylarthropathies; Arthritis, Psoriatic (PsA); Psoriasis; Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS); Uveitis

  6. Dosimetry-based treatment for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Steve L; Pratt, Brenda; Gray, Matthew; Chittenden, Sarah; Du, Yong; Harmer, Clive L; Flux, Glenn D

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the long-term outcome of a personalized dosimetry approach in Graves' disease aiming to render patients euthyroid from a planned thyroid absorbed dose of 60 Gy. A total of 284 patients with Graves' disease were followed prospectively following administration of radioiodine calculated to deliver an absorbed dose of 60 Gy. Patients with cardiac disease were excluded. Outcomes were analysed at yearly intervals for up to 10 years with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. A single radioiodine administration was sufficient to render a patient either euthyroid or hypothyroid in 175 (62%) patients, the remainder requiring further radioiodine. The median radioactivity required to deliver 60 Gy was 77 MBq. Less than 2% patients required 400-600 MBq, the standard activity administered in many centres. In the cohort receiving a single administration, 38, 32 and 26% were euthyroid on no specific thyroid medication at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Larger thyroid volumes were associated with the need for further therapy. The presence of nodules on ultrasonography did not adversely affect treatment outcome. A personalized dosimetric approach delayed the long-term onset of hypothyroidism in 26% of patients. This was achieved using much lower administered activities than currently recommended. Future studies will aim to identify those patients who would benefit most from this approach.

  7. Fluctuating functions related to quality of life in advanced Parkinson disease: effects of duodenal levodopa infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacson, D; Bingefors, K; Kristiansen, I S; Nyholm, D

    2008-12-01

    To assess fluctuations in quality of life (QoL) and motor performance in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) treated with continuous daytime duodenal levodopa/carbidopa infusion or conventional therapy. Of 18 patients completing a 6-week trial (DIREQT), 12 were followed for up to 6 months and assessed using electronic diaries and the PD Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39). During the trial and follow-up, major diurnal fluctuations were observed, especially for hyperkinesia, 'off' time, ability to walk and depression. Duodenal infusion was associated with significantly more favourable outcomes compared with conventional treatment for satisfaction with overall functioning, 'off' time and ability to walk, with improved outcomes with PDQ-39. Relative to conventional treatment, infusion therapy may stabilize and significantly improve motor function and patient's QoL. The potential for daily fluctuation in PD symptoms means single measures of treatment effectiveness can result in bias in effect estimates and hence repeated measures are recommended.

  8. Serum peptide expression and treatment responses in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Juan; Tang, Chuan-Hao; Wang, Na; Liu, Yi; Lv, Jin; Xu, Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Wan-Feng; Gao, Hong-Jun; He, Kun; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2018-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is an important predictor for response to personalized treatments of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However its usage is limited due to the difficult of obtaining tissue specimens. A novel prediction system using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been reported to be a perspective tool in European countries to identify patients who are likely to benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. In the present study, MALDI-TOF MS was used on pretreatment serum samples of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer to discriminate the spectra between disease control and disease progression groups in one cohort of Chinese patients. The candidate features for classification were subsequently validated in a blinded fashion in another set of patients. The correlation between plasma EGFR mutation status and the intensities of representative spectra for classification was evaluated. A total of 103 patients that were treated with EGFR-TKIs were included. It was determined that 8 polypeptides peaks were significant different between the disease control and disease progression group. A total of 6 polypeptides were established in the classification algorithm. The sensitivity of the algorithm to predict treatment responses was 76.2% (16/21) and the specificity was 81.8% (18/22). The accuracy rate of the algorithm was 79.1% (34/43). A total of 3 polypeptides were significantly correlated with EGFR mutations (P=0.04, P=0.03 and P=0.04, respectively). The present study confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS analysis can be used to predict responses to EGFR-TKI treatment of the Asian population where the EGFR mutation status differs from the European population. Furthermore, the expression intensities of the three polypeptides in the classification model were associated with EGFR mutation. PMID:29844828

  9. Clinical utility of nivolumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmar R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ramsey Asmar,1 Jessica Yang,1 Richard D Carvajal1,2 1Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, 2Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Melanomas are highly immunogenic tumors that evade the immune system by exploiting innate checkpoint pathways, rendering effector T-cells anergic. The immunotherapeutic approach of checkpoint inhibition can restore and invigorate endogenous antitumor T-cell responses and has become an important treatment option for patients with advanced melanoma. The CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab and the PD-1 inhibitors nivolumab and pembrolizumab have been shown to induce durable responses and improve overall survival in metastatic, refractory melanoma. Optimization and validation of pretreatment biomarkers to predict response to these agents is a crucial area of ongoing research. Combination immunotherapy has recently demonstrated superior response rates compared to monotherapy; further investigation is needed to refine combinatorial strategies. Keywords: nivolumab, immune checkpoint inhibitors, PD-1, melanoma

  10. Recent advances in management and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Niti; Craig, Timothy J

    2011-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal-dominant disease characterized by recurrent self-limiting episodes of skin and mucosal edema. Morbidity and mortality are significant, and new and pending therapies are now available to reduce the risk associated with the disease. To update the reader on new advances in HAE to improve patient care. We performed a literature search of Ovid, PubMed, and Google to develop this review. Articles that are necessary for the understanding and use of the new therapeutic options for HAE were chosen, and studies of high quality were used to support the use of therapies, and in most cases, results from phase III studies were used. Until recently, therapy for HAE attacks in the United States consisted of symptom relief with narcotics, hydration, and fresh-frozen plasma, which contains active C1 inhibitor. Therapy to prevent HAE attacks has been confined to androgens and, occasionally, antifibrinolytic agents; however, both drug groups have significant adverse effects. The approval of C1-inhibitor concentrate for prevention and acute therapy has improved efficacy and safety. Ecallantide has also been approved for therapy of attacks, and icatibant is expected to be approved in the next few months for attacks. Recombinant C1 inhibitor is presently in phase III studies and should be available for attacks in the near future. In this article we review the changing therapeutic options available for patients in 2011 and beyond.

  11. [Living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The impact of dyspnoea on patients and caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Xavier; Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Pla, Margarida; Martínez-Muñoz, Marisa; Blay, Carles; Vila, Laura

    2016-12-01

    To understand the experiences of patients and caregivers living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the impact of their symptoms and care needs arising from a functional, emotional, and social context. Qualitative study. Phenomenological perspective. Data were collected during 2013-2015. Primary, secondary and intermediate care. Osona (Barcelona). The study included 10 Primary Care patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, their respective 10 caregivers, and 19 primary care professionals, as well as 2 lung specialists, 2 palliative care professionals involved in their care, and one clinical psychologist. Theoretical sampling. Semi-structured and in-depth interviews with patients, caregivers, and professionals (47 interviews). The emergent topics identified in patients and caregivers interviews refer to dyspnoea, the predominant symptom without effective treatment and with a major impact on patients and caregivers lives. A symptom with great functional, emotional and social repercussions to which they need to adapt in order to survive. Beyond pharmacological measures to control respiratory symptoms, proper care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, requires understanding of suffering, the losses and limitations that it causes in their lives and those of their caregivers. A palliative, holistic and closer approach to their real experiences, together with an empowerment to adapt to debilitating symptoms, could contribute to a better life in the end-stages of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Barriers to treatment access for Chagas disease in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Jennifer M; Snively, Callae S; Ramsey, Janine M; Salgado, Marco Ocampo; Bärnighausen, Till; Reich, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO) prevalence estimates, 1.1 million people in Mexico are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease (CD). However, limited information is available about access to antitrypanosomal treatment. This study assesses the extent of access in Mexico, analyzes the barriers to access, and suggests strategies to overcome them. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 key informants and policymakers at the national level in Mexico. Data on CD cases, relevant policy documents and interview data were analyzed using the Flagship Framework for Pharmaceutical Policy Reform policy interventions: regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data showed that 3,013 cases were registered nationally from 2007-2011, representing 0.41% of total expected cases based on Mexico's national prevalence estimate. In four of five years, new registered cases were below national targets by 11-36%. Of 1,329 cases registered nationally in 2010-2011, 834 received treatment, 120 were pending treatment as of January 2012, and the treatment status of 375 was unknown. The analysis revealed that the national program mainly coordinated donation of nifurtimox and that important obstacles to access include the exclusion of antitrypanosomal medicines from the national formulary (regulation), historical exclusion of CD from the social insurance package (organization), absence of national clinical guidelines (organization), and limited provider awareness (persuasion). Efforts to treat CD in Mexico indicate an increased commitment to addressing this disease. Access to treatment could be advanced by improving the importation process for antitrypanosomal medicines and adding them to the national formulary, increasing education for healthcare providers, and strengthening clinical guidelines. These recommendations have important implications for other countries in the region with similar problems in access to

  13. Periodontal disease, periodontal treatment and systemic nitric oxide in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, A; Verstraete, F J M; Jerin, A; Šentjurc, M; Kass, P H; Petelin, M; Pavlica, Z

    2013-06-01

    Thirty-two client-owned dogs treated for periodontal disease were divided in group 1 if no periodontitis, group 2 if ≤25%, and group 3 if >25% of the teeth present were affected with periodontitis. Blood was tested before and 2 weeks after periodontal therapy for nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) levels. No HbNO was detected in any of the animals tested. There was no significant difference in the NOx plasma levels within each group or across the groups before and after the treatment, but a noticeable increase in NOx plasma levels was observed in group 3 after the treatment. Plasma NT was detected in only one third of the animals. NO levels varied greatly across individual dogs. The data are suggestive of an overall increase in systemic NO response 2 weeks after periodontal treatment in dogs with advanced periodontal disease, but the response is greatly individually-dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Principles of topical treatment: advancement in gel vehicle technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R

    2014-04-01

    Topical treatment is a pillar of dermatologic practice. The delivery of drug by a topical vehicle is dependent on complex physical chemistry and on how well patients apply the product. The potency of topical agents is not solely dependent on the concentration of active drug in the vehicle. A corticosteroid molecule may have vastly different potency depending on what vehicle is used to deliver it. Similarly, a new gel vehicle is able to deliver considerably more active antifungal than an older vehicle technology and may represent a promising vehicle for other novel formulations. The use of new vehicles can provide more effective means for treating patients with skin disease.

  15. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm 3 ), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  16. Leucopenia and treatment efficacy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Zhen; Mao, Yan-Ping; OuYang, Pu-Yun; Tang, Jie; Lan, Xiao-Wen; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Leucopenia or neutropenia during chemotherapy predicts better survival in several cancers. We aimed to assess whether leucopenia could be a biological measure of treatment and a marker of efficacy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (ANPC). We retrospectively analyzed 3826 patients with ANPC who received chemoradiotherapy. Leucopenia was categorised on the basis of worst grade during treatment according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.0: no leucopenia (grade 0), mild leucopenia (grade 1–2), and severe leucopenia (grade 3–4). Associations between leucopenia and survival were estimated by Cox proportional hazards model. Of the 3826 patients, 2511 (65.6 %) developed mild leucopenia (grade 1–2) and 807 (21.1 %) developed severe leucopenia (grade 3–4) during treatment; 508 (13.3 %) did not. A multivariate Cox model that included leucopenia determined that the hazard ratios (HR) of death for patients with mild and severe leucopenia were 0.69 [95 % confidence interval (95 %CI) 0.56-0.85, p < 0.001] and 0.75 (95 %CI 0.59-0.95, p = 0.019), respectively; the HR of distant metastasis for patients with mild and severe leucopenia were 0.77 (95 %CI 0.61-0.96, p = 0.023) and 0.99 (95 %CI 0.77-1.29, p = 0.995), respectively. Leucopenia had no effect on locoregional relapse. Our results indicate that mild leucopenia during chemoradiotherapy is associated with improved overall survival and distant metastasis–free survival in ANPC. Mild leucopenia may indicate appropriate dosage of chemotherapy. We can identify the patients who may benefit from chemotherapy if they experienced leucopenia during the treatment. Prospective trials are required to assess whether dosing adjustments based on leucopenia may improve chemotherapy efficacy

  17. mTOR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barilla, R.; Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 4 % of all malignancies. Much is known about the pathogenesis of RCC because of studies examining its close relationship with dysfunction of the Von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates nutritional needs, cell growth, and angiogenesisi in cells by down regulating or up regulating a variety of proteins including HIF. Until 2005, only a single agent high dose interleukin 2 was approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. More recently thanks to better knowledge in the field of molecular biology new treatment options appeared. Sunitinib and bevacizumab are currently considered to be treatment of first choice for patients in good and intermediate prognostic group and sorafenib is preferred second line treatment in the same patient population pretreated with cytokines after disease progression. Temsirolimus and everolimus, rapamycin analouges, have recently been tested in III trials in first and second line treatment in patients with advanced metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  18. Investigation of treatment strategy for advanced cancer according to treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kecheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of pancreatic cancer diagnoses are made at the advanced stage and when metastasis has already occurred, and the 1- and 5-year survival rates are extremely low. Cemcitabine remains the most frequently applied treatment option, yet the most effective chemotherapeutic agents and combinations with multiple agents and/or radiotherapy only marginally improve patient survival and may even establish an environment conducive to cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics. An alternative treatment modality, cryoablation, is available and has been applied at our institute to patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer since 2001. In this article, we present our collective experience with patient outcome using cryoablation, alone or combined with other treatment modalities such as brachytherapy (125iodine seed implantation. The overall outcomes have been encouraging, suggesting that comprehensive therapy including cryoablation may prolong the survival of patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we are achieving particular success with a novel combination of percutaneous cryoablation, cancer microvascular intervention with 125iodine seed implantation, and combined immunotherapy (3C applied using an individualized patient strategy (P. The 1- through 10-year survival rates of 145 patients treated with the so-called “3C+P model” are presented in support of this new strategy as a promising new treatment for advanced and metastatic cancer

  19. The biology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of dental caries: scientific advances in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero, Domenick T; Fontana, Margherita; Martínez-Mier, E Angeles; Ferreira-Zandoná, Andréa; Ando, Masatoshi; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Bayne, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    Scientific advances in cariology in the past 150 years have led to the understanding that dental caries is a chronic, dietomicrobial, site-specific disease caused by a shift from protective factors favoring tooth remineralization to destructive factors leading to demineralization. Epidemiologic data indicate that caries has changed in the last century; it now is distributed unequally in the U.S. population. People who are minorities, homeless, migrants, children with disabilities and of lower socioeconomic status suffer from the highest prevalence and severity of dental caries. Scientific advances have led to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of dental caries, but there is a need for new diagnostic tools and treatment methods. and Future management of dental caries requires early detection and risk assessment if the profession is to achieve timely and cost-effective prevention and treatment for those who need it most. Dental professionals look forward to the day when people of all ages and backgrounds view dental caries as a disease of the past.

  20. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Huszno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The HER2/neu ( ERBB2 oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed.

  1. Prognostic value of neoadjuvant treatment response in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Yvonne H; Tran Cao, Hop S; Chang, George J; Artinyan, Avo; Musher, Benjamin L; Smaglo, Brandon G; Massarweh, Nader N

    2018-06-01

    For locally advanced rectal cancer, response to neoadjuvant radiation has been associated with improved outcomes but has not been well characterized in general practice. The goals of this study were to describe disease response rates after neoadjuvant treatment and to evaluate the association between disease response and survival. Retrospective cohort study of patients aged 18-80 y with clinical stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma in the National Cancer Database (2006-2012). All patients underwent radical resection after neoadjuvant treatment. Treatment responses were defined as follows: no tumor response; intermediate-T and/or N downstaging with residual disease; and complete-ypT0N0. Multivariable, multinomial regression was used to evaluate the association between neoadjuvant radiation use and disease response. Multivariable Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between disease response and overall risk of death. Among 12,024 patients, 12% had a complete and 30% an intermediate response. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone was less likely to achieve an intermediate (relative risk ratio: 0.70 [0.56-0.88]) or a complete response (relative risk ratio: 0.59 [0.41-0.84]) relative to neoadjuvant radiation. Tumor response was associated with improved 5-y overall survival (complete = 90.2%, intermediate = 82.0%, no response = 70.5%; log-rank, P < 0.001). Complete and intermediate pathologic responses were associated with decreases in risk of death (hazard ratio: 0.40 [0.34-0.48] and 0.63 [0.57-0.69], respectively) compared to no response. Primary tumor and nodal response were independently associated with decreased risk of death. Neoadjuvant radiation is associated with treatment response, and pathologic response is associated with improved survival. Pathologic response may be an early benchmark for the oncologic effectiveness of neoadjuvant treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The present status of medical treatment for patients of advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kira, Shiro; Kuratomi, Yushiro; Matsuoka, Rokuro; Ishihara, Teruo

    1982-01-01

    Management of patients with inoperable, advanced lung cancer is one of the most important problems for many chest physicians, because those patients with stage 3 and stage 4 are over 70% of total patients. Although surgical treatment is attempted even in the case of stage 3 patients, many factors such as age, performance status, pulmonary and circulatory disorders accompanied with them and sometimes patient's refusal for surgical treatment preclude it. Therefore, therapeutic approach for these patients is focused on relieving their pains and troubles in their daily life. Radiation therapy is only a local treatment, but it can often control variable clinical manifestations with a highly probable estimation. Many patients can be free of disease even for a limited period. From this view-point, even at present, radiation therapy is a preferable therapeutic modality to maintain individual patient's better quality of life. (author)

  3. Present status of medical treatment for patients of advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kira, Shiro; Kuratomi, Yushiro; Matsuoka, Rokuro; Ishihara, Teruo (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    Management of patients with inoperable, advanced lung cancer is one of the most important problems for many chest physicians, because those patients with stage 3 and stage 4 are over 70% of total patients. Although surgical treatment is attempted even in the case of stage 3 patients, many factors such as age, performance status, pulmonary and circulatory disorders accompanied with them and sometimes patient's refusal for surgical treatment preclude it. Therefore, therapeutic approach for these patients is focused on relieving their pains and troubles in their daily life. Radiation therapy is only a local treatment, but it can often control variable clinical manifestations with a highly probable estimation. Many patients can be free of disease even for a limited period. From this view-point, even at present, radiation therapy is a preferable therapeutic modality to maintain individual patient's better quality of life.

  4. Advances in the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis – critical appraisal of fingolimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasperini C

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Claudio Gasperini,1 Serena Ruggieri,2 Chiara Rosa Mancinelli,2 Carlo Pozzilli2 1Department of Neurosciences, S Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza – University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, traditionally considered to be an autoimmune, demyelinating disease. Based on this understanding, initial therapeutic strategies were directed at immune modulation and inflammation control. At present, there are five licensed first-line disease-modifying drugs for MS in Europe, and two second-line treatments. Currently available MS therapies have shown significant efficacy throughout many trials, but they produce different side effects. Despite disease-modifying drugs being well known and safe, they require regular and frequent parenteral administration and are associated with limited long-term treatment adherence. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies is warranted. Several oral compounds are in late stages of development for treating MS. Fingolimod is an oral sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator that has demonstrated superior efficacy compared with placebo and interferon β-1a in phase III studies. It has already been approved in the treatment of MS. This review focuses on advances in current and novel oral treatment approaches in MS. We summarily review the oral compounds in this study, focusing on the recent development, approval, and the clinical experience with fingolimod. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, oral compounds, fingolimod, sphingosine-1-phosphate, patient satisfaction, adherence

  5. Salvage treatment after r-interferon α-2a in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilembo, N.; Buzzoni, R.; Bajetta, E.; Di Bartolomeo, M.; De Braud, F.; Castellani, R.; Maffioli, L.; Celio, L.; Villa, E.; Lorusso, V.; Fosser, V.; Buzzi, F.

    1993-01-01

    The use of interferon (IFN) in neuroendocrine advanced tumors has achieved control of hormonal symptoms but low objective tumor response rate. In patients resistant to, or failing on, IFN a second line treatment may be required. Seventeen patients having received recombinant IFN α-2a as last treatment entered the study. There were 12 carcinoids, 3 medullary thyroid carcinomas, one Merkel cell carcinoma, and one neuroendocrine pancreatic tumor. Two different treatments were used: one radiometabolic therapy with metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in 3 patients with high MIBG uptake and one polychemotherapy regimen, including streptozotocin 500 mg/m 2 intravenously days 1, 2, 3 and epirubicin 75 mg/m 2 intravenously day 1, in the remaining 14 patients. Stable disease with relief of symptoms and tumor marker reduction was obtained in two patients receiving MIGB therapy, whereas the third patient had progressive disease. In the chemotherapy group only one partial response was obtained and neither tumor marker reduction nor subjective improvement were seen. Our second-line treatment was not especially effective but may be considered for rapidly progressive and/or symptomatic disease. The radiometabolic therapy appears promising in symptomatic patients with small tumor burden whereas our chemotherapy regimen appears ineffective. (orig.)

  6. GPs' views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP's workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. To explore GPs' views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient's interests. GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  7. Smoothened inhibitors in the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstfeld, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    The Hedgehog pathway has been identified as a key element in the development of many forms of cancer. Smoothened (Smo) inhibitors are known to beneficially interfere with the Hedgehog pathway and are currently under investigation as anticancer drugs for many tumor entities. Reviewed here are the most recent developments in clinical research on Smo inhibitors for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC). When reviewing the literature of the past 12 months, it is striking to see the rapid evolution of the field. Compounds that have been presented as powerful new drug candidates 12 months ago have now been discontinued, whereas new ones have emerged. Reports on 13 drug candidates have been identified: one marketed, vismodegib, eight currently under development (phase I-II) and four for which clinical investigation for BCC is currently not being pursued. Smo inhibitors are a promising drug class for the treatment of BCC. To date, most candidates are in early stage development and are expected to enter the market in approximately 5-8 years, if successful.

  8. Improved cracking characteristics of bitumen through advanced froth treatment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S.H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Dabros, T. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Advanced Separation Technologies Laboratory; Humphries, A. [Albemarle Catalysts Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the dominant refinery conversion process for producing transportation fuels. Feed to the FCC unit is heavy gas oil (HGO). Its quality depends on the crude used and the processes involved. Bitumen-derived crude (BDC), including synthetic crude oil (SCO) is less superior to produce FCC feed than stocks from conventional sources. As a result, North American refiners have limited the use of BDC in their conventional FCC-based operations. This paper examined the improved cracking characteristics of bitumen through an advanced froth treatment process. This involved processing of the bitumen with paraffinic solvent in froth treatment with removal of some asphaltenes, CCR precursors, and metals. The paper discussed the experimental and subsequent results and discussion, including cracking characteristics; product quality; synergetic effect; and economic benefits. It was concluded that the poisoning effect by some deleterious components such as nitrogen compounds in feeds on the catalyst could be reduced or compensated for by higher C/O ratios (more catalyst per unit weight of feed). In addition, as conversion increased, sulfur in gasoline decreased slightly and linearly with more or less the same magnitude for the two bitumens. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  9. Update on Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Hallett, M.D

    2000-01-01

    @@Prevention The best treatment is to prevent the illness in the first place or to retard its progression. There is considerable new information about Parkinson's disease genetics and pathophysiology that hopefully will lead to therapy in this regard, but there is still nothing definitive. The only medication for which there are some reasonable data is selegiline, a monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor. This drug actually has a symptomatic effect since it prevents the breakdown ofdopamine in the brain. Some trials have shown a beneficial effect separate from its symptomatic effect. The situation is rather controversial, however, and in one study there was an excess of mortality. {4}There are no supportive data for antioxidants such as vitamin E, and a trial of the neurotrophic factor GDNF was not positive.

  10. Immunotherapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beka Solomon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring antibodies against amyloid-β peptides have been found in human cerebrospinal fluid and in the plasma of healthy individuals, but were significantly lower in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients, suggesting that AD may be an immunodeficient disorder. The performance of anti-amyloid-β antibodies in transgenic mice models of AD showed that they are delivered to the central nervous system, preventing and dissolving amyloid-β plaques. Moreover, these antibodies protected the mice from learning and age-related memory deficits. Active and/or passive immunization against the amyloid-β peptide has been proposed as a method for preventing and/or treating AD. Immunotherapy represents fascinating ways to test the amyloid hypothesis and offers genuine opportunities for AD treatment, but requires careful antigen and antibody selection to maximize efficacy and minimize adverse events.

  11. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Giau, Vo Van; Vo, Tuong Kha

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the disadvantages of current pharmaceutical dosage options for this chronic disorder. They could have different strengths, such as offering a stable diffusion of active substance, avoiding the first pass metabolism, and reducing system adverse reactions. This article reviews the technical principles, novel techniques of transdermal delivery drug, and prospects for future development for the management of cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions in AD patients. PMID:28706327

  12. Current advances in transdermal delivery of drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Giau, Vo Van; Vo, Tuong Kha

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder, which will play an increasingly important role both socially and financially in the aging populations. Treatments for AD show modest improvements in cognition and global functioning among patients. Furthermore, the oral administration of treating AD has had some drawbacks that decrease the medication adherence and efficacy of the therapy. Transdermal drugs are proposed as an alternative remedy to overcome the disadvantages of current pharmaceutical dosage options for this chronic disorder. They could have different strengths, such as offering a stable diffusion of active substance, avoiding the first pass metabolism, and reducing system adverse reactions. This article reviews the technical principles, novel techniques of transdermal delivery drug, and prospects for future development for the management of cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions in AD patients.

  13. Disease progression continues in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and effective subthalamic nucleus stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilker, R; Portman, AT; Voges, J; Staal, MJ; Burghaus, L; van Laar, T; Koulousakis, A; Maguire, RP; Pruim, J; de Jong, BM; Herholz, K; Sturm, [No Value; Heiss, WD; Leenders, KL

    Objectives: Glutamate mediated excitotoxicity of the hyperactive subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been reported to contribute to nigral degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation of the STN (STN DBS), in its role as a highly effective treatment of severe PD motor complications,

  14. Effective multimodality treatment for advanced epidermoid carcinoma of the female genital tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalra, J.; Cortes, E.; Chen, S.; Krumholz, B.; Rovinsky, J.J.; Molho, L.; Seltzer, V.; Papantoniou, P.; Lee, J.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen patients with advanced or recurrent squamous-cell carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, and urethra were treated with simultaneous combination chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil infusion and mitomycin C) and radiotherapy (3,000 rad for a period of three weeks). Three to four weeks after completion of radiotherapy, 13 of 15 patients achieved partial or complete tumor shrinkage. Nine of 15 patients are alive, eight of whom (at a median follow-up time of 24 months) have no evidence of disease. The longest survival time was 45 + months. There was minimal toxicity associated with this therapy. The results of this pilot study suggest that the simultaneous administration of radiation and chemotherapy is an effective method of treatment of advanced female genital tract carcinoma

  15. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tetanus: prophylaxis and treatment of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSS, D E; KRAUT, J J

    1959-05-01

    Cleansing and debridement is paramount in dealing with tetanus-prone wounds (severe crushing injuries, piercing wounds, blisters and burns are outstanding examples, particularly if contaminated with dirt, grass or other debris). Prophylaxis then is relatively easy in persons who have been actively immunized by toxoid injections. For them, a "booster" injection is indicated. Use of antitoxin, however, is hazardous, whether for prophylaxis or for treatment of the disease. Since it may in itself cause severe disease, including anaphylactic reaction and serum sickness, decision to use it must be weighed against the possibility of the development of tetanus in each case. To prepare for use of it, careful history should be taken, with particular reference to sensitivity to horse dander. Dermal tests, and perhaps ophthalmic tests, for sensitivity to the serum should be carried out. Even the tests may be hazardous and precautions should be taken accordingly. If it is decided that the use of antitoxin is necessary even though the patient is sensitive to the material, desensitization must be carried out promptly, with adequate preparation for severe reaction. There is experimental evidence that antibiotics of the tetracycline group, given soon after injury, may have prophylactic effect against tetanus.

  17. Advances in diagnosis and management of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ciarán P; Bai, Julio C; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that is induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of approximately 1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, owing to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsy specimens. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without a biopsy in certain circumstances, especially in children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy each can be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, because the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing nondietary therapies. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ciarán P.; Bai, Julio C.; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of ∼1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, due to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable, real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA DQ2 and DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without biopsy in certain circumstances, especially for children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy can each be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, as the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing non-dietary therapies. PMID:25662623

  19. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Nicola; Conforti, Giulio; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Meglio, Mario; Fernandez, Eduardo; Papacci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression) and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures) have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields

  20. Energy-Based Facial Rejuvenation: Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Christopher J; Marcus, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The market for nonsurgical, energy-based facial rejuvenation techniques has increased exponentially since lasers were first used for skin rejuvenation in 1983. Advances in this area have led to a wide range of products that require the modern facial plastic surgeon to have a large repertoire of knowledge. To serve as a guide for current trends in the development of technology, applications, and outcomes of laser and laser-related technology over the past 5 years. We performed a review of PubMed from January 1, 2011, to March 1, 2016, and focused on randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and clinical practice guidelines including case control, case studies and case reports when necessary, and included 14 articles we deemed landmark articles before 2011. Three broad categories of technology are leading non-energy-based rejuvenation technology: lasers, light therapy, and non-laser-based thermal tightening devices. Laser light therapy has continued to diversify with the use of ablative and nonablative resurfacing technologies, fractionated lasers, and their combined use. Light therapy has developed for use in combination with other technologies or stand alone. Finally, thermally based nonlaser skin-tightening devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) and intense focused ultrasonography (IFUS), are evolving technologies that have changed rapidly over the past 5 years. Improvements in safety and efficacy for energy-based treatment have expanded the patient base considering these therapies viable options. With a wide variety of options, the modern facial plastic surgeon can have a frank discussion with the patient regarding nonsurgical techniques that were never before available. Many of these patients can now derive benefit from treatments requiring significantly less downtime than before while the clinician can augment the treatment to maximize benefit to fit the patient's time schedule.

  1. Vedolizumab in the treatment of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabar, Dino; Hirsch, Ayal; Rubin, David T

    2016-01-01

    Vedolizumab, a recent addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in Crohn's disease, is promising in efficacy, durability of remission and safety. It is the first gut selective biologic treatment, acting by targeting α4β7-integrin, a receptor expressed on activated lymphocytes and binding to MAdCAM1, a cell adhesion molecule selectively expressed in the circulatory system of the digestive tract, preventing trafficking of lymphocytes to the gut. The pivotal GEMINI studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab in achieving clinical response and clinical remission in patients with moderately to severely active CD who are naïve or have previously failed therapy with TNF-antagonists, immunomodulators or dependent on steroids. Vedolizumab had a favorable safety profile and specifically showed no evidence of PML, reactivation of latent TB or hepatitis B. Overall, the number of malignancies in the clinical trials was small; however, long-term exposure was limited. Vedolizumab can be given as a first-line therapy or following treatment failure, and was tolerated as part of combination therapy. More medications with similar and novel therapeutic mechanisms are anticipated in the coming years.

  2. Hereditary Angioedema: The Economics of Treatment of an Orphan Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumry, William Raymond

    2018-01-01

    This review will discuss the cost burden of hereditary angioedema on patients, healthcare systems, and society. The impact of availability of and access to novel and specific therapies on morbidity, mortality, and the overall burden of disease will be explored along with potential changes in treatment paradigms to improve effectiveness and reduce cost of treatment. The prevalence of orphan diseases, legislative incentives to encourage development of orphan disease therapies and the impact of orphan disease treatment on healthcare payment systems will be discussed.

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid in advanced polycystic liver disease: A phase 2 multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnolo, Hedwig M A; Kievit, Wietske; Takkenberg, R Bart; Riaño, Ioana; Bujanda, Luis; Neijenhuis, Myrte K; Brunenberg, Ellen J L; Beuers, Ulrich; Banales, Jesus M; Drenth, Joost P H

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) inhibits proliferation of polycystic human cholangiocytes in vitro and hepatic cystogenesis in a rat model of polycystic liver disease (PLD) in vivo. Our aim was to test whether UDCA may beneficially affect liver volume in patients with advanced PLD. We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in symptomatic PLD patients from three tertiary referral centers. Patients with PLD and total liver volume (TLV) ⩾2500ml were randomly assigned to UDCA treatment (15-20mg/kg/day) for 24weeks, or to no treatment. Primary endpoint was proportional change in TLV. Secondary endpoints were change in symptoms and health-related quality of life. We performed a post-hoc analysis of the effect of UDCA on liver cyst volume (LCV). We included 34 patients and were able to assess primary endpoint in 32 patients, 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD). Proportional TLV increased by 4.6±7.7% (mean TLV increased from 6697ml to 6954ml) after 24weeks of UDCA treatment compared to 3.1±3.8% (mean TLV increased from 5512ml to 5724ml) in the control group (p=0.493). LCV was not different after 24weeks between controls and UDCA treated patients (p=0.848). However, UDCA inhibited LCV growth in ADPKD patients compared to ADPKD controls (p=0.049). UDCA administration for 24weeks did not reduce TLV in advanced PLD, but UDCA reduced LCV growth in ADPKD patients. Future studies might explore whether ADPKD and ADPLD patients respond differently to UDCA treatment. Current therapies for polycystic liver disease are invasive and have high recurrence risks. Our trial showed that the drug, ursodeoxycholic acid, was not able to reduce liver volume in patients with polycystic liver disease. However, a subgroup analysis in patients that have kidney cysts as well showed that liver cyst volume growth was reduced in patients who received ursodeoxycholic acid in comparison

  4. Advanced imaging techniques for small bowel Crohn's disease: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Inês; Magro, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) is intrinsically reliant on imaging techniques, due to the preponderance of small bowel disease and its transmural pattern of inflammation. Ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most widely employed imaging methods and have excellent diagnostic accuracy in most instances. Some limitations persist, perhaps the most clinically relevant being the distinction between inflammatory and fibrotic strictures. In this regard, several methodologies have recently been tested in animal models and human patients, namely US strain elastography, shear wave elastography, contrast-enhanced US, magnetization transfer MRI and contrast dynamics in standard MRI. Technical advances in each of the imaging methods may expand their indications. The addition of oral contrast to abdominal US appears to substantially improve its diagnostic capabilities compared to standard US. Ionizing dose-reduction methods in CT can decrease concern about cumulative radiation exposure in CD patients and diffusion-weighted MRI may reduce the need for gadolinium contrast. Clinical indexes of disease activity and severity are also increasingly relying on imaging scores, such as the recently developed Lémann Index. In this review we summarize some of the recent advances in small bowel CD imaging and how they might affect clinical practice in the near future.

  5. Punction methods of diagnostics and treatment of thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Tolstokorov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this research is to study the punction methods role under diagnostics and treatment of different thyroid diseases. The authors of this article present treatment methods of 121 patients with different thyroid diseases. The received results allow to draw a conclusion, that punction methods of diagnostics and treatment of thyroid disease can be used as independent methods of treatment and in a complex with other medication remedies

  6. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-30

    To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV 1 -to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m 3 . In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option.

  7. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montano N

    2015-02-01

    neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields. Keywords: microvascular decompression, percutaneous balloon compression, gamma knife radiosurgery, surgical treatment, magnetic resonance imaging, therapy

  8. Nutrition in the prevention and treatment of disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coulston, Ann M; Boushey, Carol; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2013-01-01

    .... Given its unique focus and extensive coverage of clinical applications and disease prevention, this edition is organized for easy integration into advanced upper-division or graduate nutrition curriculums...

  9. Cispaltino in radiotherapy and treatment of cancer advanced cervical and high risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini, A.; Mara, C.; Terradas, M.; Ferreira, V.; Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fulltext: Uterine cervix cancer (CCU) is a frequent disease Uruguay, killing more than 100 women per year. The standard treatment CCU for patients with locoregionally advanced cataloged as (LRA), stages IIB-IVA and operated and in those patients with high risk factors relapse (AFR) was until 1999 the radiotherapy (RT) exclusive. in February that year the National Cancer Institute USA underwent a medical alert recommending the use of chemotherapy (CT) with concomitant RT (mainly cisplatin) in this group of patients. This alert was due to the publication of 5 randomized work showing an improvement in both the locoregional control and overall survival. In June 2000, both the RT Service ospital and Clinics in INDO, I modified the standard treatment of these patients by adding cisplatin 40mg/m2 weekly for the treatment of external RT. From that date until January 2003, 36 patients were included with CCU LRA or operated with AFR. the risk factors were: tumors larger than 4cm, parametrial invasion, lymph positive, involved margins, suboptimal surgery or deep infiltration stroma. 18 patients had stage IIIB or IV and of which 6 had failure obstructive acute renal (acute obstructive renal failure). Tolerance was acceptable, only one patient not tolerated treatment for severe leucopenia continuing exclusive RT; 68% had leukopenia grade - 2 and there was no increase in toxicity gastrointestinal or urinary. There were no treatment related deaths. When comparing historical results verified an improvement in complete answers to all stages primarily for advanced in the second period with the addition of cisplatin. Stage IB2-IIB: 52% (RT-CT) - 45% RT (historical) ns. Stage IIB: 22% (RT-CT) - 15% RT (historical) sl. In those patients with acute obstructive renal failure in any complete response was not achieved. Due to the short track differences still not tested for the surviving whole or survive disease-free

  10. Rasagiline in treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Nayak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Lakshmi Nayak1, Claire Henchcliffe21Department of Neurology; 2Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USAAbstract: Rasagiline (N-propargyl-1 (R-aminoindan is a novel propargylamine, irreversible, selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor for treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD, a progressive condition associated with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Rasagiline inhibits striatal dopamine metabolism, thereby providing relief from motor symptoms of PD. It may be dosed once daily and, unlike selegiline, it is metabolized to non-amphetamine compounds. In a large clinical trial, rasagiline has proved effective, safe, and well tolerated in early PD as monotherapy. In two phase III clinical trials in advanced PD with motor fluctuations, rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa significantly decreases “off” time. In animal models of PD, data supports a neuroprotective effect of rasagiline, and its active metabolite aminoindan. Analysis of delayed-start clinical trial suggests the potential for disease modification, and further trials are examining this effect.Keywords: rasagiline, monoamine oxidase inhibitor, propargylamine, Parkinson’s disease

  11. Fluctuating functions related to quality of life in advanced Parkinson disease: effects of duodenal levodopa infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isacson, D; Bingefors, K; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess fluctuations in quality of life (QoL) and motor performance in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) treated with continuous daytime duodenal levodopa/carbidopa infusion or conventional therapy. METHODS: Of 18 patients completing a 6-week trial (DIREQT), 12 were...... followed for up to 6 months and assessed using electronic diaries and the PD Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39). RESULTS: During the trial and follow-up, major diurnal fluctuations were observed, especially for hyperkinesia, 'off' time, ability to walk and depression. Duodenal infusion was associated...... with significantly more favourable outcomes compared with conventional treatment for satisfaction with overall functioning, 'off' time and ability to walk, with improved outcomes with PDQ-39. CONCLUSIONS: Relative to conventional treatment, infusion therapy may stabilize and significantly improve motor function...

  12. Advance directives as a tool to respect patients' values and preferences: discussion on the case of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteri, Corinna

    2018-02-20

    The proposal of the new criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on biomarker data is making possible a diagnosis of AD at the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or predementia/prodromal- stage. Given the present lack of effective treatments for AD, the opportunity for the individuals to personally take relevant decisions and plan for their future before and if cognitive deterioration occurs is one the main advantages of an early diagnosis. Advance directives are largely seen as an effective tool for planning medical care in the event the subject becomes incompetent. Nevertheless, their value has been questioned with regard to people with dementia by scholars who refer to the arguments of personal identity and of patient's changing interests before and after the onset of dementia. In this paper, I discuss the value of advance directives in Alzheimer's disease and other kind of dementia. Despite critics, I argue that advance directives are especially advisable in dementia and provide reasons in favor of their promotion at an early stage of the disease as a valuable tool to respect patients' values and preferences on medical treatment, including participation in research and end of life decisions. I mainly support advance directives that include both decisions regarding health care and the appointment of an attorney in fact. I conclude that patients with AD at a prodromal or early stage should be offered the opportunity to execute an advance directive, and that not to honor a demented individual's directive would be an unacceptable form of discrimination towards those patients.

  13. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Organophosphorous Poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Balali-Mood

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorous compounds have been employed as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents. Toxicity of organophosphorous compounds is a result of excessive cholinergic stimulation through inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase. Clinical manifestations include cholinergic syndromes, central nervous system and cardiovascular disorders. Organophosphorous pesticide poisonings are common in developing worlds including Iran and Sri Lanka. Nerve agents were used during the Iraq-Iran war in 1983-1988 and in a terrorist attack in Japan in 1994-1995. Following decontamination, depending on the severity of intoxication the administration of atropine to counteract muscarinic over-stimulation, and an oxime to reactivate acetyl cholinesterase are indicated. Supportive and intensive care therapy including diazepam to control convulsions and mechanical respiration may be required. Recent investigations have revealed that intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate to produce mild to moderate alkalinization is effective. Gacyclidine; an antiglutamatergic compound, was also proved to be beneficial in conjunction with atropine, pralidoxime, and diazepam in nerve agent poisoning. Intravenous magnesium sulfate decreased hospitalization duration and improved outcomes in patients with organophosphorous poisoning. Bio-scavengers including fresh frozen plasma or albumin have recently been suggested as a useful therapy through clearing of free organophosphates. Hemofiltration and antioxidants are also suggested for organophosphorous poisoning. Recombinant bacterial phosphotriesterases and hydrolases that are able to transfer organophosphorous-degrading enzymes are very promising in delayed treatment of organophosphorous poisoning. Recently, encapsulation of drugs or enzymes in nanocarriers has also been proposed. Given the signs and symptoms of organophosphorous poisoning, health professionals should remain updated about the recent advances in treatment of

  14. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Organophosphorous Poisonings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Saber, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorous compounds have been employed as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents. Toxicity of organophosphorous compounds is a result of excessive cholinergic stimulation through inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase. Clinical manifestations include cholinergic syndromes, central nervous system and cardiovascular disorders. Organophosphorous pesticide poisonings are common in developing worlds including Iran and Sri Lanka. Nerve agents were used during the Iraq-Iran war in 1983-1988 and in a terrorist attack in Japan in 1994-1995. Following decontamination, depending on the severity of intoxication the administration of atropine to counteract muscarinic over-stimulation, and an oxime to reactivate acetyl cholinesterase are indicated. Supportive and intensive care therapy including diazepam to control convulsions and mechanical respiration may be required. Recent investigations have revealed that intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate to produce mild to moderate alkalinization is effective. Gacyclidine; an antiglutamatergic compound, was also proved to be beneficial in conjunction with atropine, pralidoxime, and diazepam in nerve agent poisoning. Intravenous magnesium sulfate decreased hospitalization duration and improved outcomes in patients with organophosphorous poisoning. Bio-scavengers including fresh frozen plasma or albumin have recently been suggested as a useful therapy through clearing of free organophosphates. Hemofiltration and antioxidants are also suggested for organophosphorous poisoning. Recombinant bacterial phosphotriesterases and hydrolases that are able to transfer organophosphorous-degrading enzymes are very promising in delayed treatment of organophosphorous poisoning. Recently, encapsulation of drugs or enzymes in nanocarriers has also been proposed. Given the signs and symptoms of organophosphorous poisoning, health professionals should remain updated about the recent advances in treatment of organophosphorous poisoning

  15. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  16. Advances in the treatment of children with phonological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceron, Marizete Ilha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of phonological disorders considering extra-linguistic and linguistic variables are important to ensure that the alteration is resolved promptly and in the best manner as possible. Aim: To analyze therapeutic advances (phonetic inventory, phonological system, and distinctive features in children with phonological disorders by considering the therapeutic approach used, the severity of the phonological disorder, age, and the number of therapeutic sessions. Methods: We conducted a case series study of 94 children aged 3 years, 9 months through 8 years, 5 months. The children were divided into groups based on the therapeutic approach used (Modified Cycles, Maximal Oppositions, ABAB-Withdrawal, and Multiple Probes, the severity of their phonological disorder, age, and the number of therapy sessions with each individual. Phonetic inventory, the phonological system, and the number of altered distinctive features were analyzed. Results: The greater the number of therapy sessions, the greater the number of sounds acquired. The number of sounds present in the phonetic inventory and phonological system increased and the severity of the phonological disorder decreased with all of the therapeutic approaches studied. There was also a reduction in the incidence of altered distinctive features. Conclusion: There was a favorable evolution in phonetic inventory and phonological system acquisitions as well as a reduction in the number of altered distinctive features for all 3 therapeutic models regardless of the severity of the phonological disorder, age, or number of sessions.

  17. Application of advanced oxidative process in treatment radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Catia; Sakata, Solange K.; Ferreira, Rafael V.P.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2009-01-01

    The ion exchange resin is used in the water purification system in both nuclear research and power reactors. Combined with active carbon, the resin removes dissolved elements from water when the nuclear reactor is operating. After its consumption, it becomes a special type of radioactive waste. The usual treatment to this type of waste is the immobilization with Portland cement, which is simple and low cost. However, its low capacity of immobilization and the increase volume of waste have been the challenges. The development of new technologies capable of destroying this waste completely by increasing its solidification is the main target due to the possibility of both volume and cost reduction. The objective of this work was to evaluate ion exchange resin degradation by Advanced Oxidative Process using Fenton's Reagent (H 2 O 2 / Fe +2 ) in different concentration and temperatures. One advantage of this process is that all additional organic compounds or inorganic solids produced are oxidized easily. The degradation experiments were conducted with IRA-400 resin and Fenton's Reagents, varying the H 2O 2 concentration (30% e 50%) and heat temperature (25, 60 and 100 deg C). The resin degradation was confirmed by the presence of BaCO 3 as a white precipitate resulting from the reaction between the Ba(OH) 2 and the CO 2 from the resin degradation. All experiments run in duplicate. Higher degradation was observed with Fenton's Reagent (Fe +2 /H 2 O 2 30%) at 100 deg C after 2 hours. (author)

  18. Advances in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L Kunz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pamela L Kunz, George A FisherStanford University Medical Center, CA, USAAbstract: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs are a rare and heterogeneous class of neoplasms. While surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment, non-surgical therapies play a role in the setting of unresectable and metastatic disease. The goals of medical therapy are directed both at alleviating symptoms of peptide release and shrinking tumor mass. Biotherapies such as somatostatin analogs and interferon can decrease the secretion of peptides and inhibit their end-organ effects. A second objective for treatment of unresectable GEP-NETs is limiting tumor growth. Options for limiting tumor growth include somatostatin analogs, systemic chemotherapy, locoregional therapies, ionizing radiation, external beam radiation, and newer targeted agents. In particular, angiogenesis inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and mTOR inhibitors have shown early promising results. The rarity of these tumors, their resistance to standard chemotherapy, and the excellent performance status of most of these patients, make a strong argument for consideration of novel therapeutic trials.Keywords: neuroendocrine, gastroenteropancreatic, carcinoid, somatostatin

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Liver Diseases in a Tertiary Referral Center in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Ivón Castellanos Fernández, MD, PhD, MP

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The clinical profile of AILD in a sample of the Cuban population is similar to that reported in South areas (Developing countries. AIH was more frequent than PBC, and usually presented with advanced liver disease that responded poorly to treatment.

  20. Treatment of congestion in upper respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli O Meltzer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eli O Meltzer1, Fernan Caballero2, Leonard M Fromer3, John H Krouse4, Glenis Scadding51Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center, San Diego, CA and Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, USA; 2Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service, Centro Medico-Docente La Trinidad, Caracas, Venezuela; 3David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 4Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA; 5Department of Allergy and Rhinology, Royal National TNE Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Congestion, as a symptom of upper respiratory tract diseases including seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis, acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and nasal polyposis, is principally caused by mucosal inflammation. Though effective pharmacotherapy options exist, no agent is universally efficacious; therapeutic decisions must account for individual patient preferences. Oral H1-antihistamines, though effective for the common symptoms of allergic rhinitis, have modest decongestant action, as do leukotriene receptor antagonists. Intranasal antihistamines appear to improve congestion better than oral forms. Topical decongestants reduce congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, but local adverse effects make them unsuitable for long-term use. Oral decongestants show some efficacy against congestion in allergic rhinitis and the common cold, and can be combined with oral antihistamines. Intranasal corticosteroids have broad anti-inflammatory activities, are the most potent long-term pharmacologic treatment of congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, and show some congestion relief in rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Immunotherapy and surgery may be used in some cases refractory to pharmacotherapy. Steps in congestion management include (1 diagnosis of the cause(s, (2 patient education and monitoring, (3 avoidance of environmental triggers where possible, (4 pharmacotherapy, and (5 immunotherapy

  1. Treatment of clinically diagnosed laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Tarek Fouad; Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat

    2010-11-01

    To determine the incidence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) stool antigen (HPSA) in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD), and to make a comparison of 2 treatment regimens that have been used based on the presence or absence of HPSA positivity in patients with LPRD. Randomized controlled study. Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismalia, Egypt. A total of 212 patients with symptoms of LPRD. Patients were evaluated by laryngoscopy, ambulatory pH monitoring for 24 hours, and HPSA testing. Esomeprazole magnesium as a monotherapy was evaluated vs triple therapy in patients with HP infection. To determine the incidence of HPSA in patients with LPRD, and to make a comparison of 2 treatment regimens that have been used based on the presence or absence of HPSA positivity in patients with LPRD. Persistent dry cough and a feeling of a lump in the throat (globus sensation) were the most frequent symptoms of LPRD, while posterior laryngeal inflammation was the main laryngoscopic finding. Results from the HPSA test were positive in 57% of the studied group. Patients with negative HPSA were treated with esomeprazole as single modality with a reported improvement score of 96.6%. Patients with positive HPSA test results were divided into 2 groups: 1 received only esomeprazole, with reported improvement in 40%, whereas the second group was treated with esomeprazole, plus amoxicillin sodium and clarithromycin (triple therapy) and reported a 90% incidence of symptom improvement. The incidence of HP infection in patients with LPRD in our study was 57%. Triple therapy showed a higher cure rate in patients with HPSA-positive test results.

  2. Rotigotine transdermal patch for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Rey, María Verónica; Ratti, Pietro Lucca; Rascol, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    Rotigotine, a non-ergot dopamine agonist, has been developed as a novel transdermal formulation. The rotigotine transdermal patch has received EMEA marketing authorization for the treatment of adult patients with early or advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) or with moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS). FDA originally granted a marketing authorization for early PD, which was later suspended, and is now studying the authorization for RLS. The aim of this review is to review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics as well as the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the rotigotine transdermal patch in PD. Source material was identified using a PubMed search for the term 'rotigotine' and PD. Articles published up to January 2011 or abstract submitted to most relevant international neurology congresses were reviewed. The rotigotine transdermal patch is efficacious for the treatment of PD. Tolerability profile appears to be well within the range of that observed with other non-ergot dopamine agonists in PD. Application-site reactions were the most frequent adverse event, and they were considered mild to moderate in the majority of cases. The rotigotine transdermal patch offers a safe and efficacious alternative for the treatment of PD. Further studies should focus on the possibility that continuous dopamine stimulation by means of the transdermal patch has any influence on levodopa-related motor complications. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Robottom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J RobottomDepartment of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.Keywords: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, rasagiline, selegiline, Parkinson's disease, efficacy, safety

  4. Advances in research on and diagnosis and treatment of achondroplasia in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Liu, Zeying; Liu, Zhenxing; Zhao, Heng; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Cui, Yazhou; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Achondroplasia is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease. Research on achondroplasia in China, however, has received little emphasis. Around 80–90% of cases of neonatal achondroplasia result from mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) according to polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). Recently, genetic research on achondroplasia in China made a major breakthrough by revealing two novel mutations located on the FGFR3 gene, thus helping to complete the pathological molecular map of achondroplasia. There are still, however, unknown aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of achondroplasia. This review will summarize advances in research on and the clinical diagnosis and treatment of achondroplasia in China. PMID:25343101

  5. Treatment strategies for locally advanced rectal cancer with synchronous resectable liver metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Young Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer are estimated to be diagnosed with synchronous liver metastasis (LM. The only method to get cured is to achieve curative resection for both primary and LM. When it comes to locally advanced rectal cancer with synchronous LM, determination of the treatment strategy for each individual is a quite complex procedure, because it demands sophisticated consideration for both local and systemic control. Timing for the application of systemic chemotherapy (CTx, determination of a chemotherapeutic agent, radiation dose and fractions, and sequencing of preoperative treatment and surgeries are all essential components for establishing optimal treatment strategies for the patients with this disease. In this article, treatment strategies proposed in the literature will be reviewed in the light of oncologic outcomes and treatment toxicity with their possible advantages and disadvantages. Owing to a lack of concrete evidences for the best strategy, this article can guide authors to a better way of determining more tailored treatment for each individual.

  6. Regenerative Medicine: Advances from Developmental to Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Nicholas F; Frith, Thomas J R; Barbaric, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Chronic tissue and organ failure caused by an injury, disease, ageing or congenital defects represents some of the most complex therapeutic challenges and poses a significant financial healthcare burden. Regenerative medicine strategies aim to fulfil the unmet clinical need by restoring the normal tissue function either through stimulating the endogenous tissue repair or by using transplantation strategies to replace the missing or defective cells. Stem cells represent an essential pillar of regenerative medicine efforts as they provide a source of progenitors or differentiated cells for use in cell replacement therapies. Whilst significant leaps have been made in controlling the stem cell fates and differentiating them to cell types of interest, transitioning bespoke cellular products from an academic environment to off-the-shelf clinical treatments brings about a whole new set of challenges which encompass manufacturing, regulatory and funding issues. Notwithstanding the need to resolve such issues before cell replacement therapies can benefit global healthcare, mounting progress in the field has highlighted regenerative medicine as a realistic prospect for treating some of the previously incurable conditions.

  7. Rasagiline for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Fossati, Chiara; Torti, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Rasagiline is a potent, selective, irreversible Monoamine Oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitor, developed to prolong the action of dopamine in the brain. It has been demonstrated that rasagiline can improve motor and some non-motor symptoms (NMS) in both early and advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and it also exhibits neuroprotective and antiapoptotic properties. The objective of this review, performed by a Medline search on the most recent papers investigating the therapeutic effects of rasagiline, is to describe the role of rasagiline in the schedule of treatment of early and advanced PD patients. It will then focus on its role in treating NMS, fatigue, early morning off and cognitive decline, which heavily affect quality of life for PD patients. Rasagiline is an efficacious, well-tolerated, easy to use drug. The drug has been extensively studied and has proven its efficacy in monotherapy and in combination with any other antiparkinsonian therapy. It proved to be efficacious in reducing 'off' time and in improving early morning 'off' but also some NMS, thus enhancing the therapeutic approach to PD.

  8. Treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease: known, unknown, and both

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Robert N FoleyChronic Disease Research Group, Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Erythropoiesis is a rapidly evolving research arena and several mechanistic insights show therapeutic promise. In contrast with the rapid advance of mechanistic science, optimal management of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease remains a difficult and polarizing issue. Although several large hemoglobin target trials have been performed, optimal treatment targets rema...

  9. Changes in different organic matter fractions during conventional treatment and advanced treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Chen; Xiaojian Zhang; Lingxia Zhu; Wenjie He; Hongda Han

    2011-01-01

    XAD-8 resin isolation of organic matter in water was used to divide organic matter into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions.A pilot plant was used to investigate the change in both fractions during conventional and advanced treatment processes.The treatment of hydrophobic organics (HPO), rather than hydrophilic organicas (HPI), should carry greater emphasis due to HPO's higher trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) and haloacetic acid formation potential (HAAFP).The removal of hydrophobic matter and its transmission into hydrophilic matter reduced ultimate DBP yield during the disinfection process.The results showed that sand filtration, ozonation, and biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration had distinct influences on the removal of both organic fractions.Additionally, the combination of processes changed the organic fraction proportions present during treatment.The use of ozonation and BAC maximized organic matter removal efficiency, especially for the hydrophobic fraction.In sum, the combination of pre-ozonation,conventional treatment, and O3-BAC removed 48% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 60% of HPO, 30% of HPI, 63% of THMFP,and 85% of HAAFP.The use of conventional treatment and O3-BAC without pre-ozonation had a comparable performance, removing 51% of DOC, 56% of HPO, 45% of HPI, 61% of THMFP, and 72% of HAAFP.The effectiveness of this analysis method indicated that resin isolation and fractionation should be standardized as an applicable test to help assess water treatment process efficiency.

  10. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveit, Kjell Maque; Wiig, Johan N.; Olsen, Dag Rune; Storaas, Andreas; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  11. Emerging bronchoscopic treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Wouter H.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease characterized by pathophysiological factors including airflow limitation, hyperinflation and reduced gas exchange. Treatment consists of lifestyle changes, lung rehabilitation and pharmacological therapies such as long acting

  12. Guidelines for treatment with infliximab for Crohn's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, D.W.; Oldenburg, B.; Bodegraven, A.A; Hogezand, R.A. van; Jong, D.J. de; Romberg-Camps, M.; Woude, J. van der; Dijkstra, G.

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab is an accepted induction and maintenance treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. The effectiveness of infliximab has been demonstrated for both active luminal disease and for enterocutaneous fistulisation. In addition, infliximab can be administered for extraintestinal symptoms of

  13. Guidelines for treatment with infliximab for Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, D. W.; Oldenburg, B.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; van Hogezand, R. A.; de Jong, D. J.; Romberg-Camps, M. J. L.; van der Woude, J.; Dijkstra, G.

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab is an accepted induction and maintenance treatment for patients with Crohn's disease. The effectiveness of infliximab has been demonstrated for both active luminal disease and for enterocutaneous fistulisation. In addition, infliximab can be administered for extraintestinal symptoms of

  14. [Development of performance evaluation and management system on advanced schistosomiasis medical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Rong; Huang, Shui-Sheng; Gong, Xin-Guo; Cen, Li-Ping; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Jun-Jing; Chen, Li

    2012-04-01

    To construct a performance evaluation and management system on advanced schistosomiasis medical treatment, and analyze and evaluate the work of the advanced schistosomiasis medical treatment over the years. By applying the database management technique and C++ programming technique, we inputted the information of the advanced schistosomiasis cases into the system, and comprehensively evaluated the work of the advanced schistosomiasis medical treatment through the cost-effect analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. We made a set of software formula about cost-effect analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. This system had many features such as clear building, easy to operate, friendly surface, convenient information input and information search. It could benefit the performance evaluation of the province's advanced schistosomiasis medical treatment work. This system can satisfy the current needs of advanced schistosomiasis medical treatment work and can be easy to be widely used.

  15. Alzheimer's disease: Cerebrovascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and advanced clinical therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlatt, M.W.; Lucassen, P.J.; Perry, G.; Smith, M.A.; Zhu, X.

    2008-01-01

    Many lines of independent research have provided convergent evidence regarding oxidative stress, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies spurred by these findings engage basic and clinical communities with tangible results regarding molecular targets and

  16. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal...

  17. Retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes after postoperative chemoradiotherapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sup; Kim, Jun Sang; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Noh, Seung Moo; Kim, Ki Whan; Cho, Moon June

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the survival outcome, patterns of failure, and complications in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in advanced gastric cancer. Between January 2000 and December 2006, 80 patients with advanced gastric cancer who received postoperative concurrent CRT were included. Pathological staging was IB-II in 9%, IIIA in 38%, IIIB in 33%, and IV in 21%. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy of radiation. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 days and last 3 days of radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 48 months (range, 3 to 83 months). The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional recurrence-free survivals were 62%, 59%, and 80%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, significant factors for disease-free survival were T stage (hazard ratio [HR], 0.278; p = 0.038), lymph node dissection extent (HR, 0.201; p = 0.002), and maintenance oral chemotherapy (HR, 2.964; p = 0.004). Locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis occurred in 5 (6%) and 18 (23%) patients, respectively. Mixed failure occurred in 10 (16%) patients. Grade 3 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 4 (5%) and one (1%) patient, respectively. Grade 3 nausea and vomiting developed in 8 (10%) patients. Intestinal obstruction developed in one (1%). The survival outcome of the postoperative CRT in advanced gastric cancer was similar to those reported previously. Our postoperative CRT regimen seems to be a safe and effective method, reducing locoregional failure without severe treatment toxicity in advanced gastric cancer patients.

  18. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... butter. These fats are usually solid at room temperature. Trans-fatty acids are often found in commercially ... someone with advanced CKD make healthy food choices? Learning how to read and understand lab reports lets ...

  19. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  20. Advanced esophageal cancer and esophageal stenosis endoscopic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazze, A. E mail: apiazze@hc.edu.uy

    2005-01-01

    Advanced esophageal cancer (AEC) is diagnosed during those stages in which surgery is possible, it is palliative for disphagia, with high morbimortality.In inoperable or irresectable cases, resorting to alternative treatment such as radiotherapy or endoscopy may palliate dsphagia.Endoscopically it is possible to place a transtumoral nasogastric catheter (NGC) for preoperative nutrition or branchial therapy (intratumoral iridium).It is possible to dilate the tumor and place and indwelling plastic or auto expandable prosthesis or to inject absolute intratumoral alcohol.There is and evaluation of results and morbimortality of personal case material through the retrospective study of 54 patients in whom 120 procedures such as those referred to above were carried out.The series includes 41 men and 13 women (3-1), 79.5% of which were of ages between 61 and 90.Optic fiber endoscopes or video endoscopes, coaxial dilators, hydro-pneumatic balloons, metallic guides and non industrial and autoexpandable plastic prosthesis were used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under radioscopy.Eleven patient (8 for nutritional purposes and 3 for brachiotherapy)form part of Groups 1 and 2 of NGC.Group 3 consist of:dilations of radicular stenosis with or without neopasic recurrence, or neoplasic infiltration of esophagus, 6 patient; Group 4: 14 patients for the purpose of dilation of esophageal neoplasm; Group 5:prosthesis, 12 patients; Group 6: 11 patients with anastomotic stenosis.In patients in Group 1-2-3 solution was achieved.In Group 3 there was 1 perforation.In Group 4, out of 14 patient 13 were dilated.In Group 5 it proved impossible to place prosthesis in 2 patient, (3.7%).The conclusion arrived at is that various endoscopic techniques may palliate disphagia in patient with AEC, collaborate with preoperative nutrition through enteral path, with brachioterapy or by treating post surgical stenosis, with low mortality

  1. Advanced treatments for the removal of a textile dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almazan S, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the remove a dye from aqueous solution and the treatment of textile wastewater using natural and iron and copper modified materials and advanced oxidation by Fenton and photo-Fenton heterogeneous processes are presented. Clay and activated carbon were modified using Fe and Cu electrodes at ph values of 7 and 2 respectively. The materials were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (Sem), electron X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction and specific area (Bet), the optimum ph for clay modifications with Fe and Cu was 7, whereas for copper modified activated carbon was 2, because de elemental analysis indicated that under the above conditions the content of evaluated metals is highest. The specific area for natural and iron and copper modified clay samples was 5.97, 131.30 and 78.44 m"2/g, whereas for natural and copper modified activated carbon at ph 2 was 654.85 and 647.61 m"2/g. Dye and wastewater used in this study were obtained from a laundry where jeans are manufactured in Almoloya del Rio in Mexico State. Dye was characterized by infrared spectrophotometry and UV-Vis and it was compared with a standard of potassium indigo trisulfonate and it was observed that both spectra were identical, whereby the dye used in this study is an indigo dye with a maximum absorption band at 591 nm. The characterization of wastewater shows a low biodegradability index (0.25) indicating the presence of non-biodegradability organic matter, and a high concentration of phosphorous was found (93.7 mg/L). A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC-2D) was built to concentrate UV radiation from sunlight and applied in photo-Fenton heterogeneous process obtaining concentrated UV-A and UV-B radiation of 54.29±0.71 and 1.65±0.37 W/m"2 respectively. Iron modified clay (Mt-Fe-7) and copper modified activated carbon (Ac-Cu-2) was used as catalyst in the photo-Fenton process with hydrogen peroxide. The results show that using 1.5 g of catalyst, a

  2. Locally advanced prostate cancer: a population-based study of treatment patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Elkin, Elena B; Yee, David S; Feifer, Andrew; Ehdaie, Behfar; Jacks, Lindsay M; Atoria, Coral L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Scher, Howard I; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2012-05-01

    Study Type--Therapy (practice patterns). Level of Evidence 2b. What's known on the subject? And what does the study add? The treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer varies widely even though there is level one evidence supporting the use of multimodality therapy as compared with monotherapy. This study defines treatment patterns of locally advanced prostate cancer within the United States and identifies predicators of who receives multimodality therapy rather than monotherapy. • To identify treatment patterns and predictors of receiving multimodality therapy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC). • The cohort comprised patients ≥66 years with clinical stage T3 or T4 non-metastatic prostate cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2005 identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry records linked with Medicare claims. • Treatments were classified as radical prostatectomy (RP), radiation therapy (RT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) received within 6 and 24 months of diagnosis. • We assessed trends over time and used multivariable logistic regression to identify predictors of multimodality treatment. • Within the first 6 months of diagnosis, 1060 of 3095 patients (34%) were treated with a combination of RT and ADT, 1486 (48%) received monotherapy (RT alone, ADT alone or RP alone), and 461 (15%) received no active treatment. • The proportion of patients who received RP increased, exceeding 10% in 2005. • Use of combined RT and ADT and use of ADT alone fluctuated throughout the study period. • In all 6% of patients received RT alone in 2005. • Multimodality therapy was less common in patients who were older, African American, unmarried, who lived in the south, and who had co-morbidities or stage T4 disease. • Treatment of LAPC varies widely, and treatment patterns shifted during the study period. • The slightly increased use of multimodality therapy since 2003 is encouraging, but

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment (II). The treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Disease nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage same. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in our Western societies, from the point of view liver in its progressive evolution from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This updated January 2016 revision consists of two parts. In this second part, the treatment of NAFLD and its influence on cardiovascular disease and drugs used in the control of cardiovascular risk factors showing a beneficial effect on the liver disease will be reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjamaegi, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analyses was performed in a series of patients with advanced cervix cancer. The aim of this analyses was to evaluate the efficiency of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced cervix cancer. For the patients with advanced stages, active multidisciplinary treatment is necessary for local control and suppression of distant metastases

  5. Advances in imaging to allow personalized medicine in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, Markus F

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease is a destructive inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin that may lead to various complications such as strictures, stenosis, fistulas and colitis-associated neoplasias. However, the course of the disease varies substantially among patients and disease behaviour may also change with time. At diagnosis behaviour is inflammatory in the majority of patients, while penetrating or structuring behaviour become more prominent at later time points. Thus, medication in Crohn's disease needs frequent optimization over time. Therefore, new strategies for prediction of response to therapy are urgently needed. Here, recent advantages in imaging techniques for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease are reviewed. Such advantages include ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and new endoscopic approaches such as molecular endoscopy. It is expected that these novel techniques will lead to marked improvements in the assessment of disease behaviour and the prediction of response to clinical therapy with biologicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early versus delayed hormonal treatment in locally advanced or asymptomatic metastatic prostatic cancer patient dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezioso, Domenico; Iacono, Fabrizio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Ruffo, Antonio; Russo, Nicola; Illiano, Ester

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the effectiveness of hormonal treatment (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists and/or antiandrogens) as an early or as a deferred intervention for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) and/or asymptomatic metastasis. Systematic review of trials published in 1950-2007. Sources included MEDLINE and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Eligible trials included adults with a history of LAPC who are not suitable for curative local treatment of prostate cancer. We retrieved 22 articles for detailed review, of which 8 met inclusion criteria. The Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group suggested that delaying hormonal therapy did not compromise overall survival and that many of the patients died of causes other than prostate cancer. In European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30846 trial, the median survival for delayed endocrine treatment was 6.1 year, and for immediate treatment 7.6 year, the HR for survival on delayed versus immediate treatment was 1.23 (95 % CI 0.88-1.71), indicating a 23 % nonsignificant trend in favour of early treatment. In EORTC 30891, the immediate androgen deprivation resulted in a modest but statistically significant increase in overall survival. The protocol SAKK 08/88 showed the lack of any major advantage of immediate compared with deferred hormonal treatment regarding quality of life or overall survival. The early intervention with hormonal treatment for patients with LAPC provides important reductions in all-cause mortality, prostate cancer-specific mortality, overall progression, and distant progression compared with deferring their use until standard care has failed to halt the disease.

  7. Advances in the Understanding and Treatment of Male Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Laura H; Manhart, Lisa E; Martin, David H; Seña, Arlene C; Dimitrakoff, Jordan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2015-12-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis are well-documented urethral pathogens, and the literature supporting Mycoplasma genitalium as an etiology of urethritis is growing. Trichomonas vaginalis and viral pathogens (herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and adenovirus) can cause urethritis, particularly in specific subpopulations. New data are emerging regarding the potential role of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria in urethritis, although results are inconsistent regarding the pathogenic role of Ureaplasma urealyticum in men. Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma parvum do not appear to be pathogens. Men with suspected urethritis should undergo evaluation to confirm urethral inflammation and etiologic cause. Although nucleic acid amplification testing would detect N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis (or T. vaginalis if utilized), there is no US Food and Drug Administration-approved clinical test for M. genitalium available in the United States at this time. The varied etiologies of urethritis and lack of diagnostic options for some organisms present treatment challenges in the clinical setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging following treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with sorafenib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Il Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinomas are highly vascular tumors, showing progressive hypervascularity by the process of neoangiogenesis. Tumor angiogenesis is critical for tumor growth as well as metastatic spread therefore, imaging and quantification of tumor neo-angiogenesis is essential for monitoring response to targeted therapies and predicting disease progression. Sorafenib is a molecular targeting agent used for treating hypervascular tumors. This drug is now the standard of care in treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Due to its anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative actions, imaging findings following treatment with Sorafenib are quite distinct when compared to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Liver MRI is a widely adopted imaging modality for assessing treatment response in hepatocellular carcinoma and imaging features may reflect pathophysiological changes within the tumor. In this mini-review, we will discuss MRI findings after Sorafenib treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma and review the feasibility of MRI as an early biomarker in differentiating responders from non-responders after treatment with molecular targeting agents.

  9. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2006-07-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin disease that were reported primarily in the Journal in 2005. Although studies documented deficiencies in community management of anaphylaxis, guidelines and National Institutes of Health summary reports provide direction toward improved research and education. At least 9% of young children "outgrow" a tree nut allergy. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include reports of probability of reactions to peanut at various peanut-specific IgE concentrations and skin test response size and the utility of evaluating IgE binding to specific epitopes. Future food allergy treatments might include selection of "less allergenic" fruit cultivars, genetic silencing of major allergens, and treatment of allergic patients with Chinese herbal remedies. Osteopontin might be a useful biomarker for success of venom immunotherapy. Progress in our understanding of the immunology of atopic dermatitis and autoimmune urticaria has also been made. These observations will likely contribute toward optimizing management of these common allergic disorders.

  10. Emerging treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer: clinical potential of albumin-bound paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontana E

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Elisa Fontana, Francesco Sclafani, David Cunningham Department of Medicine, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, UK Abstract: The management of pancreatic cancer has historically represented a major challenge for oncologists. The inherent aggressiveness of this tumor and the fibrotic features of the surrounding stromal tissue have significantly limited the impact of standard chemotherapy. Moreover, the paucity of available tumor tissue has hampered a better understanding of the biology of this disease as well as the development of new treatment strategies. Recently, the therapeutic landscape of metastatic pancreatic cancer has been enriched by two new combination regimens (FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel which have been demonstrated to improve the outcome in patients with good performance status. Moreover, the peritumoral stroma has been increasingly recognized as a potential therapeutic target for this disease, and several new agents targeting stromal components are currently under investigation. In this paper, we review the current treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer, highlight the role of the peritumoral stroma, and discuss the clinical potential of nab-paclitaxel and antistromal treatment strategies. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, nab-paclitaxel, stroma, SPARC

  11. A review of soft-tissue sarcomas: translation of biological advances into treatment measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang NT

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ngoc T Hoang,* Luis A Acevedo,* Michael J Mann, Bhairavi Tolani Thoracic Oncology Program, Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Soft-tissue sarcomas are rare malignant tumors arising from connective tissues and have an overall incidence of about five per 100,000 per year. While this diverse family of malignancies comprises over 100 histological subtypes and many molecular aberrations are prevalent within specific sarcomas, very few are therapeutically targeted. Instead of utilizing molecular signatures, first-line sarcoma treatment options are still limited to traditional surgery and chemotherapy, and many of the latter remain largely ineffective and are plagued by disease resistance. Currently, the mechanism of sarcoma oncogenesis remains largely unknown, thus necessitating a better understanding of pathogenesis. Although substantial progress has not occurred with molecularly targeted therapies over the past 30 years, increased knowledge about sarcoma biology could lead to new and more effective treatment strategies to move the field forward. Here, we discuss biological advances in the core molecular determinants in some of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas – liposarcoma, angiosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, and synovial sarcoma – with an emphasis on emerging genomic and molecular pathway targets and immunotherapeutic treatment strategies to combat this confounding disease. Keywords: sarcoma, molecular pathways, immunotherapy, genomics

  12. Larynx preservation with primary non-surgical treatment for loco-regionally advanced larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, June; Peters, Lester; D'Costa, Leta; Chua, Margaret; Peters, Lester J.; Vallance, Neil; Lyons, Bernard; Kleid, Stephen; Sizeland, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this paper was to review the results of primary non-surgical treatment with the aim of larynx preservation for loco-regionally advanced larynx cancer (LALC). Methods: All patients with LALC presenti:lg between January 2002 and Decem ber 2006 who were selected for primary non-surgical treatment were included in this study. Results: There were 60 patients, 48% with stage III and 52% with stage IV disease. The median follow-up of living patients was 41 months. Larynx preservation with local disease control was achieved in 83% and 77% of patients at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Failure-free survival at 3 and 5 years was 66% and 59%, respectively, and overall survival was 67% and 45%, respectively. All patients with larynx preservation had a functional voice. Two patients became feeding tube dependant. Thirty-nine percent of all deaths were unrelated to LALC. Conclusions: Primary non-surgical treatment achieves high rates of larynx preservation with a low rate of severe complications but overall survival remains disappointing.

  13. Impact of group psychotherapy in chemotherapy induced vomiting for treatment of advanced breast and lungs cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervez, T.; Mein, F.D.; Alharbi, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the effect of group psychotherapy in the management of the side effects of chemotherapy treatment in advanced breast and lung cancer. One hundred patients treated with chemotherapy for advanced stage (IIIB and IV) breast and lung cancer were selected with ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. All patients received anti-emetic medications half an hour before chemotherapy. All those patients in this category who completed fist line chemotherapy with 6 cycles were included. Fifty were subjected to group discussions with other patients, family members and medical staff. This was labeled group A. The other 50 were not included in group discussion and were labeled group B. Both the group received similar standard chemotherapy and pre-medication for vomiting as per their disease and chemotherapy schedule. Breast and lung cancer patients were 29 and 21 in each arm respectively. At the end of the discharge, grade 2 and above of vomiting, according to common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) was counted for all patients in both the arms A and B, over full length of treatment for 6 cycles, and then were compared statistically. Mean with standard deviation for adverse event (vomiting) in group A and B was 6.2 + 2.6 and 13.4 + 3.8 respectively per cycle of treatment. It was observed that group psychotherapy had statistically significant effect (p-value <0.05) on the management of vomiting. Group psychotherapy can be used to reduce the incidence of vomiting in advanced breast and lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. (author)

  14. Lapatinib for treatment of advanced or metastasized breast cancer: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Rachel; Soárez, Patrícia Coelho de; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi

    2009-09-01

    Around 16% to 20% of women with breast cancer have advanced, metastasized breast cancer. At this stage, the disease is treatable, but not curable. The objective here was to assess the effectiveness of lapatinib for treating patients with advanced or metastasized breast cancer. Systematic review of the literature, developed at Centro Paulista de Economia da Saúde (CPES), Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp). Systematic review with searches in virtual databases (PubMed, Lilacs [Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde], Cochrane Library, Scirus and Web of Science) and manual search. Only one clinical trial that met the selection criteria was found. This study showed that lapatinib in association with capecitabine reduced the risk of cancer progression by 51% (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.34-0.71; P < 0.001), compared with capecitabine alone, without any increase in severe adverse effects. The combination of lapatinib plus capecitabine was more effective than capecitabine alone for reducing the risk of cancer progression. Further randomized clinical trials need to be carried out with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of lapatinib as monotherapy or in association for first-line or second-line treatment of advanced breast cancer.

  15. Inoculation message treatments for curbing noncommunicable disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia M; Miller, Claude H

    2013-07-01

    To study the effect of various types of inoculation message treatments on resistance to persuasive and potentially deceptive health- and nutrition-related (HNR) content claims of commercial food advertisers. A three-phase experiment was conducted among 145 students from a Midwestern U.S. university. Quantitative statistical analyses were used to interpret the results. RESULTS provide clear evidence that integrating regulatory focus/fit considerations enhances the treatment effectiveness of inoculation messages. Inoculation messages that employed a preventative, outcome focus with concrete language were most effective at countering HNR advertising claims. The findings indicate that inoculation fosters resistance equally across the most common types of commercially advertised HNR product claims (e.g., absolute, general, and structure/function claims). As the drive to refine the inoculation process model continues, further testing and application of this strategy in a public health context is needed to counter ongoing efforts by commercial food advertisers to avoid government regulations against deceptive practices such as dubious health/nutrition claims. This research advances inoculation theory by providing evidence that 1) good regulatory fit strengthens the effect of refutational preemption and 2) an inoculation approach is highly effective at fostering resistance to commercial advertisers' HNR content claims. This macro approach appears far superior to education or information-based promotional health campaigns targeted solely at specific populations demonstrating rising rates of noncommunicable disease.

  16. Inoculation message treatments for curbing noncommunicable disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Mason

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of various types of inoculation message treatments on resistance to persuasive and potentially deceptive health- and nutrition-related (HNR content claims of commercial food advertisers. METHODS: A three-phase experiment was conducted among 145 students from a Midwestern U.S. university. Quantitative statistical analyses were used to interpret the results. Results: Results provide clear evidence that integrating regulatory focus/fit considerations enhances the treatment effectiveness of inoculation messages. Inoculation messages that employed a preventative, outcome focus with concrete language were most effective at countering HNR advertising claims. The findings indicate that inoculation fosters resistance equally across the most common types of commercially advertised HNR product claims (e.g., absolute, general, and structure/function claims. CONCLUSIONS: As the drive to refine the inoculation process model continues, further testing and application of this strategy in a public health context is needed to counter ongoing efforts by commercial food advertisers to avoid government regulations against deceptive practices such as dubious health/nutrition claims. This research advances inoculation theory by providing evidence that 1 good regulatory fit strengthens the effect of refutational preemption and 2 an inoculation approach is highly effective at fostering resistance to commercial advertisers' HNR content claims. This macro approach appears far superior to education or information-based promotional health campaigns targeted solely at specific populations demonstrating rising rates of noncommunicable disease.

  17. Depression in Parkinson's disease: impediments to recognition and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poewe, W; Luginger, E

    1999-01-01

    By some estimates, nearly half of patients with PD also suffer depression. Because features of PD frequently overlap with typical manifestations of major affective disorder (or mild dysthymia), both diagnosis and treatment of this comorbidity are challenging. Some of these interactive features include cognitive and speech deficits and impairments in emotional expression (e.g., PD-related facial masking) or processing. Parkinsonian depression probably is caused by an independent abnormality rather than as a maladaptive response to disease, in that the degree of depression is not correlated with PD severity. Prognostically, depressive features (e.g., introversion, inflexibility) may represent a subtle premorbid state heralding the onset of PD or an accelerated cognitive decline thereafter. Therapeutic mainstays for parkinsonian depression include psychosocial counseling at the time of PD diagnosis (and during advanced stages of PD) as well as appropriate medication regimens, the relative clinical efficacy of which remain a matter of ongoing clinical inquiry: levodopa, dopamine agonists, selegilene, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). This review formulates a rational treatment algorithm to assist in clinical management of parkinsonian depression, an enormously complex clinical entity.

  18. The Effect of Treatment Advances on the Mortality Results of Breast Cancer Screening Trials: A Microsimulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Jeanette; Gadi, Vijayakrishna K; Markowitz, Elan; Etzioni, Ruth

    2016-02-16

    Mammography trials, which are the primary sources of evidence for screening benefit, were conducted decades ago. Whether advances in systemic therapies have rendered previously observed benefits of screening less significant is unknown. To compare the outcomes of breast cancer screening trials had they been conducted using contemporary systemic treatments with outcomes of trials conducted with previously used treatments. Computer simulation model of 3 virtual screening trials with similar reductions in advanced-stage cancer cases but reflecting treatment patterns in 1975 (prechemotherapy era), 1999, or 2015 (treatment according to receptor status). Meta-analyses of screening and treatment trials; study of dissemination of primary systemic treatments; SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) registry. U.S. women aged 50 to 74 years. 10 and 25 years. Population. Mammography, chemotherapy, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, and trastuzumab. Breast cancer mortality rate ratio (MRR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) obtained by the difference in cumulative breast cancer mortality between control and screening groups. At 10 years, screening in a 1975 trial yielded an MRR of 90% and an ARR of 5 deaths per 10,000 women. A 2015 screening trial yielded a 10-year MRR of 90% and an ARR of 3 deaths per 10,000 women. Greater reductions in advanced-stage disease yielded a greater screening effect, but MRRs remained similar across trials. However, ARRs were consistently lower under contemporary treatments. When contemporary treatments were available only for early-stage cases, the MRR was 88%. Disease models simplify reality and cannot capture all breast cancer subtypes. Advances in systemic therapies for breast cancer have not substantively reduced the relative benefits of screening but have likely reduced the absolute benefits because of their positive effect on breast cancer survival. University of Washington and National Cancer Institute.

  19. Advances in the treatment of malignant large-bowel obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-19

    Jul 19, 2007 ... Most cases of large-bowel obstruction are due to colonic adeno- carcinoma. 324 ... to perforation and faeculent peritonitis. .... advance in emergency colorectal surgery has been the .... where there is clinical suspicion of bowel.

  20. Treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma with high-dose external beam supervoltage radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brufman, G.; Weshler, Z.; Prosnitz, L.R.; Fuks, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1978, 87 patients with locally advanced Tsub(3-4)Nsub(0-3)M 0 carcinoma of the breast were treated with 5,000 to 8,000 rad of external beam supervoltage radiotherapy. Initial clinical eradication of the tumour was observed in 76 of 87 cases (87%), but the actuarial probability of local control at 5 yr was only 53%. Furthermore, the actuarial probability of disease-free survival was 25% at 5 yr and 13% at 10 yr. Most of the patients eventually succumbed to metastatic breast carcinoma and the actuarial survival at 5 yr was 43% and at 10 yr, 16%. The addition of adjuvant low-dose chemotherapy, given to 13 patients, did not affect the rates of local control, survival or disease-free survival. The most common long-term complication was extensive and deforming radiation-induced fibrosis of the treated breast. The actuarial probability of 10-yr survival without a local recurrence and without severe fibrosis of the treated breast was only 17.5%. The role of adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced breast carcinoma and the possible use of improved radiotherapy techniques to achieve a more effective long-term local control and a more desirable cosmetic end result are discussed. (author)

  1. Treatment of locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck with neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, James G.; Laramore, George E.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Koh Wuijin; Stelzer, Keith; Griffin, Thomas W.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy for the treatment of locally advanced and/or recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck and to identify prognostic variables associated with local-regional control and survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred fifty-nine patients with nonmetastatic, previously unirradiated, locally advanced, and/or recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck region were treated with fast neutron radiotherapy during the years 1985-1997. One hundred fifty-one patients had either unresectable disease, or gross residual disease (GRD) after an attempted surgical extirpation. Eight patients had microscopic residual disease and were analyzed separately. Sixty-two percent of patients had tumors arising in minor salivary glands, 29% in major salivary glands, and 9% in other sites such as the lacrimal glands, tracheal-bronchial tree, etc. Fifty-five percent of patients were treated for postsurgical recurrent disease and 13% of patients had lymph node involvement at the time of treatment. The median duration of follow-up was 32 months (range 3-142 months). Actuarial curves for survival, cause-specific survival, local-regional control, and the development of distant metastases are presented for times out to 11 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial local-regional tumor control rate for the 151 patients with GRD was 57%; the 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 72%; and the 5-year actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 77%. Variables associated with decreased local-regional control in the patients with GRD as determined by multivariate analysis included base of skull involvement (p < 0.01) and biopsy only versus an attempted surgical resection prior to treatment (p = 0.03). Patients without these negative factors had an actuarial local-regional control rate of 80% at 5 years. Patients with microscopic residual disease (n = 8) had a 5-year actuarial local-regional control rate of 100%. Base of

  2. Role of 131-1 MIBG Therapy in the Treatment of Advanced Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riad, R.; Kotb, M.; Omar, W.; Zaher, A.; Khalafalla, Kh.; Fawzy, M.; Ebeid, E.; El-Wakil, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Neuroblastoma, a neoplasm of the sympathetic nervous system, is the second most extra-cranial malignant solid tumor of childhood. Many therapeutic strategies has evolved over the last 20 years, based upon work by international cooperative groups and smaller cohort studies. Novel therapies to improve initial disease response and treatment of minimal residual disease are required to improve survival for these children with high-risk neuroblastoma. Radio-labeled MIBG therapy has been tried in the treatment of advanced stage 3 and 4 neuroblastoma in an attempt to improve patients outcome. The use of radio-labeled MIBG to treat neuroblastoma has arisen from the high sensitivity and specificity of in-vivo MIBG imaging for detection of primary and metastatic tumors. Aim of the Work: To determine the impact of MIBG therapy on neuroblastoma patients outcome and its impact on their quality of life. Patients and Methods: Thirty pediatric patients with stage 4 pathologically proven neuroblastoma are included in this study. Eighteen of the study patients (60%) were males and 12 (40%) were females. All the patients had partially responsive tumor to first-line therapy + surgery. 131-1 Mibg doses ranged from 100 to 150 mCi with number of courses ranged from 1-7 according to response and toxicity. Results: Two patients achieved complete remission (CR) and were still disease-free after 64 and 69 months. Nine patients showed partial remission (PR) to 131-1 MIBG, all the nine patients were alive at 16-57 months (mean 30.6 months) among whom seven were alive with stable disease and two patients were alive with progressive disease (PD) at the end of study. Eighteen patients remained stable after 131-I MIBG therapy, among them six were alive with PD and four were alive with stable disease at the end of study, while the remaining eight patients died. The last patient developed PD and died within 15 months. The 5 years event free survival (EPS) was 48.2% and the overall

  3. Withdrawal of anticancer therapy in advanced disease: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, G; Johnston, S; Corrie, P; Kuhn, I; Barclay, S

    2015-11-11

    Current guidelines set out when to start anticancer treatments, but not when to stop as the end of life approaches. Conventional cytotoxic agents are administered intravenously and have major life-threatening toxicities. Newer drugs include molecular targeted agents (MTAs), in particular, small molecule kinase-inhibitors (KIs), which are administered orally. These have fewer life-threatening toxicities, and are increasingly used to palliate advanced cancer, generally offering additional months of survival benefit. MTAs are substantially more expensive, between £2-8 K per month, and perceived as easier to start than stop. A systematic review of decision-making concerning the withdrawal of anticancer drugs towards the end of life within clinical practice, with a particular focus on MTAs. Nine electronic databases searched. PRISMA guidelines followed. Forty-two studies included. How are decisions made? Decision-making was shared and ongoing, including stopping, starting and trying different treatments. Oncologists often experienced 'professional role dissonance' between their self-perception as 'treaters', and talking about end of life care. Why are decisions made? Clinical factors: disease progression, worsening functional status, treatment side-effects. Non-clinical factors: physicians' personal experience, values, emotions. Some patients continued treatment to maintain 'hope', often reflecting limited understanding of palliative goals. When are decisions made? Limited evidence reveals patients' decisions based upon quality of life benefits. Clinicians found timing withdrawal particularly challenging. Who makes the decisions? Decisions were based within physician-patient interaction. Oncologists report that decisions around stopping chemotherapy treatment are challenging, with limited evidence-based guidance outside of clinical trial protocols. The increasing availability of oral MTAs is transforming the management of incurable cancer; blurring boundaries between

  4. Active Vaccines for Alzheimer Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Rosalie M; Takahashi, Paul Y; Yu Ballard, Aimee C

    2016-09-01

    Vaccination against peptides specific to Alzheimer disease may generate an immune response that could help inhibit disease and symptom progression. PubMed and Scopus were searched for clinical trial articles, review articles, and preclinical studies relevant to the field of active Alzheimer disease vaccines and raw searches yielded articles ranging from 2016 to 1973. ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for active Alzheimer disease vaccine trials. Manual research and cross-referencing from reviews and original articles was performed. First generation Aβ42 phase 2a trial in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease resulted in cases of meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients, so next generation vaccines are working to target more specific epitopes to induce a more controlled immune response. Difficulty in developing these vaccines resides in striking a balance between providing a vaccine that induces enough of an immune response to actually clear protein sustainably but not so much of a response that results in excess immune activation and possibly adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis. Although much work still needs to be done in the field to make this a practical possibility, the enticing allure of being able to treat or even prevent the extraordinarily impactful disease that is Alzheimer disease makes the idea of active vaccination for Alzheimer disease very appealing and something worth striving toward. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Methods for Clinical Outcome Prediction in Acquired Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Battes (Linda)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Acquired heart disease, which includes conditions such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure, continues to pose a large impediment on the individuals that suffer from it as well as on society in general. CAD is the leading cause of death in the

  6. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks.

  7. Recent advances in coffee berry disease (CBD) control in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Waller & Bridge) attacks arabic a coffee in most African arabica coffee growing countries. The disease was first recorded in Uganda in 1959 and surveys on the disease indicated that up to 50% crop losses were being incurred. Most of the ...

  8. [Advances in Neurological Therapeutics for Friedreich Ataxia and Machado-Joseph Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2017-08-01

    We reviewed advances in therapeutics for both Friedreich ataxia and Machado-Joseph disease. Various clinical trials have been carried out, mainly for Friedreich ataxia; however, the therapeutic reports from these trials have not provided much evidence for success. Some interesting clinical trials have been reported, and further developments are expected. Regenerative therapy using umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and a therapeutic study investigating a new pathomechanism in animal and/or cell culture studies were reported. We expect that these results will translate to therapeutic strategies for patients with these disorders. In addition, biomarkers play an important role when novel treatments are discovered and clinical trials are performed: hence at present, a number of biomarkers such as gait analysis by triaxial accelerometers and prism adaptation of hand-reaching movements, are being examined.

  9. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doan HQ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hung Q Doan,1 Sirunya Silapunt,1 Michael R Migden2,3 1Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, McGovern Medical School, 2Mohs Surgery Unit, Department of Dermatology, 3Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC. Keywords: nonmelanoma skin cancer, Hedgehog pathway, clinical trials

  10. [Effect of the estrogen antagonist tamoxifen in the treatment of advanced mastocarcinoma (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepesi, T; Kärcher, K H

    1977-12-01

    Today the endocrin therapy of the advanced mastocarcinoma is in common use. Besides the already known therapy by estrogens, androgens, gestagens, and steroids, Tamoxifen, and estrogen antagonist, is a very promising therapeutic drug. In the presented study, Tamoxifen was submitted to a critical clinical control during a period of one year from 1st October 1975 until 1st October 1976. After a three months' treatment, a rate of 41% of objective remissions could be obtained. The criteria of success were estimated according to the scheme of Karnofsky. The average remission time is 5,5 months. By a determination of the estrogen receptors it would be possible to realize a therapeutic selection and to achieve a higher remission rate. The authors made an interesting observation, i.e. a probably immuno-stimulating effect which, however, still has to be submitted to further examinations. The side effects are described in detail and the indications are established. Its is astonishing that the subjective ameliorations, i.e. cessation of pains in case of generalized formation of metastases in the bones are much more frequent than the objective remissions. We came to the conclusion that the treatment by Tamoxifen is a valuable alternative in the therapy of the mastocarcinoma, above all in the postmenopausal period if the disease is advanced and incurable.

  11. Tree crops: Advances in insects and disease management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in next-generation sequencing have enabled genome sequencing to be fast and affordable. Thus today researchers and industries can address new methods in pest and pathogen management. Biological control of insect pests that occur in large areas, such as forests and farming systems of fruit t...

  12. IgG4-related disease of the biliary tract and pancreas: clinical and experimental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubers, Lowiek M; Beuers, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an immune-mediated disease of unknown cause. It predominantly affects the biliary tract [IgG4-associated cholangitis (IAC)] and pancreas [autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP)] of mostly elderly men. Accurate diagnostic tests are lacking. Patients benefit from predniso(lo)ne treatment. However, disease relapse is often seen. This review will address pathophysiological aspects and advances in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The role of IgG1 and IgG4 in the pathophysiology of IgG4-RD was studied in mice which showed more intense organ damage of pancreas and salivary glands when IgG1 rather than IgG4 of patients with IgG4-RD was injected. Coadministration of IgG1+IgG4 led to dampening of IgG1-mediated injury supporting the view that IgG4 exerts immune-dampening effects. IgG4+ B-cell receptor clones identified by next-generation sequencing and the IgG4/IgG RNA ratio in human blood assessed by quantitative PCR were able to accurately distinguish IAC/AIP from primary sclerosing cholangitis or pancreatobiliary malignancies. Long-term treatment with low-dose prednisolone was safe and reduced the number of flare-ups in patients with AIP. Early diagnosis by a novel accurate and easy-to-use qPCR test may prevent life-threatening complications, unnecessary interventions and fatal course because of misdiagnosis. Prednisolone treatment remains the standard of care in patients with IgG4-RD.

  13. Neurodevelopment and Chronic Illness: Mechanisms of Disease and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, F. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Successful treatment of many childhood diseases once considered terminal has resulted in the emergence of long-term effects of the disease or consequences of treatment that were previously unrecognized. Many of these long-term effects involve the central nervous system (CNS) and are developmental in the way that they emerge over time. Because we…

  14. Biomaterials for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadavi, D.; Poot, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease represents a huge unmet need for treatment. The low efficacy of current treatment methods is not only due to low drug potency but also due to the presence of various obstacles in the delivery routes. One of the main

  15. New Treatments for Infrapopliteal Disease: Devices, Techniques, and Outcomes So Far

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, Ondina; Chalmers, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The use of endovascular treatment of infrapopliteal disease has increased in popularity in recent years. An improvement in technical success rates due to the availability of newer devices has fuelled an increased interest in the subject. The pathogenesis, indications for treatment, and outcome measures of infrapopliteal disease differ from larger vessel intervention. Diabetes and renal failure are prevalent. Neuropathy and venous disease contribute to the etiology of ulceration. Most interventions are undertaken for critical limb ischemia rather than claudication. Therefore, a range of conservative, pharmacological, and invasive therapies are provided. Conventional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) using modern low-profile systems is associated with high technical success rates. However, initial data from recent randomized, controlled trials suggest that drug-eluting stents are consistently achieving improved patency over PTA alone or over bare metal stents. This review summarizes recent advances in the treatment of infrapopliteal disease.

  16. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Moving forward: advances in the treatment of movement disorders with deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry K Schiefer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The modern era of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery has ushered in state of the art technologies for the treatment of movement disorders, particularly Parkinson’s disease (PD, tremor, and dystonia. After years of experience with various surgical therapies, the eventual shortcomings of both medical and surgical treatments, and several serendipitous discoveries, deep brain stimulation (DBS has risen to the forefront as a highly effective, safe, and reversible treatment for these conditions. Idiopathic advanced Parkinson’s disease can be treated with thalamic, globus pallidus internus (GPi, or subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS. Thalamic DBS primarily relieves tremor while GPi and STN DBS alleviate a wide range of Parkinsonian symptoms. Thalamic DBS is also used in the treatment of other types of tremor, particularly essential tremor, with excellent results. Both primary and various types of secondary dystonia can be treated very effectively with GPi DBS. The variety of anatomical targets for these movement disorders is indicative of the network-level dysfunction mediating these movement disturbances. Despite an increasing understanding of the clinical benefits of DBS, little is known about how DBS can create such wide sweeping neuromodulatory effects. The key to improving this therapeutic modality and discovering new ways to treat these and other neurologic conditions lies in better understanding the intricacies of DBS. Here we review the history and pertinent clinical data for DBS treatment of PD, tremor, and dystonia. Our search criteria for PubMed included combinations of the following terms: DBS, neuromodulation, movement disorders, PD, tremor, dystonia, and history. Dates were not restricted.

  18. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robottom, Bradley J

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors. PMID:21423589

  19. The effect of advanced treatment of sewage effluents on metal speciation and (bio)availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A; Merrington, G; Leverett, D; Ellor, B; Lofts, S; Gravell, A

    2014-02-01

    The bioavailability of metals can be strongly influenced by dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Wastewater treatment effluents add considerable quantities of DOC and metals to receiving waters, and as effluent controls become more stringent advanced effluent treatments may be needed. We assessed the effects of two types of advanced treatment processes on metal availability in wastewater effluents. Trace metal availability was assessed using diffuse gradients in thin films and predicted through speciation modelling. The results show little difference in metal availability post-advanced treatment. EDTA-like compounds are important metal complexants in the effluents.

  20. Lyme disease and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome: the neglected disease in our own backyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, L A; Yedlin, V A; Weinstein, E R; Kortte, K B; Aucott, J N

    2014-09-01

    A survey was developed to assess experience and opinions about Lyme disease and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS) among faculties in public health. No previous surveys of public health faculties have been found in the literature. This is a cross sectional study of public health school faculty members designed to measure knowledge and experience with Lyme disease and PTLDS using an internet survey instrument. Participants were recruited using all the publicly available e-mail addresses of faculty members in all the 50 accredited Schools of Public Health in the United States. A 15% response rate was seen for the survey. 50% of respondents were from Lyme endemic states. Less than 5% of faculty members consider themselves expert in Lyme or PTLDS. Many faculty members had known someone with Lyme disease or PTLDS, but few had been diagnosed themselves. Most believe that PTLDS can be severe and chronic, is not easy to treat, and does not resolve on its own, but were uncertain about its aetiology. Most respondents also felt that the incidence of Lyme disease will increase and that more education is needed. The need for further understanding and communication presents an opportunity for public health research and education in Lyme disease and the sequelae of PTLDS. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dieulafoy's disease: endosonographic detection and endosonography-guided treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fockens, P.; Meenan, J.; van Dullemen, H. M.; Bolwerk, C. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate whether endosonography can help in the detection and treatment of Dieulafoy's disease, we examined eight patients with suspicion of Dieulafoy's disease. Between December 1992 and April 1995, eight patients were referred because of suspicion of Dieulafoy's disease. Seven presented with

  2. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon SA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Samantha A Scanlon1, Joseph A Murray1,21Department of Internal Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions.Keywords: immune-mediated enteropathy, gliadin, gluten, epidemiology, CD diagnosis, therapy

  3. Recent advances in delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu; Oupický, David

    2013-12-10

    Cancer treatment that uses a combination of approaches with the ability to affect multiple disease pathways has been proven highly effective in the treatment of many cancers. Combination therapy can include multiple chemotherapeutics or combinations of chemotherapeutics with other treatment modalities like surgery or radiation. However, despite the widespread clinical use of combination therapies, relatively little attention has been given to the potential of modern nanocarrier delivery methods, like liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles, to enhance the efficacy of combination treatments. This lack of knowledge is particularly notable in the limited success of vectors for the delivery of combinations of nucleic acids with traditional small molecule drugs. The delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations is particularly challenging due to differences in the physicochemical properties of the two types of agents. This review discusses recent advances in the development of delivery methods using combinations of small molecule drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics to treat cancer. This review primarily focuses on the rationale used for selecting appropriate drug-nucleic acid combinations as well as progress in the development of nanocarriers suitable for simultaneous delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Alzheimer’s Disease: Background, Current and Future Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Chou

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder, and its treatment has posed a big challenge. Proposed causes of Alzheimer’s disease include the cholinergic, amyloid and tau hypothesis. Current therapeutic treatments have been aimed at dealing with neurotransmitter imbalance. These include cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antagonists. However, current therapeutics have been unable to halt its progression. The future of Alzheimer’s disease tre...

  5. Celiac disease: From pathophysiology to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzanese, Ilaria; Qehajaj, Dorina; Patrinicola, Federica; Aralica, Merica; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Stifter, Sanja; Elli, Luca; Grizzi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as “celiac sprue”, is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, produced by the ingestion of dietary gluten products in susceptible people. It is a multifactorial disease, including genetic and environmental factors. Environmental trigger is represented by gluten while the genetic predisposition has been identified in the major histocompatibility complex region. Celiac disease is not a rare disorder like previously thought, with a global prevalence around 1%. The reason of its under-recognition is mainly referable to the fact that about half of affected people do not have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms, but they present nonspecific manifestations of nutritional deficiency or have no symptoms at all. Here we review the most recent data concerning epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, available diagnostic tests and therapeutic management of celiac disease. PMID:28573065

  6. Predialytic treatment of chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... Diabetic nephropathy is a condition where tight control of blood sugar slows the ... patients with renal disease, obesity per se has been shown to aggravate .... supplemented with essential amino acids. In my opinion the ...

  7. Microalbuminuria represents a feature of advanced renal disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The systematic screening for microalbuminuria represents the touchstone to prevent CRF in patients with diabetes mellitus. Microalbuminuria has also been demonstrated in patients with sickle cell disease. Whether this has the same ...

  8. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  9. Neoadjuvant treatment intensification or adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma rectum: The optimum treatment approach remains unresolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, S.; Benson, R.; Haresh, K.P.; Rath, G.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rectal carcinoma [RC] is often managed with preoperative radiotherapy or radio chemotherapy followed by total meso rectal excision (TME). Efforts are being made to improve outcome by intensifying the preoperative treatment. However, the optimum therapy remains unclear. There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimum radiation dose, chemotherapy regimen and schedule. In addition there exists growing disagreement regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant radiation or chemo radiation. Methodology: We reviewed the recent land mark trials to find a road map in the management of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Results: Preoperative short course radiotherapy has long been proven to improve local disease con- trol. The initial trials with long course chemoradiotherapy, comparing short course radiotherapy have shown to increase local control and pathological complete response rates. Since then treatment intensification of this neoadjuvant schedule has been tried by many researchers. But initial results of these treatment intensification trials, show no significant benefit and are associated with increased toxicity. There is an unmet need to stratify patients depending on risk to assign them to long course chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherapy. Current evidence does not support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who were treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. Conclusion: Preoperative radiotherapy appears to improve disease control with favorable toxicity profile and there is very little to choose between long course chemoradiotherapy and short course radiotherapy. However, long course chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for patients with high risk features like positive circumferential resection margin [CRM] and extramural spread of >5 mm. There is no role for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who were treated preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy

  10. Neoadjuvant treatment intensification or adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma rectum: The optimum treatment approach remains unresolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Haresh, K P; Rath, G K

    2015-12-01

    Rectal carcinoma [RC] is often managed with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME). Efforts are being made to improve outcome by intensifying the preoperative treatment. However, the optimum therapy remains unclear. There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimum radiation dose, chemotherapy regimen and schedule. In addition there exists growing disagreement regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant radiation or chemoradiation. We reviewed the recent land mark trials to find a road map in the management of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Preoperative short course radiotherapy has long been proven to improve local disease control. The initial trials with long course chemoradiotherapy, comparing short course radiotherapy have shown to increase local control and pathological complete response rates. Since then treatment intensification of this neoadjuvant schedule has been tried by many researchers. But initial results of these treatment intensification trials, show no significant benefit and are associated with increased toxicity. There is an unmet need to stratify patients depending on risk to assign them to long course chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherapy. Current evidence does not support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who were treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. Preoperative radiotherapy appears to improve disease control with favorable toxicity profile and there is very little to choose between long course chemoradiotherapy and short course radiotherapy. However, long course chemoradiotherapy may be beneficial for patients with high risk features like positive circumferential resection margin [CRM] and extramural spread of >5mm. There is no role for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who were treated preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in mechanism research of pain in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LIU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, a neurodegenerative disease, is very common in middle aged and older people. There are two kinds of symptoms: motor symptoms and non - motor symptoms (NMS. Pain, a commonly reported NMS of PD, can significantly affect the quality of life, thus causing more attention. However, mechanisms of pain in PD is not clear, and need to be further researched. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.08.006

  12. Development of an Advanced Injectable Therapy for Ischemic Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    14. ABSTRACT Cardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of death for Americans and it is estimated that 20% of the population over 65 years of...therapies due to overall poor health or diffuse vascular disease. A promising approach to this problem is to induce the growth of new vessels using...angiogenic therapy with growth factors to restore flow to the ischemic tissues. Unfortunately, many clinical trials using growth factors for treating

  13. A Case of Advanced Unicentric Retroperitoneal Castleman's Disease, Associated With Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Mohagheghi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present here a 32-year-old male with advanced lately diagnosed, right sided retroperitoneal mass, which had been already treated due to progressive muco-cutaneous lesions clinically consistent with psoriasis, during recent four years. The advanced retroperitoneal mass resected surgically and reported as hyaline-vascular castleman disease with a dense focus of coarse calcification, on histopathology. Association of psoriasis and castlman disease is discussed in this case report. 

  14. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...

  15. Advances and Challenges in Genomic Selection for Disease Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Jesse; Rutkoski, Jessica

    2016-08-04

    Breeding for disease resistance is a central focus of plant breeding programs, as any successful variety must have the complete package of high yield, disease resistance, agronomic performance, and end-use quality. With the need to accelerate the development of improved varieties, genomics-assisted breeding is becoming an important tool in breeding programs. With marker-assisted selection, there has been success in breeding for disease resistance; however, much of this work and research has focused on identifying, mapping, and selecting for major resistance genes that tend to be highly effective but vulnerable to breakdown with rapid changes in pathogen races. In contrast, breeding for minor-gene quantitative resistance tends to produce more durable varieties but is a more challenging breeding objective. As the genetic architecture of resistance shifts from single major R genes to a diffused architecture of many minor genes, the best approach for molecular breeding will shift from marker-assisted selection to genomic selection. Genomics-assisted breeding for quantitative resistance will therefore necessitate whole-genome prediction models and selection methodology as implemented for classical complex traits such as yield. Here, we examine multiple case studies testing whole-genome prediction models and genomic selection for disease resistance. In general, whole-genome models for disease resistance can produce prediction accuracy suitable for application in breeding. These models also largely outperform multiple linear regression as would be applied in marker-assisted selection. With the implementation of genomic selection for yield and other agronomic traits, whole-genome marker profiles will be available for the entire set of breeding lines, enabling genomic selection for disease at no additional direct cost. In this context, the scope of implementing genomics selection for disease resistance, and specifically for quantitative resistance and quarantined pathogens

  16. Treatment in a Preventive Cardiology Clinic Utilizing Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) Effectively Closes Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD) Risk Management Gaps Amongst a Primary Prevention Population Compared with a Propensity-Matched Primary Care Cohort: A Team Based Care Model and its Impact on Lipid and Blood Pressure Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentanes, Emilio; Vande Hei, Anthony G; Holuby, R Scott; Suarez, Norma; Slim, Yousif; Slim, Jennifer N; Slim, Ahmad M; Thomas, Dustin

    2018-04-17

    Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) can fill access to care gaps created by physician shortages and improve adherence/compliance with preventive atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) interventions. We retrospectively reviewed data on 595 patients enrolled in a preventive cardiology clinic (PCC) utilizing APPs compared with a propensity-matched cohort (PMC) of 595 patients enrolled in primary care clinics alone. PCC patients were risk stratified using Framingham risk scoring (FRS) and coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and treated based on published guideline-based algorithms. Baseline demographics were well balanced between the groups. CACS was more commonly obtained in PCC patients (p<0.001) resulting in reclassification of 30.6% patients to a higher risk category, including statin therapy in 26.6% of low FRS PCC patients with CACS ≥75 th MESA percentile. Aspirin initiation was higher for high and intermediate FRS patients in the PCC (p <0.001). Post-intervention mean LDL, non-HDL, and triglycerides (all p<0.05) were lower in the PCC group. Compliance with appropriate lipid treatment was higher in intermediate to high FRS patients (p=0.004) in the PCC group. Aggressive LDL and non-HDL treatment goals <70mg/dL (p=0.005) and <130mg/dL (p<0.001), respectively, were more commonly achieved in high FRS PCC patients. Median post-intervention SBP was lower amongst intermediate and low FRS patients (p=0.001 & p<0.001, respectively). Cumulatively, this resulted in a reduction in median post-intervention PCC FRS across all initial FRS risk categories (p<0.001 for all). APPs within a preventive cardiology clinic effectively risk stratify and aggressively manage ASCVD risk factors resulting in a reduction in post-intervention FRS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Urethral advancement procedure in the treatment of primary distal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    advancement in the repair of primary distal penile hypospadias with regard to feasibility, complication rates .... stones and growth, and any associated congenital anomaly. Meticulous local examination was performed ... with a tourniquet placed on the root of the penis. A submeatal crescent-like incision was performed a few.

  18. Increased serum phosphate concentrations in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease treated with diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Francisco; García-Pino, Guadalupe; Martínez-Gallardo, Rocío; Ferreira-Morong, Flavio; Luna, Enrique; Alvarado, Raúl; Ruiz-Donoso, Enrique; Chávez, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Serum phosphate concentrations usually show great variability in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) not on dialysis. Diuretics treatment can have an influence over the severity of mineral-bone metabolism alterations related to ACKD, but their effect on serum phosphate levels is less known. This study aims to determine whether diuretics are independently associated with serum phosphate levels, and to investigate the mechanisms by which diuretics may affect phosphate metabolism. 429 Caucasian patients with CKD not on dialysis were included in this cross-sectional study. In addition to conventional serum biochemical measures, the following parameters of renal phosphate excretion were assessed: 24-hours urinary phosphate excretion, tubular maximum phosphate reabsorption (TmP), and fractional excretion of phosphate (FEP). 58% of patients were on treatment with diuretics. Patients on diuretics showed significantly higher mean serum phosphate concentration (4.78 ± 1.23 vs. 4.24 ± 1.04 mg/dl; Pdiuretics. By multivariate linear and logistic regression, significant associations between diuretics and serum phosphate concentrations or hyperphosphataemia remained after adjustment for potential confounding variables. In patients with the highest phosphate load adjusted to kidney function, those treated with diuretics showed significantly lower FEP than those untreated with diuretics. Treatment with diuretics is associated with increased serum phosphate concentrations in patients with ACKD. Diuretics may indirectly interfere with the maximum renal compensatory capacity to excrete phosphate. Diuretics should be considered in the studies linking the relationship between serum phosphate concentrations and cardiovascular alterations in patients with CKD.

  19. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Teruel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m2. The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014 was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital’s emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50% died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams.

  20. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, José L.; Rexach, Lourdes; Burguera, Victor; Gomis, Antonio; Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros; Rivera, Maite; Diaz, Alicia; Collazo, Sergio; Liaño, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m2). The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014) was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital’s emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50%) died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams. PMID:27417813

  1. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  2. Hirschsprung’s Disease in Patients of Advanced Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Vrints

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung’s disease is a congenital motility disorder that is easily overlooked as a cause of chronic refractory constipation in adults. We present a case of Hirschsprung’s disease in a patient 70 years of age with a history of long-standing constipation, chronic use of laxatives, and recurrent episodes of colonic obstruction. Presumptive preoperative diagnosis was chronic ischemic sigmoid stenosis or intermittent sigmoid volvulus before Hirschsprung’s disease was suspected based on intraoperative colonoscopy and surgical findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by the absence of intrinsic ganglion cells on histopathologic examination of the surgical specimen and the absence of the rectoanal inhibitory reflex on postoperative manometry. A conservative surgical approach that limited the resection to the grossly diseased rectum successfully restored normal defecation despite the anastomosis being performed on the distal aganglionic rectum. This approach, which avoids extensive rectal dissection, may be suitable for older or frail patients. Heightened awareness of Hirschsprung’s disease is necessary to ensure its prompt recognition in the elderly.

  3. Adult Moyamoya disease angiographic images evolutive characters and treatment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiangnan; Ling Feng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the angiographic images with evolutional characters and the treatment methods of the Moyamoya disease. Methods: The clinical manifestations, the radiographic changes and the comparative analysis between medicine treatment and surgery treatment, together with the laboratory tests findings were analyzed in one cases adult Moyamoya disease during six years. Conclusions: The angiographic characteristics of MMD show the supplied artery trunk stenosis, and followed by occlusion, with later appearance of vascular smoking sign. Medical treatment proved to be of null. Direct or indirect intra or extra cranial vascular anastomosis are effective for treatment

  4. Advances in Wilms Tumor Treatment and Biology: Progress Through International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dome, Jeffrey S; Graf, Norbert; Geller, James I; Fernandez, Conrad V; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Spreafico, Filippo; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-09-20

    Clinical trials in Wilms tumor (WT) have resulted in overall survival rates of greater than 90%. This achievement is especially remarkable because improvements in disease-specific survival have occurred concurrently with a reduction of therapy for large patient subgroups. However, the outcomes for certain patient subgroups, including those with unfavorable histologic and molecular features, bilateral disease, and recurrent disease, remain well below the benchmark survival rate of 90%. Therapy for WT has been advanced in part by an increasingly complex risk-stratification system based on patient age; tumor stage, histology, and volume; response to chemotherapy; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p and 16q. A consequence of this system has been the apportionment of patients into such small subgroups that only collaboration between large international WT study groups will support clinical trials that are sufficiently powered to answer challenging questions that move the field forward. This article gives an overview of the Children's Oncology Group and International Society of Pediatric Oncology approaches to WT and focuses on four subgroups (stage IV, initially inoperable, bilateral, and relapsed WT) for which international collaboration is pressing. In addition, biologic insights resulting from collaborative laboratory research are discussed. A coordinated expansion of international collaboration in both clinical trials and laboratory science will provide real opportunity to improve the treatment and outcomes for children with renal tumors on a global level. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. The Impact of Advanced Technologies on Treatment Deviations in Radiation Treatment Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Light, Kim L.; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Georgas, Debra L.; Jones, Ellen L.; Wright, Melanie C.; Willett, Christopher G.; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of new technologies on deviation rates in radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Treatment delivery deviations in RT were prospectively monitored during a time of technology upgrade. In January 2003, our department had three accelerators, none with 'modern' technologies (e.g., without multileaf collimators [MLC]). In 2003 to 2004, we upgraded to five new accelerators, four with MLC, and associated advanced capabilities. The deviation rates among patients treated on 'high-technology' versus 'low-technology' machines (defined as those with vs. without MLC) were compared over time using the two-tailed Fisher's exact test. Results: In 2003, there was no significant difference between the deviation rate in the 'high-technology' versus 'low-technology' groups (0.16% vs. 0.11%, p = 0.45). In 2005 to 2006, the deviation rate for the 'high-technology' groups was lower than the 'low-technology' (0.083% vs. 0.21%, p = 0.009). This difference was caused by a decline in deviations on the 'high-technology' machines over time (p = 0.053), as well as an unexpected trend toward an increase in deviations over time on the 'low-technology' machines (p = 0.15). Conclusions: Advances in RT delivery systems appear to reduce the rate of treatment deviations. Deviation rates on 'high-technology' machines with MLC decline over time, suggesting a learning curve after the introduction of new technologies. Associated with the adoption of 'high-technology' was an unexpected increase in the deviation rate with 'low-technology' approaches, which may reflect an over-reliance on tools inherent to 'high-technology' machines. With the introduction of new technologies, continued diligence is needed to ensure that staff remain proficient with 'low-technology' approaches

  6. Treatment options for patients with Gaucher disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2016-02-28

    Feb 28, 2016 ... has been the mainstay of treatment with its major disadvantage of long life dependency on biweekly ..... Another advantage is that PCT can cross the BBB and can ... Induced pluripotent stem cells are an attractive alternative.

  7. Advanced Age is Not a Contraindication for Treatment With Curative Intent in Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voncken, Francine E M; van der Kaaij, Rosa T; Sikorska, Karolina; van Werkhoven, Erik; van Dieren, Jolanda M; Grootscholten, Cecile; Snaebjornsson, Petur; van Sandick, Johanna W; Aleman, Berthe M P

    2017-07-31

    The objective of this study is to compare long-term outcomes between younger and older (70 y and above) esophageal cancer patients treated with curative intent. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and locoregional recurrence-free interval were compared between older (70 y and above) and younger (below 70 y) esophageal cancer patients treated between 1998 and 2013. Treatment consisted of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with surgery or definitive chemoradiotherapy: 36 to 50.4 Gy in 18 to 28 fractions combined with 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin or carboplatin/paclitaxel. The study comprised 253 patients, of whom 76 were 70 years and older. Median age was 64 years (range, 41 to 83). Most patients had stage II-IIIA disease (83%). Planned treatment was neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with surgery for 169 patients (41 patients aged 70 y and older) and definitive chemoradiotherapy for 84 patients (31 patients aged 70 y and older). The compliance to radiotherapy was 92%, with no difference between older and younger patients. In 33 patients (13 patients aged 70 y and older) planned surgery was not performed. Median follow-up was 4.9 years. Three-year OS was 42%. The multivariable analysis showed no statistical difference in OS or in DFS comparing older and younger patients: OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61-1.28), DFS (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.60-1.25). Elderly showed a longer locoregional recurrence-free interval; HR, 0.53 (95% CI, 0.30-0.92; P=0.02) and a higher pathologic complete response rate (50% vs. 25%; P=0.02). Long-term outcomes of older esophageal cancer patients (70 y and above) selected for treatment with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery or definitive chemoradiotherapy were comparable with the outcomes of their younger counterparts. Advanced age alone should not be a contraindication for potentially curative chemoradiotherapy-based treatment in esophageal cancer patients.

  8. Barriers to Advance Care Planning in End-Stage Renal Disease: Who is to Blame, and What Can be Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Alan Taylor; Turner, Jeffrey; Doolittle, Benjamin

    2018-07-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease experience significant mortality and morbidity, including cognitive decline. Advance care planning has been emphasized as a responsibility and priority of physicians caring for patients with chronic kidney disease in order to align with patient values before decision-making capacity is lost and to avoid suffering. This emphasis has proven ineffective, as illustrated in the case of a patient treated in our hospital. Is this ineffectiveness a consequence of failure in the courtroom or the clinic? Through our own experience we affirm what has been written before: that legal precedent favors intensive treatment in virtually all cases without 'clear and convincing evidence' of a patient's previously declared wishes to the contrary. Equally clear is that more than 20 years of support in the clinical literature suggesting advance care planning early in the course of disease can address challenges in the legal system for those lacking capacity. However, many physicians fail to recognize the need for advance care planning in a timely manner and lack the necessary training to provide it. The need for more training and new tools to recognize opportunities for advance care planning in daily practice remains unmet.

  9. CROHN'S DISEASE: GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS AND TREATMENT WITH ADALIMUMABE BIOPHARMACEUTICAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Marques

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's Disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the gastrointestinal system. The etiology is not fully understood, however, genetic, immunological, microbiological and environmental factors are related to its genesis. The most common manifestations of this disease are diarrhea, abdominal pain, ulcers and fistulas. In the absence of adequate treatment it can evolve into extra intestinal complications and is also an important risk factor for colon and rectal cancer. The treatment of the disease is palliative and there is no cure for the disease, being considered only the period of remission of symptoms, as a good prognosis. The biopharmaceutical, Adalimumabe, produced by recombinant DNA technology has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of this disease, as it prevents the action of TNF-α, a cytokine involved in inflammation and is abundant in individuals with CD. Although Adalimumabe has good results, its use leads to side effects that can be mild or fatal, such as the activation of tuberculosis.

  10. Perspectives for uveitis treatment in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Aleksandrovna Godzenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes current approaches to treating uveitis in rheumatic diseases and theoretical backgrounds for using tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The data available in the literature suggest that anti-TNF-α therapy is highly effective in relieving and preventing uveitis attacks.

  11. Treatment of Addison's disease during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Diana; Lages, Adriana; Paiva, Sandra; Carrilho, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Addison's disease, or primary adrenocortical insufficiency, is a long-term, potentially severe, rare endocrine disorder. In pregnancy, it is even rarer. We report the case of a 30-year-old pregnant patient with Addison's disease, referred to Obstetrics-Endocrinology specialty consult at 14 weeks gestation. She had been to the emergency department of her local hospital various times during the first trimester presenting with a clinical scenario suggestive of glucocorticoid under-replacement (nausea, persistent vomiting and hypotension), but this was interpreted as normal pregnancy symptoms. Hydrocortisone dose was adjusted, and the patient maintained regular follow-up. No complications were reported for the remainder of gestation and delivery. Pregnant patients with Addison's disease should be monitored during gestation and in the peripartum period by multidisciplinary teams. Adjustments in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy are often necessary, and monitoring should be based mainly on clinical findings, which becomes increasingly difficult during pregnancy. Patient education and specialized monitoring are key to avoiding complications from under- or over-replacement therapy in this period. An increase in glucocorticoid replacement dose is expected to be necessary during pregnancy in a woman with Addison's disease.Patient education regarding steroid cover and symptoms of acute adrenal crisis are fundamental.Monitoring in this period is challenging and remains mainly clinical.The increase in hydrocortisone dose often obviates the need to increase fludrocortisone dose.

  12. Treatment of retinal diseases with VEGF antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Witmer, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the most prevalent causes of blindness in the Western world. The pathogenesis of neovascularization and vascular leakage, both hallmarks of these diseases, appears to have one common denominator: vascular endothelial growth

  13. Apatinib plus icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer after icotinib treatment failure: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-01-01

    Treatment failure frequently occurs in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who respond to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors initially. This retrospective study tried to investigate the efficacy and safety of apatinib plus icotinib in patients with advanced NSCLC after icotinib treatment failure. This study comprised 27 patients with advanced NSCLC who had progressed after icotinib monotherapy. Initially, patients received oral icotinib (125 mg, tid) alone. When the disease progressed, they received icotinib plus apatinib (500 mg, qd, orally). Treatment was continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or consent withdrawal. Followed up to December 2016, the median time of combined therapy was 7.47 months, and eight of 27 patients were dead. The median overall survival was not reached, and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.33 months (95% CI, 3.63-7.03 months). Moreover, the objective response rate (ORR) was 11.1%, and the disease control rate (DCR) was 81.5%. A total of 14 patients received combined therapy as the second-line treatment, and the ORR and DCR were 7.1% and 78.6%, respectively; 13 patients received drugs as the third- or later-line treatment, with an ORR and a DCR of 15.4% and 84.6%, respectively. In addition, 11 patients experienced icotinib monotherapy failure within 6 months with median PFS of 7.37 months, and 16 patients had progression after 6 months with median PFS of 2.60 months. The common drug-related toxic effects were hypertension (44.4%) and fatigue (37.0%). Apatinib plus icotinib is efficacious in treating patients with advanced NSCLC after icotinib treatment failure, with acceptable toxic effects.

  14. Microalbuminuria Represents a Feature of Advanced Renal Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... beta thalassemia J Nephrol 1997; 10(3):163-167. 3. Abbott,KC, Hypolite, IO and Agodoa, LY. Sickle cell nephropathy at end-stage renal disease in the United States: patient characteristics and sur- vival Clin Nephrol 2002; 58(1): 9-15. 4. Polkinghome ,KR Detection and measure- ment of urinary protein ...

  15. Nanomedicines for the Treatment of CNS Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahato, Ram I

    2017-03-01

    Targeting and delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) has been a major challenge. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Therefore, much effort has been channelled into improving transport of therapeutics across the BBB and into the CNS including the use of nanoparticles. In this thematic issue, several reviews and original research are presented that address "Nanomedicines for CNS Diseases." The articles in this issue are concentrated on either CNS-HIV disease or CNS tumors. In regards to CNS-HIV disease, there are two reviews that discuss the role of nanoparticles for improving the delivery of HIV therapeutics to the CNS. In addition, there are two original articles focusing on therapies for CNS-HIV, one of them uses nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA specific to a key protein in autophagy to microglia, and another discusses nanoparticle delivery of a soluble mediator to suppress neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a comprehensive review about gene therapy for CNS neurological diseases is also included. Finally, this issue also includes review articles on enhanced drug targeting to CNS tumors. These articles include a review on the use of nanoparticles for CNS tumors, a review on functionalization (ligands) of nanoparticles for drug targeting to the brain tumor by overcoming BBB, and the final review discusses the use of macrophages as a delivery vehicle to CNS tumors. This thematic issue provides a wealth of knowledge on using nanomedicines for CNS diseases.

  16. Genetic heterogeneity in Alzheimer disease and implications for treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M; Goate, Alison; Masters, Colin L; Cairns, Nigel J; Danek, Adrian; Graff-Radford, Neill; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2014-11-01

    Since the original publication describing the illness in 1907, the genetic understanding of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has advanced such that it is now clear that it is a genetically heterogeneous condition, the subtypes of which may not uniformly respond to a given intervention. It is therefore critical to characterize the clinical and preclinical stages of AD subtypes, including the rare autosomal dominant forms caused by known mutations in the PSEN1, APP, and PSEN2 genes that are being studied in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network study and its associated secondary prevention trial. Similar efforts are occurring in an extended Colombian family with a PSEN1 mutation, in APOE ε4 homozygotes, and in Down syndrome. Despite commonalities in the mechanisms producing the AD phenotype, there are also differences that reflect specific genetic origins. Treatment modalities should be chosen and trials designed with these differences in mind. Ideally, the varying pathological cascades involved in the different subtypes of AD should be defined so that both areas of overlap and of distinct differences can be taken into account. At the very least, clinical trials should determine the influence of known genetic factors in post hoc analyses.

  17. Study of Advanced Oxidation System for Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdi Usada; Bambang Siswanto; Suryadi; Agus Purwadi; Isyuniarto

    2007-01-01

    Hygiene water is still a big problem globally as well as energy and food, especially in Indonesia where more than 70 % lived in Java island. One of the efforts in treating hygiene water is to recycle the used water. In this case it is needed clean water technology. Many methods have been done, this paper describes the advanced oxidation technology system based on ozone, titania and plasma discharge. (author)

  18. Advances in pharmacotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Bernstein, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    , surpassing the efficacy of gold standard treatment, intranasal corticosteroids (INS), for the first time. It is indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe seasonal allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis when monotherapy with either intranasal antihistamine or INS is NOT considered...

  19. [Mindfulness-based stimulation in advanced Alzheimer's disease: A comparative, non-inferiority, clinical pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana Hernández, Domingo Jesús; Miró Barrachina, María Teresa; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio; Santana del Pino, Angelo; Rojas Hernández, Jaime; Rodríguez García, Javier; Quintana Montesdeoca, María del Pino

    2015-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted in order to analyze the feasibility, safety, and effects of the practice of mindfulness, relaxation and cognitive stimulation on the evolution of Alzheimer's disease, with the aim of testing the equivalence of these interventions. There were a total of 168 participants with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) treated with donepezil. In the present article, the 21 participants with advanced AD who completed a follow-up period of 24 months are presented. The participants were grouped into three experimental groups (mindfulness, relaxation, and cognitive stimulation) and one control group. Each group carried out three weekly sessions with bi-annual follow-up measurements (cognition: CAMCOG and MMSE; functionality: RDRS; psychopathology: NPI). Non-parametric analyses were performed. The cognitive function and functionality scores showed no significant differences between the groups. However, the scores in cognitive function of the mindfulness group and the cognitive stimulation group did not decrease in an intra-group analysis. In NPI, there were significant differences between the mindfulness group and the control group by the end of the study (P<.017). The data showed that the treatment with donepezil in combination with mindfulness or cognitive stimulation presented a better clinical evolution than the pharmacological treatment alone or combined with relaxation. These data suggest that these therapeutic alternatives should be investigated further, and that the non-pharmacological treatments should be recommended in clinical practice in order to control the evolution of AD in the long term. In order to confirm these findings, a larger study is necessary. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Diverticular disease of the large bowel - surgical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levý, M; Herdegen, P; Sutoris, K; Simša, J

    2013-07-01

    Surgical treatment, despite the rapid development of the numerous modern miniinvasive intervention techniques, remains essential in the treatment of complicated diverticular disease. The aim of this work is to summarize indications for surgical treatment in both acute and elective patients suffering from diverticular disease of the large bowel. Review of the literature and recent findings concerning indications for surgical intervention in patients with diverticulosis of the colon. The article describes indications, types of procedures, techniques and postoperative care in patients undergoing surgical intervention for diverticular disease.

  1. [Operative treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabanka, M; Thomé, C; Ringel, F; Meyer, B; Eicker, S-O; Rohde, V; Stoffel, M; Vajkoczy, P

    2018-04-20

    Degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine and associated lower back pain represent a major epidemiological and health-related economic challenge. A distinction is made between specific and unspecific lower back pain. In specific lower back pain lumbar disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis with or without associated segment instability are among the most frequent pathologies. Diverse conservative and operative strategies for treatment of these diseases are available. The aim of this article is to present an overview of current data and an evidence-based assessment of the possible forms of treatment. An extensive literature search was carried out via Medline plus an additional evaluation of the authors' personal experiences. Conservative and surgical treatment represent efficient treatment options for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation shows slight advantages compared to conservative treatment consisting of faster recovery of neurological deficits and a faster restitution of pain control. Surgical decompression is superior to conservative measures for the treatment of spinal canal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis. In this scenario conservative treatment represents an important supporting measure for surgical treatment in order to improve the mobility of patients and the outcome of surgical treatment. The treatment of specific lower back pain due to degenerative lumbar pathologies represents an interdisciplinary challenge, requiring both conservative and surgical treatment strategies in a synergistic treatment concept in order to achieve the best results for patients.

  2. Hypnosis in the treatment of Morgellons disease: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Ashley M; Dolan, Sara L; Stanford, Matthew S; Elkins, Gary R

    2011-04-01

    Morgellons Disease is a condition involving painful skin lesions, fibrous growths protruding from the skin, and subcutaneous stinging and burning sensations, along with symptoms of anxiety, depression, fatigue, and memory and attention deficits. The etiological and physiological bases of these symptoms are unclear, making the diagnosis controversial and challenging to treat. There are currently no established treatments for Morgellons Disease. The following case example depicts treatment of a woman with Morgellons Disease using hypnotherapy. Data from this case example suggest that hypnotherapy is a promising intervention for the physical and psychological symptoms associated with Morgellons Disease.

  3. Application of ozone in the treatment of periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Adusumilli; Sathish, Manthena; Sri Harsha, Anumolu Venkatanaga

    2013-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are most common inflammatory diseases of supporting tissues of teeth. Role of microbial etiology and host response in progression of gingival and periodontal diseases has been well established. Because of the beneficial biological effects of ozone, due to its antimicrobial and immunostimulating effect, it is well indicated in the treatment of gingival and periodontal diseases. The objective of this article is to provide a general review about clinical applications of ozone in treatment of periodontal diseases and to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. PMID:23946585

  4. Minimal Disease Activity as a Treatment Target in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; McGonagle, Dennis; Korotaeva, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    As in other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the objective of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment is the achievement of a defined target. Recent recommendations propose aiming for remission or low disease activity; however, a consensual definition of remission is lacking. A state of minimal disease....... Since its development, MDA has been used increasingly in studies and clinical trials. In this article, the potential use of MDA as a treatment target in PsA is reviewed. The frequencies of MDA achievement with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are summarized based on data from registries...

  5. Effects of DBS, premotor rTMS, and levodopa on motor function and silent period in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäumer, Tobias; Hidding, Ute; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used and highly effective treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Repetitive TMS (rTMS) applied to motor cortical areas has also been shown to improve symptoms in PD and modulate motor cortical...... excitability. Here, we compared clinical and neurophysiological effects of STN stimulation with those of 1 Hz rTMS given to the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and those following intake of levodopa in a group of PD patients with advanced disease. Ten PD patients were studied on 2 consecutive days before...... and after surgery. Clinical effects were determined using the UPDRS motor score. Motor thresholds, motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes during slight voluntary contraction, and the cortical silent periods (SP) were measured using TMS. Before surgery effects of levodopa and 1 Hz PMd rTMS and after surgery...

  6. Thyroid Diseases and Treatment in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aktaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of thyroid disease in pregnancy is important for gestational maternal health, obstetric outcome and, subsequent development of child. Pregnancy has pro­found effects on the regulation of thyroid function, and on thyroidal functional disorders, that need to be recognized, carefully evaluated and correctly managed. In women with normal thyroid function there is an increase in thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 production and inhibition of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in the first trimester of pregnancy,. In the pregnant woman, elevated thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB and concomitant increases in total T4 and T3 levels plateau at 12-14 weeks of pregnancy, and free T4 measurements slowly decrease. The most frequent thyroid disorder in pregnancy is maternal hy­pothyroidism. It is associated with fetal loss, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Hyperthyroidism dur­ing pregnancy is relatively uncommon, with a prevalence estimated to range between 0.1% and 1%. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves disease, as this etiology accounts for 85% of clinical hyperthyroid­ism in pregnancy. Another cause of hyperthyroidism is hyperemesis gravidarum. This is common and requires differentiation from Graves disease. There has been much discussion and many publications on the optimal management of pregnant women who are hyperthyroid or hypothyroid. Despite the lack of consensus organiza­tions, which are based on analyses, support screening in all pregnant women in the first trimester for thyroid disease. In this article, we provide information about the current approaches of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 120-124

  7. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, B.R.; Vries, N.M. de; Ebersbach, G.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period.

  8. Laser treatment of medical skin disease in women

    OpenAIRE

    C. LaRosa, MD; A. Chiaravalloti, MD; S. Jinna, MD; W. Berger, BS; J. Finch, MD

    2017-01-01

    Laser treatment is a relatively new and increasingly popular modality for the treatment of many dermatologic conditions. A number of conditions that predominantly occur in women and that have a paucity of effective treatments include rosacea, connective tissue disease, melasma, nevus of Ota, lichen sclerosus (LS), notalgia paresthetica and macular amyloidosis, and syringomas. Laser therapy is an important option for the treatment of patients with these conditions. This article will review the...

  9. Why musical memory can be preserved in advanced Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jörn-Henrik; Stelzer, Johannes; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Chételat, Gael; La Joie, Renaud; Turner, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Musical memory is considered to be partly independent from other memory systems. In Alzheimer's disease and different types of dementia, musical memory is surprisingly robust, and likewise for brain lesions affecting other kinds of memory. However, the mechanisms and neural substrates of musical memory remain poorly understood. In a group of 32 normal young human subjects (16 male and 16 female, mean age of 28.0 ± 2.2 years), we performed a 7 T functional magnetic resonance imaging study of brain responses to music excerpts that were unknown, recently known (heard an hour before scanning), and long-known. We used multivariate pattern classification to identify brain regions that encode long-term musical memory. The results showed a crucial role for the caudal anterior cingulate and the ventral pre-supplementary motor area in the neural encoding of long-known as compared with recently known and unknown music. In the second part of the study, we analysed data of three essential Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in a region of interest derived from our musical memory findings (caudal anterior cingulate cortex and ventral pre-supplementary motor area) in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (10 male and 10 female, mean age of 68.9 ± 9.0 years) and 34 healthy control subjects (14 male and 20 female, mean age of 68.1 ± 7.2 years). Interestingly, the regions identified to encode musical memory corresponded to areas that showed substantially minimal cortical atrophy (as measured with magnetic resonance imaging), and minimal disruption of glucose-metabolism (as measured with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography), as compared to the rest of the brain. However, amyloid-β deposition (as measured with (18)F-flobetapir positron emission tomography) within the currently observed regions of interest was not substantially less than in the rest of the brain, which suggests that the regions of interest were still in a very early stage of the expected course of

  10. Therapeutic Advances using Combinational Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor in adults. Median survival is only about 15 months despite aggressive treatment, consisting of surgery followed by radio- and chemotherapy, stressing the need for new therapies. Development of glioblastoma is thought to be a result of both genetic...... and epigenetic alterations, ultimately leading to oncogenic transformation of normal glia cells. Several features are suggested to give rise to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma including treatment resistance, a high degree of abnormal blood vessels, and high heterogeneity, both within the single tumor and from...... patient to patient. Thus, investigations are needed to identify the genetic-molecular alterations that glioblastoma tumors depend on in order to overcome treatment and regrow after initial surgery. The findings presented in this thesis illustrate the promising potential of combinational treatments...

  11. Advances with microRNAs in Parkinson’s disease research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma L

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Liuqing Ma,1,2,* Liangming Wei,3,* Fei Wu,2,* Zhenhua Hu,2 Zhenguo Liu,1 Weien Yuan2 1Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated with Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Research Institute of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is the second-most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and is caused by severe degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Unfortunately, current treatment only targets symptoms and involves dopamine replacement therapy, which does not counteract progressive degeneration. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small RNA molecules implicated in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development. Recent studies show that miRNAs are playing an important role in the pathophysiology of PD. miRNA-based therapy is a powerful tool with which to study gene function, investigate the mechanism of the disease, and validate drug targets. In this review, we focus on the recent advances of the use of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PD. Keywords: miRNA, α-synuclein, LRRK2, miRNA-based therapy, pathophysiology

  12. Results of complex treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolygin, B.A.; Lebedev, S.V.; Borodina, A.F.; Kochurova, N.V.; Malinin, A.P.; Safonova, S.A.; Punanov, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    The evaluation of remote results of the complex treatment (polychemotherapy plus radiotherapy) for identification of the forecasting factor which may be applied, by stratification into the risk groups, is carried out. The group of 334 children up to 15 years with lymphogranulomatosis, subjected to not less than 2 cycles of inductive polychemotherapy and consolidating radiotherapy, is analyzed. The irradiation was conducted at the radiotherapeutic devices ROCUS LUE-25 and LUEV-15 M1. The complete remission after the treatment program was fixed by 95.1% of the patients the partial remission-by 6.3%; no effect was noted by 0.6% of the patients. Actuarial 10-year survival constituted 85.9%, the frequency of nonrelapsing flow - 74.3% [ru

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, H.; Padberg, F.; Koetter, H.U.; Teipel, S.J.; Ehrhardt, T.; Hegerl, U.; Stuebner, S.; Moeller, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is often diagnosed too late. Its etiology is still largely unknown and remains one of the big challenges in neurobiological fundamental research. Optimized early and differential diagnosis can be ensured by a dynamic concept of multidisciplinary diagnosis in cooperation between practitioners specializing in brain disorders, clinical psychogeriatric deprtments, and general practitioners. This, in turn, will enable individualized planning of further living conditions and care of Alzheimer patients and their relations as well as efficient and early pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention. (orig) [de

  14. Critical appraisal of rituximab in the maintenance treatment of advanced follicular lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguiar-Bujanda D

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available David Aguiar-Bujanda, María Jesús Blanco-Sánchez, María Hernández-Sosa, Saray Galván-Ruíz, Samuel Hernández-Sarmiento Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria Doctor Negrín, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain Abstract: Rituximab is an IgG1, chimeric monoclonal antibody specifically designed to recognize the CD20 antigen expressed on the surface of normal and malignant B-lymphocytes, from the B-cell precursor to the mature B-cells of the germinal center, and by most neoplasms derived from B-cells. After 2 decades of use, rituximab is firmly positioned in the treatment of follicular lymphoma (FL, both in the front line and in the relapsing disease, improving previous results by including it in classical chemotherapy regimens. However, the pharmacology of rituximab continues to generate controversial issues especially regarding the mechanisms of action in vivo. The contribution of rituximab as a maintenance treatment in FL has been significant progress in the management of this disease without an increase in side effects or a decrease in the quality of life of patients. With the widespread use of rituximab, there are new security alerts and side effects not previously detected in the pivotal trials that clinicians should learn to recognize and manage. In this article, we will review the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rituximab, the management issues in the treatment of advanced FL focusing on maintenance rituximab, its long-term efficacy and safety profile, and its effect on the quality of life. Keywords: follicular lymphoma, long-term efficacy, maintenance, rituximab, toxicity

  15. Trials of Transcranial Stimulation for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hallett, Mark; Lomarev, Mikhail P; Richardson, Sarah P; Wassermann, Eric; Bara, William; Lopez, Grisel

    2007-01-01

    During the first year of the study, we have been mainly working on the protocol "Transcranial Electrical Polarization for the Treatment of Bradykinesia and Rigidity in Patients with Parkinson's Disease...

  16. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Treatment and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Trends Fast Facts For Clinicians Disease Specifics Clinical Features Diagnosis, Treatment, & Prevention For Health Departments Surveillance & Reporting Resources Case Definitions CDC Surveillance Classifications How to Report Cases Case ...

  17. Recent advances using immunomodulators for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Herfarth, Hans

    2013-01-01

    , a recent nationwide Dutch study pointed to a preventive effect of thiopurines. Finally, the need for an appropriate approach to the discontinuation of immunomodulators is emphasized. Since controversy continues regarding the most appropriate use of immunomodulators, this paper is focusing...... on pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics, and therapeutic blood testing, as well as the occurrence of adverse events, when using AZA, 6-MP, and MTX in an attempt to determine a more up-to-date and rational treatment regimen in IBD....

  18. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  19. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  20. Case Report: Locally advanced skin cancer in an albino, a treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: Locally advanced skin cancer in an albino ... headache, anorexia, weight loss, night sweats, dizziness, change in ... This was the case with our patient, whose five ... We need more interventional studies in treatment of locally.