WorldWideScience

Sample records for adults natural history

  1. A review of the natural history of adult Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    A compilation of the known natural history of adult Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries is provided. Food items of adult Cetoniinae include pollen and/or nectar (flower visitors), sap and/or slime flux, ripened fruits on plants, green tissues and leaves, and honey. Of the 36 species of Cetoniinae from Argentina, food items are known only for 11 species (30.5%). Attraction to light and bait-traps, adult activity periods, vertebrate predators, and the occurrence in bird nests are presented and discussed. Other insects that share the same food sources and bait-traps with Cetoniinae are mentioned. PMID:24869870

  2. The Long-Term Clinical Follow-Up and Natural History of Men with Adult-Onset Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer, Andrew A.; Hayes, Frances J.; Plummer, Lacey; Pitteloud, Nelly; Crowley, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Context and Objective: Adult-onset idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (AHH) is a rare disorder characterized by an isolated failure of gonadotropin secretion occurring after an otherwise normal sexual maturation in men. This study aims to examine the etiology and long-term natural history of this disorder.

  3. Adult Polyglucosan Body Disease: Natural History and Key Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Fanny; Schiffmann, Raphael; Steenweg, Marjan E.; Akman, Hasan O.; Wallace, Mary; Sedel, Frédéric; Laforêt, Pascal; Levy, Richard; Powers, J. Michael; Demeret, Sophie; Maisonobe, Thierry; Froissart, Roseline; Da Nobrega, Bruno Barcelos; Fogel, Brent L.; Natowicz, Marvin R.; Lubetzki, Catherine; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Rosenmann, Hanna; Barash, Varda; Kakhlon, Or; Gomori, J. Moshe; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Lossos, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD) is an autosomal recessive leukodystrophy characterized by neurogenic bladder, progressive spastic gait, and peripheral neuropathy. Polyglucosan bodies accumulate in the central and peripheral nervous systems and are often associated with glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) deficiency. To improve clinical diagnosis and enable future evaluation of therapeutic strategies, we conducted a multinational study of the natural history and imaging features of APBD. Methods We gathered clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in 50 APBD patients with GBE deficiency from Israel, the United States, France, and the Netherlands. Brain and spine magnetic resonance images were reviewed in 44 patients. Results The most common clinical findings were neurogenic bladder (100%), spastic paraplegia with vibration loss (90%), and axonal neuropathy (90%). The median age was 51 years for the onset of neurogenic bladder symptoms, 63 years for wheelchair dependence, and 70 years for death. As the disease progressed, mild cognitive decline may have affected up to half of the patients. Neuroimaging showed hyperintense white matter abnormalities on T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences predominantly in the periventricular regions, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, the external capsule, and the pyramidal tracts and medial lemniscus of the pons and medulla. Atrophy of the medulla and spine was universal. p.Y329S was the most common GBE1 mutation, present as a single heterozygous (28%) or homozygous (48%) mutation. Interpretation APBD with GBE deficiency, with occasional exceptions, is a clinically homogenous disorder that should be suspected in patients with adult onset leukodystrophy or spastic paraplegia with early onset of urinary symptoms and spinal atrophy. PMID:23034915

  4. The natural history of adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a prospective multicentre study

    OpenAIRE

    Tazi, Abdellatif; de Margerie, Constance; Naccache, Jean Marc; Fry, Stéphanie; Dominique, Stéphane; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lorillon, Gwenaël; Bugnet, Emmanuelle; Chiron, Raphael; Wallaert, Benoit; Valeyre, Dominique; Chevret, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural history of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) has been unclear due to the absence of prospective studies. The rate of patients who experience an early progression of their disease is unknown. Additionally, conflicting effects of smoking cessation on the outcome of PLCH have been reported. Methods In this prospective, multicentre study, 58 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed PLCH were comprehensively evaluated over a two-year period. Our objectives were...

  5. Natural history and management of brainstem gliomas in adults. A retrospective Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaggi, A; Fariselli, L; Milanesi, I; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A; Bizzi, A; Maccagnano, E; Trevisan, E; Laguzzi, E; Rudà, R; Boiardi, A; Soffietti, R

    2008-02-01

    Brainstem gliomas in adults are rare tumors, with heterogeneous clinical course; only a few studies in the MRI era describe the features in consistent groups of patients. In this retrospective study, we report clinical features at onset, imaging characteristics and subsequent course in a group of 34 adult patients with either histologically proven or clinico-radiologically diagnosed brainstem gliomas followed at two centers in Northern Italy. Of the patients 18 were male, 14 female, with a median age of 31. In 21 of the patients histology was obtained and in 20 it was informative (2 pilocytic astrocytoma, 9 low-grade astrocytoma, 8 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 glioblastoma). Contrast enhancement at MRI was present in 14 patients. In all of the 9 patients who were investigated with MR spectroscopy, the Cho/NAA ratio was elevated at diagnosis. In 8 of the patients, an initial watch and wait policy was adopted, while 24 were treated shortly after diagnosis with either radiotherapy alone [4] or radiotherapy and chemotherapy [20] (mostly temozolomide). Only minor radiological responses were observed after treatments; in a significant proportion of patients (9 out of 15) clinical improvement during therapy occurred in the context of radiologically (MRI) stable disease. Grade III or IV myelotoxicity was observed in 6 patients. After a follow-up ranging from 9 to 180 months, all but 2 patients have progressed and 14 have died (12 for disease progression, 2 for pulmonary embolism). Median overall survival time was of 59 months. Investigation of putative prognostically relevant parameters showed that a short time between disease onset and diagnosis was related to a shorter survival. Compared with literature data, our study confirms the clinical and radiological heterogeneity of adult brainstem gliomas and underscores the need for multicenter trials in order to assess the efficacy of treatments in these tumors. PMID:18293027

  6. Natural history of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is usually described with a focus on change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) over time as this allows for exploration of risk factors for an accelerated decline-and thus of developing COPD. From epidemiological studies we...

  7. Natural history and the Encyclopedie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llana, J

    2000-01-01

    The general popularity of natural history in the eighteenth century is mirrored in the frequency and importance of the more than 4,500 articles on natural history in the Encyclopedie. The main contributors to natural history were Daubenton, Diderot, Jaucourt and d'Holbach, but some of the key animating principles derive from Buffon, who wrote nothing specifically for the Encyclopedie. Still, a number of articles reflect his thinking, especially his antipathy toward Linnaeus. There was in principle a natural tie between encyclopedism, with its emphasis on connected knowledge, and the task of natural historians who concentrated on the relationships among living forms. Both the encyclopedists and the natural historians aimed at a sweeping overview of knowledge, and we see that Diderot's discussions of the encyclopedia were apparently informed by his reading of natural history. Most of the articles on natural history drew from traditional sources, but there are differences in emphasis and choice of subject, depending upon the author. Diderot's 300 contributions are often practical, interesting, and depend upon accounts from other parts of the world. Jaucourt, who wrote more articles on natural history than anyone else, followed in his foodsteps. Daubenton's 900 articles reflected a more narrow, professional approach. His contributions concluded for the most part with Volume 8, and Jaucourt carried on almost single-handedly after that. While staking out traditional ground (description, taxonomy) and advancing newer theoretical views linked with Buffon, natural history in the Encyclopedie avoided almost completely the sentimentalism concerning nature that developed after Rousseau. PMID:11624414

  8. The Natural History of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; David M. Levy; Wuerz, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a clinical syndrome resulting from abnormal hip joint morphology and is a common cause of hip pain in young adults. FAI has been posited as a precursor to hip osteoarthritis (OA); however, conflicting evidence exists and the true natural history of the disease is unclear. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of how FAI damages the hip joint by highlighting its pathomechanics and etiology. We then review the current evidence r...

  9. Natural history of ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Arturo Novoa

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease laden with paradigms, and it is a serious health problem. It is important to know its natural history, as it is multifactorial in origin, and also to understand its behaviour given its risk factors which can lead to death from metastasis in patients. It continues to be a challenge for oncologists. An analytical literature review was performed to update the latest concepts of its origin, evolution, risk factors, pre-clinical horizon, and its clinical manifestations;...

  10. The Natural History of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D. Kuhns

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI is a clinical syndrome resulting from abnormal hip joint morphology and is a common cause of hip pain in young adults. FAI has been posited as a precursor to hip osteoarthritis, however, conflicting evidence exists and the true natural history of the disease is unclear. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of how FAI damages the hip joint by highlighting its pathomechanics and etiology. We then review the current evidence relating FAI to osteoarthritis. Lastly, we will discuss the potential of hip preservation surgery to alter the natural history of FAI, reduce the risk of developing osteoarthritis and the need for future arthroplasty.

  11. Natural history of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In quantitative studies the authors found significant correlations between radiographic scores and physical and functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The authors review data as it applies to the natural history of RA, with attention to the pathophysiology of specific radiographic features. Cross-sectional analysis in 200 patients demonstrated significant correlations between radiographic scores and duration of disease; longitudinal studies of serial films in 52 patients revealed progression of disease in 92%. The findings of substantial radiographic abnormality and rapid progression early in the disease may provide a rationale for early aggressive therapy of RA

  12. Natural History of Pseudoboine Snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília P. Gaiarsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though natural history information is crucial for answering key ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions, basic studies are still lacking for Neotropical snakes. This study aims at contributing to the knowledge of the Neotropical tribe Pseudoboini, based on literature data, analysis of museum specimens and unpublished data. The tribe is mainly composed of moderate-sized snakes, although small and large-sized snakes also occur in the clade. Mean fecundity ranged from two (Rodriguesophis iglesiasi to 29 eggs (Clelia plumbea and the species are predominantly terrestrial and nocturnal. Most species are diet specialists and lizards are the most commonly consumed prey (found in the diet of 29 species, followed by small mammals (consumed by 20 species and snakes (consumed by 18 species. Although the tribe Pseudoboini appears to be well studied, for 15 species (32% only a small amount of information or none was available. We hope that our study can motivate research on the least known species.

  13. Selected Natural Materials in History

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julian F.V.Vincent

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Technology of natural materials Early man used conveniently shaped stones as tools."Workshop" areas have been found with large numbers of stones, some showing signs of being worked[1].However, organic materials like wood will decay under normal wet conditions in the presence of oxygen, so we won't find the same sort of evidence for wooden tools. It is safe to assume that early man used sticks as probes and clubs, and maybe even for making some sort of nestlike protection against the elements and predators, since we see chimpanzees and other animals doing this sort of thing. So wood, and almost certainly other plant materials such as fibrous leaves, and bone and other materials gleaned from dead animals, would be used from the earliest times. We need to know this in order to establish the idea that Man can be expected to have a long history of the use and manipulation of natural materials. This needs skills in choosing materials for certain uses on the basis of their mechanical properties,whether those properties are to do with the ease of shaping the material or the effectiveness of that material in use. Occasionally the material was chosen simply because it was readily available. If we find that a particular material was always used for a certain job, it's reasonable to deduce that Man was exerting materials selection criteria through experience.

  14. The natural history of anencephaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Obeidi, Nidaa

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: Early elective termination of pregnancy is the most common outcome of a diagnosis of anencephaly in developed countries. Experience and expertise with management of ongoing pregnancies is limited. We aimed to investigate the natural history of these pregnancies from diagnosis to delivery and to determine timing of death. METHOD: A retrospective review of cases of anencephaly diagnosed between 2003 and 2009 in tertiary-referral university teaching hospitals in Cork. RESULTS: The majority of cases (25\\/26; 96%) were diagnosed prenatally at a median gestation of 21(+2) weeks (range 13(+4)-32(+4)). The median maternal age was 30 years (range 17-41) and 50% were primigravidae. Seven pregnancies were complicated by polyhydramnios and four deliveries were complicated by shoulder dystocia. The median gestation at delivery was 35 weeks (range 22(+5)-42(+6)); 69% of labours were induced at a median gestation of 34 weeks. Six women (6\\/26; 23%) had a pre-labour intrauterine fetal death and nine women (9\\/26; 35%) had an intrapartum fetal death. Median neonatal survival time was 55 min (range 10 min to 8 days). Six parents donated neonatal organs for transplantation. CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information for health professionals caring for patients with a diagnosis of anencephaly. The majority of these infants die prior to delivery but short-term survival is possible.

  15. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing KE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosis and treatment exist significantly time delay now. In this study, we review the natural history of DMD, including motor, cognitive, respiratory and heart function, for improving DMD early recognition, diagnosis and treatment, so as to benefit DMD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.004

  16. Natural Histories of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Concepts relating to the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) arise most importantly from the classic study of Fletcher and colleagues (The Natural History of Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema, Oxford University Press, New York, 1976). This study, which evaluated working English men over 8 years, was used to construct a proposed life-long natural history. Although this is a classic study that has greatly advanced understanding of COPD, it has a number of limitations....

  17. A natural history of hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Valerie A

    2007-01-01

    In unpacking the Pandora’s box of hygiene, the author looks into its ancient evolutionary history and its more recent human history. Within the box, she finds animal behaviour, dirt, disgust and many diseases, as well as illumination concerning how hygiene can be improved. It is suggested that hygiene is the set of behaviours that animals, including humans, use to avoid harmful agents. The author argues that hygiene has an ancient evolutionary history, and that most animals exhibit such behav...

  18. American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Defeating Disease Crocs: Ancient Predators in a Modern World Upcoming Exhibitions Permanent Exhibitions Past Exhibitions Learn & Teach Find Programs and Resources for... Adults Families Pre-K to Grade 2 ...

  19. Natural histories of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Concepts relating to the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) arise most importantly from the classic study of Fletcher and colleagues (The Natural History of Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema, Oxford University Press, New York, 1976). This study, which evaluated working...... English men over 8 years, was used to construct a proposed life-long natural history. Although this is a classic study that has greatly advanced understanding of COPD, it has a number of limitations. Its duration is relatively short compared with the duration of COPD, so it is more cross-sectional than...... longitudinal. It was unable to distinguish among varied "natural histories." It assessed primarily the FEV(1), and the natural history of other features of COPD is largely undescribed. With advances in understanding the clinical features of COPD and with the development of evaluating new tools to assess...

  20. The natural history of asthma in a primary care cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler Prins, V.; Nieuwenhof, L.J.L. van den; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bor, J.H.J.; Weel, C. van

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the natural history of asthma in a primary care cohort of patients 10 years after the cohort was stratified for asthma risk by responses to a questionnaire and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) testing. METHODS: Children and young adults who were born between 1967 and 1979

  1. Preadult life history variation determines adult transcriptome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etges, William J; de Oliveira, Cássia; Rajpurohit, Subhash; Gibbs, Allen G

    2016-02-01

    Preadult determinants of adult fitness and behaviour have been documented in a variety of organisms with complex life cycles, but little is known about expression patterns of genes underlying these adult traits. We explored the effects of differences in egg-to-adult development time on adult transcriptome and cuticular hydrocarbon variation in order to understand the nature of the genetic correlation between preadult development time and premating isolation between populations of Drosophila mojavensis reared in different host cactus environments. Transcriptome variation was analysed separately in flies reared on each host and revealed that hundreds of genes in adults were differentially expressed (FDR P cactus, longer preadult development times caused increased expression of genes in adults enriched for ribosome production, protein metabolism, chromatin remodelling and regulation of alternate splicing and transcription. Baja California flies reared on organ pipe cactus showed fewer differentially expressed genes in adults due to longer preadult development time, but these were enriched for ATP synthesis and the TCA cycle. Mainland flies reared on organ pipe cactus with shorter development times showed increased transcription of genes enriched for mitochondria and energy production, protein synthesis and glucose metabolism: adults with longer development times had increased expression of genes enriched for adult life span, cuticle proteins and ion binding, although most differentially expressed genes were unannotated. Differences due to population, sex, mating status and their interactions were also assessed. Adult cuticular hydrocarbon profiles also showed shifts due to egg-to-adult development time and were influenced by population and mating status. These results help to explain why preadult life history variation determines subsequent expression of the adult transcriptome along with traits involved with reproductive isolation and revealed previously undocumented

  2. Creating and Promoting a Natural History Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belben, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the value of developing and promoting a natural history library by school library media specialists. Topics include benefits to students; promoting outdoor education; recommended reading for high school students; using technology; and other aids to promote outdoor education. (LRW)

  3. Natural history of Ehrlichia ruminantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, Basil A

    2010-02-10

    Ehrlichia ruminantium is an obligately intracellular proteobacterium which causes a disease known as heartwater or cowdriosis in some wild, and all domestic, ruminants. The organism is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyomma, and it is of serious economic importance wherever the natural vectors occur, an area which includes all of sub-Saharan Africa, and several islands in the Caribbean. The disease was first recognized in South Africa in the 19th century, where its tick-borne nature was determined in 1900, but the organism itself was not demonstrated until 1925, when it was recognized to be a rickettsia, initially named Rickettsia ruminantium. It was thus the first species of what are now known as Ehrlichia to be discovered, and most of the early work to elucidate the nature of the organisms, and its reservoirs and vectors, was performed in South Africa. The next milestone was the development, in 1945, of an infection and treatment regimen to immunize livestock, and this is still the only commercially available "vaccine" against the disease. Then in 1985, after fruitless attempts over many years, the organism was propagated reliably in tissue culture, opening the way for the first application of the newly developed techniques of molecular genetics. From 1990 onwards the pace of heartwater research accelerated rapidly, with notable advances in phylogeny, diagnosis, epidemiology, immunology, and vaccine development. The complete genome sequence was published in 2005, and during the last two years a new understanding has arisen of the remarkable genetic variability of the organism and new experimental vaccines have been developed. Despite all this the goal of producing an effective vaccine against the disease in the field still remains frustratingly just beyond reach. This article summarises our current understanding of the nature of E. ruminantium, at a time when the prospects for the development of an effective vaccine against the organism seem better than at

  4. The Natural History of Asthma in a Primary Care Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler Prins, V.; Nieuwenhof, L.J.L. van den; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bor, J.H.J.; van Weel, C

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the natural history of asthma in a primary care cohort of patients 10 years after the cohort was stratified for asthma risk by responses to a questionnaire and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) testing. METHODS: Children and young adults who were born between 1967 and 1979 within 1 of 4 affiliated family practices of the Nijmegen Department of Family Medicine, The Netherlands, were asked to participate in an asthma study in 1989. Of 926 patients available, 581 (63%) ...

  5. Science literacy and natural history museums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antonio G Valdecasas; Ana M Correas

    2010-12-01

    It appears that developed countries, such as the US, the UK and Italy, are losing the race against irrationalism and arbitrary thinking in regard to nature and human interactions. The incidence of misguided beliefs and the detachment from and, in some cases, outright hostility toward science are on the rise. Paradoxically, this is probably the period in the history of advanced countries in which increasing public and personal efforts have been directed toward the dissemination of scientific knowledge to increase public understanding of science. This article vindicates the role of natural history museums in consolidating rational and critical scientific thinking while briefly examining scientific illiteracy in developed countries. It also discusses methods to improve the involvement of natural history museums in the promotion of rational thinking, the only appropriate avenue for objective knowledge.

  6. The Natural Science Underlying Big History

    CERN Document Server

    Chaisson, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Nature's many varied complex systems (including galaxies, stars, planets, life, and society) are islands of order within the increasingly disordered universe. All organized systems are subject to physical, biological or cultural evolution, which together comprise the grander interdisciplinary subject of cosmic evolution. This is global history greatly extended, big history with a scientific basis, and natural history broadly portrayed across 14 billion years of time. Such evolution writ large has significant potential to unify the natural sciences into a holistic understanding of who we are and whence we came. No new science (beyond frontier, non-equilibrium thermodynamics) is needed to describe cosmic evolution's major milestones at a deep and empirical level. Quantitative models and experimental tests imply that a remarkable simplicity underlies the emergence and growth of complexity for a wide spectrum of known and diverse systems. In particular, energy rate density is an objective metric suitable to gauge...

  7. Natural History of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, George Boon-Bee; McCullough, Arthur J

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains among the most common liver diseases worldwide, with increasing prevalence in concert with the obesity and metabolic syndrome epidemic. The evidence on the natural history, albeit with some ambiguity, suggests the potential for some subsets of NAFLD to progress to cirrhosis, liver-related complications and mortality with fibrosis being the most important predictor of hard long-term endpoints such as mortality and liver complications. In this setting, NAFLD proves to be a formidable disease entity, with considerable clinical burden, for both the present and the future. Our understanding of the natural history of NAFLD is constantly evolving, with nascent data challenging current dogma. Further clarification of the natural history is required with well-designed, well-defined studies using prospectively collected data. Identifying the predictors of long-term outcomes should be used to direct development of clinical trial endpoints in NAFLD. PMID:27003142

  8. Characterization of spinal findings in children and adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 enrolled in a natural history study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Rosa; Dombi, Eva; Akshintala, Srivandana; Baldwin, Andrea; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2015-01-01

    To characterize spinal abnormalities in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). NF1 patients with at least one spine MRI were selected from participants prospectively enrolled in the National Cancer Institute NF1 Natural History Study. Data were analyzed retrospectively. Ninety-seven patients (38 females, median age 14.2 years, standard deviation [SD] 7.6) had baseline imaging of the spine, and 26 patients (27 %) had one follow-up spine MRI (follow up time 2.5 years, SD 1.1, range 0.7-4.7). Seventy-eight patients (80 %) had spinal neurofibromas, with rising frequency from 70 % in patients younger than 10 years to 80 % in patients aged 10-18 years to 89 % in individuals older than 18 years of age. At baseline, 33/97 patients (34 %) had MRI changes consistent with spinal cord compression that was most prevalent at the cervical (43 %) and lumbar spine region (40 %). Seven of nine patients with progression of their spinal neurofibromas developed cord compression. Paraspinal plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) were present in 77/97 patients (79 %), of which 68 patients (88 %) had concomitant spinal neurofibromas. Spinal curvature abnormality was present in 50/97 patients (51 %, 20 females, median age 14.6 years, SD 7.6). Patients with paraspinal PNs had six-fold higher odds of developing spinal curvature abnormalities compared to patients without PN (OR = 5.9, 95 % CI 1.81 to 19.44, p = 0.0033). A total of 58/97 patients (60 %, median age 16.1 years, SD 7.8, range 4.8-48.2 years) presented with neurologic abnormalities that progressed in 12/26 patients (46 %). Substantial spinal neurofibroma and paraspinal PN burden was observed in our study population, which represents a selective group of patients with specifically more severe tumor involvement than the general NF1 population. Occurrence and progression of spinal neurofibromas on repeat evaluations highlight the need for longitudinal clinical monitoring in patients with known

  9. Epidemiology and natural history of atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    The atopic diseases - atopic dermatitis, asthma, and hay fever - pose a great burden to the individual and society, not least, since these diseases have reached epidemic proportions during the past decades in industrialized and, more recently, in developing countries. Whereas the prevalence of the...... atopic diseases now seems to have reached a plateau in many Western countries, they are still on the increase in the developing world. This emphasizes continuing research aimed at identifying the causes, risk factors, and natural history of these diseases. Herein, the fundamental aspects of the natural...... history and epidemiology of the atopic diseases are reviewed....

  10. Autophagy in Natural History and After ERT in Glycogenosis Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Angelini, Corrado; Nascimbeni, Anna C.; Fanin, Marina

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of autophagy in a series of 10 infantile-, juvenile-, and adult-onset GSDII patients and investigated autophagy blockade in successive biopsies of adult cases during disease natural history. We also correlated the autophagosome accumulation and efficiency of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in four treated cases (two infantile and two juvenile-adult onsets).

  11. Epidemiology and natural history of vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma...

  12. Climate and Human History of Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Sune

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates the ideas that have prevented environmental knowledge from developing into action and change. According to Clarence J. Glacken throughout European history design ideas about the relation between man and nature have prevented the many local observations of the negative conse...

  13. Maxillary sinus carcinoma: Natural history and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess natural history, treatment outcome and pattern of relapse in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma. A review was conducted of the medical records of all adult patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma, who were treated at King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 1990 and December 1999. A total of 60 patients were identified for analysis, 36 men and 24 women; the median age was 58-years (range 23-95). Major presenting symptoms were facial swelling 55%, facial pain 50%, and nasal obstruction 43.4%, with a median duration of 5-months (range 1-24). Histology was quamous cell carcinoma in 71.7% and adenoid cystic in 16.7%. They were restaged according to American Joint Committee on Cancer classification 1997 as II, III and IV in 1, 10 and 49. Thirty patients received treatment with curative intent (surgery in 4 patients, radiotherapy in 2, and combined modality in 24), 6 patients refused treatment and 24 were treated palliatively. With a median follow up of 50-months (range 2-128) in surviving patients treated with a curative intent, 12/30 failed locally, 4/30 in the regional neck nodes and 2/30 had systemic relapse. The actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS), relapse free survival (RFS) and local control rate (LC) were 55%, 39% and 51%. Treatment modality was the only significant prognostic factor for outcome, with 5 year OS, RFS and LC of 72%, 49% and 61%, for combined modality using surgery followed by radiotherapy compared to 0% for single approach (p=0.0003, p=0.0052 and p=0.0098). This study indicates that the majority of our patients presented with advanced disease, resulting in poor outcome to conventional treatment modalities. Efforts should be directed to minimize the delay in diagnosis at the primary care level. Combined modality treatment should be offered to all patients with locally advanced disease. New approaches such as neoadjuvant or concurrent chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery need to

  14. Natural history collections: A scientific treasure trove

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    Natural history collections play an indispensable and often overlooked role in the conservation and management of our Nation’s flora and fauna. Scientific specimens housed in museum collections not only open an important window into the current and past diversity of life on Earth, but also play a vital role in fueling cutting-edge scientific research in many disciplines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) curates a collection of vertebrates from the Intermountain and Southwestern United States that is used by researchers from around the globe. As one of the largest Federal natural history collections in the western United States, the USGS specimen holdings offer unique opportunities to study the fauna of this incredibly diverse and unique region.

  15. Natural History of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    YuehuaPu

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease was very common among stroke patients of Asians, Blacks, and Hispanics ancestry. Furthermore, stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) have higher recurrence rate of cerebral ischemia and death than those without ICAS. However, the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease is still in controversy. Most of the studies were retrospective and randomized controlled trial of drugs. This review summarized the prognosis of symptomati...

  16. The natural history of intravascular lymphomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fonkem, Ekokobe; Lok, Edwin; Robison, David; Gautam, Shiva; Wong, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) is a rare and clinically devastating form of extranodal B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the literature on IVL's published between 1959 and 2011 and evaluated the natural history as well as identified prognostic and predictive factors in patients. Nonparametric two-tailed Mann–Whitney U-test and Mantel–Cox log rank test were used to evaluate the survival intervals and prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis of variance...

  17. Natural History of HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-12

    Dr. Phil Castle, an intramural research scientist at the National Institutes of Health, talks about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and cervical cancer and other anogenital cancers.  Created: 10/12/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  18. The "History" of Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Huxley, Spencer and the "End" of natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    As part of their defence of evolutionary theory, T. H. Huxley and Herbert Spencer argued that natural history was no longer a legitimate scientific discipline. They outlined a secularized concept of life from biology to argue for the validity of naturalism. Despite their support for naturalism, they offered two different responses to the decline of natural history. Whereas Huxley emphasized the creation of a biological discipline, and all that that entailed, Spencer was more concerned with constructing an entire intellectual system based on the idea of evolution. In effect, Spencer wanted to create a new scientific worldview based on evolutionary theory. This had consequences for their understanding of human history, especially of how science had evolved through the ages. It affected their conceptions of human agency, contingency, and directionality in history. Examining Huxley's and Spencer's responses to the "end" of natural history reveals some of the deep divisions within scientific naturalism and the inherent problems of naturalism in general. Whereas Huxley chose to separate the natural and the historical, Spencer opted to fuse them into a single system. PMID:26751794

  19. Natural History of Small Renal Masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Xue-Song Li; Li-Qun Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To review the natural history and growth kinetics of small renal masses (SRMs).Data Sources:The literature concerning natural history and growth kinetics of SRMs was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2014.Study Selection:We included all the relevant articles on the active surveillance (AS) or delayed treatment for SRMs in English,with no limitation of study design.Results:SRMs under AS have a slow growth potential in general.The mean linear growth rate is 0.33 cm/year,the mean volumetric growth rate is 9.48 cm3/year.The rate of metastasis during AS is below 2%.Some factors are associated with the growth rate of SRMs,including tumor grade,histological subtype,initial tumor size,age,radiographic characteristics,and molecular markers.No definite predictor of growth rate of SRMs is defined at present.SRMs with high tumor grade and the subtype of clear cell renal cell carcinoma may have aggressive growth potential.Conclusions:AS is a reasonable choice for elderly patients with SRMs,who are at high risk from surgery.Progression during observation is the biggest concern while performing AS.There is no definite predictor of progression for SRMs under AS.Percutaneous renal biopsy providing immunohistological and genic biomarkers may improve the understanding of natural history of SRMs.

  20. Natural history of uncomplicated sigmoid diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Nicolas C; Mortensen, Neil J; Ris, Frederic; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2015-11-27

    While diverticular disease is extremely common, the natural history (NH) of its most frequent presentation (i.e., sigmoid diverticulitis) is poorly investigated. Relevant information is mostly restricted to population-based or retrospective studies. This comprehensive review aimed to evaluate the NH of simple sigmoid diverticulitis. While there is a clear lack of uniformity in terminology, which results in difficulties interpreting and comparing findings between studies, this review demonstrates the benign nature of simple sigmoid diverticulitis. The overall recurrence rate is relatively low, ranging from 13% to 47%, depending on the definition used by the authors. Among different risk factors for recurrence, patients with C-reactive protein > 240 mg/L are three times more likely to recur. Other risk factors include: Young age, a history of several episodes of acute diverticulitis, medical vs surgical management, male patients, radiological signs of complicated first episode, higher comorbidity index, family history of diverticulitis, and length of involved colon > 5 cm. The risk of developing a complicated second episode (and its corollary to require an emergency operation) is less than 2%-5%. In fact, the old rationale for elective surgery as a preventive treatment, based mainly on concerns that recurrence would result in a progressively increased risk of sepsis or the need for a colostomy, is not upheld by the current evidence. PMID:26649154

  1. Rumination in adults: two case histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, M B; Campbell, N B; Franco, K N; Evans, C L

    1995-01-01

    Rumination has been reported to be a relatively rare disorder of eating during infancy. Over the past decade, there appears to be a renewed interest in and recognition of adult rumination. Although some authors believe adult rumination is benign, others have begun to link it with both eating disorders and depressive symptoms. This paper presents two adult cases whose rumination was associated with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. More identification and study of adult rumination is needed to clarify its course and medical significance. PMID:7894448

  2. The Natural Science Underlying Big History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Chaisson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature’s many varied complex systems—including galaxies, stars, planets, life, and society—are islands of order within the increasingly disordered Universe. All organized systems are subject to physical, biological, or cultural evolution, which together comprise the grander interdisciplinary subject of cosmic evolution. A wealth of observational data supports the hypothesis that increasingly complex systems evolve unceasingly, uncaringly, and unpredictably from big bang to humankind. These are global history greatly extended, big history with a scientific basis, and natural history broadly portrayed across ∼14 billion years of time. Human beings and our cultural inventions are not special, unique, or apart from Nature; rather, we are an integral part of a universal evolutionary process connecting all such complex systems throughout space and time. Such evolution writ large has significant potential to unify the natural sciences into a holistic understanding of who we are and whence we came. No new science (beyond frontier, nonequilibrium thermodynamics is needed to describe cosmic evolution’s major milestones at a deep and empirical level. Quantitative models and experimental tests imply that a remarkable simplicity underlies the emergence and growth of complexity for a wide spectrum of known and diverse systems. Energy is a principal facilitator of the rising complexity of ordered systems within the expanding Universe; energy flows are as central to life and society as they are to stars and galaxies. In particular, energy rate density—contrasting with information content or entropy production—is an objective metric suitable to gauge relative degrees of complexity among a hierarchy of widely assorted systems observed throughout the material Universe. Operationally, those systems capable of utilizing optimum amounts of energy tend to survive, and those that cannot are nonrandomly eliminated.

  3. The natural history of euthyroid multinodular goitre.

    OpenAIRE

    Elte, J. W.; Bussemaker, J K; Haak, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this communication data on the natural history of euthyroid multinodular goitres are presented. From a total group of 140 patients (mean age 54.6 years, 14 men and 126 women; 88 with autonomous, 52 with non-autonomous function), follow-up data were available for 90 patients (mean age 54.0 years, 11 men and 79 women; 64 with autonomous, 26 with non-autonomous function). During follow-up (means: 5.0 years, maximum 12.2 years) transitions in function were seen 15 times; 8 autonomous patients ...

  4. Psoriasis: epidemiology, natural history, and differential diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basko-Plluska JL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Juliana L Basko-Plluska, Vesna Petronic-RosicDepartment of Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disease which affects primarily the skin and joints. It occurs worldwide, but its prevalence varies considerably between different regions of the world. Genetic susceptibility as well as environmental factors play an important role in determining the development and prognosis of psoriasis. Genome-wide association studies have identified many genetic loci as potential psoriasis susceptibility regions, including PSORS1 through PSORS7. Histocompatibility antigen (HLA studies have also identified several HLA antigens, with HLA-Cw6 being the most frequently associated antigen. Epidemiological studies identified several modifiable risk factors that may predispose individuals to developing psoriasis or exacerbate pre-existing disease. These include smoking, obesity, alcohol consumption, diet, infections, medications and stressful life events. The exact mechanism by which they trigger psoriasis remains to be elucidated; however, existing data suggest that they are linked through Th1-mediated immunological pathways. The natural history of psoriasis varies depending on the clinical subtype as well as special circumstances, including pregnancy and HIV infection. In general, psoriasis is a chronic disease with intermittent remissions and exacerbations. The differential diagnosis is vast and includes many other immune-mediated, inflammatory disorders.Keywords: psoriasis, epidemiology, natural history, differential diagnosis

  5. HISTORY AND NATURE OF DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUGO ESCOBAR MELO

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The main intention of this document is to outstand a view of the Evolutive Psychology as an area ofspecific knowledge the approaches the course of changes and progress the construction of diversepsychological process thought life. The text identifies the classical historical antecedents of the currentEvolutive Psychology, its great landmarks and discusses some views about “evolution” and proposesa theoretical reflection from the disciplinary intersection perspective.Proposes that Evolutive Psychology shows ruptures and transformations in terms of a Overcomingthe image of the child as an adult in miniature. b Children, an organism that gets adapted and evolves.c The evolution of the child, the adolescent and the adult are different subjects d The subject as logicalthinker and scientific natural placed in the intersubjectivity e Identification and characterization ofunsuspected neonative competitions analogies homologies and improving rationality f Study of theinevitable transitions for aging and death. Discuses some current debates in the context of a conceptionof evolution that shows transformations, ruptures, regressions and reorganizations with progressionsthat do not establish lineal connections between the initial points with the final ones.

  6. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Juvenile Mental Health Histories of Adults with Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, Alice M.; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E; Koenen, K.; Eley, Thalia C.; Poulton, Richie

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Information about the psychiatric histories of adults with anxiety disorders was examined to further inform nosology and etiological/ preventive efforts. METHOD: The authors used data from a prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort (N=1,037) from ages 11 to 32 years, making psychiatric diagnoses according to DSM criteria. For adults with anxiety disorders at 32 years, follow-back analyses ascertained first diagnosis of anxiety and other juvenile dis...

  8. Geodiversity and the natural history of landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Christian

    2014-05-01

    possible for a geomorphologist to travel back in the past, a delicate and speculative succession of operations: as noted by Schumm (1979, 485), "The extrapolation of measured average rates of erosion and deposition to longer periods of time is misleading, in the sense that they do not reveal the natural complexity of landform development or the variability of existing landforms". Any extrapolation in the past or future implies true actualiste approach verifying only methodological uniformitarianism (i.e. spatial and temporal invariance of natural laws) as well as quantitative models purged of any hint of gradualism and which takes into account variations of timing, frequency and intensity in the action of morphogenetic forcings. In continuation of Hack's work, the concepts of landscape sensitivity developed by Brunsden and Thornes (1979) explain that some landforms are particularly well fitted to the present conditions of endogenetic and exogenetic forcings (characteristic landforms) while others not at all (transient landforms). This highly effective approach within the Holocene and the Pleistocene marks the beginning of a return to the investigation of the past in geomorphology, given that for the Neogene or even older times, the ancient concept of "héritage" (Birot, 1958) seems more relevant than the concepts of transient or characteristic landforms. We propose here as an illustration to describe the sequence of landforms defined in the Southern Massif Central (France). The full sequence is to be observed between the Languedoc Lowlands and the Monts de Lacaune Highlands, while an elision of the lower terms of the sequence towards the Aquitaine Basin allow to highlight a highly significant limit between two modes of landform development at regional level. In short, the natural history of landforms deserve a high status in the Earth sciences: geomorphology not only needs mechanics and chemistry (i.e. the changing ratio of tectonic-driven to climatic-driven processes

  9. Studying Adult Learning through the History of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Lawrence E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the methodology by which people arrive at "knowledge" and how knowledge has been seen by philosophers and critical thinkers through history. Includes the theories of Jurgen Habermas, Jack Mezirow, Thomas Kuhn, and Paulo Freire. Cites implications for adult education. (JOW)

  10. Milestones in history of adult vaccination in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Myoung-don; Lee, Jong-koo

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that reduced the mortality. Major vaccine preventable diseases have decreased dramatically after the introduction of immunization program in Korea. In this article, we review milestones in history of immunization program, especially in adult vaccination.

  11. Life history strategy and young adult substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, George B; Chen, Ching-Chen; Dai, Chia-Liang; Swoboda, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    This study tested whether life history strategy (LHS) and its intergenerational transmission could explain young adult use of common psychoactive substances. We tested a sequential structural equation model using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. During young adulthood, fast LHS explained 61% of the variance in overall liability for substance use. Faster parent LHS predicted poorer health and lesser alcohol use, greater neuroticism and cigarette smoking, but did not predict fast LHS or overall liability for substance use among young adults. Young adult neuroticism was independent of substance use controlling for fast LHS. The surprising finding of independence between parent and child LHS casts some uncertainty upon the identity of the parent and child LHS variables. Fast LHS may be the primary driver of young adult use of common psychoactive substances. However, it is possible that the young adult fast LHS variable is better defined as young adult mating competition. We discuss our findings in depth, chart out some intriguing new directions for life history research that may clarify the dimensionality of LHS and its mediation of the intergenerational transmission of substance use, and discuss implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment. PMID:25365695

  12. Giant myelolipoma of the adrenal gland: natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrenal myelolipomas are rare benign, non functioning tumors, mostly small and asymptomatic. We report the natural history of a giant adrenal myelolipoma. We could follow with CT the natural progression of the tumor during a 5-year interval. (orig.)

  13. Digital Libraries for Biodiversity and Natural History Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz, Miguel; Kramer-Duffield, Jacob; Greenberg, Jane; Hall, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    5 p. This panel aims to discuss the importance of creating digital libraries for biodiversity and natural history collections, the state of the art in terms of standards, best practices and the challenges that natural history museums and herbaria face when trying to digitize their collections, and the creation and management of personal digital libraries for botanical learning.

  14. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of natural languages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnow, T.; Ringe, D.; Taylor, A. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a new methodology for determining the evolutionary history of related languages. Our methodology uses linguistic information encoded as qualitative characters, and provides much greater precision than previous methods. Our analysis of Indo-European (IE) languages resolves questions that have troubled scholars for over a century.

  15. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    KE, QING; ZHANG Li

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosi...

  16. Making Nature the history of a scientific journal

    CERN Document Server

    Baldwin, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Making "Nature" is the first book to chronicle the foundation and development of Nature, one of the world's most influential scientific institutions. Now nearing its hundred and fiftieth year of publication, Nature is the international benchmark for scientific publication. Its contributors include Charles Darwin, Ernest Rutherford, and Stephen Hawking, and it has published many of the most important discoveries in the history of science, including articles on the structure of DNA, the discovery of the neutron, the first cloning of a mammal, and the human genome. But how did Nature become such an essential institution? In Making "Nature," Melinda Baldwin charts the rich history of this extraordinary publication from its foundation in 1869 to current debates about online publishing and open access. This pioneering study not only tells Nature's story but also sheds light on much larger questions about the history of science publishing, changes in scientific communication, and shifting notions of "scientific comm...

  17. The natural history of HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabin, C.A.; Lundgren, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    immunological deterioration which would otherwise be seen in untreated HIV infection, recent studies do not address the longer term clinical benefits of ART at this very early stage. SUMMARY: A better understanding of the relative influences of viral, host, and environmental factors on the natural course of HIV......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent published literature around three areas: long-term nonprogression/viral control; predictors of viral load set point/disease progression; and the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in early HIV infection. RECENT FINDINGS: The natural course of...

  18. Prehistoric Journey: Denver Museum of Natural History Educators' Sourcebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca L.; Leigh, Vicki; Crew, Diana Lee

    This sourcebook prepares students for a visit to the "Prehistoric Journey" exhibit at the Denver Museum of Natural History. The exhibit opened October 23, 1995, and offered a dramatic exploration of 3.5 billion years of life on Earth. Dioramas and "enviroramas" depict seven critical points in life's history. In addition to the chronological…

  19. [Natural history of pollinosis in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Carrasco, J A; Orive Iglesias, I; Linares López, P; Blanco Quirós, A; Andión Dapena, R

    1986-03-01

    Out of 2.513 clinical files of allergic children, we have found 200 pollen-allergic patients, which represent 7.9% of the total allergic pathology in children, in our environment. We have studied in these 200, the most important epidemiological parameters and the influence that this can cause upon the characteristics of this disease. A male predominance has been found (70%) and it has been discovered that 52% of the total were born in spring (p less than 0.0005). An hundred per cent have shown grass-pollen sensitiveness and 52% have also shown other kinds of pollen hypersensitivity. It has been found familiar allergic background in 76.5% of the cases and in 32.5% familiar allergic history of pollinosis. Unexpectedly, those who were in lack of familiar allergic history began their clinical symptoms earlier; 51.06% before 6 years of age (p less than 0.05). Other kinds of allergic manifestations were found in 51%, being respiratory symptoms the most important (35.5%), followed by the cutaneous (23.5%) and digestive ones (10.5%). Allergy to drugs was found in 10.5%. The more frequent symptoms of pollinosis were in order of importance: rhinitis (86.5%), conjunctivitis (77%), asthma (48%), spasmodic cough (27.5%) and urticaria (4%). Asthma induced by grass-pollen hypersensitivity was equally suffered by the males as by the females, and this was more frequent among the patients who had previously suffered from non-pollinic respiratory allergies. PMID:3706920

  20. The Natural History of Antisocial Personality Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterized by a pattern of socially irresponsible, exploitative, and guiltless behaviour. ASPD is associated with co-occurring mental health and addictive disorders and medical comorbidity. Rates of natural and unnatural death (suicide, homicide, and accidents) are excessive. ASPD is a predictor of poor treatment response. ASPD begins early in life, usually by age 8 years. Diagnosed as conduct disorder in childhood, the diagnosis converts to ASPD a...

  1. The natural history of HIV infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sabin, C. A.; Lundgren, J D

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent published literature around three areas: long-term nonprogression/viral control; predictors of viral load set point/disease progression; and the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in early HIV infection. RECENT FINDINGS: The natural course of untreated HIV infection varies widely with some HIV-positive individuals able to maintain high CD4 cell counts and/or suppressed viral load in the absence of ART. Although similar, the underlying mechanis...

  2. Atopic Dermatitis: Natural History, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Francis Thomsen

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural histor...

  3. The Natural History of Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jessica; Sicherer, Scott; Wood, Robert

    2016-01-01

    On a population level, it is well recognized that some IgE-mediated childhood food allergies, such as milk and egg allergies, are more likely to resolve than others, such as peanut and tree nuts allergies. Unfortunately, some studies suggest that resolution rates may have slowed compared with impressions from past decades. The clinician can apply the knowledge of the epidemiology of these allergies to describe likely patient outcomes, and direct management in a general manner. However, the ability to evaluate and predict the natural course of specific food allergies for individual patients is essential to inform personalized patient care. Data are accumulating to assist in identifying whether a child's allergy has likely resolved, informing the timing of oral food challenges or subsequent testing. Exciting recent studies are increasingly identifying early prognostic markers as well. Emerging food allergy therapies carry risks and costs. Identifying which egg-allergic patient has likely persistent allergy, and which patient with peanut allergy may experience natural resolution, is becoming an important goal to identify the best candidates for these therapies. Although more work needs to be done to identify reliable predictive markers and validate them, there is already much known about the natural course of food allergies that can be applied by the clinician to improve patient care. PMID:26968958

  4. Networks of Nature: Stories of Natural History Film-making at the BBC

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, G.

    1998-01-01

    In May 1953 the first natural history television programme was broadcast from Bristol by naturalist Peter Scott and radio producer Desmond Hawkins. By 1997 the BBC's Natural History Unit has established a global reputation for wildlife films, providing a keystone of the BBC's public service broadcasting charter, playing an important strategic role in television scheduling and occupying a prominent position in a competitive world film market. The BBC's blue-chip natural history programmes regu...

  5. Ecology of zoonoses: natural and unnatural histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karesh, William B; Dobson, Andy; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Lubroth, Juan; Dixon, Matthew A; Bennett, Malcolm; Aldrich, Stephen; Harrington, Todd; Formenty, Pierre; Loh, Elizabeth H; Machalaba, Catherine C; Thomas, Mathew Jason; Heymann, David L

    2012-12-01

    More than 60% of human infectious diseases are caused by pathogens shared with wild or domestic animals. Zoonotic disease organisms include those that are endemic in human populations or enzootic in animal populations with frequent cross-species transmission to people. Some of these diseases have only emerged recently. Together, these organisms are responsible for a substantial burden of disease, with endemic and enzootic zoonoses causing about a billion cases of illness in people and millions of deaths every year. Emerging zoonoses are a growing threat to global health and have caused hundreds of billions of US dollars of economic damage in the past 20 years. We aimed to review how zoonotic diseases result from natural pathogen ecology, and how other circumstances, such as animal production, extraction of natural resources, and antimicrobial application change the dynamics of disease exposure to human beings. In view of present anthropogenic trends, a more effective approach to zoonotic disease prevention and control will require a broad view of medicine that emphasises evidence-based decision making and integrates ecological and evolutionary principles of animal, human, and environmental factors. This broad view is essential for the successful development of policies and practices that reduce probability of future zoonotic emergence, targeted surveillance and strategic prevention, and engagement of partners outside the medical community to help improve health outcomes and reduce disease threats. PMID:23200502

  6. History of occupational exposure to natural radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From pre-historic times miners represented the group which received, inadvertently, occupational exposure to natural radionuclides. At the end of the 19th century scientists researching the newly found radiation called ''radioactivity'' became exposed frequently to uranium, thorium and their decay chains, still hardly aware of the potential risks associated with their work. In the first half of the 20th century some employees in the radium industry received high doses in the course of their professional duties as chemists, maintenance workers, or radium dial painters; many of them lacked adequate information on radiation protection. After World War II the increased international demand for uranium in the military and civilian sector caused overexposures of several thousands of miners (volunteers, prisoners), mostly due to the inhalation of elevated levels of radon and its decay products. By comparison on an international scale a relatively small number of workers was exposed to increased levels of thorium and its decay products in the thorium and rare-earth extraction industry. Health effects due to these past exposures range from relatively weak associations to statistically significant excesses for a variety of symptoms, such as respiratory diseases or cancer of the bone, lung or pancreas. An assessment of today industrial exposure situations indicates a wide range of occupations exposed to partly significant levels of natural radionuclides. 36 refs., 7 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Natural history, symptoms and treatment of the narcoleptic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, J D; Baraitser, M; Marsden, C D; Asselman, P

    1975-11-01

    This study describes the clinical features, natural history and treatment of 100 patients with narcolepsy. Over half had one or more affected relatives. Symptoms commenced in adolescence or early adult life in most patients, and remissions were uncommon. Narcolepsy occurred several times each day, often in unusual circumstances and sometimes with little warning. The mean total sleep time of narco-leptics was a little over 9 hours in each 24 hour period, as compared with under 8 in normal subjects. Cataplexy occurred in 93 patients, most commonly when subjects were tired. Attacks were similar in nature to physiological weakness with laughter, although other sudden sensory or emotional stimuli did not cause paralysis of voluntary movement nor loss of muscle tone in normal subjects. Half these patients had frequent dreams before the onset of proper sleep, and 62 had sleep paralysis. This was often frightening, with feelings of suffocation, accompanied by dreams, and of uncertain length. A minority of patients with narcolepsy had muscle aches and jerks before sleep, double vision or loss of focus during cataplexy, went sleep-walking by day, and had daytime hallucinations. Amphetamines had been given to 71 patients for periods of up to 33 years with adequate, but rarely complete, control of narcolepsy. Side effects were common and almost half these patients became tolerant, needing higher dosage to control symptoms. Three patients had a cerebrovascular accident whilst taking amphetamines. Imipramine or clomipramine had ben given in combination with amphetamines to 33 patients for periods of up to 6 years with considerable improvement in both cataplexy and sleep paralysis, and few side effects. Sustained or paroxysmal hypertension as a result of amphetamines or combined treatment did not occur. PMID:19899267

  8. The Natural History of Antisocial Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald W

    2015-07-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterized by a pattern of socially irresponsible, exploitative, and guiltless behaviour. ASPD is associated with co-occurring mental health and addictive disorders and medical comorbidity. Rates of natural and unnatural death (suicide, homicide, and accidents) are excessive. ASPD is a predictor of poor treatment response. ASPD begins early in life, usually by age 8 years. Diagnosed as conduct disorder in childhood, the diagnosis converts to ASPD at age 18 if antisocial behaviours have persisted. While chronic and lifelong for most people with ASPD, the disorder tends to improve with advancing age. Earlier onset is associated with a poorer prognosis. Other moderating factors include marriage, employment, early incarceration (or adjudication during childhood), and degree of socialization. PMID:26175389

  9. The Natural History of Globus Pharyngeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Cashman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Globus pharyngeus is a common disorder and accounts for 5% of all ENT referrals. Objectives. To evaluate the role of barium swallow and endoscopy in these patients, to ascertain the incidence, if any, of aerodigestive tract malignancy in this group and to assess the natural evolution of globus pharyngeus. Materials and Methods. Seventy-nine patients underwent barium swallow and rigid oesophagoscopy for globus pharyngeus between January 2005 and October 2008. Fifty-five patients were contacted by phone on average 5 years and 3 months after intervention and asked if their symptoms still persisted. Twenty-four patients were uncontactable or lost to followup, three patients were deceased, two of cardiac related disease and one of renal failure. Results. The majority of patients, 36 of 55 (65%, had a normal barium swallow. Forty-five of 55 (82% of patients had normal rigid endoscopies. Thirty-one of 55 (56% patients were at an average followup time of 5 years and 3 months. No patient developed a malignant lesion. Conclusion. Globus pharyngeus is a relatively common but benign condition of indeterminate origin. Our study demonstrates that many of these patients spontaneously improve with time.

  10. Natural Resource-Based Economic Development in History

    OpenAIRE

    Barbier, Edward B.

    2005-01-01

    The role of natural resources in fostering economic development is examined for key historical epochs, from the agricultural revolution in 8,000 BC to the present. Natural resource exploitation has been important to development for most of global history. Depending on which epoch is examined, resource-based development could be viewed as “successful†and sometimes not. Simply because a developing economy or region was endowed with abundant natural resources does not guarantee that its natu...

  11. Eye disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis: natural history and management

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, Jennifer; Balcer, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and leading cause of disability in young adults. Vision impairment is a common component of disability for this population of patients. Injury to the optic nerve, brainstem, and cerebellum leads to characteristic syndromes affecting both the afferent and efferent visual pathways. The objective of this review is to summarize the spectrum of eye disorders in patients with MS, their natural history, and current stra...

  12. Natural history of the tortoise beetle, Discomorpha (Discomorpha) biplagiata (Guérin) (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae: Omocerini)

    OpenAIRE

    Flowers, R. Wills; Chaboo, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    The fi rst natural history account of Discomorpha (Discomorpha) biplagiata (Guérin) (Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae: Omocerini) from Ecuador is presented. Larvae and adults feed on the leaves and stems of Cordia hebeclada Johnst. (Boraginaceae), the fi rst documented host plant for the species. Oviposition and pupation also occur on this host. Young larvae suffered heavy predation, especially from Ectatomma sp. (Formicidae: Ponerinae) and Oplomus nr. marginalis (Pentatomidae: Asopinae).

  13. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  14. Coexistence of three different Drosophila species by rescheduling their life history traits in a natural population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jay P. Yadav; Bashisth N. Singh

    2005-12-01

    We present evidence for coexistence of three different Drosophila species by rescheduling their life history traits in a natural population using the same resource, at the same time and same place. D. ananassae has faster larval development time (DT) and faster DT(egg-fly) than other two species thus utilizing the resources at maximum at both larval and adult stages respectively. Therefore, D. ananassae skips the interspecific competition at preadult stage but suffers more from intraspecific competition. However, D. melanogaster and D. biarmipes have rescheduled their various life history traits to avoid interspecific competition. Differences of ranks tests for various life history traits suggest that except for DT(egg-pupa), the difference of ranks is highest for the combination of D. melanogaster and D. ananassae for all other life history traits. This difference is maintained by tradeoffs between larval development time and pupal period and between pupal period and DT(egg-pupa) in D. ananassae.

  15. iSpot Mobile - A Natural History Participatory Science Application

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Will; Scanlon, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress that has been made towards the development of a mobile application to enable people to learn more about natural history by helping them to identify observations of nature as part of the iSpot project www.ispot.org. The paper identifies relevant research in mobile learning within the field of science and the challenges faced when designing and developing a mobile application for participatory science including the user-centred design approach and evaluation ...

  16. The influence of juvenile and adult environments on life-history trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Taborsky, B.

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the environment experienced early in life can strongly influence adult life histories. It is largely unknown, however, how past and present conditions influence suites of life-history traits regarding major life-history trade-offs. Especially in animals with indeterminate growth, we may expect that environmental conditions of juveniles and adults independently or interactively influence the life-history trade-off between growth and reproduction after maturati...

  17. Coastal Staphylinidae (Coleoptera: A worldwide checklist, biogeography and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Jeong Ahn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide a list of the 392 described species of Staphylinidae confined to coastal habitats worldwide. The list is in taxonomic sequence by subfamily, tribe, and genus and includes 91 genera. We provide the page reference of the original description of every species and genus listed and of many synonyms. We note the existence of recent reviews, phylogenies and keys of each of the tribes and genera included. Coastal Staphylinidae contain eight subfamilies: Microsilphinae, Omaliinae, Pselaphinae, Aleocharinae, Oxytelinae, Scydmaeninae, Paederinae, and Staphylininae. By ‘coastal habitats’ we mean habitats existing on the sea coast and subject to inundation or at least splashing by the very highest tides. This includes rocky, boulder, coral, sandy, and muddy seashores, and at least portions of salt-marshes, estuaries, and mangrove swamps. We exclude the sand dune habitat and higher parts of sea-cliffs. The list notes distribution of all the species, first according to the ocean or sea on whose shores it has been recorded, and second by country (and for the larger countries by province or state. Although this distribution is undoubtedly incomplete, it provides a basis for future development of a dedicated database. The ‘Habitats, Habits, and Classificatory Notes’ section is designed to provide ecologists with further taxonomic and ecological information. It includes references to descriptions of the immature stages, behavior of adults and immatures, their food, natural enemies, and habitat. We would have preferred to separate these entities, but current knowledge of ecology is developed in few instances beyond natural history. The Pacific Ocean basin was the origin and contributed to the dispersal of the majority of specialist coastal Staphylinidae at the level of genus. However, at the level of species, species belonging to non-coastal-specialist genera are about as likely to occur on the shores of other oceans as on the shores of the

  18. Natural history and surgical management of radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural history and surgical management of radio enteritis is reviewed. Predisposing factors include the dose of radiation patients build, combination with chemotherapy, previous operations and vascular disease. Management is related to the stage of disease at presentation, and tailored to the clinical problem. Surgical management must take into account the poor healing associated with irradiated intestine. (author)

  19. Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria: Lessons from the Natural History Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analysis of 819 participants enrolled in the Rett syndrome (RTT) Natural History Study, validates recently revised diagnostic criteria. Seven hundred sixty-five females fulfilled 2002 consensus criteria for classic (653/85.4%) or variant (112/14.6%) RTT. All participants classified as classic RTT fu...

  20. Dear readers of and contributors to Biodiversity and Natural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D. Fernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to the first issue of Biodiversity and Natural History, a peer-reviewed, open-access and electronic journal published by the Centro de Estudios en Biodiversidad de Chile (Center for Studies in Biodiversity. The journal was created in 2009 under the name of Boletín de Biodiversidad de Chile with the aim of being a contribution to the dissemination of the Chilean biodiversity and natural history. True to its original purpose, the journal only published Chilean manuscripts in the early years. However, as time went by, the journal also started to receive and publish manuscripts coming from elsewhere in the planet. Accordingly, the journal gradually became an international channel for the scientific promotion and dissemination of biodiversity and natural history and thus, the name of the journal, as well as its original scope and goals were no longer representative.Because of this, in late 2014 the Editorial Board decided to change the original name of the journal to Biodiversity and Natural History a...

  1. Inselect: Automating the Digitization of Natural History Collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence N Hudson

    Full Text Available The world's natural history collections constitute an enormous evidence base for scientific research on the natural world. To facilitate these studies and improve access to collections, many organisations are embarking on major programmes of digitization. This requires automated approaches to mass-digitization that support rapid imaging of specimens and associated data capture, in order to process the tens of millions of specimens common to most natural history collections. In this paper we present Inselect-a modular, easy-to-use, cross-platform suite of open-source software tools that supports the semi-automated processing of specimen images generated by natural history digitization programmes. The software is made up of a Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux desktop application, together with command-line tools that are designed for unattended operation on batches of images. Blending image visualisation algorithms that automatically recognise specimens together with workflows to support post-processing tasks such as barcode reading, label transcription and metadata capture, Inselect fills a critical gap to increase the rate of specimen digitization.

  2. Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreone, Franco; Bartolozzi, Luca; Boano, Giovanni; Boero, Ferdinando; Bologna, Marco A.; Bon, Mauro; Bressi, Nicola; Capula, Massimo; Casale, Achille; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Chiozzi, Giorgio; Delfino, Massimo; Doria, Giuliano; Durante, Antonio; Ferrari, Marco; Gippoliti, Spartaco; Lanzinger, Michele; Latella, Leonardo; Maio, Nicola; Marangoni, Carla; Mazzotti, Stefano; Minelli, Alessandro; Muscio, Giuseppe; Nicolosi, Paola; Pievani, Telmo; Razzetti, Edoardo; Sabella, Giorgio; Valle, Marco; Vomero, Vincenzo; Zilli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Italian natural history museums are facing a critical situation, due to the progressive loss of scientific relevance, decreasing economic investments, and scarcity of personnel. This is extremely alarming, especially for ensuring the long-term preservation of the precious collections they host. Moreover, a commitment in fieldwork to increase scientific collections and concurrent taxonomic research are rarely considered priorities, while most of the activities are addressed to public events with political payoffs, such as exhibits, didactic meetings, expositions, and talks. This is possibly due to the absence of a national museum that would have better steered research activities and overall concepts for collection management. We here propose that Italian natural history museums collaborate to instate a “metamuseum”, by establishing a reciprocal interaction network aimed at sharing budgetary and technical resources, which would assure better coordination of common long-term goals and scientific activities. PMID:25709525

  3. Thyroid cancer: Natural history, management strategies and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To understand the natural history of thyroid cancer and high risk groups; To define the biological behavior of thyroid cancer and relate it to various prognostic factors and risk groups; To divide the management strategies into conservation, radical surgery and radioactive iodine treatment; To define the role of external radiation therapy and the management of complex and advanced thyroid cancer; To analyze the results of management of anaplastic thyroid cancer and make a plea for combined modality treatment; To define the current role of genetic studies in medullary thyroid cancer. At the end of this refresher course, the attendees will be able to understand the natural history, the prognostic factors and risk groups and surgical and combined modality treatment in thyroid cancer

  4. The natural history of hepatitis C virus infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny-Walsh, E

    2012-02-03

    The natural history of HCV infection remains ill-defined. The knowledge accumulated on the progression of HCV to date is important, however. It is now abundantly clear that the progression of disease is generally slow, and the development of cirrhosis and its complications is a possibility, not a probability as hitherto thought. Predicting the outcome remains a quandary for clinicians. Ultimately it will be possible to define the natural history of hepatitis C infection through a combination of research in the fields of virology, immunology, and molecular biology and by monitoring the biochemical and histologic progress of the disease. Only then will it be possible to intervene appropriately and develop new therapies to prevent the progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Online Astronomy Resources from the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, one of the world's largest natural history museums, is the locus of a rich array of scientific research, exhibition and educational resources through its Department of Astrophysics, its Rose Center for Earth and Space and its Hall of Meteorites. For the past decade, the Museum's National Center for Science Literacy, Education and Technology has leveraged these assets to create a panoply of web-based resources for students, teachers and the general public. This session will review several of these resources, including the Digital Universe (a three-dimensional mapping of the Universe); The Solar System (an online graduate course for K-12 teachers); multimedia highlighting searches for exoplanets and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays; Journey to the Stars (a DVD version of the current planetarium show); and the astronomy section of Ology (a website for children ages 7 and up). A copy of the Journey to the Stars DVD will be provided to all attendees. )

  6. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, L. S.; Lloyd, J.; Daniloff, E.

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressi...

  7. The Variable Presentation and Natural History of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Brandser, Eric; Robinson, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is not a well defined or predictable disease. Instead, it is a spectrum of disorders of unknown etiology that vary widely in presentation and natural history, but have in common the proliferation of histiocytic cells and infiltration of these cells into normal tissues. Although the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis consist primarily of histiocytes, eosinophils are a prominent feature in some lesions. Lesions may develop in any tissue, but bone, skin and ly...

  8. Kangri cancer - natural history and role of prophylactic nodal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Kashmir Valley the skin cancer has a very peculiar distribution as most of these are directly/indirectly attributed to the use of Kangri -an indigenous fire pot used to generate warmth and used in winter months to protect body from cold. In this presentation authors have tried to evaluate the natural history of this peculiar skin cancer and the protocol of use of prophylactic nodal irradiation to achieve a cure with better quality of life

  9. Natural History of Rotator Cuff Disease and Implications on Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Jason; Keener, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff disease is commonly associated with ageing and is often asymptomatic. The factors related to tear progression and pain development are just now being defined through longitudinal natural history studies. The majority of studies that follow conservatively treated painful cuff tears or asymptomatic tears that are monitored at regular intervals show slow progression of tear enlargement and muscle degeneration over time. These studies have highlighted greater risks for d...

  10. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    OpenAIRE

    Wedatilake, Y; Brown, R; Mcfarland, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Morris, A.A.; Champion, M; Jardine, P E; Clarke, A.; Thorburn, D R; Taylor, R. W.; Land, J M; Forrest, K.; Dobbie, A.; Simmons, L; Aasheim, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The su...

  11. Natural history of severe thrombocytopenia in infectious mononucleosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Su Yong; Bennett, Bruce

    1982-01-01

    The natural history of severe thrombocytopenia in two patients with infectious mononucleosis (minimum platelet counts under 10 × 109 and 17 × 109/l respectively) is described. In both, the platelet count rose rapidly and spontaneously, reaching approximately 100 × 109/l on the seventh day. Bleeding symptoms were also transient and never life-threatening. The possibility of very rapid spontaneous recovery from severe thrombocytopenia must be borne in mind in assessing the effect of any drug in...

  12. Natural history of cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karnebeek, van, C.D.; Naeff, M.S.J.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Hennekam, R C M; Offringa, M

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the natural history of mitral valve and aortic abnormalities in patients with Marfan syndrome during childhood and adolescence.
METHODS—Fifty two patients with Marfan syndrome were followed for a mean of 7.9 years. Occurrence of adverse cardiovascular outcomes was measured clinically and by ultrasound examination.
RESULTS—Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) was diagnosed in 46 patients at a mean age of 9.7 years, more than 80% of whom presented as "silent MVP"...

  13. The eutrophication history of a naturally eutrophic watercourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammelin, Mira; Kauppila, Tommi

    2015-04-01

    For efficient inland water protection, it is essential to know the natural states of lakes or, at least, the reference conditions before intensive human impact. The estimation of the natural state is particularly difficult for geologically anomalous areas, where naturally eutrophic lakes are located within nutrient-poorer regions. This is because of the lack of monitoring data and pristine reference lakes and the poor functioning of regional paleoecological nutrient models in such anomalous areas. A paleoecological model that is specifically targeted to the anomalously eutrophic area, however, could be used to interpret the eutrophication histories and natural states of the naturally eutrophic lakes in that area. We applied a targeted paleoecological diatom-total phosphorus transfer function to examine the natural eutrophy and eutrophication history of a central basin and two upstream lakes of the anomalously nutrient-rich Iisalmi watercourse in Eastern Finland. In addition to the nutrient reconstruction based on stratigraphic diatom samples, we studied chrysophyte cyst to diatom ratio, taxonomic diversity and the magnetic susceptibility of the sediment core to find further evidence for possible changes in the lakes and their catchments. The results show that the three lakes are naturally eutrophic with average background total phosphorus levels between 40 μg/l - 60 μg/l. However, human-induced eutrophication has also affected the lakes, which can be seen as rapid changes in the diatom assemblages and magnetic susceptibility between the sediment depths of 40 cm and 90 cm. The modeled lake water total phosphorus concentration has increased less abruptly, approximately 20 μg/l altogether, and the reconstructions of the top sediments mainly correspond well with the water quality observations of the last few decades. The results of this study indicate that a targeted paleoecological nutrient model can be used to interpret the natural state and the eutrophication

  14. On the Use of Natural Elements in Young Adult Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴嘉萱

    2014-01-01

    As a reading group,young adults are specially targeted to make them grow healthily.Generally speaking,the moral sense of young adult literature is positive.To explore the outlook on nature of young adult literature,this paper selects four books as analyzing sources including Charlotte’s Web(1952),A Day No Pigs Would Die(1972),Julie of the Wolves(1972),and Homecoming(1981).

  15. Is natural history really dead?: Toward the rebirth of natural history ¿Está realmente muerta la historia natural?: Hacia el renacimiento de la Historia Natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARY F WILLSON

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years natural history has been derided by some scientists as an old-fashion endeavor that does not follow the model of "hard" science and therefore should be considered "dead" and replaced by modern ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. We contend that natural history has much to offer to contemporary scientists and that it has a primary role in the creative process of generating novel hypotheses and designing significant field experiments and observationsEn años recientes, la historia natural ha sido desacreditada por científicos que la consideran un modelo obsoleto de ciencia y que, en consecuencia, se trataría de una disciplina "muerta" que ha sido reemplazada por la ecología moderna, la biología evolutiva y la biología de la conservación. Argumentamos aquí que la historia natural tiene mucho que ofrecer a los científicos contemporáneos y que juega un rol principal en el proceso de creación de hipótesis y en el diseño acertado de observaciones y experimentos de campo

  16. The History of the Democratic Adult Education Movement in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Esther; Tellado, Itxaso; Yuste, Montserrat; Larena-Fernández, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Traditional adult education in Spain treated the learner as a mere object that could be shaped by the educator. Although current practices of the democratic adult education movement in Spain reveals a completely opposite standpoint on adult education, there has been little analysis of the several influences converging and…

  17. The Nature of Subjective Cognitive Complaints of Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, Rachel S.; Kemps, Eva B.

    2006-01-01

    The current study investigated the nature of subjective cognitive complaints of older adults in relation to a broad array of individual cognitive functions known to decline with age. A 60-item questionnaire was developed to examine: (1) whether older adults experience problems with these cognitive functions (problems with cognition); (2) the…

  18. The Biology and Natural History of Aphaenogaster rudis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lubertazzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Workers from the genus Aphaenogaster are among the most abundant ants in the hardwood forests of eastern North America. The biology of these so-called rudis-group ant species, including details about their sociometry, productivity, natural history, and behavior, are synthesized here using published and newly collected data. The latter was collected, in part, using an artificial field nest, and its construction and use are explained. Ants of the rudis group occur in high densities in forest habitats (0.5–1.3 nests m2, have moderate sized colonies (population means from 266 to 613 workers per nest, and are keystone seed dispersers. Many aspects of their life history and behavior follow an annual cycle that tracks seasonal changes. These include foraging, reproduction, the production of new workers and nest migrations. This synthesis highlights what is known about these ants and reveals gaps in our knowledge that require further study.

  19. Rock cooling history using thermoluminescence of natural radiation dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rabiul; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Recently, optical luminescences from quartz and feldspar have been proposed to have great potential in low temperature thermochronology (natural luminescence levels, which are in the dynamic equilibrium because of competition between growth due to ambient radioactivity and decay due thermal and athermal loss, are determined using multiple aliquot regeneration (MAR) protocol. Multiple thermal signals with wide range of thermal stability, extracted from composite glow curve, particularly low temperature part which is more sensitive to ambient temperature, is promising for better constraint on late stage cooling history.

  20. Why we should care about evolution and natural history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    to take the discussion of science and religion beyond our own professional circles. Peter Harrison's The Territories of Science and Religion gives us an opportunity to do so. We can use his book to understand why people consistently get the relation wrong. However, we need to take the next step ourselves......, involve historians in the common academic goal, across disciplines, to make sense of the world around us and make that combined knowledge truly useful. Evolution and natural history might help to that effect....

  1. Natural history of cerebral dot-like cavernomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To elucidate the natural history of dot-like or “black spot” cavernomas. Materials and methods: Data of 18 children with black spot cavernomas were analysed retrospectively. Results: Eleven boys and seven girls presented 187 black spot cavernomas during a mean observation period of 5.5 years. Mean and median age at diagnosis of the 187 cavernomas was 9.6 years. There were 70 de novo black spot cavernomas. Boys presented significantly more cavernomas than girls. There were three KRIT1 mutation carriers and four PDCD10 mutation carriers. Children with a PDCD10 mutation presented significantly more lesions than those children with a KRIT1 mutation (mean number of lesions per patient: 23.3 versus 3.3, respectively). There were 10 radiological haemorrhagic events caused by 10 black spot lesions. Two of these events were symptomatic. The haemorrhage rate of black spot cavernomas was 0.7% per lesion-year. Conclusions: A mean bleeding rate of 0.7% per lesion-year is lower than the overall haemorrhage rates provided in the literature. Nonetheless, black spot cavernomas are not purely benign lesions. Furthermore, genetic mutations may play a role in the natural history of black spot cavernomas

  2. Cultural Sensitivity in Screening Adults for a History of Childhood Abuse: Evidence from a Community Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Thombs, Brett D.; Bennett, Wendy; Roy C Ziegelstein; Bernstein, David P; Scher, Christine D.; Forde, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Background A number of practice guidelines and recommendations call for the assessment of childhood abuse history among adult medical patients. The cultural sensitivity of screening questions, however, has not been examined. Objective To assess whether questions that inquire about childhood abuse history function differently for black and white patients. Design Cross-sectional telephone surveys in 1997 and 2003. Subjects Randomly sampled adults from Memphis, Tenn (1997, N = 832; 2003, N = 967...

  3. 78 FR 2434 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Natural History Museum of Utah has... may contact the Natural History Museum of Utah. Repatriation of the human remains and...

  4. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... Natural History, 1390 E. Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, telephone (801) 581-3876, before... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt...

  5. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Natural History Museum of Utah has... may contact the Natural History Museum of Utah. Repatriation of the human remains and...

  6. 78 FR 19302 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT...: Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven..., Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520-8118, telephone (203)...

  7. 77 FR 25740 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT...: Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven... Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520-8118, telephone (203) 432-3752 before May 31,...

  8. What can bioinformatics do for Natural History museums?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becerra, José María

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose the founding of a Natural History bioinformatics framework, which would solve one of the main problems in Natural History: data which is scattered around in many incompatible systems (not only computer systems, but also paper ones. This framework consists of computer resources (hardware and software, methodologies that ease the circulation of data, and staff expert in dealing with computers, who will develop software solutions to the problems encountered by naturalists. This system is organized in three layers: acquisition, data and analysis. Each layer is described, and an account of the elements that constitute it given.

    Se presentan las bases de una estructura bioinformática para Historia Natural, que trata de resolver uno de los principales problemas en ésta: la presencia de datos distribuidos a lo largo de muchos sistemas incompatibles entre sí (y no sólo hablamos de sistemas informáticos, sino también en papel. Esta estructura se sustenta en recursos informáticos (en sus dos vertientes: hardware y software, en metodologías que permitan la fácil circulación de los datos, y personal experto en el uso de ordenadores que se encargue de desarrollar soluciones software a los problemas que plantean los naturalistas. Este sistema estaría organizado en tres capas: de adquisición, de datos y de análisis. Cada una de estas capas se describe, indicando los elementos que la componen.

  9. Adult volunteerism in Pennsylvania 4-H natural resources programs for youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sanford Sherrick

    2001-07-01

    Pennsylvania's 4-H Youth Development Program relies on adult volunteers to reach youth with educational information and opportunities. Finding adults willing to do this volunteer work is challenging. This study looks at the current status of adult volunteerism with natural resources 4-H projects, and seeks to understand potential volunteers. The literature has much to offer in regards to general volunteer trends, management, motivations, and task preferences; however, few studies focus on volunteers in natural resources or environmental education. A telephone survey conducted with county 4-H agents revealed that only 3.2% of Pennsylvania's 4-H volunteers work with natural resources projects in 56 out of 67 counties, and that very few volunteers have any formal background in natural resources. Semi-structured interviews with 41 adult volunteers currently working with natural resources projects explored volunteer demographics, history, program design preferences, and ideas for seeking more volunteers. Findings from the telephone survey and the semi-structured interviews were used to generate a mail survey with large, random samples from three population groups: (1) 4-H Volunteers, (2) 4-H Parents, and (3) Natural Resources Professionals. Confidence with youth and subject matter, and adult willingness to volunteer was explored for each of the groups in relation to background, demographic characteristics, motivational needs, past and present volunteer activity, personal interests, and program design importance. Natural resources subject matter confidence was shown to be the most significant variable determining willingness to volunteer for all three groups. The variables that contributed to subject matter and youth confidence varied for each population. Key variables effecting willingness to volunteer included outdoor activity level, personal interest in natural resources, the need to fulfill feelings of social responsibility, and confidence with youth. Program design

  10. Natural history of zebrafish (Danio rerio) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Muthukumarasamy; Raja, Manickam; Vijayakumar, Chinnian; Malaiammal, Punniyam; Mayden, Richard L

    2013-03-01

    The Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a well-known vertebrate model species widely used in research associated with biomedical areas and comparative and evolutionary biology. Interestingly, despite the importance of this species, little is known about the natural history, habitats, and native distribution. In our study of the species, we collected individuals from twenty-one wild populations from within the species' natural distribution, ranging from streams/rivers of the Western Ghats of Peninsular India to those of the Western and North-Eastern Himalayas. Habitat types are identified from various geographic locations. Danio rerio is largely confined to and most frequently associated with habitats of low flow and with a sandy substrate in secondary and tertiary channels connected with the main channel of a stream/river, or habitats adjacent to wetlands and paddy fields. These connections can be natural channels or man-made irrigation canals, beels, or culture ponds. Among the 21 populations, individuals from two populations (one from Orissa and another from Arunachal Pradesh) were much larger in size (total length) when compared to other populations. The general habitats of Danio rerio vary from small to large mountainous and lowland streams/rivers, wetlands, and paddy fields. PMID:23590398

  11. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Bruno; Hampel, Harald; Feldman, Howard H; Scheltens, Philip; Aisen, Paul; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Benali, Habib; Bertram, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, Karl; Cavedo, Enrica; Crutch, Sebastian; Dartigues, Jean-François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Gauthier, Serge; Genthon, Remy; Gouw, Alida A; Habert, Marie-Odile; Holtzman, David M; Kivipelto, Miia; Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, José-Luis; O'Bryant, Sid E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Schneider, Lon S; Sperling, Reisa; Teichmann, Marc; Carrillo, Maria C; Cummings, Jeffrey; Jack, Cliff R

    2016-03-01

    During the past decade, a conceptual shift occurred in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) considering the disease as a continuum. Thanks to evolving biomarker research and substantial discoveries, it is now possible to identify the disease even at the preclinical stage before the occurrence of the first clinical symptoms. This preclinical stage of AD has become a major research focus as the field postulates that early intervention may offer the best chance of therapeutic success. To date, very little evidence is established on this "silent" stage of the disease. A clarification is needed about the definitions and lexicon, the limits, the natural history, the markers of progression, and the ethical consequence of detecting the disease at this asymptomatic stage. This article is aimed at addressing all the different issues by providing for each of them an updated review of the literature and evidence, with practical recommendations. PMID:27012484

  12. Tension in the Natural History of Human Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moll Henrike

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael Tomasello has greatly expanded our knowledge of human cognition and how it differs from that of other animals. In this commentary to his recent book A Natural History of Human Thinking, I first critique some of the presuppositions and arguments of his evolutionary story about how homo sapiens’ cognition emerged. For example, I question the strategy of relying on the modern chimpanzee as a model for our last shared ancestor, and I doubt the idea that what changed first over evolutionary time was hominin behavior, which then in turn brought about changes in cognition. In the second half of the commentary I aim to show that the author oscillates between an additive and a transformative account of human shared intentionality. I argue that shared intentionality shapes cognition in its entirety and therefore precludes the possibility that humans have the same, individual intentionality (as shown in, e.g. their instrumental reasoning as other apes.

  13. Polypoid cystitis in an adult without history of catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polypoid cystitis is a benign exophytic mucosal lesion of the bladder. Differentiating it from papillary transitional cell carcinoma is difficult due to their similar characteristics. Although indwelling catheter is the main well-known cause of polypoid cystitis, some case reports unrelated to catheterization have been described. However, the radiological findings of polypoid cystitis have rarely been reported. We hereby describe polypoid cystitis in a 20-year-old man without a history of catheterization along with the computed tomographic findings.

  14. The Prevalence and Natural History of Complex Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Smith, Jason; Chung, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Central sleep apnea (CSA) may occasionally occur in patients with obstructive sleep apnea during titration with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and the natural history of CPAP-emergent CSA. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1286 patients with a diagnosis of OSA who underwent titration with a positive airway device during a 1-year period. Patients were seen in consultation and underwent full-night attended polysomnography followed by full-night attended CPAP titration. Four weeks after CPAP therapy, patients returned to the clinic for follow-up, and objective adherence to CPAP was recorded. In patients who had CSA on CPAP, a second full-night attended CPAP titration was recommended. Results: Eighty-four of the 1286 patients developed a central apnea index (CAI) of 5 or greater per hour while on CPAP. The incidence of CSA varied from 3% to 10% monthly, with an overall incidence of 6.5%. Forty--two of the 84 patients returned for a second CPAP titration. In 33 patients, CSA was eliminated. In each of the remaining 9 patients, the CAI remained at 5 or greater per hour, with an average of 13 per hour. These patients characteristically had the most severe OSA, and 5 had a CAI of 5 or more per hour at baseline. Two of the 9 patients were on opioids Conclusions: In this large retrospective study of 1286 patients with a diagnosis of OSA, 6.5% had CPAP-emergent or persistent CSA. However, CPAP-emergent CSA was generally transitory and was eliminated within 8 weeks after CPAP therapy. The prevalence of CPAP-persistent CSA was about 1.5%. Severity of OSA, a CAI of 5 or greater per hour, and use of opioids were potential risk factors. Citation: Javaheri S; Smith J; Chung E. The prevalence and natural history of complex sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):205-211. PMID:19960639

  15. Large granular lymphocyte leukemia: natural history and response to treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fortune, Anne F

    2012-02-01

    Large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL) is an indolent T lymphoproliferative disorder that was difficult to diagnose with certainty until clonality testing of the T cell receptor gene became routinely available. We studied the natural history and response to treatment in 25 consecutive patients with T-LGL diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 in which the diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis, to define an effective treatment algorithm. The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range 27-78), with a male to female ratio of 1:1.8 and presenting features of fatigue (n = 13), recurrent infections (n = 9), and\\/or abnormal blood counts (n = 5). Thirteen patients with symptomatic disease were treated as follows: pentostatin (nine patients), cyclosporine (six patients), methotrexate (three patients), and alemtuzumab in two patients in whom pentostatin was ineffective. Pentostatin was the single most effective therapy, with a response rate of 75% and minimal toxicity. The overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) 37 months from diagnosis were 80% and 52%, respectively. Treatment of T-LGL should be reserved for patients with symptomatic disease, but in this series, pentostatin treatment was less toxic and more effective than cyclosporine or methotrexate.

  16. Natural history of alkaptonuria revisited: analyses based on scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Cox, Trevor F

    2011-12-01

    Increased circulating homogentisic acid in body fluids occurs in alkaptonuria (AKU) due to lack of enzyme homogentisate dioxygenase leading in turn to conversion of HGA to a pigmented melanin-like polymer, known as ochronosis. The tissue damage in AKU is due to ochronosis. A potential treatment, a drug called nitisinone, to decrease formation of HGA is available. However, deploying nitisinone effectively requires its administration at the most optimal time in the natural history. AKU has a long apparent latent period before overt ochronosis develops. The rate of change of ochronosis and its consequences over time following its recognition has not been fully described in any quantitative manner. Two potential tools are described that were used to quantitate disease burden in AKU. One tool describes scoring the clinical features that includes clinical assessments, investigations and questionnaires in 15 patients with AKU. The second tool describes a scoring system that only includes items obtained from questionnaires in 44 people with AKU. Analysis of the data reveals distinct phases of the disease, a pre-ochronotic phase and an ochronotic phase. The ochronotic phase appears to demonstrate an earlier slower progression followed by a rapidly progressive phase. The rate of change of the disease will have implications for monitoring the course of the disease as well as decide on the most appropriate time that treatment should be started for it to be effective either in prevention or arrest of the disease. PMID:21748407

  17. Aspects of Honeybee Natural History According to the Solega

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Si

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Honeybees and their products are highly prized by many cultures around the world, and as a result, indigenous communities have come to possess rich and detailed knowledge of the biology of these important insects. In this paper, I present an in-depth investigation into some aspects of honeybee natural history, as related to me by the Solega people of southern India. The Solega recognize, name, and exploit four honeybee species, and are well aware of the geographical and temporal distributions of each one. In spite of not being beekeepers – as they only forage for wild honey – their knowledge of obscure and complex phenomena such as honeybee gender and reproduction rivals that of comparable, non-industrial beekeeping societies. Swarming, another hard-to-understand honeybee behavior, is also accurately explained by Solega consultants. I contrast this knowledge to that of European bee-keeping cultures, as evidenced by the writings of Aristotle and 18th century European beekeepers. This paper shows that the Solega have a reliable and internally consistent body of honeybee knowledge based entirely on brief encounters with these wild, migratory insects that are present in the forest for only part of the year.

  18. Pathogeny and natural history of congenital dislocation of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seringe, R; Bonnet, J-C; Katti, E

    2014-02-01

    Based on a review of the literature, the authors have made a critical study of several etiological factors. Endogenous factors such as acetabular dysplasia, increased anteversion of the femoral neck, and capsular laxity support the genetic theory but are neither constant nor necessary and are only facilitating factors. The major factor seems to be a mechanical one linked to the position in the uterus: hyperflexion with adduction and external rotation constituting the dislocating foetal posture combined with abnormal pressure on the greater trochanter and leading to expulsion of the head upward and backward. This theory can explain the natural history of C D H which is first, at birth a hip instability followed by two possible evolutions: either persistent luxation becoming irreducible or spontaneous stabilisation leading sometimes to complete healing or to residual abnormalities (subluxation or dysplasia). This concept suggests practical conclusions: the importance of an early diagnosis, the selection of the signs of the hip at risk, the pattern of prevention, the role for non-clinical investigations, the principles of the treatment based on postures, the indications for the different types of treatment. PMID:24456762

  19. Tropical Endomyocardial Fibrosis: Natural History, Challenges, and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Freers, Juergen; Lachaud, Matthias; Mirabel, Mariana; Ferreira, Beatriz; Narayanan, Kumar; Celermajer, David S; Sidi, Daniel; Jouven, Xavier; Marijon, Eloi

    2016-06-14

    Tropical endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) is a neglected disease of poverty that afflicts rural populations in tropical low-income countries, with some certain high-prevalence areas. Tropical EMF is characterized by the deposition of fibrous tissue in the endomyocardium, leading to restrictive physiology. Since the first descriptions in Uganda in 1948, high-frequency areas for EMF have included Africa, Asia, and South America. Although there is no clear consensus on a unified hypothesis, it seems likely that dietary, environmental, and infectious factors may combine in a susceptible individual to give rise to an inflammatory process leading to endomyocardial damage and scar formation. The natural history of EMF includes an active phase with recurrent flare-ups of inflammation evolving to a chronic phase leading to restrictive heart failure. In the chronic phase, biventricular involvement is the most common presentation, followed by isolated right-sided heart disease. Marked ascites out of proportion to peripheral edema usually develops as a typical feature of EMF. EMF carries a very poor prognosis. In addition to medical management of heart failure, early open heart surgery (endocardectomy and valve repair/replacement) appears to improve outcomes to some extent; however, surgery is technically challenging and not available in most endemic areas. Increased awareness among health workers and policy makers is the need of the hour for the unhindered development of efficient preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27297343

  20. Natural history of sleep disordered breathing in prepubertal children transitioning to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Edward O; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Liao, Duanping; Calhoun, Susan; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol M; Gaines, Jordan; He, Fan; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2016-05-01

    Because there is a lack of agreed upon diagnostic criteria, it is critical to understand the natural history of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children in order to establish treatment strategies based on objective data.The Penn State Child Cohort is a representative, general-population sample of 700 elementary school children at baseline, of whom 421 were reassessed 8 years later, during adolescence.The remission of childhood apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥2 events per h in adolescence was 52.9%. Using the higher threshold of AHI ≥5 events per h, remission was 100.0%, with 50.0% partially remitting to AHI 2- obesity). Moreover, consistent with recent studies in adults, this study includes the novel cross-sectional finding that visceral fat is associated with SDB as early as adolescence. PMID:26846837

  1. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of the...

  2. Hepatitis A/B Vaccine Completion among Homeless Adults with History of Incarceration

    OpenAIRE

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Marlow, Elizabeth; Branson, Catherine; Marfisee, Mary; Nandy, Karabi

    2012-01-01

    HBV vaccination rates for incarcerated adults remain low despite their high risk for infection. This study determined predictors of vaccine completion in homeless adults (N=297) who reported histories of incarceration and participated in one of three nurse-led hepatitis programs of different intensity. Moreover time since release from incarceration was also considered. Just over half of the former prisoners completed the vaccine series. Older age (≥ 40), having a partner, and chronic homeless...

  3. PUBLIC HEALTH IMPORTANCE OF SHATKRIYAKALA IN RELATION TO NATURAL HISTORY OF DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Janmejaya Samal

    2013-01-01

    Kriyakala, also known as Shatkriyakala, is predominantly a concept of Ayurveda which describes different phases of disease formation in its own unique way. This concept can be comparable with natural history of disease in modern medicine. Though many authorities compare it simply with pathogenesis but a meticulous look will reveal its relation with natural history of disease. A good understanding of natural history of disease helps to frame public health intervention strategies, more speciall...

  4. Big Things Have Small Beginnings: Curating a Large Natural History Collection – Processes and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Knight-Davis, Stacey; Bruns, Todd; Tucker, Gordon C.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Digitization of natural history collections is underway in earnest around the world and presented via platforms such as JSTOR Plants. Few natural history digital collections of specimens exist in academic institutional repositories, in spite of the fact that many universities have repositories and also hold extensive natural history collections. At Eastern Illinois University, a mid-sized public university, librarians worked with the Biological Sciences department to develop the ...

  5. Natural history of cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Karnebeek, C D M; Naeff, M; Mulder, B; Hennekam, R; Offringa, M

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the natural history of mitral valve and aortic abnormalities in patients with Marfan syndrome during childhood and adolescence.
METHODS—Fifty two patients with Marfan syndrome were followed for a mean of 7.9 years. Occurrence of adverse cardiovascular outcomes was measured clinically and by ultrasound examination.
RESULTS—Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) was diagnosed in 46 patients at a mean age of 9.7 years, more than 80% of whom presented as "silent MVP". Mitral regurgitation (MR) occurred in 25 patients, aortic dilatation in 43, and aortic regurgitation (AR) in 13. Both MVP and aortic dilatation developed at a constant rate during the age period 5-20 years. In 23 patients MVP was diagnosed before aortic dilatation, in 18 the reverse occurred, and in 11 patients the two abnormalities were diagnosed simultaneously. During follow up, 21 patients showed progression of mitral valve dysfunction; progression of aortic abnormalities occurred in 13. Aortic surgery was performed in 10; two died of subsequent complications. Mitral valve surgery was performed in six. In sporadic female Marfan patients the age at initial diagnosis of MVP, MR, aortic dilatation, and AR was lowest, the grade of MR and AR most severe, the time lapse between the occurrence of MVP and subsequent MR as well as between dilatation and subsequent AR shortest, and the risk for cardiovascular associated morbidity and mortality highest.
CONCLUSIONS—During childhood and adolescence in Marfan syndrome, mitral valve dysfunction as well as aortic abnormalities develop and progress gradually, often without symptoms, but may cause considerable morbidity and mortality by the end of the second decade, especially in female sporadic patients.

 PMID:11159287

  6. Internal crystallography and thermal history of natural gold alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, R.; Cleverley, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    New studies of gold are revealing how metallography is a key component of our understanding of the deposition of precious alloys in primary ore systems. Alluvial gold nuggets once thought to be secondary in origin have now been shown to be the erosional residue of hypogene systems, i.e. primary. This has been achieved through analysis of the internal crystallography using electron back scattered diffraction of large area ion beam polished gold samples. Comparisons of the microstructure are also being made with experiments on gold alloys with the same Ag contents where real time heating and in-situ microstructure mapping reveal the structures are of high temperature origin. A new frontier in gold analysis in both hypogene and supergene systems is the nano domain. In hypogene settings gold at all scales can be metallic and particulate as has been directly observed in refractory ores, or the so called "invisible gold" in pyrite and arsenopyrite. Such nanoparticulate and colloidal transport of gold is a viable mechanism of dispersing the gold during weathering of ore deposits. These gold nanoparticles, long known about in materials sciences and manufacturing have now been seen in these natural environments. Such colloids are also likely to play an important role in gold transport in hydrothermal deposits. The regularly heterogeneous distribution, trace concentration and nanoparticulate grain size of metallic gold in all ore systems has made it difficult for direct observation. Yet, it is critical to be able to establish a broad view of the microstructural/microchemical residence of the actual gold in a given sample. New generation element mapping tools now allow us to 'see' this invisible gold component for the first time and to probe its chemistry and controls on deposition. These studies have the potential to provide a new approach and view of the formation, deposition and provenance history of the metal in all gold deposits.

  7. Muenke syndrome: An international multicenter natural history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszka, Paul; Addissie, Yonit A; Yarnell, Colin M P; Hadley, Donald W; Guillen Sacoto, Maria J; Platte, Petra; Paelecke, Yvonne; Collmann, Hartmut; Snow, Nicole; Schweitzer, Tilmann; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Aravidis, Christos; Hall, Samantha E; Mulliken, John B; Roscioli, Tony; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Muenke syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by coronal suture craniosynostosis, hearing loss, developmental delay, carpal, and calcaneal fusions, and behavioral differences. Reduced penetrance and variable expressivity contribute to the wide spectrum of clinical findings. Muenke syndrome constitutes the most common syndromic form of craniosynostosis, with an incidence of 1 in 30,000 births and is defined by the presence of the p.Pro250Arg mutation in FGFR3. Participants were recruited from international craniofacial surgery and genetic clinics. Affected individuals, parents, and their siblings, if available, were enrolled in the study if they had a p.Pro250Arg mutation in FGFR3. One hundred and six patients from 71 families participated in this study. In 51 informative probands, 33 cases (64.7%) were inherited. Eighty-five percent of the participants had craniosynostosis (16 of 103 did not have craniosynostosis), with 47.5% having bilateral and 28.2% with unilateral synostosis. Females and males were similarly affected with bicoronal craniosynostosis, 50% versus 44.4% (P = 0.84), respectively. Clefting was rare (1.1%). Hearing loss was identified in 70.8%, developmental delay in 66.3%, intellectual disability in 35.6%, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 23.7%, and seizures in 20.2%. In patients with complete skeletal surveys (upper and lower extremity x-rays), 75% of individuals were found to have at least a single abnormal radiographical finding in addition to skull findings. This is the largest study of the natural history of Muenke syndrome, adding valuable clinical information to the care of these individuals including behavioral and cognitive impairment data, vision changes, and hearing loss. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26740388

  8. The Changing Nature of Adult Education in the Age of Transnational Migration: Toward a Model of Recognitive Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shibao

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the changing nature of adult education in the age of transnational migration and proposes recognitive adult education as an inclusive model that acknowledges and affirms cultural difference and diversity as positive and desirable assets.

  9. Bodies in nature: Associations between exposure to nature, connectedness to nature, and body image in U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Barron, David; Weis, Laura; Furnham, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Here, we sought to replicate previous work showing a relationship between connectedness to nature and body appreciation, and extend it by examining associations between exposure to natural environments and other body image-related variables. An online sample of 399 U.S. women and men (Mage=34.55 years) completed measures of body appreciation, connectedness to nature, nature exposure, appearance investment, sociocultural attitudes towards appearance, and self-esteem. Path analysis showed that nature exposure and connectedness to nature, respectively, were associated with body appreciation in women and men, both directly and indirectly via self-esteem. Connectedness to nature also mediated the link between nature exposure and body appreciation. In men, but not women, the link between connectedness to nature and body appreciation was also mediated by appearance investment and internalisation of a muscular ideal. These results may point to novel methods for promoting more positive body image in adults through engagement with nature. PMID:27476147

  10. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  11. Sexual Abuse History among Adult Sex Offenders and Non-Sex Offenders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Ashley F.; Lalumiere, Martin L.; Seto, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The sexually abused-sexual abuser hypothesis states there is a specific relationship between sexual abuse history and sexual offending, such that individuals who experience sexual abuse are significantly more likely to later engage in sexual offenses. Therefore, samples of adult sex offenders should contain a disproportionate number of…

  12. Stories of Learning across the Lifespan: Life History and Biographical Research in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouthro, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Life history or biographical approaches to research in lifelong learning may be particularly useful for researchers working from a social purpose and/or feminist perspective. Adult educators working from an emancipatory framework are often curious about factors that shape people's lives, both from an individualistic, biographical perspective…

  13. "That was grown folks' business": narrative reflection and response in older adults' family health history communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Jill; Hovick, Shelly R

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of family health history and the pivotal role of older adults in communicating it, this study examines how African American older adults (a) characterize their understandings of health-related conditions in their family histories and (b) rationalize their motivations and constraints for sharing this information with current family members. Using narrative theory as a framework, we illustrate how the participants reflect on prior health-related experiences within the family to respond to moral and practical calls for communicating family health information to current relatives. Specifically, our analysis highlights how storied family secrets--as constructed by 28 participants in group and individual interviews--reveal and inform shifting cultural and generational practices that shape the lived health behaviors and communication of older adults at greater risk for health disparities. PMID:24580636

  14. Dirt, disgust and disease: a natural history of hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Valerie A

    2007-01-01

    Hygiene has been studied from multiple perspectives, including that of history. I define hygiene as the set of behaviours that animals, including humans, use to avoid infection. I argue that it has an ancient evolutionary history, and that most animals exhibit such behaviours because they were adaptive. In humans, the avoidance of infectious threats is motivated by the emotion of disgust. Intuition about hygiene, dirt and disease can be found underlying belief about health and disease through...

  15. First Description of the Early Stage Biology of the Genus Mygona: The Natural History of the Satyrine Butterfly, Mygona irmina in Eastern Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Greeney, Harold F.; Dyer, Lee A.; Pyrcz, Tomasz W.

    2011-01-01

    The immature stages and natural history of Mygona irmina Doubleday (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae: Pronophilina) from northeastern Ecuadorian cloud forests are described based on 17 rearings. The dwarf bamboo, Chusquea c.f. scandens Kunth (Poaceae, Bambusoidea) is the larval food plant. Eggs are laid singly on the bottom side of mature host plant leaves. Larvae take 102–109 days to mature from egg to adult. Adults are encountered most frequently on sunny days, flying rapidly over areas ...

  16. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: natural history and long term treatment effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher Marc A

    2006-03-01

    risks of major surgery, a 6 to 29% chance of requiring re-operation, and the remote possibility of developing a pain management problem. Knowledge of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis natural history and long-term treatment effects is and will always remain somewhat incomplete. However, enough is know to provide patients and parents the information needed to make informed decisions about management options.

  17. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...

  18. More than a Museum: Natural History is Relevant in 21st Century Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R. R.; Murphy-Mariscal, M. L.; Barrows, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    In the Anthropocene, the relevancy of natural history in environmental science is challenged and marginalized today more than ever. We tested the hypothesis that natural history is relevant to the fields of environmental science and ecology by assessing the values, needs, and decisions related to natural history of graduate students and environmental science professionals across 31 universities and various employers, respectively, in California. Graduate students surveyed (93.3%) agreed that natural history was relevant to science, approximately 70% believed it "essential" for conducting field-based research; however, 54.2% felt inadequately trained to teach a natural history course and would benefit from additional training in natural history (> 80%). Of the 185 professionals surveyed, all felt that natural history was relevant to science and "essential" or "desirable" in their vocation (93%). Our results indicate a disconnect between the value and relevancy of natural history in 21st century ecological science and opportunities for gaining those skills and knowledge through education and training.

  19. Natural history of hepatitis C in HIV-negative patients with congenital coagulation disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, EB; Kok, T; Schirm, J; Smid, WM; van der Meer, J

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims: Knowledge of the natural history of hepatitis C is useful for counselling patients and planning treatment, More data are needed from unselected patient groups without concomitant disease, The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of hepatitis C, two decades after inf

  20. Digitizing natural history and contextualizing environmental education: the Natural Europe project as mediator of innovative and effective learning

    OpenAIRE

    Markaki, Vassiliki; Tsiflidou, Effie; Triperina, Evangelia; Gkinis, Stayros; Palavitsinis, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    Natural History Museums (NHMs) are unique spaces that have only recently come to comprehend the effectiveness of the learning opportunities they offer to their visitors. Their collections form a rich source of knowledge about Earth’s biodiversity and natural history with a high quality scientific content aiming with the exploitation of new online technologies and tools to become available to everyone. In this paper, we focus in the use of digital cultural resources, and more specifically digi...

  1. The odor of a plant metabolite affects life history traits in dietary restricted adult olive flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerofotis, Christos D.; Ioannou, Charalampos S.; Nakas, Christos T.; Papadopoulos, Nikos T.

    2016-01-01

    Food quality shapes life history traits either directly or through response of individuals to additional environmental factors, such as chemical cues. Plant extracts used as food additives modulate key life history traits; however little is known regarding such effects for olfactory chemical cues. Exploiting an interesting experimental system that involves the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae) and the plant metabolite α-pinene we asked whether exposure of adults to this compound modulates adult longevity and female reproduction in similar manner in a stressful – dietary (protein) restricted (DR) and in a relaxed- full diet (FD) feeding environment. Accordingly, we exposed males and females to the aroma of α-pinene and measured lifespan and age-specific fecundity in the above two dietary contexts. Our results demonstrate that exposure to α-pinene increased longevity in males and fecundity in females only under dietary restricted conditions. In relaxed food conditions, females exposed to α-pinene shifted high egg-laying towards younger ages compared to non-exposed ones. This is the first report demonstrating that a plant compound affects key life history traits of adult olive flies through olfaction. These effects are sex-specific and more pronounced in dietary restricted adults. Possible underlying mechanisms and the ecological significance are discussed. PMID:27339862

  2. The odor of a plant metabolite affects life history traits in dietary restricted adult olive flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerofotis, Christos D; Ioannou, Charalampos S; Nakas, Christos T; Papadopoulos, Nikos T

    2016-01-01

    Food quality shapes life history traits either directly or through response of individuals to additional environmental factors, such as chemical cues. Plant extracts used as food additives modulate key life history traits; however little is known regarding such effects for olfactory chemical cues. Exploiting an interesting experimental system that involves the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae) and the plant metabolite α-pinene we asked whether exposure of adults to this compound modulates adult longevity and female reproduction in similar manner in a stressful - dietary (protein) restricted (DR) and in a relaxed- full diet (FD) feeding environment. Accordingly, we exposed males and females to the aroma of α-pinene and measured lifespan and age-specific fecundity in the above two dietary contexts. Our results demonstrate that exposure to α-pinene increased longevity in males and fecundity in females only under dietary restricted conditions. In relaxed food conditions, females exposed to α-pinene shifted high egg-laying towards younger ages compared to non-exposed ones. This is the first report demonstrating that a plant compound affects key life history traits of adult olive flies through olfaction. These effects are sex-specific and more pronounced in dietary restricted adults. Possible underlying mechanisms and the ecological significance are discussed. PMID:27339862

  3. The natural history of the arboreal ant, Crematogaster ashmeadi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschinkel, Walter R

    2002-01-01

    The arboreal ant, Crematogaster ashmeadi Emery (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), is the most dominant arboreal ant in the pine forests of the coastal plain of northern Florida. The majority of pine trees harbor a colony of these ants. The colonies inhabit multiple chambers abandoned by bark-mining caterpillars, especially those of the family Cossidae, in the outer bark of living pines. They also inhabit ground level termite galleries in the bark, often locating the queen in galleries. The density of chambers and ants is highest in the base of the tree and drops sharply with height on the trunk. Because chambers are formed in the inner layer of bark, they gradually move outward as more bark layers are laid down, eventually sloughing off the tree's outer surface. Chambers have a mean lifetime of about 25 yr. The abundant chambers in pine bark are excavated by a small population of caterpillars and accumulate over decades. Ant colonies also inhabit abandoned galleries of woodboring beetles in dead branches in the crowns of pines. Because newly mated queens found colonies in abandoned woodboring beetle galleries in the first dead branches that form on pine saplings, C. ashmeadi is dependent on cavities made by other insects throughout its life cycle, and does little if any excavation of its own. Mature colonies nest preferentially in chambers greater than 10 cm(2) in area, a relatively rare chamber size. In natural pine forests, this does not seem to limit the ant's populations. Founding queens contain about 50% fat and lose about half of their dry weight during the claustral period, converting approximately half of this lost weight into progeny. The claustral period is about 40 to 50 days at 27 degrees C. Mature colonies contain several tens of thousands of workers (est. up to 80,000), and have a life expectancy of 10 to 15 years. Each colony occupies an entire tree, and sometimes two trees if they are close together. Within a colony, there is a single queen capable of

  4. The combined effects of parental divorce and parental history of depression on cannabis use in young adults in France.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakyi, Kwame; Melchior, Maria; Chollet, Aude; Surkan, Pamela,

    2012-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: The joint effects of multiple social risk factors on substance use, such as parental divorce and parental history of depression, have rarely been studied in young adult offspring. METHODS: We examined the combined effects of parental divorce and parental history of depression on current cannabis use among a community sample of young adults in France. Parental divorce was ascertained as divorce or separation before 2009. Parental history of depression base...

  5. The reconsideration of natural history of echinococcosis at Rebun Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, T

    1999-03-01

    It has been believed that the outbreak of echinococcosis at Rebun Island had ceased by 1970. The first patient was diagnosed in 1936 and 131 patients have been authorized as echinococcosis so far. The conference of measures against the outbreak had been organized in 1948 and started to eradicate Echinococcus multilocularis from the Island. Medical examination to detect the patients and the capture and autopsy of dogs and cats had been carried out hard till 1970. At that time, foxes imported from Simusiru Island in the middle Kuriles during the years 1924 to 1926 had already disappeared and it has seemed to be sure that stray dogs and cats might carry E. multilocularis and excrete infectious eggs in stead of foxes. Since we have had no real data concerning the natural history of patients with echinococcosis without any treatments, it can not be recognized the time of infection and the role of dogs or cats on the spread of echinococcosis at Rebun Island. From the new data, it is concluded that the active life cycle of E. multilocularis between foxes and vole might be closed by 1940, since the last patient infected with E. multilocularis was born in 1940 and died in 1945. Furthermore, it is estimated that more than 200 patients (3 to 4% of people at the island) might die from echinococcosis, because of the fact of the unusual increase of mortality of liver disorders and oldness observed during the years of 1940 to 1960. 81 patients with the high possibility of echinococcosis detected from 1937 to 1963 can be added to 131 authorized patients. Surprisingly, it is noticed that the standard deviations of ages of death of 94 patients born in Meiji era (1880-1912) and 59 in Taisho and Showa eras (1912-1940) are 63.16 +/- 11.68, and 34.32 +/- 11.87, respectively. It means that both old and young people might be infected simultaneously but for the long period. There was no difference between the susceptibility of young and old men to E. multilocularis. The numbers of male

  6. Design or accident? The natural history of teenage pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Seamark, Clare

    2001-01-01

    The UK has the highest rate of teenage pregnancy in Western Europe. A retrospective record-based study was conducted in an East Devon general practice to gain greater understanding of the outcome of first teenage pregnancy and subsequent reproductive history. The comparison group was women who had first conceived between the ages of 25 and 29 years.

  7. Natural history of Javeta pallida Baly, 1858 on Phoenix palms in India (Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae, Coelaenomenoderini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, Koormath Mohammed; Prathapan, Kaniyarikkal Divakaran; Nasser, Mannankadiyan; Chaboo, Caroline Simmrita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Members of the Old World hispine tribe, Coelaenomenoderini, are documented on host plants of Arecaceae, Cyperaceae, and Zingiberales. A few species are renowned pests of oil palm, especially in Africa. The host plants and natural history of Javeta pallida Baly, 1858, the only Indian species of the tribe, is reported for the first time. These beetles can densely infest indigenous wild date palms, Phoenix sylvestris (L.) Roxb. (Arecaceae), and also use the introduced date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L., which is an expanding crop in India. Javeta females lay single eggs and cover each with an ootheca. All larval stages mine the leaves and pupation occurs within the larval mine. Adults are exophagous, leaving linear feeding trenches. Natural and induced infestations of Javeta pallida on these two palms were observed and the potential of Javeta pallida as a pest of date palm in India is discussed. Javeta pallida completed development on Phoenix palms in 52–88 days (mean 66.38 days) with egg period 11–15 days (mean 12.8 days), larval period 21–54 days (mean 33.02 days) and pupal period 17–23 days (mean 20.52 days). Elasmus longiventris Verma and Hayat and Pediobius imbreus Walker (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) parasitize the larva and pupa of Javeta pallida. PMID:27408585

  8. Hemodynamic Reactivity to Psychological Stress in Young Adults with a Family History of Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fjóla Huld Sigurðardóttir 1989

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is currently the leading cause of death among Europeans and Americans. While many risk factors for CVD have been identified, their role in the etiology of CVD is not fully understood. One such risk factor is a family history of CVD. In addition to a positive family history, Type D personality has been established as an independent risk factor for CVD. The purpose of this study was to examine the hemodynamic reactivity to laboratory stress in young adults with a po...

  9. Natural 10-year history of simple renal cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hongzoo; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To carry out long-term follow-up of patients diagnosed with asymptomatic simple renal cysts (SRCs). Materials and Methods One hundred fifty-eight adult patients in whom SRCs were incidentally diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography or abdominopelvic computed tomography between August 1994 and June 2004 were followed up for over 10 years. The retrospective analysis investigated sequential changes in the size, shape, and Bosniak classification of the renal cyst and analyzed risk factors ...

  10. Adults with a history of child sexual abuse: evaluation of a pilot therapy service.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D.; Pearce, L.; Pringle, M.; Caplan, R.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate a pilot service offering therapy specifically to adults with a history of child sexual abuse. DESIGN--Questionnaire survey. SETTING--Specialised therapy unit, Breakfree, which offers care, therapy, and support. SUBJECTS--116 clients presenting to the service who were offered therapy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Scores from three psychological questionnaires--the social activities and distress scale, the general health questionnaire, and the delusions, symptoms, and states in...

  11. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young-Adult Self-Esteem

    OpenAIRE

    Gayman, Mathew D.; Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The three main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood; (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult self-esteem; and (3) help rule out the alternative interpretation that the relationship between major depression and self-esteem is due to state depe...

  12. The Effect of Project-Based History and Nature of Science Practices on the Change of Nature of Scientific Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çibik, Ayse Sert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the change of pre-service science teachers' views about the nature of scientific knowledge through Project-Based History and Nature of Science training and Conventional Method. The sample of the study consists of two groups of 3rd grade undergraduate students attending teacher preparation program of science…

  13. The natural history and clinical syndromes of degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John C

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy.

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure

  15. Representations of Nature of Science in Selected Histories of Science in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bing; Li, Yue; Chen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the representations of nature of science (NOS) in the eight histories of science selected from three series of integrated science textbooks used in junior high school in China. Ten aspects of NOS were adopted in the analytical framework. It was found that NOS had not been well treated in the selected histories of…

  16. 78 FR 19299 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, has completed an inventory of human remains in...

  17. Credit History: The Changing Nature of Scientific Credit

    OpenAIRE

    Gans, Joshua S.; Fiona Murray

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the role of the allocation of scientific credit in determining the organization of science. We examine changes in that organization and the nature of credit allocation in the past half century. Our contribution is a formal model of that organizational choice that considers scientist decisions to integrate, collaborate or publish and how credit should be allocated to foster efficient outcomes.

  18. A History of Research on Business and the Natural Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffman, Andrew J.; Georg, Susse

    project its future directions. The field of Business and the Natural Environment (B&NE) has now reached that stage. After expanding in the early 1990s as a distinct field of empirical inquiry, it has grown to include contributions from the full gamut of business disciplines. This introductory chapter is...

  19. Statistical problems in epidemiologic studies of the natural history of disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Brookmeyer, R

    1990-01-01

    The development of effective disease prevention and treatment programs depends on an understanding of the natural history of disease. A conceptual framework is presented for disease natural history and consists of an asymptomatic period of disease followed by a period of symptomatic disease. The focus is on epidemiologic studies for identifying risk factors of the onset of asymptomatic disease, for identifying cofactors of progression to symptomatic disease, and for estimating the duration of...

  20. The value of the study of natural history in genetic disorders and congenital anomaly syndromes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of the natural history of genetic disorders and syndromes with congenital anomalies and dysmorphic features is a challenging and often neglected area. There are many reasons to pursue this type of research but it requires special clinical skills and a considerable amount of hard work. Setting up protocols and collecting data is complex and time consuming. Frequently, helpful clues for a particular disorder come from the study of the natural history of other disorders. Older affected...

  1. Update on the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease: A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Komotar, Ricardo J.; Kellner, Christopher P.; Raper, Daniel M; Strozyk, Dorothea; Higashida, Randall T.; Meyers, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) contributes to a significant number of ischemic strokes. There is debate in the recent literature concerning the impact of the location of stenosis in ICAD on outcome. Some reports have suggested that disease processes and outcomes vary by vessel location, potentially altering the natural history and indications for intervention. Here we have performed a comprehensive, critical review of the natural history of ICAD by vessel in an attempt to assess ...

  2. 7q11.23 Duplication syndrome: Physical characteristics and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Colleen A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Paciorkowski, Alex P; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Dugan, Sarah L; Rope, Alan F; Bader, Patricia; Hendon, Laura G; Velleman, Shelley L; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P; Osborne, Lucy R

    2015-12-01

    In order to describe the physical characteristics, medical complications, and natural history of classic 7q11.23 duplication syndrome [hereafter Dup7 (MIM 609757)], reciprocal duplication of the region deleted in Williams syndrome [hereafter WS (MIM 194050)], we systematically evaluated 53 individuals aged 1.25-21.25 years and 11 affected adult relatives identified in cascade testing. In this series, 27% of probands with Dup7 had an affected parent. Seven of the 26 de novo duplications that were examined for inversions were inverted; in all seven cases one of the parents had the common inversion polymorphism of the WS region. We documented the craniofacial features of Dup7: brachycephaly, broad forehead, straight eyebrows, broad nasal tip, low insertion of the columella, short philtrum, thin upper lip, minor ear anomalies, and facial asymmetry. Approximately 30% of newborns and 50% of older children and adults had macrocephaly. Abnormalities were noted on neurological examination in 88.7% of children, while 81.6% of MRI studies showed structural abnormalities such as decreased cerebral white matter volume, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and ventriculomegaly. Signs of cerebellar dysfunction were found in 62.3%, hypotonia in 58.5%, Developmental Coordination Disorder in 74.2%, and Speech Sound Disorder in 82.6%. Behavior problems included anxiety disorders, ADHD, and oppositional disorders. Medical problems included seizures, 19%; growth hormone deficiency, 9.4%; patent ductus arteriosus, 15%; aortic dilation, 46.2%; chronic constipation, 66%; and structural renal anomalies, 18%. We compare these results to the WS phenotype and offer initial recommendations for medical evaluation and surveillance of individuals who have Dup7. PMID:26333794

  3. Approaches to Climate Literacy at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) offers a suite of courses, workshops and special events in climate change education for audiences ranging from young children to adults and utilizing both online and in-person formats. These offerings are supported by rich digital resources including video, animations and data visualizations. These efforts have the potential to raise awareness of climate change, deepen understandings and improve public discourse and decision-making on this critical issue. For adult audiences, Our Earth's Future offers participants a five-week course at AMNH that focuses on climate change science, impacts and communication, taking advantage of both AMNH expertise and exhibitry. Online versions of this course include both a ten-week course as well as three different three-week thematic courses. (The longer course is now available as a MOOC in Coursera.) These activities have been supported by a grant from IMLS. The results of independent evaluation provide insight into participant needs and how they might be addressed. For K-12 educators, the Museum's Seminars on Science program of online teacher professional development offers, in collaboration with its higher education partners, a graduate course in climate change that is authored by both an AMNH curator and leading NASA scientists. Developed with support from both NASA and NSF, the course provides a semester-equivalent introduction to climate change science for educators, including digital resources, assignments and discussions for classroom use. The results of independent evaluation will be presented. For younger audiences, the presentation will highlight resources from the AMNH Ology site; television programming conducted in partnership with HBO; Science Bulletinsvideos that include current climate change research; resources related to the GRACE mission for tracking water from space; and special event programming at the Museum on climate change. This presentation will address the

  4. Key role of congestion in natural history of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guglin M

    2011-01-01

    Maya GuglinUniversity of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: The natural course of heart failure with decreased and preserved systolic function is almost identical. The current concept of heart failure where decreased cardiac output plays the major role does not explain this similarity. We suggest a revised concept of heart failure where congestion plays the leading role. While congestion is almost invariably present in heart failure with normal and with reduced systolic function, the low ...

  5. History of the unraveling of the natural decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milestones in the subject of radioactivity, which were important to the unraveling of natural decay series, have been identified and described. The interplay between all these issues is very complex, and some aspects of the development of the uranium series is discussed as an example, the thorium and actinium series evolved in a similar way from research by many of the same people. All three series as understood in 1913 are compared with their present-day representation. (orig.)

  6. History of the unraveling of the natural decay series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milestones in the subject of radioactivity, which were important to the unraveling of natural decay series, have been identified and described. The interplay between all these issues is very complex, and some aspects of the development of the uranium series is discussed as an example, the thorium and actinium series evolved in a similar way from research by many of the same people. All three series as understood in 1913 are compared with their present-day representation. (author)

  7. Retina, Retinol, Retinal and the Natural History of Vitamin A as a Light Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Sun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Light is both the ultimate energy source for most organisms and a rich information source. Vitamin A-based chromophore was initially used in harvesting light energy, but has become the most widely used light sensor throughout evolution from unicellular to multicellular organisms. Vitamin A-based photoreceptor proteins are called opsins and have been used for billions of years for sensing light for vision or the equivalent of vision. All vitamin A-based light sensors for vision in the animal kingdom are G-protein coupled receptors, while those in unicellular organisms are light-gated channels. This first major switch in evolution was followed by two other major changes: the switch from bistable to monostable pigments for vision and the expansion of vitamin A’s biological functions. Vitamin A’s new functions such as regulating cell growth and differentiation from embryogenesis to adult are associated with increased toxicity with its random diffusion. In contrast to bistable pigments which can be regenerated by light, monostable pigments depend on complex enzymatic cycles for regeneration after every photoisomerization event. Here we discuss vitamin A functions and transport in the context of the natural history of vitamin A-based light sensors and propose that the expanding functions of vitamin A and the choice of monostable pigments are the likely evolutionary driving forces for precise, efficient, and sustained vitamin A transport.

  8. The natural history of pedal puncture wounds in diabetics: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    East Jeffrey M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons usually witness only the limb-threatening stages of infected, closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Given that this catastrophic outcome often represents failure of conservative management of pre-infected wounds, some suggest consideration of invasive intervention (coring or laying-open for pre-infected wounds in hope of preventing contamination from evolving into infection, there being no evidence based guidelines. However, an invasive pre-emptive approach is only justifiable if the probability of progression to catastrophic infection is very high. Literature search revealed no prior studies on the natural history of closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Methods A survey was conducted via an interviewer-administered questionnaire on 198 adult diabetics resident in the parish of St. James, Jamaica. The sample was selected using a purposive technique designed to mirror the social gradient and residential distribution of the target population and is twice the number needed to detect a prevalence of puncture wounds of 14% with a range of 7-21% in a random sample of the estimated adult diabetic population. Results The prevalence of a history of at least one closed pedal puncture wound since diagnosis of diabetes was 25.8% (CI; 19.6-31.9%. The only modifiable variable associated at the 5% level of significance with risk of pedal puncture wound, after adjustment by multivariable logistic regression, was site of interview/paying status, a variable substantially reflective of income more so than quality-of-care. Of 77 reported episodes of closed pedal puncture wound among 51 participants, 45.4% healed without medical intervention, 27.3% healed after non-surgical treatment by a doctor and 27.3% required surgical intervention ranging from debridement to below-knee amputation. Anesthetic foot (failure to feel the puncture and sole of the forefoot as site of puncture were the variables significantly associated with

  9. Implementing the natural flushing strategy: a case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy is targeting natural flushing as the compliance strategy to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards (40 CFR 192, subpart B) for many of the sites in the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) ground water project. Most of these former uranium-processing sites retain residual ground-water contamination in their uppermost aquifers as a result of past milling activities and uncontrolled tailings seepage. To qualify for natural flushing candidacy, a project site must meet certain criteria. These criteria are that the uppermost aquifer is a potential drinking water resource, the affected resource is not currently or projected to be a source of drinking water to local municipalities, institutional control(s) can be implemented to prevent inappropriate uses of the contaminated ground water during the flushing period, and the contaminants of concern are predicted to attenuate to EPA maximum concentration limits or background within a 100-year time frame. Computer-based analytical and numerical methods are being used to model groundwater flow conditions at two Rifle, Colorado, sites to assess and predict the flushing process. (orig.)

  10. A natural history of mathematics: George Peacock and the making of English algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In a series of papers read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society through the 1820s, the Cambridge mathematician George Peacock laid the foundation for a natural history of arithmetic that would tell a story of human progress from counting to modern arithmetic. The trajectory of that history, Peacock argued, established algebraic analysis as a form of universal reasoning that used empirically warranted operations of mind to think with symbols on paper. The science of counting would suggest arithmetic, arithmetic would suggest arithmetical algebra, and, finally, arithmetical algebra would suggest symbolic algebra. This philosophy of suggestion provided the foundation for Peacock's "principle of equivalent forms," which justified the practice of nineteenth-century English symbolic algebra. Peacock's philosophy of suggestion owed a considerable debt to the early Cambridge Philosophical Society culture of natural history. The aim of this essay is to show how that culture of natural history was constitutively significant to the practice of nineteenth-century English algebra. PMID:23961689

  11. A joint history of the nature of genetic variation and the nature of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2015-02-01

    This essay traces the history of concepts of genetic variation and schizophrenia from Darwin and Mendel to the present. For Darwin, the important form of genetic variation for evolution is continuous in nature and small in effect. Biometricians led by Pearson agreed and developed statistical genetic approaches utilizing trait correlations in relatives. Mendel studied discontinuous traits and subsequent Mendelians, led by Bateson, assumed that important genetic variation was large in effect producing discontinuous phenotypes. Although biometricians studied 'insanity', schizophrenia genetics under Kraepelin and Rüdin utilized Mendelian approaches congruent with their anatomical-clinical disease model of dementia praecox. Fisher showed, assuming many genes of small effect, Mendelian and Biometrical models were consilient. Echoing prior conflicts, psychiatric genetics since then has utilized both biometrical models, largely in twins, and Mendelian models, based on advancing molecular techniques. In 1968, Gottesman proposed a polygenic model for schizophrenia based on a threshold version of Fisher's theory. Since then, rigorous studies of the schizophrenia spectrum suggest that genetic risk for schizophrenia is more likely continuous than categorical. The last 5 years has seen increasingly convincing evidence from genome-wide association study (GWAS) and sequencing that genetic risk for schizophrenia is largely polygenic, and congruent with Fisher's and Gottesman's models. The gap between biometrical and molecular Mendelian models for schizophrenia has largely closed. The efforts to ground a categorical biomedical model of schizophrenia in Mendelian genetics have failed. The genetic risk for schizophrenia is widely distributed in human populations so that we all carry some degree of risk. PMID:25134695

  12. Natural history, treatment, and course of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the course of papillary thyroid carcinoma in 269 patients managed at the University of Chicago, with an average follow-up period of 12 yr from the time of diagnosis. Patients were categorized by clinical class; I, with intrathyroidal disease; II, with cervical nodal metastases; III, with extrathyroidal invasion; and IV, with distant metastases. Half of the patients had a history of thyroid enlargement known, on the average, for over 3 yr. In 15% of patients given thyroid hormone, the mass decreased in size. The peak incidence of cancer was when subjects were between 20-40 yr of age. Tumors averaged 2.4 cm in size; 21.6% had tumor capsule invasion, and 46% of patients had multifocal tumors. Sixty-six percent of the patients had near-total or total thyroidectomy. The overall incidence of postoperative hypoparathyroidism was 8.4%, but the incidence was zero in 83 near-total or total thyroidectomies carried out by 1 surgeon. Twenty-five percent of the patients had continuing or recurrent disease, and 8.2% died from cancer. Deaths occurred largely in patients with class III or IV disease. Cervical lymph nodes were associated with increased recurrences, but not increased deaths. Extrathyroidal invasion carried an increased risk of 5.8-fold for death, and distant metastases increased this risk 47-fold. Age over 45 yr at diagnosis increased the risk of death 32-fold. Tumor size over 3 cm increased the risk of death 5.8-fold. Surgical treatment combining lobectomy plus at least contralateral subtotal thyroidectomy was associated, by Cox proportional hazard analysis, with decreased risk of death in patients with tumors larger than 1 cm and decreased risk of recurrence among all patients, including patients in classes I and II, compared to patients who underwent unilateral thyroid surgery or bilateral subtotal resections

  13. Grapple with a Giant Squid at the Natural History Museum's Darwin Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Abigail; Collins, Sally

    2009-01-01

    The Natural History Museum's new Darwin Centre fulfils three main roles. It is a state-of-the-art scientific research and collections facility, but it is also an awe-inspiring new public space that allows visitors to explore the natural world in an exciting and innovative way. With its opening, students can experience the relevance of the science…

  14. Impact of Health Perception, Balance Perception, Fall History, Balance Performance, and Gait Speed on Walking Activity in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Talkowski, Jaime B; Brach, Jennifer S.; Studenski, Stephanie; Newman, Anne B

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Disagreement currently exists regarding the contributions of various factors to physical activity in older adults. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the simultaneous impact of psychological (health perception and balance perception) and physiological (gait speed, fall history, and balance performance) factors on walking activity in older adults.

  15. The Relations between Reported Well-Being and Divorce History, Availability of a Proximate Adult, and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdek, Lawrence A.

    1991-01-01

    Examined relations between reported well-being, divorce history, availability of proximate adult, and gender in 6,573 respondents. Three main effects were significant: those with history of no divorce reported greater happiness than those with divorce; married persons reported greater happiness and less depression than those cohabiting; and men…

  16. Clarifying the link between childhood abuse history and psychopathic traits in adult criminal offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargis, Monika; Newman, Joseph; Koenigs, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Childhood abuse is a risk factor for the development of externalizing characteristics and disorders, including antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy. However, the precise relationships between particular types of childhood maltreatment and subsequent antisocial and psychopathic traits remain unclear. Using a large sample of incarcerated adult male criminal offenders (n = 183), the current study confirmed that severity of overall childhood maltreatment was linked to severity of both psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder in adulthood. Moreover, this relationship was particularly strong for physical abuse and the antisocial facet of psychopathy. Sexual abuse history was uniquely related to juvenile conduct disorder severity, rather than adult psychopathy or antisocial behaviors. Additionally, there was a significantly stronger relationship between childhood maltreatment and juvenile conduct disorder than between childhood maltreatment and ASPD or psychopathy. These findings bolster and clarify the link between childhood maltreatment and antisocial behavior later in life. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26389621

  17. The natural history of misery perfusion in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the natural courses of misery perfusion in 5 patients with atherosclerotic cerebrovascular occlusion diseases. Cases 1 showed partial improvement and Case 2 showed deterioration of misery perfusion on positron emission tomography (PET). These 2 patients did not show any clinical changes during the follow-up periods. Case 3 showed remarkable improvement of misery perfusion during the 2-year follow-ups, but his neurological condition worsened. The EC-IC bypass improved both in PET and clinical symptoms. Case 4 had a stroke at the region of misery perfusion in PET. Case 5 had a lacunar infarction 2 years after the EC-IC bypass on the opposite side. PET taken one month before the stroke did not show any signs of hypoperfusion in the area of the lacunar infarction. Misery perfusion seems not to be a static but a dynamic condition that can develop into cerebral infarction by some hemodynamic stresses. Cerebral cortical or lobar infarction may occur in the region of severe misery perfusion. EC-IC bypass may prevent impending infarction of the cerebral cortex by improving the regional cerebral blood flow. However, EC-CI bypass will not prevent the lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia or internal capsule. (author)

  18. The nuclear reactors, from a 'natural history' perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From the discovery of fission and the divergence of the Chicago Pile, the evolution of the genus nuclear reactor can be viewed from a 'palaeontology' perspective. It started with the unbelievably ebullient creativeness of the pioneer age, where almost every possible combination of reactor ingredients was dreamed of and often designed, built and operated, be it for a short period of time. The pioneer era was followed by a stringent selection process. Factors involved in the selection have been numerous and diverse: technology, safety, geopolitics, and finally economics. The weight of this factor was not identical from country to country, nor was it constant over the period. This 'natural selection' resulted in the survival of a handful of the 'fittest' reactor species, dominated by the two subspecies of Light Water Reactors. But the reactor genus is still very young, and evolution does not stop. The changing environment may, and probably will, favour the emergence or re-emergence of other species better adapted to the new selection criteria, like those identified by INPRO and Gen-4 (competitiveness, sustainability, safety, resistance to proliferation, waste management, etc.). These new fission reactors and their evolving successors will for a long time cohabit with the early fusion reactors in a future where rarefied and expensive hydrocarbons shall be reserved for more valuable uses than mere combustion in power plants... but this is another story. (author)

  19. The natural history of the arboreal ant, Crematogaster ashmeadi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Tschinkel

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The arboreal ant, Crematogaster ashmeadi Emery (Hymenoptera: Formicidae, is the most dominant arboreal ant in the pine forests of the coastal plain of northern Florida. The majority of pine trees harbor a colony of these ants. The colonies inhabit multiple chambers abandoned by bark-mining caterpillars, especially those of the family Cossidae, in the outer bark of living pines. They also inhabit ground level termite galleries in the bark, often locating the queen in galleries. The density of chambers and ants is highest in the base of the tree and drops sharply with height on the trunk. Because chambers are formed in the inner layer of bark, they gradually move outward as more bark layers are laid down, eventually sloughing off the tree's outer surface. Chambers have a mean lifetime of about 25 yr. The abundant chambers in pine bark are excavated by a small population of caterpillars and accumulate over decades. Ant colonies also inhabit abandoned galleries of woodboring beetles in dead branches in the crowns of pines. Because newly mated queens found colonies in abandoned woodboring beetle galleries in the first dead branches that form on pine saplings, C. ashmeadi is dependent on cavities made by other insects throughout its life cycle, and does little if any excavation of its own. Mature colonies nest preferentially in chambers greater than 10 cm2 in area, a relatively rare chamber size. In natural pine forests, this does not seem to limit the ant's populations.

  20. Coping style and memory specificity in adolescents and adults with histories of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Latonya S; Block, Stephanie D; Ogle, Christin M; Goodman, Gail S; Augusti, Else-Marie; Larson, Rakel P; Culver, Michelle A; Pineda, Annarheen R; Timmer, Susan G; Urquiza, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with histories of childhood trauma may adopt a nonspecific memory retrieval strategy to avoid unpleasant and intrusive memories. In a sample of 93 adolescents and adults with or without histories of child sexual abuse (CSA), we tested the hypothesis that nonspecific memory retrieval is related to an individual's general tendency to use avoidant (i.e., distancing) coping as a personal problem-solving or coping strategy, especially in victims of CSA. We also examined age differences and other individual differences (e.g., trauma-related psychopathology) as predictors of nonspecific memories. Distancing coping was significantly associated with less specific autobiographical memory. Younger age, lower vocabulary scores, and non-CSA childhood maltreatment (i.e., physical and emotional abuse) also uniquely predicted less autobiographical memory specificity, whereas trauma-related psychopathology was associated with more specific memory. Implications for the development of autobiographical memory retrieval in the context of coping with childhood maltreatment are discussed. PMID:26241375

  1. Identifying Family History and Substance Use Associations for Adult Epilepsy from the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Elizabeth S; Leppik, Ilo; Pakhomov, Serguei; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Melton, Genevieve B

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a prevalent chronic neurological disorder afflicting about 50 million people worldwide. There is evidence of a strong relationship between familial risk factors and epilepsy, as well as associations with substance use. The goal of this study was to explore the interactions between familial risk factors and substance use based on structured data from the family and social history modules of an electronic health record system for adult epilepsy patients. A total of 8,957patients with 38,802 family history entries and 8,822 substance use entries were gathered and mined for associations at different levels of granularity for three age groupings (>18, 18-64, and ≥65 years old). Our results demonstrate the value of an association rule mining approach to validate knowledge of familial risk factors. The preliminary findings also suggest that substance use does not demonstrate significant association between social and familial risk factors for epilepsy. PMID:27570679

  2. Regulatory Skill as a Resilience Factor for Adults With a History of Foster Care: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Angela J; Tottenham, Nim

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with a history of foster care (FC) are at elevated risk for emotion regulation-related mental illness. The purpose of the current study was to characterize regulatory function in a group of adults with a history of FC (N = 26) relative to those without a history of FC (N = 27) and how regulatory function moderates adverse caregiving-related outcomes (daily cortisol production and trait anxiety). Self-report items (anxiety, emotion regulation strategies, inhibitory control, caregiv...

  3. Early life history and habitat ecology of estuarine fishes: responses to natural and human induced change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Able

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the early life history of fishes and their habitats has proceeded from basic natural history to ecology, but we often need to return to natural history to address deficiencies in conceptual and quantitative models of ecosystems. This understanding is further limited by the complex life history of fishes and the lack of appreciation of shifting baselines in estuaries. These inadequacies are especially evident when we try to address the effects of human influences, e.g. fishing, urbanization, and climate change. Often our baselines are inadequate or inaccurate. Our work has detected these along the coasts of the U.S. in extensive time series of larval fish ingress into estuaries, studies of the effects of urbanization, and responses to catastrophes such as the BP oil spill. Long-term monitoring, especially, continues to provide critical insights

  4. Nature of Interactions among Young Children and Adult Caregivers in a Children's Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Caitlin McMunn; Welch, Meghan M.

    2014-01-01

    This naturalistic, qualitative study examines the nature of child- and adult-led interactions in a children's museum. Using dialogic learning as a theoretical framework, the study examines how children and adults engage in interactions while learning at a museum. Findings suggest that children and adults are almost equally likely to lead…

  5. Natural history and morphology of the hoverfly Pseudomicrodon biluminiferus and its parasitic relationship with ants nesting in bromeliads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Volker S; Morales, Mírian N; Marinoni, Luciane; Kamke, Rafael; Steiner, Josefina; Zillikens, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The syrphid subfamily Microdontinae is characterized by myrmecophily of their immature stages, i.e., they develop in ant nests. Data on natural history of microdontines are scarce, especially in the Neotropics. Based on fieldwork in southern Brazil, this study provided new data on development and ecology of the hoverfly Pseudomicrodon biluminiferus (Hull) (Diptera: Syrphidae) as well as the first morphological descriptions of male genitalia, larvae, and pupa. Immature specimens were specifically found in colonies of the ant species Crematogaster limata Smith (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) found in rosettes of the bromeliad species Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren) Baker (Poales: Bromeliaceae) and A. nudicaulis (L.) Grisebach. Third instar larvae were observed preying on ant larvae, revealing the parasitic nature of P. biluminiferus. In this and several other aspects, the natural history of P. biluminiferus is similar to that of Holarctic microdontine species. Exceptions include: (i) indications that adults of P. biluminiferus outlast the winter months (in contrast to 3(rd)instar larvae in Holarctic species) and (ii) P. biluminiferus' relationship with bromeliads. The importance of bromeliads for this host-parasite system is evaluated in this paper. The single occurrence of another, unidentified microdontine species' pupae in a nest of the ant species Camponotus melanoticus Emery (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is reported. PMID:25373185

  6. Using A Natural Language Processing System to Extract and Code Family History Data from Admission Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Friedlin, Jeff; McDonald, Clement J.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a rule-based natural language processing (NLP) system for extracting and coding clinical data from free text reports. We studied the systems ability to accurately extract and code family history data from hospital admission notes. The system searches the family history for 12 diseases (and relative degree). It achieved a sensitivity of .96 and a PPV of .97 for disease extraction, and .96 and .93 respectively for relative categorization.

  7. Impaired Fasting Glucose in Omani Adults with no Family History of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Al-Sinani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG among Omani adults with no family history (FH of diabetes and to investigate the factors behind the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D, while excluding a FH of diabetes. Methods: A total of 1,182 Omani adults, aged ≥40 years, visited the Family Medicine & Community Health Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, on days other than the Diabetes Clinic days, from July 2010 to July 2011. The subjects were interviewed and asked if they had T2D or a FH of T2D. Results: Only 191 (16% reported no personal history of T2D or FH of the disease. Of these, anthropometric and biochemical data was complete in 159 subjects. Of these a total of 42 (26% had IFG according to the American Diabetes Association criteria. Body mass index, fasting insulin, haemoglobin A1C and blood pressure (BP, were significantly higher among individuals with IFG (P <0.01, P <0.05, P <0.01 and P <0.01, respectively. In addition, fasting insulin, BP and serum lipid profile were correlated with obesity indices (P <0.05. Obesity indices were strongly associated with the risk of IFG among Omanis, with waist circumference being the strongest predictor. Conclusion: Despite claiming no FH of diabetes, a large number of Omani adults in this study had a high risk of developing diabetes. This is possibly due to environmental factors and endogamy. The high prevalence of obesity combined with genetically susceptible individuals is a warning that diabetes could be a future epidemic in Oman.

  8. Antibody to Hepatitis B Core Antigen Levels in the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis B

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Wei; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Yu-Qing; Xiao-feng WU; Liu, Dan-Yang; Xu, Chun; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Wen; Lv, Dong-Xia; Li, Jun; Deng, Yong-Qiong; Wang, Yan; Huo, Na; Yu, Min; Xi, Hong-Li

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have revealed antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) levels as a predictor of treatment response in hepatitis B early antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in both interferon and nucleos(t)ide analog therapy cohorts. However, there is no information about anti-HBc levels in the natural history of CHB. This study aimed to define anti-HBc levels of different phases in the natural history of CHB. Two hundred eleven treatment-naive CHB pati...

  9. The natural history of surgically treated but radiotherapy-naïve nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Eoin P

    2009-11-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is indicated for patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) causing compressive symptoms. Previous studies attempting to define the rate of recurrence\\/regrowth of surgically treated but radiation-naïve NFPAs were somewhat limited by selection bias and\\/or small numbers and\\/or lack of consistency of findings between studies. A better understanding of the natural history of this condition could allow stratification of recurrence risk and inform future management. We aimed to define the natural history of a large, mainly unselected cohort with surgically treated, radiotherapy (RT)-naïve NFPAs and to try to identify predictors of recurrence\\/regrowth.

  10. The University of Edinburgh natural history class lists 1782-1800.

    OpenAIRE

    Eddy, M D

    2003-01-01

    In 1779 Revd Dr John Walker was appointed to be the University of Edinburgh’s Professor of Natural History. Because of the institutional structure of the university, he took care to keep detailed class lists from 1782 to 1800. These are extant in the University of Edinburgh’s Special Collections Department. As many of the students on the lists would go on to have a profound impact on the practice of nineteenth century natural history, I have compiled them into a table so that they can be used...

  11. List of Strigiformes species in the Belgrade Natural History Museum bird collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novčić Ivana D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During re-inventory of the order Strigiformes in the ornithological collection of the Belgrade Natural History Museum, we recorded a total of 134 specimens, collected at over 40 localities throughout Serbia. Of these 71 are in the study collection, 59 in the exhibition collection, and four in the historical collection of birds. In view of the number of specimens diversity of species, and the geographical representatives, the collection of owls in the Natural History Museum represents an extremely important source of information for the taxon Strigiformes.

  12. New York City International Polar Weekend at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S.; Turrin, M.; Macphee, R.

    2008-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, in partnership with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Earth Institute of Columbia University and Barnard College, is featuring the International Polar Year through a New York City International Polar Weekend (NYC-IPW) in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The event showcases current polar research, polar environmental changes, history and culture during two days of family programs and activities, performances, and lectures. The goal of the NYC-IPW is to engage diverse audiences and enhance the public understanding of polar science, in particular IPY research, through close interactions with polar experts. Activities for the public include many disciplines, ranging from the physical sciences and cultural anthropology to music and art, and are presented in many forms, from lectures, panels and films to posters and play. Highlights of the NYC-IPW include: 1) A polar fair for youth and adults, showcasing scientists, artists, and educators who have worked at one or both poles and including many interactive exhibits featuring such topics as life in New York at the end of the last Ice Age, how Arctic sea ice is changing, and life on and under the ice. 2) Performances and presentations oriented towards children and families, including Inuit Throat Singers, Central Park Zoo Theater Group, and a northern lights show. 3) Lectures showcasing current IPY research and addressing such issues as the possible effects of climate change on the poles and the rest of the world, as well as polar poetry, art and film. 4) A partnership with New York City Urban Advantage program for Middle School students in the city to meet with scientists, teachers and students who had participated in polar research and travel. 5) Norwegian Consulate sponsorship of science presenters and Sami performers. The March 2007 event involved 85 presenters and volunteers from 22 institutions, and attracted ca. 3,500 visitors. Approximately 5,000 visitors attended the February 2008

  13. Steelhead Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers: To evaluate the feasibility of using artificial production to increase natural steelhead populations and to collect baseline life history, genetic, and disease data from natural steelhead populations. 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Steelhead Supplementation Study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using artificial production to increase natural steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations and to collect baseline life history, genetic, and disease data from natural steelhead populations. To evaluate supplementation, the authors focused their experimental design on post-release survival, reproductive success, long-term fitness, and ecological interactions. They began field experiments in 1993 by outplanting hatchery adults and fingerlings to assess reproductive fitness and long-term survival. They snorkeled eight streams to estimate juvenile steelhead densities, recorded temperatures in 17 streams, and tagged natural steelhead in six streams with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags

  14. Promoting Positive Adaptation in Adult Survivors of Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Judith R.; Graham, Louise B.

    2011-01-01

    This article integrates the guidelines of American Red Cross and the "Psychological First Aid: Field Operations Guide" (Brymer et al., 2006) with adult development theories to demonstrate the promotion of adaptive functioning in adults after a disaster. Case examples and recommendations for counselors working in disaster situations are included.

  15. Antibody deficiency associated with gold treatment: natural history and management in 22 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Snowden, N; Dietch, D M; Teh, L.S.; Hilton, R C; Haeney, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a clinical and immunological study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who develop subnormal serum immunoglobulins on gold treatment; to clarify the nature of the defect in antibody production and determine the natural history of this adverse reaction; to use this information to suggest guidelines for the detection, investigation, and management of this complication. METHODS: 22 patients who developed subnormal levels of one or more immunoglobulin isotypes while receiv...

  16. Natural history of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias : Findings from a population survey

    OpenAIRE

    Agüero-Eklund, Hedda

    1998-01-01

    "Natural history of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.Findings from a population survey" The aim of this doctoral thesis is to increase understanding of the natural historyof different types of dementia in a very old population. Five studies were performedusing data from the Kungsholmen Project, a population-based study on aging and dementiain Stockholm that includes subjects aged 75+. Both prevalent and incident dementiacases, as well as cross-sectional and longit...

  17. ["Artificial animals etc." Popular natural history and bourgeois curiosity around 1900].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Christina

    2008-01-01

    During the 19th and early 20th century zoological gardens ranged among the most prominent places of popular natural history While aristocratic owners of earlier menageries installed animal collections mostly to symbolize their power over nature as well as to display their extensive diplomatic relations, the zoological gardens founded from the 1830s onwards all over Europe by members of the local bourgeois elites were supposed to mediate their social and political values by "enjoyably educating" a broader public. The new zoos were introduced as places at the antipodes of the frenzy, noise and motion of modern urban life, as spaces of pure, authentic nature whose observation would teach people a reasonable and responsible way of life in a civilised bourgeois community. Taking the Berlin Zoo as an example this paper questions these programmatic imaginations by showing how popular Naturkunde (natural history) was informed by cultures of urban entertainment and spectacle. It discusses the numerous relations and productive tensions that evolved out of the establishment of a "realm of nature" in the middle of the ever growing modern metropolis and investigates the consequences the zoo's rise as "the city's most important attraction" around the turn of the century had for the public perception of natural history as well as for the institution's scientific program. PMID:19227705

  18. The historical context of science and education at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer D.

    2007-04-01

    In this article I critically examine the historical context of science education in a natural history museum and its relevance to using museum resources to teach science today. I begin with a discussion of the historical display of race and its relevance to my practice of using the Museum's resources to teach science. I continue with a critical review of the history of the education department in a natural history museum to demonstrate the historical constitution of current practices of the education department. Using sociocultural constructs around identity formation and transformation, I move to the present with a case study of a teacher who transforms the structure of science education in her classroom and school as a result of her identity transformation and association with a museum-based professional education program.

  19. 76 FR 48179 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between... cultural affiliation with the human remain should contact the Slater Museum of Natural History, University... and a straight mandibular border. These characteristics indicate that the individual is likely...

  20. Isolated congenital atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero : Natural history and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Kapusta, Livia; Stoutenbeek, Philip; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Van Den Berg, Paul; Meijboom, Erik-Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background. Isolated congenital atrioventricular block (CAVB) diagnosed in utero is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Prognosis is especially poor when heart rate drops below 55 beats per minute (bpm) and when fetal hydrops develops. We describe the natural history and outcome of 24 in

  1. On the taxonomy of Latonigena auricomis (Araneae, Gnaphosidae, with notes of geographical distribution and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The male of Latonigena auricomis Simon, 1893 is described for the first time and the female is redescribed. New records are provided for Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Notes on the natural history and a potential distribution model of the species are presented in the Neotropical Region.

  2. An Amphibious Being: How Maritime Surveying Reshaped Darwin's Approach to Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, Alistair

    2016-06-01

    This essay argues that Charles Darwin's distinctive approach to studying distribution and diversity was shaped by his face-to-face interactions with maritime surveyors during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1831-1836). Introducing their hydrographic surveying methods into natural history enabled him to compare fossil and living marine organisms, to compare sedimentary rocks to present-day marine sediments, and to compare landscapes to submarine topology, thereby realizing Charles Lyell's fanciful ambition for a superior form of geology that might be practiced by an "amphibious being." Darwin's theories of continental uplift, coral reef formation, and the origin of species all depended on his amphibious natural history. This essay contributes to our understanding of theorizing in nineteenth-century natural history by illustrating that specific techniques of observing and collecting could themselves help to generate a particular theoretical orientation and, indeed, that such practical experiences were a more proximate source of Darwin's "Humboldtian" interest in distribution and diversity than Alexander von Humboldt's writings themselves. Darwin's debt to the hydrographers became obscured in two ways: through the "funneling" of credit produced by single-authorship publication in natural history and the "telescoping" of memory by which Darwin's new theories made him recall his former researches as though he had originally undertaken them for the very purpose of producing the later theory. PMID:27439285

  3. Teaching Science Rhetorically: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Natural History, 1948-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaolo, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Considers the different analogies used by James Rettie, Teilhard de Chardin, Robert Ardrey, Jacob Bronowski, Richard Leakey, Steven Weinberg, Heinz Pagels, and Carl Sagan to make concepts related to time and natural history accessible to the layperson. Suggests that these analogies be used at the undergraduate level in both humanities and science…

  4. Classical Natural History: the importance of volunteers in collection management and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reumer, J.W.F.; Post, K.

    2010-01-01

    As a result of increasing budget constraints and decreasing interest in classical natural history, the work effort of volunteer researchers and the need for private funding are of growing importance. A brief historical background is provided, showing the decreasing interest in the subject shown by g

  5. New Tortricoidea (Lepidoptera) from Southeast Asia in the British Museum (Natural History)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diakonoff, A.

    1975-01-01

    The following stray descriptions and records refer to species from New Guinea, Kei Island, Sumatra and Java. The material is chiefly in the collection of the British Museum (Natural History), London (BM) and also in the Leiden Museum (LM). Four genera and 11 species are discribed on the following pa

  6. Cooperative Learning about Nature of Science with a Case from the History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Balz; Canella, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a predominantly qualitative classroom study on cooperative learning about nature of science (NOS) using a case from the history of science. The purpose of the research was to gain insight into how students worked with the historical case study during cooperative group work, how students and teachers assessed the teaching unit,…

  7. Type specimens of amphibians in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasso Miracle, M.E.; Hoek Ostende, van den L.W.; Arntzen, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    The amphibian type specimens held in the National Museum of Natural History in Leiden are listed. A total of 775 type specimens representing 143 taxon names were encountered. The list provides the original name, the original publication date, pagination and illustrations, current name, type locality

  8. Long-term studies of the natural history of asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    secondary prevention through the use of inhaled corticosteroids can effectively halt the long-term disease progression in childhood. In conclusion, the natural history of asthma and the associated airway changes is still poorly understood, and we have not managed to translate findings from long-term studies...

  9. Heroes and Villains: Suggestions for a Classroom Activity on the Nature of History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Joseph H. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Provides a classroom exercise, known as Synergistic Convergence (SYNCON), in which students are divided into small groups, and then into successively larger groups, until the entire class is involved in one problem. Asks students to develop a list of five heroes and five villains in history. Generates insights into the nature of historical…

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Natural History Museum, London

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    Nature Live is a programme of daily events which take place at the Natural History Museum, London. Nature Live brings together scientists and visitors to explore, discover and discuss the natural world and our place within it. In each event visitors get the chance to meet our scientists, see the specimens they study and ask lots of questions. Today Nature Live will feature a live link to the LHC control room at CERN. This will give visitors the amazing opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the Large Hadron Collider experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. As well as to discover how scientists at the Museum and at CERN are all looking back through deep time to answer those big questions on the origins of life, the universe and everything. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/London_NatureLive-2012.html

  11. False Memory for Trauma-Related DRM Lists in Adolescents and Adults with Histories of Child Sexual Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Gail S.; Ogle, Christin M.; Block, Stephanie D.; Harris, Latonya S.; Larson, Rakel P.; Augusti, Else-Marie; Cho, Young Il; Beber, Jonathan; Timmer, Susan; Urquiza, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to examine Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory for trauma-related and nontrauma-related lists in adolescents and adults with and without documented histories of child sexual abuse (CSA). Individual differences in psychopathology and adult attachment were also explored. Participants were administered free recall and recognition tests after hearing CSA, negative, neutral, and positive DRM lists. In free recall, CSA and negative lists produced the ...

  12. The Developmental Mental-Disorder Histories of Adults With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Prospective Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koenen, Karestan C.; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom; Gregory, Alice; Harrington, HonaLee; Poulton, Richie

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies have established that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly comorbid with other mental disorders. However, such studies have largely relied on adults' retrospective reports to ascertain comorbidity. The authors examined the developmental mental health histories of adults with PTSD using data on mental disorders assessed across the first 3 decades of life among members of the longitudinal Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study; 100% o...

  13. [Science and nation: romanticism and natural history in the works of E. J. da Silva Maia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, L

    1998-01-01

    The works of physician and naturalist Emílio Joaquim da Silva Maia (1808-59) can be viewed as a scientific project that discovers Brazil and its inhabitants. Maia's nationalism and his romantic view of nature formed the underpinnings of his scientific theories, especially his studies on zoological geography. He subordinated the issue of the biological specificity of different regions of the world to his era's debates on the construction of Brazil as an independent nation. In his interpretations of European natural history, Maia endeavored to understand Brazilian nature as a specific achievement of the Cosmos, in keeping with Alexander von Humboldt's approach. PMID:16676427

  14. Predicting the natural mortality of marine fish from life history characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Henrik

    their parents on a one-for-one basis in the long run. Otherwise the population would either increase exponentially or become extinct. Combining data on growth and specific fecundity in a size-based fish community model of the North Sea and using the requirement of a one-for-one replacement provides......For fish much of the life history is determined by body size. Body size and asymptotic size significantly influences important life history processes such as growth, maturity, egg production, and natural mortality. Futhermore, for a population to persist, offspring must be able to replace......, and with estimates from a comprehensive compilation of empirical data on the natural mortality of marine fishes. The comparisons are all in aggreement with the predictions from the model. We conclude that natural mortality scales with body length raised to a power around -1.6, with the asymptotic length...

  15. Giant left atrial myxoma in an elderly patient: natural history over a 7-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajraktari, Gani; Emini, Merita; Berisha, Venera; Gashi, Fitnete; Beqiri, Arton; Zahiti, Bedri; Selmani, Hamza; Shatri, Faik; Manaj, Rexhep

    2006-01-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with a 7-year history of a giant left atrial myxoma. The myxoma was attached to the atrial septum and occupied almost the entire left atrial cavity. The patient was hospitalized 4 times because of dyspnea on exertion, palpitations, fatigue, general asthenia, and weight loss. During prior hospitalizations, the patient had refused cardiac surgery. She developed several complications, including atrial fibrillation, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, mesenteric embolism, pulmonary edema, and thrombotic stroke. We herein describe the natural history of left atrial myxoma in an elderly patient over a 7-year period. PMID:17024671

  16. Natural variation and genetic covariance in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempermann, Gerd [Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Gage, Fred [Salk Institute for Biological Studies, The, San Diego, CA

    2006-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is highly variable and heritable among laboratory strains of mice. Adult neurogenesis is also remarkably plastic and can be modulated by environment and activity. Here, we provide a systematic quantitative analysis of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in two large genetic reference panels of recombinant inbred strains (BXD and AXB?BXA, n ? 52 strains). We combined data on variation in neurogenesis with a new transcriptome database to extract a set of 190 genes with expression patterns that are also highly variable and that covary with rates of (i) cell proliferation, (ii) cell survival, or the numbers of surviving (iii) new neurons, and (iv) astrocytes. Expression of a subset of these neurogenesis-associated transcripts was controlled in cis across the BXD set. These self-modulating genes are particularly interesting candidates to control neurogenesis. Among these were musashi (Msi1h) and prominin1?CD133 (Prom1), both of which are linked to stem-cell maintenance and division. Twelve neurogenesis-associated transcripts had significant cis-acting quantitative trait loci, and, of these, six had plausible biological association with adult neurogenesis (Prom1, Ssbp2, Kcnq2, Ndufs2, Camk4, and Kcnj9). Only one cis- cting candidate was linked to both neurogenesis and gliogenesis, Rapgef6, a downstream target of ras signaling. The use of genetic reference panels coupled with phenotyping and global transcriptome profiling thus allowed insight into the complexity of the genetic control of adult neurogenesis.

  17. [Identification of ancient Chinese medicinal specimens preserved at Natural History Museum in London].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhong-zhen; Zhao, Kai-cun; Brand, Eric

    2015-12-01

    On-site field investigation was conducted to authenticate a batch of ancient Chinese medicinal decoction pieces that have been preserved in a rare collection at the Natural History Museum in London. These treasured artifacts comprise a portion of the Sloane Collection, and the nearly one hundred Chinese medicinal specimens examined within provide an objective record of the real situation regarding the Chinese medicinal materials in commercial circulation three hundred years ago. The precious data from this collection pro-vides an extremely valuable reference for the research into the history of medicinal exchange between China and the West during the Age of Exploration, shedding light on the evolution and historical changes in the species used in Chinese medicine, as well as the history of medicinal processing and decoction pieces. PMID:27245044

  18. Using the Natural Language Paradigm (NLP) to Increase Vocalizations of Older Adults with Cognitive Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Linda A.; Geiger, Kaneen B.; Sautter, Rachael A.; Sidener, Tina M.

    2007-01-01

    The Natural Language Paradigm (NLP) has proven effective in increasing spontaneous verbalizations for children with autism. This study investigated the use of NLP with older adults with cognitive impairments served at a leisure-based adult day program for seniors. Three individuals with limited spontaneous use of functional language participated…

  19. Autism and Diagnostic Substitution: Evidence from a Study of Adults with a History of Developmental Language Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Dorothy V. M.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Watt, Helen J.; Line, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Rates of diagnosis of autism have risen since 1980, raising the question of whether some children who previously had other diagnoses are now being diagnosed with autism. We applied contemporary diagnostic criteria for autism to adults with a history of developmental language disorder, to discover whether diagnostic substitution has taken place. A…

  20. Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuheimer, Anna; Hartvig, Martin; Heuschele, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    is observed along with variability in physical and biological forcing factors in space and time. We compiled adult and offspring size for 407 pelagic marine species covering more than 17 orders of magnitude in body mass including Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Crustaceans, Ctenophora, Elasmobranchii, Mammalia...... history strategies and possible group-specific responses to changing environmental conditions (e.g., production and distribution)....

  1. Natural history and physiological determinants of changes in glucose tolerance in a non-diabetic population: the RISC Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, E; Natali, A; Muscelli, E;

    2011-01-01

    The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area.......The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area....

  2. 77 FR 11567 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... museum, institution or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History... Natural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that cultural...

  3. 75 FR 52013 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field...

  4. 76 FR 28067 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ..., institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field...

  5. The development of a digitising service centre for natural history collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta Tegelberg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Digitarium is a joint initiative of the Finnish Museum of Natural History and the University of Eastern Finland. It was established in 2010 as a dedicated shop for the large-scale digitisation of natural history collections. Digitarium offers service packages based on the digitisation process, including tagging, imaging, data entry, georeferencing, filtering, and validation. During the process, all specimens are imaged, and distance workers take care of the data entry from the images. The customer receives the data in Darwin Core Archive format, as well as images of the specimens and their labels. Digitarium also offers the option of publishing images through Morphbank, sharing data through GBIF, and archiving data for long-term storage. Service packages can also be designed on demand to respond to the specific needs of the customer. The paper also discusses logistics, costs, and intellectual property rights (IPR issues related to the work that Digitarium undertakes.

  6. Clinical and polysomnographic predictors of the Natural History of poor sleep in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Singareddy, Ravi; Shaffer, Michele L.; Calhoun, Susan L.; KARATARAKI, MARIA; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Approximately 8-10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia, whereas another 20-30% of the population has insomnia symptoms at any given time (i.e., poor sleep). However, few longitudinal studies have examined risk factors of the natural history of poor sleep, and none have examined the role of polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Design: Representative longitudinal study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: From a random, general population ...

  7. Natural History of Pulmonary Fibrosis in Two Subjects With the Same Telomerase Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    El-Chemaly, Souheil; Ziegler, Shira G.; Calado, Rodrigo T.; Wilson, Kirkland A.; Wu, Hai Ping; Haughey, Mary; Peterson, Nathan R.; Young, Neal S; William A Gahl; Moss, Joel; Gochuico, Bernadette R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have identified subclinical lung disease in family members of probands with familial pulmonary fibrosis, but the natural history of preclinical pulmonary fibrosis is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether individuals with preclinical lung disease will develop pulmonary fibrosis. After a 27-year interval, two subjects with manifestations of preclinical familial pulmonary fibrosis, including asymptomatic alveolar inflammation and alveolar macrophage activ...

  8. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: Tricentenary of Isaac Newton's "Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Vitalii L.

    1987-01-01

    The first edition of Newton's "Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica" was published in 1687. The present paper is dedicated to the tricentenary of this event, which is important not just in the history of physics, but of science generally. After the Introduction, the paper continues with the following Sections: Before Newton, Principia, Principia and the method of principles, The nature of gravitation, Critique of Newtonian mechanics and its subsequent development, On Newton, Concluding remarks.

  9. Quantification of the natural history of visceral leishmaniasis and consequences for control.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, LA; Dyson, L.; Courtenay, O; Chowdhury, R.; Bern, C.; Medley, GF; Hollingsworth, TD

    2015-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis has been targeted for elimination as a public health problem (less than 1 case per 10,000 people per year) in the Indian sub-continent by 2017. However, there is still a high degree of uncertainty about the natural history of the disease, in particular about the duration of asymptomatic infection and the proportion of asymptomatically infected individuals that develop clinical visceral leishmaniasis. Quantifying these aspects of the disease is key for guiding...

  10. Natural history of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia: How much do we really know?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Information on the natural history of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) is currently inadequate due to a lack of carefully orchestrated long-term follow-up on a large cohort of patients with asymptomatic disease. Based on the available data, one can draw the conclusions that main duct IPMN is commonly associated with malignancy and an aggressive operative stance should be taken with resection being offered to most patients who are suitable operative candidates. In contrast, the ...

  11. Natural history of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: a paediatric disease diagnosed in adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Degos, Bertrand; Nadjar, Yann; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Lamari, Foudil; Sedel, Frédéric; Roze, Emmanuel; Couvert, Philippe; Mochel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is among the few inherited neurometabolic disorders amenable to specific treatment. It is easily diagnosed using plasma cholestanol. We wished to delineate the natural history of the most common neurological and non-neurological symptoms in thirteen patients with CTX. Diarrhea almost always developed within the first year of life. Cataract and school difficulties usually occurred between 5 and 15 years of age preceding by years the onset of motor or psychi...

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease course in Crohn’s disease: Is the natural history changing?

    OpenAIRE

    Golovics, Petra A; Mandel, Michael D; Lovasz, Barbara D; Lakatos, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a multifactorial potentially debilitating disease. It has a variable disease course, but the majority of patients eventually develop penetrating or stricturing complications leading to repeated surgeries and disability. Studies on the natural history of CD provide invaluable data on its course and clinical predictors, and may help to identify patient subsets based on clinical phenotype. Most data are available from referral centers, however these outcomes may be differ...

  13. The Natural History of Depression in Parkinson’s Disease within 30-Month Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common and persistent nonmotor syndromes occurring in 35% of patients diagnosed with PD. However, little information is known about the longitudinal study of its natural history of depression in PD. In this study, we identified 110 patients who are diagnosed with idiopathic PD and recruited them for assessing information about their PD related motor and nonmotor symptoms and rating scales. A follow-up evaluation was performed in 103 patients 30 months later. Abou...

  14. Lessons from type 1 diabetes for understanding natural history and prevention of autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Kimber; Michels, Aaron W

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder resulting from immune mediated destruction of insulin producing beta cells within the pancreatic islets. The natural history of T1D is well defined with distinct stages in disease development. Genetics and environmental factors contribute to disease susceptibility, followed by autoimmune targeting of proteins within beta cells. Preclinical T1D is marked by the presence of islet autoantibodies and normal blood glucose levels. Prediction of...

  15. Natural history and survival of 14 patients with corticobasal degeneration confirmed at postmortem examination

    OpenAIRE

    Wenning, G; Litvan, I; Jankovic, J; Granata, R.; Mangone, C; McKee, A.; Poewe, W; Jellinger, K.; Chaudhuri, K; D'Olhaberriague, L; Pearce, R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the natural history and survival of corticobasal degeneration by investigating the clinical features of 14 cases confirmed by postmortem examination.
METHODS—Patients with definite corticobasal degeneration were selected from the research and clinical files of seven tertiary medical centres in Austria, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Clinical features were analysed in detail.
RESULTS—The sample consisted of eight female and six male patients; ...

  16. An Island Studies Course at a Liberal Arts Institution: Pedagogy from a Natural History Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    David Sunderlin; Lijuan Xu

    2008-01-01

    An intellectual treatment of islands and isolation lends itself to a foundation in a liberal arts education. The introductory undergraduate course on island studies can serve as a topical platform on which to develop critical thinking, research, analytical, and creative thinking skills for beginning college students. The paper analyzes the natural history perspective in island studies and its methods of inquiry as pedagogical strategies that enhance the development of academic curiosity. The ...

  17. Use of image transformation to track the natural history of diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Shar, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Albert SharInformation Technology, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey, USAAbstract: The inability to precisely measure the area of a lesion can impair the study of its natural history and response to therapy. This is especially true in case of gastrointestinal lesions, where a standard imaging technique is endoscopy and an unaided visual interpretation of the size of the lesion is difficult. This study presents a novel technique that provides precise measurement of 2-dimens...

  18. Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Infection in New Zealand White Rabbits: Natural History and Intravenous Levofloxacin Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Steven B.; Hatkin, Joshua M; Dyer, David N; Orr, Steven A.; Pitt, M. Louise M.

    2010-01-01

    The natural history for inhalational Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) exposure in New Zealand white rabbits was investigated to better identify potential, early biomarkers of anthrax. Twelve SPF Bordetella-free rabbits were exposed to 150 LD50 aerosolized B. anthracis spores, and clinical signs, body temperature, complete blood count, bacteremia, and presence of protective antigen in the blood (that is, antigenemia) were examined. The development of antigenemia and bacteremia coincided and pr...

  19. Natural history of Xenosaurus phalaroanthereon (Squamata, Xenosauridae), a Knob-scaled Lizard from Oaxaca, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    JULIO A LEMOS-ESPINAL; Smith, Geoffrey R.

    2005-01-01

    We made observations on the natural history of a population of the lizard Xenosaurus phalaroanthereon from Oaxaca, Mexico. Females were larger than males (SVL). Most lizards were found completely inside rock crevices. Mean body temperature was 20.3°C. Body temperature wasrelated primarily to substrate temperature. Body temperature was not influenced by any crevice characteristic. Based on abdominal palpation, the size at maturity for females appears to be 117-119 mm SVL. Sex ratio did not dif...

  20. Tethered cord: natural history, surgical outcome and risk for Chiari malformation 1 (CM1)

    OpenAIRE

    Valentini, Laura Grazia; Selvaggio, Giorgio; Visintini, Sergio; Erbetta, Alessandra; Scaioli, Vidmer; Solero, Carlo Lazzaro

    2011-01-01

    The surgical results of this series of occult spina bifida seem better than the natural history registered in the long pre-operative period in terms of neurological deterioration. The major contribution to this result is attributed to neurophysiological monitoring that lowers the risks of permanent damage and increases the percentage of effective detethering. The present series of TCS, due to conus and filar lipoma, documents that CM1 is a really rare association occurring in less than 6% of ...

  1. A simulation model of the natural history of human breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Koscielny, S; Tubiana, M; Valleron, A J

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the time at which the distant metastases were initiated, a model has been developed to simulate the natural history of human breast cancer. The metastasis appearance curves were fitted to those observed for tumours of various sizes among the 2648 patients treated at the Institut Gustave Roussy from 1954 to 1972. The model assumes that metastases are initiated when the tumour reaches a threshold volume (distribution of this volume was estimated in a previous article). Two pa...

  2. What was historical about natural history? Contingency and explanation in the science of living things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter

    2016-08-01

    There is a long-standing distinction in Western thought between scientific and historical modes of explanation. According to Aristotle's influential account of scientific knowledge there cannot be an explanatory science of what is contingent and accidental, such things being the purview of a descriptive history. This distinction between scientia and historia continued to inform assumptions about scientific explanation into the nineteenth century and is particularly significant when considering the emergence of biology and its displacement of the more traditional discipline of natural history. One of the consequences of this nineteenth-century transition was that while modern evolutionary theory retained significant, if often implicit, historical components, these were often overlooked as evolutionary biology sought to accommodate itself to a model of scientific explanation that involved appeals to laws of nature. These scientific aspirations of evolutionary biology sometimes sit uncomfortably with its historical dimension. This tension lies beneath recent philosophical critiques of evolutionary theory and its modes of explanation. Such critiques, however, overlook the fact that there are legitimate modes of historical explanation that do not require recourse to laws of nature. But responding to these criticisms calls for a more explicit recognition of the affinities between evolutionary biology and history. PMID:26795077

  3. Citizen science networks in natural history and the collective validation of biodiversity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnhout, Esther; Lawrence, Anna; Turnhout, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Biodiversity data are in increasing demand to inform policy and management. A substantial portion of these data is generated in citizen science networks. To ensure the quality of biodiversity data, standards and criteria for validation have been put in place. We used interviews and document analysis from the United Kingdom and The Netherlands to examine how data validation serves as a point of connection between the diverse people and practices in natural history citizen science networks. We found that rather than a unidirectional imposition of standards, validation was performed collectively. Specifically, it was enacted in ongoing circulations of biodiversity records between recorders and validators as they jointly negotiated the biodiversity that was observed and the validity of the records. These collective validation practices contributed to the citizen science character or natural history networks and tied these networks together. However, when biodiversity records were included in biodiversity-information initiatives on different policy levels and scales, the circulation of records diminished. These initiatives took on a more extractive mode of data use. Validation ceased to be collective with important consequences for the natural history networks involved and citizen science more generally. PMID:27111818

  4. Between the national and the universal: natural history networks in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Regina Horta

    2013-12-01

    This essay examines contemporary Latin American historical writing about natural history from the nineteenth through the twentieth centuries. Natural history is a "network science," woven out of connections and communications between diverse people and centers of scholarship, all against a backdrop of complex political and economic changes. Latin American naturalists navigated a tension between promoting national science and participating in "universal" science. These tensions between the national and the universal have also been reflected in historical writing on Latin America. Since the 1980s, narratives that recognize Latin Americans' active role have become more notable within the renewal of the history of Latin American science. However, the nationalist slant of these approaches has kept Latin American historiography on the margins. The networked nature of natural history and Latin America's active role in it afford an opportunity to end the historiographic isolation of Latin America and situate it within world history. PMID:24783494

  5. Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuheimer, A B; Hartvig, M; Heuschele, J; Hylander, S; Kiørboe, T; Olsson, K H; Sainmont, J; Andersen, K H

    2015-12-01

    Explaining variability in offspring vs. adult size among groups is a necessary step to determine the evolutionary and environmental constraints shaping variability in life history strategies. This is of particular interest for life in the ocean where a diversity of offspring development strategies is observed along with variability in physical and biological forcing factors in space and time. We compiled adult and offspring size for 407 pelagic marine species covering more than 17 orders of magnitude in body mass including Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Crustaceans, Ctenophora, Elasmobranchii, Mammalia, Sagittoidea, and Teleost. We find marine life following one of two distinct strategies, with offspring size being either proportional to adult size (e.g., Crustaceans, Elasmobranchii, and Mammalia) or invariant with adult size (e.g., Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Sagittoidea, Teleosts, and possibly Ctenophora). We discuss where these two strategies occur and how these patterns (along with the relative size of the offspring) may be shaped by physical and biological constraints in the organism's environment. This adaptive environment along with the evolutionary history of the different groups shape observed life history strategies and possible group-specific responses to changing environmental conditions (e.g., production and distribution). PMID:26909435

  6. Familial adenomatous polyposis in pediatrics: natural history, emerging surveillance and management protocols, chemopreventive strategies, and areas of ongoing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Seth; Lawson, Caitlin E; Anant, Shrikant; Attard, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary condition with a near 100 % lifetime risk of colorectal cancer without prophylactic colectomy. Most patients with FAP have a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene on chromosome 5q22. This condition frequently presents in children with polyps developing most frequently in the second decade of life and surveillance colonoscopy is required starting at age ten. Polyps are found not only in the colon, but in the stomach and duodenum. Knowledge of the natural history of FAP is important as there are several extra-colonic sequelae which also require surveillance. In infants and toddlers, there is an increased risk of hepatoblastoma, while in teenagers and adults duodenal carcinomas, desmoid tumors, thyroid cancer and medulloblastoma are more common in FAP than in the general population. Current chemopreventive strategies include several medications and natural products, although to this point there is no consensus on the most efficacious and safe agent. Genetic counseling is an important part of the diagnostic process for FAP. Appropriate use and interpretation of genetic testing is best accomplished with genetic counselor involvement as many families also have concerns regarding future insurability or discrimination when faced with genetic testing. PMID:27056662

  7. Young Children's Opportunities for Unstructured Environmental Exploration of Nature: Links to Adults' Experiences in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shelby Gull; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Allen, Sydnye

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor environmental education and provision of unstructured exploration of nature are often forgotten aspects of the early childhood experience. The aim of this study was to understand how adults' early experiences in nature relate to their attitudes and practices in providing such experiences for young children. This study surveyed 33 parents…

  8. The natural history of ankylosing spondylitis in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Campana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the axial skeleton and evolves in stiffnes followed by ankylosis and disability. However, it may be difficult to exactly establish the natural history of the disease and the influence of risk factors of progression, since most patients are treated with various pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic agents, which may potentially influence the natural progression of the disease. In this context, we report here a very interesting case of a 40 year old man, presented to our outpatient clinic, 28 years after the onset of AS. Previously for personal reasons, did not choose not to undergo any treatment. This case allows us to evaluate the natural radiological progression of the disease and the influence of predictive risk factors.

  9. [Conservation and natural history around 1900: the contribution of the Sarasin cousins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Some basic concepts for the creation of the Swiss National Park were derived from observations made in Sri Lanka, Indonesia and New Caledonia. European researchers feared that the study of "virgin nature" would no longer be possible, as various species would soon become extinct under the combined influences of colonial practices and profit-oriented capitalism. While the motives for protecting nature originated from experiences made in the southern hemisphere, their scientific concept of conservation was based on European natural history and the related theories of evolution. In the light of this approach, endangered zoological and botanical species as well as "primitive" varieties of man were appreciated as "documents" to be preserved within their original environment for future scientific reference and research. Museum collections and reservations (parks) were two types of repositories connected to each other by the same objective. PMID:25233677

  10. Follicle development and FSH secretion pattern of Ongole crossbred cow with natural twin birth history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryogi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A research was done to obtain basic data about influence of natural twin birth history on reproduction of Ongole crossbred (PO cow, as a basic consideration in utilizing twin genetic potency to increase beef production. The research was done for three estrus cycles respectively, and consists of two activities. The first activity was done in Beef Cattle Research Station (BCReS at Grati sub-district, Pasuruan district – East Java, to observe number and development of follicle of ten cows with natural twin birth history (TP and ten cows with single birth history (SP. In this activit ultra sonography (USG equipment was used. The second activity was done in BCReS and in the Faculty of Veterinary Airlangga University at Surabaya, to observe concentration and profile of FSH using Bovine Blood Serum kit and IRMA method of five cows with TP and five PO cows with SP. Data obtained were analyzed using Chi-square test, t-test and descriptive presentation. Result shows that 23.33% of cows with TP produced two dominant (de Graf follicles in an estrus cycle and significantly (P < 0.01 higher FSH secretion concentration (1.26 – 3.13 times than that of cows with SP. It is concluded that PO cows with TP can produces more than one de Graf follicles in an estrus cycle and it has very high secretion concentration level of FSH.

  11. The significance of Temminck's work on biogeography: early nineteenth century natural history in Leiden, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracle, M Eulàlia Gassó

    2008-01-01

    C.J. Temminck, director of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie (now the National Museum of Natural History in Leiden) and a renowned ornithologist, gained his contemporary's respect thanks to the description of many new species and to his detailed monographs on birds. He also published a small number of works on biogeography describing the fauna of the Dutch colonies in South East Asia and Japan. These works are remarkable for two reasons. First, in them Temminck accurately described the species composition of poorly explored regions, like the Sunda Islands and Japan. Secondly, he formulated a new law on the geographical distribution of animals around the globe, based on the parallels he observed between the fauna from Europe, Asia and Japan. The underlying ideas that lead Temminck to this law were the type-concept, which he understood as the ideal morphological plan behind animal form, the unchanging character of the species and a strong belief in nature's divine design. During the first half of the nineteenth century, the type- and the species-concept, the origin and fixity of the species and the meaning of variations aroused heated discussions. When put in the context of his time, Temminck emerges as a scientist whose work was driven by the dominating scientific philosophy of the time in which he lived, under the influence of late eighteenth century natural history and of French empiricists, in particular, the great zoologist and paleontologist Georges Cuvier. Temminck's detailed descriptions of the Dutch East Indian fauna helped the great naturalists after him to understand nature's patterns and to propose comprehensive theories that explain its diversity. PMID:19244845

  12. "Never Really Had a Good Education You Know, Until I Came in Here": Educational Life Histories of Young Adult Male Prisoner Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Jane; Maunsell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the educational life histories of nine prisoner learners aged between 18 and 21 years which were collated as part of doctoral work which sought to access the life histories of adult male prisoners who were attending a prison school while incarcerated in prison. The nine life histories of the young men were collated not only…

  13. Regulatory skill as a resilience factor for adults with a history of foster care: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela J; Tottenham, Nim

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of foster care (FC) are at elevated risk for emotion regulation-related mental illness. The purpose of the current study was to characterize regulatory function in a group of adults with a history of FC (N = 26) relative to those without a history of FC (N = 27) and how regulatory function moderates adverse caregiving-related outcomes (daily cortisol production and trait anxiety). Self-report items (anxiety, emotion regulation strategies, inhibitory control, caregiving history) were collected along with more objective measures (computerized task and salivary cortisol). Inhibitory control was assessed via self-report and a computerized task (emotional face go/nogo). Results showed that for adults with a history of FC, higher levels of inhibitory control were associated with higher accuracy on the emotional face go/nogo task and greater reported use of the emotion regulation strategy cognitive reappraisal. Greater use of cognitive reappraisal in turn was associated with healthier stress-related outcomes (decreased trait anxiety and steeper sloped cortisol production throughout the day). Dose-response associations were observed between self-reported regulatory skills and FC experiences (i.e., number of placements and age when exited foster care). These findings suggest that adverse caregiving can have long-term influences on mental health that extend into adulthood; however, individual differences in regulatory skills moderate these outcomes and may be an important target for intervention following caregiving adversity. PMID:25270099

  14. College Students Constructing Collective Knowledge of Natural Science History in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates whether engaging college students ( n = 42) in a knowledge building environment would help them work as a community to construct their collective knowledge of history of science and, accordingly, develop a more informed scientific view. The study adopted mixed-method analyses and data mainly came from surveys and student online discourse recorded in a database. Findings indicate that students' knowledge building activities were conducive to the development of their online collaboration as a learning process and the effective collective knowledge work concerning natural science history as a learning outcome. Moreover, students were able to attain a more constructivist-oriented epistemic view that sees scientific theories as invented, tentative, and improvable objects. Finally, based on course reflection, students also regarded their collective learning experiences in this course as meaningful and productive.

  15. From basilar artery dolichoectasia to basilar artery aneurysm: natural history in images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zis, Panagiotis; Fragkis, Stylianos; Lykouri, Maria; Bageris, Ioannis; Kolovos, Georgios; Angelidakis, Panagiotis; Tavernarakis, Antonios

    2015-05-01

    Dolichoectasia is a medical term used to describe elongated and dilated vessels that follow a tortuous and windy course with frequent loops and curves. We are presenting the natural history in images of a normal basilar artery becoming dolichoectatic, followed by the formation of an aneurysm, over a period of many years, in 60-year-old Caucasian man with a long history of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and uncontrolled arterial hypertension, who was diagnosed with dolichoectasia of basilar artery in 2008. Although relatively stable at this point, eventually his mobility deteriorated and signs from the cranial nerves, such as trigeminal neuralgia and bilateral palsy of the VI and the VII nerves were added in the clinical picture. In 2014, both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed the formation of an unruptured aneurysm of the basilar artery. PMID:25765208

  16. Fracture in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Natural History and Vitamin D Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Nadia; Sampaio, Hugo; Woodhead, Helen; Farrar, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the natural history of fracture and vitamin D levels in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, who are vulnerable to osteoporosis and fractures. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 48 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients revealed that 43% of patients experienced ≥1 fracture. Fracture probabilities at ages 6, 9, 12, and 15 years were 4%, 9%, 31%, and 60% respectively, accelerating around the time of ambulation loss (mean age 11.8 ± 2.7 years). Chronic corticosteroid therapy was utilized in 69% of patients and was associated with all vertebral fractures. A history of vitamin D deficiency occurred in 84%, and 35% were currently deficient. Despite chronic vitamin D supplementation, 38% remained deficient. These results demonstrate that osteoporosis and fracture remain major concerns in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Bone health should be optimized well before loss of ambulation, however current levels of vitamin D supplementation may be inadequate given high levels of deficiency. PMID:27221372

  17. Further insights into the natural history and management of primary cutaneous neuroendocrine (merkel cell) carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Primary cutaneous neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinoma is a rare neoplasm with aggressive behavior but potential for response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Optimal treatment regimens are evolving based on reports of case series and a growing understanding of the natural history. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 34 cases treated at two Australian Institutions over 13 years is presented, focusing on clinical features and response to therapy. Results: The aggressive nature of this neoplasm is confirmed by the local recurrence rate of 22% following surgical excision, the development of regional node metastases in 76%, and of distant metastases in 70%. Overall median survival was 24 months with 65% of patients succumbing to metastatic disease. An association with B cell malignancies and immunosuppressive therapy is noted, with these patients having a poorer outcome, and one spontaneous remission was observed. Radiation therapy produced responses in 21 of 30 measurable sites (11 complete, 10 partial), and in 11 sites irradiated prophylactically there was only one infield relapse (9%). Responses to chemotherapy were observed in 8 of 20 applications (40%), particularly carboplatin and etoposide given in the setting of regional node disease. Conclusion: In this poor prognosis tumor, further investigation of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is warranted, as responsiveness of recurrent disease is confirmed. Immunological factors appear important in the natural history, and their manipulation may offer additional therapeutic options

  18. Highlights in IBD Epidemiology and Its Natural History in the Paediatric Age

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Gasparetto; Graziella Guariso

    2013-01-01

    Background. The number of patients of all age brackets diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) has risen dramatically worldwide over the past 50 years. IBD’s changing epidemiology suggests that environmental factors play a major role in modifying disease expression. Aim. To review studies carried out worldwide analyzing IBD epidemiology. Methods. A Medline search indicating as keywords “Inflammatory Bowel Disease,” “epidemiology,” “natural history,” “Crohn’s Disease,” “Ulcerative Coli...

  19. Impact of chronic kidney disease on the natural history of alkaptonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Bernardo; Vidinha, Joana; Pêgo, Cátia; Correia, Hugo; Sousa, Tânia

    2012-01-01

    In alkaptonuria, deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its metabolites in the body, resulting in ochronosis. Reports of patients with alkaptonuria who have decreased kidney function are rare, but this seems to play an important role in the natural history of the disease. We describe a 68-year-old female with chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology who started peritoneal dialysis (PD) after 5 years of follow-up and who was...

  20. Primary renal carcinoid natural history of the disease for ten years: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ugras Murat; Yilmaz Ugur; Gunes Ali; Mizrak Bulent

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary renal carcinoid is extremely rare and there are few reports on the natural history of the disease. Case presentation A 68-year-old male with a right renal mass who lost to follow-up for ten years has been presented. His only complaint was a mild flank pain. Upon admission to the hospital for his renal mass, he underwent a right radical nephrectomy and pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of primary renal carcinoid. Conclusions In light of the presented c...

  1. Fire history and ecology of the boreal forest nature reserve Trillemarka-Rollagsfjell

    OpenAIRE

    Nkrumah-Boakye, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macroscopic charcoal particles (axis ≥ 0.5mm) give an indication of local fire presence to a fine spatial accuracy. I have examined the history, distribution and impact of fires on the ecology of Trillemarka-Rollagsfjell boreal forest nature reserve, located in the south of Norway. Data were obtained from a total of 225 soil core samples from 15 macro sample plots measuring 300 x 300m2. There was macroscopic charcoal in 153 of the soil samples out of 225, giving an estimated b...

  2. Natural history of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: a paediatric disease diagnosed in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degos, Bertrand; Nadjar, Yann; Amador, Maria del Mar; Lamari, Foudil; Sedel, Frédéric; Roze, Emmanuel; Couvert, Philippe; Mochel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is among the few inherited neurometabolic disorders amenable to specific treatment. It is easily diagnosed using plasma cholestanol. We wished to delineate the natural history of the most common neurological and non-neurological symptoms in thirteen patients with CTX. Diarrhea almost always developed within the first year of life. Cataract and school difficulties usually occurred between 5 and 15 years of age preceding by years the onset of motor or psychiatric symptoms. The median age at diagnosis was 24.5 years old. It appears critical to raise awareness about CTX among paediatricians in order to initiate treatment before irreversible damage occurs. PMID:27084087

  3. Intertemporal choice behavior in emerging adults and adults: effects of age interact with alcohol use and family history status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Boettiger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adults with alcohol use disorders (AUDs show marked immediate reward selection (or “Now” bias in intertemporal choice tasks. This Now bias persists long into abstinence, suggesting an irreversible consequence of chronic alcohol abuse or a pre-existing AUD intermediate phenotype. However, some data show substantial Now bias among emerging adults (18-25, regardless of drinking behavior, suggesting age-dependent effects on Now bias. The objectives of the present study were to determine 1 whether Now bias is greater among emerging adults relative to adults, 2 whether any such age effect on Now bias is diminished in sub-clinical heavy alcohol users, and 3 whether having a problem drinking first degree relative is independently associated with elevated Now bias. To achieve these objectives, we used an intertemporal choice task to quantify Now bias in n=237 healthy participants (ages 18-40; 50% female, and a wide range of non-zero alcohol use, based on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT. We found that among non-heavy drinkers, Now bias inversely correlated with age; this relationship was not present among heavy drinkers. We found no significant relationship between AUDIT score and Now bias among emerging adults, but AUDIT scores and Now bias were positively correlated among 26-40 year olds.

  4. Impact of family history on relations between insulin resistance, LDL cholesterol and carotid IMT in healthy adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anderwald, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is implicated as an independent risk factor for vascular disease. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of family history (FH) of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and\\/or cardiovascular disease (CVD) on the associations between IR, low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and subclinical atherosclerosis (common and internal carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT)) in healthy European adults.

  5. Regulation of Naturally Acquired Mucosal Immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae in Healthy Malawian Adults and Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah J Glennie; Banda, Dominic; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Nkhata, Rose; Neil A Williams; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is most common in young children. In adults, disease rates decline following intermittent colonization and the acquisition of naturally acquired immunity. We characterized mucosal and systemic pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in African children and adults who contend with intense rates of colonization, up to 100% and 60% respectively. We find most Malawian children have high pneumococcal-specific T-cell respons...

  6. Association of oxytocin level and less severe forms of childhood maltreatment history among healthy Japanese adults involved with child care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie eMizuki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin (OT is known to play a role in stress regulation. The association between childhood maltreatment history and neuropeptide OT concentration is inconsistent due to the varying degrees of severity of childhood maltreatment, among other contributing factors. Less severe forms of childhood maltreatment history might enhance OT concentrations as a response to coping with social stress within the family. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between less severe forms of childhood maltreatment history and OT concentrations among healthy adults.Method: Eighty-one adults (50 women and 31 men with 18- to 48-month-old children were recruited using a snowball sample in Tokyo, Japan. Urine samples were collected for OT measurement. Less severe (low and moderate childhood maltreatment history, including physical abuse, physical neglect, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, and sexual abuse, was assessed using the self-report questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Results: Less severe physical abuse was significantly associated with higher OT concentration after adjusting for age (p=0.014. Also, less severe forms of physical abuse were independently significantly associated with higher OT concentration after controlling for other types of childhood maltreatment (p=0.027. A positive dose-response association between the number of less severe childhood maltreatment types and OT concentration was observed (p=0.031. Conclusion: A history of less severe forms of childhood physical abuse was associated with higher OT concentration in healthy adults. Poly-victimization of several types of less severe childhood maltreatment was also associated with higher OT concentrations. Less severe forms of childhood maltreatment might enhance OT concentrations in order to cope with social stress.

  7. Using the History of Research on Sickle Cell Anemia to Affect Preservice Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Eric M.

    This paper examines how using a series of lessons developed from the history of research on sickle cell anemia affects preservice teacher conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The importance of a pedagogy that has students do science through an integral use of the history of science is effective at enriching students' NOS views is presented.…

  8. Addressing Nature of Science Core Tenets with the History of Science: An Example with Sickle-Cell Anemia & Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Erica M.

    2007-01-01

    The history of science (HOS) has proven to be a useful pedagogical tool to help students learn about what has come to be regarded as an agreed upon set of core nature of science (NOS) tenets. The following article illustrates an example of how teachers can instrumentally use the history of research on heterozygote protection in sickle-cell anemia…

  9. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forato, Thais Cyrino de Mello; Martins, Roberto de Andrade; Pietrocola, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the…

  10. Family history of irritable bowel syndrome is the major determinant of persistent abdominal complaints in young adults with a history of pediatric recurrent abdominal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Pace; Giovanna Zuin; Stefania Di Giacomo; Paola Molteni; Valentina Casini; Massimo Fontana; Gabriele Bianchi Porro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the late outcome of teen-agers with a previous history of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS: A group of 67 children with RAP referred to the department from January 1986 to December 1995was followed up between 5 and 13 years after the initial diagnosis by means of a structured telephone interview.We hypothesized that those patients with persistent adult IBS-like symptoms would be significantly more likely to report a family history of IBS in comparison with adults with no persistent abdominal complaint.RESULTS: Out of the 52 trackable subjects, 15 were found to present IBS-like symptoms at follow-up (29%)whereas the majority (37 subjects) did not. Subjects with IBS-like symptoms were almost three times more likely to present at least one sibling with similar symptoms compared to subjects not complaining (40.0% vs 16.0%), respectively (P < 0.05 at Student t test).Subjects with IBS-like symptoms also reported a higher prevalence of extra-intestinal symptoms, such as back pain, fibromyalgia, headache, fatigue and sleep disturbances.CONCLUSION: The study confirms previous observations indicating that pediatric RAP can predict later development of IBS. The latter appears to be greatly influenced by intrafamilial aggregation of symptoms,possibly through the learning of a specific illness behavior.

  11. An annotated catalogue of the Lepidoptera collection of Guido Lanfranco at the National Museum of Natural History in Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Paul; Borg, John J.

    2008-01-01

    An annotated list of the lepidoptera in the Lanfranco collection donated to the National Museum of Natural History of Mdina in Malta is included. Where relevant, comments on particular species or specimens are provided.

  12. An Island Studies Course at a Liberal Arts Institution: Pedagogy from a Natural History Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sunderlin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available An intellectual treatment of islands and isolation lends itself to a foundation in a liberal arts education. The introductory undergraduate course on island studies can serve as a topical platform on which to develop critical thinking, research, analytical, and creative thinking skills for beginning college students. The paper analyzes the natural history perspective in island studies and its methods of inquiry as pedagogical strategies that enhance the development of academic curiosity. The success of this approach to early undergraduate education is documented in traditional assessment and the direction that student-driven inquiry followed throughout the course. A course in island studies is a natural fit into progressive curriculum design strategies that are currently under development at many colleges and universities.

  13. Natural history of chondroid skull base lesions - case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term follow-up reports on chondroid lesions of the skull base are rarely presented in the literature. There are virtually no data on natural growth rates of these tumors based on MRI obtained over a period of 10 years or longer. We followed a patient who has had such a lesion for more than 12 years. A non-progressive, slight abducens palsy has been the only associated symptom so far. Even though the patient was operated on for an additional intracranial arterio-venous malformation, clinical features and chromosomal testing excluded Maffucci's syndrome. The MRI follow-up in this case provides an extraordinary perspective on the natural history of chondroid skull base tumors. (orig.)

  14. Lazzaro Spallanzani and fossils: from a naturalist's travel observations to the teaching of natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Maria Elice Brzezinski; Faria, Frederico Felipe de Almeida

    2011-12-01

    This article analyzes opinions expressed by Italian naturalist Lazzaro Spallanzani on the origin and constitution of fossils on three of his travels, which punctuated three courses in mineralogy he gave in the natural history discipline at the University of Pavia. These trips to Portovenere, the island of Cerigo and the Two Sicilies enabled him to address important topics, such as the discovery of fossilized shells inside volcanic rocks, the discovery of human fossils, and the existence of fossils of species that had 'been lost', incorporating knowledge being developed at the time that drew on mineral chemistry. His concern with fossils is demonstrative of how Spallanzani, in true eighteenth century fashion, integrated studies from the three kingdoms of nature. PMID:22281956

  15. The natural history of interferon-α induced thyroiditis in chronic hepatitis c patients: a long term study

    OpenAIRE

    Tran Huy A; Jones Tracey L; Ianna Elizabeth A; Reeves Glenn EM

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Autoimmune thyroid disease is a common complication of patients with chronic hepatitis C undergoing combination pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin treatment. A small proportion develops interferon-induced thyroiditis of which the long term natural history is unknown and how it compares with de novo thyroiditis. The aim of the study is to determine the natural history of thyroid disease including antibody profile in this particular setting 36 months from the completion of...

  16. DCCT and EDIC Studies in Type 1 Diabetes: Lessons for Diabetic Neuropathy Regarding Metabolic Memory and Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Herman, William H.; Feldman, Eva L.; Low, Phillip A.; Martin, Catherine L.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Waberski, Barbara H.; Lachin, John M.; Albers, James W.

    2010-01-01

    The DCCT/EDIC (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/ Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications) provides a comprehensive characterization of the natural history of diabetic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes and provides insight into the impact of intensive insulin therapy in disease progression. The lessons learned about the natural history of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and the impact of glycemic control on neuropathy...

  17. Natural history and surgical results in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) is controversial. We aimed to assess the natural history of UIAs and evaluate the surgical results. We analyzed 154 patients (181 saccular UIAs) with no history of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a different aneurysm. Aneurysms were detected by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or by 3-dimensional CT angiography. Although the most frequent reason for the diagnosis was routine brain examinations of healthy patients or a vague symptom such as headache or dizziness, 15 patients were symptomatic. The natural history in patients who did not have surgery (follow-up group: 76 cases, 95 aneurysms) was assessed, and the surgical outcome of UIAs (surgical group: 78 cases, 86 aneurysms) was evaluated. Among 76 patients in the follow-up group, 7 had SAH. The mean latency period to aneurysm rupture was 3.2 months. The aneurysms with subsequent bleeding ranged from 5 to 25 mm (19.3 mm on average), whereas those without ranged from 1 to 28 mm (4.5 mm on average). The rupture rates of UIAs in anterior and posterior circulation were 6.2% and 14.3%, respectively. All ruptured cases were females. Mortality and morbidity associated with UIAs in the follow-up group were 3.9% and 3.9%, respectively. In the surgical group, no mortality was noted. Permanent morbidity associated with prospective repair of UIAs was 5.1%, although the morbidity of the patients with preoperative Rankin scores of 0 or 1 was 1.3%. Transient morbidity was observed in 6 patients (7.7%) with the size of the aneurysm 19.8 mm on average. The natural history and surgical results in patients with UIAs are modified by several factors including aneurysm size and location, the patient's age and gender, the medical status and the patient's preoperative Rankin score. The present results indicated that these factors should be considered in deciding whether to treat UIAs, and that careful assessment of the surgical benefits might be essential

  18. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc. PMID:27586279

  19. Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LE Rogers

    1995-08-01

    This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.

  20. Natural history of the lizard Enyalius iheringii (Squamata, Leiosauridae in southern Brazilian Atlantic forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rautenberg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the natural history of the lizard Enyalius iheringii Boulenger, 1885, as well as other tropical lizards, are rare. In this study, some aspects of the natural history of this endemic species from the Atlantic forest are reported in areas of Vale do Itajaí, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Twenty individuals were found, of which 18 were collected. Most of them were found over the vegetation (n=17 and on the ground (n=3. The main defensive strategy displayed was camouflage (n=16. Jumping (n=1, jumping and running (n=1 and running (n=2 were also observed in some individuals. When handled, lizards exhibited mouth wide open, hissing, and occasionally biting, as well as color change in males. Regarding its diet, the numerically most important prey was beetles (Coleoptera, followed by Lepidoptera larvae. Beetles, lepidopteran larvae and spiders were the most frequent food items. Males and females did not differ in size. Three sexually mature females (100-113 mm SVL were found in December and January.

  1. Sahagún's "Florentine codex," a little known Aztecan natural history of the Valley of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Henry M

    2006-01-01

    Franciscan missionary Fray Bernardino de Sahagún arrived in New Spain (Mexico) in 1529 to proselytize Aztecs surviving the Conquest, begun by Hernán Cortés in 1519. About 1558 he commenced his huge opus "Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España" completed in Latin-Nahuatl manuscript in 1569. The best surviving version, the "Florentine Codex," 1579 in Spanish-Nahuatl, is the basis for the editions published since 1829. The first English translation was issued in 13 volumes between 1950 and 1982, and the first facsimile was published in 1979. Book 11, "Earthly things," is a comprehensive natural history of the Valley of Mexico based on pre-Cortésian Aztec knowledge. Sahagún's work, largely unknown among English-speaking biologists, is an untapped treasury of information about Aztecan natural history. It also establishes the Aztecs as the preeminent pioneering naturalists of North American, and Sahagún and his colleagues as their documentarians. PMID:19845064

  2. The natural history of familial cerebral cavernomas: a retrospective MRI study of 40 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to determine the natural history and prognostic factors of familial forms of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). Cavernomas are one of the most common central nervous system vascular malformations. Familial CCM is increasingly diagnosed, but little is known about its natural history. In a national survey, we analysed clinical and MRI features of 173 patients from 57 unrelated French families. Of these 40 had undergone at least two clinical and MRI examinations. Occurrence of haemorrhage, new lesions, change in signal intensity and size of lesions have been studied by comparison between first and last MRI studies. The CCM were classified according to Zabramski et al. Mean follow-up was 3.2 years (range 0.5-6.5 years). We followed 232 cavernomas (mean 5.9 per patient, range 1-17). Serial MRI demonstrated changes in 28 patients (70 %). Bleeding occurred in 21 lesions (9.1 %) in 14 patients (35 %). The haemorrhagic risk was 2.5 % per lesion-year, higher in type I and brain-stem CCM. We saw 23 new lesions appear in 11 patients (27.5 %), with an incidence of 0.2 lesions per patient year. Signal change was observed in 11 patients (27.5 %), in 14 lesions (6 %), while 9 lesions (3.9 %) in 9 patients (22.5 %) changed significantly in size. (orig.)

  3. Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans: a 5-year review of the natural history using clinical and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although MRI prognostic features for juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) have been determined, the natural history of JOCD on serial MRI has not been fully documented. To document the natural history of JOCD on serial MRI and to correlate this with arthroscopy and clinical outcome over a 5-year follow-up. Twenty-one knees in 19 patients (15 boys, 4 girls; age range 5-15 years) with JOCD underwent MRI and clinical follow-up over 5 years. Lesions were classified as stable or unstable on MRI and compared with clinical and arthroscopic data. On 5-year follow-up, 17 of 19 patients were asymptomatic and 2 of 19 had minimal pain. Fourteen arthroscopies were performed on 11/21 knees. One of twenty-one had fragment fixation. On initial MRI, eight knees had marked fragmentation, high signal at the fragment/bone interface and incomplete defects in the hyaline cartilage (MRI stage III-stable), but no tear. Of these, five had arthroscopy, all confirming intact cartilage. One of twenty-one knees was unstable (MRI stage IVb) with a detached osteochondral fragment, requiring surgery. Despite extensive subchondral bone changes on MRI, all cases with intact cartilage (95%) improved with conservative treatment. Early MRI allows prompt diagnosis and institution of conservative treatment. This results in healing and avoidance of surgery in most patients. (orig.)

  4. First description of the breeding biology and natural history of the ochre-breasted brush finch atlapetes semirufus in venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancucci, L.; Martin, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    We provide the first description of the eggs, breeding biology, and natural history of the Ochre-breasted Brush Finch (Atlapetes semirufus). We found 37 nests over four breeding seasons (2004-2007) in Yacamb?? National Park, Venezuela. Nesting activity started in late April and continued until early June suggesting single-brooded behavior despite a typical tropical clutch size of two eggs (x?? = 1.89) that were laid on consecutive days. Egg mass averaged 3.38 g and 11.6% of adult female mass. The incubation and nestling periods averaged 14.9 and 10.5 days, respectively. Only females incubated and the percent time they spent incubating did not change between early and late incubation. Females brooded 42.7% of the time when nestlings were 2 days of age and 20.5% when 9 days of age. Both parents provisioned young at a low rate (3.9 trips/hr) and nestling growth rate (k = 0.45) was also slow. Nest predation rates were relatively high with daily mortality rates of 0.058 and 0.067 during incubation and nestling stages, respectively.

  5. Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    Witteveen, J.

    2016-01-01

    ‘Type’ in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93–119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. ‘Type’ was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber’s analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important d...

  6. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  7. History of Child Abuse and Severity of Adult Depression: The Mediating Role of Cognitive Schema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; McGinn, Lata K.

    2006-01-01

    The link between childhood abuse, adult depression, and anxiety has been well studied, but few studies have empirically explored the mechanism of that link. Using a clinical sample of women, this study examined the relationship between retrospectively measured childhood abuse and neglect and current adult symptoms of anxiety and depression, via…

  8. Socioeconomic Determinants of Adult Mortality in Namibia Using an Event History Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandjimbi, Alina; Nickanor, Ndeyapo; Kazembe, Lawrence N

    2014-01-01

    Adult mortality remains a neglected public health issue in sub-Saharan Africa, with most policy instruments concentrated on child and maternal health. In developed countries, adult mortality is negatively associated with socioeconomic factors. A similar pattern is expected in developing countries, but has not been extensively demonstrated, because of dearth of data. Understanding the hazard and factors associated with adult mortality is crucial for informing policies and for implementation of interventions aimed at improving adult survival. This paper applied a geo-additive survival model to elucidate effects of socioeconomic factors on adult mortality in Namibia, controlling for spatial frailties. Results show a clear disadvantage for adults in rural areas, for those not married and from poor households or in female-headed households. The hazard of adult mortality was highly variable with a 1.5-fold difference between areas, with highest hazard recorded in north eastern, central west and southern west parts of the country. The analysis emphasizes that, for Namibia to achieve its national development goals, targeted interventions should be aimed at poor-resourced adults, particularly in high-risk areas. PMID:26208512

  9. Vision-related quality of life assessment using the NEI-VFQ-25 in adolescents and young adults with a history of congenital cataract.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kirwan, Caitriona

    2013-07-22

    To assess vision-specific health-related quality of life in adolescents and young adults with a history of congenital cataract using the National Eye Institute 25-item Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25).

  10. Perceived history of anaphylaxis and parental overprotection, autonomy, anxiety, and depression in food allergic young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Linda J; Dahlquist, Lynnda M

    2008-12-01

    This study examined autonomy, anxiety, depression, and perceptions of parental behavior in 86 food allergic young adults and 344 healthy young adults between the ages of 18 and 22. Participants completed an online survey measuring self-reported autonomy, anxiety, depression, and perceptions of parental behavior. Results indicated that, as a group, food allergic young adults did not differ from healthy peers. However, food allergic young adults who reported having experienced an anaphylactic reaction described their disease as more severe, reported more worry about their disease, and rated their parents as more overprotective than food allergic young adults who reported never having experienced anaphylaxis. The experience of anaphylaxis may be a reliable indicator of food allergic individuals who are at risk for psychological distress. PMID:19104982

  11. Naturally Acquired Mentoring Relationships and Young Adult Outcomes among Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Kym; DuBois, David Lane; Lozano, Paula; Richardson, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated whether having a naturally acquired mentor during adolescence was associated with improved adult outcomes among youth with learning disabilities (YLD). Mentored youth were more likely to have graduated from high school, reported a higher level of self-esteem, and reported a higher overall number of positive outcomes than nonmentored…

  12. Outcome of systemic and analytic group psychotherapy for adult women with history of intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, M; Kristensen, Ellids

    2007-01-01

    Research suggests that group psychotherapy for adults with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA) is generally beneficial. Only few studies have included random assignment. This study compared the effects of analytic (A) and systemic group psychotherapy (S) on CSA.......Research suggests that group psychotherapy for adults with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA) is generally beneficial. Only few studies have included random assignment. This study compared the effects of analytic (A) and systemic group psychotherapy (S) on CSA....

  13. Evidence for a Detrimental Relationship Between Hypertension History, Prospective Memory, and Prefrontal Cortex White Matter in Cognitively-Normal Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Scullin, Michael K.; Gordon, Brian A.; Shelton, Jill Talley; Lee, Ji Hae; Head, Denise; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension affects many older adults and is associated with impaired neural and cognitive functioning. We investigated whether a history of hypertension was associated with impairments to prospective memory, which refers to the ability to remember to perform delayed intentions such as remembering to take medication. Thirty-two cognitively-normal older adult participants with or without a history of hypertension (self-reported) performed two laboratory prospective memory tasks, one that reli...

  14. The Educational Utilization of Elements of the History of Natural Sciences (19th Century): Highlighting the Cognitive Continuity with Antiquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniati, Helen A.

    2005-01-01

    In the current paper, the reasons why the late 19th century Greek university community of natural scientists used elements from the History of Natural sciences which refer exclusively to ancient Greek science, and the consequences of such a choice are evaluated. Emphasis will be given to the speech delivered by the Dean, Professor of Chemistry, A.…

  15. Is a history of school bullying victimization associated with adult suicidal ideation?: a South Australian population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeger, Leigh; Allison, Stephen; Korossy-Horwood, Rebecca; Eckert, Kerena A; Goldney, Robert D

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether a history of school bullying victimization is associated with suicidal ideation in adult life. A random and representative sample of 2907 South Australian adults was surveyed in Autumn, 2008. Respondents were asked "When you were at school, did you experience traumatic bullying by peers that was particularly severe, for example, being frequently targeted or routinely harassed in any way by 'bullies'?" Depression was determined by the mood module of the PRIME-MD which includes a suicidal ideation question; "In the last 2 weeks, have you had thoughts that you would be better off dead or hurting yourself in some way?" The overall prevalence of suicidal ideation in postschool age respondents was 3.4% (95% confidence interval: 2.8%-4.2%) in 2008. Bullying by peers was recalled by 18.7% (17.2%-20.3%). Respondents with a history of being bullied were approximately 3 times (odds ratio: 3.2) more likely to report suicidal ideation compared with those who did not. The association between being bullied and suicidal ideation remained after controlling for both depression and sociodemographic variables (odds ratio: 2.1). The results from the present research suggest that there is a strong association between a history of childhood bullying victimization and current suicidal ideation that persists across all ages. Bullying prevention programs in schools could hold the potential for longer lasting benefits in this important area of public health. PMID:20921863

  16. The Natural History and Treatment Outcomes of Perineural Spread of Malignancy within the Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Timothy A; Nagle, Christina M; Bowman, James; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural history of diseases enables the clinician to better diagnose and treat their patients. Perineural spread of head and neck cancers are poorly understood and often diagnosis is delayed resulting in poorer outcomes and more debilitating treatments. This article reviews a large personal series of head and neck malignancy presenting with perineural spread along almost exclusively the trigeminal and/or facial nerves. A detailed analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of cutaneous origin is presented including an analysis of likely primaries, which most often have occurred months to years prior. The importance of early detection is reinforced by the highly significant (p cranial nerve the disease has been allowed to spread. PMID:27123386

  17. Using History of Science to Teach Nature of Science to Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Khadija E.; Masters, Heidi; Akerson, Valarie L.

    2015-11-01

    Science lessons using inquiry only or history of science with inquiry were used for explicit reflective nature of science (NOS) instruction for second-, third-, and fourth-grade students randomly assigned to receive one of the treatments. Students in both groups improved in their understanding of creative NOS, tentative NOS, empirical NOS, and subjective NOS as measured using VNOS-D as pre- and post-test surveys. Social and cultural context of science was not accessible for the students. Students in second, third, and fourth grades were able to attain adequate views of empirical NOS, the role of observation and inference, creative and imaginative NOS, and subjective NOS. Students were not able to express adequate views of socially and culturally embedded NOS. Most gains in NOS eroded by the next school year, except for tentative NOS for both groups and creative NOS for the inquiry group.

  18. Infarction of omentum and epiploic appendage: Diagnosis, epidemiology and natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiploic appendagitis and segmental omentum infarction are considered to be rare conditions, which may mimic an abdominal surgical emergency. The purpose of our study was to describe clinical findings, US and CT appearance of infarction of an epiploic appendage and omentum, and to determine their epidemiological characteristics and natural history. We retrospectively studied clinical, US and CT findings at hospital admission and follow-up of all patients who were diagnosed at our institution with epiploic appendagitis or omentum infarction between June 1988 and November 1997. We found a relatively high incidence of 40 cases: 20 patients with epiploic appendagitis, 11 with omentum infarction, and 9 in whom it was not possible to discriminate between the both. All 40 patients recovered under conservative treatment without complications. We conclude that US and CT features allow a reliable diagnosis, thereby obviating unnecessary surgery. Discriminating between both conditions is of no practical relevance since treatment and prognosis are identical. (orig.)

  19. Natural history of disease in atomic bomb exposed twins in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects of this study are mainly pairs of monozygotic twins, one of whom was exposed to the atomic bomb and the other not exposed, and the natural history of the diseases of these twins was analyzed to find out genetic and environmental factors of the diseases and some biological effect of the atomic bomb exposure or other. In this study, 13 pairs of monozygotic and 5 pairs of dizygotic twins and other 34 cases of non-twins were examined by means of heart and lung X-ray films and electrocardiograms. The results suggest that most of the monozygotic twins show the similar findings of chest X-ray films, though their electrocardiograms have a tendency to deviate to the left in the QRS axis. These findings will not be enough to clear up the relation between the atomic bomb exposed and the abnormal electrocardiograms. (author)

  20. Long-term studies of the natural history of asthma in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    secondary prevention through the use of inhaled corticosteroids can effectively halt the long-term disease progression in childhood. In conclusion, the natural history of asthma and the associated airway changes is still poorly understood, and we have not managed to translate findings from long-term studies......Segmentation of children with asthma and other wheezy disorders remains the main research challenge today, as it was when described 2 centuries ago. Early childhood wheezy disorders follow different temporal trajectories, probably representing different underlying mechanisms (endophenotypes......). Prospective identification of endophenotypes allowing accurate prediction of the clinical course is currently not possible. The variability of the clinical course remains an enigma and difficult to predict. Three of 4 school-aged children with asthma have outgrown disease by midadulthood. The risk of...

  1. Online Physics Education Resources from the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert

    2006-04-01

    Through its National Center for Science Literacy, Education and Technology, the American Museum of Natural History has created a rich array of physics education resources for teachers, students and the general public. Many of these resources, which include essays, images, videos and interactive simulations, leverage ongoing research within the Division of Physical Sciences at the Museum as well as exhibitions and specimens from the Museum's collections. The online resources featured include Science Bulletins (current research and recent discoveries) , Ology (a website for children), Resources for Learning (a searchable database of curricular resources) and Seminars on Science (online teacher professional development). The genesis of these projects, their underlying strategies and their implementation will be reviewed. Sample resources will be presented, including colliding galaxies, the tracking of near-Earth asteroids, Einstein's legacy and geophysics. A CD of physics resources from the Museum will be provided to attendees.

  2. Abundance, Disposal Hypsiboas Espaciale lanciformis Natural History (Anura: Hylidae) southwest of the Venezuelan Andes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypsiboas lanciformis is a tree frog belonging to the albopunctatus group. Its distribution ranges from Bolivia, Brazil, Peru to Colombia and Venezuela. We studied the status of a population inhabiting the realms property of Complejo Uribante-Caparo, CORPOELEC, in Tachira state (southwestern Andean Venezuela), by monitoring their call and visual detection across transects, gathering information on their abundance; available space, and other natural history accounts. The abundance decreases as the dry season progresses, while individuals show an aggregate spatial arrangement. Individuals were vocalizing at the edges of secondary forest adjacent to disturbed areas. This species is sympatric with the hylids Hypsiboas pugnax and Scinax manriquei. Some individuals revealed the presence of ectoparasites and endoparasites that might be affecting the species survivalship.

  3. Associations between a History of Traumatic Brain Injuries and Current Cigarette Smoking, Substance Use, and Elevated Psychological Distress in a Population Sample of Canadian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Gabriela; Adlaf, Edward M; Mann, Robert E; Ialomiteanu, Anca; Hamilton, Hayley; Rehm, Jürgen; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-07-15

    This study describes the prevalence of reported history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its association with reports of current substance use, cigarette smoking, and psychological distress among Canadian adults in a population sample. A cross-sectional sample of 1999 Ontario adults 18-93 years of age were surveyed by telephone in 2011 as part of the Center for Addiction and Mental Health's ongoing representative survey of adult mental health and substance use in Ontario, Canada. Loss of consciousness for at least 5 min or at least one overnight hospitalization resulting from symptoms associated with the TBI injury represented minimum criteria for TBI. An estimated 16.8% (95% confidence interval, 14.8, 19.0) of adults reported a TBI in their lifetime. Men had higher prevalence of TBI than women. Adults who reported a history of TBI had higher odds of reported past-year daily smoking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.15), using cannabis (AOR = 2.80) and nonmedical opioids (AOR = 2.90), as well as screened significantly for recent elevated psychological distress (AOR = 1.97) in the past few weeks, compared to adults without a history of TBI. Co-occurrence of a history of TBI with current elevated psychological distress and substance use warrants vigilance among medical practitioners to assess the possibility of a history of TBI during reviews of the history leading to the occurrence of these conditions. PMID:25496189

  4. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Resources TSC Connect Brochures & Booklets Information Sheets Life Stages Guides & Personal Journals Perspective Magazine Archives TSC Clinics Physician Referral TSC Clinical Trials TSC Natural History Database Research Teleconference Presentations National Conference Presentations State & ...

  5. Communication strategy of the National Museum of Natural History ”Grigore Antipa”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Irina POPESCU

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the amplitude of the communication techniques in the public area in Western Countries and the spectacular development of publicity and public relations in this field, we find it interesting to analyze how and if this measure can be applied by Romanian public institutions and to Romanian public products. Thus, we discovered the sustained effort of the National Museum of Natural History “Grigore Antipa” (cultural nonprofit institution which delivers goods as public cultural products towards the entire nation’s population to promote itself and to communicate its activities to the public by using various techniques, both publicity and public relations, elaborating and creating exhibitions, conferences, festivals with interactive activities for the public, to involve him and transform him from a passive visitor of the museum into a participant at the cultural act. In 2003, the National Museum of Natural History “Grigore Antipa” from Bucharest began the implementation of an intense program of integrated marketing communication. The notion involves a strategic communication plan which uses more channels, addresses to various types of public and regards results achievement (cognitive, affective and behavior like – plan borrowed from the commercial area and applied in order to replace itself in the public’s mind, to achieve a larger exposure and to convince the public that, besides the scientific and educational role it plays, Antipa Museum offers also a relaxing way of spending free time. In this matter, I have analyzed the strategic and integrated communication plans of the museum, following each step, starting from research and to the result evaluation.

  6. Considering GH replacement for GH-deficient adults with a previous history of cancer: a conundrum for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kevin C J; Heaney, Anthony P; Popovic, Vera

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that GH and IGF-I may enhance tumorigenesis, metastasis, and cell proliferation in humans and animals. Evidence supporting this notion is derived from animal model studies, epidemiological studies, experience from patients with acromegaly, molecular therapeutic manipulation of GH and IGF-I actions, and individuals with GH receptor and congenital IGF-I deficiencies. Prior exposure to radiation therapy, aging, family history of cancer, and individual susceptibility may also contribute to increase this risk. Therefore, the use of GH replacement in patients with a history of cancer raises hypothetical safety concerns for patients, caregivers, and providers. Studies of GH therapy in GH-deficient adults with hypopituitarism and childhood cancer survivors have not convincingly demonstrated an increased cancer risk. Conversely, the risk of occurrence of a second neoplasm (SN) in childhood cancer survivors may be increased, with meningiomas being the most common tumor; however, this risk appears to decline over time. In light of these findings, if GH replacement is to be considered in patients with a previous history of cancer, we propose this consideration to be based on each individual circumstance and that such therapy should only be initiated at least 2 years after cancer remission is achieved with the understanding that in some patients (particularly those with childhood cancers), GH may potentially increase the risk of SNs. In addition, close surveillance should be undertaken working closely with the patient's oncologist. More long-term data are thus needed to determine if GH replacement in GH-deficient adults with a history of cancer is associated with the development of de novo tumors and tumor recurrence. PMID:26732039

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during Researchers Night by Natural History Museum, London

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This event is part of EU Researchers Night, when institutions in more than 200 cities across Europe reveal the exciting science research taking place behind their doors and how science research is exciting, fun and vital to our daily lives. Following the success of Science Uncovered in 2010 and 2011, the Natural History Museum, London throws open its doors once again this September. There will be hundreds of inspiring scientific activities happening throughout the Museum's iconic galleries and behind the scenes. One big part of the night is a series of Nature Live events, where visitors get the chance to meet our scientists, see the specimens they study and join in the discussion. Throughout the night these events will feature live links to other scientific institutions across the world, including to the LHC control room at CERN. This will give visitors the amazing opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the Large Hadron Collider experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. As well as to...

  8. Natural history of canine paroxysmal movement disorders in Labrador retrievers and Jack Russell terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, Mark; Garosi, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Delineation of the typical disease progression in canine paroxysmal dyskinesia (PD) may assist in evaluating therapeutic agents during clinical trials. Our objective was to establish the natural disease course in a group of dogs diagnosed with PD that received no medication. Fifty-nine dogs (36 Labradors, 23 JRTs) with clinically confirmed PD and a follow-up of ≥3 years were retrospectively reviewed. Dogs with PD had a young onset, were triggered by startle or sudden movements, and had a male bias (75%) with the majority being entire sample population. Twenty-one dogs (36%) had at least one event comprising cluster episodes. Episode duration and frequency varied dramatically, even within an individual. Median follow-up was 7 years. No concurrent disease was identified in any dog that was investigated. The natural history was self-limiting with 32% entering remission and an improvement in 75%. Episodes reduced in terms of frequency and duration in Labradors and JRTs respectively. Remission was lower in dogs with cluster episodes than those without. These findings suggest that the diagnostic yield of advanced neuroimaging techniques in dogs with video footage and historical data supporting PD, without neurological deficits, is low. The presence of cluster episodes is of predictive value for the prognosis of canine PD. Future research should be cautious in reporting treatment response for PD without first considering the spontaneous remission rate and improvements in untreated dogs documented in this study. PMID:27240912

  9. Joseph FoxのThe Natural History of the Human Teeth(1803年刊)について

    OpenAIRE

    市川, 博保

    1987-01-01

    "The Natural History of the Human Teeth," written by English surgeon, John Hunter, was first published in 1771, and is one of the most famous works in the history of dentistry. In 1803, another English surgeon, Joseph Fox, also published a book with the same title as Hunter's, but it is not as famous as the former. However, Fox's work is remembered for its description of appliances for correcting dental irregularity and his account of diseases which affect children during their first dentitio...

  10. The Effect of Student Studies in The Nature and History of Science Lesson To The Level of The Knowledge About History of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Laçin Şimşek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of students’ inquires in the Nature and History of Science lessons on the level of their understanding of history of science. Another purpose of this study was to give students a richer perspective about different cultures that have made contributions to the advancement of science. This study is an action research. The participants for this study consist of 65 pre-service science teachers at the beginning and 66 pre-service science teacher at the end. Students’ initial understanding of history of science measured through an open ended questionnaire that was prepared by the author. To arrange the questionnaire Science and Technology Lesson Curriculum that prepared by National Education Ministry was used. Students were challenged to choose a subject (civilization or scientist to research. Then, the participants presented the results of their research projects on the history of science. The open-ended questionnaire was administered after students’ presentations. The content analysis of students’ responses to the open-ended questionnaire showed that while students gave examples about history of science and scientists that they had learned from the books or media at the beginning of the study, they provided more diverse and richer examples at the conclusion of the study.

  11. História natural da hepatite crônica B Natural history of chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Ferraz da Fonseca

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Estima-se que existam 350 milhões de portadores crônicos do VHB distribuídos ao redor do mundo. Três fases de infecção crônica pelo VHB são reconhecidas: fase de imunotolerância (HBsAg e HBeAg positivos, altos títulos de HBV-DNA, ALT normal e não evidência de doença hepática ativa; fase imunoativa ou de hepatite crônica B (HBsAg e HBeAg positivos, altos títulos de HBV-DNA, ALT elevada e evidência de doença hepática ativa; fase de portador inativo do VHB ou assintomático (HBsAg no soro sem o HBeAg , títulos do HBV-DNA An estimated 350 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV. Three phases of chronic hepatitis B virus infection is are recognized: the immune tolerant phase (HBeAg-positive, high levels of serum HBV-DNA, normal ALT, and no evidence of active liver diseases, the immune clearance phase or chronic hepatitis phase (HBeAg-positive, high levels of serum HBV-DNA, elevated ALT, and active liver disease , and the inactive carrier state or asymptomatic phase (HBsAg-positive in serum without HBeAg, HBV-DNA levels than < 10(5 copies/mL, and normal ALT levels. Chronic hepatitis B is classified into 2 major forms: HBeAg-positive disease (wild-type HBV and HBeAg negative disease (pre-core/core promoter HBV variant. Both forms can lead to liver cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation and liver cancer. The purpose of this article is to review the principal aspects of natural history of chronic hepatitis B.

  12. From biomedicine to natural history research: EST resources for ambystomatid salamanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Susan V

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing genomic resources for closely related species will provide comparative insights that are crucial for understanding diversity and variability at multiple levels of biological organization. We developed ESTs for Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum and Eastern tiger salamander (A. tigrinum tigrinum, species with deep and diverse research histories. Results Approximately 40,000 quality cDNA sequences were isolated for these species from various tissues, including regenerating limb and tail. These sequences and an existing set of 16,030 cDNA sequences for A. mexicanum were processed to yield 35,413 and 20,599 high quality ESTs for A. mexicanum and A. t. tigrinum, respectively. Because the A. t. tigrinum ESTs were obtained primarily from a normalized library, an approximately equal number of contigs were obtained for each species, with 21,091 unique contigs identified overall. The 10,592 contigs that showed significant similarity to sequences from the human RefSeq database reflected a diverse array of molecular functions and biological processes, with many corresponding to genes expressed during spinal cord injury in rat and fin regeneration in zebrafish. To demonstrate the utility of these EST resources, we searched databases to identify probes for regeneration research, characterized intra- and interspecific nucleotide polymorphism, saturated a human – Ambystoma synteny group with marker loci, and extended PCR primer sets designed for A. mexicanum / A. t. tigrinum orthologues to a related tiger salamander species. Conclusions Our study highlights the value of developing resources in traditional model systems where the likelihood of information transfer to multiple, closely related taxa is high, thus simultaneously enabling both laboratory and natural history research.

  13. Regulation of naturally acquired mucosal immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy Malawian adults and children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Glennie

    Full Text Available Worldwide, invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is most common in young children. In adults, disease rates decline following intermittent colonization and the acquisition of naturally acquired immunity. We characterized mucosal and systemic pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in African children and adults who contend with intense rates of colonization, up to 100% and 60% respectively. We find most Malawian children have high pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in tonsil tissue and peripheral blood. In addition, frequent commensalism generates CD25(hi (Tregs which modulate mucosal pneumococcal-specific T-cell responses in some children and ≥50% of adults. We propose that immune regulation may prolong pneumococcal colonization and predispose vulnerable individuals to disease.

  14. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  15. Natural history of Ctenus medius Keyserling, 1891 (Araneae, Ctenidae I: observations on habitats and the development of chromatic patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALMEIDA C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Ctenus medius Keyserling, 1891 is a common species in several spots of Mata Atlântica, however there is a great lack of studies in all aspects of its natural history. This work aims to elucidate aspects of ecotope preference compared to large spiders, and to provide data on the development of chromatic patterns during its life cycle. The observations on the behavior of C. medius were done in the campus of Centro Universitário de Barra Mansa (UBM by means of observations and nocturnal collections using cap lamps. For observations on the development of chromatic patterns, spiderlings raised in laboratory, hatched from an oviposition of a female from campus of UBM, and others spiderlings collected in field were used. The field observations indicate that: C. medius seems to prefer ecotopes characterized by dense shrub vegetation or herbal undergrowth; Lycosa erythrognatha and L. nordeskioldii seems to prefer open sites; Phoneutria nigriventer seems to prefer shrub vegetation and anthropogenic ecotopes as rubbish hills; Ancylometes sp. seems to prefer ecotopes near streams. Concerning chromatic patterns, it was observed that males and females show well distinct patterns during the last two instars, allowing distinction by sex without the use of a microscope. Through chromatic patterns it was also possible to draw a distinction between C. medius and C. ornatus longer that 3 mm cephalothorax width. 69 specimens of C. medius (males and females collected in the campus of UBM did not show a striking polymorphism in chromatic pattern, but one among 7 adult females collected in National Park of Itatiaia, showed a distinct chromatic pattern.

  16. Rearing history and allostatic load in adult western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in human care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edes, Ashley N; Wolfe, Barbara A; Crews, Douglas E

    2016-03-01

    Disrupted rearing history is a psychological and physical stressor for nonhuman primates, potentially resulting in multiple behavioral and physiological changes. As a chronic, soma-wide stressor, altered rearing may be best assessed using a holistic tool such as allostatic load (AL). In humans, AL estimates outcomes of lifetime stress-induced damage. We predicted mother-reared gorillas would have lower AL than nursery-reared and wild-caught conspecifics. We estimated AL for 27 gorillas housed at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium between 1956 and 2014. AL estimates were calculated using biomarkers obtained during previous anesthetic events. Biomarkers in the high-risk quartile were counted toward a gorilla's AL. Rearing history was categorized as mother-reared, nursery-reared, and wild-caught. Using ANCOVA, rearing history and AL are significantly associated when age and sex are entered as covariates. Wild-caught gorillas have significantly higher AL than mother-reared gorillas. Neither wild-caught nor mother-reared gorillas are significantly different from nursery-reared gorillas. When examined by sex, males of all rearing histories have significantly lower AL than females. We suggest males face few stressors in human care and ill effects of rearing history do not follow. Wild-caught females have significantly higher AL than mother-reared females, but neither is significantly different from nursery-reared females. Combined with our previous work on AL in this group, wherein females had twofold higher AL than males, we suggest females in human care face more stressors than males. Disrupted rearing history may exacerbate effects of these stressors. Providing opportunities for females to choose their distance from males may help reduce their AL. Zoo Biol. 35:167-173, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26881840

  17. The natural history of local regional breast cancer recurrence: prognosis and implications for systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the natural history and long term outcome of breast cancer patients sustaining local regional failure as their first site of relapse in an effort to design a prospective study evaluating systemic therapy at the time of local regional relapse. Materials and Methods: Between January 1970 and December 1992, over 4000 patients with a diagnosis of breast cancer were treated at our facilities with mastectomy or conservative surgery with radiation therapy (CS+RT). A total of 195 patients sustained a local regional relapse, without evidence of distant metastasis, as the first site of failure and serve as the population base for this study. The 195 patients with local-regional recurrence of disease were distributed as follows: 59 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast following CS+RT within 5 years of original diagnosis (EARLYBR); 45 patients relapsed in the ipsilateral breast >5 years from original diagnosis (LATEBR); 52 patients relapsed in the chest wall following mastectomy (CWREC); and 23 patients failed in the regional lymphatics following mastectomy or CS+RT (REGREC). Patients with EARLYBR or LATEBR were generally treated with salvage mastectomy and patients with CWREC or REGREC were treated with definitive irradiation to the chest wall and/or regional nodes. Systemic therapy at the time of locoregional relapse was highly individualized, ranging from observation to tamoxifen to high dose chemotherapy with transplantation. Patient charts were reviewed with all clinical, pathologic, treatment, and outcome parameters entered onto a computerized database. Survival curves were calculated using the life table method with differences between survival curves compared by the Mantle-Haensel statistic. Survival, disease-free survival and distant metastasis rates were calculated from the date of original diagnosis, as well as from the date of local regional relapse. Local regional recurrence-free time was calculated from

  18. The type material of Mantodea (praying mantises deposited in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Svenson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The collection of Mantodea of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, includes 26 holotypes, 7 allotypes, 4 lectotypes, 23 paratypes, and 1 paralectotype. Four type specimens were designated as lectotypes within this work. Highly accurate measurement data, high resolution images of specimens and labels, verbatim label data, georeferenced coordinates, original and newly assigned database codes, and bibliographic data are presented for all primary types. Label data for all paratype specimens in the collection are provide in tabular form. The location of the USNM collection has been moved to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History as a loan under the Off-site Enhancement Program.

  19. Robust Trapdoor Tarantula Haploclastus validus Pocock, 1899: notes on taxonomy, distribution and natural history (Araneae: Theraphosidae: Thrigmopoeinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.A. Mirza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The genus Haploclastus is endemic to India and is represented by six species. One of the species H. validus Pocock, 1899 was described from Matheran and has remained poorly known in terms of its natural history and distribution. During recent surveys the species was for the first time found again since its description nearly 110 years ago. Based on the new material collected it is redescribed and data on its natural history and distribution are added. It is the first record of an Indian theraphosid spider, which closes its burrow with a trapdoor.

  20. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with IBD and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with IBD and rectal cancer treated over a 34-year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty-five patients had ulcerative colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients, and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In two of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent postoperative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median 24 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease-free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5-year rate of 86% for patients with Tis-T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in three patients (20%) receiving pelvic irradiation ± chemotherapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade 4 gastrointestinal

  1. Social Competence of Adult Chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes") with Severe Deprivation History: I. An Individual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcher-Sommersguter, Elfriede; Preuschoft, Signe; Crailsheim, Karl; Franz, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Early social deprivation in highly social mammals interferes with their varying needs for security and stimulation. Toleration of social stimulation was studied in 18 adult ex-laboratory chimpanzees, who had been deprived for 16 to 27 years, during their 1st year after resocialization into 1 of 3 social groups. For this, a model of social…

  2. Sexual and Physical Abuse History and Adult Sexual Risk Behaviors: Relationships among Women and Potential Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Berenson, Abbey

    2007-01-01

    Objective: While research has supported associations between experiencing abuse and engaging in risky sexual behaviors during adolescence, research regarding these associations among adult women is much more equivocal. In addition, few studies have attempted to identify potential pathways from abuse experiences to sexual risk behaviors. The…

  3. Family history predicts major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in young adults with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Bruun, Louise E; Mallbris, Lotus;

    2016-01-01

    history of CVD. METHODS: Between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2011, we identified 2,722,375 individuals, including 25,774 and 4504 patients with mild and severe psoriasis, through administrative registers. Incidence rate ratios were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Mean baseline age was 26......BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis may have increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular (CV) events (MACE), and a family history of CV disease (CVD) is an independent risk factor for MACE. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the risk of first-time MACE in patients with psoriasis with or without a family.......6 (SD 8.6) years. A family history of CVD was found among 16,080 (62.4%) and 3009 (66.8%) patients with mild and severe psoriasis, respectively. In patients with psoriasis and a family history of CVD, the adjusted incidence rate ratios (95% CI) of MACE were 1.28 (1.12-1.46) and 1.62 (1.14-2.30) for mild...

  4. Family history of alcohol dependence and gray matter abnormalities in non-alcoholic adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; van den Brink, Wim; Van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Buchem, Mark A.; Aleman, Andre; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Alcohol-use disorders in adolescents are associated with gray matter (GM) abnormalities suggesting neurotoxicity by alcohol. However, recently similar GM abnormalities were found in non-drinking children with a family history (FH) of alcohol dependence (AD). The question thus rises wheth

  5. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young Adult Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayman, Mathew D.; Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The 3 main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood, (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult…

  6. Telomere Length in Human Adults and High Level Natural Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Birajalaxmi Das; Divyalakshmi Saini; Seshadri, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telomere length is considered as a biomarker of aging, stress, cancer. It has been associated with many chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Although, telomere shortening due to ionizing radiation has been reported in vitro, no in vivo data is available on natural background radiation and its effect on telomere length. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present investigation is an attempt to determine the telomere length among human adults residing in high level na...

  7. Tough adults, frail babies: an analysis of stress sensitivity across early life-history stages of widely introduced marine invertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Carmen Pineda

    Full Text Available All ontogenetic stages of a life cycle are exposed to environmental conditions so that population persistence depends on the performance of both adults and offspring. Most studies analysing the influence of abiotic conditions on species performance have focussed on adults, while studies covering early life-history stages remain rare. We investigated the responses of early stages of two widely introduced ascidians, Styela plicata and Microcosmus squamiger, to different abiotic conditions. Stressors mimicked conditions in the habitats where both species can be found in their distributional ranges and responses were related to the selection potential of their populations by analysing their genetic diversity. Four developmental stages (egg fertilisation, larval development, settlement, metamorphosis were studied after exposure to high temperature (30°C, low salinities (26 and 22‰ and high copper concentrations (25, 50 and 100 µg/L. Although most stressors effectively led to failure of complete development (fertilisation through metamorphosis, fertilisation and larval development were the most sensitive stages. All the studied stressors affected the development of both species, though responses differed with stage and stressor. S. plicata was overall more resistant to copper, and some stages of M. squamiger to low salinities. No relationship was found between parental genetic composition and responses to stressors. We conclude that successful development can be prevented at several life-history stages, and therefore, it is essential to consider multiple stages when assessing species' abilities to tolerate stress. Moreover, we found that early development of these species cannot be completed under conditions prevailing where adults live. These populations must therefore recruit from elsewhere or reproduce during temporal windows of more benign conditions. Alternatively, novel strategies or behaviours that increase overall reproductive success

  8. Spinal Cord Injury Caused by Stab Wounds: Incidence, Natural History, and Relevance for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Euan J; Purcell, Mariel; Barnett, Susan C; Allan, David B

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury caused by stab wounds (SCISW) results from a partial or complete transection of the cord, and presents opportunities for interventional research. It is recognized that there is low incidence, but little is known about the natural history or the patient's suitability for long-term clinical outcome studies. This study aims to provide population-based evidence of the demographics of SCISW, and highlight the issues regarding the potential for future research. The database of the Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit (QENSIU), the sole center for treating SCI in Scotland, was reviewed between 1994 and 2013 to ascertain the incidence, demographics, functional recovery, and mortality rates for new SCISW. During this 20 year period, 35 patients with SCISW were admitted (97.1% male, mean age 30.0 years); 31.4% had a cervical injury, 60.0% had a thoracic injury, and 8.6% had a lumbar injury. All had a neurological examination, with 42.9% diagnosed as motor complete on admission and 77.1% discharged as motor incomplete. A total of 70.4% of patients with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) level of A to C on admission had an improved AIS level on discharge. Nine (25.7%) patients have died since discharge, with mean life expectancy for these patients being 9.1 years after injury (20-65 years of age). Patients had higher levels of comorbidities, substance abuse, secondary events, and poor compliance compared with the general SCI population, which may have contributed to the high mortality rate observed post-discharge. The low incidence, heterogeneous nature, spontaneous recovery rate, and problematic follow-up makes those with penetrating stab injuries of the spinal cord a challenging patient group for SCI research. PMID:26825180

  9. Long-term natural history of acquired cystic disease of the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Isao; Hayama, Satoshi; Morita, Kyoko; Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Honda, Ryumon; Satoh, Kyoko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki

    2010-08-01

    Patients with acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) were followed longitudinally over an average of 21.7 +/- 5.4 years to determine the natural history of the disease; that is, how big the kidneys become, when the kidney size reaches a plateau, and when the size regresses. Twenty-seven male and 20 female patients with chronic glomerulonephritis treated at our hospital were investigated. CT scans were performed once a year and kidney volume was measured. Two different quadratic curves with a node of 5.2 years for males and 2.5 years for females after the start of hemodialysis were fitted to log-transformed kidney volume to the duration of hemodialysis using a linear mixed model. The maximum kidney volume in male patients was obtained 21.1 years after the start of hemodialysis using this model. Peak values of kidney volume were demonstrated in 19 of 26 cases during the observation period. The median peak value (interquartile range) of bilateral kidney volumes was 274 (165-849) mL/1.73 m(2) occurring 19.1 +/- 4.5 years after the start of dialysis. In one male patient who had undergone nephrectomy due to renal cell carcinoma and in two of the remaining 26 male patients, the maximum kidney volume of 782 (residual kidney), 1151, and 1129 mL regressed to 428, 616, and 847 mL (reduction rate: 45.3, 46.5, and 25.0%) at 20.6, 25.4, and 23.1 years after the start of hemodialysis, respectively. Kidney enlargement due to ACDK reached a plateau after 21.1 years of hemodialysis in the male patients. Partial regression of severe ACDK may occur naturally after long-term hemodialysis without renal transplantation. PMID:20649762

  10. The GM1 and GM2 Gangliosidoses: Natural History and Progress toward Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Debra S; Proia, Richard L; D'Azzo, Alessandra; Tifft, Cynthia J

    2016-06-01

    The gangliosidoses are lysosomal storage disorders caused by accumulation of GM1 or GM2 gangliosides. GM1 gangliosidosis has both central nervous system and systemic findings; while, GM2 gangliosidosis is restricted primarily to the central nervous system. Both disorders have autosomal recessive modes of inheritance and a continuum of clinical presentations from a severe infantile form to a milder, chronic adult form. Both are devastating diseases without cure or specific treatment however, with the use of supportive aggressive medical management, the lifespan and quality of life has been extended for both diseases. Naturally occurring and engineered animal models that mimic the human diseases have enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of disease progression. Some models have shown significant improvement in symptoms and lifespan with enzyme replacement, substrate reduction, and anti-inflammatory treatments alone or in combination. More recently gene therapy has shown impressive results in large and small animal models. Treatment with FDA-approved glucose analogs to reduce the amount of ganglioside substrate is used as off-label treatments for some patients. Therapies also under clinical development include small molecule chaperones and gene therapy. PMID:27491214

  11. Natural history of heartburn: A 10-year population-based study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda Bjork Olafsdottir; Hallgrimur Gudjonsson; Heidur Hrund Jonsdottir; Bjarni Thjodleifsson

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the natural history and prevalence of heartburn at a 10-year interval, and to study the effect of heartburn on various symptoms and activities.METHODS: A population-based postal study was carried out. Questionnaires were mailed to the same ageand gender-stratified random sample of the Icelandic population (aged 18-75 years) in 1996 and again in 2006. Subjects were classified with heartburn if they reported heartburn in the preceding year and/or week,based on the definition of heartburn.RESULTS: Heartburn in the preceding year was reported in 42.8% (1996) and 44.2% (2006) of subjects, with a strong relationship between those who experienced heartburn in both years. Heartburn in the preceding week was diagnosed in 20.8%. There was a significant relationship between heartburn, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. Individuals with a body mass index (BMI)below or higher than normal weight were more likely to have heartburn. Heartburn caused by food or beverages was reported very often by 20.0% of subjects.CONCLUSION: Heartburn is a common and chronic condition. Subjects with a BMI below or higher than normal weight are more likely to experience heartburn.Heartburn has a great impact on daily activities, sleep and quality of life.

  12. The natural history and prognostic factors of Graves' disease in Korean children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Min Song

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children and adolescents. In this study, we investigated the natural course and the prognostic factors of Graves' disease in Korean children and adolescents. Methods : One-hundred thirteen (88 girls and 25 boys patients were included in this study. A retrospective analysis was made of all patients who were diagnosed with Graves' disease. The following parameters were recorded and analyzed: patient's sex, age at diagnosis, duration of disease, laboratory findings, symptoms and signs, and family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Results : All patients were initially treated with antithyroid drugs, either methimazole (93.8% or propylthiouracil (6.2%. Antithyroid drugs had been discontinued in 75 (66.4% of 113 patients. Of these 75 patients, 23 (20.4% relapsed after 25.5¡?#?3.7; months. Thirteen (11.5% of 23 patients, who experienced the first relapse, showed a second remission. However, 2 (1.8% of 13 patients relapsed again. Euthyroid state could not be achieved by antithyroid drugs in 1 patient, and radioactive iodine therapy was performed. The older the patient at diagnosis, the greater the likelihood of remission (P =0.034. Conclusion : Age at diagnosis seems to be a prognostic factor in Korean children and adolescents with Graves' disease, and should be taken into account in treatment plan determination.

  13. Efficient capture of natural history data reveals prey conservatism of cryptic termite predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Eric R L; Weirauch, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Stenophagy, specialization of a clade on a narrow range of taxa, has not been well studied in speciose clades of predators, principally due to the difficulty of obtaining adequate natural history data. The pantropical Salyavatinae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae; 17 genera, 107 species) contains members with enigmatic morphology and specialized behavior for feeding on termites. All Salyavatinae are suspected specialist termite predators; however, existing observations are limited to seven species. Prior analyses indicate that Salyavatinae may be paraphyletic with respect to another subfamily, Sphaeridopinae, also hypothesized to feed on termites. A molecular phylogeny of these putative termite assassins is here constructed using seven loci from 28 species in nine genera and is used in a dating analysis to shed light on the timing of Neotropical colonization by this primarily Old World clade. DNA extracted from gut contents of 50 individuals was assayed using PCR with prey-specific primers.Molecular assays, along with recent photographs and observations, provide substantial evidence that this clade feeds specifically upon termites, documenting 28 new individual associations. Our phylogeny supports a sister group relationship of the Neotropical genus Salyavata with Sphaeridopinae. Termite association data combined with our phylogeny provide evidence of previously unknown prey conservatism among clades of one of the most diverse groups of specialist termite predators. PMID:26314664

  14. The natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli in gynecologic oncology: a prospective study of 382 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three hundred eighty-two patients who underwent major operations for gynecologic malignancy were studied prospectively to determine the natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli. Iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg counting, to diagnose deep venous thrombosis, was performed daily. Sixty-three patients (17%) developed postoperative venous thromboembolic complications. Deep venous thrombosis initially arose in the calf veins in 52 patients. Twenty-seven percent of these thrombi lysed spontaneously. Four percent of thrombi in the calf veins progressed to deep venous thrombosis in the femoral vein, and 4% resulted in pulmonary emboli. Nine other patients developed proximal deep venous thrombosis without prior thrombosis in the calf veins. One patient with proximal deep venous thrombosis also had a pulmonary embolus. Two patients with no evidence of deep venous thrombosis on prospective 125I-labeled fibrinogen leg counting developed pulmonary emboli, including one fatal pulmonary embolus that was found at autopsy to have arisen from the internal iliac veins. Fifty percent of all venous thromboemboli were detected within 48 hours of operation, although two patients developed significant deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary emboli after discharge from the hospital. These results add important information to our understanding of this disease process, and raise issues related to appropriate treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients after gynecologic operations

  15. Natural history of adenocarcinoma of the lung. A computed tomography-pathologic correlative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the natural history of adenocarcinoma of the lung, we reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans for nine patients with histologically proven peripheral adenocarcinoma of the lung. The tumors on these CT images were correlated with the six histologic classifications (types A-F) reported by Noguchi et al. The findings for all adenocarcinomas on the CT images were classified into two patterns: the solid-density type (n=5) or the air-containing type (n=4). Among those the air-containing category, types A and B were revealed in one and three cases, respectively. Those in the solid-density category were all type C, except for two cases which were type D. Three of the tumors of the solid-density type appearing in the CT images, which tended to fall mainly into type C, exhibited a progression from the air-containing type to the solid-density type. We speculate that this progression observed in the CT images suggests that pulmonary small adenocarcinoma follows a pattern of development from the types A and B to the invasive type C. (author)

  16. Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy: clinicopathological features, natural history and pathomechanism(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, Takahiro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-03-01

    Collagen VI is widely distributed throughout extracellular matrices (ECMs) in various tissues. In skeletal muscle, collagen VI is particularly concentrated in and adjacent to basement membranes of myofibers. Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) is caused by mutations in either COL6A1, COL6A2 or COL6A3 gene, thereby leading to collagen VI deficiency in the ECM. It is known to occur through either recessive or dominant genetic mechanism, the latter most typically by de novo mutations. UCMD is well defined by the clinicopathological hallmarks including distal hyperlaxity, proximal joint contractures, protruding calcanei, scoliosis and respiratory insufficiency. Recent reports have depicted the robust natural history of UCMD; that is, loss of ambulation by early teenage years, rapid decline in respiratory function by 10 years of age and early-onset, rapidly progressive scoliosis. Muscle pathology is characterised by prominent interstitial fibrosis disproportionate to the relative paucity of necrotic and regenerating fibres. To date, treatment for patients is supportive for symptoms such as joint contractures, respiratory failure and scoliosis. There have been clinical trials based on the theory of mitochondrion-mediated myofiber apoptosis or impaired autophagy. Furthermore, the fact that collagen VI producing cells in skeletal muscle are interstitial mesenchymal cells can support proof of concept for stem cell-based therapy. PMID:24938411

  17. Role of antiviral therapy in the natural history of hepatitis Bvirus-related chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a dynamic state of interactions among HBV, hepatocytes, and the hostimmune system. Natural history studies of chronichepatitis B (CHB) infection have shown an associationbetween active viral replication and adverse clinicaloutcomes such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.The goal of therapy for CHB is to improve quality of lifeand survival by preventing progression of the diseaseto cirrhosis, decompensation, end-stage liver disease,hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death. This goalcan be achieved if HBV replication is suppressed ina sustained manner. The accompanying reduction inhistological activity of CHB lessens the risk of cirrhosisand of HCC, particularly in non-cirrhotic patients.However, CHB infection cannot be completely eradicated,due to the persistence of covalently closed circular DNAin the nucleus of infected hepatocytes, which may explainHBV reactivation. Moreover, the integration of the HBVgenome into the host genome may favour oncogenesis,development of HCC and may also contribute to HBVreactivation.

  18. Preventive capacity of allergen immunotherapy on the natural history of allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, C

    2013-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the practice of administering gradually increasing doses of the specific causative allergen to reduce the clinical reactivity of allergic subjects. A bulk of literature demonstrates that AIT is an effective and safe treatment to reduce allergic symptoms and the use of drugs. The preventive capacity of AIT is less investigated. The studies thus far available showed that this treatment, in both forms of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is able to prevent the development of asthma in patients with allergic rhinitis and the occurrence of new sensitizations in patients monosensitized. Such outcomes demonstrate the ability of AIT to change the natural history of respiratory allergy. Of particular importance, SCIT with Hymenoptera venom has an invaluable role in preventing potentially fatal anaphylactic reactions to the culprit sting in venom-allergic patients. Ongoing studies are aimed at evaluating the possible capacity of AIT in primary prevention of allergy. All these capabilities are related to the mechanisms of action of AIT. In fact, both SCIT and SLIT are able to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells that in turn modify the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation, to a Th1-type response. An important role is played by allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce suppressive cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. PMID:24396984

  19. Natural History of Aerosol Exposure with Marburg Virus in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Evan C.; Pratt, William D.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Shamblin, Joshua; Donnelly, Ginger; Esham, Heather; Wlazlowski, Carly; Johnson, Joshua C.; Botto, Miriam; Hensley, Lisa E.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus causes severe and often lethal viral disease in humans, and there are currently no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical countermeasures. The sporadic occurrence of Marburg outbreaks does not allow for evaluation of countermeasures in humans, so therapeutic and vaccine candidates can only be approved through the FDA animal rule—a mechanism requiring well-characterized animal models in which efficacy would be evaluated. Here, we describe a natural history study where rhesus macaques were surgically implanted with telemetry devices and central venous catheters prior to aerosol exposure with Marburg-Angola virus, enabling continuous physiologic monitoring and blood sampling without anesthesia. After a three to four day incubation period, all animals developed fever, viremia, and lymphopenia before developing tachycardia, tachypnea, elevated liver enzymes, decreased liver function, azotemia, elevated D-dimer levels and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines suggesting a systemic inflammatory response with organ failure. The final, terminal period began with the onset of sustained hypotension, dehydration progressed with signs of major organ hypoperfusion (hyperlactatemia, acute kidney injury, hypothermia), and ended with euthanasia or death. The most significant pathologic findings were marked infection of the respiratory lymphoid tissue with destruction of the tracheobronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes, and severe diffuse infection in the liver, and splenitis. PMID:27043611

  20. Additive Hazard Regression Models: An Application to the Natural History of Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhong Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several statistical methods for time-to-event analysis, among which is the Cox proportional hazards model that is most commonly used. However, when the absolute change in risk, instead of the risk ratio, is of primary interest or when the proportional hazard assumption for the Cox proportional hazards model is violated, an additive hazard regression model may be more appropriate. In this paper, we give an overview of this approach and then apply a semiparametric as well as a nonparametric additive model to a data set from a study of the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. The results from the semiparametric model indicated on average an additional 14 oncogenic HPV infections per 100 woman-years related to CD4 count < 200 relative to HIV-negative women, and those from the nonparametric additive model showed an additional 40 oncogenic HPV infections per 100 women over 5 years of followup, while the estimated hazard ratio in the Cox model was 3.82. Although the Cox model can provide a better understanding of the exposure disease association, the additive model is often more useful for public health planning and intervention.

  1. Attempts to stop or reduce daily cannabis use: An intensive natural history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R; Naud, Shelly; Budney, Alan J; Fingar, James R; Callas, Peter W

    2016-05-01

    We attempted to replicate and add to our prior study of attempts to stop or reduce cannabis use among daily cannabis users trying to change on their own, by observing a larger sample and adding further clinically relevant outcomes. Daily users (n = 193) who intended to stop or reduce sometime in the next 3 months called an Interactive Voice Response system each morning for 3 months to report on cannabis use, attempts to stop or reduce, withdrawal symptoms, and so forth, on the prior day. This study replicated our prior findings that (a) cannabis users trying to change make many, and often rapid, transitions among use as usual, reduction, and abstinence; (b) reduction attempts are more common than abstinence attempts; (c) quit and reduction attempts are short-lived and few participants achieve long-term abstinence; (d) alcohol and drug use are not greater on abstinence days; and (e) few users seek treatment. Novel findings included (f) a greater number of days of abstinence or intentional reduction predicted a greater decline in cannabis dependence, (g) most users do not prepare before their quit attempt, (h) coping outcomes during abstinence predict increased duration of abstinence, (i) tobacco use is less common on days of abstinence, and (j) withdrawal symptoms occur even with short quit attempts. Replication tests in more generalizable samples and of longer duration are indicated. Further natural history studies are likely to provide information to help improve the content of psychological treatments for cannabis use. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26828641

  2. The Natural History and Predictors for Intervention in Patients with Small Renal Mass Undergoing Active Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Bahouth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe the natural history of small renal mass on active surveillance and identify parameters that could help in predicting the need for intervention in patients with small renal masses undergoing active surveillance. We also discuss the need for renal biopsy in the management of these patients. Methods. A retrospective analysis of 78 renal masses ≤4 cm diagnosed at our Urology Department at Bnai Zion Medical Center between September 2003 and March 2012. Results. Seventy patients with 78 small renal masses were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 68 years (47–89. The mean follow-up period was 34 months (12–112. In 54 of 78 masses there was a growth of at least 2 mm between imaging on last available follow-up and diagnosis. Eight of the 54 (15% masses which grew in size underwent a nephron-sparing surgery, of which two were oncocytomas and six were renal cell carcinoma. Growth rate and mass diameter on diagnosis were significantly greater in the group of patients who underwent a surgery. Conclusions. Small renal masses might eventually be managed by active surveillance without compromising survival or surgical approach. All masses that were eventually excised underwent a nephron-sparing surgery. None of the patients developed metastases.

  3. Distribution and natural history of stress fractures in U.S. Marine recruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study of stress injuries of the lower extremities of U.S. Marine recruits, researchers derived a frequency distribution of stress fractures. The most frequently fractured bone was the tibia (73%), while the single most common site was the posterior calcaneal tuberosity (21%). The natural history of stress fractures by scintigraphy and radiography has been outlined, showing the evolutionary changes on either study as a universal progression independent of injury site or type of stress. An identical spectrum of changes should be present within any group undergoing intense new exercise. The frequency distribution of stress fractures should be a function of differing forms and intensities of exercise, therefore, our figures should not be applied to other groups. Researchers used the presence of a scintigraphic abnormality at a symptomatic site as the criterion for diagnosis of stress fracture. Since the distribution of skeletal radiotracer uptake is directly dependent on local metabolic activity, it is expected that a focal alteration in bone metabolism will result in a scintigram approaching 100% sensitivity for the abnormality (9). In the proper clinical setting, the specificity should approximate this figure; however, a focal, nonstress-related bone abnormality which has not manifested any radiographic change, such as early osteomyelitis, could result in a false-positive examination. Specificity cannot, therefore, be accurately determined without an actual determination of the pathologic changes within the bone, necessarily involving biopsy

  4. Epidemiology and natural history of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Yousef; Koenig, Aaron B; Sayiner, Mehmet; Goodman, Zachary D; Younossi, Zobair M

    2016-08-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is part of the spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that leads to progressive liver disease and presents a growing challenge to public health. Because of the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity, NAFLD and NASH have expanded to a substantial extent. In NASH patients, advanced fibrosis is the major predictor of morbidity and liver-related mortality, and an accurate diagnosis of NASH is mandatory. Although there is currently no validated test of serum biomarkers available to diagnose NASH, and histologic evaluation with a liver biopsy remains the gold standard, screening for fibrosis is recommended in patients with suspicion of NASH. Clinical prediction models and serum biomarkers for advanced fibrosis have relatively good negative predictive value and can be useful for screening. Also, transient elastography is increasingly available to estimate fibrosis in NASH. Therefore, due to the lack of a reliable and accepted non-invasive diagnostic modality, screening for NASH in the general population is not currently recommended. Better understanding of the natural history of NASH is needed to evaluate the utility and cost-effectiveness of screening. PMID:26997539

  5. Natural mortality: Its ecology, how it shapes fish life histories, and why it may be increased by fishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Holt, Rebecca E.

    2013-01-01

    A stronger focus on natural mortality may be required to better understand contemporary changes in fish life histories and behaviour and their responses to anthropogenic drivers. Firstly, natural mortality is the selection under which fish evolved in the first place, so a theoretical understanding of effects of natural mortality alone is needed. Secondly, due to trade-offs, most organismal functions can only be achieved at some cost in terms of survival. Several trade-offs might need to be analysed simultaneously with effects on natural mortality being a common currency. Thirdly, there is scattered evidence that natural mortality has been increasing, some would say dramatically, in some fished stocks, which begs explanations. Fourthly, natural mortality most often implies transfer of mass and energy from one species to another, and therefore has foodweb and ecosystem consequences. We therefore analyse a model for evolution of fish life histories and behaviour, where state-dependent energy-allocation and growth strategies are found by optimization. Natural mortality is split into five different components, each specified as the outcome of individual traits and ecological trade-offs: a fixed baseline mortality; size-dependent predation; risk-dependent growth strategy; a fixed mortality when sexually mature; and mortality increasing with reproductive investment. The analysis is repeated with and without fishing. Each component of natural mortality has consequences for optimal life history strategies. Beyond earlier models, we show i) how the two types of reproductive mortality sometimes have similar and sometimes contrasting effects on life history evolution, ii) how ecosystem properties such as food availability and predation levels have stronger effects on optimal strategies than changing other mortality components, and iii) how expected changes in risk-dependent growth strategies are highly variable depending on the type of mortality changed.

  6. Adults with genetic syndromes and cardiovascular abnormalities: Clinical history and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela E.; Basson, Craig T.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Magoulas, Pilar L.; McDermott, Deborah A.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; McPherson, Elspeth; Morris, Colleen A.; Noonan, Jacqueline; Nowak, Catherine; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Rope, Alan F.; Zackai, Elaine; Pober, Barbara R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities, especially structural congenital heart defects (CHDs), commonly occur in malformation syndromes and genetic disorders. Individuals with syndromes comprise a significant proportion of those affected with selected CHDs such as complete atrioventricular canal, interrupted arch type B, supravalvar aortic stenosis and pulmonary stenosis. As these individuals age, they contribute to the growing population of adults with special health care needs. Although most will require longterm cardiology followup, primary care providers, geneticists and other specialists should be aware of (1) the type and frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, (2) the range of clinical outcomes, and (3) guidelines for prospective management and treatment of potential complications. This article reviews fundamental genetic, cardiac, medical and reproductive issues associated with common genetic syndromes which are frequently associated with a cardiovascular abnormality. New data are also provided about the cardiac status of adults with a 22q11.2 deletion and with Down syndrome. PMID:18580689

  7. Varicella zoster virus-associated anterior uveitis in a seronegative adult without a history of chickenpox

    OpenAIRE

    Mine I; Ishikawa S; Takeuchi M

    2015-01-01

    Izumi Mine, Sho Ishikawa, Masaru TakeuchiDepartment of Ophthalmology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa City, Saitama, JapanAim: The aim of this report was to present a case of varicella zoster virus (VZV)-associated anterior uveitis, which developed in an adult who was seronegative for anti-VZV antibodies.Case presentation: A 66-year-old male patient was referred to the National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa City, Japan with iridocyclitis in his right eye. On examination, in...

  8. Abnormal Neural Responses to Emotional Stimuli but Not Go/NoGo and Stroop Tasks in Adults with a History of Childhood Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxing Wang

    Full Text Available Nocturnal enuresis (NE is a common disorder in school-aged children. Previous studies have reported that children with NE exhibit structural, functional and neurochemical abnormalities in the brain, suggesting that children with NE may have cognitive problems. Additionally, children with NE have been shown to process emotions differently from control children. In fact, most cases of NE resolve with age. However, adults who had experienced NE during childhood may still have potential cognitive or emotion problems, and this possibility has not been thoroughly investigated.In this work, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to evaluate brain functional changes in adults with a history of NE. Two groups, consisting of 21 adults with NE and 21 healthy controls, were scanned using fMRI. We did not observe a significant abnormality in activation during the Go/NoGo and Stroop tasks in adults with a history of NE compared with the control group. However, compared to healthy subjects, young adults with a history of NE mainly showed increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junctions, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex while looking at negative vs. neutral pictures.Our results demonstrate that adults with a history of childhood NE have no obvious deficit in response inhibition or cognitive control but showed abnormal neural responses to emotional stimuli.

  9. Abnormal Neural Responses to Emotional Stimuli but Not Go/NoGo and Stroop Tasks in Adults with a History of Childhood Nocturnal Enuresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Jilei; Dong, Guangheng; Zhang, Hui; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Background Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is a common disorder in school-aged children. Previous studies have reported that children with NE exhibit structural, functional and neurochemical abnormalities in the brain, suggesting that children with NE may have cognitive problems. Additionally, children with NE have been shown to process emotions differently from control children. In fact, most cases of NE resolve with age. However, adults who had experienced NE during childhood may still have potential cognitive or emotion problems, and this possibility has not been thoroughly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate brain functional changes in adults with a history of NE. Two groups, consisting of 21 adults with NE and 21 healthy controls, were scanned using fMRI. We did not observe a significant abnormality in activation during the Go/NoGo and Stroop tasks in adults with a history of NE compared with the control group. However, compared to healthy subjects, young adults with a history of NE mainly showed increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junctions, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex while looking at negative vs. neutral pictures. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that adults with a history of childhood NE have no obvious deficit in response inhibition or cognitive control but showed abnormal neural responses to emotional stimuli. PMID:26571500

  10. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building Up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forato, Thaís Cyrino de Mello; de Andrade Martins, Roberto; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2012-05-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the historiographic requirements of history of science and the pedagogical recommendations of science teaching. The research included the elaboration of a pilot course on the history of optics, with historical texts and educational activities, and its application in a high school. We used three episodes of the history of optics, addressing some epistemological points, especially criticizing the naive empirical-inductive view of science. It was possible to identify a series of obstacles in using history of science and conveying philosophical views. Their analysis resulted in devising strategies to surmount or to circumvent them. We implemented those strategies in the classroom and analyzed the data that was obtained. As a result, we substantiated several of our proposals and found that some solutions require improvement. We suggest some generalizations, which can be understood as initial parameters for guiding the use of history and philosophy of science in science teaching. We used a qualitative methodology of educational research to plan, to collect and to analyze the data, examining the interaction between students, teacher and knowledge.

  11. Zoological collectings in Albania between 2004 and 2010 by the Hungarian Natural History Museum and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murányi, D.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Albanian locality data of zoological collectings carried out by the Hungarian Natural History Museum and theHungarian Academy of Sciences during 30 tours to the Balkans between 2004 and 2010 are enumerated. The localities andmethods of collecting are enumerated in chronological order. Sites are marked on the map of Albania.

  12. [Longevity in tetralogy of Fallot. The natural history of a 63-year-old man living without surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimone, F; Mechelli, S; Riccioni, S; Del Corso, L

    1992-01-01

    We report the natural history, the clinical, radiological, echocardiographic and hemodynamic pattern of a living sixty-three year old man with tetralogy of Fallot and cyanosis since birth. We discuss the possible circulatory adaptations which allowed exceptional survival up to the seventh decade: it is the sixth case reported in the literature. PMID:1470392

  13. Mortality risk of untreated myosin-binding protein C-related hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: insight into the natural history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Nannenberg; M. Michels; I. Christiaans; D. Majoor-Krakauer; Y.M. Hoedemaekers; J.P. van Tintelen; M.P. Lombardi; F.J. ten Cate; A.F.L. Schinkel; J.G.P. Tijssen; I.M. van Langen; A.A.M. Wilde; E.J.G. Sijbrands

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the mortality of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), partly in times when the disease was not elucidated and patients were untreated. HCM is feared for the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Insight in the natural history of the disorder is needed to design prope

  14. 78 FR 21413 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Field Museum of Natural History... determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects...

  15. Integration of Field Studies and Undergraduate Research into an Interdisciplinary Course: Natural History of Tropical Carbonate Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eves, Robert L.; Davis, Larry E.; Brown, D. Gordon; Lamberts, William L.

    2007-01-01

    According to Carl Sagan (1987), "Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge." Field studies and undergraduate research provide students with the best opportunities for "thinking" about science, while at the same time acquiring a body of knowledge. Natural History of Tropical Carbonate Ecosystems is a spring semester…

  16. 77 FR 25738 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ..., institution, or Federal agency that is in possession of the Native American cultural items. The National Park... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History... cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian...

  17. 78 FR 19305 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ..., institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History... cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects, and repatriation to the Indian...

  18. From Teachers to Testers: How Parents Talk to Novice and Expert Children in a Natural History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Sasha; Crowley, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Informed by literature on childhood expertise in high-interest topics and parent-child conversation in museum settings, this study explored how children's level of dinosaur expertise influences family learning opportunities in a natural history museum. Interviews identified children with high and low dinosaur knowledge and assigned them to expert…

  19. On the Ethology of Female Homo Sapiens Sapiens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Christopher

    This study is a followup to the author's earlier study of the learning differences exhibited by museum exhibit visitors and seeks to discern the effects of the pathological cultural problems identified by other researchers in a science education setting. The setting for this followup study was the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.…

  20. From sermons in stone to studies in science: The transformation of 19th-century juvenile natural history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Jon-Paul Charles

    This dissertation seeks to explain the social, cultural, and economic factors that transformed the ways nineteenth-century American children learned about, encountered, and understood the natural world. It highlights the interests, tastes, and fears of the middle-class as key factors in the transformation of children's relationship to nature. Developments such as the quest for gentility and refinement, the evolution of religious practices and beliefs, the print revolution, the popularity of Romanticism, the marginalization of women, the rise of professionalization, the impact of industrialization, and the growth of cities all helped shape nineteenth-century children's relationship to nature. For much of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries adults had taught children to see nature as a world of wonders in which God acted out his Providential design. During the early republic, however, Americans, especially women, increasingly valued more refined and genteel interpretations of nature that invoked discrete segments of nature for their ability to cultivate morals, evidence the existence of God, and mold children's behavior. The print revolution that swept America during this period abetted this process. During the second quarter of the nineteenth century, increasing numbers of adults began to use religious publications, schoolbooks, literature, and domestic amusements to involve children with the natural world in ways that were variously religious or Romantic. As a result nature became an accepted and valued segment of middle-class life. Ironically, however, these efforts also helped separate religious from secular interpretations of nature, and changes in fashions, literary techniques, and parenting techniques allowed children more autonomy to interpret nature as they wished. In the last half of the nineteenth century, adults continued to rely on nature as a means of training up children in the ways they should go. Writers, teachers, and reformers increasingly

  1. Variation in adult life history and stress resistance across five species of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. Sharmila Bharathi; N. G. Prasad; Mallikarjun Shakarad; Amitabh Joshi

    2003-12-01

    Dry weight at eclosion, adult lifespan, lifetime fecundity, lipid and carbohydrate content at eclosion, and starvation and desiccation resistance at eclosion were assayed on a long-term laboratory population of Drosophila melanogaster, and one recently wild-caught population each of four other species of Drosophila, two from the melanogaster and two from the immigrans species group. The relationships among trait means across the five species did not conform to expectations based on correlations among these traits inferred from selection studies on D. melanogaster. In particular, the expected positive relationships between fecundity and size/lipid content, lipid content and starvation resistance, carbohydrate (glycogen) content and desiccation resistance, and the expected negative relationship between lifespan and fecundity were not observed. Most traits were strongly positively correlated between sexes across species, except for fractional lipid content and starvation resistance per microgram lipid. For most traits, there was evidence for significant sexual dimorphism but the degree of dimorphism did not vary across species except in the case of adult lifespan, starvation resistance per microgram lipid, and desiccation resistance per microgram carbohydrate. Overall, D. nasuta nasuta and D. sulfurigaster neonasuta (immigrans group) were heavier at eclosion than the melanogaster group species, and tended to have somewhat higher absolute lipid content and starvation resistance. Yet, these two immigrans group species were shorter-lived and had lower average daily fecundity than the melanogaster group species. The smallest species, D. malerkotliana (melanogaster group), had relatively high daily fecundity, intermediate lifespan and high fractional lipid content, especially in females. D. ananassae (melanogaster group) had the highest absolute and fractional carbohydrate content, but its desiccation resistance per microgram carbohydrate was the lowest among the five

  2. Telomere length in human adults and high level natural background radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birajalaxmi Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomere length is considered as a biomarker of aging, stress, cancer. It has been associated with many chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Although, telomere shortening due to ionizing radiation has been reported in vitro, no in vivo data is available on natural background radiation and its effect on telomere length. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present investigation is an attempt to determine the telomere length among human adults residing in high level natural radiation areas (HLNRA and the adjacent normal level radiation areas (NLNRA of Kerala coast in Southwest India. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 310 individuals (HLNRA: N = 233 and NLNRA: N = 77. Telomere length was determined using real time q-PCR. Both telomere (T and single copy gene (S specific primers were used to calculate the relative T/S and expressed as the relative telomere length. The telomere length was determined to be 1.22+/-0.15, 1.12+/-0.15, 1.08+/-0.08, 1.12+/-0.11, respectively, among the four dose groups (5.00 mGy per year, which did not show any dose response. The results suggested that the high level natural chronic radiation did not have significant effect on telomere length among young adult population living in HLNRA, which is indicative of better repair of telomeric ends. No significant difference in telomere length was observed between male and female individuals. In the present investigation, although the determination of telomere length was studied among the adults with an age group between 18 to 40 years (mean maternal age: 26.10+/-4.49, a negative correlation was observed with respect to age. However, inter-individual variation was (0.81-1.68 was clearly observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this preliminary investigation, we conclude that elevated level of natural background radiation has no significant effect on telomere length among the adult population residing in HLNRAs of

  3. Digitalization of the exceptional building and decorative stones collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Steinwender, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Natural History Museum Vienna (NHMV) owns one of the largest building, decorative, and ornamental stones collections in Europe. This important collection dates back to the 19th century and was initiated by curator Felix Karrer after a donation of the "Union-Baugesellschaft" (Karrer, 1892). It contains rock samples used for the construction of most of the famous buildings and monuments in Vienna and in the entire Austria and surrounding countries, as well as from other famous constructions and antique (Egyptian, Greek, Roman, etc.) monuments in the world. Decorative stones that were used for the inside parts of buildings as well as artificial materials, such as stucco, tiles, and building-materials like gravel, are also part of this collection. Unfortunately, most specimens of this collection cannot be displayed at the NHMV (i.e., only 500 specimens are visible in the display Hall I) and are therefore preserved in storage rooms, and not accessible to the public. The main objective of our project of digitalization is to share our rock collection and all treasures it contains with the large majority of interested persons, and especially to provide knowledge on these rocks for people who need this information, such as people who work in cultural, architectural, scientific, and commercial fields. So far 4,500 samples from our collection have been processed with the support of the Open Up! project (Opening up the Natural History Heritage for Europeana). Our database contains all information available on these samples (including e.g., the name of the rock, locality, historic use, heritage utilization, etc.), high-quality digital photographs (with both top and bottom sides of the samples), and scanned labels (both "old" NHMV labels and other (original) labels attached to the samples). We plan to achieve the full digitalization of our unique collection within the next two years and to develop a website to provide access to the content of our database (if adequate

  4. Natural history and clinical assessment of Taiwanese patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase deficiency, which catalyzes a step in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate. This disease has a variable age of onset and rate of progression. Methods A retrospective analysis of medical records of 24 patients with MPS IVA (11 males, 13 females; current mean age ± SD, 12.6 ± 6.6 years; age range, 1.4-29.4 years) seen at 6 medical centers in Taiwan from January 1996 through June 2013 was performed. Results Mean ages of onset of symptoms and confirmed diagnosis were 2.0 ± 1.6 and 5.7 ± 4.5 years, respectively. The most prevalent clinical manifestations were kyphosis (100%), pectus carinatum (96%), abnormal gait (93%), striking short trunk dwarfism (92%), genu valgum (92%), and valvular heart disease (91%). Eight patients (33%) experienced at least one surgical procedure with the most common being ear tube insertion (25%), adenoidectomy (17%), tonsillectomy (13%), supraglottoplasty (13%), spinal decompression (13%), and spinal fusion (13%). The most prevalent cardiac valve abnormalities were aortic stenosis (45%) and mitral regurgitation (45%). At the time of the study, 8 out of 24 patients (33%) have died at the mean age of 17.2 ± 7.7 years. Conclusions An understanding of the natural history involved in MPS IVA may allow early diagnosis of the disease. All affected Taiwanese patients experienced significant functional limitations. Adequate evaluations and timely management may improve clinical outcomes and quality of life. PMID:24513086

  5. The prevalence, incidence and natural history of primary sclerosing cholangitis in an ethnically diverse population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chin-Shang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a rare chronic cholestatic liver disease often associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Current epidemiological data are limited to studies of predominantly Caucasian populations. Our aim was to define the epidemiology of PSC in a large, ethnically diverse US population. Methods The Northern California Kaiser Permanente (KP database includes records from over 3 million people and was searched for cases of PSC between January 2000 and October 2006. All identified charts were reviewed for diagnosis confirmation, IBD co-morbidity, and major natural history endpoints. Results We identified 169 (101 males cases fulfilling PSC diagnostic criteria with a mean age at diagnosis of 44 years (range 11-81. The age-adjusted point prevalence was 4.15 per 100,000 on December 31, 2005. The age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 person-years was not significantly greater in men 0.45 (95% CI 0.33 - 0.61 than women 0.37 (95% CI 0.26 - 0.51. IBD was present in 109/169 (64.5% cases and was significantly more frequent in men than women with PSC (73.3% and 51.5%, respectively, p = 0.005. The cumulative average yearly mortality rate was 1.9%. Age and serum sodium, creatinine and bilirubin at diagnosis and albumin at last entry were identified as significant factors associated with death, liver transplant or cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The incidence and prevalence of PSC observed in a representative Northern California population are lower compared to previous studies in Caucasian populations and this might reflect differences in the incidence of PSC among various ethnic groups.

  6. Thyroid iodine content and serum thyroglobulin: cues to the natural history of destruction-induced thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-eight patients with destructive thyroiditis were followed to study the natural history of healing of thyroid gland injury. All had sequential measurements of thyroidal iodine [127I] content by fluorescent scanning (normal mean, 10.1 mg), 17 had serial serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements (normal, less than 21 ng/ml), and 13 had perchlorate discharge studies during the recovery phase. Seventeen patients had painful subacute thyroiditis (SAT), 9 had painless thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PTT), and 2 had postpartum thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PPT). Thyroidal iodine content decreased from a mean of 9.8 to a nadir of 3.8 mg in patients with SAT and from 8.5 to a nadir of 3.5 mg in patients with PTT. Mean serum Tg concentrations were highest (approximately 165 ng/ml) in both groups 1-3 months after the onset of symptoms. Abnormalities in both 127I content and Tg levels persisted for 2 or more yr in some individuals. No patient had detectable Tg antibodies by hemagglutination, but low titers were detected intermittently by sensitive RIA in 5 PTT patients. Microsomal antibodies were positive in only 1 of 16 SAT patients, but in 4 of 7 PTT patients and in both PPT patients. Three patients had positive perchlorate discharge tests (2 of 8 with SAT, 0 of 4 with PTT, and 1 of 1 with PPT). Permanent hypothyroidism occurred in 3 patients (2 with PTT; 1 with SAT and positive antibodies), but did not correlate with perchlorate results. HLA typing and serum immunoglobulin measurements were not useful for predicting the clinical course. These data indicate that several years may be necessary for complete resolution of destructive thyroiditis; many patients have evidence of thyroid injury persisting long after serum thyroid hormone and TSH levels become normal

  7. Incidental pancreatic cysts: natural history and diagnostic accuracy of a limited serial pancreatic cyst MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Escal, Laure; Guiu, Boris [Saint Eloi University Hospital, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Reinhold, Caroline; Chong, Jaron [McGill University, Department of Abdominal Imaging, MUHC, Montreal (Canada); Mercier, Gregoire; Molinari, Nicolas [CHU Montpellier, Department of Biostatistics, Montpellier (France); Fabre, Jean Michel [CHU Montpellier, Department of Surgery, Saint Eloi University Hospital, Montpellier (France)

    2014-05-15

    To examine the natural history of incidentally detected pancreatic cysts and whether a simplified MRI protocol without gadolinium is adequate for lesion follow-up. Over a 10-year period, 301-patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts underwent follow-up (45 months ± 30). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol included axial, coronal T2-weighted images, MR cholangiopancreatographic and fat suppressed T1-weighted sequences before and after gadolinium. Three radiologists independently reviewed the initial MRI, the follow-up studies using first only unenhanced images, then secondly gadolinium-enhanced-sequences. Lesion changes during follow-up were recorded and the added value of gadolinium-enhanced sequences was determined by classifying the lesions into risk categories. Three hundred and one patients (1,174 cysts) constituted the study population. Only 35/301 patients (12 %) showed significant lesion change on follow-up. Using multivariate analysis the only independent factor of lesion growth (OR = 2.4; 95 % CI, 1.7-3.3; P < 0.001) and mural nodule development (OR = 1.9; 95 % CI, 1.1-3.4, P = 0.03) during follow-up was initial lesion size. No patient with a lesion initial size less than 2 cm developed cancer during follow-up. Intra-observer agreement with and without gadolinium enhancement ranged from 0.86 to 0.97. After consensus review of discordant cases, gadolinium-enhanced sequences demonstrated no added value. Most incidental pancreatic cystic lesions did not demonstrate change during follow-up. The addition of gadolinium-enhanced-sequences had no added-value for risk assignment on serial follow-up. (orig.)

  8. Pathophysiology and Natural History of Anorectal Sequelae Following Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize the prevalence, pathophysiology, and natural history of chronic radiation proctitis 5 years following radiation therapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Studies were performed in 34 patients (median age 68 years; range 54-79) previously randomly assigned to either 64 Gy in 32 fractions over 6.4 weeks or 55 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks RT schedule using 2- and later 3-dimensional treatment technique for localized prostate carcinoma. Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (Modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic scales including effect on activities of daily living [ADLs]); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before RT, at 1 month, and annually for 5 years after its completion. Results: Total GI symptom scores increased after RT and remained above baseline levels at 5 years and were associated with reductions in (1) basal anal pressures, (2) responses to squeeze and increased intra-abdominal pressure, (3) rectal compliance and (4) rectal volumes of sensory perception. Anal sphincter morphology was unchanged. At 5 years, 44% and 21% of patients reported urgency of defecation and rectal bleeding, respectively, and 48% impairment of ADLs. GI symptom scores and parameters of anorectal function and anal sphincter morphology did not differ between the 2 RT schedules or treatment techniques. Conclusions: Five years after RT for prostate carcinoma, anorectal symptoms continue to have a significant impact on ADLs of almost 50% of patients. These symptoms are associated with anorectal dysfunction independent of the RT schedules or treatment techniques reported here.

  9. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. I. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF EIGHTEEN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also 'fossil' bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D 100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid 'self-quenching' of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the Hα emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the Hα emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the Hα emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy.

  10. Incidental pancreatic cysts: natural history and diagnostic accuracy of a limited serial pancreatic cyst MRI protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the natural history of incidentally detected pancreatic cysts and whether a simplified MRI protocol without gadolinium is adequate for lesion follow-up. Over a 10-year period, 301-patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts underwent follow-up (45 months ± 30). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol included axial, coronal T2-weighted images, MR cholangiopancreatographic and fat suppressed T1-weighted sequences before and after gadolinium. Three radiologists independently reviewed the initial MRI, the follow-up studies using first only unenhanced images, then secondly gadolinium-enhanced-sequences. Lesion changes during follow-up were recorded and the added value of gadolinium-enhanced sequences was determined by classifying the lesions into risk categories. Three hundred and one patients (1,174 cysts) constituted the study population. Only 35/301 patients (12 %) showed significant lesion change on follow-up. Using multivariate analysis the only independent factor of lesion growth (OR = 2.4; 95 % CI, 1.7-3.3; P < 0.001) and mural nodule development (OR = 1.9; 95 % CI, 1.1-3.4, P = 0.03) during follow-up was initial lesion size. No patient with a lesion initial size less than 2 cm developed cancer during follow-up. Intra-observer agreement with and without gadolinium enhancement ranged from 0.86 to 0.97. After consensus review of discordant cases, gadolinium-enhanced sequences demonstrated no added value. Most incidental pancreatic cystic lesions did not demonstrate change during follow-up. The addition of gadolinium-enhanced-sequences had no added-value for risk assignment on serial follow-up. (orig.)

  11. A DNA 'barcode blitz': rapid digitization and sequencing of a natural history collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D N Hebert

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding protocols require the linkage of each sequence record to a voucher specimen that has, whenever possible, been authoritatively identified. Natural history collections would seem an ideal resource for barcode library construction, but they have never seen large-scale analysis because of concerns linked to DNA degradation. The present study examines the strength of this barrier, carrying out a comprehensive analysis of moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera species in the Australian National Insect Collection. Protocols were developed that enabled tissue samples, specimen data, and images to be assembled rapidly. Using these methods, a five-person team processed 41,650 specimens representing 12,699 species in 14 weeks. Subsequent molecular analysis took about six months, reflecting the need for multiple rounds of PCR as sequence recovery was impacted by age, body size, and collection protocols. Despite these variables and the fact that specimens averaged 30.4 years old, barcode records were obtained from 86% of the species. In fact, one or more barcode compliant sequences (>487 bp were recovered from virtually all species represented by five or more individuals, even when the youngest was 50 years old. By assembling specimen images, distributional data, and DNA barcode sequences on a web-accessible informatics platform, this study has greatly advanced accessibility to information on thousands of species. Moreover, much of the specimen data became publically accessible within days of its acquisition, while most sequence results saw release within three months. As such, this study reveals the speed with which DNA barcode workflows can mobilize biodiversity data, often providing the first web-accessible information for a species. These results further suggest that existing collections can enable the rapid development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for the most diverse compartment of terrestrial biodiversity - insects.

  12. A DNA ‘Barcode Blitz’: Rapid Digitization and Sequencing of a Natural History Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul D. N.; deWaard, Jeremy R.; Zakharov, Evgeny V.; Prosser, Sean W. J.; Sones, Jayme E.; McKeown, Jaclyn T. A.; Mantle, Beth; La Salle, John

    2013-01-01

    DNA barcoding protocols require the linkage of each sequence record to a voucher specimen that has, whenever possible, been authoritatively identified. Natural history collections would seem an ideal resource for barcode library construction, but they have never seen large-scale analysis because of concerns linked to DNA degradation. The present study examines the strength of this barrier, carrying out a comprehensive analysis of moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) species in the Australian National Insect Collection. Protocols were developed that enabled tissue samples, specimen data, and images to be assembled rapidly. Using these methods, a five-person team processed 41,650 specimens representing 12,699 species in 14 weeks. Subsequent molecular analysis took about six months, reflecting the need for multiple rounds of PCR as sequence recovery was impacted by age, body size, and collection protocols. Despite these variables and the fact that specimens averaged 30.4 years old, barcode records were obtained from 86% of the species. In fact, one or more barcode compliant sequences (>487 bp) were recovered from virtually all species represented by five or more individuals, even when the youngest was 50 years old. By assembling specimen images, distributional data, and DNA barcode sequences on a web-accessible informatics platform, this study has greatly advanced accessibility to information on thousands of species. Moreover, much of the specimen data became publically accessible within days of its acquisition, while most sequence results saw release within three months. As such, this study reveals the speed with which DNA barcode workflows can mobilize biodiversity data, often providing the first web-accessible information for a species. These results further suggest that existing collections can enable the rapid development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for the most diverse compartment of terrestrial biodiversity – insects. PMID:23874660

  13. Case history of natural analogue research on sandstone type uranium occurrences, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous fundamental studies on the ore genesis of uranium occurrences chiefly in Cenozoic sandstone formations in Japan, have been re-examined as the case history on natural analogue of radionuclides in high-level radioactive wastes (HLRW). Two principal mode of occurrences have been distinguished among Cenozoic uranium localities in Japan. In the Setouchi (Inland Sea) subregion, hot-spots are found in lacustrine to shallow sea facies of calm environment, corresponding to the first stage of formation of tectonic basins. As observed in Ningyo-toge and Tono area, stratabound ore bodies are generally arranged into paleo-channels. Another type of sporadic uranium indications are found within collapse basins in the 'Green-tuff' subregion, where intense volcanisms and block movements had been taken places throughout Middle miocene age. Well-developed fractures were to be favorable paths for uraniferous groundwater, as well as the suitable site for deposition of uranium. In both cases, the source material of uranium is granitic basement. Under oxidizing environment, uranium anomalies have been occasionally detected in surface- or fracture waters which passing through decomposed granite. In contrast to the behavior of uranium, one of the adequate analogues for mobile nuclides, thorium and REE are relatively immobile even under the same geologic and geochemical circumstances. In ore horizon, where reducing condition has still been kept, geochronological age of tetravalent uranium mineral is in concordance with the age of the host rock. Analysis of structural control shows that the principal factors for uranium concentration are the layout of redox front related to paleo-water tables. 234U/238U disequilibrium method has been proved to be the powerful tool for detecting mobility of uranium in the host rock throughout diagenesis and weathering process. The result of field and laboratory works on this is reported as an example. (author)

  14. Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis infection in New Zealand white rabbits: natural history and intravenous levofloxacin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Steven B; Hatkin, Joshua M; Dyer, David N; Orr, Steven A; Pitt, M Louise M

    2010-12-01

    The natural history for inhalational Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) exposure in New Zealand white rabbits was investigated to better identify potential, early biomarkers of anthrax. Twelve SPF Bordetella-free rabbits were exposed to 150 LD(50) aerosolized B. anthracis spores, and clinical signs, body temperature, complete blood count, bacteremia, and presence of protective antigen in the blood (that is, antigenemia) were examined. The development of antigenemia and bacteremia coincided and preceded both pyrexia and inversion of the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of infection. Antigenemia was determined within 1 h by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, compared with the 24-h traditional culture needed for bacteremia determination. Rabbits appeared clinically normal until shortly before succumbing to anthrax approximately 47 h after challenge or approximately 22 h after antigenemia, which suggests a relatively narrow therapeutic window of opportunity. To evaluate the therapeutic rabbit model, B. anthracis-exposed rabbits were treated (after determination of antigenemia and later confirmed to be bacteremic) intravenously with the fluoroquinolone antibiotic levofloxacin for 5 d at a total daily dose of 25 or 12.5 mg/kg, resulting in nearly 90% and 70% survival, respectively, to the study end (28 d after challenge). The peak level for 12.5 mg/kg was equivalent to that observed for a 500-mg daily levofloxacin dose in humans. These results suggest that intravenous levofloxacin is an effective therapeutic against inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our findings indicate that antigenemia is a viable and early biomarker for B. anthracis infection that can be used as a treatment trigger to allow for timely intervention against this highly pathogenic disease. PMID:21262133

  15. Teaching Evolution & the Nature of Science via the History of Debates about the Levels at Which Natural Selection Operates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Students should not graduate from high school without understanding that scientific debates are essential components of scientific methodology. This article presents a brief history of ongoing debates regarding the hypothesis that group selection is an evolutionary mechanism, and it serves as an example of the role that debates play in correcting…

  16. Promoting Preservice Chemistry Teachers' Understanding about the Nature of Science through History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Chung-Chih

    2002-01-01

    Documents the benefits of teaching chemistry through history. The experimental group consisted of seniors enrolled in a teacher preparation program in which they learned how to teach chemistry through the history of science. The results of the analysis of covariance revealed that the experimental group outperformed the control group on an…

  17. INFLUENCE OF A POSITIVE FAMILY HISTORY AND ASSOCIATED ALLERGIC DISEASES ON THE NATURAL COURSE OF ASTHMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROORDA, RJ; GERRITSEN, J; VANAALDEREN, WMC; KNOL, K

    1992-01-01

    The outcome of childhood asthma was studied in a cohort of 406 asthmatic children, with emphasis on the influence of family history for allergic disease, as well as the influence of associated allergic diseases on prognosis. Sixty-two per cent had a positive family history for atopy. In young adulth

  18. Individual and parental psychiatric history and risk for suicide among adolescents and young adults in Denmark : A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Kirstina; Qin, Ping

    2008-01-01

    case-control study was undertaken using data from Danish population registers to include 4,142 suicide cases and 82,840 matched controls aged 9-35 years. Data were analyzed with conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: A history of hospitalized psychiatric illness was a strong risk factor for suicide......BACKGROUND: Both individual and familial histories of mental illness are substantial risk factors for suicide in young people. AIM: To explore suicide risk among adolescents and young adults according to detailed aspects of individual and parental psychiatric admission history. METHODS: A nested...... in adolescents and young adults, and the effect of such a history was greater in females than males. The elevated risk peaked in the two periods immediately after admission and discharge for both sexes, and exceeded in females who had multiple admissions and in males who were diagnosed with schizophrenia...

  19. Varicella zoster virus-associated anterior uveitis in a seronegative adult without a history of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine I

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Izumi Mine, Sho Ishikawa, Masaru TakeuchiDepartment of Ophthalmology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa City, Saitama, JapanAim: The aim of this report was to present a case of varicella zoster virus (VZV-associated anterior uveitis, which developed in an adult who was seronegative for anti-VZV antibodies.Case presentation: A 66-year-old male patient was referred to the National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa City, Japan with iridocyclitis in his right eye. On examination, intraocular pressure was 30 mmHg in the right eye, and biomicroscopy revealed ciliary injection, corneal epithelial edema, mutton fat keratic precipitates, flare, and infiltrating cells in the anterior chamber. Serological tests were negative for anti-VZV antibodies, but VZV-DNA copies of 1.28×107 copies/mL were detected by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using the aqueous humor obtained from the right eye. Iridocyclitis was reduced by administration of oral valaciclovir in addition to corticosteroid eye drops, and serum anti-VZV antibodies were first detected after 4 months’ administration. When ocular inflammation was resolved after 6 months, VZV-DNA could not be detected in the aqueous humor any more.Conclusion: VZV-associated uveitis may develop in an adult with undetectable serum anti-VZV antibodies. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous humor is the key investigation necessary for the diagnosis in such cases.Keywords: varicella zoster virus, VZV, zoster sine herpete, multiplex polymerase chain reaction, uveitic glaucoma

  20. Anti-dentine Salivary SIgA in young adults with a history of dental trauma in deciduous teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Fleury SEIXAS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-dentin autoantibodies are associated with inflammatory root resorption in permanent teeth and are modulated by dental trauma and orthodontic force. However, it is not known whether deciduous tooth trauma can stimulate the development of a humoral immune response against dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of salivary SIgA reactivity against human dentin extract in young adults with a history of trauma in the primary dentition. A sample of 78 patients, aged 18 to 25, who had completed an early childhood (0 to 5 years old caries prevention program years earlier at the Universidade Estadual de LondrinaPediatric Clinic, underwent radiographic examination and salivary sampling. Anti-dentin SIgA levels were analyzed by immunoenzymatic assay and Western blotting. Although dental trauma to deciduous teeth had occurred in 34 (43.6% of the patients, no differences in SIgA levels were detected between individuals who had experienced trauma and those who had not (p > 0.05. Multivariate regression analysis showed no association between dental trauma and SIgA levels (p > 0.05. Patients with a history of deciduous trauma presented low levels of anti-dentin antibodies, associated with orthodontic root resorption (p

  1. Low FEV1, smoking history, and obesity are factors associated with oxygen saturation decrease in an adult population cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vold ML

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monica Linea Vold,1,3 Ulf Aasebø,1,2 Hasse Melbye3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 2Department of Clinical Medicine, 3Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway Background: Worsening of pulmonary diseases is associated with a decrease in oxygen saturation (SpO2. Such a decrease in SpO2 and associated factors has not been previously evaluated in a general adult population. Aim: We sought to describe SpO2 in a sample of adults, at baseline and after 6.3 years, to determine whether factors predicting low SpO2 in a cross-sectional study were also associated with a decrease in SpO2 in this cohort. Methods: As part of the Tromsø Study, 2,822 participants were examined with pulse oximetry in Tromsø 5 (2001/2002 and Tromsø 6 (2007/2008. Low SpO2 by pulse oximetry was defined as an SpO2 ≤95%, and SpO2 decrease was defined as a ≥2% decrease from baseline to below 96%. Results: A total of 139 (4.9% subjects had a decrease in SpO2. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 <50% of the predicted value and current smoking with a history of ≥10 pack-years were the baseline characteristics most strongly associated with an SpO2 decrease in multivariable logistic regression (odds ratio 3.55 [95% confidence interval (CI 1.60–7.89] and 2.48 [95% CI 1.48–4.15], respectively. Male sex, age, former smoking with a history of ≥10 pack-years, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2, and C-reactive protein ≥5 mg/L were also significantly associated with an SpO2 decrease. A significant decrease in FEV1 and a new diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during the observation period most strongly predicted a fall in SpO2. A lower SpO2 decrease was observed in those who quit smoking and those who lost weight, but these tendencies were not statistically significant. Conclusion: A decrease in SpO2 was most strongly associated with severe airflow limitation and a history of

  2. Using the history of research on sickle-cell anemia to affect preservice teachers' conceptions of the nature of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Eric M.

    Preservice elementary teachers enrolled in an elective biology course participated in an eight-class unit of instruction based on the history of research in understanding the disease sickle-cell anemia. Students were introduced to the disease as a "mystery" for them to solve, and subsequently developed an understanding of the disease from several disciplines in biology (e.g., genetics, ecology, evolution, molecular biology). The unit involved open-ended problems in which students examined evidence and developed explanations in a manner analogous to the reasoning used by Anthony C. Allison and his colleagues during the early to middle part of the twentieth century. Throughout the unit, students were challenged to explicitly and reflectively connect their work with the historical material to more general conclusions about aspects of the nature of science. These aspects included (a) the nature of scientific theories, (b) the tentative nature of science, (c) the difference between scientific theories and laws, (d) the validity of observational methods in science, and (e) the subjective (theory-laden) nature of science. The research measured students' pre- and post-instruction views by using both an open-ended survey (VNOS) and follow-up, semi-structured interviews. The results indicated that an appreciable number of students underwent a change or enrichment in their views for some of the nature of science aspects. Moreover, change or enrichment in students' views was directly attributable to their work in the sickle-cell unit as evidenced from the specific examples students articulated in their post-instruction responses in support of their more informed views. In general, the findings of this research lend empirical support to the value of having students actively recapitulate the history of science to improve their nature of science conceptions. This is facilitated when the lessons challenge students to explicitly and reflectively develop views of the nature of

  3. On the “Duel” Nature of History: Revisiting Contingency versus Determinism

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Brian Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Are we “historical accidents” of an undirected evolutionary history? In his recent book, Islands in the Cosmos, Dale Russell addresses this question, and Brian Swartz reviews his synthesis of this “cosmic” evolutionary debate.

  4. A Natural History of Dune and Beach Ridge Vegetation Along the Southeastern United States Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The underlying question of the proposed research is this: Given different geomorphological histories of coastal landforms eolian versus marine origins, can a biotic...

  5. On the “Duel” Nature of History: Revisiting Contingency versus Determinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Andrew Swartz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Are we “historical accidents” of an undirected evolutionary history? In his recent book, Islands in the Cosmos, Dale Russell addresses this question, and Brian Swartz reviews his synthesis of this “cosmic” evolutionary debate.

  6. Molecular ecology and natural history of simian foamy virus infection in wild-living chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying microbial pathogens with zoonotic potential in wild-living primates can be important to human health, as evidenced by human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2 and Ebola virus. Simian foamy viruses (SFVs are ancient retroviruses that infect Old and New World monkeys and apes. Although not known to cause disease, these viruses are of public health interest because they have the potential to infect humans and thus provide a more general indication of zoonotic exposure risks. Surprisingly, no information exists concerning the prevalence, geographic distribution, and genetic diversity of SFVs in wild-living monkeys and apes. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of SFVcpz infection in free-ranging chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes using newly developed, fecal-based assays. Chimpanzee fecal samples (n = 724 were collected at 25 field sites throughout equatorial Africa and tested for SFVcpz-specific antibodies (n = 706 or viral nucleic acids (n = 392. SFVcpz infection was documented at all field sites, with prevalence rates ranging from 44% to 100%. In two habituated communities, adult chimpanzees had significantly higher SFVcpz infection rates than infants and juveniles, indicating predominantly horizontal rather than vertical transmission routes. Some chimpanzees were co-infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz; however, there was no evidence that SFVcpz and SIVcpz were epidemiologically linked. SFVcpz nucleic acids were recovered from 177 fecal samples, all of which contained SFVcpz RNA and not DNA. Phylogenetic analysis of partial gag (616 bp, pol-RT (717 bp, and pol-IN (425 bp sequences identified a diverse group of viruses, which could be subdivided into four distinct SFVcpz lineages according to their chimpanzee subspecies of origin. Within these lineages, there was evidence of frequent superinfection and viral recombination. One chimpanzee was infected by a foamy virus from a Cercopithecus monkey

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF-21 in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Natural History and Metabolic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena González

    Full Text Available Human fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF-21 is an endocrine liver hormone that stimulates adipocyte glucose uptake independently of insulin, suppresses hepatic glucose production and is involved in the regulation of body fat. Peritoneal dialysis (PD patients suffer potential interference with FGF-21 status with as yet unknown repercussions.The aim of this study was to define the natural history of FGF-21 in PD patients, to analyze its relationship with glucose homeostasis parameters and to study the influence of residual renal function and peritoneal functional parameters on FGF-21 levels and their variation over time.We studied 48 patients with uremia undergoing PD. Plasma samples were routinely obtained from each patient at baseline and at 1, 2 and 3 years after starting PD therapy.Plasma FGF-21 levels substantially increased over the first year and were maintained at high levels during the remainder of the study period (253 pg/ml (59; 685 at baseline; 582 pg/ml (60.5-949 at first year and 647 pg/ml (120.5-1116.6 at third year (p<0.01. We found a positive correlation between time on dialysis and FGF-21 levels (p<0.001, and also, those patients with residual renal function (RRF had significantly lower levels of FGF-21 than those without RRF (ρ -0.484, p<0.05. Lastly, there was also a significant association between FGF-21 levels and peritoneal protein losses (PPL, independent of the time on dialysis (ρ 0.410, p<0.05.Our study shows that FGF-21 plasma levels in incident PD patients significantly increase during the first 3 years. This increment is dependent on or is associated with RRF and PPL (higher levels in patients with lower RRF and higher PPL. FGF-21 might be an important endocrine agent in PD patients and could act as hormonal signaling to maintain glucose homeostasis and prevent potential insulin resistance. These preliminary results suggest that FGF-21 might play a protective role as against the development of insulin resistance over

  8. The Natural History of Flare-Ups in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP): A Comprehensive Global Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignolo, Robert J; Bedford-Gay, Christopher; Liljesthröm, Moira; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Shore, Eileen M; Rocke, David M; Kaplan, Frederick S

    2016-03-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) leads to disabling heterotopic ossification (HO) from episodic flare-ups. However, the natural history of FOP flare-ups is poorly understood. A 78-question survey on FOP flare-ups, translated into 15 languages, was sent to 685 classically-affected patients in 45 countries (six continents). Five hundred patients or knowledgeable informants responded (73%; 44% males, 56% females; ages: 1 to 71 years; median: 23 years). The most common presenting symptoms of flare-ups were swelling (93%), pain (86%), or decreased mobility (79%). Seventy-one percent experienced a flare-up within the preceding 12 months (52% spontaneous; 48% trauma-related). Twenty-five percent of those who had received an intramuscular injection reported an immediate flare-up at the injection site, 84% of whom developed HO. Axial flare-ups most frequently involved the back (41.6%), neck (26.4%), or jaw (19.4%). Flare-ups occurred more frequently in the upper limbs before 8 years of age, but more frequently in the lower limbs thereafter. Appendicular flare-ups occurred more frequently at proximal than at distal sites without preferential sidedness. Seventy percent of patients reported functional loss from a flare-up. Thirty-two percent reported complete resolution of at least one flare-up and 12% without any functional loss (mostly in the head or back). The most disabling flare-ups occurred at the shoulders or hips. Surprisingly, 47% reported progression of FOP without obvious flare-ups. Worldwide, 198 treatments were reported; anti-inflammatory agents were most common. Seventy-five percent used short-term glucocorticoids as a treatment for flare-ups at appendicular sites. Fifty-five percent reported that glucocorticoids improved symptoms occasionally whereas 31% reported that they always did. Only 12% reported complete resolution of a flare-up with glucocorticoids. Forty-three percent reported rebound symptoms within 1 to 7 days after completing a course of

  9. The inextricable axis of targeted diagnostic imaging and therapy: An immunological natural history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Frederick O; Abbruzzese, Bonnie; Sanders, James; Metz, Wendy; Sturms, Kristyn; Ralph, David; Blue, Michael; Zhang, Jane; Bracci, Paige; Bshara, Wiam; Behr, Spencer; Maurer, Toby; Williams, Kenneth; Walker, Joshua; Beverly, Allison; Blay, Brooke; Damughatla, Anirudh; Larsen, Mark; Mountain, Courtney; Neylon, Erin; Parcel, Kaeli; Raghuraman, Kapil; Ricks, Kevin; Rose, Lucas; Sivakumar, Akhilesh; Streck, Nicholas; Wang, Bryan; Wasco, Christopher; Williams, Amifred; McGrath, Michael

    2016-03-01

    approaches. Beyond the elements of imaging applications of these agents is their evolution to therapeutic agents as well, and even in the neo-logical realm of theranostics. Characteristics of agents such as tilmanocept that exploit the natural history of diseases with remarkably high specificity are the expectations for the future of patient- and disease-centered diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26924502

  10. Portal hypertensive gastropathy: A systematic review of thepathophysiology, clinical presentation, natural history andtherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the pathophysiology, clinical presentation,natural history, and therapy of portal hypertensivegastropathy (PHG) based on a systematic literaturereview.METHODS: Computerized search of the literature wasperformed via PubMed using the following medicalsubject headings or keywords: "portal" and "gastropathy";or "portal" and "hypertensive"; or "congestive"and "gastropathy"; or "congestive" and "gastroenteropathy".The following criteria were applied for studyinclusion: Publication in peer-reviewed journals, andpublication since 1980. Articles were independentlyevaluated by each author and selected for inclusionby consensus after discussion based on the followingcriteria: Well-designed, prospective trials; recent studies;large study populations; and study emphasis on PHG.RESULTS: PHG is diagnosed by characteristic endoscopicfindings of small polygonal areas of variableerythema surrounded by a pale, reticular border in amosaic pattern in the gastric fundus/body in a patientwith cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Histologicfindings include capillary and venule dilatation,congestion, and tortuosity, without vascular fibrinthrombi or inflammatory cells in gastric submucosa.PHG is differentiated from gastric antral vascular ectasiaby a different endoscopic appearance. The etiology ofPHG is inadequately understood. Portal hypertensionis necessary but insufficient to develop PHG becausemany patients have portal hypertension without PHG.PHG increases in frequency with more severe portalhypertension, advanced liver disease, longer liver diseaseduration, presence of esophageal varices, and endoscopicvariceal obliteration. PHG pathogenesis is related to ahyperdynamic circulation, induced by portal hypertension,characterized by increased intrahepatic resistance toflow, increased splanchnic flow, increased total gastricflow, and most likely decreased gastric mucosal flow.Gastric mucosa in PHG shows increased

  11. The Feasibility of Using Low-oxygen Atmospheres to Control Insect Pests for Taxidermies in Natural History Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To find the environmental friendly alternative methods for control taxidermy pests in natural history museum, six species insect pests at various stages of their development were exposed to a low-oxygen atmosphere of 1.5% for a period of one week. Apart from a 50% survival rate for the larval stage of Anthrenus verbasci, the modified atmosphere was observed to have a lethal effect on all insect stages tested. When the exposure period was extended to periods of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks, respectively 100% mortality was recorded for all insects tested. Evidence from this investigation supports the view that atmospheres reduced in oxygen may represent a viable alternative to chemical control methods. The feasibility of using this technique for the routine control and eradication of insect pests in natural history museums is discussed.

  12. Online and Blended Climate Change Courses for Secondary School Educators from the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R. V.; Contino, J.; Kinzler, R. J.; Mathez, E. A.; Randle, D. E.; Schmidt, G. A.; Shindell, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) has created both online and blended climate change education courses directed toward secondary school educators. The online course carries graduate credit and is authored by leading scientists at AMNH and at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. It focuses on weather and climate; sources of climate change; the response of the climate system to input; modeling, theory and observation; what we can learn from past climates; and potential consequences, risks and uncertainties. The blended course includes an abbreviated version of the online course along with additional activities, many suitable for classroom use. Both the online and blended course experiences will be reviewed, including the use of an educational version of NASA's Global Climate Model. Attendees will be provided with a DVD of Climate Change videos and data visualizations from the American Museum of Natural History.

  13. A multicentre case control study on complicated coeliac disease: two different patterns of natural history, two different prognoses.

    OpenAIRE

    Biagi, F; Marchese. A; F. Ferretti; Ciccocioppo, R; Schiepatti, A; Volta, U; Caio, G; Ciacci, C.; Zingone, F.; D'Odorico, A; Carroccio, A; Ambrosiano, G; P. Mansueto; Gasbarrini, A; Piscaglia, AC

    2014-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease is a common enteropathy characterized by an increased mortality mainly due to its complications. The natural history of complicated coeliac disease is characterised by two different types of course: patients with a new diagnosis of coeliac disease that do not improve despite a strict gluten-free diet (type A cases) and previously diagnosed coeliac patients that initially improved on a gluten-free diet but then relapsed despite a strict diet (type B cases). Our aim w...

  14. The Natural History of Trachoma Infection and Disease in a Gambian Cohort with Frequent Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Grassly, NC; Ward, ME; Ferris, S.; Mabey, DC; Bailey, RL

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The natural history of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections in endemic communities has not been well characterised and is an important determinant of the effectiveness of different mass treatment strategies to prevent blindness due to trachoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A multistate hidden Markov model was fitted to data on infection and active disease from 256 untreated villagers in The Gambia who were examined every 2 weeks over a 6-month period. Parameters defining the...

  15. Evolutionary economics and the counterfactual threat: on the nature and role of counterfactual history as an empirical tool in economics

    OpenAIRE

    Dominique Foray; Robin Cowan

    2002-01-01

    Counterfactual conditional statements are ubiquitous in any scientific endeavour. This paper contains an analysis of the nature of counterfactual conditionals and the conditions under which they are considered assertable by scientists. The paper then applies this analysis to the use of counterfactuals in evolutionary economics, arguing that because evolutionary economics is inherently concerned with historical processes it cannot avoid the use of counterfactual history as one of its tools of ...

  16. Natural history of spontaneous aortic intramural hematoma progression: Six years follow-up with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Lei; Fan Zhanming; Zhang Zhaoqi; Ma Xiaohai; Yu Jing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We described a 6 years follow-up of a spontaneous aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examination. Since multiple factors may play roles in the natural history of IMH, the patient experienced the course of progression, which included hematoma absorption, ulcer-like lesion, aneurysm and limited dissection. The initial and follow-up CMR examination included 3D CE MRA and non-enhanced "bright blood" pulse sequence. The inherent advantage of outs...

  17. Natural History of Malignant Bone Disease in Renal Cancer: Final Results of an Italian Bone Metastasis Survey

    OpenAIRE

    D. Santini; Procopio, G; Porta, C; Ibrahim, T; Barni, S.; Mazzara, C; Fontana, A.; Berruti, A; R. Berardi; Vincenzi, B; Ortega, C; Ottaviani, D; Carteni, G; Lanzetta, G; Virzì, V

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. Patients and methods Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs), and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female) with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. Results Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months ...

  18. Natural History and Outcome of Hepatic Vascular Malformations in a Large Cohort of Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Teleangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Buscarini, Elisabetta; Leandro, Gioacchino; Conte, Dario; DANESINO, CESARE; Daina, Erica; Manfredi, Guido; Lupinacci, Guido; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Menozzi, Fernanda; De Grazia, Federico; Gazzaniga, Pietro; INAMA, GIUSEPPE; Bonardi, Roberto; Blotta, Pasquale; Forner, PierAngelo

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a genetic disease characterized by teleangiectasias involving virtually every organ. There are limited data in the literature regarding the natural history of liver vascular malformations in hemorrhagic telangiectasia and their associated morbidity and mortality. Aim This prospective cohort study sought to assess the outcome of liver involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients. Methods We analyzed 16 years of surveillance d...

  19. The type material of Mantodea (praying mantises) deposited in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin Svenson

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The collection of Mantodea of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, includes 26 holotypes, 7 allotypes, 4 lectotypes, 23 paratypes, and 1 paralectotype. Four type specimens were designated as lectotypes within this work. Highly accurate measurement data, high resolution images of specimens and labels, verbatim label data, georeferenced coordinates, original and newly assigned database codes, and bibliographic data are presented for all primary types. Label ...

  20. Natural history of asymptomatic non-thrombosed fusiform aneurysm of vertebral artery. A study of 10 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural history of incidentally found non-thrombosed fusiform aneurysms of the vertebral artery has not yet been determined. We retrospectively analyzed 10 asymptomatic cases confirmed by head MRI and cerebral angiography. All were males aged from 42 to 73 years old (mean±standard deviation (SD) 56.3±9.90). Three cases were found in a brain doc, another 3 were incidentally found in the workup of other neurological disease, and 4 were found in screening for chronically sustained headache. The patients' vascular risk included hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking. The aneurysms were found more often on the right (8 out of 10). The aneurysmal wall contained major cortical arteries in all cases except 1 who received endovascular trapping. The endoview mode obtained from 3D-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed smooth arterial surface seen from the inside. The treatment option was vascular risk control in most cases, with the exception of 2 endovascular procedures according to the patients' will. Compared with the symptomatic cases, the characteristics of the asymptomatic cases resembled those of cases with cerebral infarction such as age, sex and natural history. It may be that the asymptomatic cases represent the chronic phase of unnoticed dissection of the vertebral artery. The endosurface view obtained from 3D-DSA might reflect the change they had taken. Although based on only a limited number of cases, this study indicates the possibility of a benign natural history of asymptomatic non-thrombosed fusiform aneurysm of the vertebral artery. (author)

  1. Revealing Invisible Beauty, Ultra Detailed: The Influence of Low Cost UV Exposure on Natural History Specimens in 2D+ Digitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecko, Jonathan; Mathys, Aurore; Dekoninck, Wouter; De Ceukelaire, Marleen; VandenSpiegel, Didier; Semal, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Digitization of the natural history specimens usually occurs by taking detailed pictures from different sides or producing 3D models. Additionally this is normally limited to imaging the specimen while exposed by light of the visual spectrum. However many specimens can see in or react to other spectra as well. Fluorescence is a well known reaction to the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum by animals, plants, minerals etc. but rarely taken into account while examining natural history specimens. Our tests show that museum specimens still fluoresce when exposed to UV light of 395 nm and 365 nm, even after many years of preservation. When the UV exposure is used in the digitization of specimens using our low cost focus stacking (2D+) setup, the resulting pictures reveal more detail than the conventional 2D+ images. Differences in fluorescence using 395 nm or 365 nm UV lights were noticed, however there isn't a preferred wavelength as some specimens react more to the first, while others have better results with the latter exposure. Given the increased detail and the low cost of the system, UV exposure should be considered while digitizing natural history museum collections. PMID:27536993

  2. From cat scratch disease to endocarditis, the possible natural history of Bartonella henselae infection

    OpenAIRE

    Raoult Didier; Collart Frédéric; Habib Gilbert; Lepidi Hubert; Gouriet Frédérique

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Most patients with infectious endocarditis (IE) due to Bartonella henselae have a history of exposure to cats and pre-existing heart valve lesions. To date, none of the reported patients have had a history of typical cat scratch disease (CSD) which is also a manifestation of infection with B. henselae. Case presentation Here we report the case of a patient who had CSD and six months later developed IE of the mitral valve caused by B. henselae. Conclusion Based on this uniq...

  3. Molecularly defined adult-type hypolactasia in school-aged children with a previous history of cow's milk allergy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heli Rasinper(a); Kristiina Saarinen; Anna Pelkonen; Irma J(a)rvel(a); Erkki Savilahti; Kaija-Leena Kolho

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of lactase non-persistence/persistence in school-aged children and their milk-related sYmptoms.METHODS: The genotypes for the C/T-13910 variant associated with lactase non-persistence/ persistence were determined using PCR-minisequencing in a group of 172 children with a mean age of 8.6 years (SE = 0.02,93 boys) participating in a follow-up study for cow's milk allergy. The parents were asked to assess their children's milk consumption and abdominal symptoms.RESULTS: The presence of allergy to cow's milk was not associated with the C/G13910 genotype related with a decline of lactase enzyme activity during childhood (lactase non-persistence). The frequency of the C/G13910genotype (16%) was similar to published figures for the prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia in Finland. The majority of the children (90%) in this series consumed milk but 26% of their families suspected that their children had milk-related symptoms. Forty-eight percent of the children with the C/G13910 genotype did not drink milk at all or consumed a low lactose containing diet prior to the genotyping (P<0.004 when compared to the other genotypes).CONCLUSION: Analysis of the C/T-13910 polymorphism is an easy and reliable method for excluding adult-type hypolactasia in children with milk-related symptoms.Genotyping for this variant can be used to advise diets for children with a previous history of cow's milk allergy.

  4. College Students Constructing Collective Knowledge of Natural Science History in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huang-Yao; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates whether engaging college students (n = 42) in a knowledge building environment would help them work as a community to construct their collective knowledge of history of science and, accordingly, develop a more informed scientific view. The study adopted mixed-method analyses and data mainly came from surveys and student…

  5. Determination of Stress Histories in Structures by Natural Input Modal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Henrik P.; Brincker, Rune; Graugaard-Jensen, Jesper;

    2005-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that stress histories can be estimated with high accuracy by integrating measured accelerations to obtain displacement and then performing a modal decomposition of the so estimated displacements. The relation between the modal coordinate and the stress in an arbitrary po...

  6. Tourism, nature and environmental history: leisure farms on the banks of the Capivara Dam.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmar Arruda

    2013-01-01

    According to the World Tourism Organization the number of international travels, in 2012, around the world surpassed 1 billion, of which more than half had as purpose of travel tourism. Among the targets of the 'holiday trips "are the beach, the countryside, nature reserves, etc.. Certain forms of perception and / or representation of natural attract tourists to these areas. This text exposes the construction of a theme, the relationship between tourism and nature, from a case study: the leis...

  7. Historia natural de la infección por el VHC Natural history of hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Uriz, J; R. Briz

    2004-01-01

    El curso generalmente indolente, lento y prolongado de la infección por el virus de la hepatitis C ha limitado la realización de estudios que valoren su historia natural. Dichos estudios han tenido como objetivo la probabilidad de muerte por enfermedad hepática, cirrosis hepática (compensada o descompensada) y/o hepatocarcinoma, o el desarrollo de una fibrosis hepática importante (substrato anatomopatológico indispensable para el desarrollo de las complicaciones de la cirrosis hepática). A pe...

  8. From Re-Emergence to Hyperendemicity: The Natural History of the Dengue Epidemic in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Braga, Cynthia; de Souza, Wayner V; Marques, Ernesto T.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) was reintroduced into Brazil in 1986 and by 1995 it had spread throughout the country. In 2007 the number of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases more than doubled and a shift in the age distribution was reported. While previously the majority of DHF cases occurred among adults, in 2007 53% of cases occurred in children under 15 years old. The reasons for this shift have not been determined. Methods and Findings Age stratified cross-sectional seroepidemiologic s...

  9. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the natural history of duodenal ulcer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goggin, N; Rowland, M; Imrie, C; Walsh, D.; Clyne, M.; Drumm, B

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Duodenal ulcer disease is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa. Eradication of H pylori from the gastric mucosa in adults is associated with long term healing of ulcers.
AIMS—To follow a cohort of children with duodenal ulcer disease for a minimum of two years after the eradication of H pylori.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Over a three year period, all children diagnosed with duodenal ulcer disease had their symptoms documented a...

  10. Neurobehavioral Features and Natural History of Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Batten Disease)

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Heather R.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with prominent symptoms comprising a pediatric dementia syndrome: intellectual decline, mood and behavioral impairments, and loss of adaptive skills. We review the history of neurobehavioral features in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and the work of the University of Rochester Batten Center to characterize the extent and progression of neurobehavioral symptoms over disease course, and discuss the r...

  11. The nature and dynamics of world religions: a life-history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas; Chevallier, Coralie

    2015-11-01

    In contrast with tribal and archaic religions, world religions are characterized by a unique emphasis on extended prosociality, restricted sociosexuality, delayed gratification and the belief that these specific behaviours are sanctioned by some kind of supernatural justice. Here, we draw on recent advances in life history theory to explain this pattern of seemingly unrelated features. Life history theory examines how organisms adaptively allocate resources in the face of trade-offs between different life-goals (e.g. growth versus reproduction, exploitation versus exploration). In particular, recent studies have shown that individuals, including humans, adjust their life strategy to the environment through phenotypic plasticity: in a harsh environment, organisms tend to adopt a 'fast' strategy, pursuing smaller but more certain benefits, while in more affluent environments, organisms tend to develop a 'slow' strategy, aiming for larger but less certain benefits. Reviewing a range of recent research, we show that world religions are associated with a form of 'slow' strategy. This framework explains both the promotion of 'slow' behaviours such as altruism, self-regulation and monogamy in modern world religions, and the condemnation of 'fast' behaviours such as selfishness, conspicuous sexuality and materialism. This ecological approach also explains the diffusion pattern of world religions: why they emerged late in human history (500-300 BCE), why they are currently in decline in the most affluent societies and why they persist in some places despite this overall decline. PMID:26511055

  12. The importance of natural history and research collections to environmental reconstruction and remediation, and the establishment of shifting baselines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Anderson, L.; Roopnarine, D.; Gillikin, D. P.; Leal, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's environments are changing more rapidly today than at almost any time in the Phanerozoic. These changes are driven by human activities, and include climate change, landscape alteration, fragmentation and destruction, environmental pollution, species overexploitation, and invasive species. The rapidity of the changes challenges our best efforts to document what is changing, how it has changed, and what has been lost. Central to these efforts, therefore, is the proper documentation, archiving and curation of past environments. Natural history and other research collections form the core of this documentation, and have proven vital to recent studies of environmental change. Those collections are, however, generally under-utilized and under-appreciated by the general research community. Also, their utility is hampered by insufficient availability of the data, and the very nature of what has been collected in the past. Past collections emphasized a typological approach, placing emphasis on individual specimens and diversity, whether geological or biological, while what is needed today is greater emphasis on archiving entire environments. The concept of shifting baselines establishes that even on historical time scales, the notion of what constitutes an unaltered environment is biased by a lack of documentation and understanding of environments in the recent past. Baselines are necessary, however, for the proper implementation of mitigating procedures, for environmental restoration or remediation, and for predicting the near-term future. Here we present results from a study of impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWH) on the American oyster Crassostrea virginica. Natural history collections of specimens from the Gulf and elsewhere have been crucial to this effort, and serve as an example of how important such collections are to current events. We are examining the effects of spill exposure on shell growth and tissue development, as well as the potential

  13. Bleeding risk during latent period after gamma knife surgery for small cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Comparison with natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the bleeding risk during latency period after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for small (3 cm or less) cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We analyzed 720 cases with a natural history and 100 cases with GKS. The incidence of bleeding was calculated from the data of the former cases according to the history of bleeding and their age and was compared with the actual number obtained from the latter. The estimated incidence of bleeding was 1.6 for unruptured AVMs and 5.5 for ruptured AVMs, whereas the actual incidence of bleeding was 2 for unruptured and 0 for ruptured. The difference was statistically significant in the ruptured but was not significant in the unruptured. These results lead us to conclude that the bleeding risk during latency period after GKS for small AVMs is almost the same in the unruptured, but is decreased in the ruptured. (author)

  14. Tourism, nature and environmental history: leisure farms on the banks of the Capivara Dam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Arruda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Tourism Organization the number of international travels, in 2012, around the world surpassed 1 billion, of which more than half had as purpose of travel tourism. Among the targets of the 'holiday trips "are the beach, the countryside, nature reserves, etc.. Certain forms of perception and / or representation of natural attract tourists to these areas. This text exposes the construction of a theme, the relationship between tourism and nature, from a case study: the leisure farms on the banks of the Capivara Dam, Paranapanema River, north of the state of Paraná.

  15. Snakes of an urban-rural landscape in the central Andes of Colombia: species composition, distribution, and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Andrés Rojas-Morales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From 2005 to 2011, I studied the composition, distribution and natural history of an Andean urban-rural snake assemblage at the Cordillera Central of Colombia, based on three data sources: (1 examination of specimens in the MHN-UC [Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad de Caldas], (2 incidental encounters by author, and (3 collection of data by other researchers. Additionally, I provide natural history notes for the species involved. A total of 14 species, including two subspecies of snakes, belonging to 12 genera and four families, have been found in the studied area (municipality of Manizales, Caldas. Taking into account this total, 10 had atleast one record in the urban area, 13 in the rural area and 14 in forested areas. Only Liophis epinephelus bimaculatus was found exclusively in forest environment. Three species (21.4% are apparently endemic to the region, six species (42.8% correspond to afauna representative of the Tropical–Andean range of South America, four species (28.5% are distributed from Central America to the tropical Andes, and only one species is widely distributed in the whole continent. The snake assemblage in Manizales is mostly terrestrial, and in general, the species tend to be more active in the rainy periods of the year (mainly from October–December, and most of them may occasionally be found in urban areas, mainly close to areas of vegetation such as crops and pastures.

  16. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2000 The natural and unnatural history of methane-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Methane gas is produced from many natural and anthropogenic sources. As such, methane gas plays a significant role in the Earth's climate, being 25 times more effective as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As with nearly all other naturally produced organic molecules on Earth, there are also micro-organisms capable of using methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. The microbes responsible (methanotrophs) are ubiquitous and, for the most part, aerobic. Although anaerobic methanot...

  17. The Progression and Natural History of Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Nidhi P; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the United States. Childhood NAFLD is associated with hepatic and nonhepatic morbidity and mortality. Nonhepatic associations include cardiovascular, metabolic, pulmonary, and psychological disorders. Cardiovascular conditions observed in childhood include left ventricular dysfunction. Furthermore, childhood obesity is associated with greater odds of having hepatocellular carcinoma as an adult. Evidence suggests that NAFLD may begin in utero in children of diabetic mothers. Thus rigorous efforts for structured diagnosis and follow-up are a priority to better develop the understanding of outcomes in pediatric NAFLD. PMID:27063272

  18. A South Seas State of Nature: The Legal History of Pitcairn Island, 1790-1900

    OpenAIRE

    Eshleman, Michael O.

    2011-01-01

    Pitcairn Island was uninhabited in 1790 when the mutineers of the Royal Navy's Bounty settled there with men and women from Tahiti to serve as slaves and wives for the sailors. Murders and accidents claimed the lives the leader of the mutiny, Fletcher Christian, and those of every adult male save John Adams. Adams led the remaining islanders under a benevolent dictatorship for the rest of his life, a South Seas Christian monarchy cut off from the rest of the world. After the island was redisc...

  19. Working Memory for Serial Order Is Dysfunctional in Adults With a History of Developmental Dyscalculia: Evidence From Behavioral and Neuroimaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attout, Lucie; Salmon, Eric; Majerus, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that order working memory (WM) may be specifically associated with numerical abilities. This study explored behavioral performance and neural networks associated with verbal WM in adults with a history of developmental dyscalculia (DD). The DD group performed significantly poorer but with the same precision than the control group in order WM tasks and showed a lower activation of the right middle frontal gyrus during the order WM and the alphabetical order judgment tasks. This study suggests a persistent impairment in order WM in adults with DD, characterized by more general difficulties in controlled activation of order information. PMID:26179489

  20. 龟的博物学:兼谈博物学与自然史%Turtles in Natural History:Also on Bowuxue and Natural History

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易华

    2011-01-01

    在古代中国,人与生物之间并不像现代生物学揭示的那样仅仅是物质或生态关系,而且存在着一种精神上的照应。这就意味着古代中国人对生物的认识不可能客观,主观附会难以避免。研究以龟为例对这种关系进行了探讨。中国人对龟的认识深受经学、博物、实用传统的影响。在中国有博物或博学传统,但基本上没有以自然为主要研究对象自然史或博物学,也就难以孕育或产生自然科学。博物知识的积累和流传蕴含丰富的文化信息,是民族生物学或民族动物学研究对象。%In ancient China,the tie between humans and creatures is not only physical or ecological as modern biology has revealed,but also a spiritual one.This means that the ancient Chinese understanding of creatures could not be objective.This paper tries to explore this relationship with the turtle as an example.The Chinese understanding of the turtle is deeply influenced by Confucian classics,bowu and practical tradition.In China,there is natural history or learned tradition,but basically no natural history with nature as the main research object;thus natural science is difficult to be developed.The accumulation and spread of such knowledge contains rich cultural information and is the research object of ethnobiology and ethnozoology.

  1. Epidemiology and natural history of ligase chain reaction detected chlamydial and gonococcal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Kissin, D; Holman, S.; Minkoff, H; DeMeo, L.; McCormack, W; DeHovitz, J

    2002-01-01

    Methods: We studied a cohort of sexually active women followed at 6 month intervals for up to 3 years. Frozen urine specimens from 181 women with negative cultures for C trachomatis and N gonorrhoeae who were "high risk" (defined as being less than 40 years old at baseline, and having either Trichomonas vaginalis at baseline or a history of more than one sexual partner during the 12 months before baseline) were tested for C trachomatis and N gonorrhoeae by LCR (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Par...

  2. The Feasibility of Using Low-oxygen Atmospheres to Control Insect Pests for Taxidermies in Natural History Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    To find the environmental friendly alternative methods for control taxidermy pests in natural history museum, six species insect pests at various stages of their development were exposed to a low-oxygen atmosphere of 1.5% for a period of one week. Apart from a 50% survival rate for the larval stage of Anthrenus verbasci, the modified atmosphere was observed to have a lethal effect on all insect stages tested. When the exposure period was extended to periods of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks, respecti...

  3. Natural History of Disease in Atomic Bomb Exposed Twins in Hiroshima : Findings of Chest X-Ray and Electrocardiogram

    OpenAIRE

    Satow, Yukio; Ohmae, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Naomasa; Abe, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Shoji

    1982-01-01

    The subjects of this study are mainly pairs of monozygotic twins, one of whom was exposed to the atomic bomb and the other not exposed, and the natural history of the diseases of these twins was analyzed to find out genetic and environmental factors of the diseases and some biological effect of the atomic bomb exposure or other. In this study, 13 pairs of monozygotic and 5 pairs of dizygotic twins and other 34 cases of non-twins were examined by means of heart and lung X-ray films and electro...

  4. Natural History of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Women and Dysmenorrhea: A 10-Year Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Bjork Olafsdottir; Hallgrimur Gudjonsson; Heidur Hrund Jonsdottir; Einar Björnsson; Bjarni Thjodleifsson

    2012-01-01

    Background. Studies have shown that women are more likely to have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and more women seek healthcare because of IBS than men. Aim. We wanted to examine the natural history of IBS and dysmenorrhea in women over a 10-year period and to assess the change in IBS after menopause. Method. A population-based postal study. A questionnaire was mailed to the same age- and gender-stratified random sample of the Icelandic population aged 18–75 in 1996 and again in 2006. Results...

  5. A natural history of the deep-sea aplacophoran Prochaetoderma yongei and its relationship to confamilials (Mollusca, Prochaetodermatidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheltema, Amélie H.; Ivanov, Dmitry L.

    2009-09-01

    Previously published studies are woven together into a natural history of a deep-sea aplacophoran mollusc species, Prochaetoderma yongei Scheltema, 1985, and its confamilial species in the Prochaetodermatidae. This amphi-Atlantic species occurs sometimes in great numbers at upper bathyal depths, rivaling polychaetes in numerical dominance. It appears to be an opportunist, with wide geographic and depth distribution, rapid development from lecithotrophic larva to settlement and maturity, and omnivory. A short illustrated morphological description using characters useful for identifying all prochaetodermatid species should prove useful to nontaxonomists whose business is the deep-sea benthic fauna.

  6. Birds of the Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History Campus, Anaikatty Hills, southern India

    OpenAIRE

    A.M.S. Ali; S.B. Shanthakumar; S.R. Kumar; Chandran, R; S.S. Marimuthu; P. R. Arun

    2013-01-01

    A study on avifauna was conducted in and around the campus of the Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Anaikatty hills, Coimbatore, Southern India between January 2012 and May 2013. A total of 145 species of birds belonging to 48 families and 15 orders was recorded of which 73 species were residents, 58 local migrants and 14 were winter migrants. Forty species of birds were recorded breeding here. The birds of the campus included two species endemic to Western Ghats and 14 sp...

  7. Birds of the Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History Campus, Anaikatty Hills, southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.S. Ali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A study on avifauna was conducted in and around the campus of the Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Anaikatty hills, Coimbatore, Southern India between January 2012 and May 2013. A total of 145 species of birds belonging to 48 families and 15 orders was recorded of which 73 species were residents, 58 local migrants and 14 were winter migrants. Forty species of birds were recorded breeding here. The birds of the campus included two species endemic to Western Ghats and 14 species listed under Schedule-I of the Indian Wildlife (Protection Act, 1972.

  8. Food consumption of adults in Germany: results of the German National Nutrition Survey II based on diet history interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Thorsten; Krems, Carolin; Moon, Kilson; Brombach, Christine; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2015-05-28

    The second German National Nutrition Survey (NVS II) aimed to evaluate food consumption and other aspects of nutritional behaviour of a representative sample of the German population, using a modular design with three different dietary assessment methods. To assess usual food consumption, 15,371 German speaking subjects 14-80 years of age completed a diet history interview between November 2005 and November 2006. With reference to the guidelines of the German Nutrition Society (DGE), NVS II observed that the German population did not eat enough foods of plant origin, especially vegetables and consumed too much of meat and meat products. While generally similar food consumption is observed in other European countries, consumption of bread, fruit juices/nectars and beer is higher in Germany. On average, men consumed two times more meat and soft drinks as well as six times more beer than women did, whereas the consumption of vegetables, fruit as well as herbal/fruit tea was higher in women. Older participants showed a lower consumption of meat, fruit juice/nectars, soft drinks and spirits as well as a higher consumption of fish, vegetables, fruit, and herbal/fruit tea than adolescents and younger adults did. There are also differences in food consumption with regard to socio-economic status (SES). Persons with higher SES consumed more vegetables, fruit, fish, water, coffee/tea and wine, while persons with lower SES consumed more meat and meat products, soft drinks and beer. In general, the food consumption of women, the elderly and the higher SES group tends to be closer to the official dietary guidelines in Germany. PMID:25866161

  9. History of natural resource use and environmental impacts in an interfluvial upland forest area in western Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Siren

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Much of the research done on environmental impacts by Amazonian indigenous peoples in the past focus on certain areas where archaeological remains are particularly abundant, such as the Amazon River estuary, the seasonally inundated floodplain of the lower Amazon, and various sites in the forest-savannah mosaic of the southern Amazon The environmental history of interfluvial upland areas has received less attention. This study reconstructed the history of human use of natural resources in an upland area of 1400 km2 surrounding the indigenous Kichwa community of Sarayaku in the Ecuadorian Amazon, based on oral history elicited from local elders as well as historical source documents and some modern scientific studies. Although data is scarce, one can conclude that the impacts of humans on the environment have varied in time and space in quite intricate ways. Hunting has affected, and continues affecting, basically the whole study area, but it is now more concentrated in space than what it has probably ever been before. Also forest clearing has become more concentrated in space but, in addition, it has gone from affecting only hilltops forests to affecting alluvial plains as well as hilltops and, lately, also the slopes of the hills.

  10. Doses to the red bone marrow of young people and adults from radiation of natural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, G M [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford, Richards Building, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7LG (United Kingdom); Fell, T P, E-mail: Gerald.Kendall@ccrg.ox.ac.uk [Health Protection Agency, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    Natural radiation sources comprise cosmic rays, terrestrial gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhaled isotopes of radon with their decay products. These deliver doses to all organs and tissues including red bone marrow (RBM), the tissue in which leukaemia is thought to originate. In this paper we calculate the age-dependent annual RBM doses from natural radiation sources to young people and to adults at average levels of exposure in the UK. The contributions to dose are generally less complex than in the case of doses to foetuses and young children where it is necessary to take into account transfer of radionuclides across the placenta, intakes in mother's milk and changes in gut uptake in young infants. However, there is high uptake of alkaline earths and of similar elements in the developing skeleton and this significantly affects the doses from radioisotopes of these elements, not just in the teens and twenties but through into the fifth decade of life. The total equivalent dose to the RBM from all natural sources of radiation at age 15 years is calculated to be about 1200 {mu}Sv a year at average UK levels, falling to rather less than 1100 {mu}Sv per year in later life; the gentle fall from the late teens onwards reflects the diminishing effect of the high uptakes of radioisotopes of the alkaline earths and of lead in this period. About 60% of the equivalent dose is contributed by the low linear energy transfer (LET) component. Radionuclides in food make the largest contribution to equivalent doses to RBM and much the largest contribution to the absorbed dose from high LET radiation (mainly alpha particles).

  11. Doses to the red bone marrow of young people and adults from radiation of natural origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radiation sources comprise cosmic rays, terrestrial gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhaled isotopes of radon with their decay products. These deliver doses to all organs and tissues including red bone marrow (RBM), the tissue in which leukaemia is thought to originate. In this paper we calculate the age-dependent annual RBM doses from natural radiation sources to young people and to adults at average levels of exposure in the UK. The contributions to dose are generally less complex than in the case of doses to foetuses and young children where it is necessary to take into account transfer of radionuclides across the placenta, intakes in mother's milk and changes in gut uptake in young infants. However, there is high uptake of alkaline earths and of similar elements in the developing skeleton and this significantly affects the doses from radioisotopes of these elements, not just in the teens and twenties but through into the fifth decade of life. The total equivalent dose to the RBM from all natural sources of radiation at age 15 years is calculated to be about 1200 μSv a year at average UK levels, falling to rather less than 1100 μSv per year in later life; the gentle fall from the late teens onwards reflects the diminishing effect of the high uptakes of radioisotopes of the alkaline earths and of lead in this period. About 60% of the equivalent dose is contributed by the low linear energy transfer (LET) component. Radionuclides in food make the largest contribution to equivalent doses to RBM and much the largest contribution to the absorbed dose from high LET radiation (mainly alpha particles).

  12. The Tropical Rainforest: A Valuable Natural History Resource for Students in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Christine; bin Rajib, Tayeb

    2010-01-01

    Students living in cities seldom experience the rural outdoors when learning science. This lack of first-hand experience with nature is of concern, especially when they are learning about animals, plants and ecosystems. This study investigated how a teacher in Singapore organised a field trip to the rainforest to help his students bridge the gap…

  13. Natural history of TPA-untreated minor stroke in the North Dublin population stroke study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marnane, M

    2011-05-01

    Introduction: Current guidelines recommend caution when considering emergency tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy for patients with minor neurological deficits. However few data exist regarding the “natural history” (without tPA) of stroke in unselected population-based cohorts. We sought to evaluate the risk of long term disability in “minor stroke” patients.\\r\

  14. The Nature of Starbursts: I. The Star Formation Histories of Eighteen Nearby Starburst Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Cannon, John M; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Sebastian; Holtzman, Jon; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    We use archival HST observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams, and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only currently bursting galaxies but also "fossil" bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid "self-quenching" of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but...

  15. Monomelic amyotrophy: clinical profile and natural history of 279 cases seen over 35 years (1976-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Gourie-Devi, Mandavilli; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Ramalingaiah, Aravinda Hanumanthapura

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to study the clinical characteristics and natural history of monomelic amyotrophy (MMA). We used a retrospective study of 279 patients diagnosed to have either upper (Hirayama disease) or lower limb MMA. Results showed that brachial MMA (BMMA) occurred in 224 patients (male:female, 9:1). Mean age of onset was 19.5 ± 4.18 years. Progression occurred over less than five years in the majority (95.9%) of patients. Duration at the last follow-up was: up to five years in 61.4%, 5-10 in 21.3%, 10-15 in 7.2%, > 15 years in 10.1%. MRI showed asymmetrical lower cervical cord atrophy in 44.6% of patients. Crural MMA (CMMA) occurred in 55 patients (male:female, 13:1). Mean age of onset was 21.38 ± 5.3 years. Similar to BMMA, most cases (65.5%) had onset between 15 and 25 years of age. Total duration of illness at the last follow-up was up to five years in 52.7%, 10 and beyond in 47.3%. In conclusion, a large cohort of patients with monomelic amyotrophy seen over 35 years (1976-2010) is described. Study data support the clinical findings and its natural history with long term follow-up, and the findings emphasize that monomelic amyotrophy is a 'benign' condition with a self-limiting course. PMID:24853410

  16. Tuberculosis in elephants-a reemergent disease: diagnostic dilemmas, the natural history of infection, and new immunological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, J N; Mikota, S K

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants has been described since ancient times. However, it was not until 1996 when infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis was identified in a herd of circus elephants that significant research into this disease began. The epidemiology and natural history of TB were unknown in elephants since there had been no comprehensive screening programs, and diagnostic techniques developed for cervidae and bovidae were of unknown value. And, while precepts of test and slaughter were the norm for cattle and deer, this was considered untenable for an endangered species. With no precedent for the treatment of TB in animals, treatment regimens for elephants were extrapolated from human protocols, which guided changes to the Guidelines for the Control of Tuberculosis in Elephants. In the absence of diagnostic testing to confirm cure in elephants, the efficacy of these treatment regimens is only beginning to be understood as treated elephants die and are examined postmortem. However, because of pressures arising from public relations related to elephant husbandry and the added considerations of TB infection in animals (whether real or imagined), sharing of information to aid in research and treatment has been problematic. Here we review the challenges and successes of the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants and discuss the natural history of the disease to put the work of Landolfi et al on the immunological response to tuberculosis in elephants in perspective. PMID:25633896

  17. Influence of variceal bleeding on natural history of ACLF and management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Garg, Hitendra

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed chronic liver diseases experience one or more acute assaults of a hepatic nature and develop a downhill course of liver diseases, a condition regarded as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). It is a medical emergency, the prognosis of ACLF is extremely bad and considerable numbers of patients with ACLF die even after diagnosis and receiving conservative treatment. ACLF is characterized by jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites and encephalopathy. ACLF patients are very sick and associated with different hemodynamic profiles and have very high 3-month mortality. As these groups of patients have high baseline hepatic venous pressure gradients, the chances of variceal bleed are also high, and the impact is also greater in comparison to stable cirrhosis; however, evidence is lacking to substantiate such effects. The aim of this review is to discuss the natural course of variceal bleeding in ACLF patients and to develop insights into the management of variceal bleeding in ACLF. PMID:26589951

  18. Analysis of natural history of the diaphragmatic injury on the right in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Benedito Aparecido Caiel; Cristovam Scapulatempo Neto; Arthur Soares de Souza Júnior; Roberto Saad Júnior

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate natural evolution of right diaphragmatic injury after the surgical removal of a portion from hemi diaphragm. Methods: the animals were submitted to a surgical removal of portion from right hemi diaphragm by median laparotomy. The sample consists of 42 animals being 2 animals from pilot project and 40 operated animals. And the variables of the study were herniation, liver protection, healing, persistent diaphragm injury, evaluation of 16 channels tomography and the var...

  19. Review: The history and role of naturally occurring mouse models with Pde6b mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Juanjuan; Dinculescu, Astra; Dai, Xufeng; Du, Wei; Smith, W. Clay; Pang, Jijing

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models are useful tools for developing potential therapies for human inherited retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), since more strains are being identified with the same mutant genes and phenotypes as humans with corresponding retinal degenerative diseases. Mutations in the beta subunit of the human rod phosphodiesterase (PDE6B) gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive RP (arRP). This article focuses on two well-established naturally occurring mouse models of arRP ...

  20. Writing on Pigments in Natural History and Art Technology in Sixteenth-Century Germany and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltrogge, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Renaissance painters used a number of inorganic color materials. The development of mineralogy as a discipline opened a new discourse on mineral pigments. Agricola and other naturalists were familiar with the contemporary writings on art technology, but their focus was different. Therefore, the exchange of knowledge between these two color worlds remained selective. One possible meeting point was the Kunstkammer where the study of natural objects and materials was combined with an interest in the manual execution of a painting. PMID:26856047

  1. Specificity of unenhanced CT for non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis: implications for the investigation of the natural history of incidental steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Hahn, Luke [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Park, Seong Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Gyu [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kyongtae T. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yu, Eun Sil [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    To determine a highly specific liver attenuation threshold at unenhanced CT for biopsy-proven moderate to severe hepatic steatosis ({>=}30% at histology). 315 asymptomatic adults (mean age {+-} SD, 31.5 {+-} 10.1 years; 207 men, 108 women) underwent same-day unenhanced liver CT and ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. Blinded to biopsy results, CT liver attenuation was measured using standard region-of-interest methodology. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of CT liver attenuation with patient age, gender, BMI, CT system, and hepatic fat and iron content. Thirty-nine subjects had moderate to severe steatosis and 276 had mild or no steatosis. A liver attenuation threshold of 48 HU was 100% specific (276/276) for moderate to severe steatosis, with no false-positives. Sensitivity, PPV and NPV at this HU threshold was 53.8%, 100% and 93.9%. Hepatic fat content was the overwhelming determinant of liver attenuation values, but CT system (P < 0.001), and hepatic iron (P = 0.035) also had a statistically significant independent association. Unenhanced CT liver attenuation alone is highly specific for moderate to severe hepatic steatosis, allowing for confident non-invasive identification of large retrospective/prospective cohorts for natural history evaluation of incidental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Low sensitivity, however, precludes effective population screening at this threshold. (orig.)

  2. Specificity of unenhanced CT for non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis: implications for the investigation of the natural history of incidental steatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine a highly specific liver attenuation threshold at unenhanced CT for biopsy-proven moderate to severe hepatic steatosis (≥30% at histology). 315 asymptomatic adults (mean age ± SD, 31.5 ± 10.1 years; 207 men, 108 women) underwent same-day unenhanced liver CT and ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. Blinded to biopsy results, CT liver attenuation was measured using standard region-of-interest methodology. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of CT liver attenuation with patient age, gender, BMI, CT system, and hepatic fat and iron content. Thirty-nine subjects had moderate to severe steatosis and 276 had mild or no steatosis. A liver attenuation threshold of 48 HU was 100% specific (276/276) for moderate to severe steatosis, with no false-positives. Sensitivity, PPV and NPV at this HU threshold was 53.8%, 100% and 93.9%. Hepatic fat content was the overwhelming determinant of liver attenuation values, but CT system (P < 0.001), and hepatic iron (P = 0.035) also had a statistically significant independent association. Unenhanced CT liver attenuation alone is highly specific for moderate to severe hepatic steatosis, allowing for confident non-invasive identification of large retrospective/prospective cohorts for natural history evaluation of incidental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Low sensitivity, however, precludes effective population screening at this threshold. (orig.)

  3. Survival of Adult Songbirds in Boreal Forest Landscapes Fragmented by Clearcuts and Natural Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darroch M. Whitaker

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available There exists little information on demographic responses of boreal songbirds to logging. We conducted a 4-yr (2003-2006 songbird mark-recapture study in western Newfoundland, where land cover is a naturally heterogeneous mosaic of productive spruce-fir forest, stunted taiga, and openings such as bogs, fens, and riparian zones. We compared apparent survival and rate of transience for adults of 14 species between areas having forests fragmented primarily by either natural openings or 3-7 yr-old clearcuts. Data were collected on three landscape pairs, with birds being marked on three 4-6 ha netting sites on each landscape (total = 18 netting sites. Survival rates were estimated using multi-strata mark-recapture models with landscape types specified as model strata. Landscape type was retained in the best model for only two species, Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Yellow-rumped Warbler, in both cases indicating lower apparent survival in landscapes having clearcuts. Though parameter estimates suggested lower survival in clearcut landscapes for several species, meta-analysis across all species detected no general difference between landscape types. Further, we did not detect any relation between landscape differences in survival and a species' habitat affinity, migratory strategy, or the proportion of transients in its population. Although sensitivity to logging was limited, we observed high interspecific variation in rates of breeding season apparent survival (48% [Dark-eyed Junco] to 100% [several species], overwinter apparent survival (0.3% [Ruby-crowned Kinglet] to 86.5% [Gray Jay], and transience (≈0% [several species] to 61% [Ruby-crowned Kinglet in clearcut landscapes]. For Lincoln's and White-throated Sparrows, over-winter apparent survival was >2× higher for males than females, and rate of transience was > 8× higher for White-throated Sparrow males than females. Moderately male-biased sex ratios suggested that both lower mortality and higher

  4. From re-emergence to hyperendemicity: the natural history of the dengue epidemic in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Rodriguez-Barraquer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: dengue virus (DENV was reintroduced into Brazil in 1986 and by 1995 it had spread throughout the country. In 2007 the number of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF cases more than doubled and a shift in the age distribution was reported. While previously the majority of DHF cases occurred among adults, in 2007 53% of cases occurred in children under 15 years old. The reasons for this shift have not been determined. METHODS AND FINDINGS: age stratified cross-sectional seroepidemiologic survey conducted in Recife, Brazil in 2006. Serostatus was determined by ELISA based detection of Dengue IgG. We estimated time-constant and time-varying forces of infection of DENV between 1986 and 2006. We used discrete-time simulation to estimate the accumulation of monotypic and multitypic immunity over time in a population previously completely susceptible to DENV. We projected the age distribution of population immunity to dengue assuming similar hazards of infection in future years. The overall prevalence of DENV IgG was 0.80 (n = 1427. The time-constant force of infection for the period was estimated to be 0.052 (95% CI 0.041, 0.063, corresponding to 5.2% of susceptible individuals becoming infected each year by each serotype. Simulations show that as time since re-emergence of dengue goes by, multitypic immunity accumulates in adults while an increasing proportion of susceptible individuals and those with monotypic immunity are among young age groups. The median age of those monotypically immune can be expected to shift from 24 years, 10 years after introduction, to 13 years, 50 years after introduction. Of those monotypically immune, the proportion under 15 years old shifts from 27% to 58%. These results are consistent with the dengue notification records from the same region since 1995. INTERPRETATION: assuming that persons who have been monotypically exposed are at highest risk for severe dengue, the shift towards younger patient ages observed

  5. Assessment of habitual energy and macronutrient intake in adults: comparison of a seven day food record with a dietary history interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høidrup, S.; Andreasen, A. H.; Osler, M.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Jørgensen, L. M.; Jørgensen, T.; Schroll, M.; Heitmann, B. L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the quantitative agreement between a 7 day food record and a diet history interview when these are conducted under the same conditions and to evaluate whether the two methods assess habitual diet intake differently among subgroups of age and body mass index (BMI). Design......: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Population study, Denmark. Subjects: A total of 175 men and 173 women aged 30-60 y, selected randomly from a larger population sample of Danish adults. Interventions: All subjects had habitual diet intake assessed by a diet history interview and completed a 7 day food....... Difference between reported energy intake from both methods and estimated energy expenditure in different subgroups. Results: Energy and macronutrient intake was assessed slightly higher by the 7 day food record than by the diet history interview, but in absolute terms the differences were negligible. The...

  6. Assessment of habitual energy and macronutrient intake in adults: comparison of a seven day food record with a dietary history interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høidrup, S.; Andreasen, A. H.; Osler, M.;

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the quantitative agreement between a 7 day food record and a diet history interview when these are conducted under the same conditions and to evaluate whether the two methods assess habitual diet intake differently among subgroups of age and body mass index (BMI). Design......: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Population study, Denmark. Subjects: A total of 175 men and 173 women aged 30-60 y, selected randomly from a larger population sample of Danish adults. Interventions: All subjects had habitual diet intake assessed by a diet history interview and completed a 7 day food...... record within 3 weeks following the interview. The diet history interview and coding of records were performed by the same trained dietician. Main outcome measure: Median between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake, absolute intake of macronutrients, and nutrient energy percentages...

  7. Immature stages and natural history of the Andean butterfly Altinote ozomene (Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae: Acraeini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Duque Velez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The immature stages (eggs, larvae and pupae, oviposition and larval behavior of Altinote ozomene (Godart, 1819 are described here for the first time. Larvae were reared from egg clutches collected from the host plants Erato vulcanica (Klatt H.Rob and Munnozia senecionidis Benth (Asteraceae. Eggs were laid in groups on the undersides of leaves. The number of instars varied from five to eight within the same egg clutch, and the corresponding development time from larva to adult varied from 91 to 115 days. Most (72% larvae pupated during the sixth instar. The first four instars fed only on the leaf cuticle, whereas later instars consumed the whole leaf. Larvae were gregarious during all instars but rested together only during the day in later instars, either hidden inside dry leaves, on the stem at the base of the host plants, or in the leaf litter. Larvae showed similar morphology and behavior to those previously described for species of Actinote Hübner, 1819 from southeastern Brazil and the Andes.

  8. Epidemiology and Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infections in the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common newly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Although the majority of sexually active adults will be infected with HPV at least once in their lives, it is sexually active women less than 25 years of age who consistently have the highest rates of infection. Besides youth and gender, common risk factors for HPV infection and clinical sequelae of infection include high number of sexual partners and coinfection with Chlamydia trachomatis or herpes simplex virus. Most HPV infections are cleared by the immune system and do not result in clinical complications. Clinical sequelae in cases of low-risk HPV infection consist of genital warts, and clinical manifestations of high-risk HPV infection include abnormal Pap test results, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL, and cervical cancer. LSIL, HSIL, and cervical cancer carry significant morbidity and/or mortality; genital warts and abnormal Pap test results are often significant sources of psychosocial distress. Currently, there are neither effective means of preventing HPV transmission nor cures for clinical manifestations: infection can only be prevented via complete sexual abstinence, while treatment for clinical sequelae such as genital warts and cytologic abnormalities consists of removing the problematic cells and watching for recurrence; this method consumes significant health care resources and is costly. New prophylactic HPV vaccines promise to dramatically reduce the incidence of HPV infection, genital warts, and cytologic abnormalities.

  9. Review of Natural History, Benefits and Risk Factors Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver or hepatic transplantation (LT is the replacement of a diseased liver with part or whole healthy liver from another person (allograft. Human liver transplants were first performed by Thomas Starzl in the United States and Roy Calne in Cambridge, England in 1963 and 1967, respectively. Liver transplantation is a viable treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. Pediatric patients account for about 12.5% of liver transplant recipients. The most commonly used technique is orthotopic transplantation, in which the native liver is removed and replaced by the donor organ in the same anatomic location as the original liver. Cirrhosis, or liver injury, is a common reason why adults need liver transplants and children with bile duct disease issues are often the candidates. Survival statistics depend greatly on the age of donor, age of recipient, skill of the transplant center, compliance of the recipient, whether the organ came from a living or cadaveric donor and overall health of the recipient. Survival rates improve almost yearly, due to improved techniques and medications.

  10. Breeding biology and natural history of the Slate-throated Whitestart in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggera, R.A.; Martin, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    We provide details on the breeding biology of the Slate-throated Whitestart (Myioborus miniatus) from 126 nests found during seven breeding seasons, 2002-2008, at Yacamb?? National Park, Venezuela. Nesting activity peaked in late April and May. Only the female built the nest and incubated the eggs. Males rarely visited the nest during these stages. Mean clutch size (2.1 ?? 0.04 eggs, n = 93) was the smallest recorded for the Slate-throated Whitestart. Incubation and nestling period lengths were 15.3 ?? 0.31 (n = 21) and 10.8 ?? 0.24 (n = 7) days, respectively. Attentiveness (% of time on the nest) during incubation (59 ?? 1.6%, n = 52) was similar to other tropical warblers and much lower than northern relatives. This caused a relatively low egg temperature (34.40 ?? 0.33u C, n = ?? nests, 20 days) compared with north temperate birds. Both parents fed nestlings and increased their provisioning rates with nestling age. Growth rate based on nestling mass (k = 0.521 ?? 0.015) was faster than for other tropical passerines but slower than northern relatives. Predation was the main cause of nesting failure and rate of predation increased with age of the nest. An estimated 15% of nests were successful based on an overall Mayfield daily predation rate of 0.053 ?? 0.007. This study confirms a strong latitudinal variation in life history traits of warblers. ?? 2010 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  11. Going the whole orang: Darwin, Wallace and the natural history of orangutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the European discovery and early ideas about orangutans followed by the contrasting experiences with these animals of the co-founders of evolution by natural selection, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. The first non-human great ape that both of them interacted with was...... the orangutan. They were both profoundly influenced by what they saw, but the contexts of their observations could hardly be more different. Darwin met orangutans in the Zoological Gardens in London while Wallace saw them in the wild in Borneo. In different ways these observations helped shape their...

  12. CLAXTON by Mark Cocker:Natural history, location, environmental subjects, conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Editor: Dan Franklin; Senior art editor: Suzanne DeanCo-ordinated by the Central Illustration Agency, LondonSixteen wood engravings for cover-art, chapter headings and spine illustrations.Two-colour cover-art, and black & white full-page illustrationsThe conceptual approach to this series of illustrations was based upon the spirit of nature and landscape, as well as the actual appearance of animals, birds, insects, and plants. This was not to be a realistic representation of particular sp...

  13. Natural history of the false channel of type A aortic dissection following surgical repair: CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative CT scans were reviewed in 33 patients after surgical repair of type A aortic dissection. Initial CT scans showed persistence of a false channel distal to the site of surgical repair in 26 patients (79%). Serial CT scans showed enlargement of the false channel in four patients and progression of thrombus in the false channel in five patients. Calcification developed within the false channel in six patients (19%). Thirteen patients (39%) required reoperation 2 months to 9 years after the initial surgery. In view of the progressive nature of aortic dissection in the postoperative period, periodic serial CT examinations can contribute important information

  14. Natural history of age-related lobular involution and impact on breast cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Radisky, Derek C.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Frank, Ryan D.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Winham, Stacey; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Nassar, Aziza; Vachon, Celine M.; Denison, Lori A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Degnim, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related lobular involution (LI) is a physiological process in which the terminal duct lobular units of the breast regress as a woman ages. Analyses of breast biopsies from women with benign breast disease (BBD) have found that extent of LI is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer development. Here we assess the natural course of LI within individual women, and the impact of progressive LI on breast cancer risk. The Mayo Clinic BBD cohort consists of 13,455 women with BBD fro...

  15. Emerging Approaches in Synchrotron Studies of Materials from Cultural and Natural History Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Loïc; Bernard, Sylvain; Marone, Federica; Thoury, Mathieu; Reiche, Ina; Gourrier, Aurélien; Sciau, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Synchrotrons have provided significant methods and instruments to study ancient materials from cultural and natural heritages. New ways to visualise (surfacic or volumic) morphologies are developed on the basis of elemental, density and refraction contrasts. They now apply to a wide range of materials, from historic artefacts to paleontological specimens. The tunability of synchrotron beams owing to the high flux and high spectral resolution of photon sources is at the origin of the main chemical speciation capabilities of synchrotron-based techniques. Although, until recently, photon-based speciation was mainly applicable to inorganic materials, novel developments based, for instance, on STXM and deep UV photoluminescence bring new opportunities to study speciation in organic and hybrid materials, such as soaps and organometallics, at a submicrometric spatial resolution over large fields of view. Structural methods are also continuously improved and increasingly applied to hierarchically structured materials for which organisation results either from biological or manufacturing processes. High-definition (spectral) imaging appears as the main driving force of the current trend for new synchrotron techniques for research on cultural and natural heritage materials. PMID:27572990

  16. Memoirs Useful for the Natural History of Petrifactions in the Four Quarters of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneer, Cecil J.

    Louis Bourguet, the ‘Pliny of Neuchâtel,’ is described in the thoughtful introduction to this translation as a second-echelon member of the early 18th century scientific community. When he was 7 years old, his Huguenot family was driven from France by the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. They established a precarious manufacturing and mercantile life in Lausanne and Zurich, with Louis eventually settling in Neuchâtel, an existence that included years of work in Northern Italy and the study of archaeology, the Hebrew Talmud, and the geology of the Jura. His major work published in 1729, On the Nature of Salts and Crystals, included a memoir theory of the earth. Although these works were reviewed at length on appearance and went through several editions, and although Bourguet corresponded with 70 significant scientists enjoying the esteem of such men as Leibniz, Vallisnieri, de Jussieu, Scheuchzer, etc., he seems even in his own time to have been neglected. He does not appear in the historical section with which Charles Lyell opened his Principles, nor is he mentioned in Giekie's Founders of Geology or by Adams. This translation of Bourguet's Memoirs is part of a reappraisal that has generated a stream of papers over the last decade. The earlier neglect of Bourguet was probably due to his strict diluvialist theory of the earth, an approach in sharp contradiction to the main thrust of the emergent natural science of the Age of Reason.

  17. Emerging out of nature into history: the plurality of the sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziman, John

    2003-08-15

    The idea of a 'theory of everything' is inconsistent with a natural feature of biological evolution: the spontaneous emergence of composite entities with completely new properties. At successively higher levels of complexity, from elementary particles and chemical molecules, through unicellular and multicellular organisms, to self-aware human beings and their cultural institutions, we find systems obeying entirely novel principles. The behaviour of such systems is not predictable from the properties of their constituents, so distinct 'languages' are required to describe them scientifically. The plurality of our sciences is thus an irreducible feature of the universe we live in. In particular, the reversible time coordinate of mathematical physics cannot cope with the natural 'path dependence' of biology. In the human sciences this extends into the imagined future as well as the remembered past. Furthermore, science nowadays usually arises in localized social contexts, where the 'logic of the situation' is continually being transformed by the emergence of cultural novelties such as unpredictable technological innovations. Thus, scientific knowledge cannot be restricted to generalized synchronic models, but involves historical narratives of specific events and unforeseen circumstances. PMID:12952677

  18. Agricultural area impacts within a natural area: Cades cove, a case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, Susan Power; Mathews, Raymond C.; White, Peter S.

    1980-09-01

    Agricultural management in Cades Cove, an historic district in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, has affected natural resources both within the district and in the adjoining natural areas. Aquatic impacts of haying and cattle grazing included increases in water temperatures, turbidity, nutrient loading, and bacterial counts and decreases in benthic macroinvertebrate density and fish biomass. Wildlife populations, including groundhogs, wild turkeys, and white-tailed deer, have increased in the open fields and around the periphery of the historic district. Intensive deer foraging has removed deciduous seedlings and saplings from woodlots, lowering species diversity and favoring coniferous reproduction. Cades Cove has limestone habitats unique in the park, and both deer browse and cattle grazing may have disturbed populations of rare plant species. Effects on water quality are detectable at a campground 15 stream km from the agricultural area, and the effects of deer foraging extend about 1 km beyond the open fields. Since “historic landscape” preservation is presently a goal of the park, managing for open vistas in Cades Cove will require some sort of continuing disturbance. Conversion of cattle pastures to hayfields would reduce aquatic impacts but the deer herd might increase as a result of reduced competition for forage. Retarding old field succession would increase populations of native plant species dependent on sunlight, but would require government-funded mowing. Other options are discussed. Completely eliminating the effects of the historic district on adjoining areas may be impossible, at least under present economic constraints.

  19. Development and implementation of a 600-MW natural gas cogeneration project - a financial case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February 1990, General Electric Capital Corporation (GECC), through its wholly owned subsidiary, General Electric Power Funding Corporation (GEPFC), provided a number of commitments to a partnership (the Partnership) formed by a company that develops, owns, and operates cogeneration facilities to fund the development, construction, and permanent debt and equity financing of a 614 megawatt (M) cogeneration facility (the Project) to be located near a large refinery in the northeastern United States. The Project is unusual both for the magnitude of its natural gas requirements and for its contractual configuration. The Project's entire transportation needs and a substantial portion of its gas requirements will be met by a joint venture between two local gas distribution companies (the Joint Venture), one of which is a large gas-consuming utility in the eastern United States. The Project's power purchase customer, (the Utility Host), is another very large gas-consuming utility. Thus, the fuel cost recovery of the Project is determined by the Utility Host's gas costs while its actual bill for fuel will be heavily influenced by the Joint Venture's gas commodity and transportation costs. Therefore, in appraising the credit quality of the Project's proposed fuel supply arrangements, the key issue to be answered is: Are the Project's natural gas supply and transportation arrangements compatible with the fuel cost recovery provisions of the power sales agreement with the Utility Host? If so, then the sensitivity of the Project's financing to adverse gas price movements would be minimized

  20. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Rare Disorders; Undiagnosed Disorders; Disorders of Unknown Prevalence; Cornelia De Lange Syndrome; Prenatal Benign Hypophosphatasia; Perinatal Lethal Hypophosphatasia; Odontohypophosphatasia; Adult Hypophosphatasia; Childhood-onset Hypophosphatasia; Infantile Hypophosphatasia; Hypophosphatasia; Kabuki Syndrome; Bohring-Opitz Syndrome; Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy; Narcolepsy-cataplexy; Hypersomnolence Disorder; Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia With Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia; Kleine-Levin Syndrome; Kawasaki Disease; Leiomyosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma of the Corpus Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of the Cervix Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of Small Intestine; Acquired Myasthenia Gravis; Addison Disease; Hyperacusis (Hyperacousis); Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis; Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis; Williams Syndrome; Lyme Disease; Myasthenia Gravis; Marinesco Sjogren Syndrome(Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome); Isolated Klippel-Feil Syndrome; Frasier Syndrome; Denys-Drash Syndrome; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Emanuel Syndrome; Isolated Aniridia; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Paternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Translocation/Inversion; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microdeletion; Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome; Aniridia-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Aniridia - Renal Agenesis - Psychomotor Retardation; Aniridia - Ptosis - Intellectual Disability - Familial Obesity; Aniridia - Cerebellar Ataxia - Intellectual Disability; Aniridia - Absent Patella; Aniridia; Peters Anomaly - Cataract; Peters Anomaly; Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Syndromic Aniridia; WAGR Syndrome; Wolf

  1. A prospective study of the incidence and nature of injuries to adult rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D R; Roux, C; Noakes, T D

    1990-06-01

    The incidence and nature of injuries occurring in 8 adult club rugby teams was followed prospectively during the 1988 rugby season. The findings were compared with those from two similar studies in schoolboy rugby players. A total of 114 injuries were sustained by 78 players; 85% of injuries occurred during matches. Injury was most prevalent during the first 8 weeks of the season and again after the mid-season break. Hookers (19%), wings (15%), fullbacks (11%) and centres (10%) were the players most often injured. Injury occurred most commonly when the player was tackled (26%), during open play (21%) and during the loose scrum (17%). Muscles (33%) and ligaments (32%) were the anatomical structures most often injured. Injury caused 35% of injured players to miss more than 35 days of rugby. Thirteen per cent of injured players did not play again for the rest of the season and only 14% of injured players returned to rugby after 7 days or less. Prolonged disability was associated with ligament injuries (57%), dislocations (17%) and fractures (10%). PMID:2345880

  2. Linking monazite geochronology with fluid infiltration and metamorphic histories: Nature and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazia, J. R.; Harlov, D. E.; Suzuki, K.; Kim, S. W.; Girish-Kumar, M.; Hayasaka, Y.; Ishwar-Kumar, C.; Windley, B. F.; Sajeev, K.

    2015-11-01

    Migmatised metapelites from the Kodaikanal region, central Madurai Block, southern India have undergone ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism (950-1000 °C; 7-8 kbar). In-situ electron microprobe Th-U-Pb isochron (CHIME) dating of monazites in a leucosome and surrounding silica-saturated and silica-poor restites from the same outcrop indicates three principal ages that can be linked to the evolutionary history of these rocks. Monazite grains from the silica-saturated restite have well-defined, inherited cores with thick rims that yield an age of ca. 1684 Ma. This either dates the metamorphism of the original metapelite or is a detrital age of inherited monazite. Monazite grains from the silica-poor restite, thick rims from the silica-saturated restite, and monazite cores from the leucosome have ages ranging from 520 to 540 Ma suggesting a mean age of 530 Ma within the error bars. In the leucosome the altered rim of the monazite gives an age of ca. 502 Ma. Alteration takes the form of Th-depleted lobes of monazite with sharp curvilinear boundaries extending from the monazite grain rim into the core. We have replicated experimentally these altered rims in a monazite-leucosome experiment at 800 °C and 2 kbar. This experiment, coupled with earlier published monazite-fluid experiments involving high pH alkali-bearing fluids at high P-T, helps to confirm the idea that alkali-bearing fluids, in the melt and along grain boundaries during crystallization, were responsible for the formation of the altered monazite grain rims via the process of coupled dissolution-reprecipitation.

  3. Combining natural history collections with fisher knowledge for community-based conservation in Fiji.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail S Golden

    Full Text Available Harnessing the traditional ecological knowledge (TEK of local communities has the potential to enhance conservation planning in developing regions. Marine protected areas (MPAs that incorporate traditional beliefs about reef tenure are generally more successful in reaching conservation goals and ensuring the participation of local fishermen on vulnerable tropical reef systems. Fiji possesses a unique system of traditional reef management in which local clans or villages, called mataqali, control individual units of a reef, known as qoliqoli, and make independent management decisions based on traditional beliefs and conservation concerns. This is an example of a system, known as customary marine tenure, which has attracted interest from conservation scientists hoping to set up MPAs in vulnerable regions. As one example of this grassroots participation, Nagigi village on the Fijian island of Vanua Levu has expressed interest in setting up an MPA in part of its qoliqoli because of concerns about overfishing. In response to this interest, we took a two-pronged approach to assessing Nagigi's fishery status and conservation needs, first conducting a fishery-independent species survey using destructive sampling and then focusing on fisheries targets identified through fisher interviews. These interviews allowed us to identify heavily targeted species, assess villagers' understanding of reef dynamics over 30 or 40 years of fisheries expansion, and evaluate village support and expectations for a proposed conservation program. Based on our findings we recommend a temporary closure to be in effect for at least three years, allowing one of the more important fishery targets, Lethrinus harak (Forsskål, 1775; Lethrinidae, to complete at least one generation within the reserve. The methodology of matching the proposed marine protected area with the life histories and ecologies of heavily targeted species identified through fisherman and -woman interviews can

  4. Site response of heterogeneous natural deposits to harmonic excitation applied to more than 100 case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenari, Reza Jamshidi; Bostani Taleshani, Shirin Aminzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Variation of shear-wave propagation velocity (SWV) with depth was studied by analyzing more than one hundred actual SWV profiles. Linear, power, and hyperbolic variation schemes were investigated to find the most representative form for naturally occurred alluvial deposits. It was found that hyperbolic (asymptotic) variation dominates the majority of cases and it can be reliably implemented in analytical or analytical-numerical procedures. Site response analyses for a one-layer heterogeneous stratum were conducted to find an equivalent homogeneous alternative which simplifies the analysis procedure but does not compromise the accuracy of the resonance and amplification responses. Harmonic average, arithmetic average and mid-value equivalents are chosen from the literature for investigation. Furthermore, full and partial depth averaging schemes were evaluated and compared in order to verify the validity of current practices which rely upon averaging shallow depths, viz., the first 30 m of the strata. Engineering bedrock concept was discussed and the results were compared.

  5. The natural history of sound localization in mammals – a story of neuronal inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pecka

    2014-10-01

    Here we argue that mammalian and avian phylogeny of spatial hearing is characterized by a convergent evolution of hearing air-borne sounds rather than by homology. In particular, the different evolutionary origins of tympanic ears and the different availability of binaural cues in early mammals and archosaurs imposed distinct constraints on the respective binaural processing mechanisms. The role of synaptic inhibition in generating binaural spatial sensitivity in mammals is highlighted, as it reveals a unifying principle of mammalian circuit design for encoding sound position. Together, we combine evolutionary, anatomical and physiological arguments for making a clear distinction between mammalian processing mechanisms and coding strategies and those of archosaurs. We emphasize that a consideration of the convergent nature of neuronal mechanisms will significantly increase the explanatory power of studies of spatial processing in both mammals and birds.

  6. Evolution of natural history information in the 21st century – developing an integrated framework for biological and geographical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry, II

    2011-01-01

    Threats to marine and estuarine species operate over many spatial scales, from nutrient enrichment at the watershed/estuarine scale to invasive species and climate change at regional and global scales. To help address research questions across these scales, we provide here a standardized framework for a biogeographical information system containing queriable biological data that allows extraction of information on multiple species, across a variety of spatial scales based on species distributions, natural history attributes and habitat requirements. As scientists shift from research on localized impacts on individual species to regional and global scale threats, macroecological approaches of studying multiple species over broad geographical areas are becoming increasingly important. The standardized framework described here for capturing and integrating biological and geographical data is a critical first step towards addressing these macroecological questions and we urge organizations capturing biogeoinformatics data to consider adopting this framework.

  7. Tethered cord: natural history, surgical outcome and risk for Chiari malformation 1 (CM1): a review of 110 detethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Laura Grazia; Selvaggio, Giorgio; Visintini, Sergio; Erbetta, Alessandra; Scaioli, Vidmer; Solero, Carlo Lazzaro

    2011-12-01

    The surgical results of this series of occult spina bifida seem better than the natural history registered in the long pre-operative period in terms of neurological deterioration. The major contribution to this result is attributed to neurophysiological monitoring that lowers the risks of permanent damage and increases the percentage of effective detethering. The present series of TCS, due to conus and filar lipoma, documents that CM1 is a really rare association occurring in less than 6% of the patients, despite the low position of conus. The detethering procedure did not influence the tonsillar position, thus excluding the correlation between the tethering and the tonsillar descent. The genetic alteration documented in a girl reinforces the hypothesis of a rare complex polymaformative picture deserving multiple procedures according to the prevailing clinical symptoms. PMID:21922314

  8. Ocean disposal option for bulk wastes containing naturally occurring radionuclides: an assessment case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 180,000 m3 of slightly contaminated radioactive wastes (36 pCi/g radium-226) currently stored at the US Department of Energy's Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), near Lewiston, New York. These wastes resulted from the cleanup of soils that were contaminated above the guidelines for unrestricted use of property. An alternative to long-term management of these wastes on land is dispersal in the ocean. A scenario for ocean disposal is presented for excavation, transport, and emplacement of these wastes in an ocean disposal site. The potential fate of the wastes and impacts on the ocean environment are analyzed, and uncertainties in the development of two worst-case scenarios for dispersion and pathway analyses are discussed. Based on analysis of a worst-case pathway back to man, the incremental dose from ingesting fish containing naturally occurring radionuclides from ocean disposal of the NFSS wastes is insignificant. Ocean disposal of this type of waste appears to be a technically promising alternative to the long-term maintenance costs and eventual loss of containment associated with management in a near-surface land burial facility

  9. Effects of a natural toxin on life history and gene expression of Eisenia andrei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommen Kloeke, A E Elaine; Gong, Ping; Ellers, Jacintha; Roelofs, Dick

    2014-02-01

    Earthworms perform key functions for a healthy soil ecosystem, such as bioturbation. The soil ecosystem can be challenged by natural toxins such as isothiocyanates (ITCs), produced by many commercial crops. Therefore, the effects of 2-phenylethyl ITC were investigated on the earthworm Eisenia andrei using an ecotoxicogenomics approach. Exposure to 2-phenylethyl ITC reduced both survival and reproduction of E. andrei in a dose-dependent manner (median effective concentration [EC50] = 556 nmol/g). Cross-species comparative genomic hybridization validated the applicability of an existing 4 × 44,000 Eisenia fetida microarray to E. andrei. Gene expression profiles revealed the importance of metallothionein (MT) as an early warning signal when E. andrei was exposed to low concentrations of 2-phenylethyl ITC. Alignment of these MT genes with the MT-2 gene of Lumbricus rubellus showed that at least 2 MT gene clusters are present in the Eisenia sp. genome. At high-exposure concentrations, gene expression was mainly affected by inhibiting chitinase activity, inducing an oxidative stress response, and stimulating energy metabolism. Furthermore, analysis by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway implied that the high concentration may have caused impaired light sensitivity, angiogenesis, olfactory perception, learning, and memory. Increased levels of ITCs may be found in the field in the near future. The results presented call for a careful investigation to quantify the risk of such compounds before allowing them to enter the soil on a large scale. PMID:24395740

  10. Militarised natural history: tales of the avocet's return to postwar Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sophia

    2011-06-01

    Absent as a breeding bird from Britain for at least a century, avocets (Recurvirostra avosetta) began nesting on the east coast of Britain, in Suffolk, shortly after the end of the Second World War, having honed in on two spots on Britain's coast that had been flooded for war-related reasons. The avocets' presence was surrounded in secrecy, while a dedicated few kept up a protective watch over them. As the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) took over responsibility for the flourishing colony, they claimed the episode as a symbol of success for British protection, later making the bird their logo. Counter to the RSPB's story of protecting a British bird, I read the narratives of events in terms of making a bird British. I show how, as postwar Britain slumped economically and spiritually and tried to rebuild itself, the birds became a vehicle for formulating national identity: of Britain as a home to which to return and belong. Exploring the themes of returning servicemen and closed territories, the paper also examines the episode in terms of the naturalisation of the military and the militarisation of nature. PMID:21486661

  11. Natural history of extensive diaphragmatic injury on the right side: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Henrique Rivaben

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the natural healing of the rat diaphragm that suffered an extensive right penetrating injury.METHODS: Animals were submitted to an extensive penetrating injury in right diaphragm. The sample consisted of 40 animals. The variables studied were initial weight, weight 21 days after surgery; healing of the diaphragm, non-healing of the diaphragm, and herniated abdominal contents into the chest.RESULTS: Ten animals were used as controls for weight and 30 animals were operated. Two animals died during the experiment, so 28 animals formed the operated group; healing of the diaphragm occurred in 15 animals (54%, 11 other animals showed diaphragmatic hernia (39% and in two we observed only diaphragmatic injury without hernia (7%. Among the herniated organs, the liver was found in 100% of animals, followed by the omentum in 77%, small bowel in 62%, colon in 46%, stomach in 31% and spleen in 15%. The control group and the diaphragmatic healing subgroup showed increased weight since the beginning of the study and the 21 days after surgery (p <0.001. The unhealed group showed no change in weight (p = 0.228.CONCLUSION: there is a predominance of spontaneous healing in the right diaphragm; animals in which there was no healing of the diaphragm did not gain weight, and the liver was the organ present in 100% the diaphragmatic surface in all rats with healed diaphragm or not.

  12. The alveolitis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Evaluation of natural history and alveolitis-dependent changes in lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current concepts of the pathogenesis of pulmonary sarcoidosis suggest that a mononuclear cell alveolitis, comprised of activated T-lymphocytes and activated alveolar macrophages, precedes and modulates the formation of granuloma and fibrosis. To evaluate the natural history of this alveolitis and determine the relationship it has to subsequent changes in lung function, 19 untreated patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis without extrapulmonary manifestations were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, 67Ga scanning, and pulmonary function tests to evaluate lung T-cells, lung alveolar macrophages, and lung function, respectively. In patients with sarcoidosis, low intensity alveolitis (lung T-cells less than or equal to 28% of all lung effector cells and/or 67Ga scan negative) was much more common (80% of all observations) than high intensity alveolitis (lung T-cells greater than 28% and 67Ga scan positive, 20% of all observations). Conventional clinical, roentgenographic, or physiologic studies could not predict the alveolitis status. Interestingly, of the 51 alveolitis evaluations in the 19 patients, there were 24 occurrences (47%) where the alveolitis was ''split,'' i.e., 67Ga scans positive and T-cells low (39%) or 67Ga negative and T-cells high (8%). Most untreated patients with sarcoidosis without extrapulmonary symptoms may have some inflammatory processes ongoing in their alveolar structures. Overall, whenever a high intensity alveolitis episode occurred, it was followed by deterioration over the next 6 months in at least one lung function parameter. A low intensity alveolitis episode was followed by functional deterioration only 8% of the time. The alveolitis parameters (lavage and 67Ga scanning) clearly predicted prognosis. These observations should prove useful in understanding the natural history of pulmonary sarcoidosis, in staging patients with this disease, and in making rational therapy decisions

  13. Natural humic substances effects on the life history traits of Latonopsis australis SARS (1888) (Cladocera--Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana Soares de Andrade; Santos, Thirza de Santana; Pestana, Edilene M S; Souza, Fábio Neves; Lage, Vivian Marina Gomes Barbosa; Nunesmaia, Bárbara Janaína Bezerra; Sena, Palloma Thaís Souza; Mariano-Neto, Eduardo; da Silva, Eduardo Mendes

    2015-02-01

    Cultivation medium is one of the first aspects to be considered in zooplankton laboratory cultivation. The use of artificial media does not concern to reproduce natural conditions to the cultivations, which may be achieved by using natural organic compounds like humic substances (HS). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a concentrate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the Negro River (NR(1)) and an extraction of humic acids (HA) from humus produced by Eisenia andrei on the life history traits of laboratory-based Latonopsis australis SARS (1888). A cohort life table approach was used to provide information about the effectiveness of NR and HA as supplements for the artificial cultivation of L. australis. Additionally, we seek to observe a maximization of L. australis artificial cultivation fitness by expanding the range of HS concentrations. The first experiment demonstrated that the females of L. australis reared under NR10 (mgDOCL(-1)) may have experienced an acceleration of the population life cycle, as the females have proportionally reproduced more and lived shorter than controls. By contrast, the use of the HA did not improve life history traits considered. The expansion of the concentration range (5, 10, 20 and 50 mgDOCL(-1)) corroborated the patterns observed on the first assay. Results for the fitness estimates combined with shorter lifespans than controls demonstrated trade-offs between reproductive output and female longevity reared under NR conditions, with NR20 been suggested as the best L. australis cultivation medium. This response might be associated with hormone-like effects. PMID:25025739

  14. Coral reefs in an urban embayment in Hawaii: a complex case history controlled by natural and anthropogenic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, R. W.

    1995-11-01

    The effects of natural and anthropogenic stress need to be separated before coral reef ecosystems can be effectively managed. In this paper, a 25 year case history of coral reefs in an urban embayment (Mamala Bay) off Honolulu, Hawaii is described and differences between natural and man-induced stress are distinguished. Mamala Bay is a 30 km long shallow coastal bay bordering the southern (leeward) shore of Oahu and the city of Honolulu in the Hawaiian Islands. During the last 25 years, this area has been hit by two magnitude 5 hurricane events (winds > 240 km/h) generating waves in excess of 7.5 m. Also during this period, two large sewer outfalls have discharged up to 90 million gallons per day (mgd) or (360 × 106 L/day) of point source pollution into the bay. Initially the discharge was raw sewage, but since 1977 it has received advanced primary treatment. Non-point source run-off from the Honolulu watershed also enters the bay on a daily basis. The results of the study show that discharge of raw sewage had a serious but highly localized impact on shallow (˜10 m) reef corals in the bay prior to 1977. After 1977, when treatment was upgraded to the advanced primary level and outfalls were extended to deep water (> 65 m), impacts to reef corals were no longer significant. No measurable effects of either point or non-point source pollution on coral calcification, growth, species composition, diversity or community structure related to pollution can now be detected. Conversely the effects of hurricane waves in 1982 and 1992 together caused major physical destruction to the reefs. In 1982, average coral cover of well-developed offshore reefs dropped from 60-75% to 5-15%. Only massive species in high relief areas survived. Today, recovery is occurring, and notwithstanding major future disturbance events, long-term biological processes should eventually return the coral ecosystems to a more mature successional stage. This case history illustrates the complex nature of

  15. Munazza's story: Understanding science teaching and conceptions of the nature of science in Pakistan through a life history study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Nelofer

    In this study I have described and tried to comprehend how a female science teacher understands her practice. Additionally, I have developed some understanding of her understanding of the nature of science. While teaching science, a teacher projects messages about the nature of science that can be captured by observations and interviews. Furthermore, the manner is which a teacher conceptualizes science for teaching, at least in part, depends on personal life experiences. Hence, I have used the life history method to understand Munazza's practice. Munazza is a young female science teacher working in a private, co-educational school for children from middle income families in Karachi, Pakistan. Her stories are central to the study, and I have represented them using a number of narrative devices. I have woven in my own stories too, to illustrate my perspective as a researcher. The data includes 13 life history interviews and many informal conversations with Munazza, observations of science teaching in classes seven and eight, and interviews with other science teachers and administrative staff of the school. Munazza's personal biography and experiences of school and undergraduate courses has influenced the way she teaches. It has also influenced the way she does not teach. She was not inspired by her science teachers, so she has tried not to teach the way she was taught science. Contextual factors, her conception of preparation for teaching as preparation for subject content and the tension that she faces in balancing care and control in her classroom are some factors that influence her teaching. Munazza believes that science is a stable, superior and value-free way of knowing. In trying to understand the natural world, observations come first, which give reliable information about the world leading inductively to a "theory". Hence, she relies a great deal on demonstrations in the class where students "see" for themselves and abstract the scientific concept from the

  16. The Inclusion of the Nature of Science and Its Elements in Recent Popular Science Writing for Adults and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the inclusion of nature of science (NOS) in popular science writing to determine whether it could serve supplementary resource for teaching NOS. Four groups of documents published from 2001 to 2010 were included in the analysis: "Scientific American," "Discover" magazine, winners of the…

  17. The Dnieper River Aquatic System Radioactive Contamination; Long-tern Natural Attenuation And Remediation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovych, Oleg; Laptev, Genadiy; Kanivets, Vladimir; Konoplev, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Near 27 year passed after the Chernobyl Accident, and the experience gained to study radionuclide behavior in the aquatic systems and to mitigate water contamination are still pose of interest for scientists, society and regulatory austerities. There are different aspects of radionuclide transport in the environment were studied since the Chernobyl fallout in 1986 covered the river catchments, wetlands, river, lakes/reservoirs and reached the Black Sea. The monitoring time series data set and also data on the radionuclides behavior studies in the water bodies (river, lakes and the Black Sea) are available now in Ukraine and other affected countries. Its causation analyses, considering the main geochemical, physical and chemical and hydrological process, governing by radionuclide mobility and transport on the way from the initially contaminated catchments, through the river-reservoir hydrological system to the Black Sea can help in better understanding of the main factors governing be the radionuclide behavior in the environment. Radionuclide washout and its hydrological transport are determined speciation of radionuclides as well as soil types and hydrological mode and also geochemistry and landscape conditions at the affected areas. Mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides are determined by ratio of radionuclide chemical forms in fallout and site-specific environmental characteristics determining rates of leaching, fixation/remobilization as well as sorption-desorption of mobile fraction (its solid-liquid distribution). In many cases the natural attenuation processes governing by the above mentioned processes supported by water flow transportation and sedimentation played the key role in self-rehabilitation of the aquatic ecosystems. The models developed during post-Chernobyl decade and process parameters studies can help in monitoring and remediation programs planed for Fukusima Daichi affected watersheds areas as well. Some most important monitoring data

  18. The natural history of porcine circovirus type 2: from an inoffensive virus to a devastating swine disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalés, Joaquim; Kekarainen, Tuija; Cortey, Martí

    2013-07-26

    The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural history of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection and its related diseases. The perception about PCV2 as a significant pathogen has markedly changed in the last 15 years. The ubiquitous nature of the virus, the retrospective evidence of this infection long before disease association, the multifactorial aetio-pathogenesis of PCV2-systemic disease (SD) and the lack of consistent demonstration of Koch's postulates caused great controversy about the real causal capabilities of this virus. The advent of vaccines against PCV2 radically changed such perception and this virus is nowadays regarded as a very important pig pathogen. Moreover, the current PCV2 vaccines are ones of the most widely used in pig producing countries. On the other hand, how the virus causes disease is still a not fully solved complex scientific question, but host, infection timing and the virus itself are pivotal factors to consider explaining disease presentation at an individual level. The appearance of PCV2-SD as an epidemic problem at the end of 1990 s or early-mid 2000s might be related with a number of known and unknown variables. Based on available data, the international trade of pigs may have played a major role in the dissemination of more susceptible swine genetic lines as well as in the global PCV2 genotype replacement (PCV2b over PCV2a) during such period. PMID:23380460

  19. The illusion of the positive: the impact of natural and induced mood on older adults' false recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Lisa; Hess, Thomas M; Elliot, Tonya

    2012-11-01

    Recent research suggests that affective and motivational processes can influence age differences in memory. In the current study, we examine the impact of both natural and induced mood state on age differences in false recall. Older and younger adults performed a version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM; Roediger & McDermott, 1995 , Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, 803) false memory paradigm in either their natural mood state or after a positive or negative mood induction. Results indicated that, after accounting for age differences in basic cognitive function, age-related differences in positive mood during the testing session were related to increased false recall in older adults. Inducing older adults into a positive mood also exacerbated age differences in false memory. In contrast, veridical recall did not appear to be systematically influenced by mood. Together, these results suggest that positive mood states can impact older adults' information processing and potentially increase underlying cognitive age differences. PMID:22292431

  20. Adult Education in the Danish Modernization Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2014-01-01

    at local participants and contexts and a globalization process which redefines the cultural environment and presents a new and challenging agenda for adult learning. I will apply a rather general framework of historical analysis of adult education which is derived from and related to European modernization...... (Salling Olesen 2009) on the history of Danish adult education and the possible contemporary impacts of this history (Salling Olesen 1985;1989). It looks at the societal nature of adult learning and hence the societal functions of adult education, and emphasizes the historical dimension in the sense......The aim of this article is to provide an input for a discussion about the situation of a Danish (Nordic) model of adult education in the context of European policy as well as globalization. The article will seek to conceptualize the tension between adult education which is founded in and aiming...

  1. Adult Education in the Danish Modernization Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    The aim of this article is to provide an input for a discussion about the situation of a Danish (Nordic) model of adult education in the context of European policy as well as globalization. The article will seek to conceptualize the tension between adult education which is founded in and aiming at...... local participants and contexts and a globalization process which redefines the cultural environment and presents a new and challenging agenda for adult learning. I will apply a rather general framework of historical analysis of adult education which is derived from and related to European modernization...... (Salling Olesen 2009) on the history of Danish adult education and the possible contemporary impacts of this history (Salling Olesen 1985;1989). It looks at the societal nature of adult learning and hence the societal functions of adult education, and emphasizes the historical dimension in the sense of...

  2. Association of oxytocin level and less severe forms of childhood maltreatment history among healthy Japanese adults involved with child care

    OpenAIRE

    Rie eMizuki; Takeo eFujiwara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxytocin (OT) is known to play a role in stress regulation. The association between childhood maltreatment history and neuropeptide OT concentration is inconsistent due to the varying degrees of severity of childhood maltreatment, among other contributing factors. Less severe forms of childhood maltreatment history might enhance OT concentrations as a response to coping with social stress within the family. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between less s...

  3. Motivations, Barriers, and Behaviors Related to Obtaining and Discussing Family Health History: A Sex-Based Comparison Among Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Beaudoin, Christopher E.; Sosa, Erica T.; Pulczinski, Jairus C.; Ory, Marcia G; McKyer, E Lisako J

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition is a risk factor for many chronic diseases, yet little is known about the frequency in which college students seek out their family health history or with whom they communicate relevant information. Purpose This study examines motivations and barriers associated with obtaining one’s family health history and discussing it with others. Methods Data were analyzed from 625 college students using an internet-delivered questionnaire, which compr...

  4. The association between parental history of diagnosed mood/anxiety disorders and psychiatric symptoms and disorders in young adult offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Low Nancy CP; Dugas Erika; Constantin Evelyn; Karp Igor; Rodriguez Daniel; O’Loughlin Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Parental history of mood or anxiety disorders is one of the strongest and most consistent risk factors for the development of these disorders in offspring. Gaps remain however in our knowledge of whether maternal or paternal disorders are more strongly associated with offspring disorders, and whether the association exists in non-clinical samples. This study uses a large population-based sample to test if maternal or paternal history of mood and/or anxiety disorders increa...

  5. Interactions Between Mathematics and Physics: The History of the Concept of Function—Teaching with and About Nature of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Tinne Hoff; Lützen, Jesper

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the history of the concept of function and emphasize in particular how problems in physics have led to essential changes in its definition and application in mathematical practices. Euler defined a function as an analytic expression, whereas Dirichlet defined it as a variable that depends in an arbitrary manner on another variable. The change was required when mathematicians discovered that analytic expressions were not sufficient to represent physical phenomena such as the vibration of a string (Euler) and heat conduction (Fourier and Dirichlet). The introduction of generalized functions or distributions is shown to stem partly from the development of new theories of physics such as electrical engineering and quantum mechanics that led to the use of improper functions such as the delta function that demanded a proper foundation. We argue that the development of student understanding of mathematics and its nature is enhanced by embedding mathematical concepts and theories, within an explicit-reflective framework, into a rich historical context emphasizing its interaction with other disciplines such as physics. Students recognize and become engaged with meta-discursive rules governing mathematics. Mathematics teachers can thereby teach inquiry in mathematics as it occurs in the sciences, as mathematical practice aimed at obtaining new mathematical knowledge. We illustrate such a historical teaching and learning of mathematics within an explicit and reflective framework by two examples of student-directed, problem-oriented project work following the Roskilde Model, in which the connection to physics is explicit and provides a learning space where the nature of mathematics and mathematical practices are linked to natural science.

  6. Stress on health-related quality of life in older adults: the protective nature of mindfulness

    OpenAIRE

    de Frias, Cindy M.; Whyne, Erum

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The current study examined whether the link between stress and health-related quality of life was buffered by protective factors, namely mindfulness, in a sample of middle-aged and older adults. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 134 healthy, community-dwelling adults (ages 50–85 years) were recruited from Dallas, TX. The participants were screened for depressive symptoms and severity (using the Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9]). All participants completed measures of sel...

  7. Records of natural fire and climate history during the last three glacial-interglacial cycles around the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO; Yunli

    2001-01-01

    [1]Komarek, E. V. Sr., The meteorological basis for fire ecology, in Proc. Tall Timbers Fire Ecol. Conf., 1966, 35-44.[2]Gilbert, L. M., Fire as a factor in the development of vegetation types, Aust. Fores., 1962, 26: 67-70.[3]Johnston, V. R., The ecology of fire, Audubon, 1970, 72: 76-119.[4]Chen Yinshuo, Forest fire in early Holocene forest changes at Lake Barrine, Australia, Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese),1990, 32(1): 69-75.[5]Michael, I. B., Fire in the earth sciences, Episodes, 1997, 20(4): 223-226.[6]Herring, J. R., Charcoal flux into sediments of the north Pacific Ocean: The Cenozoic record of burning, in The carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2: Natural variations from Archean to present, Geophysical Monograph, 1985, 32:237-251.[7]Kershaw, A. P., Climatic change and aboriginal burniing in northeast Australia during the last two glacial/interglacial cy cles. Nature, 1985, 322: 47-49.[8]Hermann, B., Late Quaternary vegetation, climates and fire history from the tropical mountain region of Morrode Itapeva,SE Brazil, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 1997, 129: 407-422.[9]Earle, C. J., Brubaker, L. B., Anderson, P. M., Charcoal in northcentral Alaskan lake sediments: Relationships to fire and late-Quaternary vegetation history, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 1996, 92: 83-95.[10]Xuan Wang, Sander van der Karrs., Peter, K. et al., A record of fire, vegetation and climate through the last three glacial cycles from Lombok Ridge core G6-4, eastern Indian Ocean, Indonesia, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Pa laeoecology, 1999, 147: 241-256.[11]Sander van der Kaars, Xuan Wang, Peter, K. et al., A late Quaternary palaeoecological record from the Banda Sea, Indo nesia: Patterns of vegetation, climate and biomass burning in Indonesia and northern Australia, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2000, 155: 135-154.[12]Isabel, F., Volker, M., A review of charcoal analysis as a tool for

  8. Life History of Aggression scores are predicted by childhood hyperactivity, conduct disorder, adult substance abuse, and low cooperativeness in adult psychiatric patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Hofvander, Björn; Ståhlberg, Ola; Nydén, Agneta; Wentz, Elisabet; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Billstedt, Eva; Forsman, Anders; Gillberg, Christopher; Nilsson, Thomas; Råstam, Maria; Anckarsäter, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The prevention of aggressive behaviours is a core priority for psychiatric clinical work, but the association between the diagnostic concepts used in psychiatry and aggression remains largely unknown. Outpatients referred for psychiatric evaluations of childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorders (n=178) and perpetrators of violent crimes referred to pre-trial forensic psychiatric investigations (n=92) had comprehensive, instrument-based, psychiatric assessments, including the Life History of A...

  9. Natural history of markers of collagen turnover in patients with early diastolic dysfunction and impact of eplerenone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mak, George J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to evaluate the impact of eplerenone on collagen turnover in preserved systolic function heart failure (HFPSF). BACKGROUND: Despite growing interest in abnormal collagen metabolism as a feature of HFPSF with diastolic dysfunction, the natural history of markers of collagen turnover and the impact of selective aldosterone antagonism on this natural history remains unknown. METHODS: We evaluated 44 patients with HFPSF, randomly assigned to control (n = 20) or eplerenone 25 mg daily (n = 24) for 6 months, increased to 50 mg daily from 6 to 12 months. Serum markers of collagen turnover and inflammation were analyzed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months and included pro-collagen type-I and -III aminoterminal peptides, matrix metalloproteinase type-2, interleukin-6 and -8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Doppler-echocardiographic assessment of diastolic filling indexes and tissue Doppler analyses were also obtained. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 80 +\\/- 7.8 years; 46% were male; 64% were receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, 34% an angiotensin-II receptor blocker, and 68% were receiving beta-blocker therapy. Pro-collagen type-III and -I aminoterminal peptides, matrix metalloproteinase type-2, interleukin-6 and -8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased with time in the control group. Eplerenone treatment had no significant impact on any biomarker at 6 months but attenuated the increase in pro-collagen type-III aminoterminal peptide at 12 months (p = 0.006). Eplerenone therapy was associated with modest effects on diastolic function without any impact on clinical variables or brain natriuretic peptide. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates progressive increases in markers of collagen turnover and inflammation in HFPSF with diastolic dysfunction. Despite high background utilization of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone modulators, eplerenone therapy prevents a progressive increase in pro-collagen type

  10. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma with initial supradiaphragmatic presentation: natural history and patterns of disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma commonly presents in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma is less common and its natural history is not well defined. This study was conducted to understand the natural history, to determine the frequency of synchronous disease in the GI tract, and to understand the patterns of disease progression after treatment for supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 39 patients who presented with supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma between 1991 and 1997. Results: The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 25-90 years) with 16 male and 23 female patients. The most common primary site was salivary gland followed by ocular adnexa, lung, oral cavity, and others. Sixteen patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and biopsy (EGD + Bx) and 4 were found to have gastric involvement. Ann Arbor stages were the following: IEA, 17; IIEA, 5, IIEB, 1; and IVA, 16. The initial treatments were: involved field radiation therapy (n = 10), chemotherapy (n = 14), combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy (n = 9), observation after biopsy (n = 4), antibiotics only (n = 1), and patient refusal of further intervention (n = 1). Seven patients received antibiotics as a part of the initial treatment. Every patient except for 1 was alive at a median follow-up of 39.5 months (range, 3-83 months). Thirty-six patients achieved complete response (CR) to the initial treatment. The actuarial 5-year progression-free survival rate was 83%. Progression of the disease occurred in 4 patients, with 2 in the stomach. Salvage attempts were made to 4 and were successful in 3. Of the 2 patients who relapsed in the stomach, 1 had negative EGD + Bx at the time of initial diagnosis. An EGD + Bx was not done in the second patient. Conclusion: Supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma appears to have a favorable prognosis. However, routine evaluation of the stomach

  11. [THE PROFESSORS OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND THE SOCIETY OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SCIENCES OF WARSAW (1800-1832)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The National Museum of Natural History played a crucial role in the formation of Polish scientific elites in the 19th century. Many Polish students were attending in Paris natural history, botany, zoology, chemistry and mineralogy courses. The Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning was the largest scientific society and one of the most important scientific institutions in Poland. It had also an impact on the political and cultural life of the country, occupied and deprived of freedom at that time. Amongst its founders and members, could be found listeners to the lectures of Lamarck, Haüy, Vauquelin, Desfontaines, Jussieu. Moreover, seven professors of the National Museum of Natural History were elected foreign members of the Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning: Cuvier, Desfontaines, Haüy, Jussieu, Latreille, Mirbel, Vauquelin. The article analyses this choice and underlines the relationship between these scientists and Warsaw's scientists. The results of this research allow to confirm that the National Museum of Natural History was the most important foreign institution in the 19th century for Polish science, and more specifically natural sciences. PMID:27071294

  12. The influence of the history of science course on pre-service science teachers' understanding of the nature of science concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Behiye

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a history of science course on pre-service science teachers' understanding of the nature of science concepts. Subjects in the study were divided in two groups: (1) students who enrolled in only in the history of science course, (2) students who enrolled both the meaning of science and the history of science courses. An interpretative-descriptive approach and constant comparative analysis were used to identify similarities and differences among pre-service teachers' views about nature of scientific knowledge prior to and after the history of science course. The results of this study indicate that explicitly addressing certain aspects of the nature of science is effective in promoting adequate understanding of the nature of science for pre-service science teachers. Moreover, the results indicate that a student's prior experience with the history of science helps to improve their understanding of the history and nature of science. The history of science course helped pre-service teachers to develop the following views which are parallel with these advocated in both the Benchmarks (AAAS, 1993) and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996) concerning the nature of scientific knowledge: (1) Scientific knowledge is empirically based and an ongoing process of experimentation, investigation, and observation. (2) Science is a human endeavor. (3) People from different cultures, races, genders, and nationality contribute to science. (4) Scientific knowledge is not based on myths, personal beliefs, and religious values. (5) Science background and prior knowledge have important roles for scientific investigations. (6) Scientific theories and laws represent different kinds of knowledge. (7) Science is affected by political, social, and cultural values. (8) Creativity and imagination are used during all stages of scientific investigations. (9) Theories change because of new evidence and new views of existing

  13. Emphasizing the History of Genetics in an Explicit and Reflective Approach to Teaching the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cody Tyler; Rudge, David Wÿss

    2016-05-01

    Science education researchers have long advocated the central role of the nature of science (NOS) for our understanding of scientific literacy. NOS is often interpreted narrowly to refer to a host of epistemological issues associated with the process of science and the limitations of scientific knowledge. Despite its importance, practitioners and researchers alike acknowledge that students have difficulty learning NOS and that this in part reflects how difficult it is to teach. One particularly promising method for teaching NOS involves an explicit and reflective approach using the history of science. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of a historically based genetics unit on undergraduates' understanding of NOS. The three-class unit developed for this study introduces students to Mendelian genetics using the story of Gregor Mendel's work. NOS learning objectives were emphasized through discussion questions and investigations. The unit was administered to undergraduates in an introductory biology course for pre-service elementary teachers. The influence of the unit was determined by students' responses to the SUSSI instrument, which was administered pre- and post-intervention. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted that focused on changes in students' responses from pre- to post-test. Data collected indicated that students showed improved NOS understanding related to observations, inferences, and the influence of culture on science.

  14. Cyatta abscondita: taxonomy, evolution, and natural history of a new fungus-farming ant genus from Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Sosa-Calvo

    Full Text Available Cyatta abscondita, a new genus and species of fungus-farming ant from Brazil, is described based on morphological study of more than 20 workers, two dealate gynes, one male, and two larvae. Ecological field data are summarized, including natural history, nest architecture, and foraging behavior. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data from four nuclear genes indicate that Cyatta abscondita is the distant sister taxon of the genus Kalathomyrmex, and that together they comprise the sister group of the remaining neoattine ants, an informal clade that includes the conspicuous and well-known leaf-cutter ants. Morphologically, Cyatta abscondita shares very few obvious character states with Kalathomyrmex. It does, however, possess a number of striking morphological features unique within the fungus-farming tribe Attini. It also shares morphological character states with taxa that span the ancestral node of the Attini. The morphology, behavior, and other biological characters of Cyatta abscondita are potentially informative about plesiomorphic character states within the fungus-farming ants and about the early evolution of ant agriculture.

  15. Catalog of type specimens of recent Crocodilia and Testudines in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.P.; Gotte, S.W.; Ernst, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    The known type specimens of Crocodilia and Testudines in the collection of the Division of Amphibians and Reptiles, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, published through 2006 represent 93 names of taxa. The catalog presents a list of 249 type-specimen records consisting of 39 holotypes, 52 syntypes, 3 lectotypes, 2 neotypes, 132 paratypes, and 21 paralectotypes. The list is arranged alphabetically by family within Crocodilia and Testudines, and alphabetically by genus and species, as described originally within family. Each entry provides both original and current genus and species names, author(s), date of publication, abbreviated type citation, page of original description, and accompanying fi gures and plates (if any), current type status, USNM catalog number, number of specimens, specimen measurement(s), locality, collector, and date collected. Also included for each taxon is the published type locality, type material at other institutions, an etymology, and remarks on corrections or additional data for original type records, changes in type status, and information pertaining to lost, exchanged, or destroyed specimens. An index of scientific names follows the catalog.

  16. Impact of ruxolitinib on the natural history of primary myelofibrosis: a comparison of the DIPSS and the COMFORT-2 cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Francesco; Maffioli, Margherita; Cervantes, Francisco; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Morra, Enrica; Barbui, Tiziano; Caramazza, Domenica; Pieri, Lisa; Rumi, Elisa; Gisslinger, Heinz; Knoops, Laurent; Kiladjian, Jean Jaques; Mora, Barbara; Hollaender, Norbert; Pascutto, Cristiana; Harrison, Claire; Cazzola, Mario

    2014-03-20

    The international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) provides reliable risk assessment in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Recent clinical trials in PMF patients with intermediate-2 or high IPSS risk have shown a survival advantage of ruxolitinib over placebo (COMFORT-1) or best available therapy (COMFORT-2). Because crossover was allowed in these studies, we analyzed the cohort of ruxolitinib-naive patients used for developing the dynamic IPSS (DIPSS). By adopting ad hoc statistical analyses, we compared survival from diagnosis of 100 PMF patients receiving ruxolitinib within COMFORT-2 with that of 350 patients of the DIPSS study. Subjects were properly matched, and both left-truncation and right-censoring were accounted in order to compare higher IPSS risks exclusively. Patients receiving ruxolitinib had longer survival (5 years, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.9-7.8 vs 3.5 years, 95% CI: 3.0-3.9) with a hazard ratio of 0.61 (95% CI: 0.41-0.91; P = .0148). This observation suggests that ruxolitinib may modify the natural history of PMF. PMID:24443442

  17. Natural history of malignant bone disease in renal cancer: final results of an Italian bone metastasis survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Santini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs, and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months for patients without bone metastasis at diagnosis. Median time to diagnosis of bone metastasis by MSKCC risk was 24 months for good, 5 months for intermediate, and 0 months for poor risk. Median number of SREs/patient was one, and 71% of patients experienced at least one SRE. Median times to first, second, and third SRE were 2, 5, and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 12 months after bone metastasis diagnosis and 10 months after first SRE. Among 181 patients who received zoledronic acid (ZOL, median time to first SRE was significantly prolonged versus control (n = 186 (3 months vs 1 month for control; P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: RCC patients with bone metastasis are at continuous risk of SREs, and in this survey ZOL effectively reduced this risk.

  18. Natural history and manifestations of the hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a pilot study on 21 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Danese, Chiara; Santilli, Valter; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria; Grammatico, Paola

    2010-03-01

    Hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (HT-EDS) is a relatively frequent, although commonly misdiagnosed variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, mainly characterized by marked joint instability and mild cutaneous involvement. Chronic pain, asthenia, and gastrointestinal and pelvic dysfunction are characteristic additional manifestations. We report on 21 HT-EDS patients selected from a group of 40 subjects with suspected mild hereditary connective tissue disorder. General, mucocutaneous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, neurologic, gastrointestinal, urogynecological, and ear-nose-throat abnormalities are investigated systematically and tabulated. Six distinct clinical presentations of HT-EDS are outlined, whose tabulation is a mnemonic for the practicing clinical geneticist in an attempt to diagnose this condition accurately. With detailed clinical records and phenotype comparison among patients of different ages, the natural history of the disorder is defined. Three phases (namely, hypermobility, pain, and stiffness) are delineated based on distinguishing manifestations. A constellation of additional, apparently uncommon abnormalities is also identified, including dolichocolon, dysphonia, and Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. Their further investigation may contribute to an understanding of the pathogenesis of the protean manifestations of HT-EDS, and a more effective approach to the evaluation and management of affected individuals. PMID:20140961

  19. Natural history of cytomegalovirus infection in a series of patients diagnosed with moderate-severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeria Criscuoli; Maria Rosa Rizzuto; Luigi Montalbano; Elena Gallo; Mario Cottone

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the natural history of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in a series of 28 ulcerative colitis patients in whom the search for HCMV was positive.METHODS: A series of 85 patients with moderate-severe ulcerative colitis flare-up were evaluated for a HCMV search by performing a haematoxylin and eosin stain,immunohistochemical assay and nested polymerase chain reaction on rectal biopsies. Among 85 screened patients (19 of whom were steroid resistant/dependant),28 were positive for HCMV; after remission the patients were followed up clinically and histologically.RESULTS: Among the 22 patients with complete followup,in 8 (36%) patients HCMV-DNA persisted in the intestinal specimens. Among the HCMV positive patients,4 (50%) experienced at least one moderate-severe flare-up of colitis without evidence of peripheral HCMV.Among the 14 HCMV negative patients, 3 with pouches developed pouchitis and 5 out of 11 (45%) experienced a colitis flare-up.CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results suggest that HCMV may remain in the colon after an acute colitis flareup despite remission; it seems that the virus is not responsible for the disease relapse.

  20. Population Dynamics of the Swallowtail Butterfly Battus polystictus polystictus (Butler) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) with Notes on Its Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, V W; de Morais, A B B; Romanowski, H P; Mega, N O

    2016-02-01

    Battus polystictus (Butler) is a butterfly from the Neotropical region, occurring in the Atlantic Forest and Pampa biomes. It is commonly found in forest fragments surrounded by meadow formations, subjected to marked seasonal changes. Here, we report the population dynamics of B. polystictus at a high latitude environment and provide notes on its natural history. Population parameters were estimated on a 12-month mark-recapture program and the seasonality of resources investigated by exhaustive mapping of host-plants and flowers. The number of butterflies per day was not stable during the year, ranging from zero (winter) to 22 (summer); the sex ratio was always male biased (3M:1F). The age structure was not constant, with an increase of older individuals toward summer. The population density was positively correlated with temperature, relative humidity, and day length. The residence time was lower for males, while the vagility was lower for females; the increment of resources at forest edges seems to increase the likelihood of occurrence of both sexes. The results shown here suggest that South Brazilian populations of B. polystictus have high ecological demands for spring and summer conditions, avoiding winter in diapause. PMID:26590142