WorldWideScience

Sample records for adulticides

  1. Adulticidal activity against Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) of three Piper spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Choochote Wej; Chaithong Udom; Kamsuk Kittichai; Rattanachanpichai Eumporn; Jitpakdi Atchariya; Tippawangkosol Pongsri; Chaiyasit Dana; Champakaew Daruna; Tuetun Benjawan; Pitasawat Benjawan

    2006-01-01

    Three Piper species, Piper longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, were selected for investigation of adulticidal potential against Stegomyia aegypti, a main vector of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Successive extraction by maceration with 95% ethanol showed percentage yields of ethanolic extracts, which derived from P. longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, of 8.89, 3.21 and 5.30% (w/w), respectively. All Piper extracts illustrated an impressive adulticidal activity when tested a...

  2. Adulticidal efficacy of Delonix elata against filariasis vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohan Rajeswary; Marimuthu Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the adulticidal activity and toxicity of different solvent crude extracts of Delonix elata (D. elata) against filariasis vector mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus). Methods: The adulticidal activities of crude hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol leaf and seed extracts of D. elata were assayed for their toxicity against vector mosquitoCx. quinquefasciatus. Bioassay was carried out by WHO method for determination of adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Results: All extracts showed moderate adulticidal effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract of D. elata leaf against the adults of Cx. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values at 197.28 and 347.45mg/L, respectively.Conclusions:These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. This study provides first report on the mosquito adulticidal activity of D. elata plant extracts against filariasis vector mosquito, Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  3. Control of the Transmission of Chikungunya Fever Epidemic Through the use of Adulticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Naowarat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Another newly emerging disease, chikungunya fever, has appeared in various places such as the Island of Reunion, Thailand and other India. To control an epidemic of disease once it has been established, the use of adulticide is proposed. Approach: To simulate the effects of different control measurement, a mathematical model incorporating the specific features of this disease has been proposed. Using the standard methods for analyzing the dynamical stability of the system, the role of the efficacy of the adulticide on the basic reproduction number of the disease is studied. Results and Conclusion: It was found that below a particular value of the efficacy which depends on the values of the parameters used in the model, adulticide would not be effective at controlling the epidemic.

  4. Adulticidal activity against Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) of three Piper spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choochote, Wej; Chaithong, Udom; Kamsuk, Kittichai; Rattanachanpichai, Eumporn; Jitpakdi, Atchariya; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Chaiyasit, Dana; Champakaew, Daruna; Tuetun, Benjawan; Pitasawat, Benjawan

    2006-01-01

    Three Piper species, Piper longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, were selected for investigation of adulticidal potential against Stegomyia aegypti, a main vector of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Successive extraction by maceration with 95% ethanol showed percentage yields of ethanolic extracts, which derived from P. longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, of 8.89, 3.21 and 5.30% (w/w), respectively. All Piper extracts illustrated an impressive adulticidal activity when tested against female mosquitoes by topical application. The susceptibility of St. aegypti females to ethanol-extracted Piper was dose dependent and varied among the plant species. The highest adulticidal effect was established from P. sarmentosum, followed by P. ribesoides and P. longum, with LD50 values of 0.14, 0.15 and 0.26 microg/female, respectively. The potential of these Piper species, as possible mosquitocides, established convincing activity for further researches to develop natural substances for combat against adult mosquitoes. PMID:16547577

  5. Mosquito adulticidal properties of Delonix elata (Family:Fabaceae) against dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohan Rajeswary; Marimuthu Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the adulticidal activity of hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol leaf and seed extracts of Delonix elata (D. elata) against Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti). Methods:The bioassay was conducted in an experimental kit consisting of two cylindrical plastic tubes both measuring 125 mm×44 mm following the WHO method;mortality of the mosquitoes was recorded after 24 h. Results:The adulticidal activity of plant leaf and seed extracts showed moderate toxic effect on the adult mosquitoes after 24 h of exposure period. However, the highest adulticidal activity was observed in the leaf methanol extract of D. elata against Ae. aegypti with the LC50 and LC90 values 162.87 and 309.32 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions:From this result, it can be concluded the crude extract of D. elata was an excellent potential for controlling Ae. aegypti mosquitoes.

  6. Larvicidal and adulticidal potential of medicinal plant extracts from south India against vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinnaperumal Kamaraj; Abdul Abdul Rahuman

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the larvicidal and adulticidal activities of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Momordica charantia (M.charantia), Moringa oleifera(M. oleifera), Ocimumgratissimum (O. gratissimum), Ocimum tenuiflorum (O. tenuiflorum), Punica granatum(P. granatum) and Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) against Culex gelidus (Cx. gelidus) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus). Methods: Bioassay test was carried out by WHO method for determination of larvicidal and adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. Results: All plant extracts showed moderate larvicidal and adulticidal activities, however the effective larval mortality was found in the leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extract of O. gratissimum and bark methanol extract of M. oleifera against Cx.gelidus with LC50 values of 39.31, 66.28, and 21.83 μg/mL respectively, and methanol extract of O. gratissimum, O. tenuiflorum and P. granatum againstCx. quinquefasciatus exposed for 1 h and mortality was recorded at 24 h recovery period. Above 90% mortality was found in the ethyl acetate and methanol extract of all experimental plants at the concentrations of 500 μg/mL. Conclusions: The present results suggest that the medicinal plant extracts provided an excellent potential for controlling Cx. gelidus and Cx. quinquefasciatus. with LC50 values of 38.47, 24.90 and 67.20 μg/mL, respectively. The adult feoxupnods eidn tfhore 1e thhy al nadc emtaotert aalnidty m weatsh arneoclo redxetrda catt o2f4 a lhl erxepcoevriemrye nptearl ipodla.n Atsb aotv teh e9 0c%on mceonrttraaltiitoyn ws aosf 500 μg/mL. Conclusions: The present results suggest that the medicinal plant extracts provided an excellent potential for controlling Cx. gelidus and Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  7. Combination ground and aerial adulticide applications against mosquitoes in an Arkansas riceland community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersbee, A A; Meisch, M V; Sandoski, C A; Finch, M F; Dame, D A; Olson, J K; Inman, A

    1986-12-01

    Simultaneous ground and aerial adulticide applications were evaluated against riceland mosquitoes in Stuttgart, AR, during July 1985. Naled was aerially applied at 52.6 ml/ha over 10.4 km2 surrounding the city. Ground ULV applications of a mixture of malathion, HAN and resmethrin/PBO (1:1:0.0625) were applied within the city at a rate of 221.8 ml/min at 24 kph. Adult populations of Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Psorophora columbiae were reduced at 24 hr but resurgence of Ps. columbiae was evident at 48 hr posttreatment. Posttreatment data indicated that movement of both mosquitoes occurred along the path of prevailing wind. PMID:2906984

  8. Adulticidal activity against Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) of three Piper spp. Atividade de três Piper spp. contra adultos de Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wej Choochote; Udom Chaithong; Kittichai Kamsuk; Eumporn Rattanachanpichai; Atchariya Jitpakdi; Pongsri Tippawangkosol; Dana Chaiyasit; Daruna Champakaew; Benjawan Tuetun; Benjawan Pitasawat

    2006-01-01

    Three Piper species, Piper longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, were selected for investigation of adulticidal potential against Stegomyia aegypti, a main vector of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Successive extraction by maceration with 95% ethanol showed percentage yields of ethanolic extracts, which derived from P. longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, of 8.89, 3.21 and 5.30% (w/w), respectively. All Piper extracts illustrated an impressive adulticidal activity when tested a...

  9. Screening for adulticidal activity against Anopheles arabiensis in ten plants used as mosquito repellent in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mavundza, Edison J; Maharaj, Rajendra; Chukwujekwu, Jude C; Finnie, Jeffrey F; Staden, Johannes Van

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the development of resistance to synthetic insecticides, adverse effects to human health, non-target organisms and the environment, there is an urgent need to develop new insecticides, which are effective, safe, biodegrable and target-specific. This study was undertaken to evaluate the adulticidal activity of 10 plants used traditionally as mosquito repellents in South Africa. Methods The dried plant materials were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM) and ethanol (EtOH). The...

  10. Spatial and Temporal Distributions of Mosquito Adulticide in Houston during Spraying Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, S.; Clark, A. E.; Yoon, S.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is a common practice for urban areas in the south to control the mosquito population through the routine spraying of pesticides utilizing ultra-low volume (ULV) foggers, either aerially or from trucks. Adult mosquitoes are known disease-borne vectors, including, but not limited to, West Nile Virus. Common mosquito adulticides include Permethrin (a pyrethroid) which is a neurotoxin. The EPA has labelled this pesticide good for mosquito treatment due to low cost, high effectiveness and low pest resistance. Permethrin is released directly into the atmosphere during active ULV fogger spraying, resulting in potentially significantly elevated atmospheric concentrations for hours to days after spray event. The metropolitan area of Houston, TX has a population of nearly 6 million people, making it the fourth most populous city in the U.S., and covers over 9000 square miles. During the DISCOVER-AQ sampling campaign in September 2013, nearly 300 atmospheric particular matter samples were collected during the month-long sampling campaign at four different locations in the Houston metropolitan area. Both total suspended particle (TSP) and particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) samples were collected, the latter of which is more readily inhaled and presents a greater risk to human health. Harris County, the main county of the Houston metropolitan area, controls mosquito for ~4-7 months, annually, covering the summer months. During 2013, Harris County utilized Permethrin as one of two pesticides in a weekly rotation from April to October. Proposed daily ULV treatment plans are published online on a neighborhood scale (Zip Code). Preliminary atmospheric concentrations show that Permethrin has been detected coinciding with days when treatment was proposed by the county. During or directly after use, atmospheric concentration of Permethrin were measuring at typically >10 ng m-3, but as high as 90 ng m-3. Atmospheric concentrations were also

  11. Mosquito adulticidal and repellent activities of botanical extracts against malarial vector,Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marimuthu Govindarajan; Rajamohan Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the adulticidal and repellent activities of different solvent leaf extracts ofEclipta alba (E. alba) andAndrographis paniculata (A. paniculata)against malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi).Methods:Adulticidal efficacy of the crude leaf extracts ofE. alba andA. paniculata with five different solvents like benzene, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and chloroform was tested against the five to six day old adult female mosquitoes of An. stephensi. The adult mortality was observed after24 h under the laboratory conditions. The repellent efficacy was determined againstAn. stephensimosquito species at three concentrations viz.,1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/cm2 under laboratory conditions.Results: Among the tested solvents the maximum efficacy was observed in the methanol extract. TheLC50 andLC90 values ofE. alba andA. paniculata against adults ofAn. stephensiwere150.36, 130.19 ppm and285.22, 244.16ppm, respectively. No mortality was observed in controls. Thechi-square values were significant at P<0.05 level. Methanol extract of E. alba andA. paniculata was produce maximum repellency againstAn. stephensi.Conclusions:From the results it can be concluded the crude extract ofE. alba andA. paniculatawas an excellent potential for controllingAn. stephensimosquitoes.

  12. Larvicidal and Adulticidal Activity of Chroman and Chromene Analogues against Susceptible and Permethrin-Resistant Mosquito Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meepagala, Kumudini M; Estep, Alden S; Becnel, James J

    2016-06-22

    Mosquitoes play a major role as vectors that transmit parasitic and viral diseases worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical countries. Mosquito borne diseases not only affect humans but they also affect livestock in many parts of the world. They carry diseases that are lethal to dogs and horses. Dog heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) is a parasitic disease spread through mosquitoes. This disease is not limited to dogs, but it can affect other animals and humans as well. Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and West Nile virus (WNV) are also mosquito borne diseases that affect the central nervous system of horses and cause severe complications and death. Emergence of resistance among mosquitoes to current pesticides has increased the importance of the search for alternate compounds that are effective and environmentally benign with diverse modes of actions than those that are commercially available. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the primary vector for transmission of Zika viral fever, yellow fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Mosquito control is currently the best strategy to prevent mosquito borne diseases. There are numerous approaches for control of potentially dangerous mosquito populations. These approaches include the use of adulticides (insecticides), larvicides, and, to a limited extent, the use of repellents. Our previous studies have shown the mosquito repellent activity of chromenes. In the present study, we demonstrate larvicidal and adulticidal activity of chroman and chromene analogues against a permethrin susceptible laboratory strain as well as activity against a permethrin-resistant strain of Aedes aegypti. PMID:27249182

  13. Resistance Status of the Malaria Vector Mosquitoes, Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles subpictus Towards Adulticides and Larvicides in Arid and Semi-Arid Areas of India

    OpenAIRE

    Tikar, S. N.; M J Mendki; Sharma, A K; D. Sukumaran; Veer, Vijay; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, B. D.

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility studies of malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae) and An. subpictus Grassi collected during 2004–2007 from various locations of Arid and Semi-Arid Zone of India were conducted by adulticide bioassay of DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and larvicide bioassay of fenthion, temephos, chlorpyriphos and malathion using diagnostic doses. Both species from all locations exhibited variable resistance to DDT and malathion from majority of location. Adults of both the...

  14. Mosquito knock-down and adulticidal activities of essential oils by vaporizer, impregnated filter paper and aerosol methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from 12 medicinal plants were evaluated by three different bioassay methods (Vaporizer, Filter paper and Aerosol for Knock-down and adulticidal efficacy on the filarial vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Based on screening results the effective plants were selected for investigating Knock-down and adulticidal potential against adult female of the laboratory-reared mosquito species, Cx. quinquefasciatus. In vaporizer bioassay method four different doses (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% were used. Four different doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5 and 10% were used both filter paper (cm2 and aerosol (cm3 bioassay methods. Five essential oils (calamus, camphor, citronella, clove and eucalyptus were identified as potential treatments in vaporizer bioassay. The result showed that the knock down time decreased with increased concentration in clove oil treatment; the Knock-down time (KT 50 = 46.1 ± 0.1, 38.5 ± 0.1, 30.7 ± 0.2, and 20.1 ± 0.1 minutes was recorded at 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% /cm3 respectively. In filter paper method nine essential oils were identified as potential treatments. After 1 hr exposure period clove oil recorded the lowest median Knock-down time (KT50 which was calculated as 9.15 ± 0.1min/cm2. Followed by citronella (KT50 =11.4 ± 0.1 min and eucalyptus (KT50 =11.4 ±0.1min oils since they recorded lower median Knock-down time. All the twelve essential oils were identified as potential treatments in aerosol activity. The lethal time decreased when the concentration increased. At 5 % concentration the median lethal time (LT50 for clove oil was calculated as (LT50=3.80 ± 0.1minutes. The Cinnamon oil was effective which recorded (LT50 = 1.99 mins as median lethal time. Camphor (LT50 =19.6± 0.1 min oil were found to be less toxic by aerosol method. These results suggest that clove oil and cinnamon oil have the potential to be used as a eco-friendly approach for the control of the major important filaria vector Cx. quinquefasciatus

  15. Droplet Characterization and Penetration of an Ultra-Low Volume Mosquito Adulticide Spray Targeting the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus, within Urban and Suburban Environments of Northeastern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik; Crepeau, Taryn; Healy, Sean; Crans, Scott; Lizarraga, Griffith; Fonseca, Dina; Gaugler, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Adult control of Aedes albopictus via ultra-low volume is difficult because this species occurs primarily in peridomestic habitats where obstacles such as buildings and vegetation can disrupt spray plumes and droplet dispersion. We determined droplet penetration and characterization of a pyrethroid adulticide applied from the ground at mid (46.77 ml/ha) and maximum (93.53 ml/ha) label rates within cryptic habitats of urban and suburban environments. Droplets were collected from all habitats, with no significant differences detected between locations within the same application rate or collection method. No differences were detected in droplet densities (drops per mm2) between rates within urban environments, but more droplets were collected in urban (149.93 ± 11.07 SE) than suburban sites (114.37 ± 11.32) at the maximum label rate (P = 0.003). The excellent penetration of aerosols into cryptic habitats of an urban site was likely due to the shorter spray paths afforded by our network of roads and alleys. Mid label rates displayed similar droplet density values as maximum label rates in urban areas, indicating that lower rates may be used effectively to reduce costs, lessen non-target effects, and increase environmental stewardship. Advances in formulations and technology are driving changes in adulticide applications, leading to use of the minimum effective dose for maximum efficacy, precision, and accountability. PMID:27116103

  16. Droplet Characterization and Penetration of an Ultra-Low Volume Mosquito Adulticide Spray Targeting the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus, within Urban and Suburban Environments of Northeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik; Crepeau, Taryn; Healy, Sean; Crans, Scott; Lizarraga, Griffith; Fonseca, Dina; Gaugler, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Adult control of Aedes albopictus via ultra-low volume is difficult because this species occurs primarily in peridomestic habitats where obstacles such as buildings and vegetation can disrupt spray plumes and droplet dispersion. We determined droplet penetration and characterization of a pyrethroid adulticide applied from the ground at mid (46.77 ml/ha) and maximum (93.53 ml/ha) label rates within cryptic habitats of urban and suburban environments. Droplets were collected from all habitats, with no significant differences detected between locations within the same application rate or collection method. No differences were detected in droplet densities (drops per mm2) between rates within urban environments, but more droplets were collected in urban (149.93 ± 11.07 SE) than suburban sites (114.37 ± 11.32) at the maximum label rate (P = 0.003). The excellent penetration of aerosols into cryptic habitats of an urban site was likely due to the shorter spray paths afforded by our network of roads and alleys. Mid label rates displayed similar droplet density values as maximum label rates in urban areas, indicating that lower rates may be used effectively to reduce costs, lessen non-target effects, and increase environmental stewardship. Advances in formulations and technology are driving changes in adulticide applications, leading to use of the minimum effective dose for maximum efficacy, precision, and accountability. PMID:27116103

  17. Adulticidal activity against Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae of three Piper spp. Atividade de três Piper spp. contra adultos de Stegomyia aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wej Choochote

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Three Piper species, Piper longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, were selected for investigation of adulticidal potential against Stegomyia aegypti, a main vector of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Successive extraction by maceration with 95% ethanol showed percentage yields of ethanolic extracts, which derived from P. longum, P. ribesoides and P. sarmentosum, of 8.89, 3.21 and 5.30% (w/w, respectively. All Piper extracts illustrated an impressive adulticidal activity when tested against female mosquitoes by topical application. The susceptibility of St. aegypti females to ethanol-extracted Piper was dose dependent and varied among the plant species. The highest adulticidal effect was established from P. sarmentosum, followed by P. ribesoides and P. longum, with LD50 values of 0.14, 0.15 and 0.26 µg/female, respectively. The potential of these Piper species, as possible mosquitocides, established convincing activity for further researches to develop natural substances for combat against adult mosquitoes.Três espécies de Piper, Piper longum, P. ribesoides e P. sarmentosum, foram selecionadas para investigação da potencialidade contra Stegomyia aegypti adultos, principal vetor de dengue e febre do dengue hemorrágico. Sucessivas extrações por maceração com etanol a 95% mostraram uma porcentagem de extratos etanólicos, derivados de P. longum, P. ribesoides e P. sarmentosum, de 8,89, 3,21 e 5,30% (w/w, respectivamente. Todos os extratos de Piper mostraram atividade adulticida expressiva quando testados contra fêmeas de mosquitos através de aplicação tópica. A suscetibilidade das fêmeas do St. aegypt ao extrato de Piper etanólico foi dose dependente e variou entre as espécies de plantas. O mais elevado efeito adulticida foi demonstrado a partir do P. sarmentosum, seguido pelo P. ribesoides e P. longum, valores LD50 de 0,14, 0,15 e 0,26 µg/fêmea, respectivamente. O potencial destas espécies de Piper, como poss

  18. Minimizing the impact of the mosquito adulticide naled on honey bees, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae): aerial ultra-low-volume application using a high-pressure nozzle system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, He; Latham, Mark; Payne, Steve; Brock, Cate

    2004-02-01

    The impact of the mosquito adulticide naled on honey bees, Apis mellifera L., was evaluated by exposing test beehives to nighttime aerial ultra-low-volume (ULV) applications using a high-pressure nozzle system. The tests were conducted during routine mosquito control missions at Manatee County, Florida, in summer 2000. Two treatment sites were sprayed a total of four times over a 10-wk period. Honey bees, which clustered outside of the hive entrances, were subjected to naled exposure during these mosquito control sprays. The highest average naled ground deposition was 2,688 microg/m2 at the Port Manatee site, which resulted in statistically significant bee mortality (118) compared with the controls. At the Terra Ceia Road site, an intermediate level of naled deposition was found (1,435 microg/m2). For this spray mission, the range of dead bees per hive at Terra Ceia was 2 to 9 before spraying and 5 to 36 after naled application. Means of all other naled ground depositions were 100 dead bees) resulted when naled residue levels were > 2,000 kg/m2 and honey bees were clustered outside of the hive entrances during mosquito adulticide applications. Compared with the flat-fan nozzle systems currently used by most of Florida's mosquito control programs, the high-pressure nozzle system used in this experiment substantially reduced environmental insecticide contamination and lead to decreased bee mortality. Statistical analysis also showed that average honey yield at the end of the season was not significantly reduced for those hives that were exposed to the insecticide. PMID:14998120

  19. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ADULTICIDAL ACTIVITY OF SIXTEEN INSECT REPELLENTS IN AEROSOL SPRAYS AGAINST THREE MOSQUITO SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixteen commercial insect repellents (six natural and 10 chemical products) in spray formulations were evaluated in the laboratory for adult knockdown (KD) and mortality of laboratory-reared female Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. All tested products produced significa...

  20. Environmental fate of mosquito adulticides and effects on non-target invertebrates in wetlands of the Sacramento Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) is a synergist of pyrethroid pesticides found in many products for structural pest control, mosquito control, and home and garden uses....

  1. Adulticidal Activity of Olea vera, Linum usitatissimum and Piper nigera against Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nawaz

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Black pepper showed best results in term of LC50, LC90, LT50 and percentage mortality against Ae. ae­gypti and An. stephensi. Our study suggested that the plant extracts have potential to kill adult mosquitoes, are envi­ronment friendly and can be used for the control of mosquitoes.

  2. Tolerance of sewage treatment plant microorganisms to mosquitocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, N S; Olson, M A; Hester, P G; Moore, J J

    1993-12-01

    Beneficial protozoa and rotifers collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Panama City, FL, were tested for tolerance to 11 commonly used mosquito larvicides and adulticides in the laboratory. The acute effects were assessed using selected concentrations of the adulticides fenthion, malathion, naled, permethrin, and resmethrin; and the larvicides Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, Bacillus sphaericus, diflubenzuron, larviciding oil, methoprene, and temephos for the following microorganism taxa: ameoboids, flagellates, free-swimming ciliates, stalked ciliates, and rotifers. PMID:8126488

  3. Acute toxicity of mosquitocidal compounds to young mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, N S; Hester, P G; Hallmon, C F; Olson, M A; Shaffer, K R

    1991-06-01

    Toxicity of Florida mosquito larvicides and adulticides to 3-5 day old Gambusia affinis was determined in the laboratory. After 24-h exposure, the larvicides, temephos, fenoxycarb and petroleum distillates had LC50 values of 5.60, 1.05 and 593.4 ppm, respectively. After 24 h the adulticides resmethrin, fenthion, naled and malathion had LC50 values of 0.007, 2.94, 3.50 and 12.68 ppm, respectively. The only compound toxic to young mosquitofish at maximum field application rates was resmethrin. However, in the light of earlier tests, aerially applied adulticides generally reach the water surface at reduced concentrations and thus probably pose little or no risk to mosquitofish populations. PMID:1716659

  4. Diel activity patterns of major species of adult mosquitoes and ULV spraying impacts in St. John's County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of daily activity patterns in adult mosquitoes can be used to determine the best time to apply adulticides for mosquito control. Many factors influence these activity patterns, including migration, hormonal cycles in the mosquito, hunger, and the need to lay eggs. In this study, FL scien...

  5. Chemical ecology of stable fly and its future practical applications in control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study reports the discovery of catnip as an effective repellent, as well as its adulticidal activity on stable fly. The essential oil of catnip reduced the biting of stable flies by more than 96% in an in vitro bioassay system, when compared with other sesquiterpene-rich plant oils. Catn...

  6. Antifungal activity of extracts from endophytic fungi associated with Smallanthus maintained in vitro as autotrophic cultures and as pot plants in the greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes associated with leaves, lateral shoots, and roots of Echinacea purpurea, a medicinal plant used by Native Americans, were evaluated for antifungal activity as well as larvicidal, adulticidal, and repellent activities against Aedes aegypti. A total of 39 fungal isolates were identif...

  7. Modeling and Optimal Control applied to a vector borne disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Monteiro, M. Teresa T.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2012-01-01

    A model with six mutually-exclusive compartments related to Dengue disease is presented. In this model there are three vector control tools: insecticides (larvicide and adulticide) and mechanical control. The problem is studied using an Optimal Control (OC) approach. The human data for the model is based on the Cape Verde Dengue outbreak. Some control measures are simulated and their consequences analyzed.

  8. Dengue in Cape Verde: vector control and vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F M

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, for the first time in Cape Verde, an outbreak of dengue was reported and over twenty thousand people were infected. Only a few prophylactic measures were taken. The effects of vector control on disease spreading, such as insecticide (larvicide and adulticide) and mechanical control, as well as an hypothetical vaccine, are estimated through simulations with the Cape Verde data.

  9. Synthesis, Polymorphism, and Insecticidal Activity of Methyl 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-iodo-2-methyl-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-4H-pyrimido[2,1-b]quinazoline-3-Carboxylate Against Anopheles arabiensis Mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopala, Katharigatta N; Nayak, Susanta K; Gleiser, Raquel M; Sanchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Garcia, Daniel A; Odhav, Bharti

    2016-07-01

    Mosquitoes are the major vectors of pathogens and parasites including those causing malaria, the most deadly vector-borne disease. The negative environmental effects of most synthetic compounds combined with widespread development of insecticide resistance encourage an interest in finding and developing alternative products against mosquitoes. In this study, pyrimido[2,1-b]quinazoline derivative DHPM3 has been synthesized by three-step chemical reaction and screened for larvicide, adulticide, and repellent properties against Anopheles arabiensis, one of the dominant vectors of malaria in Africa. The title compound emerged as potential larvicide agent for further research and development, because it exerted 100% mortality, while adulticide activity was considered moderate. PMID:26841246

  10. Area-Wide Ground Applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the Control of Aedes albopictus in Residential Neighborhoods: From Optimization to Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Gregory M.; Ary Faraji; Isik Unlu; Sean P Healy; Muhammad Farooq; Randy Gaugler; George Hamilton; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG)...

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Insecticides for Use Against the House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae): Determination of Resistance Levels on a Malaysian Poultry Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Jaal, Zairi; Rus, Adanan Che

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicology of two commercial larvicides--cyromazine (Neporex 50SP) and ChCy (combination of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin, Naga 505)--and five commercial adulticides--thiamethoxam (Agita 10WG), cyfluthrin (Responsar WP), lambda-cyhalothrin (Icon 2.8EC), fipronil (Regent 50SC), and imidacloprid (Toxilat 10WP)--was examined against the WHO/VCRU (World Health Organization/ Vector Control Research Unit) susceptible strain and the AYTW (Ayer Tawar) field strain of house fly, Musca domestica L. These pesticides were administered topically, in the diet, or as a dry residue treatment on plywood. Probit analysis using at least five concentrations and the concentration that was lethal to 50% (LC(50)) of the organisms was applied to compare the toxicology and resistance levels of the AYTW population to different insecticides. In the larvicide laboratory study, ChCy was more effective than cyromazine, with a significantly lower LC(50) value when administered topically or in the diet, although the AYTW population was susceptible to both larvicides with a resistance ratio (RR) <10. For the adulticide laboratory study, cyfluthrin and fipronil exhibited the lowest LC50 values of the adulticides, indicating that they are both effective at controlling adult flies, although lambda-cyhalothrin showed moderate resistance (RR = 11.60 by topical application; 12.41 by plywood treatment). Further investigation of ChCy, cyromazine, cyfluthrin, and fipronil under field conditions confirmed that ChCy and cyromazine strikingly reduced larval density, and surprisingly, ChCy also exhibited adulticidal activity, which significantly reduced adult fly numbers compared with the control group. Cyfluthrin and fipronil were also confirmed to be effective, with a significant reduction in adult fly numbers compared with the control group. PMID:26546486

  12. An ecological risk assessment for insecticides used in adult mosquito management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan S; Peterson, Robert K D; Macedo, Paula A

    2007-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has been a concern for people across the United States since the disease was initially observed in the summer of 1999. Since 1999, WNV has caused the largest arboviral encephalitis epidemic in US history. Vector control management programs have been intensively implemented to control mosquitoes that carry WNV. Our deterministic ecological risk assessment focused on 6 common mosquito adulticides used in vector control, including 3 pyrethroids (d-phenothrin, resmethrin, and permethrin), pyrethrins, and 2 organophosphates (malathion and naled). Piperonyl butoxide, a synergist for the pyrethroids, was also assessed. Both aquatic and terrestrial nontarget organisms were considered for acute and chronic exposures to the adulticides. Tier I exposure estimates were derived from ISCST3 and AERMOD for deposition and air concentrations affecting terrestrial organisms and PRZM-EXAMS for standard pond concentrations affecting aquatic organisms. Nontargets exposed to adulticides included small mammals, birds, as well as aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates in a pond subject to receiving the chemical via drift and runoff. Risk quotients were obtained by comparing exposures to toxic endpoints. All risk quotients were low indicating that risks to ecological receptors most likely were small. PMID:17695110

  13. The Eye of the Tiger, the Thrill of the Fight: Effective Larval and Adult Control Measures Against the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae), in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik

    2016-09-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), is a highly invasive container-inhabiting species with a global distribution. This mosquito, similar to other Stegomyia species such as Aedes aegypti (L.), is highly adapted to urban and suburban areas, and commonly oviposits in artificial containers, which are ubiquitous in these peridomestic environments. The increase in speed and amount of international travel and commerce, coupled with global climate change, have aided in the resurgence and expansion of Stegomyia species into new areas of North America. In many parts of their range, both species are implicated as significant vectors of emerging and re-emerging arboviruses such as dengue, chikungunya, and now Zika. Although rapid and major advances have been made in the field of biology, ecology, genetics, taxonomy, and virology, relatively little has changed in the field of mosquito control in recent decades. This is particularly discouraging in regards to container-inhabiting mosquitoes, because traditional integrated mosquito management (IMM) approaches have not been effective against these species. Many mosquito control programs simply do not possess the man-power or necessary financial resources needed to suppress Ae. albopictus effectively. Therefore, control of mosquito larvae, which is the foundation of IMM approaches, is exceptionally difficult over large areas. This review paper addresses larval habitats, use of geographic information systems for habitat preference detection, door-to-door control efforts, source reduction, direct application of larvicides, biological control agents, area-wide low-volume application of larvicides, hot spot treatments, autodissemination stations, public education, adult traps, attractive-toxic sugar bait methods, lethal ovitraps, barrier-residual adulticides, hand-held ultra-low-volume adulticides, area-wide adulticides applied by ground or air, and genetic control methods. The review concludes with future

  14. The Effectiveness of Organotin (IV Benzylisopropyldithiocarbamate Compounds as Insecticide Against Aedes Aegypti Linn (Diptera: Culicidae in Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normah Awang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The widespread use of insecticides had resulted in insecticide resistance of vectors of dengue as well as polluting the environment. Organotin (IV compounds had the potential to be developed as the insecticides to overcome the existing problem. Approach: The aim of this study was to examine the insecticidal effects which were larvicidal and adulticidal effects of organotin (IV benzylisopropyldithiocarbamate compounds against Aedes Aegypti Linn. In laboratory larvicidal bioassay test of a series of three organotin (IV benzylisopropyldithiocarbamate compounds on third instar larvae of Aedes Aegypti had been carried out. Results: The study was found that compound B showed the best larvicidal effect with the LC50 and LC90 values of 0.004 ppm and 0.007 ppm, respectively. Compound C was also displayed good larvicidal effect with the LC50 and LC90 values of 0.029 ppm and 0.108 ppm, respectively. While, compound A was shown the least larvicidal effect with the LC50 and LC90 values of 0.404 ppm and 0.749 ppm, respectively. Further testing was conducted on compound B on adults of Aedes ageypti female to investigate its adulticidal property. The result showed that compound B displayed good adulticidal activity with LC50 dan LC90 of 4.277 ppm and 27.653 ppm, respectively. Conclusion: Compound B is the most effective compound among three organotin (IV benzylisopropyldithiocarbamate compounds tested against the dengue vector Aedes Aegypti and has potential to be explored as an insecticide to control the spread of dengue fever.

  15. Assessment of the Effectiveness of a Seasonal-Long Insecticide-Based Control Strategy against Aedes albopictus Nuisance in an Urban Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Beniamino; Manica, Mattia; D'Alessandro, Antonello; Bottà, Giordano; Filipponi, Federico; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Rosà, Roberto; Della Torre, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    Seasonal-long larvicide treatments and/or outdoor space-spray applications of insecticides are frequently applied to reduce Aedes albopictus nuisance in urban areas of temperate regions, where the species has become a permanent pest affecting people's quality of life and health. However, assessments of the effectiveness of sequential interventions is a difficult task, as it requires to take into account the cumulative and combined effect of multiple treatments, as well as the mosquito seasonal dynamics (rather than mosquito abundance before and after single treatments). We here present the results of the effectiveness assessment of a seasonal-long calendar-based control intervention integrating larvicide treatments of street catch basins and night-time adulticide ground spraying in the main University hospital in Rome (Italy). Cage-experiments and an intensive monitoring of wild mosquito abundance in treated and untreated sites were carried out along an entire season. Sticky traps were used to monitor adult abundance and site-specific eco-climatic variations (by recording water left over in each trap), in order to disentangle the effect of insecticide treatments from eco-climatic drivers on mosquito seasonal dynamics. Despite the apparent limited impact of single adulticide sprayings assessed based on mortality in caged and wild mosquitoes, the results of the temporal analysis showed that mosquito seasonal patterns were initially comparable in the two sites, diverged in the absence of diverging eco-climatic conditions and remained stable afterwards. This allowed to attribute the lack of the expected Ae. albopictus population expansion in the treated site to the combined effect of multiple adulticide sprayings and larvicide treatments carried out during the whole season. The approach proposed was proved to be successful to assess effects of seasonal-long control treatments on adult mosquito population dynamics and could represent a valuable instrument to assess the

  16. Susceptibility of first instar Toxorhynchites splendens to malathion, naled and resmethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, N S; Schreiber, E T; Hester, P G; Hallmon, C F; Olson, M A; Shaffer, K R

    1993-03-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to measure the response of first instar Toxorhynchites splendens to commonly used mosquito adulticides: malathion, naled and resmethrin. The concentrations of pesticide causing 50% mortality (LC50) after 24 h was 2.87, 69.1 and 623 ppb for resmethrin, malathion and naled, respectively. Naled was determined to be the least toxic of the 3 compounds tested for integrated use with Tx. splendens. The latter assessments were based on comparisons between laboratory-derived dose-response curves and maximum concentrations reached in standing water calculated using standard application rates. PMID:8096872

  17. Public health pesticide use in California: a comparative summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Timothy S; Novak, Mark G; Kramer, Vicki L; Bronson, Larry R

    2010-09-01

    California pesticide use summary data and use reports from local vector control agencies were reviewed to document public health pesticide use patterns. During the 15-year period 1993-2007, public health pesticide use averaged 1.75 million lb (0.79 million kg) (AI), accounted for 99% of all reported public health pesticide use. Petroleum distillates, principally larviciding oils, accounted for 88% of public health pesticide use. Pyrethrins and naled, used as mosquito adulticides, increased substantially in recent years (post-2004), coinciding with increased West Nile virus control activities and availability of emergency funding. PMID:21033068

  18. Effects of ultra-low volume and thermal fog malathion, Scourge and naled applied against caged adult Culicoides furens and Culex quinquefasciatus in open and vegetated terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, J R; Jordan, S

    1992-03-01

    The adulticidal effect of ULV and thermal fog malathion, Scourge and naled was tested at 2x label dosage (1.42, 0.22, 0.39 oz/acre, respectively) against caged Culicoides furens and Culex quinquefasciatus in open and vegetated (orange grove) terrain. Cages were at 122 cm elevation and positioned at 15.2, 45.7, 76.2, 106.7, 137.2 and 167.6 m from the line of insecticide release. Ultra-low volume applications of all 3 insecticides were markedly more effective than thermal fog under all conditions, especially in vegetated terrain. Of the 3 insecticides, malathion performed the poorest, especially against Cx. quinquefasciatus (in which there was some resistance) and particularly when applied as thermal fog. Scourge and naled were about equally effective. The best adulticide against C. furens was naled, which was clearly superior applied as ULV. It yielded 75% mortality out to 283 m in the open, and to 38 m in the presence of dense vegetation. PMID:1583493

  19. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Wanumen, Andrea Carolina; Salamanca, Jordano; Holdcraft, Robert; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day) control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1-7 days) larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries. PMID:27092527

  20. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Rodriguez-Saona

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae, and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae. The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1–7 days larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries.

  1. Effect of Polygonum hydropiper L. against dengue vector mosquito Aedes albopictus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaran, Rajan; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the essential oil and an isolated compound from the leaves of Polygonum hydropiper L. against dengue vector mosquito Aedes albopictus L. The plant material was macerated and steam distilled using clavenger apparatus for oil extraction. The essential oil was tested at different concentrations of 100, 50, 25, 12.5 and 6.25 ppm concentrations against the larvae of Ae. albopictus. The isolated compound was tested for larvicidal, ovicidal, repellent, oviposition deterrent and adulticidal activities at 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25 and 0.625 ppm concentrations. The essential oil exhibited LC₅₀ values of 194.63 and 199.65 and confertifolin exhibited LC₅₀ values of 2.02 and 3.16 against the second and fourth instar larvae of Ae. albopictus, respectively. The ovicidal activity of 100% on 0- to 6-h-old eggs, repellent activity of 320.6 min, oviposition deterrent activity of 98.51% and adulticidal activity of 100% at 10 ppm concentration of confertifolin were recorded. No mortality of was observed in negative control. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the potential mosquitocidal activities of confertifolin against Ae. albopictus. PMID:25033815

  2. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-Mounted Cold Mist Spray of Permethrin and Tetramethylfluthrin Targeting Aedes albopictus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Dong, Yan-De; Zhou, Ming-Hao; Zhang, Heng-Duan; Chen, Hong-Na; Tian, Ye; Yang, Wei-Fang; Wu, Xiao-Qun; Chu, Hong-Liang; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-03-01

    Aedes albopictus is the primary vector of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in China. Although there are previous studies on the application of adulticides to control this species, the application methods have either been back-pack or vehicle-mounted systems. However, many sites are too large to be effectively treated with back-pack sprayers, and the lack of roads restricts the use of vehicle-mounted sprayers. This paper provides the first study of using unmanned aerial vehicles to conduct cold mist sprays on Ae. albopictus habitats. A spray containing 4% permethrin and 1% tetramethylfluthrin was applied at an effective application rate of 9.0 mg/m(2). This method reduced Ae. albopictus populations by more than 90%. The results indicate this novel spray system is a powerful method to achieve a rapid decline of mosquito population in Ae. albopictus habitats in China. PMID:27105218

  3. Feline heartworm disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recognition of heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infection in cats is increasing. In general, clinical signs displayed by cats are vague and can easily be confused with other respiratory or gastrointestinal disorders. As more data are gathered on feline heartworm disease, it is becoming apparent that cats respond to heartworms in a fashion uniquely different from dogs. Therefore, diagnostic and therapeutic methods that have been extrapolated from canine heartworm disease require modification to be applied to cats. Although no adulticide or microfilaricide drugs or preventives have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, literature that describes treatment methods is becoming available. Because of the toxicity of thiacetarsamide sodium in cats, symptomatic, supportive treatment may be most appropriate for elimination of adult worms. As with dogs, the macrolide antibiotics (ivermectin and milbemycin oxime) seem to be efficacious as microfilaricides and preventives

  4. Insecticidal, repellent and oviposition-deterrent activity of selected essential oils against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Veena; Tripathi, A K; Aggarwal, K K; Khanuja, S P S

    2005-11-01

    Essential oils extracted from 10 medicinal plants were evaluated for larvicidal, adulticidal, ovicidal, oviposition-deterrent and repellent activities towards three mosquito species; Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. The essential oils of Juniperus macropoda and Pimpinella anisum were highly effective as both larvicidal and ovicidal. The essential oil of P. anisum showed toxicity against 4th instar larvae of A. stephensi and A. aegypti with equivalent LD95 values of 115.7 microg/ml, whereas it was 149.7 microg/ml against C. quinquefasciatus larvae. Essential oils of Zingiber officinale and Rosmarinus officinalis were found to be ovicidal and repellent, respectively towards the three mosquito species. The essential oil of Cinnamomum zeylanicum resulted into highest repellent (RD95) values of 49.6, 53.9 and 44.2 mg/mat against A. stephensi, A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus, respectively apart from oviposition-deterrent potential. PMID:16051081

  5. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  6. Control of dengue disease: a case study in Cape Verde

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F M; Zinober, Alan

    2010-01-01

    A model for the transmission of dengue disease is presented. It consists of eight mutually-exclusive compartments representing the human and vector dynamics. It also includes a control parameter (adulticide spray) in order to combat the mosquito. The model presents three possible equilibria: two disease-free equilibria (DFE) --- where humans, with or without mosquitoes, live without the disease --- and another endemic equilibrium (EE). In the literature it has been proved that a DFE is locally asymptotically stable, whenever a certain epidemiological threshold, known as the basic reproduction number, is less than one. We show that if a minimum level of insecticide is applied, then it is possible to maintain the basic reproduction number below unity. A case study, using data of the outbreak that occured in 2009 in Cape Verde, is presented.

  7. Canopy penetration and deposition of barrier sprays from electrostatic and conventional sprayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, W C; Farooq, M; Walker, T W; Fritz, B; Szumlas, D; Quinn, B; Bernier, U; Hogsette, J; Lan, Y; Huang, Y; Smith, V L; Robinson, C A

    2009-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the usefulness of electrostatic and conventional sprayers for barrier applications. Two conventional and three electrostatic sprayers were used in the study. Usefulness of the sprayers was rated based on penetration of spray into and deposition onto 2 sides of leaves on natural vegetation. Bifenthrin (Talstar adulticide) was applied at labeled rate, fluorescent dye was added to the tank mix as tracer, and all sprayers applied the dye and insecticide at the same rate. The results indicated that sprayers producing larger droplets produced significantly higher deposition on vegetation in barrier applications than the sprayers producing smaller droplets. Sprayers with higher air velocity at the nozzle discharge proved significantly better for barrier sprays than the sprayers with lower air velocity. Electrostatic sprayers did not show any improvement in deposition on vegetation or in penetration into vegetation over the conventional sprayers. There was no difference in deposition between truck-mounted and backpack sprayers. PMID:19852223

  8. Controlling the mealworm Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in broiler and turkey houses: field trials with a combined insecticide treatment: insect growth regulator and pyrethroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, C; Delettre, Y R; Vernon, P

    2003-02-01

    Trials were conducted during one year under field conditions to control the lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer), in broiler and turkey houses. The tested combined treatment included an adulticidal compound (pyrethroid: cyfluthrin) and a larvicidal compound (insect growth regulator [IGR]: triflumuron). The combined insecticide treatment greatly reduced the adult and larval stocks throughout the different broiler growing periods, and control of A. diaperinus populations was achieved by the end of the second treatment. Control of the insect population in a turkey house was not similar. A reestablishment of the insect population was observed during the second turkey growing period in summer. Building characteristics and management practices of the breeding system (duration of the breeding period, management of the litter) interact with the combined insecticide treatment and lead to a different efficiency. PMID:12650354

  9. Chemical constituents of the stems of Spathelia excelsa (rutaceae) and activity against Aedes aegypti; Constituintes quimicos do caule de Spathelia excelsa (rutaceae) e atividade contra Aedes aegypti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Aline Carvalho de; Lima, Maria da Paz [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Coordenacao de Pesquisas em Produtos Naturais], e-mail: mdapaz@inpa.gov.br; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Tadei, Wanderli Pedro; Pinto, Ana Cristina da Silva [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Lab. de Vetores de Malaria e Dengue

    2009-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation from the stems of Spathelia excelsa (Rutaceae) collected in Amazonas yielded deacetylspathelin (1), 7,8-dimethoxyflindersine (2), new glabretal-type triterpenoid 3{beta}-angeloyl-21,24-epoxy-7{alpha}, 21{alpha}, 23{alpha}, 25-tetrahydroxy-4{alpha}, 4{beta}, 8{beta}, 10{beta}-tetramethyl-25-dimethyl-14,18-cyclo-5{alpha}, 13{alpha}, 14{alpha}, 17{alpha}-cholestane (3), in addition to the known steroids s-sitosterol and stigmasterol. Their structures were established on the basis of spectral data. The compounds 1 and 3 were assayed on Aedes aegypti (larvicidal and adulticidal activities and compound 3 exhibited larvicidal properties with LC{sub 50} of 4,8 {mu}g/mL. (author)

  10. Aerial and tidal transport of mosquito control pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). The study monitored the distribution and persistente of two mosquito adulticides, permethrin and dibrom (naled), during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District. The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport. The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads, set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS. Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications, ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 μg/m2 throughout the study. Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site. Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation product) was apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS. These compounds were detected in subsurface, offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 gg/l, 14 hr after application. Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 μg/1 were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route. Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50, 96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia = 0.02 μg/1) indicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas

  11. Chemical composition and efficacy of some selected plant oils against Pediculus humanus capitis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yones, Doaa A; Bakir, Hanaa Y; Bayoumi, Soad A L

    2016-08-01

    Natural compounds have been suggested as alternative sources for pediculosis capitis control. We aimed to investigate the chemical composition and evaluate the pediculicidal activity of spearmint, clove, cassia, thyme, eucalyptus, and anise essential oils in addition to sesame oil against human head lice in vitro. A filter paper contact bioassay method was used by applying 0.25 and 0.5 mg/cm(2) of each tested oil to filter paper in Petri dishes with 15 females head lice and another with ten nits. The lice mortalities were reported every 5 min for 180 min. The percentage of inhibition of hatch (PIH) was used to calculate ovicidal activity by daily microscopic inspections 5 days after the hatching of controls. Comparison with the widely used pediculicide (malathion) was performed. The most effective essential oil was spearmint followed by cassia and clove with KT50 values of 4.06, 7.62, and 12.12 at 0.5 mg/cm(2) and 8.84, 11.38, and 19.73 at 0.25 mg/cm(2), respectively. Thyme, eucalyptus, and anise were also effective adulticides with KT50 values of 18.61, 32.65, and 37.34 at 0.5 mg/cm(2) and 29.92, 43.16, and 45.37 at 0.25 mg/cm(2), respectively. Essential oils were also successful in inhibiting nymph emergence. Spearmint oil was the most effective, with a complete inhibition of emergence at 0.5 mg/cm(2). Sesame fixed oil did not show any adulticidal or ovicidal activity against head lice in vitro. The observed insecticidal activity was comparable to malathion. The results herein described the effectiveness of these essential oils as potential pediculicides for head lice control. Incorporation of essential oils in pediculicide formulations needs proper formulation and clinical trials. PMID:27112758

  12. Aerial and tidal transport of mosquito control pesticides into the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, R H; Henry, M S; Blum, T C; Mueller, E M

    2005-05-01

    This project was undertaken as the initial monitoring program to determine if mosquito adulticides applied along the Florida Keys cause adverse ecological effects in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). The study monitored the distribution and persistence of two mosquito adulticides, permethrin and dibrom (naled), during three separate routine applications by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District. The approach was to determine if toxic concentrations of the pesticides entered the FKNMS by aerial drift or tidal transport. The amount of pesticide entering the FKNMS by way of aerial drift was monitored by collection on glass fiber filter pads, set on floats in a grid pattern on either side of the FKNMS. Permethrin was recovered from filter pads on the leeward side for each of the three applications, ranging from 0.5 to 50.1 microg/m(2) throughout the study. Tidal current transport was monitored by collection of surface and subsurface water samples at each grid site. Tidal transport of naled and dichlorvos (naled degradation product) was apparent in the adjacent waters of the FKNMS. These compounds were detected in subsurface, offshore water at 0.1 to 0.6 microg/1, 14 hr after application. Permethrin was not detected in offshore water samples; however, concentrations ranging from 5.1 to 9.4 microg/l were found in surface water from the canal system adjacent to the application route. Comparison of the observed environmental concentrations with toxicity data (permethrin LC-50, 96 hr for Mysidopsis bahia = 0.02 microg/l) indicated a potential hazard to marine invertebrates in the canals with possible tidal transport to other areas. PMID:17465151

  13. Efficacy of three-week oxytetracycline or rifampin monotherapy compared with a combination regimen against the filarial nematode Onchocerca ochengi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Germanus S; Ward, Emma L; Srivastava, Abhishek; Trees, Alexander J; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is a major cause of visual impairment and dermatitis in sub-Saharan Africa. As O. volvulus contains an obligatory bacterial symbiont (Wolbachia), it is susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, although current regimens are considered too prolonged for community-level control programs. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of oxytetracycline and rifampin, administered separately or in combination, against a close relative of O. volvulus (Onchocerca ochengi) in cattle. Six animals per group were treated with continuous or intermittent oxytetracycline regimens, and effects on adult worm viability, dermal microfilarial loads, and Wolbachia density in worm tissues were assessed. Subsequently, the efficacies of 3-week regimens of oxytetracycline and rifampin alone and a combination regimen were compared, and rifampin levels in plasma and skin were quantified. A 6-month regimen of oxytetracycline with monthly dosing was strongly adulticidal, while 3-week and 6-week regimens exhibited weaker adulticidal effects. However, all three regimens achieved >2-log reductions in microfilarial load. In contrast, rifampin monotherapy and oxytetracycline-rifampin duotherapy failed to induce substantive reductions in either adult worm burden or microfilarial load, although a borderline effect on Wolbachia density was observed following duotherapy. Dermal rifampin levels were maintained above the MIC for >24 h after a single intravenous dose. We conclude that oxytetracycline-rifampin duotherapy is less efficacious against O. ochengi than oxytetracycline alone. Further studies will be required to determine whether rifampin reduces oxytetracycline bioavailability in this system, as suggested by human studies using other tetracycline-rifampin combinations. PMID:24247133

  14. Structure-activity relationship studies on derivatives of eudesmanolides from Inula helenium as toxicants against Aedes aegypti larvae and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Charles L; Pridgeon, Julia W; Fronczek, Frank R; Becnel, James J

    2010-07-01

    An Aedes aegypti larval toxicity bioassay was performed on compounds representing many classes of natural compounds including polyacetylenes, phytosterols, flavonoids, sesquiterpenoids, and triterpenoids. Among these compounds, two eudesmanolides, alantolactone, and isoalantolactone showed larvicidal activities against Ae. aegypti and, therefore, were chosen for further structure-activity relationship study. In this study, structural modifications were performed on both alantolactone and isoalantolactone in an effort to understand the functional groups necessary for maintaining and/or increasing its activity, and to possibly lead to more effective insect-control agents. All parent compounds and synthetic modification reaction products were evaluated for their toxic activities against Ae. aegypti larvae and adults. Structure modifications included epoxidations, reductions, catalytic hydrogenations, and Michael additions to the alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones. None of the synthetic isomers synthesized and screened against Ae. aegypti larvae were more active than isoalantolactone itself which had an LC(50) value of 10.0 microg/ml. This was not the case for analogs of alantolactone for which many of the analogs had larvicidal activities ranging from 12.4 to 69.9 microg/ml. In general, activity trends observed from Ae. aegypti larval screening were not consistent with observations from adulticidal screening. The propylamine Michael addition analog of alantolactone was the most active adulticide synthesized with an LC(50) value of 1.07 microg/mosquito. In addition, the crystal structures of both alantolactone and isoalantolactone were determined using CuK(alpha) radiation, which allowed their absolute configurations to be determined based on resonant scattering of the light atoms. PMID:20658657

  15. Immunotherapy with mutated onchocystatin fails to enhance the efficacy of a sub-lethal oxytetracycline regimen against Onchocerca ochengi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Germanus S; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2015-08-15

    Human onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, has been successfully controlled by a single drug, ivermectin, for over 25 years. Ivermectin prevents the disease symptoms of severe itching and visual impairment by killing the microfilarial stage, but does not eliminate the adult parasites, necessitating repeated annual treatments. Mass drug administration with ivermectin does not always break transmission in forest zones and is contraindicated in individuals heavily co-infected with Loa loa, while reports of reduced drug efficacy in Ghana and Cameroon may signal the development of resistance. An alternative treatment for onchocerciasis involves targeting the essential Wolbachia symbiont with tetracycline or its derivatives, which are adulticidal. However, implementation of antibiotic therapy has not occurred on a wide scale due to the prolonged treatment regimen required (several weeks). In the bovine Onchocerca ochengi system, it has been shown previously that prolonged oxytetracycline therapy increases eosinophil counts in intradermal nodules, which kill the adult worms by degranulating on their surface. Here, in an "immunochemotherapeutic" approach, we sought to enhance the efficacy of a short, sub-lethal antibiotic regimen against O. ochengi by prior immunotherapy targeting onchocystatin, an immunomodulatory protein located in the adult female worm cuticle. A key asparagine residue in onchocystatin was mutated to ablate immunomodulatory activity, which has been demonstrated previously to markedly improve the protective efficacy of this vaccine candidate when used as an immunoprophylactic. The immunochemotherapeutic regimen was compared with sub-lethal oxytetracycline therapy alone; onchocystatin immunotherapy alone; a gold-standard prolonged, intermittent oxytetracycline regimen; and no treatment (negative control) in naturally infected Cameroonian cattle. Readouts were collected over one year and comprised adult

  16. Evaluation of plant-mediated synthesized silver nanoparticles against vector mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Kaliyan; Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Hoti, S L

    2014-12-01

    Diseases transmitted by blood-feeding mosquitoes, such as dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, Japanese encephalitis, malaria, and filariasis, are increasing in prevalence, particularly in tropical and subtropical zones. To control mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases, which have worldwide health and economic impacts, synthetic insecticide-based interventions are still necessary, particularly in situations of epidemic outbreak and sudden increases of adult mosquitoes. Green nanoparticle synthesis has been achieved using environmentally acceptable plant extract and eco-friendly reducing and capping agents. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, in the present study, the adulticidal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized using Heliotropium indicum plant leaf extract against adults of Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus was determined. Adult mosquitoes were exposed to varying concentrations of aqueous extract of H. indicum and synthesized AgNPs for 24 h. AgNPs were rapidly synthesized using the leaf extract of H. indicum, and the formation of nanoparticles was observed within 6 h. The results recorded from UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy support the biosynthesis and characterization of AgNPs. The maximum efficacy was observed in synthesized AgNPs against the adult of A. stephensi (lethal dose (LD)₅₀ = 26.712 μg/mL; LD₉₀ = 49.061 μg/mL), A. aegypti (LD₅₀ = 29.626 μg/mL; LD₉₀ = 54.269 μg/mL), and C. quinquefasciatus (LD₅₀ = 32.077 μg/mL; LD₉₀ = 58.426 μg/mL), respectively. No mortality was observed in the control. These results suggest that the leaf aqueous extracts of H.indicum and green synthesis of AgNPs have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of

  17. Pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis in seven dogs (1976-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven dogs with pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis were reviewed. The disease occurred in six large-breed and one small-breed dogs. The dogs were five to 14 years old (mean, 8.4; median, 7), and four of seven dogs were males. Three dogs had been previously treated with adulticide therapy for canine dirofilariasis. Clinical histories included a progressive respiratory disease characterized by varying degrees of cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and weight loss. Thoracic radiographic features included hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary masses of varying sizes, and mixed pulmonary patterns of lobar consolidation with ill-defined interstitial and alveolar pulmonary infiltrates. Cardiovascular changes compatible with chronic dirofilariasis were present in three dogs. The clinical course was usually progressive and fatal. The survival time ranged from six days to four years (mean, 12.5 mos; median, 3 mos). Gross and histologic features included mass lesions with areas of necrosis that replaced normal pulmonary architecture. Cytologically, these lesions were characterized by infiltration with pleomorphic, angioinvasive mononuclear cells that often resulted in vascular obliteration. The infiltrating cells resembled large lymphoid cells that possessed large hyperchromatic nuclei and small amounts of cytoplasm. Systemic lymphoid neoplasia with peripheral lymphadenopathy was diagnosed in two dogs. In both cases, lymph-node cytology was similar to the cellular infiltrates found in the lungs and consistent with a diagnosis of lymphomatoid granulomatosis. These features are compared with previously reported cases of canine lymphomatoid granulomatosis and those features identified in a similar disease described in man

  18. Deposition from Ultra-Low Volume Application of Public Health Insecticides in a Hot Desert Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michael L; Hoel, David F; Farooq, Muhammad; Walker, Todd W

    2015-06-01

    Three insecticides commonly used for mosquito and sand fly control were applied 30 min to 3 h after sunset during June and July 2010, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, to determine the relative quantity of pesticides to height and distance traveled in a hot desert environment. A BVA dilution oil was used for the control. Oil-based adulticides were sprayed using a truck-mounted Curtis DynaFog Maxi-Pro 4 ultra-low volume (ULV) sprayer. Malathion (Fyfanon ULV, 96% active ingredient [AI]), resmethrin (Scourge 4+12, 4% AI), pyrethrins (ULD BP-300, 3% AI), and BVA Spray 13 (100% refined petroleum distillate) were mixed with Uvitex optical brightener fluorescent dye and applied at 2 speeds on evenings when wind speed was less than 16.1 km/h (10 mph). Collection targets using biodegradable cotton ribbons (1 m×2.5 cm) were later read with a fluorometer to quantify the amount of insecticide deposited on targets set at heights of 15.2, 76.2, and 152.4 cm (6, 30, and 60 in.) and distances of 1.5, 6.1, 15.2, 30.5, 61.0, and 91.4 m (5, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 300 ft). Mean insecticide deposition across all distances was 31% on 76.2-cm targets and 49% on 152.4-cm targets, while 15.2-cm targets typically collected Middle East. PMID:26181691

  19. Wolbachia endosymbionts and human disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatko, Barton E; Luck, Ashley N; Dobson, Stephen L; Foster, Jeremy M

    2014-07-01

    Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filaria, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility and survival, whereas in arthropods, they are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as Dengue, Chikungunya, Yellow Fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Furthermore, Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases. PMID:25046729

  20. Survey on the Ability of Wolbachia to Control Human Viral, Protozoan, and Filarial Disease Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garedaghi Yagoob

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filariasis, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility, and survival. However, in arthropods, Wolbachia are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Materials and Methods: Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. Results: In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Conclusion: Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus, Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont, offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases.

  1. Musca domestica laboratory susceptibility to three ethnobotanical culinary plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zayyat, Elham A; Soliman, Mohammed I; Elleboudy, Noha A; Ofaa, Shaimaa E

    2015-10-01

    Throughout history, synanthropic Musca domestica had remained a worldwide problem whenever poor sanitation and bad hygienic conditions exists. Houseflies growing resistance to chemical insecticides are a rising environmental problem that necessitates search for alternatives. Mentha cervina, Ocimum basilicum, and Coriandrum sativum were tested for bioactivity on M. domestica adults and larvae. They are culinary Mediterranean plants. In adulticidal bioassay, using both CDC bottles and fumigation techniques, basil was the most effective extract with LC50 1.074 and 34.996 g/L, respectively. Concerning larvicidal bioassay by fumigation technique, coriander had the highest toxicity index with LC50 29.521 g/L. In both dipping and feeding technique, basil had the highest toxicity with LC50 32.643 and 0.749 g/L, respectively. Basil showed the highest toxicity results in four out of the five models tested followed by coriander then mint; this result highlights the potentiality of basil as a green insecticide in management of flies and opens new insight in the industrialization of basil-based fly control products. PMID:26036589

  2. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Insecticidal Activities of Hedychium Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanniah Rajasekaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of these oils were tested against Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae, and C. gloeosporioides, and three insects, the azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta. Hedychium oils were rich in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, especially 1,8-cineole (0.1%–42%, linalool (<0.1%–56%, a-pinene (3%–17%, b-pinene (4%–31%, and (E-nerolidol (0.1%–20%. Hedychium oils had no antifungal effect on C. gloeosporioides, C. fragariae, and C. acutatum, but most Hedychium oils effectively killed azalea lace bugs. The oils also show promise as an adult mosquito repellent, but they would make rather poor larvicides or adulticides for mosquito control. Hedychium oils acted either as a fire ant repellent or attractant, depending on plant genotype and oil concentration.

  3. Mosquitocidal and Oviposition Repellent Activities of the Extracts of Seaweed Bryopsis pennata on Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Xin Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing threat from infectious diseases and the development of insecticide resistance in mosquito populations drive the global search for new natural insecticides. The aims of this study were to evaluate the mosquitocidal activity of the extracts of seaweed Bryopsis pennata against dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and determine the seaweed’s toxic effect on brine shrimp nauplii (as a non-target organism. In addition, the chemical compositions of the active larvicidal extract and fraction were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Chloroform extract exhibited strong ovicidal activity (with LC50 values of 229.3 and 250.5 µg/mL and larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. The larvicidal potential of chloroform extract was further ascertained when its A7 fraction exhibited strong toxic effect against Ae. aegypti (LC50 = 4.7 µg/mL and Ae. albopictus (LC50 = 5.3 µg/mL. LC-MS analysis of the chloroform extract gave a tentative identification of 13 compounds; Bis-(3-oxoundecyl tetrasulfide was identified as the major compound in A7 fraction. Methanol extract showed strong repellent effect against female oviposition, along with weak adulticidal activity against mosquito and weak toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii. The mosquitocidal results of B. pennata suggest further investigation for the development of effective insecticide.

  4. Insecticidal and repellent activity of Clausena dentata (Rutaceae) plant extracts against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Govindaraju; Karthi, Sengodan; Muthusamy, Ranganathan; Natarajan, Devarajan; Shivakumar, Muthugounder Subramanian

    2015-03-01

    Mosquito control is facing a threat due to the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol agents. The present study is to evaluate adulticidal activity of Clausena dentata plant extract against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. The highest mortality was found in acetone extracts against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 4.1783 mg/ml (3.8201-7.1026), 9.3884 mg/ml (7. 8258-13.1820) and 4.2451 mg/ml (3.8547-8.0254), 12.3214 mg/ml (10.9287-16.2220), respectively. Smoke toxicity was observed at 10-min interval for 40 min, and the mortality data were recorded. Result shows that Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus are 85 ± 2 and 89 ± 1.5, respectively. A mortality of 100 % was recorded in the commercial mosquito control. These results suggest that the leaf extracts of C. dentata have a potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. PMID:25573693

  5. Repellent and mosquitocidal effects of leaf extracts of Clausena anisata against the Aedes aegypti mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukandiwa, Lillian; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas; Naidoo, Vinny

    2016-06-01

    Mosquitoes are rapidly developing resistance to insecticides that millions of people relied on to protect themselves from the diseases they carry, thereby creating a need to develop new insecticides. Clausena anisata is used traditionally as an insect repellent by various communities in Africa and Asia. For this study, the repellency and adulticidal activities of leaf extracts and compounds isolated from this plant species were evaluated against the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. In the topical application assays, using total bites as an indicator, repellency was dose dependent, with the acetone crude extract (15 %) having 93 % repellence and the hexane fraction (7.5 %) 67 % repellence after 3 h. Fractionation resulted in a loss of total repellence. As mosquito-net treating agents, the acetone and hexane extracts of C. anisata, both at 15 %, had average repellences of 46.89 ± 2.95 and 50.13 ± 2.02 %, respectively, 3 h after exposure. The C. anisata acetone extract and its hexane fraction caused mosquito knockdown and eventually death when nebulised into the testing chamber, with an EC50 of 78.9 mg/ml (7.89 %) and 71.6 mg/ml (7.16 %) in the first 15 min after spraying. C. anisata leaf extracts have potential to be included in protection products against mosquitoes due to the repellent and cidal compounds contained therein. PMID:26924698

  6. BIOEFFICACY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF THYMUS VULGARIS AND EUGENIA CARYOPHYLLUS AGAINST HOUSEFLY, MUSCA DOMESTICA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. CHINTALCHERE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The housefly, Musca domestica L., is a cosmopolitan insect, associated with vectoring of various etiologicalagents. In order to search for effective control method, bioefficacy of essential oils of Thyme (Thymus vulgarisand Clove leaf (Eugenia coryophyllus was studied against housefly. The LC (50 3.18ug/cm2 value of Clove leaf oilwas found highly effective as compared to LC (50 value 4.39ug/cm2 of Thyme essential oil for inducing mortalityof M. domestica larvae. The adulticidal activity of Thyme essential oil LC (50 32.71 mg/dm3 was toxic than Cloveleaf essential oil [LC (50 53.10 mg/dm3]. In Attractant / repellant Bioassay, Thyme essential oil revealed 90.21%repellency as compared to 80.68 % value of Clove leaf essential oil against adults of House fly. In fumigationbioassay, Thyme showed high Pupicidal activity than Clove leaf oil and in contact toxicity bioassay using topicalapplication both the oils showed 100 % pupicidal mortality. The data reveals that Clove and Thyme essential oilshave excellent potential for controlling M. domestica population as eco-friendly approach in IPM.

  7. Peel and leaf powders of three fruits and a vegetable as promising botanicals against Callosobruchus maculatus (F.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Abdulrasak K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the insecticidal activities of powders of bitter leaf, cashew leaf, orange peel and pawpaw leaf against Callosobruchus maculatus (F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae. These were tested at 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% (w/w for their insecticidal activities against the insect. Results showed that the ovicidal and adulticidal activities of the plant powders depended on dosages and exposure time. Mortalities of 16.28% and 18.75% were observed in bitter leaf powder applied at 7.5% (w/w dosage within 24 and 48 hours post infestation (HPI, respectively. In grains treated with 7.5% orange peel powder, 12.50% and 16.28% mortalities were observed within 24 and 48 HPI, respectively. Each of bitter leaf and orange peel powders was significantly different (p orange peel > cashew leaf > pawpaw leaf. It is recommended that incorporating these plant parts in pest management of stored products will guarantee user safety, reduce environmental pollution and suppress insect infestation.

  8. Synthesis of certain fused pyrazoles derived from 2-methyl-3-amino-6-iodo-4(3 H) quinazolinone as possible insecticidal and radiosensitizing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Verisimilar reaction on 3-amino-2-methyl-6-4-quinazolone (1) using P O Cl3/DMF afforded 3-formyl pyrazole derivative (2). The condensation products (3 a,b) were obtained via reaction of (2) with malononitrile or ethyl cyano acetate. Heating the condensation products (3 a,b) with acetyl derivatives in the presence of ammonium acetate yielded the corresponding cyano pyridines (9 a-e) and (10 a-e), respectively. Compounds (9 c) and (10 c) were obtained also from the interaction of the chalcone derivative (11) with malononitrile or ethyl cyano acetate. Condensation of (2) with semicarbazide hydrochloride, thio semicarbazide or aromatic amines gave the corresponding (12 a), (12 b) and (13 a-c), respectively. Compound (12 a) could be cyclized to (14) in acid medium. Interaction of compound (12 b) with chloro acetyl chloride gave (15). The Verisimilar reaction on Schiff bass (16) using P O Cl3/DMF gave the amino acrolein derivates (17), which was converted into 2-pyrazole derivative (18) and 2-isoxazolinyl derivative (19), respectively. The obtained compounds have been characterized on the basis of their IR, 'H-NMR and Mass spectral data and elemental analysis. Among the synthesized compounds only the formyl pyrazole derivative (2) and the azetidinylthioured derivative (15) showed a remarkable adulticidal activity. In addition the formyl pyrazole derivative (2) acted as a potent radiosensitizer. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Efficacy of aerial spray applications using fuselage booms on Air Force C-130H aircraft against mosquitoes and biting midges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Haagsma, Karl A; Wojcik, George M; De Szalay, Ferenc A

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of a novel fuselage boom configuration was tested with flat-fan nozzles on U.S. Air Force C-130H aircraft to create ultra-low volume sprays to control mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae). The mortality of mosquitoes and biting midges in bioassay cages and natural populations, using the organophosphate adulticide, naled, was measured. Mosquitoes in bioassay cages had 100% mortality at 639 m downwind in all single-pass spray trials, and most trials had >90% mortality up to 1491 m downwind. Mosquito mortality was negatively correlated with distance from the spray release point (r2 = 0.38, P 90%). In wide-area operational applications, numbers of mosquitoes from natural populations 1 wk postspray were 83% (range 55%-95%), lower than prespray numbers (P < 0.05). Biting midge numbers were reduced by 86% (range 53%-97%) on average (P = 0.051) after 7 days. The results of these field trials indicate that the fuselage boom configuration on C-130H aircraft are an effective method to conduct large-scale aerial sprays during military operations and public health emergencies. PMID:20099594

  10. Organophosphate and pyrethroid susceptibilities of Culex salinarius adults from Texas and New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukontason, K; Olson, J K; Hartberg, W K; Duhrkopf, R E

    1998-12-01

    Susceptibilities of adults from newly established colonies of Culex salinarius from New Jersey and Texas to commonly used mosquito adulticides were assessed using the insecticide-coated vial bioassay technique. Females from both colonies were similar in their susceptibilities to naled, chlorpyrifos, resmethrin, and permethrin. However, females from the New Jersey colony (established from collections made in Cape May County, NJ) were found to be 9 times more tolerant to malathion than were those from the Texas colony (established from collections made in Chambers County, TX), with median lethal concentration values for malathion tested against these 2 colonies of 0.70 and 0.08 microgram malathion/vial, respectively. The differences between these 2 colonies with respect to their tolerances to malathion may be a product of the age of each colony at the time assessments were made and/or the degree to which the parent stock used to start each colony was previously exposed to malathion in the field. PMID:10084146

  11. Impact of naled (Dibrom 14) on the mosquito vectors of eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J J; Oliver, J

    1997-12-01

    In central New York, aerial mosquito adulticide applications have been used in response to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) outbreaks and have targeted the swamp habitats of the primary enzootic vector of EEE virus, Culiseta melanura (Coquillett). The organophosphate insecticide naled (1, 2, dibromo-2, 2-dichloroethyl dimethyl phosphate) has been the insecticide of choice in this region. This study reports on analyses of 11 years (1984-94) of mosquito collection data from Cicero and Toad Harbor swamps in relation to applications of naled. Naled applications were successful in achieving short-term reductions in mosquito abundance. However, despite repetitive applications, populations of the primary vector of EEE virus, Cs. melanura, have increased 15-fold at Cicero Swamp. Preventive applications had no noticeable impact on the enzootic amplification of EEE virus, and isolations of virus following preventive applications have resulted in additional spraying. The possibility that applications of naled contributed to increased populations of Cs. melanura discredits the rationale that preventive applications of naled reduce the risk of EEE. PMID:9474556

  12. Development and validation of a rapid analytical method to quantify naled residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, H; Latham, M

    2001-12-01

    A rapid gas chromatographic method for detecting residues of the thio-organophosphate naled was developed and subsequently validated in laboratory and field studies. More than 90% of naled was recovered by a gas chromatograph when equipped with a DB-5 capillary column and a thermionic specific detector. The limit of detection was 0.01 microg/ml with direct injection. Stabilization of naled under a variety of storage conditions also was examined. Analysis of field data showed that naled broke down rapidly in the environment but was stable when stored in hexane solvent at 4 degrees C and 23 degrees C for at least 7 days. Range of percentage matrix spike recovery was 31-49% for filter paper samples exposed under field conditions for 14 h. A field study was also initiated that collected naled droplets trapped on 6.7-m acrylic mohair-look yarn strands in addition to residue on filter paper after aerial ultra-low-volume mosquito adulticide application. Spike recovery was 79% for filter paper samples and 93% for yarn samples. Average naled residue concentrations with these methods were 373 microg/m2 and 11.28-73.77 microg/yarn, respectively. PMID:11804458

  13. Susceptibility of field-collected mosquitoes in central New Jersey to organophosphates and a pyrethroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Debin; Indelicato, Nick; Petersen, Jack; Williges, Eric; Unlu, Isik; Farajollahi, Ary

    2014-06-01

    Chemical insecticides are the primary means to control mosquitoes, and mosquito control programs must regularly monitor for resistance of mosquito vectors to commonly used insecticides to ensure the efficacy and sustainability of active ingredients. We performed insecticide resistance bioassays to test the susceptibility of field-collected mosquitoes in central New Jersey to 1 larvicide (temephos) and 2 adulticides (malathion and sumithrin). Larval susceptibility of Culex pipiens pipiens to temephos provided median concentration (LC50) and 95% lethal concentration (LC95) values of 1.108 microg/l and 2.02 microg/l, respectively. Bottle bioassays of adult Aedes albopictus showed that 100% mortality was achieved at 35-min exposure to sumithrin and at 40-min to malathion. Baseline values were obtained using both temephos and sumithrin. Our bioassays indicate satisfactory susceptibility to temephos and sumithrin in Ae. albopictus and Cx. p. pipiens field populations in central New Jersey. Despite constant field use, both products are still effective and can be used adequately for control of the test species. However, the susceptibility of target insects to various formulations should be closely monitored periodically to ensure continual efficacy. PMID:25102600

  14. Impact of insecticide resistance on the field control of Aedes aegypti in the State of São Paulo

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    Maria de Lourdes da Graça Macoris

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The need to control dengue transmission by means of insecticides has led to the development of resistance to most of the products used worldwide against mosquitoes. In the State of São Paulo, the Superintendência de Controle de Endemias (SUCEN has annually monitored the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti to insecticides since 1996; since 1999, surveys were conducted in collaboration with the National Network of Laboratories (MoReNAa Network and were coordinated by the Ministry of Health. In this study, in addition to the biological characterization of insecticide resistance in the laboratory, the impact of resistance on field control was evaluated for vector populations that showed resistance in laboratory assays. Methods Field efficacy tests with larvicides and adulticides were performed over a 13-year period, using World Health Organization protocols. Results Data from the field tests showed a reduction in the residual effect of temephos on populations with a resistance ratio of 3. For adults, field control was less effective in populations characterized as resistant in laboratory qualitative assays, and this was confirmed using qualitative assays and field evaluation. Conclusions Our results indicated that management of resistance development needs to be adopted when insect populations show reduced susceptibility. The use of insecticides is a self-limiting tool that needs to be applied cautiously, and dengue control requires more sustainable strategies.

  15. Antimosquito properties of 2-substituted phenyl/benzylamino-6-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-methoxycarbonyl-4-methyl-3,6-dihydropyrimidin--ium chlorides against Anopheles arabiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Venugopala K; Gleiser, Raquel M; Chalannavar, Raju K; Odhav, Bharti

    2014-03-01

    Eight novel dihydropyrimidine analogs named DHPM1-DHPM8 was synthesized in their hydrochloride salt form using one pot synthesis between methyl 2-chloro-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-6-methyl-1,4-dihydropyrimidine-5-carboxylate and substituted arylamines in isopropanol. The antimosquito effect of the test compounds were assessed against the adult mosquito Anopheles arabiensis. For adulticidal properties the test compounds were sprayed onto ceramic tiles and screened using the cone bio-assay method. The larvicidal activity was tested by monitoring larval mortality daily and up to 3 days of exposure. Repellency properties were tested in a feeding-probe assay using unfed female Anopheles arabiensis. Compounds DHPM1, DHPM4, DHPM5 and DHPM6 exerted larval mortality equivalent to temephos (trade name Abate, a commercial larvicidal compound). Compounds DHPM1 to DHPM5 repelled or knocked down 92 to 98% of mosquitoes exposed to rodent skin treated with the compounds. None of the compounds showed any significant activity against the adult mosquito Anopheles arabiensis. PMID:24506684

  16. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE LARVAE OF TWO WILD STRAINS OF ANOPHELES STEPHENSI TO EIGHT INSECTICIDES, IN SOUTH OF IRAN

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    H.Ladonni

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of two wild strains of An. stepliens, collected from Kazeroun (ST-K.Az and Bandar-Abbas (ST-BAN, south of Iran was compared to fenthion, malathion, temephos , pirimiphos, methyk, deltamethrth, DDT dimilin and etopenprox as larvicides in the laboratory. Susceptibility test on the ST-KAZ strain indicated that this strain is susceptible to the named insecticides i.e. the resistance ratios remained between 0.91 to 1.37 folds that of the ST-TEH strain, the susceptible laboratory stock .The ST-BAN strain has the long history of insecticide — application like, DDT, dieldrin, malathion, propoxur, actellic lambdacyhalotith(icon as adulicides and abate as a larvicide, therefor it showed different pattern of susceptibility to the latter insecticides. The ST-BAN strain showed susceptibility to DDT, deltamethrjn, etofenprox and dimilin, moderately tolerant to fenthion and temephos (i.e.reslstance ratios ranged between 1.67 to 1.75 folds and tolerant to Pirimiphos~methyl and malathion with resistance ratio of about 2.37 folds , that of the ST-TEH strain. The observer’s tolerance in the ST-DAN strain to Pmmiphos-methyl (actellic and malathion might be as the result of regular use of adulticides or abate in malaria control programs in south of Iran and develop of cross-tolerance in An.stephensj from Bandar-Abbas south of Iran.

  17. Diminished reproductive fitness associated with the deltamethrin resistance in an Indian strain of dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sarita; Thomas, Anita; Samuel, Thomas; Sahgal, Arunima; Verma, Anita; Pillai, M K K

    2009-08-01

    The susceptible (SS) and resistant (DLR) strains of Aedes aegypti selected with deltamethrin and combination of deltamethrin and PBO (1:5) at the larval/adult stage were studied in the laboratory for their reproductive fitness in terms of fecundity, hatchability and longevity of gonotrophic cycles. The DLR strains exhibited 73-88% reduction in the duration of gonotrophic cycles as compared to their SS counterparts. There was a considerable decrease in egg production and hatchability rates in the selected strains of Ae. aegypti, as compared to that of the SS strain. Data indicate deltamethrin being an effective insecticide against Ae. aegypti and a possible correlation between the deltamethrin resistance and disadvantages during reproduction. The most drastic and significant effect was observed in DLR1b strains exhibiting 36.7% decrease in fecundity and 32.4% reduction in hatchability. Another important observation was diminished reproductive fitness in DLR2 strains. This suggests the usefulness of synergized deltamethrin selections in reducing the frequency of resistant individuals. A significant finding was to observe the reproductive disadvantage in adult-selected strains having negligible resistance to deltamethrin implicating the efficacy of deltamethrin as an adulticide rather than as a larvicide. Various probable reasons for the reduction in the reproductive potential and the possible resistance-management strategies of Ae. aegypti are discussed. PMID:19901902

  18. Assessment of emerging contaminants including organophosphate esters and pyrethroids during DISCOVER-AQ in Houston, Texas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Sascha; Clark, Addie; Sheesley, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is a NASA-funded air quality research program that focused on Houston, Texas, United States in September 2013. In conjunction with DISCOVER-AQ, particulate matter was collected for the month of September from four ground-based sampling sites across the Houston metropolitan area. The Houston metropolitan area is one of the most populous cities in the United States. Sampling sites included an upwind and downwind site as well as an urban (i.e. downtown) and industrial/port areas (i.e. Houston Ship Channel). Particulate matter samples were collected to examine both spatial and temporal trends (including day versus night). Particulate matter was collected on quartz fiber filters, which were analyzed for emerging classes of concern including organophosphate esters (OPEs; including flame retardants) and pyrethroids. OPEs have in recent years increased in both use and production as they replaced polybrominated diphenyl ethers flame retardants. Permethrin is one of the most commonly used mosquito adulticides in the United States.

  19. Deltamethrin:Promising mosquito control agent against adult stage of Aedes aegypti L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarita Kumar; Anita Thomas; Pillai MKK

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of deltamethrin against field-collected adults of Aedes aegypti L. (Ae. aegypti). Methods: The adults were selected with 0.025%deltamethrin for 40 successive generations. The selected adults were tested with 4%DDT and the emerging larvae were tested with various insecticides to study the cross-resistance spectrum. The knockdown and irritability studies were carried out in adult mosquitoes to investigate their behavioural response to deltamethrin. Results:Forty generations of selection with deltamethrin resulted in only 3.8-fold resistance in the adults of Ae. aegypti. The adults of parent (PS) and selected strains (DAS) exhibited only 0.8-fold cross resistance to 4%DDT. The larvae emerging from the PS and DAS strains did not develop appreciable levels of resistance to various insecticides tested. The knockdown studies revealed KT50 of 14.4 min in PS adults with no signs of recovery even after 24 h. The DAS strains could develop only 1.2 to 1.3-fold knockdown resistance (KDR). The knockdown response of DDT was though 5-6 times slower than deltamethrin but the continued response in deltamethrin-selected adults caused only 1.2-fold KDR. The PS and DAS strains exhibited significant irritability response towards deltamethrin and DDT. The DAS strains showed 5-6 fold increased irritability to deltamethrin as compared to the PS strain. Conclusions:The above results suggest the prolonged effective use of deltamethrin against Ae. aegypti as an adulticide.

  20. Impact of vectorborne parasitic neglected tropical diseases on child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Meagan A; Murray, Kristy O; Hotez, Peter J; Jones, Kathryn M

    2016-07-01

    Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are all vectorborne neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that are responsible for significant disease burden in impoverished children and adults worldwide. As vectorborne parasitic diseases, they can all be targeted for elimination through vector control strategies. Examples of successful vector control programmes for these diseases over the past two decades have included the Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease, the Kala-azar Control Scheme against leishmaniasis, the Onchocerciasis Control Programme and the lymphatic filariasis control programme in The Gambia. A common vector control component in all of these programmes is the use of adulticides including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and newer synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against the insect vectors of disease. Household spraying has been used against Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, and insecticide-treated bed nets have helped prevent leishmaniasis and lymphatic filariasis. Recent trends in vector control focus on collaborations between programmes and sectors to achieve integrated vector management that addresses the holistic vector control needs of a community rather than approaching it on a disease-by-disease basis, with the goals of increased efficacy, sustainability and cost-effectiveness. As evidence of vector resistance to currently used insecticide regimens emerges, research to develop new and improved insecticides and novel control strategies will be critical in reducing disease burden. In the quest to eliminate these vectorborne NTDs, efforts need to be made to continue existing control programmes, further implement integrated vector control strategies and stimulate research into new insecticides and control methods. PMID:26921274

  1. Mosquitocidal and Oviposition Repellent Activities of the Extracts of Seaweed Bryopsis pennata on Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Xin; Wong, Ching-Lee; Ahmad, Rohani; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing threat from infectious diseases and the development of insecticide resistance in mosquito populations drive the global search for new natural insecticides. The aims of this study were to evaluate the mosquitocidal activity of the extracts of seaweed Bryopsis pennata against dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and determine the seaweed's toxic effect on brine shrimp nauplii (as a non-target organism). In addition, the chemical compositions of the active larvicidal extract and fraction were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Chloroform extract exhibited strong ovicidal activity (with LC50 values of 229.3 and 250.5 µg/mL) and larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. The larvicidal potential of chloroform extract was further ascertained when its A7 fraction exhibited strong toxic effect against Ae. aegypti (LC50 = 4.7 µg/mL) and Ae. albopictus (LC50 = 5.3 µg/mL). LC-MS analysis of the chloroform extract gave a tentative identification of 13 compounds; Bis-(3-oxoundecyl) tetrasulfide was identified as the major compound in A7 fraction. Methanol extract showed strong repellent effect against female oviposition, along with weak adulticidal activity against mosquito and weak toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii. The mosquitocidal results of B. pennata suggest further investigation for the development of effective insecticide. PMID:26247928

  2. In vivo assessment of closantel ovicidal activity in Fasciola hepatica eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, María Victoria; Mera y Sierra, Roberto; Scarcella, Silvana; Neira, Gisela; Solana, Hugo Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance in livestock parasites is currently a worldwide problem. Fasciola hepatica is a cosmopolitan parasite which causes considerable loss in sheep and cattle production systems all over the world. Chemotherapy is currently the main tool available for its control. The intensive use of triclabendazole, the drug of choice for more than 20 years, has resulted in the development of resistant strains. The therapeutic options are adulticides such as closantel (salicylanilide anthelmintic that binds extensively to plasma albumin) to treat chronic fascioliasis in sheep, and cattle. In the present work, an Egg Hatch Assay (EHA) and morphometric studies were used to evaluate in vivo the ovicidal activity and morphology F. hepatica eggs, recovered from closantel treated sheep collected at different time intervals post treatment. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.0001) were observed in egg morphometry between the control and the treated groups in all the parameters studied. Eggs recovered from treated animals tend to be narrower and longer. Significant differences were found in the embryonation and hatching of eggs between 36 h post treatment (32, 5%) vs. approximately 85% in control, 12 h and 24 h post treatment. Our results confirm that closantel affects in vivo the normal development of the eggs. As one of the first effects, this drug affects the performance of the trematode's reproductive physiology. Even though closantel treated animals may still eliminate eggs in the first days post treatment, these are not viable. PMID:26551411

  3. The safety-net story about macrocyclic lactone heartworm preventives: a review, an update, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John W

    2005-10-24

    A number of safe, effective, and convenient heartworm preventatives are currently available for virtually all canine and feline pets. Yet, a 2001 survey of over 18,000 veterinary clinics in the United States identified more than 240,000 dogs and 3000 cats infected with Dirofilaria immitis. This high level of owner compliance failure is alarming. Prolonged administration of some of the macrocyclic lactone (ML) preventatives kills young larvae, older larvae, "immatures," young adults, and/or old adults. Efficacy of 95% or more requires dosing for 9-30 months, with older worms being more difficult to kill. Of the various MLs, ivermectin (IVM) has the most potent safety-net and adulticidal activity, milbemycin oxime has the least, and selamectin and moxidectin injectable lie somewhere in between. The unique effects of IVM are related to the age of the heartworms at initiation of treatment. The earlier treatment is started, the more stunted and smaller the worms and the shorter their survival time. Conversely, the later treatment is started, the longer the worms live, and the more likely the dog will be antigen- and microfilariae-positive. Drug effects do not appear to be enhanced by increasing the dosage or administering at shorter intervals, and it appears that continuous monthly treatment is needed to produce the full effects of the drug. The American Heartworm Society (AHS) recognizes the safety-net (or reach-back effect) and adulticidal properties of some MLs, particularly IVM. The AHS 2003 (American Heartworm Society, 2004. 2003 Updated guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infection in dogs. In: McCall, et al., (Eds.), Proceedings of the Symposium Session on Recent Advances in Heartworm Disease, The 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology, New Orleans, LA, 10-14 August, 2003. Vet. Parasitol. 125, 105-130) canine guidelines state that it is

  4. The combination of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae with the insecticide Imidacloprid increases virulence against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Samuels Richard I

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, is one of the most rapidly spreading insect borne diseases, stimulating the search for alternatives to current control measures. The dengue vector A. aegypti has received less attention than anophelene species, although more than 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection worldwide. Entomopathogenic fungi are emerging as potential candidates for the control of mosquitoes. Here we continue our studies on the pathogenicity of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae against adult A. aegypti females. With the aim of further reducing mean survival times of A. aegypti exposed to fungus impregnated surfaces, a sub-lethal concentration of the neonicotinoid insecticide Imidacloprid (IMI was added to fungal suspensions. Results A sub-lethal concentration of IMI that did not significantly alter the daily survival rates or mean survival percentages of mosquitoes was identified to be 0.1 ppm. This sub-lethal concentration was combined with M. anisopliae conidia (1 × 109 conidia mL-1. Both the combined treatment and the conidia alone were able to reduce the survival of A. aegypti compared with untreated or IMI treated mosquitoes. Importantly, mosquito survival following exposure to the combined treatment for 6 and 12 hrs was significantly reduced when compared with mosquitoes exposed to conidia alone. Conclusions This is the first time that a combination of an insecticide and an entomopathogenic fungus has been tested against A. aegypti. Firstly, the study showed the potential of IMI as an alternative to the currently employed pyrethroid adulticides. Secondly, as an alternative to applications of high concentrations of chemical insecticides, we suggest that adult A. aegypti could be controlled by surface application of entomopathogenic fungi and that the efficiency of these fungi could be increased by combining the fungi with ultra-low concentrations of insecticides

  5. Bioefficacy ofMentha piperita essential oil against dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarita Kumar; Naim Wahab; Radhika Warikoo

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To assess the larvicidal and repellent potential of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of peppermint plant,Mentha piperita (M. piperita) against the larval and adult stages of Aedes aegypti (Ae. Aegypti).Methods: The larvicidal potential of peppermint oil was evaluated against early fourth instar larvae ofAe. aegypti usingWHO protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 and48 h, and LC50 and LC90values were calculated. The efficacy of peppermint oil as mosquito repellent was assessed using the human-bait technique. The measured area of one arm of a human volunteer was applied with the oil and the other arm was applied with ethanol. The mosquito bites on both the arms were recorded for3 min after every15 min. The experiment continued for 3 h and the percent protection was calculated.Results:The essential oil extracted fromM. piperita possessed excellent larvicidal efficiency against dengue vector. The bioassays showed an LC50 and LC90 value of111.9 and295.18 ppm, respectively after24 h of exposure. The toxicity of the oil increased11.8% when the larvae were exposed to the oil for48 h. The remarkable repellent properties ofM. piperita essential oil were established against adults Ae. aegypti. The application of oil resulted in100% protection till150 min. After next30min, only1-2 bites were recorded as compared with8-9 bites on the control arm.Conclusions:The peppermint essential oil is proved to be efficient larvicide and repellent against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of oil as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the oil could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control.

  6. Mosquito control insecticides: a probabilistic ecological risk assessment on drift exposures of naled, dichlorvos (naled metabolite) and permethrin to adult butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, T C; Rand, G M

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive probabilistic terrestrial ecological risk assessment (ERA) was conducted to characterize the potential risk of mosquito control insecticide (i.e., naled, it's metabolite dichlorvos, and permethrin) usage to adult butterflies in south Florida by comparing the probability distributions of environmental exposure concentrations following actual mosquito control applications at labeled rates from ten field monitoring studies with the probability distributions of butterfly species response (effects) data from our laboratory acute toxicity studies. The overlap of these distributions was used as a measure of risk to butterflies. The long-term viability (survival) of adult butterflies, following topical (thorax/wings) exposures was the environmental value we wanted to protect. Laboratory acute toxicity studies (24-h LD50) included topical exposures (thorax and wings) to five adult butterfly species and preparation of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). The ERA indicated that the assessment endpoint of protection, of at least 90% of the species, 90% of the time (or the 10th percentile from the acute SSDs) from acute naled and permethrin exposures, is most likely not occurring when considering topical exposures to adults. Although the surface areas for adulticide exposures are greater for the wings, exposures to the thorax provide the highest potential for risk (i.e., SSD 10th percentile is lowest) for adult butterflies. Dichlorvos appeared to present no risk. The results of this ERA can be applied to other areas of the world, where these insecticides are used and where butterflies may be exposed. Since there are other sources (e.g., agriculture) of pesticides in the environment, where butterfly exposures will occur, the ERA may under-estimate the potential risks under real-world conditions. PMID:25261815

  7. Association of esterases with insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jennifer R; Ottea, James

    2012-06-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, is a competent vector of human disease and an important target of mosquito abatement programs. However, these management programs have been compromised by development of insecticide resistance. In the current study, susceptibilities to naled and resmethrin, two adulticides used in mosquito abatement, were monitored using a topical and contact bioassay, respectively, in five field- collected populations of C. quinquefasciatus (MARC, HOOD1, HOOD2, MINLOVE, and THIB). Frequencies of resistance, measured as survival after treatment with discriminating concentrations (i.e., sufficient to kill > 90% of a reference susceptible strain) were high (88.0-96.8%) in all field collections treated with naled, but were variable (3.3-94.2%) with resmethrin. In addition, esterase activities in mosquitoes from these collections were quantified using alpha-naphthyl acetate and ranged from 1.08 to 3.39 micromol alpha-naphthol produced min(-1) mg prot(-1). Heightened activities were associated with decreased insecticide susceptibility in HOOD1, THIB, and MINLOVE but not HOOD2. Esterases were visualized using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and intra- and interstrain differences in banding patterns were detected. In addition, esterases from MINLOVE mosquitoes were more numerous and intensely staining when compared with those from a laboratory-susceptible strain. Finally, naled synergized the toxicity of resmethrin in populations with decreased insecticide susceptibility and increased esterase activity by 2.5-(MINLOVE) to three-fold (THIB). Results from this study will allow management strategies for populations of C. quinquefasciatus to be optimized, and provide a foundation for further studies exploring use of esterase inhibitors as synergists of pyrethroid toxicity. PMID:22812138

  8. Biorational insecticides for control of mosquitoes and black flies in Sinaloa

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    Cipriano García Gutiérrez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sinaloa Mexico the presence of mosquitoes is a important health problem, and each spring-summer season appear several species which include: Aedes aegypti (Linneus, Anopheles albimanus (Wiedemann, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say and black flies of the Simulidae family. The control of larvae and adults of these insects are usually performed with chemical insecticides, so the use of biorational insecticides for control of these insects is novel, due to that have low environment impact. The objective of this work is to give known to the different biorational insecticides and their biological effects (inhibitor, insect repellent, larvicide, adulticide, that can be used to combat to different development stages of these insects. As well as show the progress of a study on the effectiveness of neem extracts, garlic, cinnamon, albahaca and cypermethrin at low doses (0.25,0.5 and 1ml/L, for control of larvae and adults of black flies in the unicipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa. By the mode of action, the biorational that can doing use for the control of theseinsects were: Spinosad, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner var. israeliensis for larvae control, Spinosad and Beauveria bassiana (Vuill. for adults; as well as extracts of neem, garlic, cinnamon and albahaca for both stages. The preliminary results of the study showed that the effectiveness application in tourist sites, through aerial spraying of cypermethrin at low doses and the plants extracts, allow low the index of larvae and infestation of mosquitoes and blackflies, decreasing the discomfort caused by these insects in the place of study.

  9. Moxidectin causes adult worm mortality of human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Meenakshi; Pathak, Manisha; Shahab, Mohd; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2014-12-01

    Moxidectin is a macrocyclic lactone belonging to milbemycin family closely related to ivermectin and is currently progressing towards Phase III clinical trial against human infection with the filaria Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1894). There is a single report on the microfilaricidal and embryostatic activity of moxidectin in case of the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi (Brug, 1927) in Mastomys coucha (Smith) but without any adulticidal action. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo antifilarial efficacy of moxidectin was evaluated on, B. malayi. In vitro moxidectin showed 100% reduction in adult female worm motility at 0.6 μM concentration within 7 days with 68% inhibition in the reduction of MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide dye) (which is used to detect viability of worms). A 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of moxidectin for adult female parasite was 0.242 μM, for male worm 0.186 μM and for microfilaria IC50 was 0.813 μM. In adult B. malayi-transplanted primary screening model (Meriones unguiculatus Milne-Edwards), moxidectin at a single optimal dose of 20 mg/kg by oral and subcutaneous route was found effective on both adult parasites and microfilariae. In secondary screening (M coucha, subcutaneously inoculated with infective larvae), moxidectin at the same dose by subcutaneous route brought about death of 49% of adult worms besides causing sterilisation in 54% of the recovered live female worms. The treated animals exhibited a continuous and sustained reduction in peripheral blood microfilaraemia throughout the observation period of 90 days. The mechanism of action of moxidectin is suggested to be similar to avermectins. The in silico studies were also designed to explore the interaction of moxidectin with glutamate-gated chloride channels of B. malayi. The docking results revealed a close interaction of moxidectin with various GluCl ligand sites of B. malayi. PMID:25651699

  10. Efficacy of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin paste formulations against naturally acquired Oxyuris equi infections in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemeyer, Craig R; Prado, Julio C; Nichols, Eric C; Marchiondo, Alan A

    2010-07-15

    In recent years, numerous veterinary practitioners have reported anecdotal episodes in which anthelmintic treatment did not appear to deliver the expected efficacy against equine pinworms (Oxyuris equi). Anthelmintic resistance has not been demonstrated formally in equine pinworms, so a clinical study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of paste formulations of pyrantel pamoate or ivermectin against naturally acquired infections with O. equi. Twenty-one horses (>4 months to 15 years of age) with patent, naturally acquired pinworm infections were blocked by source of origin and allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups: horses (n=7) assigned to Group 1 were treated orally with pyrantel pamoate paste at a dosage of 13.2 mg/kg (2x label dosage), Group 2 horses (n=7) were untreated controls, and horses (n=7) assigned to Group 3 were treated orally with ivermectin paste at a dosage of 200 microg/kg. Fourteen days after treatment, horses were euthanatized, necropsied, and large intestinal contents were processed for recovery of adult pinworms. In addition, duplicate 1% aliquots of intestinal contents from the cecum, ventral colon, dorsal colon, and small colon were collected, preserved, and examined for recovery and enumeration of fourth-stage larval O. equi. Anthelmintic efficacy against pinworms was evaluated by comparing the post-treatment worm counts of Groups 1 and 3 to those of control animals. Mean numbers of O. equi adults recovered postmortem were significantly decreased by both pyrantel pamoate (P=0.0366) and ivermectin (P=0.0137) treatment, with respective efficacies of 91.2% and 96.0%. In addition, both products demonstrated >99% efficacy against fourth-stage O. equi larvae. The current study demonstrated acceptable adulticidal and larvicidal efficacy of both pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin paste formulations against O. equi and did not support the existence of macrocyclic lactone or pyrimidine resistance in the pinworm populations evaluated. PMID

  11. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  12. The Impact of Selection with Diflubenzuron, a Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor, on the Fitness of Two Brazilian Aedes aegypti Field Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, Thiago Affonso; Valle, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Several Aedes aegypti field populations are resistant to neurotoxic insecticides, mainly organophoshates and pyrethroids, which are extensively used as larvicides and adulticides, respectively. Diflubenzuron (DFB), a chitin synthesis inhibitor (CSI), was recently approved for use in drinking water, and is presently employed in Brazil for Ae. aegypti control, against populations resistant to the organophosphate temephos. However, tests of DFB efficacy against field Ae. aegypti populations are lacking. In addition, information regarding the dynamics of CSI resistance, and characterization of any potential fitness effects that may arise in conjunction with resistance are essential for new Ae. aegypti control strategies. Here, the efficacy of DFB was evaluated for two Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations known to be resistant to both temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Laboratory selection for DFB resistance was then performed over six or seven generations, using a fixed dose of insecticide that inhibited 80% of adult emergence in the first generation. The selection process was stopped when adult emergence in the diflubenzuron-treated groups was equivalent to that of the control groups, kept without insecticide. Diflubenzuron was effective against the two Ae. aegypti field populations evaluated, regardless of their resistance level to neurotoxic insecticides. However, only a few generations of DFB selection were sufficient to change the susceptible status of both populations to this compound. Several aspects of mosquito biology were affected in both selected populations, indicating that diflubenzuron resistance acquisition is associated with a fitness cost. We believe that these results can significantly contribute to the design of control strategies involving the use of insect growth regulators. PMID:26107715

  13. The Impact of Selection with Diflubenzuron, a Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor, on the Fitness of Two Brazilian Aedes aegypti Field Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Affonso Belinato

    Full Text Available Several Aedes aegypti field populations are resistant to neurotoxic insecticides, mainly organophoshates and pyrethroids, which are extensively used as larvicides and adulticides, respectively. Diflubenzuron (DFB, a chitin synthesis inhibitor (CSI, was recently approved for use in drinking water, and is presently employed in Brazil for Ae. aegypti control, against populations resistant to the organophosphate temephos. However, tests of DFB efficacy against field Ae. aegypti populations are lacking. In addition, information regarding the dynamics of CSI resistance, and characterization of any potential fitness effects that may arise in conjunction with resistance are essential for new Ae. aegypti control strategies. Here, the efficacy of DFB was evaluated for two Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations known to be resistant to both temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Laboratory selection for DFB resistance was then performed over six or seven generations, using a fixed dose of insecticide that inhibited 80% of adult emergence in the first generation. The selection process was stopped when adult emergence in the diflubenzuron-treated groups was equivalent to that of the control groups, kept without insecticide. Diflubenzuron was effective against the two Ae. aegypti field populations evaluated, regardless of their resistance level to neurotoxic insecticides. However, only a few generations of DFB selection were sufficient to change the susceptible status of both populations to this compound. Several aspects of mosquito biology were affected in both selected populations, indicating that diflubenzuron resistance acquisition is associated with a fitness cost. We believe that these results can significantly contribute to the design of control strategies involving the use of insect growth regulators.

  14. Evaluation of seed extracts from plants found in the Caatinga biome for the control of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; de Oliveira, Julliete Medeiros; Chagas, Juliana Macêdo; Rabelo, Luciana Maria Araujo; de Medeiros, Guilherme Fulgêncio; Giodani, Raquel Brant; da Silva, Elizeu Antunes; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; de Fátima de Freire Melo Ximenes, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Dengue fever, currently the most important arbovirus, is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Given the absence of a prophylactic vaccine, the disease can only be controlled by combating the vector insect. However, increasing reports of resistance and environmental damage caused by insecticides have led to the urgent search for new safer alternatives. In this regard, plants stand out as a source of easy-to-obtain biodegradable insecticide molecules. Twenty (20) plant seed extracts from the Caatinga, an exclusively Brazilian biome, were prepared. Sodium phosphate (50 mM, pH 8.0) was used as extractor. The extracts were used in bioassays and submitted to partial characterisation. A Probit analysis of insecticides was carried out, and intergroup differences were verified by the Student's t test and ANOVA. All the extracts exhibited larvicidal and ovipositional deterrence activity. The extracts of Amburana cearenses, Piptadenia viridiflora, Erythrina velutina, Myracrodruon urundeuva and Schinopsis brasiliensis were also pupicides, while the extracts of P. viridiflora, E. velutina, A. cearenses, Anadenanthera colubrina, Diocleia grandiflora, Bauhinia cheilantha, Senna spectabilis, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Mimosa regnelli and Genipa americana displayed adulticidal activity. Egg laying was compromised when females were fed extracts of Ricinus communis, Croton sonderianus and S. brasiliensis. At least two proteins with insecticidal activity were found in all the extracts. Phenol compounds were identified in all the extracts and flavonoids, triterpenes or alkaloids in 14 of them. The results show the potential of plant seed extracts from the Caatinga as a source of active molecules against A. aegypti mosquitos. PMID:25056942

  15. Zika Virus Surveillance and Preparedness - New York City, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher T; Vora, Neil M; Bajwa, Waheed; Boyd, Lorraine; Harper, Scott; Kass, Daniel; Langston, Aileen; McGibbon, Emily; Merlino, Mario; Rakeman, Jennifer L; Raphael, Marisa; Slavinski, Sally; Tran, Anthony; Wong, Ricky; Varma, Jay K

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus has rapidly spread through the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas since being identified in Brazil in early 2015. Transmitted primarily through the bite of infected Aedes species mosquitoes, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause spontaneous abortion and birth defects, including microcephaly (1,2). New York City (NYC) is home to a large number of persons who travel frequently to areas with active Zika virus transmission, including immigrants from these areas. In November 2015, the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) began developing and implementing plans for managing Zika virus and on February 1, 2016, activated its Incident Command System. During January 1-June 17, 2016, DOHMH coordinated diagnostic laboratory testing for 3,605 persons with travel-associated exposure, 182 (5.0%) of whom had confirmed Zika virus infection. Twenty (11.0%) confirmed patients were pregnant at the time of diagnosis. In addition, two cases of Zika virus-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome were diagnosed. DOHMH's response has focused on 1) identifying and diagnosing suspected cases; 2) educating the public and medical providers about Zika virus risks, transmission, and prevention strategies, particularly in areas with large populations of immigrants from areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission; 3) monitoring pregnant women with Zika virus infection and their fetuses and infants; 4) detecting local mosquito-borne transmission through both human and mosquito surveillance; and 5) modifying existing Culex mosquito control measures by targeting Aedes species of mosquitoes through the use of larvicides and adulticides. PMID:27337505

  16. Effects of mosquito control pesticides on competent queen conch (Strombus gigas) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Gabriel A; Glazer, Robert A; Wetzel, Dana

    2013-10-01

    Pesticides are applied seasonally in the Florida Keys to control nuisance populations of mosquitoes that pose a health threat to humans. There is, however, a need to investigate the effects of these pesticides on non-target marine organisms. We tested naled and permethrin, two mosquito adulticides used in the Keys, on a critical early life-history stage of queen conch (Strombus gigas). We conducted 12-h exposure experiments on competent (i.e., capable of undergoing metamorphosis) queen conch larvae using environmentally relevant pesticide concentrations. We found that there was little to no mortality and that the pesticides did not induce or interfere with metamorphosis. However, after introduction of a natural metamorphic cue (extract of the red alga Laurencia potei), a significantly greater proportion of larvae underwent metamorphosis in the pesticide treatments than in those with the alga alone. In addition to the morphogenetic pathway that induces metamorphosis when stimulated, there thus appears to be a regulatory pathway that enhances the response to metamorphic triggers, as suggested by the increased sensitivity of the queen conch larvae to the algal cue after pesticide exposure (i.e., the pesticides stimulated the regulatory pathway). The regulatory pathway probably plays a role in the identification of high-quality habitat for metamorphosis, as the increased response to the algal cue suggests. Aerial drift and runoff can carry these pesticides into nearshore waters, where they may act as a false signal of favorable conditions and facilitate metamorphosis in suboptimal habitat, thus adversely affecting recruitment in nearshore queen conch populations. PMID:24243960

  17. Correlation between the reproductive potential and the pyrethroid resistance in an Indian strain of filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Pillai, M K K

    2011-02-01

    The laboratory studies were conducted to uncover the correlation between the levels of pyrethroid resistance and the reproductive potential of parent (SS) and resistant strains of Culex quinquefasciatus (RR) originating from Delhi, India and selected with deltamethrin (RDL) or the combination of deltamethrin and PBO (1:5) (RDP) at the larval stage and selected with deltamethrin at the adult stage (RDA). The reproductive potential was evaluated in terms of fecundity, fertility, egg hatchability and longevity of gonotrophic cycles. The RR strains exhibited 68-74% reduced duration of the gonotrophic cycles when compared with that of SS strain. The considerable decrease in the egg production, ranging from 45.4% to 61.6%, observed in the selected strains as compared to the SS strain, indicates the possible positive correlation between the levels of deltamethrin resistance and the reproduction disadvantage. This correlation was further confirmed by 24.6% to 53.6% decrease in the hatchability of eggs of the selected strains with respect to that of the parent strain. A worth-mentioning observation of the reduced reproductive fitness in RDP strains suggests the effectiveness of synergized deltamethrin selections in reducing the frequency of resistant individuals. The reproductive disadvantage in adult-selected strains possessing negligible resistance to deltamethrin implicates the efficacy of deltamethrin as an adulticide rather than as a larvicide against Cx. quinquefasciatus. The results suggest that the reduced reproductive fitness of resistant genotypes in the population can eliminate heterozygotes and resistant homozygotes by implementing different resistance-management strategies against Cx. quinquefasciatus. PMID:20569518

  18. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  19. Plant Essential Oils from Apiaceae Family as Alternatives to Conventional Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Main method to control insect pest is using synthetic insecticides, but the development of insect resistance to this products, the high operational cost, environmental pollution, toxicity to humans and harmful effect on non-target organisms have created the need for developing alternative approaches to control insect pest. Furthermore, the demand for organic crops, especially vegetables for the fresh market, has greatly increased worldwide. The ideal insecticide should control target pests adequately and should be target-specific, rapidly degradable, and low in toxicity to humans and other mammals. Plant essential oils could be an alternative source for insect pest control because they constitute a rich source of bioactive chemicals and are commonly used as flavoring agents in foods. These materials may be applied to food crops shortly before harvest without leaving excessive residues. Moreover, medically safe of these plant derivatives has emphasized also. For these reasons, much effort has been focused on plant essential oils or their constituents as potential sources of insect control agents. In this context, Apiaceae (Umbelliferae family would rank among the most important families of plants. In the last few years more and more studies on the insecticidal properties of essential oils from Apiaceae family have been published and it seemed worthwhile to compile them. The focus of this review lies on the lethal (ovicidal, larvicidal, pupicidal and adulticidal and sublethal (antifeedant, repellent, oviposition deterrent, Growth inhibitory and progeny production activities of plant essential oils and theirmain components from Apiaceae family. These features indicate that pesticides based on Apiaceae essential oils could be used in a variety of ways to control a large number of pests. It can be concluded that essential oils and phytochemicals isolated from Apiaceae family may be efficacious and safe replacements for conventional synthetic

  20. Evaluation of Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn. Extract against Aedes aegypti L. and Aedes albopictus (Skuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn extract were evaluated against dengue vectors in the laboratory."nMethods: Both Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn crude hexane extract were bioassayed against the adults and larval stages of dengue vectors Aedes aegypti L. and Aedes albopictus(Skuse in the laboratory."nResults: The A. calamus crude hexane extract exhibited a larvicidal activity against 4th-instar Ae. aegypti larvae with LC50 and LC90 values of 0.4418 and 11.3935 ppm respectively. The plant crude extract exhibited against Ae. albopictus larvae with a higher LC50 and LC90 values of 21.2555 ppm and 36.1061 ppm, respectively. There was a significant difference on the effect of A. calamus extract on both Aedes spp. Larvae (P< 0.05. However, bifenthrin showed a significant difference on larvicidal effect to that of A. calamus hexane extract on both Aedes spp (P< 0.05. In testing the adulticidal activity, this plant extract exhibited the LC50 and LC90 values of 17.4075 and 252.9458 ppm against Ae .aegypti and a higher LC50 and LC90 values of 43.9952 and 446.1365 ppm respectively on Ae. albopictus. There was no significant difference on the effect of A. calamus extract on both Aedes spp adults (P> 0.05."nConclusion: Bifenthrin however showed a significant difference on both Aedes spp adults (P< 0.05. With the wide availability of A. calamus in Malaysia, it could be utilized for controlling dengue vectors. "n 

  1. Area-wide ground applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the control of Aedes albopictus in residential neighborhoods: from optimization to operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gregory M; Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik; Healy, Sean P; Farooq, Muhammad; Gaugler, Randy; Hamilton, George; Fonseca, Dina M

    2014-01-01

    The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG) as a larvicide targeting Aedes albopictus. During 2010-2013 we performed initially open field trials and then 19 operational area-wide applications in urban and suburban residential areas in northeastern USA to test three truck-mounted sprayers at two application rates. Area-wide applications of WDG in open field conditions at 400 and 800 g/ha killed on average 87% of tested larvae. Once techniques were optimized in residential areas, applications with a Buffalo Turbine Mist Sprayer at a rate of 800 g/ha, the best combination, consistently provided over 90% mortality. Importantly, there was no significant decrease in efficacy with distance from the spray line even in blocks of row homes with trees and bushes in the backyards. Under laboratory conditions Bti deposition in bioassay cups during the operational trials resulted in over 6 weeks of residual control. Our results demonstrate that area-wide truck mounted applications of WDG can effectively suppress Ae. albopictus larvae and should be used in integrated mosquito management approaches to control this nuisance pest and disease vector. PMID:25329314

  2. Area-wide ground applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the control of Aedes albopictus in residential neighborhoods: from optimization to operation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Williams

    Full Text Available The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG as a larvicide targeting Aedes albopictus. During 2010-2013 we performed initially open field trials and then 19 operational area-wide applications in urban and suburban residential areas in northeastern USA to test three truck-mounted sprayers at two application rates. Area-wide applications of WDG in open field conditions at 400 and 800 g/ha killed on average 87% of tested larvae. Once techniques were optimized in residential areas, applications with a Buffalo Turbine Mist Sprayer at a rate of 800 g/ha, the best combination, consistently provided over 90% mortality. Importantly, there was no significant decrease in efficacy with distance from the spray line even in blocks of row homes with trees and bushes in the backyards. Under laboratory conditions Bti deposition in bioassay cups during the operational trials resulted in over 6 weeks of residual control. Our results demonstrate that area-wide truck mounted applications of WDG can effectively suppress Ae. albopictus larvae and should be used in integrated mosquito management approaches to control this nuisance pest and disease vector.

  3. Study on the cure efficacy of drug against dog's dirofilariasis%犬恶丝虫病的药物治疗效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶青华; 陈涛

    2012-01-01

    This experiment used thiacetarsamide sodium to kill the dirofilariosis adult of 24 dogs,then used levamisole to kill the larvae after 60 days, meanwhile, a control group was established. The efficacy result showed that only one dog was positive after 5 months; 10 months later, these dogs were tested by ELISA Anigen Rapid Heartworm Ag Test Kit again, two dogs in control group were positive, and one dog in experimental group was positive. It indicated that adulticide therapy with thiacetarsamide sodium is more efficient, and the effective rates reached 95%, but it couldn′t kill the larvae, and the levamisol could kill the larvae at the same conditions.%本试验对24头恶丝虫病阳性犬的成虫选用硫砷酰胺钠进行驱杀,60d后再用左旋咪唑对幼虫进行驱杀,并设对照组。结果5个月后只有1头犬呈阳性;10个月后再次用ELISA检测,对照组有2头呈阳性,试验组仅1头呈阳性。表明硫砷胺酰胺钠杀灭犬恶丝虫成虫的效果比较好,有效率高达95%,但不能杀灭幼虫;左旋咪唑在该使用条件下能够有效杀灭幼虫。

  4. Larvicidal and irritant activities of hexane leaf extracts of Citrus sinensis against dengue vector Aedes aegypti L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Radhika Warikoo; Ankita Ray; Jasdeep Kaur Sandhu; Roopa Samal; Naim Wahab; Sarita Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To assess the larvicidal and irritant activities of the hexane extracts of leaves of Citrus sinensis (C. sinensis) against the early fourth instars and female adults of Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti). Methods: The larvicidal potential of the prepared leaf extract was evaluated against early fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti using WHO protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 h and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. The efficacy of extract as mosquito irritant was assessed by contact irritancy assays. Extract-impregnated paper was placed on a glass plate over which a perspex funnel with a hole on the top was kept inverted. Single female adult, 3-day old unfed/blood-fed, was released inside the funnel. After 3 min of acclimatization time, the time taken for the first take-off and total number of flights undertaken during 15 min were scored. Results: The citrus leaf extracts from hexane possessed moderate larvicidal efficiency against dengue vector. The bioassays resulted in an LC50 and LC90 value of 446.84 and 1 370.96 ppm, respectively after 24 h of exposure. However, the extracts were proved to be remarkable irritant against adults Ae. aegypti, more pronounced effects being observed on blood-fed females than unfed females. The extract-impregnated paper was thus proved to be 7-11 times more irritable as compared with the control paper. Conclusions:The hexane extracts from C. sinensis leaves are proved to be reasonably larvicidal but remarkably irritant against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of extract as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the extract could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control.

  5. Plant-mediated biosynthesis of nanoparticles as an emerging tool against mosquitoes of medical and veterinary importance: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are a key threat for millions of people worldwide, since they act as vectors for devastating parasites and pathogens. Mosquito young instars are usually targeted with organophosphates, insect growth regulators and microbial control agents. Indoors residual spraying and insecticide-treated bed nets are also employed. However, these chemicals have strong negative effects on human health and the environment. Newer and safer tools have been recently implemented to enhance control of mosquitoes. In this review, I focus on characterization, effectiveness, and non-target effects of mosquitocidal nanoparticles synthesized using botanical products (mosquitocidal nanoparticles, MNP). The majority of plant-fabricated MNP are silver ones. The synthesis of MNP is usually confirmed by UV-visualization spectroscopy, followed by scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. Interestingly, plant-synthesized metal nanoparticles have been reported as effective ovicides, larvicides, pupicides, adulticides, and oviposition deterrents against different mosquito species of medical and veterinary importance. Few parts per million of different MNP are highly toxic against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, and the filariasis mosquito Culex quiquefasciatus. However, despite the growing number of evidences about the effectiveness of MNP, moderate efforts have been carried out to shed light on their possible non-target effects against mosquito's natural enemies and other aquatic organisms. In the final section, particular attention was dedicated to this issue. A number of hot areas that need further research and cooperation among parasitologists and entomologists are highlighted. PMID:26541154

  6. Susceptibility profile of Aedes aegypti from Santiago Island, Cabo Verde, to insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Hélio Daniel Ribeiro; Paiva, Marcelo Henrique Santos; Silva, Norma Machado; de Araújo, Ana Paula; Camacho, Denise dos Reis da Rosa de Azevedo; Moura, Aires Januário Fernandes da; Gómez, Lara Ferrero; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira; Santos, Maria Alice Varjal de Melo

    2015-12-01

    In 2009, Cabo Verde diagnosed the first dengue cases, with 21,137 cases reported and Aedes aegypti was identified as the vector. Since the outbreak, chemical insecticides and source reduction were used to control the mosquito population. This study aimed to assess the susceptibility of A. aegypti populations from Santiago, Cabo Verde to insecticides and identify the mechanisms of resistance. Samples of A. aegypti eggs were obtained at two different time periods (2012 and 2014), using ovitraps in different locations in Santiago Island to establish the parental population. F1 larvae were exposed to different concentrations of insecticides (Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis (Bti), diflubenzuron and temephos) to estimate the lethal concentrations (LC90) and calculate the respective rate of resistance (RR90). Semi-field tests using temephos-ABATE(®) were performed to evaluate the persistence of the product. Bottle tests using female mosquitoes were carried out to determine the susceptibility to the adulticides malathion, cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to investigate the presence of metabolic resistance mechanisms, associated with the enzymes glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), esterases and mixed-function oxidases (MFO) and to detect mutations or alterations in the sodium channel and acetylcholinesterase genes. A. aegypti mosquitoes from Santiago exhibited resistance to deltamethrin, cypermethrin (mortality<80%) and temephos (RR90=4.4) but susceptibility to malathion (mortality≥98%), Bti and diflubenzuron. The low level of resistance to temephos did not affect the effectiveness of Abate(®). The enzymatic analysis conducted in 2012 revealed slight changes in the activities of GST (25%), MFO (18%), α-esterase (19%) and β-esterase (17%), but no significant changes in 2014. Target site resistance mutations were not detected. Our results suggest that the A. aegypti population from Santiago is resistant to two major

  7. Synergistic effect of some essential oils on toxicity and knockdown effects, against mosquitos, cockroaches and housefly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idin Zibaee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity and knockdown effect of Eucalyptus globulus, Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils and their mixed formulation on Periplaneta Americana (L., Blattella germanica (L., Supella longipalpa, Culex pipiens, Anopheles stephensi and Musca domestica were evaluated in a series of laboratory experiments. In all bioassay five different doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% were used by filter paper (cm2 and aerosol (cm3 bioassay methods, all essential oils was toxic to cockroaches, mosquitos and housefly species the lowest and the highest LC50 belong to mixed formulation on B. germanica (LC50 6.1 and E. globulus on P. americana (LC50 27.7 respectively. In continuous exposure experiments, Mortality (LT50 values for cockroaches ranged from 1403.3 min with 0.625% E. globulus (for P. americana to 2.2 min with 10% mixed formulation for A. stephensi. The KT50 values ranged from 0.1 to 1090.8 min for 10% and 0.625 for mixed formulation and R. officinalis respectively. The mortality after 24 h for mixed formulation was 100% but for single essential oils ranged from 81.5 to 98.3 for P. americana treated with R. officinalis and A. stephensi treated with E. globulus respectively. Studies on persistence of essential oils on impregnated paper revealed that it has more adulticidal activity for longer period at low storage temperature. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of essential oil showed 14 and 16 peaks for E. globules and R. officinalis respectively. α-Pinene (39.8%, 1, 8-Cineole (13.2%, Camphene (9.1% and Borneol (3.7% were present in major amounts for R. officinalis and 1,8-Cineole (31.4%, α-Pinene (15.3%, d-Limonene (9.7% and α-Terpinolen (5.3% were present in major amounts for E. globulus respectively. Our results showed that two surveyed essential oils has compatible with synergistic effect on various insect species, furthermore it is useful for applying as integrated pest management tool for studied insects management, especially in

  8. Synergized resmethrin and corticosterone alter the chicken's response to west nile virus

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    Jankowski, Mark David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Franson, J Christian [US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY; Mostl, Erich [UNIV OF VIENNA; Porter, Warren P [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Hofmeister, Erik K [US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    2009-01-01

    Debate concerning arbovirus control strategies remains contentious because concern regarding the relative risk of viral infection and environmental toxicant exposure is high but inadequately characterized. Taking this into account, mosquito control agencies employ aerial insecticides only after arbovirus surveillance data indicate high local mosquito-infection-rates. Successfully mitigating the risk of adult-mosquito-control insecticides ('adulticides') to non-target species such as humans, domestic animals, fish, beneficial insects and wildlife, while increasing their efficacy to reduce arbovirus outbreak intensity requires targeted scientific data from animal toxicity studies and environmental monitoring activities. Wild birds are an important reservoir host for WNv and are potentially exposed to insecticides used for mosquito control. However, no risk assessments have evaluated whether insecticides augment or extend the potential transmissibility of West Nile virus (WNv) in birds. In order to augment existing resmethrin risk assessments, we aimed to determine whether synergized resmethrin (SR) may cause chickens to develop an elevated or extended WN viremia and if subacute stress may affect its immunotoxicity. We distributed 40 chickens into four groups then exposed them prior to and during WNv infection with SR (50 {mu}g/l resmethrin + 150 {mu}g/l piperonyl butoxide) and/or 20 mg/I corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking-water. Corticosterone was given for 10 continuous days and SR was given for 3 alternate days starting the 3rd day of CORT exposure, then chickens were subcutaneously inoculated with WNv on the 5th day of CORT treatment. Compared to controls, CORT treatment extended and elevated viremia, enhanced WNv-specific antibody and increased the percentage of birds that shed oral virus, whereas SR treatment extended viremia, depressed WNv-specific IgG, and increased the percentage of CORT-treated birds that shed oral virus. Corticosterone and SR

  9. 41种植物精油对淡色库蚊的熏蒸活性%Fumigation activity of 41 essential oils against Culex pipiens pallens (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付臣臣; 万涛; 江志利; 吴华; 冯俊涛; 马志卿; 张兴

    2013-01-01

    为发现具有较高杀蚊活性的精油,推动植物精油类卫生杀虫剂的创制,本研究采用三角瓶熏蒸法测定了17科41种植物精油对淡色库蚊Culex pipiens pallens雌成蚊的熏蒸活性,并进一步采用密闭圆筒法验证其杀虫毒力大小.三角瓶熏蒸法测定表明,在12μL/L浓度下,留兰香油(spearmint oil)、薰衣草油(lavender oil)、山苍子油(Litsea cubeba oil)等26种精油均有较强的熏蒸作用,KT50小于15 min.该26种精油用密闭圆筒熏蒸法进一步测定表明,在浓度为10 μL/L时,冬青油(wintergreen oil)、艾叶油(blumea oil)、薄荷油(peppermint oil)、桉叶油(Eucalyptus robusta oil)和蓝桉油(E.globulus oil)等植物精油熏蒸活性较强,其KT50分别为16.91,21.20,22.57,18.43和19.48 min.结果证明冬青油、艾叶油、薄荷油、桉叶油和蓝桉油等5种精油对淡色库蚊具有较强的熏蒸活性,具备作为淡色库蚊防控剂开发的潜力,值得进一步研究.%To find the essential oils with high insecticidal activity and promote the development of hygienic insecticides,essential oils from 41 plants belonging to 17 families were evaluated for adulticidal activity against female adults of Culex pipiens pallens by airtight fumigation in conical flask and hermetic round canister method.The results showed that 26 essential oils (12 μL/L) including spearmint oil,lavender oil and Litsea cubeba oil were very toxic to the mosquito (KT50 < 15 min) by airtight fumigation in conical flask.Further assay using hermetic round canister method indicated that 5 essential oils (wintergreen oil,blumea oil,peppermint oil,Eucalyptus robusta oil and E.globulus oil) had high fumigation toxicity at the concentration of 10 μL/L,and their KT50 values were 16.91,21.20,22.57,18.43 and 19.48 min,respectively.The results demonstrate that wintergreen oil,blumea oil,peppermint oil,E.robusta oil and E.globulus oil all have high fumigation activity against C.pipiens pallens,with the

  10. Recent rapid rise of a permethrin knock down resistance allele in Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

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    Gustavo Ponce García

    heterogeneity in Ile1,016 frequencies among 2007-2008 collections, which ranged from 45.7% (+ or - 2.00% CI95 in the state of Veracruz to 51.2% (+ or - 4.36% CI95 in the Yucatán peninsula and 14.5% (+ or - 2.23% CI95 in and around Tapachula in the state of Chiapas. Spatial heterogeneity was also evident at smaller geographic scales. For example within the city of Chetumal, Quintana Roo, Ile1,016 frequencies varied from 38.3%-88.3%. A linear regression analysis based on seven collections from 2007 revealed that the frequency of Ile1,016 homozygotes accurately predicted knockdown rate for mosquitoes exposed to permethrin in a bioassay (R(2 = 0.98. CONCLUSIONS: We have recorded a dramatic increase in the frequency of the Ile1,016 mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti in México from 1996 to 2009. This may be related to heavy use of permethrin-based insecticides in mosquito control programs. Spatial heterogeneity in Ile1,016 frequencies in 2007 and 2008 collections may reflect differences in selection pressure or in the initial frequency of Ile1,016. The rapid recent increase in Ile1,016 is predicted by a simple model of positive directional selection on a recessive allele. Unfortunately this model also predicts rapid fixation of Ile1,016 unless there is negative fitness associated with Ile1,016 in the absence of permethrin. If so, then spatial refugia of susceptible Ae. aegypti or rotational schedules of different classes of adulticides could be established to slow or prevent fixation of Ile1,016.