WorldWideScience

Sample records for adulticides

  1. Adulticidal efficacy of Delonix elata against filariasis vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rajeswary

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the adulticidal activity and toxicity of different solvent crude extracts of Delonix elata (D. elata against filariasis vector mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus. Methods: The adulticidal activities of crude hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol leaf and seed extracts of D. elata were assayed for their toxicity against vector mosquito Cx. quinquefasciatus. Bioassay was carried out by WHO method for determination of adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Results: All extracts showed moderate adulticidal effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract of D. elata leaf against the adults of Cx. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values at 197.28 and 347.45mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. This study provides first report on the mosquito adulticidal activity of D. elata plant extracts against filariasis vector mosquito, Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  2. Adulticidal efficacy of Delonix elata against filariasis vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohan Rajeswary; Marimuthu Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the adulticidal activity and toxicity of different solvent crude extracts of Delonix elata (D. elata) against filariasis vector mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus). Methods: The adulticidal activities of crude hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol leaf and seed extracts of D. elata were assayed for their toxicity against vector mosquitoCx. quinquefasciatus. Bioassay was carried out by WHO method for determination of adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. Results: All extracts showed moderate adulticidal effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract of D. elata leaf against the adults of Cx. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values at 197.28 and 347.45mg/L, respectively.Conclusions:These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. This study provides first report on the mosquito adulticidal activity of D. elata plant extracts against filariasis vector mosquito, Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  3. Adult emergence inhibition and adulticidal activities of medicinal plant extracts againstAnopheles stephensiListon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AbdulAbduzZahir; AbdulAbdulRahuman; AsokanBa=gavan; GandhiElango; Chinnaperumal Kamaraj

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To determine the adult emergence inhibition (EI) and adulticidal activities of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and acetone leaves extracts of Anisomeles malabarica (A. malabarica), Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta), Ocimum basilicum (O. basilicum), Ricinus communis (R. communis), Solanum trilobatum (S. trilobatum), Tridax procumbens (T. procumbens)and seeds ofGloriosa superba (G. superba) againstAnopheles stephensi (An. stephensi).Methods: The EI and adulticidal trials were carried out according to World Health Organization (WHO) procedures with slight modifications. The extracts were diluted in dimethyl sulphoxide in order to prepare a serial dilution of test dosages (15.625, 31.25, 62.5, 125, 250, 500 and1 000μg/mL). Five duplicate trials were carried out for every sample concentration, and for each trial a negative control was included and the mortality was determined after24 h of exposure.Results: The highestEI activity was found in ethyl acetate extracts ofA. malabarica, chloroform extracts ofO. basilicum, S.trilobatum, acetone of extract ofR. communis, T. procumbens, and seed extract ofG. superba withEI50 values143.12, 119.82, 157.87, 139.39, 111.19, and134.85 μg/mL, and the effective adulticidal activity was observed in chloroform, acetone extracts ofG. superba, T. procumbens, R. communis, S.trilobatum and ethyl acetate extract ofO. basilicum with LD50 values120.17, 108.77, 127.22, 163.11, 118.27, and93.02μg/mL, respectively. Chi-square value was significant atP<0.05 level.Conclusions: These results should encourage further efforts to investigate the compounds that might possess good EI and adulticidal properties when isolated in pure form.

  4. Mosquito adulticidal properties of Delonix elata (Family:Fabaceae) against dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohan Rajeswary; Marimuthu Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the adulticidal activity of hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol leaf and seed extracts of Delonix elata (D. elata) against Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti). Methods:The bioassay was conducted in an experimental kit consisting of two cylindrical plastic tubes both measuring 125 mm×44 mm following the WHO method;mortality of the mosquitoes was recorded after 24 h. Results:The adulticidal activity of plant leaf and seed extracts showed moderate toxic effect on the adult mosquitoes after 24 h of exposure period. However, the highest adulticidal activity was observed in the leaf methanol extract of D. elata against Ae. aegypti with the LC50 and LC90 values 162.87 and 309.32 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions:From this result, it can be concluded the crude extract of D. elata was an excellent potential for controlling Ae. aegypti mosquitoes.

  5. Larvicidal and adulticidal potential of medicinal plant extracts from south India against vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinnaperumal Kamaraj; Abdul Abdul Rahuman

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the larvicidal and adulticidal activities of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Momordica charantia (M.charantia), Moringa oleifera(M. oleifera), Ocimumgratissimum (O. gratissimum), Ocimum tenuiflorum (O. tenuiflorum), Punica granatum(P. granatum) and Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) against Culex gelidus (Cx. gelidus) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus). Methods: Bioassay test was carried out by WHO method for determination of larvicidal and adulticidal activity against mosquitoes. Results: All plant extracts showed moderate larvicidal and adulticidal activities, however the effective larval mortality was found in the leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extract of O. gratissimum and bark methanol extract of M. oleifera against Cx.gelidus with LC50 values of 39.31, 66.28, and 21.83 μg/mL respectively, and methanol extract of O. gratissimum, O. tenuiflorum and P. granatum againstCx. quinquefasciatus exposed for 1 h and mortality was recorded at 24 h recovery period. Above 90% mortality was found in the ethyl acetate and methanol extract of all experimental plants at the concentrations of 500 μg/mL. Conclusions: The present results suggest that the medicinal plant extracts provided an excellent potential for controlling Cx. gelidus and Cx. quinquefasciatus. with LC50 values of 38.47, 24.90 and 67.20 μg/mL, respectively. The adult feoxupnods eidn tfhore 1e thhy al nadc emtaotert aalnidty m weatsh arneoclo redxetrda catt o2f4 a lhl erxepcoevriemrye nptearl ipodla.n Atsb aotv teh e9 0c%on mceonrttraaltiitoyn ws aosf 500 μg/mL. Conclusions: The present results suggest that the medicinal plant extracts provided an excellent potential for controlling Cx. gelidus and Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  6. Ovicidal, repellent, adulticidal and field evaluations of plant extract against dengue, malaria and filarial vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Thiyagarajan, Perumal; John William, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    Mosquitoes are insect vectors responsible for the transmission of parasitic and viral infections to millions of people worldwide, with substantial morbidity and mortality. Infections transmitted by mosquitoes include malaria, yellow fever, chikungunya, filariasis and other arboviruses. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The adulticidal activities of crude hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol leaf extracts of Acalypha alnifolia were assayed for their toxicity against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate adulticide effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract were observed. The LC(50) values of A. alnifolia leaf extracts against adulticidal activity of (hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol) A. aegypti, A. stephensi and C. quinquefasciatus were the following: A. aegypti values were 371.87, 342.97, 320.17, 300.86 and 279.75 ppm; A. stephensi values were 358.35, 336.64, 306.10, 293.01 and 274.76 ppm; C. quinquefasciatus values were 383.59, 354.13, 327.74, 314.33 and 291.71 ppm. The results of the repellent activity of hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extract of A. alnifolia plant at three different concentrations of 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 mg/cm(2) were applied on skin of forearm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. In this observation, this plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction to the test person, and also, the repellent activity is dependent on the strength of the plant extracts. Mean percent hatchability of the ovicidal activity was observed 48 h post-treatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. Mortality of 100

  7. Assessing the impacts of truck based ultra-low volume applications of mosquito adulticides on honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquito control reduces populations of mosquitoes to minimize the risk of mosquito-borne diseases. As part of an integrated approach to mosquito control, application of adulticides can be effective in rapidly reducing mosquito populations during times of high arbovirus transmission. However, impact...

  8. Utility of cardiac biomarkers during adulticide treatment of heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretón, E; Morchón, R; González-Miguel, J; Juste, M C; Simón, F; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2013-10-18

    Heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) is a parasitic disease of dogs and other carnivores, characterized by the presence of adult worms in the pulmonary arteries and right ventricle, leading to pulmonary hypertension which may progress to congestive heart failure. Cardiac biomarkers are biological parameters that can be objectively measured as indicators of pathological processes, or to assess the response to therapeutic interventions. To evaluate the myocardial damage during the adulticide treatment in 15 heartworm-infected dogs with ivermectin, doxycycline and melarsomine, measurements of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin, MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were carried out on days 0, 60 and afterwards weekly on days 67, 75, 82, 91, 106, 113 and 120. Dogs were divided by low parasite burden (n=9) and high parasite burden (n=6). On day 0, dogs with high worm burden showed increased cTnI concentrations (3.62 ± 4.78 ng/ml) while dogs with low worm burden had concentrations similar to those of healthy dogs (0.78 ± 0.22 ng/ml), CK-MB concentrations were increased only in dogs with high parasite burden as well (54.4 ± 54.2U/l) and 26.6% (4/15) of the dogs showed pathological concentrations of myoglobin. On day 91, most dogs showed pathological concentrations of myoglobin, CK-MB and AST, probably due to the myositis associated to the intramuscular injection of melarsomine. The rest of the measurements made in the study, the biomarkers concentrations were within normal values, except for cTnI in dogs with high parasite burden, which remained above reference concentrations for healthy dogs during all the study. The evaluation of cardiac biomarkers seems to be a helpful test in the assessment of the myocardium in dogs with heartworm disease during the adulticide treatment.

  9. Screening for adulticidal activity against Anopheles arabiensis in ten plants used as mosquito repellent in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mavundza, Edison J; Maharaj, Rajendra; Chukwujekwu, Jude C; Finnie, Jeffrey F.; Staden, Johannes Van

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the development of resistance to synthetic insecticides, adverse effects to human health, non-target organisms and the environment, there is an urgent need to develop new insecticides, which are effective, safe, biodegrable and target-specific. This study was undertaken to evaluate the adulticidal activity of 10 plants used traditionally as mosquito repellents in South Africa. Methods The dried plant materials were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM) and ethanol (EtOH). The...

  10. Variation of D-dimer values as assessment of pulmonary thromboembolism during adulticide treatment of heartworm disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretón, E; Morchón, R; González-Miguel, J; Simón, F; Juste, M C; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2013-07-01

    Dirofilaria immitis adult worms lodged in the pulmonary arteries are the causative agent of heartworm disease, characterized by endarteritis and obstruction of the blood flow. Dying worms form embolic fragments which trigger thrombosis. Thus, pulmonary thromboembolism is an inevitable consequence of successful adulticide therapy. Clinical signs of pulmonary thromboembolisms are highly variable and non-specific, and its diagnosis is often difficult to obtain. The D-dimer assay is considered the marker of choice for dogs with a suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the variation of D-dimer and platelets in 15 heartworm-infected dogs during the adulticide treatment with ivermectin, doxycycline and melarsomine. Nine dogs were considered to have a low parasite burden and 6 had a high burden. Measurements were carried out on days 0, 60, and afterwards weekly on days 67, 75, 82, 91, 98, 106, 113, 120, and finally on day 271 after treatment. 40% of dogs showed pathological concentrations of D-dimer and 40% showed slight or mild thrombocytopenia on day 0. The levels of D-dimer decreased by day 60, probably due to the joint action of the ivermectin, doxycycline and exercise restriction. All dogs with high parasite burden showed elevated values of D-dimer on several occasions during the treatment, reaching the highest values the first and second week after the injections of melarsomine. Only 33.3% of the dogs with low parasite burden showed elevated D-dimer levels at some point during the treatment, and all of them showed undetectable levels from the third week after the first injection of melarsomine. On day 271, all dogs showed undetectable levels of D-dimer. There was no correlation between thrombocytopenia and levels of D-dimer during the treatment. The evaluation of serum D-dimer appears to be a supportive test in the assessment and monitoring of pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs with heartworm disease during the adulticide

  11. Adulticidal and repellent properties of Cassia tora Linn. (Family: Caesalpinaceae) against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerasan, Duraisamy; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; John William, Samuel; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2012-11-01

    Mosquitoes have developed resistance to various synthetic insecticides, making its control increasingly difficult. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The adulticidal and repellent activities of crude hexane, chloroform, benzene, acetone, and methanol extracts of the leaf of Cassia tora were assayed for their toxicity against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate adulticidal effects; however, the highest adult mortality observed was found in methanol extract. The LC(50) and LC(90) values of C. tora leaf extracts against adulticidal activity of (hexane, chloroform benzene, acetone, and methanol) C. quinquefasciatus, A. aegypti, and A. stephensi were the following: C. quinquefasciatus LC(50) values were 338.81, 315.73, 296.13, 279.23, and 261.03 ppm and LC(90) values were 575.77, 539.31, 513.99, 497.06, and 476.03 ppm; A. aegypti LC(50) values were 329.82, 307.31, 287.15, 269.57, and 252.03 ppm and LC(90) values were 563.24, 528.33, 496.92, 477.61, and 448.05 ppm; and A. stephensi LC(50) values were 317.28, 300.30, 277.51, 263.35, and 251.43 ppm and LC(90) values were 538.22, 512.90, 483.78, 461.08, and 430.70 ppm, respectively. The results of the repellent activity of hexane, chloroform, benzene, acetone, and methanol extracts of C. tora plant at three different concentrations of 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/cm(2) were applied on skin of forearm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. In this observation, this plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction to the test person, and also, the repellent activity is dependent on the strength of the plant extracts. These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of

  12. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoe, Jun; Petchampai, Natthida; Isoe, Yurika E; Co, Katrina; Mazzalupo, Stacy; Scaraffia, Patricia Y

    2017-02-08

    Aedesaegypti has 2 genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). We analyzed XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR in tissues from sugar- and blood-fed females. Differential XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression was observed in tissues dissected throughout a time course. We next exposed females to blood meals supplemented with allopurinol, a well-characterized XDH inhibitor. We also tested the effects of injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against XDH1, XDH2, or both. Disruption of XDH by allopurinol or XDH1 by RNA interference significantly affected mosquito survival, causing a disruption in blood digestion, excretion, oviposition, and reproduction. XDH1-deficient mosquitoes showed a persistence of serine proteases in the midgut at 48 h after blood feeding and a reduction in the uptake of vitellogenin by the ovaries. Surprisingly, analysis of the fat body from dsRNA-XDH1-injected mosquitoes fell into 2 groups: one group was characterized by a reduction of the XDH1 transcript, whereas the other group was characterized by an up-regulation of several transcripts including XDH1, glutamine synthetase, alanine aminotransferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate receptor, and ammonia transporter. Our data demonstrate that XDH1 plays an essential role and that XDH1 has the potential to be used as a metabolic target for Ae.aegypti vector control.-Isoe, J., Petchampai, N., Isoe, Y. E., Co, K., Mazzalupo, S., Scaraffia, P. Y. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

  13. Mosquito adulticidal and repellent activities of botanical extracts against malarial vector,Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marimuthu Govindarajan; Rajamohan Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the adulticidal and repellent activities of different solvent leaf extracts ofEclipta alba (E. alba) andAndrographis paniculata (A. paniculata)against malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi).Methods:Adulticidal efficacy of the crude leaf extracts ofE. alba andA. paniculata with five different solvents like benzene, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and chloroform was tested against the five to six day old adult female mosquitoes of An. stephensi. The adult mortality was observed after24 h under the laboratory conditions. The repellent efficacy was determined againstAn. stephensimosquito species at three concentrations viz.,1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/cm2 under laboratory conditions.Results: Among the tested solvents the maximum efficacy was observed in the methanol extract. TheLC50 andLC90 values ofE. alba andA. paniculata against adults ofAn. stephensiwere150.36, 130.19 ppm and285.22, 244.16ppm, respectively. No mortality was observed in controls. Thechi-square values were significant at P<0.05 level. Methanol extract of E. alba andA. paniculata was produce maximum repellency againstAn. stephensi.Conclusions:From the results it can be concluded the crude extract ofE. alba andA. paniculatawas an excellent potential for controllingAn. stephensimosquitoes.

  14. Larvicidal and Adulticidal Activity of Chroman and Chromene Analogues against Susceptible and Permethrin-Resistant Mosquito Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meepagala, Kumudini M; Estep, Alden S; Becnel, James J

    2016-06-22

    Mosquitoes play a major role as vectors that transmit parasitic and viral diseases worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical countries. Mosquito borne diseases not only affect humans but they also affect livestock in many parts of the world. They carry diseases that are lethal to dogs and horses. Dog heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) is a parasitic disease spread through mosquitoes. This disease is not limited to dogs, but it can affect other animals and humans as well. Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and West Nile virus (WNV) are also mosquito borne diseases that affect the central nervous system of horses and cause severe complications and death. Emergence of resistance among mosquitoes to current pesticides has increased the importance of the search for alternate compounds that are effective and environmentally benign with diverse modes of actions than those that are commercially available. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the primary vector for transmission of Zika viral fever, yellow fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Mosquito control is currently the best strategy to prevent mosquito borne diseases. There are numerous approaches for control of potentially dangerous mosquito populations. These approaches include the use of adulticides (insecticides), larvicides, and, to a limited extent, the use of repellents. Our previous studies have shown the mosquito repellent activity of chromenes. In the present study, we demonstrate larvicidal and adulticidal activity of chroman and chromene analogues against a permethrin susceptible laboratory strain as well as activity against a permethrin-resistant strain of Aedes aegypti.

  15. Effectiveness of ultra-low volume nighttime applications of an adulticide against diurnal Aedes albopictus, a critical vector of dengue and chikungunya viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ary Farajollahi

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, continues expanding its geographic range and involvement in mosquito-borne diseases such as chikungunya and dengue. Vector control programs rarely attempt to suppress this diurnal species with an ultra-low volume (ULV adulticide because for maximum efficacy applications are conducted at night. During 2009-2011 we performed experimental nighttime applications of a novel adulticide (DUET® against field populations of Ae. albopictus within an urban site composed of approximately 1,000 parcels (home and yard in northeastern USA. Dual applications at mid label rate of the adulticide spaced one or two days apart accomplished significantly higher control (85.0 ± 5.4% average reduction than single full rate applications (73.0 ± 5.4%. Our results demonstrate that nighttime ULV adulticiding is effective in reducing Ae. albopictus abundance and highlight its potential for use as part of integrated pest management programs and during disease epidemics when reducing human illness is of paramount importance.

  16. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary biomarkers during classic adulticide treatment versus the American Heartworm Society recommended treatment protocol in dogs infected by Dirofilaria immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretón, E; Morchón, R; Simón, F; Juste, M C; González-Miguel, J; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2014-11-15

    Adulticide treatment of dogs with canine heartworm disease causes the death of the adult Dirofilaria immitis lodged in the vascular system of the host. During the death of the worms, pulmonary thromboembolisms (PTE), pulmonary inflammation, congestive heart failure, or renal disease are possible consequences. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiopulmonary biomarkers and renal parameters during adulticide treatment of canine heartworm to compare the classic two-injection treatment protocol versus the American Heartworm Society (AHS) recommended protocol. Fourteen heartworm-infected dogs with high parasite burdens were divided in three groups and allocated to adulticide protocols as follows: Group A (n=5) was treated with the classic two-injection protocol; group B (n=5) was treated using the AHS recommended protocol, and group C (n=4) was treated as for group B but received diminishing anti-inflammatory doses of prednisone. To assess cardiorespiratory status, cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin, and D-dimer were measured. Renal function was evaluated by measuring urea, creatinine, and urine protein:creatinine (UP:C). Serum and urine samples were collected day 0 (day of diagnosis), 7 and 14 days after the first dose of adulticide, and 1 month after the last adulticide injection. Dogs that received classic treatment presented pathologic concentrations of D-dimer more frequently and showed higher average D-dimer levels, which may indicate the presence of more severe PTE. Group C showed the highest levels of D-dimer during treatment, which may be due to an exacerbation of PTE caused by the administration of prednisone. CTnI and myoglobin values remained above reference values in all groups during the study but reached the lowest values 1 month after the last injection. Levels of urea and creatinine were within normal ranges in all groups, and 28.5% of the dogs were proteinuric on day 0, progressing to better UP:C values at the end of the treatment, except in

  17. Nontarget Effects of Aerial Mosquito Adulticiding With Water-Based Unsynergized Pyrethroids on Honey Bees and Other Beneficial Insects in an Agricultural Ecosystem of North Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    1977). Pesticides cause higher losses to bees when applied during day (Byrne and Waller 1990), but late evening spraying when the majority of bees are...Control Assoc. 20: 27Ð35. Erickson, B. J., and E. H. Erickson. 1983. Honey bees and pesticides past. 2. Facts and common sense. Am. Bee J. 123...SHORT COMMUNICATION Nontarget Effects of Aerial Mosquito Adulticiding With Water-Based Unsynergized Pyrethroids on Honey Bees and Other Beneficial

  18. Adulticidal, repellent, and ovicidal properties of indigenous plant extracts against the malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Murugan, Kadarkarai

    2013-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases with an economic impact create loss in commercial and labor outputs, particularly in countries with tropical and subtropical climates. Mosquito control is facing a threat because of the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Extracts from plants may be alternative sources of mosquito control agents because they constitute a rich source of bioactive compounds that are biodegradable into nontoxic products and potentially suitable for use to control mosquitoes. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, this study was undertaken to assess the adulticidal, repellent, and ovicidal potential of the crude hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, aqueous, and methanol solvent extracts from the medicinal plants Andrographis paniculata, Cassia occidentalis, and Euphorbia hirta against the medically important mosquito vector, Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate adulticide effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract of A. paniculata followed by C. occidentalis and E. hirta against the adults of A. stephensi with LC(50) and LC(90) values of 210.30, 225.91, and 263.91 ppm and 527.31, 586.36, and 621.91 ppm, respectively. The results of the repellent activity of hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, aqueous, and methanol extract of A. paniculata, C. occidentalis, and E. hirta plants at three different concentrations of 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mg/cm(2) were applied on skin of forearm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. In this observation, these three plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction to the test person, and also, the repellent activity is dependent on the strength of the plant extracts

  19. Mosquito knock-down and adulticidal activities of essential oils by vaporizer, impregnated filter paper and aerosol methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from 12 medicinal plants were evaluated by three different bioassay methods (Vaporizer, Filter paper and Aerosol for Knock-down and adulticidal efficacy on the filarial vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Based on screening results the effective plants were selected for investigating Knock-down and adulticidal potential against adult female of the laboratory-reared mosquito species, Cx. quinquefasciatus. In vaporizer bioassay method four different doses (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% were used. Four different doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5 and 10% were used both filter paper (cm2 and aerosol (cm3 bioassay methods. Five essential oils (calamus, camphor, citronella, clove and eucalyptus were identified as potential treatments in vaporizer bioassay. The result showed that the knock down time decreased with increased concentration in clove oil treatment; the Knock-down time (KT 50 = 46.1 ± 0.1, 38.5 ± 0.1, 30.7 ± 0.2, and 20.1 ± 0.1 minutes was recorded at 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% /cm3 respectively. In filter paper method nine essential oils were identified as potential treatments. After 1 hr exposure period clove oil recorded the lowest median Knock-down time (KT50 which was calculated as 9.15 ± 0.1min/cm2. Followed by citronella (KT50 =11.4 ± 0.1 min and eucalyptus (KT50 =11.4 ±0.1min oils since they recorded lower median Knock-down time. All the twelve essential oils were identified as potential treatments in aerosol activity. The lethal time decreased when the concentration increased. At 5 % concentration the median lethal time (LT50 for clove oil was calculated as (LT50=3.80 ± 0.1minutes. The Cinnamon oil was effective which recorded (LT50 = 1.99 mins as median lethal time. Camphor (LT50 =19.6± 0.1 min oil were found to be less toxic by aerosol method. These results suggest that clove oil and cinnamon oil have the potential to be used as a eco-friendly approach for the control of the major important filaria vector Cx. quinquefasciatus

  20. Adulticidal properties of synthesized silver nanoparticles using leaf extracts of Feronia elephantum (Rutaceae) against filariasis, malaria, and dengue vector mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Kaliyan; Govindarajan, Marimuthu

    2014-11-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases with an economic impact create loss in commercial and labor outputs, particularly in countries with tropical and subtropical climates. Mosquito control is facing a threat because of the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Extracts from plants may be alternative sources of mosquito control agents because they constitute a rich source of bioactive compounds that are biodegradable into nontoxic products and potentially suitable for use to control mosquitoes. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, in the present study, the adulticidal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized using Feronia elephantum plant leaf extract against adults of Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus was determined. The range of concentrations of synthesized AgNPs (8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 μg mL(-1)) and aqueous leaf extract (40, 80, 120, 160, and 200 μg mL(-1)) were tested against the adults of A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus. Adults were exposed to varying concentrations of aqueous crude extract and synthesized AgNPs for 24 h. Considerable mortality was evident after the treatment of F. elephantum for all three important vector mosquitoes. The synthesized AgNPs from F. elephantum were highly toxic than crude leaf aqueous extract to three important vector mosquito species. The results were recorded from UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Synthesized AgNPs against the vector mosquitoes A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus had the following lethal dose (LD)₅₀ and LD₉₀ values: A. stephensi had LD₅₀ and LD₉₀ values of 18

  1. Adulticidal Activity of Olea Vera, Linum Usitatissimum and Piper Nigera Against Anopheles Stephensi and Aedes Aegypti Under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several plant extractions which are being used for mosquito control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Olea vera, Linum usitatissimum and Piper nigera against Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti under laboratory conditions. Methods: These tests were carried out using WHO recommended bioassay method for adult mosquitoes. Results: The extracts from black pepper was more effective as adulticide with lowest LC50 values (2.26% and 8.4% against Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi after 24 h of exposure while after 48h (1.56% and 5.11% respec­tively. In terms of LC90 value black pepper was best with (8.66% and 30.1% against Ae. aegypti and An. stephensi after 24 h of exposure while after 48h (4.59% and 17.3% respectively. In terms of LT50 black pepper took 15 h to kill 50% tested population of Ae. aegypti while against An. stephensi it took more than 2 days. In terms of percentage mortality black pepper kill 84% of the population of Ae. aegypti and 44.75% of the An. stephensi population. Conclusion: Black pepper showed best results in term of LC50, LC90, LT50 and percentage mortality against Ae. ae­gypti and An. stephensi. Our study suggested that the plant extracts have potential to kill adult mosquitoes, are environment friendly and can be used for the control of mosquitoes.

  2. A combination of doxycycline and ivermectin is adulticidal in dogs with naturally acquired heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, G; Quintavalla, C; Mavropoulou, A; Genchi, M; Gnudi, G; Bertoni, G; Kramer, L

    2010-05-11

    Canine heartworm disease is caused by infection with Dirofilaria immitis, a filarial nematode that resides in the pulmonary arteries and occasionally in the right heart chambers of infected dogs. Here the authors evaluated the effect of a combination of doxycycline (10 mg/kg/sid for 30 days) and ivermectin–pyrantel(6μg/kg [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] of ivermectin+5mg/kg of pyrantel every 15 days for 180 days) on microfilariemia, antigenemia and parasite load at echocardiography in naturally infected dogs from an endemic region of Italy. Dogs were examined monthly for 6 months and followed-up 4 months later. One hundred percent of dogs became negative for circulating microfilariae by day 90, while 8/11 (72.7%) of dogs became antigen-negative by day 300. Of the 7 dogs that were positive for visualization of parasites at echocardiography, 6 (85.7%) became negative by day 300. Treatment was well-tolerated by all dogs. These results suggest that a combination of doxycycline and ivermectin is adulticide in dogs with D. immitis.

  3. Ovicidal, larvicidal and adulticidal properties of Asparagus racemosus (Willd.) (Family: Asparagaceae) root extracts against filariasis (Culex quinquefasciatus), dengue (Aedes aegypti) and malaria (Anopheles stephensi) vector mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Sivakumar, Rajamohan

    2014-04-01

    Several diseases are associated to the mosquito-human interaction. Mosquitoes are the carriers of severe and well-known illnesses such as malaria, arboviral encephalitis, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, West Nile virus and yellow fever. These diseases produce significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock around the world. The present investigation was undertaken to study the ovicidal, larvicidal and adulticidal activities of crude hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, chloroform and methanol extracts of root of Asparagus racemosus were assayed for their toxicity against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae). The mean percent hatchability of the eggs was observed after 48 h post-treatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. All the five solvent extracts showed moderate ovicidal activity; however, the methanol extract showed the highest ovicidal activity. The methanol extract of Asparagus racemosus against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi exerted 100% mortality (zero hatchability) at 375, 300 and 225 ppm, respectively. Control eggs showed 99-100% hatchability. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in methanol extract of root of Asparagus racemosus against the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi with the LC50 and LC90 values were 115.13, 97.71 and 90.97 ppm and 210.96, 179.92, and 168.82 ppm, respectively. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h recovery period. The plant crude extracts showed dose-dependent mortality. At higher concentrations, the adult showed restless movement for some times with abnormal wagging and then died. Among the extracts tested, the highest adulticidal activity was observed in

  4. The ovicidal, larvacidal and adulticidal properties of 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl against Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Breugelmans, Bert; Pagel, Charles N; Williams, Adam K; Varan, Aiden K; Burke, Richard; Bowles, Vernon M; Batterham, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Insecticide resistance has limited the number of available chemical options for insect pest control. Hence there is a need for new chemistries with novel modes of action. Here we investigate the mode of action for an insecticide that has not yet been released for commercial use. The ovicidal, larvacidal and adulticidal effects of 5,5'-dimethyl -2, 2'-dipyridyl (termed Ha44), which is being developed as a treatment for head lice, were evaluated in the Drosophila melanogaster model system. Ha44 demonstrated significant activity against embryos and was capable of arresting development at a number of stages of embryogenesis. The effects of Ha44 on embryos was shown to be reversible following the addition of the metal ions Fe(II) and Fe(III), Cu and Zn. When larvae were exposed to Ha44, lethality was recorded at similar concentrations to those observed for embryos. Using an eYFP reporter system it was shown that Ha44 was able to reduce the levels of both copper and zinc in the digestive tract, confirming the binding of Ha44 to these metals in vivo. Ha44 has further been shown to inhibit a zinc containing metalloproteinase in vitro. Exposure of adult flies to Ha44 resulted in lethality, but at higher concentrations than those observed for embryos and larvae. The median lethal dose in adult flies was shown to be associated with the type of exposure, with an LD-50 of 1.57 mM being recorded following the direct contact of flies with Ha44, while an LD-50 of 12.29 mM was recorded following the ingestion of the compound. The capacity of Ha44 to act on all stages of the life-cycle and potentially via a range of targets suggests that target site resistance is unlikely to evolve.

  5. The ovicidal, larvacidal and adulticidal properties of 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl against Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias B Van Hiel

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance has limited the number of available chemical options for insect pest control. Hence there is a need for new chemistries with novel modes of action. Here we investigate the mode of action for an insecticide that has not yet been released for commercial use. The ovicidal, larvacidal and adulticidal effects of 5,5'-dimethyl -2, 2'-dipyridyl (termed Ha44, which is being developed as a treatment for head lice, were evaluated in the Drosophila melanogaster model system. Ha44 demonstrated significant activity against embryos and was capable of arresting development at a number of stages of embryogenesis. The effects of Ha44 on embryos was shown to be reversible following the addition of the metal ions Fe(II and Fe(III, Cu and Zn. When larvae were exposed to Ha44, lethality was recorded at similar concentrations to those observed for embryos. Using an eYFP reporter system it was shown that Ha44 was able to reduce the levels of both copper and zinc in the digestive tract, confirming the binding of Ha44 to these metals in vivo. Ha44 has further been shown to inhibit a zinc containing metalloproteinase in vitro. Exposure of adult flies to Ha44 resulted in lethality, but at higher concentrations than those observed for embryos and larvae. The median lethal dose in adult flies was shown to be associated with the type of exposure, with an LD-50 of 1.57 mM being recorded following the direct contact of flies with Ha44, while an LD-50 of 12.29 mM was recorded following the ingestion of the compound. The capacity of Ha44 to act on all stages of the life-cycle and potentially via a range of targets suggests that target site resistance is unlikely to evolve.

  6. Neem cake as a promising larvicide and adulticide against the rural malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: Culicidae): a HPTLC fingerprinting approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Dinesh, Devakumar; Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Higuchi, Akon; Toniolo, Chiara; Canale, Angelo; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2017-05-01

    Mosquitoes are insects of huge public health importance, since they act as vectors for important pathogens and parasites. Here, we focused on the possibility of using the neem cake in the fight against mosquito vectors. The neem cake chemical composition significantly changes among producers, as evidenced by our HPTLC (High performance thin layer chromatography) analyses of different marketed products. Neem cake extracts were tested to evaluate the ovicidal, larvicidal and adulticidal activity against the rural malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies. Ovicidal activity of both types of extracts was statistically significant, and 150 ppm completely inhibited egg hatching. LC50 values were extremely low against fourth instar larvae, ranging from 1.321 (NM1) to 1.818 ppm (NA2). Adulticidal activity was also high, with LC50 ranging from 3.015 (NM1) to 3.637 ppm (NM2). This study pointed out the utility of neem cake as a source of eco-friendly mosquitocides in Anopheline vector control programmes.

  7. Ovicidal and adulticidal potential of leaf and seed extract of Albizia lebbeck (L.) Benth. (Family: Fabaceae) against Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Several diseases are associated to the mosquito-human interaction. Mosquitoes are the carriers of severe and well-known illnesses such as malaria, arboviral encephalitis, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, West Nile virus, and yellow fever. These diseases produce significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock around the world. In the present study, hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of leaf and seed of Albizia lebbeck were assayed for their toxicity against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles stephensi. The mean percent hatchability of the eggs was observed after 48 h post-treatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. All the five solvent extracts showed moderate ovicidal activity; however, the methanol extract showed the highest ovicidal activity. One hundred percent mortality was observed at 250, 200, and 150 ppm for leaf methanol extract and 375, 300, and 225 ppm for seed methanol extract of A. lebbeck against C. quinquefasciatus, Ae. aegypti, and An. stephensi, respectively. The adulticidal activity of plant leaf and seed extracts showed moderate toxic effect on the adult mosquitoes after 24 h of exposure period. However, the highest adulticidal activity was observed in the leaf methanol extract of A. lebbeck against An. stephensi where the LC₅₀ and LC₉₀ values were 65.12 and 117.70 ppm, respectively. Compared to leaf extracts, seeds have low potency against three mosquito species. No mortality was recorded in the control. Our data suggest that the crude hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol solvent extracts of A. lebbeck have the potential to be used as an eco-friendly approach for the control of the An. stephensi, Ae. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus. These results suggest that the leaf and seed extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal

  8. Larvicidal, ovicidal, and adulticidal efficacy of Erythrina indica (Lam.) (Family: Fabaceae) against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Sivakumar, Rajamohan

    2014-02-01

    Mosquitoes are the major vector for the transmission of malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, filariasis, schistosomiasis, and Japanese encephalitis. Mosquito control is facing a threat because of the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, this study was undertaken to assess the larvicidal, ovicidal, and adulticidal potential of the crude hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol solvent extracts from the medicinal plant Erythrina indica against the medically important mosquito vectors, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in methanol extract of leaf of E. indica against the larvae of A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values of 69.43, 75.13, and 91.41 ppm and 125.49, 134.31, and 167.14 ppm, respectively. The mean percent hatchability of the eggs was observed after 48 h post treatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. All the five solvent extracts showed moderate ovicidal activity; however, the methanol extract showed the highest ovicidal activity. The methanol extract of E. indica against A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus exerted 100 % mortality (zero hatchability) at 150, 200, and 250 ppm, respectively. Control eggs showed above 99.3-100 % hatchability. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h recovery period. The plant crude extracts showed dose-dependent mortality. At higher concentrations, the adult showed restless movement for some times with abnormal wagging and

  9. Sarniensine, a mesembrine-type alkaloid isolated from Nerine sarniensis, an indigenous South African Amaryllidaceae, with larvicidal and adulticidal activities against Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Marco; van der Westhuyzen, Alet E; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Evidente, Marco; Cimmino, Alessio; Green, Ivan R; Bernier, Ulrich R; Becnel, James J; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    A new mesembrine-type alkaloid, named sarniensine, was isolated together with tazettine, lycorine, the main alkaloid, and 3-epimacronine from Nerine sarniensis, with the last two produced for the first time by this plant. This Amaryllidaceae, which is indigenous of South Africa, was investigated for its alkaloid content, because the organic extract of its bulbs showed strong larvicidal activity with an LC50 value of 0.008μgμL(-1) against first instar Aedes aegypti larvae and with an LD50 value 4.6μg/mosquito against adult female Ae. aegypti, which is the major vector for dengue, yellow fever and the Zika virus. The extract did not show repellency at MED value of 0.375mgcm(2) against adult Ae. aegypti. Sarniensine was characterized using spectroscopic and chiroptical methods as (3aR,4Z,6S,7aS)-6-methoxy-3a-(2'-methoxymethyl-benzo [1,3]dioxol-1'-yl)-1-methyl-2,3,3a,6,7,7a-hexahydro-1H-indole. It was less effective against larva at the lowest concentration of 0.1μgμL(-1), however it showed strong adulticidal activity with an LD50 value of 1.38±0.056μgmosquito(-1).

  10. Adulticidal and larvicidal activity of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae against housefly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae), in laboratory and simulated field bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sapna; Kumar, Peeyush; Malik, Anushree; Satya, Santosh

    2011-06-01

    The susceptibility of the adult and larval stage of housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), to two entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch.) Sor. and Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuill., was evaluated under laboratory and simulated field bioassays. Bioassays on adult houseflies were carried out at different conidial concentrations ranging from 10(3) to 10(9) conidia/ml in petri plate and minichamber assays. Absolute mortality was observed within 4-5 days at all the concentrations tested. M. anisopliae was found to be more effective with LC(50) of 6.75 × 10(7) conidia/ml compared with 1.21 × 10(8) conidia/ml of B. bassiana in petri plate bioassay. Similar trend was observed in minichamber bioassay. Larvicidal activity evaluated through petri plate bioassay also indicated that M. anisopliae was more effective larvicide with LC(50) of 4.1 × 10(8) conidia/ml as against 3.31 × 10(9) conidia/ml of B. bassiana. Larvicidal activity was further evaluated in simulated field condition of decaying waste matrix using dry conidial formulations (10(8) conidia/g) of both the fungi. Larval mortality obtained in this assay was 43% (B. bassiana) and 63% (M. anisopliae). Remarkably better performance of M. anisopliae as an adulticidal and larvicidal agent over B. bassiana in laboratory bioassays as well as simulated field conditions suggests that it may have good potential to become part of an integrated housefly control program.

  11. Fungal-mediated nano silver: an effective adulticide against mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Namita; Prakash, Soam

    2012-11-01

    Fungi as such are known to be an effective mosquito control agent. In the present investigation, the effect of silver nanoparticles synthesized with Chrysosporium keratinophilum, Verticillium lecanii, and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. pisi has been evaluated against the adult mosquito of filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The silver nanoparticles were characterized by using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer and X-ray diffraction techniques. The micrographs of silver nanoparticles were obtained by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. Elemental analysis on single particle was carried out by EDX analysis. The characterization study confirmed different shapes and sizes of silver nanoparticles. The efficacy test was performed at five different concentrations for a period of 24 h by the probit analysis. The C. quinquefasciatus has shown higher efficacy against the silver nanoparticles synthesized with C. keratinophilum and V. lecanii (lethal concentration (LC)(50) 0.19 and 0.4 μl/cm(2); LC(90) 2.4 and 3.2 μl/cm(2); and LC(99) 4.0 and 5.6 μl/cm(2)) after 22 h of exposure. While the silver nanoparticles synthesized with F. oxysporum f.sp. pisi were found to be less effective against the C. quinquefasciatus, the silver nanoparticles synthesized by C. keratinophilum and V. lecanii were found to be more effective than those generated with the help of F. oxysporum f.sp. pisi and C. quinquefasciatus. The use of fungus-mediated silver nanoparticles is a rapid, environmentally safer, and greener approach for vector control strategy and is adaptable globally.

  12. Ovicidal and adulticidal activity of Eucalyptus globulus leaf oil terpenoids against Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Young-Cheol; Choi, Han-Young; Choi, Won-Sil; Clark, J M; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2004-05-05

    The toxic effects of Eucalyptus globulus leaf oil-derived monoterpenoids [1,8-cineole, l-phellandrene, (-)-alpha-pinene, 2-beta-pinene, trans-pinocarveol, gamma-terpinene, and 1-alpha-terpineol] and the known Eucalyptusleaf oil terpenoids (beta-eudesmol and geranyl acetate) on eggs and females of the human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, were examined using direct contact and fumigation bioassays and compared with the lethal activity of delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum, two commonly used pediculicides. In a filter paper contact bioassay with female P. h. capitis, the pediculicidal activity was more pronounced with Eucalyptus leaf oil than with either delta-phenothrin or pyrethrum on the basis of LT(50) values (0.125 vs 0.25 mg/cm(2)). 1,8-Cineole was 2.2- and 2.3-fold more toxic than either delta-phenothrin or pyrethrum, respectively. The pediculicidal activities of (-)-alpha-pinene, 2-beta-pinene, and (E)-pinocarveol were comparable to those of delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. l-Phellandrene, gamma-terpinene, and 1-alpha-terpineol were relatively less active than delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. beta-Eudesmol and geranyl acetate were ineffective. 1-alpha-Terpineol and (E)-pinocaveol were highly effective at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/cm(2), respectively, against P. h. capitis eggs. At 1.0 mg/cm(2), (-)-alpha-pinene, 2-beta-pinene, and gamma-terpinene exhibited moderate ovicidal activity, whereas little or no ovicidal activity was observed with the other terpenoids and with delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. In fumigation tests with female P. h. capitis at 0.25 mg/cm(2), 1,8-cineole, (-)-alpha-pinene, (E)-pinocarveol, and 1-alpha-terpineol were more effective in closed cups than in open ones, indicating that the effect of the monoterpenoids was largely due to action in the vapor phase. Neither delta-phenothrin nor pyrethrum exhibited fumigant toxicity. Eucalyptus leaf oil, particularly 1,8-cineole, 1-alpha-terpineol, and (E)-pinocaveol, merits further study as potential pediculicides or lead compounds for the control of P. h. capitis.

  13. Ovicidal and adulticidal effects of Eugenia caryophyllata bud and leaf oil compounds on Pediculus capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Young-Cheol; Lee, Si-Hyeock; Lee, Won-Ja; Choi, Don-Ha; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2003-08-13

    The toxicity of Eugenia caryophyllata bud and leaf oil-derived compounds (acetyleugenol, beta-caryophyllene, eugenol, alpha-humulene, and methyl salicylate) and congeners of eugenol (isoeugenol and methyleugenol) against eggs and females of Pediculus capitis was examined using direct contact application and fumigation methods and compared with those of the widely used delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. In a filter paper diffusion bioassay with female P. capitis, the pediculicidal activity of the Eugenia bud and leaf oils was comparable to those of delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum on the basis of LT(50) values at 0.25 mg/cm(2). At 0.25 mg/cm(2), the compound most toxic to female P. capitis was eugenol followed by methyl salicylate. Acetyleugenol, beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, isoeugenol, and methyleugenol were not effective. Eugenol at 0.25 mg/cm(2) was as potent as delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum but was slightly less effective than the pyrethroids at 0.125 mg/cm(2). Against P. capitis eggs, methyl salicylate and eugenol were highly effective at 0.25 and 1.0 mg/cm(2), respectively, whereas little or no activity at 5 mg/cm(2) was observed with the other test compounds as well as with delta-phenothrin and pyrethrum. In fumigation tests with female P. capitis at 0.25 mg/cm(2), eugenol and methyl salicylate were more effective in closed cups than in open ones, indicating that the effect of the compounds was largely due to action in the vapor phase. Neither delta-phenothrin nor pyrethrum exhibited fumigant toxicity. The Eugenia bud and leaf essential oils, particularly eugenol and methyl salicylate, merit further study as potential P. capitis control agents or lead compounds.

  14. Ovicidal and adulticidal effects of monoterpenoids against permethrin-resistant human head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, A C; Vassena, C; Picollo, M I

    2008-12-01

    The improper use of pediculicides containing permethrin has led to the development of resistance. Thus, new alternatives for control are needed. Plant-derived insecticides are attractive alternatives to common chemical insecticides because most of them are environmentally friendly and non-toxic to mammals. The toxic activity of 23 monoterpenoids belonging to several chemical classes was tested against the eggs of permethrin-resistant head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae). Significant differences in ovicidal action were observed among the tested substances. The most effective chemicals were hydrocarbons and ethers, followed by ketones, alcohols, phenols and esters. A linear relationship between egg mortality and knockdown time (KT(50)) on adults by the tested components revealed that most of the components were effective on both egg and adult stages. The monoterpenoids described herein are good candidates as effective pediculicides.

  15. Adulticidal & larvicidal efficacy of three neonicotinoids against insecticide susceptible & resistant mosquito strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreehari Uragayala

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The present study indicated that insecticide resistant strains of mosquito species tested showed more susceptibility to the three neonicotinoids tested, and the possibility of using neonicotinoids for the control of resistant mosquitoes should be explored.

  16. Adulticidal Activity of Olea vera, Linum usitatissimum and Piper nigera against Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nawaz

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Black pepper showed best results in term of LC50, LC90, LT50 and percentage mortality against Ae. ae­gypti and An. stephensi. Our study suggested that the plant extracts have potential to kill adult mosquitoes, are envi­ronment friendly and can be used for the control of mosquitoes.

  17. Ovicidal and adulticidal activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark essential oil compounds and related compounds against Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Young-Cheol; Lee, Hoi-Seon; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J Marshall; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2005-12-01

    The toxicity of cinnamon, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, bark essential oil compounds against eggs and adult females of human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, was examined using direct contact and vapour phase toxicity bioassays and compared with the lethal activity of their related compounds, benzyl alcohol, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl acetate, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, as well as two widely used pediculicides, d-phenothrin and pyrethrum. In a filter-paper contact toxicity bioassay with female lice at 0.25 mg/cm(2), benzaldehyde was 29- and 27-fold more toxic than pyrethrum and d-phenothrin, respectively, as judged by median lethal time (LT(50)) values. Salicylaldehyde was nine and eight times more active than pyrethrum and d-phenothrin, respectively. Pediculicidal activity of linalool was comparable with that of d-phenothrin and pyrethrum. Cinnamomum bark essential oil was slightly less effective than either d-phenothrin or pyrethrum. Benzyl alcohol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde exhibited moderate pediculicidal activity. After 24h of exposure, no hatching was observed with 0.063 mg/cm(2) salicylaldehyde, 0.125 mg/cm(2) benzaldehyde, 0.5mg/cm(2)Cinnamomum bark essential oil, 1.0 mg/cm(2) (E)-cinnamaldehyde, and 1.0 mg/cm(2) benzyl cinnamate. Little or no ovicidal activity was observed with d-phenothrin or pyrethrum. In vapour phase toxicity tests with female lice, benzaldehyde and salicylaldehyde were much more effective in closed containers than in open ones, indicating that the mode of delivery of these compounds was largely due to action in the vapour phase. Neither d-phenothrin nor pyrethrum exhibited fumigant toxicity. Cinnamomum bark essential oil and test compounds described merit further study as potential pediculicides or ovicides for the control of P. h. capitis.

  18. Environmental fate of mosquito adulticides and effects on non-target invertebrates in wetlands of the Sacramento Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) is a synergist of pyrethroid pesticides found in many products for structural pest control, mosquito control, and home and garden uses....

  19. Comparison of the larvicidal efficacies of moxidectin or a five-day regimen of fenbendazole in horses harboring cyathostomin populations resistant to the adulticidal dosage of fenbendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemeyer, C R; Prado, J C; Nielsen, M K

    2015-11-30

    Despite widespread acknowledgement of cyathostomin resistance to adult icidal dosages of benzimidazole (BZD) anthelmintics, many strongyle control programs continue to feature regularly scheduled larvicidal treatment with fenbendazole (FBZ). However, no studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of larvicidal regimens against encysted cyathostomins in a BZD-resistant (BZD-R) population. A masked, randomized, controlled clinical study was conducted with 18 juvenile horses harboring populations of cyathostomins that were considered BZD-R on the basis of fecal egg count reduction (FECR). Horses were blocked by prior history, ranked by egg counts, and allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups: 1--control, 2--FBZ >10mg/kg once daily for five consecutive days, or 3--moxidectin (MOX) >0.4 mg/kg once. Fecal samples were collected prior to treatment and seven and 14 days after the final dose of anthelmintic. On Days 18-20, complete replicates of horses were euthanatized and necropsied, and 1% aliquots of large intestinal contents were recovered for determination of complete worm counts. The cecum and ventral colon were weighed, and measured proportions of the respective organ walls were processed for quantitation and characterization of encysted cyathostomin populations. The five-day regimen of FBZ achieved 44.6% fecal egg count reduction, had 56.4% activity against luminal adults and larvae, and was 38.6% and 71.2% effective against encysted early third stage (EL3) and late third stage/ fourth stage (LL3/L4) cyathostomin larvae, respectively. In contrast, MOX provided 99.9% FECR, removed 99.8% of luminal stages, and exhibited 63.6% and 85.2% efficacy against EL3 and LL3/L4 mucosal cyathostomins, respectively. Although BZD-R was the most feasible explanation for the lower larvicidal efficacies of FBZ, mean larval counts of moxidectin-treated horses were not significantly different from controls or those treated with FBZ. The lack of significant differences between larvicidal treatments was partially attributed to a small sample size and high variability among worm burdens. Historical differences in the time intervals between treatment and necropsy were identified as a confounding factor for accurate estimation of larvicidal efficacy. Determining appropriate post-treatment intervals for measuring larvicidal efficacy remains a critical regulatory and scientific challenge for this therapeutic area.

  20. Environmental Assessment Aerial Application of Pesticide for Mosquito Control at Tyndall Air Force Base and Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-27

    direct contact with the adulticide spray material. Bees and wasps (Hymenoptera), dragonflies and damselflies ( Odonata ), and moths and butterflies...likely be killed upon direct contact with the adulticide spray material. Bees and wasps (Hymenoptera), dragonflies and damselflies ( Odonata ). and moths

  1. Alternative treatment of heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, G; Ross, J N

    1992-06-01

    Conventional adulticidal therapy may cause acute death due to embolism in major pulmonary arteries resulting in severe infarction of the lung. To avoid this problem removing a significant number of worms with flexible alligator forceps prior to adulticidal therapy is recommended. Before surgery, an accurate diagnosis and critical evaluation of the patient is mandated for proper choice and sequence of treatment.

  2. Synthesis, Polymorphism, and Insecticidal Activity of Methyl 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-iodo-2-methyl-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-4H-pyrimido[2,1-b]quinazoline-3-Carboxylate Against Anopheles arabiensis Mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopala, Katharigatta N; Nayak, Susanta K; Gleiser, Raquel M; Sanchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Garcia, Daniel A; Odhav, Bharti

    2016-07-01

    Mosquitoes are the major vectors of pathogens and parasites including those causing malaria, the most deadly vector-borne disease. The negative environmental effects of most synthetic compounds combined with widespread development of insecticide resistance encourage an interest in finding and developing alternative products against mosquitoes. In this study, pyrimido[2,1-b]quinazoline derivative DHPM3 has been synthesized by three-step chemical reaction and screened for larvicide, adulticide, and repellent properties against Anopheles arabiensis, one of the dominant vectors of malaria in Africa. The title compound emerged as potential larvicide agent for further research and development, because it exerted 100% mortality, while adulticide activity was considered moderate.

  3. Antifungal activity of extracts from endophytic fungi associated with Smallanthus maintained in vitro as autotrophic cultures and as pot plants in the greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes associated with leaves, lateral shoots, and roots of Echinacea purpurea, a medicinal plant used by Native Americans, were evaluated for antifungal activity as well as larvicidal, adulticidal, and repellent activities against Aedes aegypti. A total of 39 fungal isolates were identif...

  4. Relative potency of various insecticides for use in ATSBs against mosquitoes and sand flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquitoes and sand flies are important throughout the world as nuisance pests and vectors of a variety of human and livestock diseases. Control efforts are limited often to adulticide sprays and larvicides, however, environmental concerns restrict their use. Both mosquitoes and sand flies need to...

  5. Larvicidal and irritant activities of hexane leaf extracts of Citrus sinensis against dengue vector Aedes aegypti L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Warikoo

    2012-02-01

    Conclusions: The hexane extracts from C. sinensis leaves are proved to be reasonably larvicidal but remarkably irritant against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of extract as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the extract could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control.

  6. Bioefficacy of Mentha piperita essential oil against dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Conclusions: The peppermint essential oil is proved to be efficient larvicide and repellent against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of oil as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the oil could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control.

  7. 75 FR 8341 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... 000239-02498 Ortho Rose & Flower Insect Killer 000239-02527 Ortho Pet Flea & Tick Spray 000239-02565... 000572-00316 Rockland Mill-Mist ``S'' 000769-00317 Superior Oil 70 000769-00682 SMCP SBP- 1382...-00703 40% SBP-1382 Mosquito Adulticide ULV Oil Base Concentrate 000769-00704 SMCP SBP-1382...

  8. Dengue in Cape Verde: vector control and vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F M

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, for the first time in Cape Verde, an outbreak of dengue was reported and over twenty thousand people were infected. Only a few prophylactic measures were taken. The effects of vector control on disease spreading, such as insecticide (larvicide and adulticide) and mechanical control, as well as an hypothetical vaccine, are estimated through simulations with the Cape Verde data.

  9. Evaluation of Halogenated Coumarins for Antimosquito Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopala K. Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are the major vectors of parasites and pathogens affecting humans and domestic animals. The widespread development of insecticide resistance and negative environmental effects of most synthetic compounds support an interest in finding and developing alternative products against mosquitoes. Natural coumarins and synthetic coumarin analogues are known for their several pharmacological properties, including being insecticidal. In the present study halogenated coumarins (3-mono/dibromo acetyl, 6-halogenated coumarin analogues were screened for larvicidal, adulticidal, and repellent properties against Anopheles arabiensis, a zoophilic mosquito that is one of the dominant vectors of malaria in Africa. Five compounds exerted 100% larval mortality within 24 h of exposure. All coumarins and halogenated coumarins reversibly knocked down adult mosquitoes but did not kill them after 24 h of exposure. Repellent properties could not be evidenced. Five compounds were considered potential larvicidal agents for further research and development, while adulticidal activity was considered only mild to moderate.

  10. Evaluation of a New Spraying Machine for Barrier Treatment and Penetration of Bifenthrin on Vegetation Against Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    2013). Barrier treatments with the pyrethroid bifenthrin and other residual adulticides have been successful in controlling several vector and...formulation mixed with 162 liters of well water was used to cover the 3.2 km of vegetation. During the treatment , the ends of the nozzles of the machine...therefore, we collected samples from deciduous vegetation and only selected leaves that were present on the treatment date. Leaves from 3 species of plants

  11. Bioefficacy of Morinda tinctoria and Pongamia glabra plant extracts against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Amerasan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases have an economic impact, including loss in commercial and labour outputs, particularly in countries with tropical and subtropical climates; however, no part of the world is free from vector-borne diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the larvicidal, adulticidal and ovicidal activity of dried leaf chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, aqueous, and methanol extracts of Morinda tinctoria and Pongamia glabra against larvae of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae. Larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of plant extracts for 24 h. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects after 24 h of exposure; however, the highest larval mortality was found with the leaf methanol extracts of M. tinctoria and P. glabra against the larvae of A. stephensi lethal concentration (LC50=136.24 and 141.05 ppm; LC90=342.67 and 368.89 ppm, respectively. The results of the adulticidal activity assays of chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, aqueous, and methanol extracts of M. tinctoria and P. glabra showed significant mortality against larvae of A. stephensi. The methanol extract showed maximum activity compared with the other extracts. The greatest effect on mean percentage hatch in the ovicidal assays was observed 48 h post-treatment. Percent hatch was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract, and directly proportional to the number of eggs. A mortality of 100% was observed with 100-400 ppm methanol extracts and 200-400 ppm aqueous extracts of M. tinctoria, and 200-400 ppm aqueous and methanol extracts of P. glabra. This study provides the first report of the larvicidal, adulticidal and ovicidal activities of M. tinctoria and P. glabra plant extracts against the malaria vector, A. stephensi, representing an ideal eco-friendly approach for its control.

  12. Mosquitocidal Effect of Glycosmis pentaphylla Leaf Extracts against Three Mosquito Species (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Govindaraju; Karthi, Sengodan; Muthusamy, Ranganathan; Suganya, Ponnusamy; Natarajan, Devarajan; Kweka, Eliningaya J.; Shivakumar, Muthugounder S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The resistance status of malaria vectors to different classes of insecticides used for public health has raised concern for vector control programmes. Alternative compounds to supplement the existing tools are important to be searched to overcome the existing resistance and persistence of pesticides in vectors and the environment respectively. The mosquitocidal effects of Glycosmis pentaphylla using different solvents of acetone, methanol, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts against three medically important mosquito vectors was conducted. Methods Glycosmis pentaphylla plant leaves were collected from Kolli Hills, India. The WHO test procedures for larval and adult bioassays were used to evaluate extracts against mosquito vectors, and the chemical composition of extracts identified using GC-MS analysis. Results The larvicidal and adulticidal activity of G. pentaphylla plant extracts clearly impacted the three species of major mosquitoes vectors. Acetone extracts had the highest larvicidal effect against An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti with the LC50 and LC90 values of 0.0004, 138.54; 0.2669, 73.7413 and 0.0585, 303.746 mg/ml, respectively. The LC50 and LC90 adulticide values of G. pentaphylla leaf extracts in acetone, methanol, chloroform and ethyl acetate, solvents were as follows for Cx. quinquefasciatus, An. stephensi and Ae. Aegypti: 2.957, 5.458, 2.708, and 4.777, 3.449, 6.676 mg/ml respectively. The chemical composition of G. pentaphylla leaf extract has been found in 20 active compounds. Conclusions The plant leaf extracts of G. pentaphylla bioactive molecules which are effective and can be developed as an eco-friendly approach for larvicides and adulticidal mosquitoes vector control. Detailed identification and characterization of mosquitocidal effect of individual bioactive molecules ingredient may result into biodegradable effective tools for the control of mosquito vectors. PMID:27391146

  13. The Eye of the Tiger, the Thrill of the Fight: Effective Larval and Adult Control Measures Against the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae), in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik

    2016-09-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), is a highly invasive container-inhabiting species with a global distribution. This mosquito, similar to other Stegomyia species such as Aedes aegypti (L.), is highly adapted to urban and suburban areas, and commonly oviposits in artificial containers, which are ubiquitous in these peridomestic environments. The increase in speed and amount of international travel and commerce, coupled with global climate change, have aided in the resurgence and expansion of Stegomyia species into new areas of North America. In many parts of their range, both species are implicated as significant vectors of emerging and re-emerging arboviruses such as dengue, chikungunya, and now Zika. Although rapid and major advances have been made in the field of biology, ecology, genetics, taxonomy, and virology, relatively little has changed in the field of mosquito control in recent decades. This is particularly discouraging in regards to container-inhabiting mosquitoes, because traditional integrated mosquito management (IMM) approaches have not been effective against these species. Many mosquito control programs simply do not possess the man-power or necessary financial resources needed to suppress Ae. albopictus effectively. Therefore, control of mosquito larvae, which is the foundation of IMM approaches, is exceptionally difficult over large areas. This review paper addresses larval habitats, use of geographic information systems for habitat preference detection, door-to-door control efforts, source reduction, direct application of larvicides, biological control agents, area-wide low-volume application of larvicides, hot spot treatments, autodissemination stations, public education, adult traps, attractive-toxic sugar bait methods, lethal ovitraps, barrier-residual adulticides, hand-held ultra-low-volume adulticides, area-wide adulticides applied by ground or air, and genetic control methods. The review concludes with future

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy associated with heartworm disease in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caprariis, Donato; Sasanelli, Mariateresa; Paradies, Paola; Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    A 12-year-old, intact female, mixed Yorkshire terrier was evaluated for syncopal episodes, weakness, decreased appetite, and weight loss. Heartworm disease was diagnosed based on evidence of circulating microfilariae of Dirofilaria immitis on direct examination of blood smears and a positive SNAP heartworm antigen test. An immunoglobulin G (IgG) gammopathy, demonstrated by serum protein electrophoresis, was associated with heartworm disease in this dog. Response to treatment with both an adulticide and the microfilaricide ivermectin included remission of clinical signs and a decrease in the monoclonal gammopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IgG gammopathy associated with heartworm disease in the dog.

  15. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Wanumen, Andrea Carolina; Salamanca, Jordano; Holdcraft, Robert; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day) control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1–7 days) larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries. PMID:27092527

  16. Neem by-products in the fight against mosquito-borne diseases:Biotoxicity of neem cake fractions towards the rural malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies(Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balamurugan Chandramohan; Kadarkarai Murugan; Pari Madhiyazhagan; Kalimuthu Kovendan; Palanisamy Mahesh Kumar; Chellasamy Panneerselvam; Devakumar Dinesh; Jayapal Subramaniam; Rajapandian Rajaganesh; Marcello Nicoletti; Angelo Canale; Giovanni Benelli

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ovicidal, larvicidal and adulticidal potential of neem cake fractions of different polarity against the rural malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies(An.culicifacies).Methods: Neem cake fractions’ total methanol extract(NTMeOH), total ethyl acetate extract(NTAc OEt), ethyl acetate fraction after repartition with NTMe OH(NRAc OEt),butanol fraction after repartition with NTMeOH(NRBuOH), and aqueous fraction after repartition of NTMeOH(NRH2O) were tested against An. culicifacies eggs, fourth instar larvae and adults.Results: In larvicidal experiments, NTMeOH, NTAcOEt, NRAcOEt, NRBuOH and NRH2O achieved LC50 values of 1.32, 1.50, 1.81, 1.95 and 2.54 mg/L, respectively. All fractions tested at 150 mg/L were able to reduce egg hatchability of more than 50%, with the exception of NTAc OEt and NRAc OEt. In adulticidal assays, NTMeOH, NTAcOEt,NRAcOEt, NRBuOH and NRH2O achieved LC50 values of 3.01, 2.95, 3.23, 3.63 and3.00 mg/L, respectively.Conclusions: Overall, this study suggests that the methanolic fractions of neem cake may be considered as a new and cheap source of highly effective compounds against the rural malaria vector An. culicifacies.

  17. Insecticidal and Repellent Activity of Several Plant-Derived Essential Oils Against Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ruth M; Stashenko, Elena; Duque, Jonny E

    2017-03-01

    We examined the pupicidal, adulticidal, repellent, and oviposition-deterrent activities of essential oils (EOs) from Lippia alba, L. origanoides, Eucalyptus citriodora, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Citrus sinensis , Cananga odorata , Swinglea glutinosa, and Tagetes lucida plants against Aedes aegypti under laboratory conditions. Pupicidal and adulticidal activities were assessed at exploratory concentrations of 250, 310, and 390 parts per million (ppm); and 30, 300, and 1,000 ppm, respectively. The greatest pupicidal activity was exhibited at 390 ppm with a 24-h exposure by L. origanoides, and 390 ppm with a 48-h exposure by Citrus sinensis . Lippia origanoides killed all adult mosquitoes at 300 ppm after 120 min of exposure. Only L. origanoides and E. citriodora EOs, applied at 1,000 ppm to human skin, produced the greatest repellency (100%) to host-seeking Ae. aegypti after 2 min of exposure; the repellency decreased between 12% and 10% after 15 min. Complete oviposition deterrence by gravid Ae. aegypti was observed for E. citriodora EOs at 200 ppm with an oviposition activity index of -1.00. These results confirm that the EOs assessed in this study have insecticidal, repellent, and oviposition-deterrent activities against the dengue vector, Ae. aegypti.

  18. Neem by-products in the fight against mosquito-borne diseases:Biotoxicity of neem cake fractions towards the rural malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera:Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balamurugan Chandramohan; Marcello Nicoletti; Angelo Canale; Giovanni Benelli; Kadarkarai Murugan; Pari Madhiyazhagan; Kalimuthu Kovendan; Palanisamy Mahesh Kumar; Chellasamy Panneerselvam; Devakumar Dinesh; Jayapal Subramaniam; Rajapandian Rajaganesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ovicidal, larvicidal and adulticidal potential of neem cake fractions of different polarity against the rural malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies (An. culicifacies). Methods: Neem cake fractions' total methanol extract (NTMeOH), total ethyl acetate extract (NTAcOEt), ethyl acetate fraction after repartition with NTMeOH (NRAcOEt), butanol fraction after repartition with NTMeOH (NRBuOH), and aqueous fraction after repartition of NTMeOH (NRH2O) were tested against An. culicifacies eggs, fourth instar larvae and adults. Results: In larvicidal experiments, NTMeOH, NTAcOEt, NRAcOEt, NRBuOH and NRH2O achieved LC50 values of 1.32, 1.50, 1.81, 1.95 and 2.54 mg/L, respectively. All fractions tested at 150 mg/L were able to reduce egg hatchability of more than 50%, with the exception of NTAcOEt and NRAcOEt. In adulticidal assays, NTMeOH, NTAcOEt, NRAcOEt, NRBuOH and NRH2O achieved LC50 values of 3.01, 2.95, 3.23, 3.63 and 3.00 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: Overall, this study suggests that the methanolic fractions of neem cake may be considered as a new and cheap source of highly effective compounds against the rural malaria vector An. culicifacies.

  19. Efficacy of Two Common Methods of Application of Residual Insecticide for Controlling the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse, in Urban Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marini

    Full Text Available After its first introduction in the 1980's the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse, has spread throughout Southern Europe. Ae. albopictus is considered an epidemiologically important vector for the transmission of many viral pathogens such as the yellow fever virus, dengue fever and Chikungunya fever, as well as several filarial nematodes such as Dirofilaria immitis or D. repens. It is therefore crucial to develop measures to reduce the risks of disease transmission by controlling the vector populations. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two application techniques (mist vs. stretcher sprayer and two insecticides (Etox based on the nonester pyrethroid Etofenprox vs. Microsin based on the pyrethroid type II Cypermetrin in controlling adult tiger mosquito populations in highly populated areas. To test the effect of the two treatments pre- and post-treatment human landing rate counts were conducted for two years. After one day from the treatment we observed a 100% population decrease in mosquito abundance with both application methods and both insecticides. However, seven and 14 days after the application the stretcher sprayer showed larger population reductions than the mist sprayer. No effect of insecticide type after one day and 14 days was found, while Etox caused slightly higher population reduction than Microsin after seven days. Emergency measures to locally reduce the vector populations should adopt adulticide treatments using stretcher sprayers. However, more research is still needed to evaluate the potential negative effects of adulticide applications on non-target organisms.

  20. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Rodriguez-Saona

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae, and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae. The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1–7 days larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries.

  1. Toxicity of Insecticides on Various Life Stages of Two Tortricid Pests of Cranberries and on a Non-Target Predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Wanumen, Andrea Carolina; Salamanca, Jordano; Holdcraft, Robert; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera

    2016-04-15

    Laboratory and extended laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the residual toxicities of various insecticides against two key pests of cranberries, Sparganothis sulfureana and Choristoneura parallela (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and their non-target effects on the predatory Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). The effects of nine insecticides with different modes of action on S. sulfureana and Ch. parallela eggs, larvae, and adults were tested in the laboratory, while the efficacy of a post-bloom application on larval mortality and mass of these pests and on adult O. insidiosus was evaluated in extended laboratory experiments. The organophosphate chlorpyrifos and the spinosyn spinetoram provided long-lasting (seven-day) control against all stages of both pests. The growth regulator methoxyfenozide and the diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole had strong (1-7 days) larvicidal, particularly on young larvae, and growth inhibitory activity, but only the diamides were adulticidal. Among neonicotinoids, acetamiprid had stronger ovicidal and adulticidal activity than thiamethoxam, showing within-insecticide class differences in toxicities; however, both were weak on larvae. Lethality of novaluron and indoxacarb was inconsistent, varying depending on species and stage. Chlorpyrifos was most toxic to O. insidiosus. These results show species- and stage-specific toxicities, and greater compatibility with biological control, of the newer reduced-risk classes of insecticides than older chemistries.

  2. Recent advances in heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, J; McCall, J W; Genchi, C; Bazzocchi, C; Kramer, L; Simòn, F; Martarino, M

    2004-10-28

    This compilation of articles consists of four papers presented at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) (held in New Orleans, LA, USA, on 10–14 August 2003) in a symposium session titled “ Recent Advances in Heartworm Disease,” organized and chaired by JohnW. McCall and Jorge Guerrero. The first paper(Guerrero) covered the American Heartworm Society’s most recent revision of their guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of heartworm infection in dogs, based on new research and clinical experience, particularly in the areas of heartworm chemoprophylaxis, adulticide therapy,and serologic testing and retesting. The entire updated 2003 “Guidelines” are presented herein.One paper (McCall) reviewed the “soft-kill” adulticidal and “safety-net” (reach-back, retroactive,clinical prophylactic) activity of prolonged dosing of prophylactic doses of macrocyclic lactones,concluding that ivermectin is the most effective in this way, milbemycin oxime is the least effective,and the activity of injectable moxidectin and selamectin lies between that of ivermectin and milbemycin oxime. The two remaining papers provided an overview of the discovery, rediscovery,phylogeny, and biological association between Wolbachia endosymbionts and filarial nematodes(Genchi and co-authors) and compelling evidence that Wolbachia may play a major role in the immunopathogenesis of filarial diseases of man and animals (Kramer and co-authors).

  3. Toxicity of 25 synthetic insecticides to the field population of Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rizwan Mustafa; Alam, Mahbob; Ahmad, Daniyal; Waqas, Muhammad; Ali, Qasim; Binyamin, Muhammad; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2016-11-01

    The Culex quinquefaciatus Say, commonly known as the southern house mosquito, is well known for biting nuisance and vectoring of some fatal diseases. Synthetic chemicals have been relied upon as the major control measure to control mosquitoes. Therefore, we have evaluated 21 insecticides belonging to different chemical classes for their toxicity to C. quinquefaciatus females. Chlorfenapyr was the most toxic adulticide among all the tested insecticides. Among pyrethroids, deltamethrin was the least toxic adulticide, and all other have same toxicity. In case of organophosphates, the chlorpyrifos was the most toxic insecticide. Neonicotinoids such as acetamiprid, nitenpyram, and clothianidin have similar toxicity based on overlapping of 95 % confidence intervals (CI) and were more toxic when compared with the imidacloprid. The spinetoram was more toxic as compared with the spinosad (based on non-overlapping 95 % Cl). In case of ketoenoles, spirotetrament was more toxic as compared with the spiromesifen. Emamectin benzoate was the most toxic insecticide when compared with fipronil and indoxacarb. We also have tested four insect growth regulators (IGRS) including lufenuron, methoxyfenozide, pyriproxyfen, and cyromazine as larvicides. The lufenuron and pyriproxyfen have similar toxicity based upon their overlapping 95 % CI and were more toxic as compared with the methoxyfenozide and cyromazine. The methoxyfenozide was the moderately toxic among all the tested IGRS, and cyromazine was the least toxic among all the tested IGRS. These results will prove helpful in effectuating an effective integrated vector management program for C. quinquefaciatus.

  4. Chemical constituents of the stems of Spathelia excelsa (rutaceae) and activity against Aedes aegypti; Constituintes quimicos do caule de Spathelia excelsa (rutaceae) e atividade contra Aedes aegypti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Aline Carvalho de; Lima, Maria da Paz [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Coordenacao de Pesquisas em Produtos Naturais], e-mail: mdapaz@inpa.gov.br; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Tadei, Wanderli Pedro; Pinto, Ana Cristina da Silva [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Lab. de Vetores de Malaria e Dengue

    2009-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation from the stems of Spathelia excelsa (Rutaceae) collected in Amazonas yielded deacetylspathelin (1), 7,8-dimethoxyflindersine (2), new glabretal-type triterpenoid 3{beta}-angeloyl-21,24-epoxy-7{alpha}, 21{alpha}, 23{alpha}, 25-tetrahydroxy-4{alpha}, 4{beta}, 8{beta}, 10{beta}-tetramethyl-25-dimethyl-14,18-cyclo-5{alpha}, 13{alpha}, 14{alpha}, 17{alpha}-cholestane (3), in addition to the known steroids s-sitosterol and stigmasterol. Their structures were established on the basis of spectral data. The compounds 1 and 3 were assayed on Aedes aegypti (larvicidal and adulticidal activities and compound 3 exhibited larvicidal properties with LC{sub 50} of 4,8 {mu}g/mL. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  6. Retrospective study on the presence and pathogenicity of Dirofilaria repens in 5 dogs and 1 cat from Aosta Vally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarello, W

    2003-10-01

    Aosta Valley is the only region of Italy free of reported human cases of dirofilariosis due to Dirofilaria repens. Nonetheless, the retrospective analysis of five locally acquired D. repens infections in dogs, seems to indicate that an animal reservoir exist in the area. A feline case imported from Camargue, France, is also described. The most common dermatological signs were erythema, alopecia, crusting, papulae and nodules. All patients had lesional pruritus and dogs were affected by concurrent babesiosis. Eradication of the underlying condition, followed by a therapy with the specific adulticide and microfilaricide drugs led to a complete recovery of microfilaraemia. Increased pet travel and ecological changes are extending the ranges of vector borne, parasitic and zoonotic diseases. This fact pose a unique diagnostic challenge for the veterinarian, since the index of suspicion may be absent outside endemic areas.

  7. Doxycycline levels and anti-Wolbachia antibodies in sera from dogs experimentally infected with Dirofilaria immitis and treated with a combination of ivermectin/doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menozzi, A; Bertini, S; Turin, L; Serventi, P; Kramer, L; Bazzocchi, C

    2015-04-30

    Sera from Dirofilaria immitis-experimentally infected dogs treated with a combination of ivermectin/doxycycline were analysed for doxycycline levels by HPLC and anti-Wolbachia Surface Protein (rWSP) antibodies by ELISA and compared with sera from dogs treated with doxycycline alone. Results show that doxycycline levels were not statistically different between the two groups. Circulating anti-WSP antibody titres were markedly lower in both treatment groups when compared to control D. immitis infected dogs, indicating that doxycycline is able to reduce Wolbachia and prevent the immune response against the bacteria. The combination treatment protocol has been shown to be highly adulticidal and further studies are needed to better understand the interaction between doxycycline and ivermectin in D. immitis infected dogs.

  8. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-Mounted Cold Mist Spray of Permethrin and Tetramethylfluthrin Targeting Aedes albopictus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Dong, Yan-De; Zhou, Ming-Hao; Zhang, Heng-Duan; Chen, Hong-Na; Tian, Ye; Yang, Wei-Fang; Wu, Xiao-Qun; Chu, Hong-Liang; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-03-01

    Aedes albopictus is the primary vector of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in China. Although there are previous studies on the application of adulticides to control this species, the application methods have either been back-pack or vehicle-mounted systems. However, many sites are too large to be effectively treated with back-pack sprayers, and the lack of roads restricts the use of vehicle-mounted sprayers. This paper provides the first study of using unmanned aerial vehicles to conduct cold mist sprays on Ae. albopictus habitats. A spray containing 4% permethrin and 1% tetramethylfluthrin was applied at an effective application rate of 9.0 mg/m(2). This method reduced Ae. albopictus populations by more than 90%. The results indicate this novel spray system is a powerful method to achieve a rapid decline of mosquito population in Ae. albopictus habitats in China.

  9. Toxicity of plant essential oils to Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Byeoung-Ryeol; Park, Hyung-Man; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2003-10-01

    A total of 53 plant essential oils were tested for their insecticidal activities against eggs, nymphs, and adults of Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westwood, using an impregnated filter paper bioassays without allowing direct contact. Responses varied according to oil type and dose, and developmental stage of the insect. Bay, caraway seed, clove leaf, lemon eucalyptus, lime dis 5 F, pennyroyal, peppermint, rosewood, spearmint, and tea tree oils were highly effective against T. vaporariorum adults, nymphs, and eggs at 0.0023, 0.0093, and 0.0047 microl/ml air, respectively. These results indicate that the mode of delivery of these essential oils was largely a result of action in the vapor phase. Significant correlations among adulticidal, nymphicidal, and ovicidal activities of the test oils were observed. The essential oils described herein merit further study as potential fumigants for T. vaporariorum control.

  10. Ipomoea batatas (Convolvulaceae)-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles for controlling mosquito vectors of Aedes albopictus, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera:Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavithra Bharathi, V; Ragavendran, C; Murugan, N; Natarajan, D

    2016-12-08

    We proposed an effective and eco-friendly control of dengue, malaria, and filariasis-causing vectors. We tested Ipomoea batatas leaves-mediated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against first to fourth instar larvae and adults of Aedes albopictus, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus at different concentrations. The synthesized AgNPs showed broad spectrum of larvicidal and adulticidal effects after 48 h of exposure. The characterization of synthesized AgNPs was done using various spectral and microscopy analyses. The maximum efficacy was observed in synthesized AgNPs against the adult of Ae. albopictus with the LC50 and LC90 values were 10.069 and 15.657 μg/mL, respectively, followed by others.

  11. Dirofilaria immitis and Wolbachia pipientis: a thorough investigation of the symbiosis responsible for canine heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaffie, Jake

    2012-02-01

    Canine heartworm disease wreaks havoc inside canines all throughout the modern world, including the USA. Any region where mosquitoes thrive will provide efficient dog-to-dog transportation for the microfilaria of the infectious nematode Dirofilaria immitis. Veterinary scientists have recently discovered both phylogenetic and biochemical evidence for the obligate symbiosis of D. immitis and the bacteria Wolbachia pipientis. As a result, veterinarians have initiated testing of antibiotic therapies either instead of, or together with, the currently utilized antiparasitic treatments for canine heartworm. The toxicity of melarsomine adulticidal therapies has prompted an abundance of new research involving doxycycline and other antibiotics, which will be addressed in this review. As our knowledge of the Wolbachia endosymbiont expands, so will our abilities to minimize toxicity and maximize efficiency of heartworm treatments.

  12. Development and resolution of radiographic lesions in canine heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, C A; Losonsky, J M; Lewis, R E; McCall, J W

    1981-06-01

    Thoracic radiography of 7 Beagles was performed before heartworm infection, during a 1-year heartworm infection, and for 1 year following appropriate treatment. Cardiac and vascular lesions on thoracic radiographs were compared with angiographic changes. Within 3 months of obstructed blood flow in the caudal lobar arteries, associated increased focal parenchymal densities were detected. These lesions were regarded as characteristic of heartworm disease. Although the most severe arteriographic changes were in the caudal lobar arteries, lobar arterial changes on a lateral view were best detected in the right cranial lobar artery. These arteries increased in size during infection and decreased in size after treatment. It was concluded that the dorsoventral view is best for evaluation of the caudal lobar arteries. The most marked parenchymal lesions were detected during the first 6 months following adulticide treatment. These lesions and the other radiographic alterations then decreased in severity. Persistence of the parenchymal lesions were related to persistence of heartworm infection.

  13. Control of dengue disease: a case study in Cape Verde

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F M; Zinober, Alan

    2010-01-01

    A model for the transmission of dengue disease is presented. It consists of eight mutually-exclusive compartments representing the human and vector dynamics. It also includes a control parameter (adulticide spray) in order to combat the mosquito. The model presents three possible equilibria: two disease-free equilibria (DFE) --- where humans, with or without mosquitoes, live without the disease --- and another endemic equilibrium (EE). In the literature it has been proved that a DFE is locally asymptotically stable, whenever a certain epidemiological threshold, known as the basic reproduction number, is less than one. We show that if a minimum level of insecticide is applied, then it is possible to maintain the basic reproduction number below unity. A case study, using data of the outbreak that occured in 2009 in Cape Verde, is presented.

  14. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) floats for surveillance of Ochlerotatus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jamesina J; Crans, Wayne J

    2003-12-01

    Blocks of expanded polystyrene (EPS) were placed in a variety of habitats to investigate their potential as an egg-collection device for container-dwelling Aedes and Ochlerotatus species. Eggs from Ochlerotatus japonicus, Oc. triseriatus, Oc. hendersoni, and Aedes albopictus were collected with EPS floats. The float provides an inexpensive, low-maintenance alternative to the Centers for Disease Control ovitrap for sampling container-dwelling mosquito species that are important vectors of disease. Eggs collected on the floats have many potential applications, including use in routine population surveillance; detection of Oc. japonicus, Ae. albopictus, and other container-dwelling species in new areas; species distribution studies; natural transovarial transmission studies; ovipositional studies; collection of local field populations for insecticide resistance assays; assessment of adulticiding efficacy; and establishment of new laboratory colonies.

  15. A study of population changes in adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) during a mosquito control programme in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, P R

    1986-02-01

    The effectiveness of insecticidal control measures on adult Culex quinquefasciatus Say in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, was examined. Direct treatment of the study site with cypermethrin applied as a fog caused a temporary reduction both in total numbers (males and females) and in the proportion of older females. When cypermethrin was applied as an ultra low volume formulation at dusk and dawn numbers of males were greatly reduced, but numbers of females were not affected. It appears that the adulticiding operations had little overall effect on the total numbers or survival rate of females, or breeding success. The oviposition cycle duration was estimated to be two days, with the survival rate per oviposition cycle calculated as 30%. With these values it is thought unlikely that filariasis would be transmitted in Dubai.

  16. Comparative toxicity of oxygenated monoterpenoids in experimental hydroalcoholic lotions to permethrin-resistant adult head lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Audino, Paola; Picollo, María Inés; Gallardo, Anabella; Toloza, Ariel; Vassena, Claudia; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón

    2011-07-01

    The use of botanical compounds such as essential oils has recently become the subject of great interest as a natural means of pest control because of their ovicidal, larvicidal, or adulticidal activity against various insect species including head lice. We tested and compared the efficacy of pure oxygenated monoterpenoids that are main ingredients of essential oils of good biological activity. We used pulegone and citral, components of Aloysia citrodora, and geraniol, citronellol, and linalool, components of Geranium sp. oil. We found that citronellol and geraniol showed the highest knockdown and mortality effect (>60%) on adults of both sexes (50:50%) and third-stage nymphs. Pulegone, linalool, and citral showed knockdown percentages between 42 and 55%, and mortality percentages between 47 and 53%. A simple linear regression analysis showed statistically significant relationships between the studied toxic effects and viscosity of the monoterpenoids (p < 0.05), but not with their partition coefficient (log P).

  17. Chemical composition and efficacy of some selected plant oils against Pediculus humanus capitis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yones, Doaa A; Bakir, Hanaa Y; Bayoumi, Soad A L

    2016-08-01

    Natural compounds have been suggested as alternative sources for pediculosis capitis control. We aimed to investigate the chemical composition and evaluate the pediculicidal activity of spearmint, clove, cassia, thyme, eucalyptus, and anise essential oils in addition to sesame oil against human head lice in vitro. A filter paper contact bioassay method was used by applying 0.25 and 0.5 mg/cm(2) of each tested oil to filter paper in Petri dishes with 15 females head lice and another with ten nits. The lice mortalities were reported every 5 min for 180 min. The percentage of inhibition of hatch (PIH) was used to calculate ovicidal activity by daily microscopic inspections 5 days after the hatching of controls. Comparison with the widely used pediculicide (malathion) was performed. The most effective essential oil was spearmint followed by cassia and clove with KT50 values of 4.06, 7.62, and 12.12 at 0.5 mg/cm(2) and 8.84, 11.38, and 19.73 at 0.25 mg/cm(2), respectively. Thyme, eucalyptus, and anise were also effective adulticides with KT50 values of 18.61, 32.65, and 37.34 at 0.5 mg/cm(2) and 29.92, 43.16, and 45.37 at 0.25 mg/cm(2), respectively. Essential oils were also successful in inhibiting nymph emergence. Spearmint oil was the most effective, with a complete inhibition of emergence at 0.5 mg/cm(2). Sesame fixed oil did not show any adulticidal or ovicidal activity against head lice in vitro. The observed insecticidal activity was comparable to malathion. The results herein described the effectiveness of these essential oils as potential pediculicides for head lice control. Incorporation of essential oils in pediculicide formulations needs proper formulation and clinical trials.

  18. Search for new prototypes for the chemotherapy of filariasis: a chemotherapeutic and biochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Preeti; Verma, Shailendra Kumar; Katiyar, Diksha; Tewari, Neetu; Tripathi, R P; Bansal, Iti; Saxena, J K; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2005-04-01

    The antifilarial activity of two coumarin derivatives (A, B) and three glycosyl amine derivatives (D, E, F) was evaluated against a subperiodic strain of human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi by the intraperitoneal route at 50 mg/kg for 5 consecutive days. Of these, the two sugar derivatives (D and E) were selected for evaluation by the oral route based on their microfilaricidal (mild), macrofilaricidal and female worm sterilization efficacy using the i.p. route of administration. Compound E was finally selected for combination therapy on the basis of its microfilaricidal and embryostatic action by the oral route and its spectrum of activity against micro- and macrofilariae including embryostatic activity by the i.p. route. In addition, E also significantly inhibited the parasite DNA topoisomerase II. Compound A, in contrast, led to an enhanced adult worm burden. Compound B was toxic by the i.p. route, killing all of the treated animals before completion of the experiment. Some of these compounds demonstrated significant antifilarial efficacy of varying degree when tested in vitro Compounds B, D and F also killed adult B. malayi in vitro at 100 muM while 50 muM resulted in very slow motility of worms. Compound E in combination with a promising macrofilaricidal benzopyran derivative reported by us recently (compound C) did not show any synergistic or additive effect. These two compounds (C and E) individually on oral administration with either DEC or ivermectin significantly improved microfilaricidal efficacy in terms of intensity and duration of suppressed microfilaraemia. The combination of DEC with compound E demonstrated marginal enhancement in adulticidal efficacy, however, the embryostatic effect of the duo was significantly higher than that exerted by the individual agents. It may thus be inferred that in the absence of an adulticidal antifilarial drug, the use of potential antifilarials in combination with the standard filaricides may yield better

  19. Anti-plasmodial and insecticidal activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants growing in the Mediterranean area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’Agli Mario

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sardinia is a Mediterranean area endemic for malaria up to the last century. During a screening study to evaluate the anti-plasmodial activity of some aromatic plants traditionally used in Sardinia, Myrtus communis (myrtle, Myrtaceae, Satureja thymbra (savory, Lamiaceae, and Thymus herba-barona (caraway thyme, Lamiaceae were collected in three vegetative periods: before, during and after flowering. Methods The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation, fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and analysed by GC-FID-MS. Total oil and three main fractions were tested on D10 and W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. Larvicidal and adulticidal activities were tested on Anopheles gambiae susceptible strains. Results The essential oil of savory, rich in thymol, was the most effective against P. falciparum with an inhibitory activity independent from the time of collection (IC50 17–26 μg/ml on D10 and 9–11 μg/ml on W2. Upon fractionation, fraction 1 was enriched in mono-sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbons; fraction 2 in thymol (73-83%; and fraction 3 contained thymol, carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol, with a different composition depending on the time of collection. Thymol-enriched fractions were the most active on both strains (IC50 20–22 μg/ml on D10 and 8–10 μg/ml on W2 and thymol was confirmed as mainly responsible for this activity (IC50 19.7± 3.0 and 10.6 ± 2.0 μg/ml on D10 and W2, respectively. The essential oil of S. thymbra L. showed also larvicidal and adulticidal activities. The larvicidal activity, expressed as LC50, was 0.15 ± 0.002; 0.21 ± 0.13; and 0.15 ± 0.09 μg/ml (mean ± sd depending on the time of collection: before, during and after flowering, respectively. Conclusions This study provides evidence for the use of essential oils for treating malaria and fighting the vector at both the larval and adult stages. These findings open the possibility for further

  20. Evaluation of plant-mediated synthesized silver nanoparticles against vector mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Kaliyan; Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Hoti, S L

    2014-12-01

    Diseases transmitted by blood-feeding mosquitoes, such as dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, Japanese encephalitis, malaria, and filariasis, are increasing in prevalence, particularly in tropical and subtropical zones. To control mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases, which have worldwide health and economic impacts, synthetic insecticide-based interventions are still necessary, particularly in situations of epidemic outbreak and sudden increases of adult mosquitoes. Green nanoparticle synthesis has been achieved using environmentally acceptable plant extract and eco-friendly reducing and capping agents. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, in the present study, the adulticidal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized using Heliotropium indicum plant leaf extract against adults of Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus was determined. Adult mosquitoes were exposed to varying concentrations of aqueous extract of H. indicum and synthesized AgNPs for 24 h. AgNPs were rapidly synthesized using the leaf extract of H. indicum, and the formation of nanoparticles was observed within 6 h. The results recorded from UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy support the biosynthesis and characterization of AgNPs. The maximum efficacy was observed in synthesized AgNPs against the adult of A. stephensi (lethal dose (LD)₅₀ = 26.712 μg/mL; LD₉₀ = 49.061 μg/mL), A. aegypti (LD₅₀ = 29.626 μg/mL; LD₉₀ = 54.269 μg/mL), and C. quinquefasciatus (LD₅₀ = 32.077 μg/mL; LD₉₀ = 58.426 μg/mL), respectively. No mortality was observed in the control. These results suggest that the leaf aqueous extracts of H.indicum and green synthesis of AgNPs have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of

  1. Peel and leaf powders of three fruits and a vegetable as promising botanicals against Callosobruchus maculatus (F.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Abdulrasak K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the insecticidal activities of powders of bitter leaf, cashew leaf, orange peel and pawpaw leaf against Callosobruchus maculatus (F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae. These were tested at 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% (w/w for their insecticidal activities against the insect. Results showed that the ovicidal and adulticidal activities of the plant powders depended on dosages and exposure time. Mortalities of 16.28% and 18.75% were observed in bitter leaf powder applied at 7.5% (w/w dosage within 24 and 48 hours post infestation (HPI, respectively. In grains treated with 7.5% orange peel powder, 12.50% and 16.28% mortalities were observed within 24 and 48 HPI, respectively. Each of bitter leaf and orange peel powders was significantly different (p orange peel > cashew leaf > pawpaw leaf. It is recommended that incorporating these plant parts in pest management of stored products will guarantee user safety, reduce environmental pollution and suppress insect infestation.

  2. Toxic and antifeedant activities of prenylated flavonoids isolated from Tephrosia apollinea L. against three major coleopteran pests of stored grains with reference to their structure-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenaah, Gomah E

    2014-01-01

    Four prenylated flavonoids, isoglabratephrin, (+)-glabratephrin, tephroapollin-F and lanceolatin-A, were isolated from Tephrosia apollinea L. and tested against three stored grain insects. Using the filter paper bioassay, compounds showed adulticidal activity against Sitophilus oryzae (L), Rhyzopertha dominica (F) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) at concentrations of 0.875, 1.75 and 3.5 mg mL(- 1). At 3.5 mg mL(- 1), tephroapollin-F was the most toxic (78.6%, 64.6% and 60.7% mortality was recorded after 10 days exposure of S. oryzae, R. dominica and T. castaneum, respectively). The F1 progeny production of insects was affected after parental exposure to flavonoids, where S. oryzae was the most susceptible. A nutritional bioassay, employing a flour disc and test concentrations of 0.65, 1.3 and 2.6 mg g(- 1), revealed a significant reduction in the relative growth rate, relative consumption rate and efficiency of conversion of ingested food by all insects. The structure-activity relationship among the tested flavonoids was discussed.

  3. Impact of insecticide resistance on the field control of Aedes aegypti in the State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes da Graça Macoris

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The need to control dengue transmission by means of insecticides has led to the development of resistance to most of the products used worldwide against mosquitoes. In the State of São Paulo, the Superintendência de Controle de Endemias (SUCEN has annually monitored the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti to insecticides since 1996; since 1999, surveys were conducted in collaboration with the National Network of Laboratories (MoReNAa Network and were coordinated by the Ministry of Health. In this study, in addition to the biological characterization of insecticide resistance in the laboratory, the impact of resistance on field control was evaluated for vector populations that showed resistance in laboratory assays. Methods Field efficacy tests with larvicides and adulticides were performed over a 13-year period, using World Health Organization protocols. Results Data from the field tests showed a reduction in the residual effect of temephos on populations with a resistance ratio of 3. For adults, field control was less effective in populations characterized as resistant in laboratory qualitative assays, and this was confirmed using qualitative assays and field evaluation. Conclusions Our results indicated that management of resistance development needs to be adopted when insect populations show reduced susceptibility. The use of insecticides is a self-limiting tool that needs to be applied cautiously, and dengue control requires more sustainable strategies.

  4. Insecticidal activity of Jatropha curcas extracts against housefly, Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nitin; Kumar, Peeyush; Mishra, Sapna; Verma, Sharad; Malik, Anushree; Sharma, Satyawati

    2015-10-01

    The hexane and ether extracts of leaves, bark and roots of Jatropha curcas were screened for their toxicity against different developmental stages of housefly. The larvicidal, pupicidal and adulticidal activities were analysed at various concentrations (0.78-7.86 mg/cm(2)) of hexane and ether extracts. The lethal concentration values (LC50) of hexane extract of J. curcas leaves were 3.0 and 0.27 mg/cm(2) for adult and larval stages of housefly, respectively, after 48 h. Similarly, the ether extract of leaf showed the LC50 of 2.20 and 4.53 mg/cm(2) for adult and larval stages of housefly. Least toxicity was observed with hexane root extract of J. curcas with LC50 values of 14.18 and 14.26 mg/cm(2) for adult and larvae of housefly, respectively, after 48 h. The variation in LC50 against housefly pupae was found to be 8.88-13.10 mg/cm(2) at various J. curcas extract concentrations. The GC-MS analysis of J. curcas leaf extract revealed the presence of trans-phytol (60.81 %), squalene (28.58 %), phytol (2.52 %) and nonadecanone (1.06 %) as major components that could be attributed for insecticidal activity of J. curcas extracts.

  5. Musca domestica laboratory susceptibility to three ethnobotanical culinary plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zayyat, Elham A; Soliman, Mohammed I; Elleboudy, Noha A; Ofaa, Shaimaa E

    2015-10-01

    Throughout history, synanthropic Musca domestica had remained a worldwide problem whenever poor sanitation and bad hygienic conditions exists. Houseflies growing resistance to chemical insecticides are a rising environmental problem that necessitates search for alternatives. Mentha cervina, Ocimum basilicum, and Coriandrum sativum were tested for bioactivity on M. domestica adults and larvae. They are culinary Mediterranean plants. In adulticidal bioassay, using both CDC bottles and fumigation techniques, basil was the most effective extract with LC50 1.074 and 34.996 g/L, respectively. Concerning larvicidal bioassay by fumigation technique, coriander had the highest toxicity index with LC50 29.521 g/L. In both dipping and feeding technique, basil had the highest toxicity with LC50 32.643 and 0.749 g/L, respectively. Basil showed the highest toxicity results in four out of the five models tested followed by coriander then mint; this result highlights the potentiality of basil as a green insecticide in management of flies and opens new insight in the industrialization of basil-based fly control products.

  6. BIOEFFICACY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF THYMUS VULGARIS AND EUGENIA CARYOPHYLLUS AGAINST HOUSEFLY, MUSCA DOMESTICA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. CHINTALCHERE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The housefly, Musca domestica L., is a cosmopolitan insect, associated with vectoring of various etiologicalagents. In order to search for effective control method, bioefficacy of essential oils of Thyme (Thymus vulgarisand Clove leaf (Eugenia coryophyllus was studied against housefly. The LC (50 3.18ug/cm2 value of Clove leaf oilwas found highly effective as compared to LC (50 value 4.39ug/cm2 of Thyme essential oil for inducing mortalityof M. domestica larvae. The adulticidal activity of Thyme essential oil LC (50 32.71 mg/dm3 was toxic than Cloveleaf essential oil [LC (50 53.10 mg/dm3]. In Attractant / repellant Bioassay, Thyme essential oil revealed 90.21%repellency as compared to 80.68 % value of Clove leaf essential oil against adults of House fly. In fumigationbioassay, Thyme showed high Pupicidal activity than Clove leaf oil and in contact toxicity bioassay using topicalapplication both the oils showed 100 % pupicidal mortality. The data reveals that Clove and Thyme essential oilshave excellent potential for controlling M. domestica population as eco-friendly approach in IPM.

  7. Effectiveness of a multiple intervention strategy for the control of the tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramides, Gisela Chebabi; Roiz, David; Guitart, Raimon; Quintana, Salvador; Guerrero, Irene; Giménez, Nuria

    2011-05-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of four complementary and combined strategies to minimize the presence of the invasive mosquito Aedes albopictus, firmly established in Sant Cugat del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. A quasi-experimental design including six neighbourhoods was performed in 2008-2009. The abundance of mosquitoes was monitored through ovitraps. The multiple intervention strategy consisted of four actions: source reduction; larvicide treatments (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis and diflubenzuron); adulticide treatments (alfacipermetrin); and cleaning up uncontrolled landfills. The results showed the number of eggs significantly reduced in the areas with intervention. In 2008, the accumulate median of eggs was 175 and 272 in the intervention and control areas, respectively. In 2009, these medians were 884 and 1668 eggs. In total, 3104 households were visited and 683 people were interviewed. During inspections inside the houses, the cooperation of citizens in 2009 was 16% higher than that in 2008 (95% CI 13-19%). These findings suggest that the strategy was effective in reducing the number of eggs. Citizen cooperation, an essential factor for success, was observed through a high level of collaboration by the home owners, who allowed entry into their private dwellings. This study could be a model for controlling the populations of Ae. albopictus in the Mediterranean region.

  8. Deltamethrin:Promising mosquito control agent against adult stage of Aedes aegypti L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarita Kumar; Anita Thomas; Pillai MKK

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effects of deltamethrin against field-collected adults of Aedes aegypti L. (Ae. aegypti). Methods: The adults were selected with 0.025%deltamethrin for 40 successive generations. The selected adults were tested with 4%DDT and the emerging larvae were tested with various insecticides to study the cross-resistance spectrum. The knockdown and irritability studies were carried out in adult mosquitoes to investigate their behavioural response to deltamethrin. Results:Forty generations of selection with deltamethrin resulted in only 3.8-fold resistance in the adults of Ae. aegypti. The adults of parent (PS) and selected strains (DAS) exhibited only 0.8-fold cross resistance to 4%DDT. The larvae emerging from the PS and DAS strains did not develop appreciable levels of resistance to various insecticides tested. The knockdown studies revealed KT50 of 14.4 min in PS adults with no signs of recovery even after 24 h. The DAS strains could develop only 1.2 to 1.3-fold knockdown resistance (KDR). The knockdown response of DDT was though 5-6 times slower than deltamethrin but the continued response in deltamethrin-selected adults caused only 1.2-fold KDR. The PS and DAS strains exhibited significant irritability response towards deltamethrin and DDT. The DAS strains showed 5-6 fold increased irritability to deltamethrin as compared to the PS strain. Conclusions:The above results suggest the prolonged effective use of deltamethrin against Ae. aegypti as an adulticide.

  9. Preparation of Ecofriendly Formulations Containing Biologically Active Monoterpenes with Their Fumigant and Residual Toxicities against Adults of Culex pipiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. I. Badawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different mixtures of monoterpenes (ketone, alcohol, and alkene were loaded on paper discs and wax and their knockdown activities were evaluated against Culex pipiens adults. Some individual monoterpenes were also evaluated by residual toxicity technique. Citronella oil as a reference was also loaded separately or in combination with monoterpenes on paper discs and wax. The ketone monoterpenes mixture (camphor, menthone, carvone, and fenchone on paper discs was the most active (KT50 = 17.20 min followed by ketone monoterpenes with citronella oil (KT50 = 20.79 min and citronella oil alone (KT50 = 28.72 min. Wax formulations proved that the ketone and alcohol (geraniol, thymol, and menthol monoterpenes gave the most activity as knockdown (KT50 = 31.79 and 43.39 min, resp.. Alcohol monoterpenes formulation recorded KT50 = 43.39 min. Residual activity of tested individual monoterpenes reported that the menthol was more toxic than camphor and camphene. Generally, this study suggests that the monoterpenes have the properties, which make them used as eco-friendly compounds in the control programs of Cx. pipiens adult. The use of paper discs is more applicable than wax in the adulticidal formulations.

  10. Antifilarial Lead Molecules Isolated from Trachyspermum ammi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyanasundaram Muthuswamy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is caused by infection with the parasitic filarial nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori, transmitted by mosquitoes. The lack of an adulticidal drug poses a challenge to filariasis elimination, hence it is essential to develop an effective antifilarial drug which could either kill or permanently sterilize the adult worms. In the reported work the in vitro activity of a methanolic extract of fruits of Trachyspermum ammi (Apiaceae against adult bovine filarial Setaria digitata worms has been investigated. A bioassay-guided fractionation was carried out by subjecting the crude extract to flash chromatography. HPLC analysis was done for the crude extract and active fraction. The crude extract and the active fraction showed significant activity against the adult S. digitata by both a worm motility and MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction assays. The isolated active principle was chemically characterized by IR, 1H-NMR and MS analysis and identified as a phenolic monoterpene. It was screened for in vivo antifilarial activity against the human filarial worm B. malayi in Mastomys coucha, showing macrofilaricidal activity and female worm sterility in vivo against B. malayi. The findings thus provide a new lead for development of a macrofilaricidal drug from natural products

  11. Activity of broad-spectrum and reduced-risk insecticides on various life stages of cranberry fruitworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in highbush blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John C; Jenkins, Paul E; Poppen, Ryan Vander; Isaacs, Rufus

    2010-10-01

    Laboratory and semifield bioassays were conducted to determine the life-stage activity of insecticides for controlling cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a key lepidopteran pest of highbush blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum L. The organophosphates azinphosmethyl and phosmet, the pyrethroid esfenvalerate, and the carbamate methomyl were lethal to all life stages. The neonicotinoids thiacloprid and acetamiprid demonstrated strong larvicidal and ovicidal activity but were somewhat weaker adulticides than the conventional broad-spectrum compounds. Bacillus thuringiensis, indoxacarb, and emamectin benzoate were shown to control A. vacinii primarily through their larvicidal activity. Spinosad was toxic to all life stages, including eggs laid on top of residues and those that were treated topically, but larvicidal activity was short lived. The growth regulators pyriproxyfen and novaluron had strong ovicidal activity when eggs were laid on top of residues but had limited larvicidal activity. Tebufenozide was not directly toxic to eggs, but demonstrated larvicidal activity, and ovilarvicidal activity when topically applied to eggs. Azinphosmethyl, phosmet, indoxacarb, thiacloprid, and acetamiprid were all toxic to the egg parasitoid Trichogramma minutum Riley. In contrast pyriproxyfen, emamectin benzoate, methomyl, novaluron, and spinosad did not negatively affect the survival of T. minutum within Acrobasis vacinii eggs. These results help inform the ongoing development of integrated strategies for insect management in blueberry.

  12. In vivo assessment of closantel ovicidal activity in Fasciola hepatica eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, María Victoria; Mera y Sierra, Roberto; Scarcella, Silvana; Neira, Gisela; Solana, Hugo Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance in livestock parasites is currently a worldwide problem. Fasciola hepatica is a cosmopolitan parasite which causes considerable loss in sheep and cattle production systems all over the world. Chemotherapy is currently the main tool available for its control. The intensive use of triclabendazole, the drug of choice for more than 20 years, has resulted in the development of resistant strains. The therapeutic options are adulticides such as closantel (salicylanilide anthelmintic that binds extensively to plasma albumin) to treat chronic fascioliasis in sheep, and cattle. In the present work, an Egg Hatch Assay (EHA) and morphometric studies were used to evaluate in vivo the ovicidal activity and morphology F. hepatica eggs, recovered from closantel treated sheep collected at different time intervals post treatment. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.0001) were observed in egg morphometry between the control and the treated groups in all the parameters studied. Eggs recovered from treated animals tend to be narrower and longer. Significant differences were found in the embryonation and hatching of eggs between 36 h post treatment (32, 5%) vs. approximately 85% in control, 12 h and 24 h post treatment. Our results confirm that closantel affects in vivo the normal development of the eggs. As one of the first effects, this drug affects the performance of the trematode's reproductive physiology. Even though closantel treated animals may still eliminate eggs in the first days post treatment, these are not viable.

  13. Mosquitocidal and Oviposition Repellent Activities of the Extracts of Seaweed Bryopsis pennata on Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Xin Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing threat from infectious diseases and the development of insecticide resistance in mosquito populations drive the global search for new natural insecticides. The aims of this study were to evaluate the mosquitocidal activity of the extracts of seaweed Bryopsis pennata against dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and determine the seaweed’s toxic effect on brine shrimp nauplii (as a non-target organism. In addition, the chemical compositions of the active larvicidal extract and fraction were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Chloroform extract exhibited strong ovicidal activity (with LC50 values of 229.3 and 250.5 µg/mL and larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. The larvicidal potential of chloroform extract was further ascertained when its A7 fraction exhibited strong toxic effect against Ae. aegypti (LC50 = 4.7 µg/mL and Ae. albopictus (LC50 = 5.3 µg/mL. LC-MS analysis of the chloroform extract gave a tentative identification of 13 compounds; Bis-(3-oxoundecyl tetrasulfide was identified as the major compound in A7 fraction. Methanol extract showed strong repellent effect against female oviposition, along with weak adulticidal activity against mosquito and weak toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii. The mosquitocidal results of B. pennata suggest further investigation for the development of effective insecticide.

  14. Survey on the Ability of Wolbachia to Control Human Viral, Protozoan, and Filarial Disease Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garedaghi Yagoob

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filariasis, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility, and survival. However, in arthropods, Wolbachia are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Materials and Methods: Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. Results: In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Conclusion: Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus, Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont, offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases.

  15. Insecticidal and repellent activity of Hiptage benghalensis L. Kruz (Malpighiaceae) against mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalrotluanga; Ngente, Lalchawimawii; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar; Guruswami, Gurusubramanian

    2012-09-01

    Plant-based insecticides for vector control are urgently needed for Anopheles barbirostris, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Aedes albopictus which are the primary vectors of malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue, respectively, in India and other South East Asian countries. In the present study, larvicidal, adulticidal, and repellent activities of acetone root bark extract of Hiptage benghalensis were tested against the larvae and adults of the three mosquito vectors. The acetone root bark extracts of H. benghalensis was more effective as larvicides with low LC(50) (11.15-16.78 ppm) and LT50 (1.25-4.84 h at 200 and 400 ppm) values. Results of log probit analysis (at 95 % confidence level) and regression analysis of crude acetone root bark extract of H. benghalensis revealed that lethal concentration (LC(50)) values gradually decreased with the exposure periods; lethal time (LT(50)) decreased with the concentration, and the mortality is positively correlated with the concentration. The order of susceptibility of the three mosquito species was as follows: A. albopictus > A. barbirostris > C. quinquefascitus. Biochemical changes were also evidenced in third instar larvae of three mosquito species following a sublethal exposure for 24 h. The level of sugar, glycogen, lipids, and proteins was significantly (P larvicide against A. albopictus, A. barbirostris, and C. quinquefascitus, which can be recommended to control these mosquito species on its breeding site. However, further investigations are needed to confirm the lethal effects of H. benghalensis in field conditions and its impact on the nontarget organisms.

  16. Comparative Effectiveness of Insecticides for Use Against the House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae): Determination of Resistance Levels on a Malaysian Poultry Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Song-Quan; Ahmad, Hamdan; Jaal, Zairi; Rus, Adanan Che

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicology of two commercial larvicides--cyromazine (Neporex 50SP) and ChCy (combination of chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin, Naga 505)--and five commercial adulticides--thiamethoxam (Agita 10WG), cyfluthrin (Responsar WP), lambda-cyhalothrin (Icon 2.8EC), fipronil (Regent 50SC), and imidacloprid (Toxilat 10WP)--was examined against the WHO/VCRU (World Health Organization/ Vector Control Research Unit) susceptible strain and the AYTW (Ayer Tawar) field strain of house fly, Musca domestica L. These pesticides were administered topically, in the diet, or as a dry residue treatment on plywood. Probit analysis using at least five concentrations and the concentration that was lethal to 50% (LC(50)) of the organisms was applied to compare the toxicology and resistance levels of the AYTW population to different insecticides. In the larvicide laboratory study, ChCy was more effective than cyromazine, with a significantly lower LC(50) value when administered topically or in the diet, although the AYTW population was susceptible to both larvicides with a resistance ratio (RR) activity, which significantly reduced adult fly numbers compared with the control group. Cyfluthrin and fipronil were also confirmed to be effective, with a significant reduction in adult fly numbers compared with the control group.

  17. Insecticidal and repellent activity of Clausena dentata (Rutaceae) plant extracts against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Govindaraju; Karthi, Sengodan; Muthusamy, Ranganathan; Natarajan, Devarajan; Shivakumar, Muthugounder Subramanian

    2015-03-01

    Mosquito control is facing a threat due to the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol agents. The present study is to evaluate adulticidal activity of Clausena dentata plant extract against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. The highest mortality was found in acetone extracts against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 4.1783 mg/ml (3.8201-7.1026), 9.3884 mg/ml (7. 8258-13.1820) and 4.2451 mg/ml (3.8547-8.0254), 12.3214 mg/ml (10.9287-16.2220), respectively. Smoke toxicity was observed at 10-min interval for 40 min, and the mortality data were recorded. Result shows that Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus are 85 ± 2 and 89 ± 1.5, respectively. A mortality of 100 % was recorded in the commercial mosquito control. These results suggest that the leaf extracts of C. dentata have a potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquitoes.

  18. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Insecticidal Activities of Hedychium Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanniah Rajasekaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of these oils were tested against Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae, and C. gloeosporioides, and three insects, the azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta. Hedychium oils were rich in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, especially 1,8-cineole (0.1%–42%, linalool (<0.1%–56%, a-pinene (3%–17%, b-pinene (4%–31%, and (E-nerolidol (0.1%–20%. Hedychium oils had no antifungal effect on C. gloeosporioides, C. fragariae, and C. acutatum, but most Hedychium oils effectively killed azalea lace bugs. The oils also show promise as an adult mosquito repellent, but they would make rather poor larvicides or adulticides for mosquito control. Hedychium oils acted either as a fire ant repellent or attractant, depending on plant genotype and oil concentration.

  19. Lethal effects of Aspergillus niger against mosquitoes vector of filaria, malaria, and dengue: a liquid mycoadulticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gavendra; Prakash, Soam

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is a fungus of the genus Aspergillus. It has caused a disease called black mold on certain fruits and vegetables. The culture filtrates released from the A. niger ATCC 66566 were grown in Czapek dox broth (CDB) then filtered with flash chromatograph and were used for the bioassay after a growth of thirty days. The result demonstrated these mortalities with LC(50), LC(90), and LC(99) values of Culex quinquefasciatus 0.76, 3.06, and 4.75, Anopheles stephensi 1.43, 3.2, and 3.86, and Aedes aegypti 1.43, 2.2, and 4.1 μl/cm(2), after exposure of seven hours. We have calculated significant LT(90) values of Cx. quinquefasciatus 4.5, An. stephensi 3.54, and Ae. aegypti 6.0 hrs, respectively. This liquid spray of fungal culture isolate of A. niger can reduce malaria, dengue, and filarial transmission. These results significantly support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond chemical adulticides.

  20. Antifilarial activity of Zoanthus species (Phylum Coelenterata, Class Anthzoa) against human lymphatic filaria, Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V; Saxena, A; Pandey, K; Bajpai, Preeti; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2004-07-01

    The chloroform methanol (1:1) extract of an unidentified green zoanthus (Phylum Coelenterata, Class Anthozoa) showed promising in vitro adulticidal activity with a lethal concentration of 125 microg/ml on Brugia malayi. This extract brought about a 52.2% reduction in circulating microfilariae of B. malayi when administered to infected Mastomys coucha at 250 mg/kg, orally for 5 consecutive days. Further fractionation of the extract led to the recovery of four fractions, which were evaluated simultaneously in both in vitro and in vivo systems against B. malayi. The chloroform fraction at 250 mg/kg orally for 5 days exhibited the highest macrofilaricidal action (42.5%), closely followed by the insoluble n-butanol fraction (34.3%), the soluble hexane fraction (32.4%), and the soluble n-butanol fraction (20.4%). In addition, the hexane soluble fraction caused 44.3% sterilization of the surviving female parasites. Two compounds isolated were found devoid of antifilarial activity.

  1. Lethal Effects of Aspergillus niger against Mosquitoes Vector of Filaria, Malaria, and Dengue: A Liquid Mycoadulticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus niger is a fungus of the genus Aspergillus. It has caused a disease called black mold on certain fruits and vegetables. The culture filtrates released from the A. niger ATCC 66566 were grown in Czapek dox broth (CDB then filtered with flash chromatograph and were used for the bioassay after a growth of thirty days. The result demonstrated these mortalities with LC50, LC90, and LC99 values of Culex quinquefasciatus 0.76, 3.06, and 4.75, Anopheles stephensi 1.43, 3.2, and 3.86, and Aedes aegypti 1.43, 2.2, and 4.1 μl/cm2, after exposure of seven hours. We have calculated significant LT90 values of Cx. quinquefasciatus 4.5, An. stephensi 3.54, and Ae. aegypti 6.0 hrs, respectively. This liquid spray of fungal culture isolate of A. niger can reduce malaria, dengue, and filarial transmission. These results significantly support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond chemical adulticides.

  2. Anthelmintic activity of continuous low doses of fenbendazole into the rumen of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvenue, R J; Colestock, E L; Hendrix, J C

    1988-01-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) was continuously infused for 30 days into the rumen of 103 lambs which had mature or developing benzimidazole-susceptible or thiabendazole-resistant Haemonchus contortus and susceptible Trichostrongylus colubriformis infections. Ovicidal, larvicidal and adulticidal activities were exhibited against benzimidazole-susceptible and benzimidazole-resistant H. contortus worms by FBZ at a dose level of greater than or equal to 0.2 mg kg-1 body weight day-1. Reasonably consistent high level efficacy against H. contortus was obtained with dose levels greater than 0.4 mg kg-1. Excellent control of susceptible T. colubriformis worms was achieved with the lowest dose tested of 0.4 mg kg-1 day-1. The intraruminal infusion critical study method is a tool to determine the feasibility of incorporating a candidate anthelmintic compound in a continuous sustained-release rumen device formulation. The anthelmintic profile of FBZ obtained by low-level intraruminal administration suggests that it would be a potential candidate.

  3. Assessment of emerging contaminants including organophosphate esters and pyrethroids during DISCOVER-AQ in Houston, Texas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Sascha; Clark, Addie; Sheesley, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is a NASA-funded air quality research program that focused on Houston, Texas, United States in September 2013. In conjunction with DISCOVER-AQ, particulate matter was collected for the month of September from four ground-based sampling sites across the Houston metropolitan area. The Houston metropolitan area is one of the most populous cities in the United States. Sampling sites included an upwind and downwind site as well as an urban (i.e. downtown) and industrial/port areas (i.e. Houston Ship Channel). Particulate matter samples were collected to examine both spatial and temporal trends (including day versus night). Particulate matter was collected on quartz fiber filters, which were analyzed for emerging classes of concern including organophosphate esters (OPEs; including flame retardants) and pyrethroids. OPEs have in recent years increased in both use and production as they replaced polybrominated diphenyl ethers flame retardants. Permethrin is one of the most commonly used mosquito adulticides in the United States.

  4. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE LARVAE OF TWO WILD STRAINS OF ANOPHELES STEPHENSI TO EIGHT INSECTICIDES, IN SOUTH OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Ladonni

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of two wild strains of An. stepliens, collected from Kazeroun (ST-K.Az and Bandar-Abbas (ST-BAN, south of Iran was compared to fenthion, malathion, temephos , pirimiphos, methyk, deltamethrth, DDT dimilin and etopenprox as larvicides in the laboratory. Susceptibility test on the ST-KAZ strain indicated that this strain is susceptible to the named insecticides i.e. the resistance ratios remained between 0.91 to 1.37 folds that of the ST-TEH strain, the susceptible laboratory stock .The ST-BAN strain has the long history of insecticide — application like, DDT, dieldrin, malathion, propoxur, actellic lambdacyhalotith(icon as adulicides and abate as a larvicide, therefor it showed different pattern of susceptibility to the latter insecticides. The ST-BAN strain showed susceptibility to DDT, deltamethrjn, etofenprox and dimilin, moderately tolerant to fenthion and temephos (i.e.reslstance ratios ranged between 1.67 to 1.75 folds and tolerant to Pirimiphos~methyl and malathion with resistance ratio of about 2.37 folds , that of the ST-TEH strain. The observer’s tolerance in the ST-DAN strain to Pmmiphos-methyl (actellic and malathion might be as the result of regular use of adulticides or abate in malaria control programs in south of Iran and develop of cross-tolerance in An.stephensj from Bandar-Abbas south of Iran.

  5. Understanding feline heartworm infection: disease, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice C Y; Atkins, Clarke E

    2010-11-01

    Feline heartworm disease is a very different clinical entity from canine heartworm disease. In cats, the arrival and death of immature heartworms in the pulmonary arteries can cause coughing and dyspnea as early as 3 months postinfection. Adult heartworms suppress the function of pulmonary intravascular macrophages and thus reduce clinical disease in chronic feline heartworm infection. Approximately 80% of asymptomatic cats self-cure. Median survival time for symptomatic cats is 1.5 years, or 4 years if only cats living beyond the day of presentation are considered. Aberrant worm migration is more frequent than it is in dogs, and sudden death can occur with no prior clinical signs. The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia likely contributes to the inflammatory pathology of heartworm disease, but its role is not yet fully clear. Unfortunately, the diagnosis, treatment, and management of feline heartworm disease are far from simple. Antemortem diagnosis is hampered by low worm burdens, the frequency of all-male infections, and nonspecific radiographic lesions. It is up to the veterinarian to determine the correct index of suspicion and choose the right combination of diagnostic tests to achieve an answer. Treatment is symptomatic because adulticide therapy is risky and does not increase survival time. Despite the dangers of feline heartworm disease, less than 5% of cats in the United States are on chemoprophylaxis. It is important for veterinarians to take a proactive preventive stance because heartworm infection in cats is a multisystemic disease that has no easy cure.

  6. Feline heartworm disease: A'Rubik's-cube-like' diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, L; Marchesotti, F; Manzocchi, S

    2015-12-01

    Feline heartworm disease presents a unique diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive challenge for veterinarians. Due to the elusive clinical nature and peculiar physiopathology of heartworm infection in cats, a multistep diagnostic process is mandatory. Clinical signs may be absent or atypical. At the present time there is no single ante mortem diagnostic test that can reach a high level of sensitivity for feline heartworm infection. The most efficient approach for the diagnosis of feline heartworm disease is based upon a synergic association of several tests: thoracic radiography and serum antibody tests for rising index of suspicion, and echocardiography and serum antigen tests for confirming the infection. Other tests should be considered of secondary importance, even if they can help to support the diagnosis. Treatment of feline heartworm disease is typically based on clinical signs, as adulticidal therapy is associated with a high rate of complications and cats frequently self-cure. Chemoprophylaxis, knowledge of the biology of the parasite, and a high index of suspicion seem to be the most important tools for combating feline heartworm disease.

  7. Efficacy of female Culex quinquefasciatus with entomopathogenic fungus Fusarium pallidoroseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Suman Sundar; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Rai, Usha; Dash, Aditya Prasad

    2008-06-01

    This study was conducted to isolate and identify natural entomopathogenic fungi from female Culex quinquefasciatus and to test their adulticidal activity. Field-collected female C. quinquefasciatus died early and were placed on a Saboraud's dextrose agar plates for growth and isolation of natural entomopathogenic fungi. The plates were maintained in an incubator at 24+/-2 degrees C for 3 days. Four fungal species were isolated in two genera namely, Aspergillus and Fusarium. The identified fungal species were A. niger, A. flavus, A. nidulans var acristatus (ITCC-6327.04), and F. pallidoroseum (ITCC-6324.06). Adult bioassays were carried out using spore-impregnated paper in WHO-holding tubes. F. pallidoroseum was found to be more effective than the others. Exposure of C. quinquefasciatus to spores of A. flavus and A. niger for 4 h caused 5.53% and 5.51% mortality in the mosquitoes within a week, respectively. All the female C. quinquefasciatus were killed within 4 days of exposure to F. pallidoroseum at a concentration of 1.11 x 10(10) conidia per m2. Significant difference of longevity was observed between the F. pallidoroseum-treated C. quinquefasciatus and control mosquitoes. The LT50 of F. pallidoroseum was 2.08 days for 4 h exposure to C. quinquefasciatus. Results of the present study confirm that F. pallidoroseum is one of the alternative biological control agents of adult mosquitoes.

  8. Efficacy of fipronil combined with permethrin commercial spot on (Effitix) preventing Culex pipiens from feeding on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, Michel; Lienard, Emmanuel; Jacquiet, Philippe; Bonneau, Stephane; Bouhsira, Emilie

    2015-06-01

    A controlled clinical trial was carried out to assess the adulticidal and anti-feeding effectiveness of a spot-on combining fipronil and permethrin (Effitix, Virbac, Carros, France) in preventing Culex pipiens from feeding on dogs. Twelve dogs with equal sensitivity to mosquitoes were included in the study and divided into two groups of six dogs: an untreated control group and a group treated with Effitix. All dogs were challenged with 80 females C. pipiens for 90 ± 5 min on days -7, 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 (day 0 being treatment day). The number of engorged, dead, and live mosquitoes was determined after each exposure to treated and untreated dogs. Dead mosquitoes were also counted 24 h after exposure. The anti-feeding effect of the spot-on formulation was 100, 99.5, 97.7, 98.3, and 96.7% on days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28, respectively. The mortality effect was 66.6, 55.9, 38, 17.2, and 12.3% on days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28, respectively. At each challenge point, the mortality and anti-feeding effects on mosquitoes were significantly different between the control and treated group (p < 0.05). The results indicate that a combination of permethrin and fipronil could be used as an effective mosquito control strategy in dogs and is therefore recommended for use in a dirofilariasis prevention program.

  9. Larvicidal potentiality, longevity and fecundity inhibitory activities of Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV on vector mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjunan Nareshkumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intervention measures to control the transmission of vector-borne diseases include control of the vector population. In mosquito control, synthetic insecticides used against both the larvae (larvicides and adults (adulticides create numerous problems, such as environmental pollution, insecticide resistance and toxic hazards to humans. In the present study, a bacterial pesticide, Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV, was used to control the dengue and filarial vectors, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV was very effective against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, showing significant larval mortality. Evaluated lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC90 were age-dependent, with early instars requiring a lower concentration compared with later stages of mosquitoes. Culex quinquefasciatus was more susceptible to Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV than was Aedes aegypti. Fecundity rate was highly reduced after treatment with different concentrations of Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV. Larval and pupal longevity both decreased after treatment with Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV, total number of days was lower in the B. sphaericus treatments compared with the control. Our results show the bacterial pesticide Bacillus sphaericus (Bs G3-IV to be an effective mosquito control agent that can be used for more integrated pest management programs.

  10. Wolbachia endosymbionts and human disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatko, Barton E; Luck, Ashley N; Dobson, Stephen L; Foster, Jeremy M

    2014-07-01

    Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filaria, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility and survival, whereas in arthropods, they are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as Dengue, Chikungunya, Yellow Fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Furthermore, Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases.

  11. Mosquitocidal and Oviposition Repellent Activities of the Extracts of Seaweed Bryopsis pennata on Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Xin; Wong, Ching-Lee; Ahmad, Rohani; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing threat from infectious diseases and the development of insecticide resistance in mosquito populations drive the global search for new natural insecticides. The aims of this study were to evaluate the mosquitocidal activity of the extracts of seaweed Bryopsis pennata against dengue vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and determine the seaweed's toxic effect on brine shrimp nauplii (as a non-target organism). In addition, the chemical compositions of the active larvicidal extract and fraction were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Chloroform extract exhibited strong ovicidal activity (with LC50 values of 229.3 and 250.5 µg/mL) and larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. The larvicidal potential of chloroform extract was further ascertained when its A7 fraction exhibited strong toxic effect against Ae. aegypti (LC50 = 4.7 µg/mL) and Ae. albopictus (LC50 = 5.3 µg/mL). LC-MS analysis of the chloroform extract gave a tentative identification of 13 compounds; Bis-(3-oxoundecyl) tetrasulfide was identified as the major compound in A7 fraction. Methanol extract showed strong repellent effect against female oviposition, along with weak adulticidal activity against mosquito and weak toxicity against brine shrimp nauplii. The mosquitocidal results of B. pennata suggest further investigation for the development of effective insecticide.

  12. Acaricidal activity of essential oils from Lippia alba genotypes and its major components carvone, limonene, and citral against Rhipicephalus microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Magna Galvão; Costa-Júnior, Livio Martins; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Lima, Aldilene da Silva; Menezes, Thays Saynara Alves; Santos, Darlisson de Alexandria; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Bacci, Leandro; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima

    2015-05-30

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the acaricidal potential of Lippia alba essential oil, citral chemotypes (LA-10 and LA-44 genotypes) and carvone chemotypes (LA-13 and LA-57 genotypes), as well as purified citral and enantiomers of carvone and limonene. Efficacy against Rhipicephalus microplus was assessed by the larval packet and the engorged female immersion tests. Citral chemotypes had greater larvicidal activity than carvone chemotypes, and this was further supported by larvicidal and adulticidal activity of purified citral with LC50 values of 7.0 and 29.8 mg/mL, respectively. While purified enantiomers of carvone exhibited greater larvicidal activity than those of limonene, enantioselectivity of limonene was observed with R-(+) displaying significantly higher efficacy (LC50 of 31.2mg/mL) than S-(-) (LC50 of 54.5mg/mL). The essential oils and purified compounds were much less toxic toward engorged adult females, with the exception of citral, and this may be due to limited cuticular penetration.

  13. The combination of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae with the insecticide Imidacloprid increases virulence against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuels Richard I

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, is one of the most rapidly spreading insect borne diseases, stimulating the search for alternatives to current control measures. The dengue vector A. aegypti has received less attention than anophelene species, although more than 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection worldwide. Entomopathogenic fungi are emerging as potential candidates for the control of mosquitoes. Here we continue our studies on the pathogenicity of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae against adult A. aegypti females. With the aim of further reducing mean survival times of A. aegypti exposed to fungus impregnated surfaces, a sub-lethal concentration of the neonicotinoid insecticide Imidacloprid (IMI was added to fungal suspensions. Results A sub-lethal concentration of IMI that did not significantly alter the daily survival rates or mean survival percentages of mosquitoes was identified to be 0.1 ppm. This sub-lethal concentration was combined with M. anisopliae conidia (1 × 109 conidia mL-1. Both the combined treatment and the conidia alone were able to reduce the survival of A. aegypti compared with untreated or IMI treated mosquitoes. Importantly, mosquito survival following exposure to the combined treatment for 6 and 12 hrs was significantly reduced when compared with mosquitoes exposed to conidia alone. Conclusions This is the first time that a combination of an insecticide and an entomopathogenic fungus has been tested against A. aegypti. Firstly, the study showed the potential of IMI as an alternative to the currently employed pyrethroid adulticides. Secondly, as an alternative to applications of high concentrations of chemical insecticides, we suggest that adult A. aegypti could be controlled by surface application of entomopathogenic fungi and that the efficiency of these fungi could be increased by combining the fungi with ultra-low concentrations of insecticides

  14. Alkaloids with Activity against the Zika Virus Vector Aedes aegypti (L.—Crinsarnine and Sarniensinol, Two New Crinine and Mesembrine Type Alkaloids Isolated from the South African Plant Nerine sarniensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids, belonging to the mesembrine- and crinine-types, named crinsarnine (1 and sarniensinol (2, were isolated from the dried bulbs of Nerine sarniensis together with bowdensine (3, sarniensine (4, hippadine (5 and 1-O-acetyl-lycorine (6. Crinsarnine (1 and sarniensinol (2 were characterized using spectroscopic and chiroptical methods as (1S,2S,4aR,10bS-2,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4,4a,6-hexahydro-5,11b-ethano[1,3]dioxolo-[4,5-j]phenanthridin-1-yl acetate and (6-(3aR,4Z,6S,7aS-6-methoxy-1-methyl-2,3,3a,6,7,7a-hexa-hydro-1H-indol-3a-ylbenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-ylmethanol, respectively. Furthermore, the complete spectroscopic characterization of bowdensine (3 is reported for the first time. Compounds 1–6 were evaluated against the Orlando reference strain of Aedes aegypti. None of compounds showed mortality against 1st instar Ae. aegypti larvae at the concentrations tested. In adult topical bioassays, only 1 displayed adulticidal activity with an LD50 = 2.29 ± 0.049 μg/mosquito. As regards the structure-activity relationship, the pretazettine and crinine scaffold in 2 and 4 and in 1 and 3 respectively, proved to be important for their activity, while the pyrrole[de]phenanthridine scaffold present in 5 and 6 was important for their reactivity. Among the pretazettine group compounds, opening of the B ring or the presence of a B ring lactone as well as the trans-stereochemistry of the A/B ring junction, appears to be important for activity, while in crinine-type alkaloids, the substituent at C-2 seems to play a role in their activity.

  15. Area-Wide Ground Applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis for the Control of Aedes albopictus in Residential Neighborhoods: From Optimization to Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gregory M.; Faraji, Ary; Unlu, Isik; Healy, Sean P.; Farooq, Muhammad; Gaugler, Randy; Hamilton, George; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing range of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, in the USA and the threat of chikungunya and dengue outbreaks vectored by this species have necessitated novel approaches to control this peridomestic mosquito. Conventional methods such as adulticiding provide temporary relief, but fail to manage this pest on a sustained basis. We explored the use of cold aerosol foggers and misting machines for area-wide applications of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (VectoBac WDG) as a larvicide targeting Aedes albopictus. During 2010–2013 we performed initially open field trials and then 19 operational area-wide applications in urban and suburban residential areas in northeastern USA to test three truck-mounted sprayers at two application rates. Area-wide applications of WDG in open field conditions at 400 and 800 g/ha killed on average 87% of tested larvae. Once techniques were optimized in residential areas, applications with a Buffalo Turbine Mist Sprayer at a rate of 800 g/ha, the best combination, consistently provided over 90% mortality. Importantly, there was no significant decrease in efficacy with distance from the spray line even in blocks of row homes with trees and bushes in the backyards. Under laboratory conditions Bti deposition in bioassay cups during the operational trials resulted in over 6 weeks of residual control. Our results demonstrate that area-wide truck mounted applications of WDG can effectively suppress Ae. albopictus larvae and should be used in integrated mosquito management approaches to control this nuisance pest and disease vector. PMID:25329314

  16. Evaluation of Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn. Extract against Aedes aegypti L. and Aedes albopictus (Skuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn extract were evaluated against dengue vectors in the laboratory."nMethods: Both Bifenthrin and Acorus calamus Linn crude hexane extract were bioassayed against the adults and larval stages of dengue vectors Aedes aegypti L. and Aedes albopictus(Skuse in the laboratory."nResults: The A. calamus crude hexane extract exhibited a larvicidal activity against 4th-instar Ae. aegypti larvae with LC50 and LC90 values of 0.4418 and 11.3935 ppm respectively. The plant crude extract exhibited against Ae. albopictus larvae with a higher LC50 and LC90 values of 21.2555 ppm and 36.1061 ppm, respectively. There was a significant difference on the effect of A. calamus extract on both Aedes spp. Larvae (P< 0.05. However, bifenthrin showed a significant difference on larvicidal effect to that of A. calamus hexane extract on both Aedes spp (P< 0.05. In testing the adulticidal activity, this plant extract exhibited the LC50 and LC90 values of 17.4075 and 252.9458 ppm against Ae .aegypti and a higher LC50 and LC90 values of 43.9952 and 446.1365 ppm respectively on Ae. albopictus. There was no significant difference on the effect of A. calamus extract on both Aedes spp adults (P> 0.05."nConclusion: Bifenthrin however showed a significant difference on both Aedes spp adults (P< 0.05. With the wide availability of A. calamus in Malaysia, it could be utilized for controlling dengue vectors. "n 

  17. Impact of Terminalia chebula Retz. against Aedes aegypti L. and non-target aquatic predatory insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Vasantha-Srinivasan, Prabhakaran; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Edwin, Edward-Sam; Ponsankar, Athirstam; Chellappandian, Muthiah; Selin-Rani, Selvaraj; Lija-Escaline, Jalasteen; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy

    2017-03-01

    Aedes aegypti Linn is one of the most important mosquito species. The vectors are responsible for causing deadly diseases like dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Several chemical pesticides used to control these dengue vectors caused severe toxic significances on human health and other non-target beneficial insects. Therefore the current investigation has been made to access the bio-efficacy of the crude seed extracts of T. chebula against the dengue vector Ae. aegypti. The GC-MS analysis of crude seed extracts of T. chebula identified nine chemical compounds with major peak area in the 1,2,3-Benzenetriol (61.96%), followed by Tridecanoic acid (09.55%). Ae. aegypti larvae showed dose dependent mortality rate was observed between the treatments. Prominent protection rate at greater concentrations of 100ppm and moderate protection at 75 and 50ppm was observed in the repellent assay. Lethal concentration (LC50 and LC90) of fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti was observed in 138 and 220ppm concentration respectively. Similarly, the seed extracts showed 100% adulticidal activity at the concentration of 400ppm at 30min of exposure time. Phytochemicals present in the seed extracts of T. chebula significantly affects the major portions of the midgut tissues of Ae. aegypti at the concentration of 100ppm. The toxicological evaluation of seed extracts also proved non-toxic towards the A. bouvieri and Tx. splendens aquatic predatory insects. Hence, the present result suggest that bio-rational plant derived T. chebula could be incorporated in the dengue vector control and have no adverse effects on non-target beneficial insects.

  18. Larvicidal and irritant activities of hexane leaf extracts of Citrus sinensis against dengue vector Aedes aegypti L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Radhika Warikoo; Ankita Ray; Jasdeep Kaur Sandhu; Roopa Samal; Naim Wahab; Sarita Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To assess the larvicidal and irritant activities of the hexane extracts of leaves of Citrus sinensis (C. sinensis) against the early fourth instars and female adults of Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti). Methods: The larvicidal potential of the prepared leaf extract was evaluated against early fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti using WHO protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 h and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. The efficacy of extract as mosquito irritant was assessed by contact irritancy assays. Extract-impregnated paper was placed on a glass plate over which a perspex funnel with a hole on the top was kept inverted. Single female adult, 3-day old unfed/blood-fed, was released inside the funnel. After 3 min of acclimatization time, the time taken for the first take-off and total number of flights undertaken during 15 min were scored. Results: The citrus leaf extracts from hexane possessed moderate larvicidal efficiency against dengue vector. The bioassays resulted in an LC50 and LC90 value of 446.84 and 1 370.96 ppm, respectively after 24 h of exposure. However, the extracts were proved to be remarkable irritant against adults Ae. aegypti, more pronounced effects being observed on blood-fed females than unfed females. The extract-impregnated paper was thus proved to be 7-11 times more irritable as compared with the control paper. Conclusions:The hexane extracts from C. sinensis leaves are proved to be reasonably larvicidal but remarkably irritant against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of extract as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the extract could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control.

  19. Bioefficacy ofMentha piperita essential oil against dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarita Kumar; Naim Wahab; Radhika Warikoo

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To assess the larvicidal and repellent potential of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of peppermint plant,Mentha piperita (M. piperita) against the larval and adult stages of Aedes aegypti (Ae. Aegypti).Methods: The larvicidal potential of peppermint oil was evaluated against early fourth instar larvae ofAe. aegypti usingWHO protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 and48 h, and LC50 and LC90values were calculated. The efficacy of peppermint oil as mosquito repellent was assessed using the human-bait technique. The measured area of one arm of a human volunteer was applied with the oil and the other arm was applied with ethanol. The mosquito bites on both the arms were recorded for3 min after every15 min. The experiment continued for 3 h and the percent protection was calculated.Results:The essential oil extracted fromM. piperita possessed excellent larvicidal efficiency against dengue vector. The bioassays showed an LC50 and LC90 value of111.9 and295.18 ppm, respectively after24 h of exposure. The toxicity of the oil increased11.8% when the larvae were exposed to the oil for48 h. The remarkable repellent properties ofM. piperita essential oil were established against adults Ae. aegypti. The application of oil resulted in100% protection till150 min. After next30min, only1-2 bites were recorded as compared with8-9 bites on the control arm.Conclusions:The peppermint essential oil is proved to be efficient larvicide and repellent against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of oil as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the oil could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control.

  20. Susceptibility profile of Aedes aegypti from Santiago Island, Cabo Verde, to insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Hélio Daniel Ribeiro; Paiva, Marcelo Henrique Santos; Silva, Norma Machado; de Araújo, Ana Paula; Camacho, Denise dos Reis da Rosa de Azevedo; Moura, Aires Januário Fernandes da; Gómez, Lara Ferrero; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira; Santos, Maria Alice Varjal de Melo

    2015-12-01

    In 2009, Cabo Verde diagnosed the first dengue cases, with 21,137 cases reported and Aedes aegypti was identified as the vector. Since the outbreak, chemical insecticides and source reduction were used to control the mosquito population. This study aimed to assess the susceptibility of A. aegypti populations from Santiago, Cabo Verde to insecticides and identify the mechanisms of resistance. Samples of A. aegypti eggs were obtained at two different time periods (2012 and 2014), using ovitraps in different locations in Santiago Island to establish the parental population. F1 larvae were exposed to different concentrations of insecticides (Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis (Bti), diflubenzuron and temephos) to estimate the lethal concentrations (LC90) and calculate the respective rate of resistance (RR90). Semi-field tests using temephos-ABATE(®) were performed to evaluate the persistence of the product. Bottle tests using female mosquitoes were carried out to determine the susceptibility to the adulticides malathion, cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to investigate the presence of metabolic resistance mechanisms, associated with the enzymes glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), esterases and mixed-function oxidases (MFO) and to detect mutations or alterations in the sodium channel and acetylcholinesterase genes. A. aegypti mosquitoes from Santiago exhibited resistance to deltamethrin, cypermethrin (mortalityaegypti population from Santiago is resistant to two major insecticides used for vector control, deltamethrin and temephos. To our knowledge, this is the first report of temephos resistance in an African A. aegypti population. The low level of temephos resistance was maintained from 2012-2014, which suggested the imposition of selective pressure, although it was not possible to identify the resistance mechanisms involved. These data show that the potential failures in the local mosquito control program are not

  1. The Impact of Selection with Diflubenzuron, a Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor, on the Fitness of Two Brazilian Aedes aegypti Field Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, Thiago Affonso; Valle, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Several Aedes aegypti field populations are resistant to neurotoxic insecticides, mainly organophoshates and pyrethroids, which are extensively used as larvicides and adulticides, respectively. Diflubenzuron (DFB), a chitin synthesis inhibitor (CSI), was recently approved for use in drinking water, and is presently employed in Brazil for Ae. aegypti control, against populations resistant to the organophosphate temephos. However, tests of DFB efficacy against field Ae. aegypti populations are lacking. In addition, information regarding the dynamics of CSI resistance, and characterization of any potential fitness effects that may arise in conjunction with resistance are essential for new Ae. aegypti control strategies. Here, the efficacy of DFB was evaluated for two Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations known to be resistant to both temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Laboratory selection for DFB resistance was then performed over six or seven generations, using a fixed dose of insecticide that inhibited 80% of adult emergence in the first generation. The selection process was stopped when adult emergence in the diflubenzuron-treated groups was equivalent to that of the control groups, kept without insecticide. Diflubenzuron was effective against the two Ae. aegypti field populations evaluated, regardless of their resistance level to neurotoxic insecticides. However, only a few generations of DFB selection were sufficient to change the susceptible status of both populations to this compound. Several aspects of mosquito biology were affected in both selected populations, indicating that diflubenzuron resistance acquisition is associated with a fitness cost. We believe that these results can significantly contribute to the design of control strategies involving the use of insect growth regulators.

  2. Bioefficacy of Mentha piperita essential oil against dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sarita; Wahab, Naim; Warikoo, Radhika

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the larvicidal and repellent potential of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of peppermint plant, Mentha piperita (M. piperita) against the larval and adult stages of Aedes aegypti (Ae. Aegypti). Methods The larvicidal potential of peppermint oil was evaluated against early fourth instar larvae of Ae. aegypti using WHO protocol. The mortality counts were made after 24 and 48 h, and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. The efficacy of peppermint oil as mosquito repellent was assessed using the human-bait technique. The measured area of one arm of a human volunteer was applied with the oil and the other arm was applied with ethanol. The mosquito bites on both the arms were recorded for 3 min after every 15 min. The experiment continued for 3 h and the percent protection was calculated. Results The essential oil extracted from M. piperita possessed excellent larvicidal efficiency against dengue vector. The bioassays showed an LC50 and LC90 value of 111.9 and 295.18 ppm, respectively after 24 h of exposure. The toxicity of the oil increased 11.8% when the larvae were exposed to the oil for 48 h. The remarkable repellent properties of M. piperita essential oil were established against adults Ae. aegypti. The application of oil resulted in 100% protection till 150 min. After next 30 min, only 1-2 bites were recorded as compared with 8-9 bites on the control arm. Conclusions The peppermint essential oil is proved to be efficient larvicide and repellent against dengue vector. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of oil as adulticide, oviposition deterrent and ovicidal agent. The isolation of active ingredient from the oil could help in formulating strategies for mosquito control. PMID:23569733

  3. Biorational insecticides for control of mosquitoes and black flies in Sinaloa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriano García Gutiérrez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sinaloa Mexico the presence of mosquitoes is a important health problem, and each spring-summer season appear several species which include: Aedes aegypti (Linneus, Anopheles albimanus (Wiedemann, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say and black flies of the Simulidae family. The control of larvae and adults of these insects are usually performed with chemical insecticides, so the use of biorational insecticides for control of these insects is novel, due to that have low environment impact. The objective of this work is to give known to the different biorational insecticides and their biological effects (inhibitor, insect repellent, larvicide, adulticide, that can be used to combat to different development stages of these insects. As well as show the progress of a study on the effectiveness of neem extracts, garlic, cinnamon, albahaca and cypermethrin at low doses (0.25,0.5 and 1ml/L, for control of larvae and adults of black flies in the unicipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa. By the mode of action, the biorational that can doing use for the control of theseinsects were: Spinosad, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner var. israeliensis for larvae control, Spinosad and Beauveria bassiana (Vuill. for adults; as well as extracts of neem, garlic, cinnamon and albahaca for both stages. The preliminary results of the study showed that the effectiveness application in tourist sites, through aerial spraying of cypermethrin at low doses and the plants extracts, allow low the index of larvae and infestation of mosquitoes and blackflies, decreasing the discomfort caused by these insects in the place of study.

  4. Choice of optimal biocide combination to control flies (Diptera: Muscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Kavran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Flies – by feeding on decaying matter, human waste and food – have been implicated in the spread of numerous animal and human diseases. Excessive fly populations are generally associated with livestock units and domestic waste due to decaying organic matter. A large number of flies cause extreme disturbance in the behavior of the host, resulting in skin irritation, lesions, wounds, and secondary infections are likely to appear. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of combined applications of larvicide (cyromazine and adulticides (acetamiprid in formulation with pheromone and thiamethoxam on the suppression of fly populations. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on a pig farm. The piglet farms are one of the most favorable places for fly breeding. Three units were used for biocide applications and a fourth unit as the control where biocides were not applied. The monitoring of pre- and post-treatment of adult fly populations was carried out by glued cardboards. The cards were hung on metal rods above piglet’s cage. This monitoring method served as a parameter for the estimation of biological effectiveness. Results. The highest degree of fly control (88.4% mortality 8 days after treatment was achieved when a combination of cyromazine and thiamethoxam was used. A biocide based on sex pheromone (Z-9-tricosene + acetamiprid was the most effective on flies 3 days after biocide application, with a mortality rate of 69.1 %. Thiamethoxam achieved the highest reduction of flies 6 days after treatment, with 78.19% obtained mortality. Conclusion. Biological efficacy of the applied biocides in combination ciromazine + thiamethoxam and thiamethoxam alone was justified.

  5. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  6. Plant-mediated biosynthesis of nanoparticles as an emerging tool against mosquitoes of medical and veterinary importance: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are a key threat for millions of people worldwide, since they act as vectors for devastating parasites and pathogens. Mosquito young instars are usually targeted with organophosphates, insect growth regulators and microbial control agents. Indoors residual spraying and insecticide-treated bed nets are also employed. However, these chemicals have strong negative effects on human health and the environment. Newer and safer tools have been recently implemented to enhance control of mosquitoes. In this review, I focus on characterization, effectiveness, and non-target effects of mosquitocidal nanoparticles synthesized using botanical products (mosquitocidal nanoparticles, MNP). The majority of plant-fabricated MNP are silver ones. The synthesis of MNP is usually confirmed by UV-visualization spectroscopy, followed by scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. Interestingly, plant-synthesized metal nanoparticles have been reported as effective ovicides, larvicides, pupicides, adulticides, and oviposition deterrents against different mosquito species of medical and veterinary importance. Few parts per million of different MNP are highly toxic against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi, the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, and the filariasis mosquito Culex quiquefasciatus. However, despite the growing number of evidences about the effectiveness of MNP, moderate efforts have been carried out to shed light on their possible non-target effects against mosquito's natural enemies and other aquatic organisms. In the final section, particular attention was dedicated to this issue. A number of hot areas that need further research and cooperation among parasitologists and entomologists are highlighted.

  7. Silver nanoparticles: a possibility for malarial and filarial vector control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Namita; Prakash, Soam

    2014-11-01

    Green synthesis technology is one of the rapid, reliable and best routes for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). There are bioactive compounds with enormous potential in Azadirachta indica (Neem). The extraordinary mosquitoes warrant nanotechnology to integrate with novel molecules. This will be sustainable technology for future. Here, we synthesized AgNPs using aqueous extracts of leaves and bark of Az. indica (Neem). We tested AgNPs as larvicides, pupicides and adulticides against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The results were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations varying many hours by probit analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were spherical in shape and with varied sizes (10.47-nm leaf and 19.22-nm bark). The larvae, pupae and adults of filariasis vector C. quinquefasciatus were found to be more susceptible to our AgNPs than the malaria vector An. stephensi. The first and the second instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus show a mortality rate of 100% after 30 min of exposure. The results against the pupa of C. quinquefasciatus were recorded as LC₅₀ 4 ppm, LC₉₀ 11 ppm and LC₉₉ 13 ppm after 3 h of exposure. In the case of adult mosquitoes, LC₅₀ 1.06 μL/cm(2), LC₉₀ 2.13 μL/cm(2) and LC₉₉ 2.4 μL/cm(2) were obtained after 4 h of exposure. These results suggest that our AgNPs are environment-friendly for controlling malarial and filarial vectors.

  8. Eco-friendly control of malaria and arbovirus vectors using the mosquitofish Gambusia affinis and ultra-low dosages of Mimusops elengi-synthesized silver nanoparticles: towards an integrative approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Jayapal; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Dinesh, Devakumar; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Suresh, Udaiyan; Nicoletti, Marcello; Higuchi, Akon; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Kumar, Suresh; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Messing, Russell H; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. However, the use of synthetic insecticides to control Culicidae may lead to high operational costs and adverse non-target effects. Plant-borne compounds have been proposed for rapid extracellular synthesis of mosquitocidal nanoparticles. Their impact against biological control agents of mosquito larval populations has been poorly studied. We synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using the aqueous leaf extract of Mimusops elengi as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The formation of AgNP was studied using different biophysical methods, including UV-vis spectrophotometry, TEM, XRD, EDX and FTIR. Low doses of AgNP showed larvicidal and pupicidal toxicity against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and the arbovirus vector Aedes albopictus. AgNP LC50 against A. stephensi ranged from 12.53 (I instar larvae) to 23.55 ppm (pupae); LC50 against A. albopictus ranged from 11.72 ppm (I) to 21.46 ppm (pupae). In the field, the application of M. elengi extract and AgNP (10 × LC50) led to 100 % larval reduction after 72 h. In adulticidal experiments, AgNP showed LC50 of 13.7 ppm for A. stephensi and 14.7 ppm for A. albopictus. The predation efficiency of Gambusia affinis against A. stephensi and A. albopictus III instar larvae was 86.2 and 81.7 %, respectively. In AgNP-contaminated environments, predation was 93.7 and 88.6 %, respectively. This research demonstrates that M. elengi-synthesized AgNP may be employed at ultra-low doses to reduce larval populations of malaria and arbovirus vectors, without detrimental effects on predation rates of mosquito natural enemies, such as larvivorous fishes.

  9. Feline heartworm disease: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, Annette L; Atwell, Richard B

    2008-04-01

    Feline heartworm disease is caused by the filarial nematode Dirofilaria immitis, and is transmitted by mosquitoes in heartworm-endemic areas worldwide. While dogs are the definitive hosts for this parasite, cats can also be infected, and the overall prevalence in cats is between 5% and 10% of that in dogs in any given area. The spectrum of feline presentations varies from asymptomatic infections to chronic respiratory signs, sometimes accompanied by chronic vomiting to acute death with no premonitory signs. Ante-mortem diagnosis can be challenging and relies on a combination of tests, including antigen and antibody serology, thoracic radiography and echocardiography. As treatment with heartworm adulticidal drugs can be life-threatening and heartworm infection in cats is often self-limiting, infected cats are frequently managed with supportive treatment (corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and anti-emetics). Surgical removal of filariae using extraction devices may be considered in some acute cases where immediate curative treatment is necessary, but filarial breakage during the procedure may result in an acute fatal shock-like reaction. Necropsy findings are mainly pulmonary and include muscular hypertrophy of the pulmonary arteries and arterioles on histopathology. A number of safe and effective macrocytic lactone drugs are available for prophylaxis in cats. These drugs can kill a range of larval and adult life-cycle stage heartworms, which may be advantageous in cases of owner compliance failure or when heartworm infection status is undetermined at the time prophylaxis is commenced. An index of suspicion for feline heartworm disease is warranted in unprotected cats with respiratory signs, and perhaps chronic vomiting, in areas where canine heartworm disease is endemic. Many cats, once diagnosed and with appropriate supportive care and monitoring, will resolve their infection and be free of clinical signs.

  10. Heartworm disease in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John W; Genchi, Claudio; Kramer, Laura H; Guerrero, Jorge; Venco, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Heartworm disease due to Dirofilaria immitis continues to cause severe disease and even death in dogs and other animals in many parts of the world, even though safe, highly effective and convenient preventatives have been available for the past two decades. Moreover, the parasite and vector mosquitoes continue to spread into areas where they have not been reported previously. Heartworm societies have been established in the USA and Japan and the First European Dirofilaria Days (FEDD) Conference was held in Zagreb, Croatia, in February of 2007. These organizations promote awareness, encourage research and provide updated guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of heartworm disease. The chapter begins with a review of the biology and life cycle of the parasite. It continues with the prevalence and distribution of the disease in domestic and wild animals, with emphasis on more recent data on the spreading of the disease and the use of molecular biology techniques in vector studies. The section on pathogenesis and immunology also includes a discussion of the current knowledge of the potential role of the Wolbachia endosymbiont in inflammatory and immune responses to D. immitis infection, diagnostic use of specific immune responses to the bacteria, immunomodulatory activity and antibiotic treatment of infected animals. Canine, feline and ferret heartworm disease are updated with regard to the clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, therapy and management of the disease, with special emphasis on the recently described Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD) Syndrome in cats. The section devoted to heartworm infection in humans also includes notes on other epizootic filariae, particularly D. repens in humans in Europe. The chapter concludes with a discussion on emerging strategies in heartworm treatment and control, highlighting the potential role of tetracycline antibiotics in adulticidal therapy.

  11. Toxic effects of Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin on Artemia salina, human cells, and the schistosomiasis vector Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Silva, Luanna Ribeiro Santos; Aguiar, Jaciana dos Santos; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Rêgo, Moacyr Jesus Barreto de Melo; Pitta, Maira Galdino da Rocha; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2014-10-01

    The present study evaluated the toxicity of Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) to Artemia salina, human tumour cell lines (larynx epidermoid carcinoma Hep-2, NCI-H292 lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and chronic myelocytic leukaemia K562), and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as to Biomphalaria glabrata embryos and adults. MvRL was toxic to A. salina (LC50=159.9 μg/mL), and exerted cytotoxic effects on NCI-H292 cells (IC50=25.23 μg/mL). The lectin (1-100 μg/mL) did not affect the viability of K562 and Hep-2 tumour cells, as well as of PBMCs. MvRL concentration of 1, 10, and 100 μg/mL promoted malformations (mainly exogastrulation) in 7.8%, 22.5%, and 27.7% of embryos, respectively, as well as delayed embryo development in 42.0%, 69.5%, and 54.7% of embryos, respectively. MvRL at a concentration of 100 μg/mL killed B. glabrata embryos (17.7%) and adults (25%). Further, MvRL damaged B. glabrata reproductive processes, which was evidenced by observations that snails exposed to the lectin (100 μg/mL) deposited fewer eggs than those in the control group, and approximately 40% of the deposited eggs exhibited malformations. Comparison of these results with that from A. salina assay indicates that MvRL is adulticidal at the concentration range which is toxic to environment. In conclusion, the cytotoxicity of MvRL on tumour cell and absence of toxicity to normal cell indicate its potential as chemotherapeutic drug. Also, the study revealed that the lectin is able to promote deleterious effects on B. glabrata embryos at environmentally safe concentrations.

  12. Combination of Nicotiana tabacum and Azadirachta indica: A Novel Substitute to Contain Prevalence of Levamisole and Ivermectin-Resistant Haemonchus contortus in Ovine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Khoshnow Hamad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study was aimed at exploring the activity of combined crude aqueous methanol extracts (CAMEs of Nicotiana (N. tabacum leaves and Azadirachta (A. indica seed kernels to control levamisole (LEV and ivermectin (IVM-resistant Haemonchus (H. contortus in sheep. The in vivo fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT demonstrated rampancy of resistance among H. contortus populations against LEV and IVM. There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between groups treated with the combined plant extracts compared to other groups treated with solitary N. tabacum and A. indica. The recorded FECR% at low (1+1g kg-1 BW and high (2+2g kg-1 BW doses was 52.71 and 94.59, respectively for the combined extracts, whilst for N. tabacum at low (2g kg-1 BW and high (4g kg-1 BW doses, the FECR% was 87.5 and 88.6, respectively. Moreover, the FECR% for A. indica was 45.62 and 85.14 at low (2g kg-1 BW and high (4g kg-1 BW doses, respectively. There was a dose and time dependent ovicidal and adulticidal activity of CAMEs with estimated LC50 values of 0.523, 0.566 and 1.169 μg ml-1 for the combined extracts, solitary N. tabacum and A. indica, respectively in egg hatch assay (in vitro test. The estimated LC50 values in adult motility test (in vitro test 10 hours post-exposure were 0.17, 0.20 and 0.80 mg ml-1 for the combined extracts, sole N. tabacum and A. indica, respectively. Accordingly, the aforementioned combined extracts at high dose were more efficacious than solitary N. tabacum and A. indica and, thus, can be used to restrict rampancy of LEV and IVM-resistant H. contortus populations parasitized in sheep.

  13. Plant Essential Oils from Apiaceae Family as Alternatives to Conventional Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Main method to control insect pest is using synthetic insecticides, but the development of insect resistance to this products, the high operational cost, environmental pollution, toxicity to humans and harmful effect on non-target organisms have created the need for developing alternative approaches to control insect pest. Furthermore, the demand for organic crops, especially vegetables for the fresh market, has greatly increased worldwide. The ideal insecticide should control target pests adequately and should be target-specific, rapidly degradable, and low in toxicity to humans and other mammals. Plant essential oils could be an alternative source for insect pest control because they constitute a rich source of bioactive chemicals and are commonly used as flavoring agents in foods. These materials may be applied to food crops shortly before harvest without leaving excessive residues. Moreover, medically safe of these plant derivatives has emphasized also. For these reasons, much effort has been focused on plant essential oils or their constituents as potential sources of insect control agents. In this context, Apiaceae (Umbelliferae family would rank among the most important families of plants. In the last few years more and more studies on the insecticidal properties of essential oils from Apiaceae family have been published and it seemed worthwhile to compile them. The focus of this review lies on the lethal (ovicidal, larvicidal, pupicidal and adulticidal and sublethal (antifeedant, repellent, oviposition deterrent, Growth inhibitory and progeny production activities of plant essential oils and theirmain components from Apiaceae family. These features indicate that pesticides based on Apiaceae essential oils could be used in a variety of ways to control a large number of pests. It can be concluded that essential oils and phytochemicals isolated from Apiaceae family may be efficacious and safe replacements for conventional synthetic

  14. Use of the CDC autocidal gravid ovitrap to control and prevent outbreaks of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Roberto; Amador, Manuel; Acevedo, Veronica; Caban, Belkis; Felix, Gilberto; Mackay, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Populations ofAedes aegypti (L.) can be managed through reductions in adult mosquito survival, number of offspring produced, or both. Direct adult mortality can be caused by the use of space sprays or residual insecticides to mosquito resting sites, and with a variety of residual insecticide-impregnated surfaces that are being tested, such as curtains, covers for water-storage vessels, bednets, and ovitraps. The fertility ofAe. aegypti populations can be reduced by the use of autocidal oviposition cups that prevent the development of mosquitoes inside the trap by mechanical means or larvicides, as well as by releasing sterile, transgenic, and para-transgenic mosquitoes. Survival and fertility can be simultaneously reduced by capturing gravid female Ae. aegypti with sticky gravid traps. We tested the effectiveness of the novel Centers for Disease Control and Prevention autocidal gravid ovitrap (CDC-AGO trap) to control natural populations ofAe. aegypti under field conditions in two isolated urban areas (reference vs. intervention areas) in southern Puerto Rico for 1 yr. There were significant reductions in the captures of female Ae. aegypti (53-70%) in the intervention area The presence of three to four AGO control traps per home in 81% of the houses prevented outbreaks of Ae. aegypti, which would be expected after rains. Mosquito captures in BG-Sentinel and AGO traps were significantly and positively correlated, showing that AGO traps are useful and inexpensive mosquito surveillance devices. The use of AGO traps to manage Ae. aegypti populations is compatible with other control means such as source reduction, larviciding, adulticiding, sterile insect techniques, induced cytoplasmic incompatibility, and dominant lethal gene systems.

  15. Mathematical studies on the sterile insect technique for the Chikungunya disease and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Y; Tchuenche, J M

    2012-11-01

    Chikungunya is an arthropod-borne disease caused by the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus. It can be an important burden to public health and a great cause of morbidity and, sometimes, mortality. Understanding if and when disease control measures should be taken is key to curtail its spread. Dumont and Chiroleu (Math Biosc Eng 7(2):315-348, 2010) showed that the use of chemical control tools such as adulticide and larvicide, and mechanical control, which consists of reducing the breeding sites, would have been useful to control the explosive 2006 epidemic in Réunion Island. Despite this, chemical control tools cannot be of long-time use, because they can induce mosquito resistance, and are detrimental to the biodiversity. It is therefore necessary to develop and test new control tools that are more sustainable, with the same efficacy (if possible). Mathematical models of sterile insect technique (SIT) to prevent, reduce, eliminate or stop an epidemic of Chikungunya are formulated and analysed. In particular, we propose a new model that considers pulsed periodic releases, which leads to a hybrid dynamical system. This pulsed SIT model is coupled with the human population at different epidemiological states in order to assess its efficacy. Numerical simulations for the pulsed SIT, using an appropriate numerical scheme are provided. Analytical and numerical results indicate that pulsed SIT with small and frequent releases can be an alternative to chemical control tools, but only if it is used or applied early after the beginning of the epidemic or as a preventive tool.

  16. Evaluation of Sumithion L-40 against Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus Skuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, S R; Sing, K W; Teoh, G N; Lee, H L

    2015-03-01

    Space spraying of chemical insecticides is still an important mean of controlling Aedes mosquitoes and dengue transmission. For this purpose, the bioefficacy of space-sprayed chemical insecticide should be evaluated from time to time. A simulation field trial was conducted outdoor in an open field and indoor in unoccupied flat units in Kuala Lumpur, to evaluate the adulticidal and larvicidal effects of Sumithion L-40, a ULV formulation of fenitrothion. A thermal fogger with a discharge rate of 240 ml/min was used to disperse Sumithion L-40 at 3 different dosages (350 ml/ha, 500 ml/ha, 750 ml/ha) against lab-bred larvae and adult female Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. An average of more than 80% adult mortality was achieved for outdoor space spray, and 100% adult mortality for indoor space spray, in all tested dosages. Outdoor larvicidal effect was noted up to 14 days and 7 days at a dosage of 500 and 750 ml/ha for Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, respectively. Indoor larvicidal effect was up to 21 days (500 ml/ha) and 14 days (750 ml/ha), respectively, after spraying with larval mortality > 50% against Ae. aegypti. This study concluded that the effective dosage of Sumithion L-40 thermally applied against adult Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus indoor and outdoor is 500 and 750 ml/ha. Based on these dosages, effective indoor spray volume is 0.4 - 0.6 ml/m³. Additional indoor and outdoor larvicidal effect will be observed at these application dosages, in addition to adult mortality.

  17. Evaluation of seed extracts from plants found in the Caatinga biome for the control of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; de Oliveira, Julliete Medeiros; Chagas, Juliana Macêdo; Rabelo, Luciana Maria Araujo; de Medeiros, Guilherme Fulgêncio; Giodani, Raquel Brant; da Silva, Elizeu Antunes; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; de Fátima de Freire Melo Ximenes, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Dengue fever, currently the most important arbovirus, is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Given the absence of a prophylactic vaccine, the disease can only be controlled by combating the vector insect. However, increasing reports of resistance and environmental damage caused by insecticides have led to the urgent search for new safer alternatives. In this regard, plants stand out as a source of easy-to-obtain biodegradable insecticide molecules. Twenty (20) plant seed extracts from the Caatinga, an exclusively Brazilian biome, were prepared. Sodium phosphate (50 mM, pH 8.0) was used as extractor. The extracts were used in bioassays and submitted to partial characterisation. A Probit analysis of insecticides was carried out, and intergroup differences were verified by the Student's t test and ANOVA. All the extracts exhibited larvicidal and ovipositional deterrence activity. The extracts of Amburana cearenses, Piptadenia viridiflora, Erythrina velutina, Myracrodruon urundeuva and Schinopsis brasiliensis were also pupicides, while the extracts of P. viridiflora, E. velutina, A. cearenses, Anadenanthera colubrina, Diocleia grandiflora, Bauhinia cheilantha, Senna spectabilis, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Mimosa regnelli and Genipa americana displayed adulticidal activity. Egg laying was compromised when females were fed extracts of Ricinus communis, Croton sonderianus and S. brasiliensis. At least two proteins with insecticidal activity were found in all the extracts. Phenol compounds were identified in all the extracts and flavonoids, triterpenes or alkaloids in 14 of them. The results show the potential of plant seed extracts from the Caatinga as a source of active molecules against A. aegypti mosquitos.

  18. Assessment of flukicide efficacy against Fasciola hepatica in sheep in Sweden in the absence of a standardised test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Novobilský

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthelmintic resistance (AR to Fasciola hepatica is emerging worldwide. Recently, AR to the adulticide compound albendazole (ABZ was shown in Argentina and Spain. In Sweden, ABZ treatment failure against F. hepatica was first reported in sheep in 2012. The present study tested the efficacy of ABZ and triclabendazole (TCBZ in sheep naturally infected with F. hepatica using a combination of three different diagnostic methods: faecal egg counts (FEC, coproantigen ELISA (cELISA and Fasciola egg hatch test (FEHT. Two deworming trials, in November 2014 and January 2015, were performed on two sheep farms (farms A and B in south-western Sweden. Except ABZ in November, treatment with ABZ or TCBZ achieved sufficient efficacy (97–100% against adult F. hepatica on farm A. In contrast, ABZ treatment failed in the sheep flock on farm B, despite low initial faecal egg output. On farm B, ABZ efficacy based on FEC was 67% (95% CI: 35–84 and four of eight ewes tested were coproantigen-positive 21 days post-treatment. Ovicidal activity of ABZ against Fasciola eggs in isolates from both farms and one additional bovine isolate were tested by FEHT to exclude the presence of juvenile flukes and other factors such as dosing failure and poor quality of drug product. Irrespective of drug trial, data from FEHT showed significantly lower ovicidal activity of ABZ for the ovine farm B isolate than for the isolate from farm A. This confirms that the low efficacy of ABZ in sheep flock B was associated with ABZ resistance. Overall, the usefulness of three complementary methods for detection of ABZ resistance in the field was demonstrated.

  19. Synergized resmethrin and corticosterone alter the chicken's response to west nile virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowski, Mark David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Franson, J Christian [US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY; Mostl, Erich [UNIV OF VIENNA; Porter, Warren P [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Hofmeister, Erik K [US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    2009-01-01

    Debate concerning arbovirus control strategies remains contentious because concern regarding the relative risk of viral infection and environmental toxicant exposure is high but inadequately characterized. Taking this into account, mosquito control agencies employ aerial insecticides only after arbovirus surveillance data indicate high local mosquito-infection-rates. Successfully mitigating the risk of adult-mosquito-control insecticides ('adulticides') to non-target species such as humans, domestic animals, fish, beneficial insects and wildlife, while increasing their efficacy to reduce arbovirus outbreak intensity requires targeted scientific data from animal toxicity studies and environmental monitoring activities. Wild birds are an important reservoir host for WNv and are potentially exposed to insecticides used for mosquito control. However, no risk assessments have evaluated whether insecticides augment or extend the potential transmissibility of West Nile virus (WNv) in birds. In order to augment existing resmethrin risk assessments, we aimed to determine whether synergized resmethrin (SR) may cause chickens to develop an elevated or extended WN viremia and if subacute stress may affect its immunotoxicity. We distributed 40 chickens into four groups then exposed them prior to and during WNv infection with SR (50 {mu}g/l resmethrin + 150 {mu}g/l piperonyl butoxide) and/or 20 mg/I corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking-water. Corticosterone was given for 10 continuous days and SR was given for 3 alternate days starting the 3rd day of CORT exposure, then chickens were subcutaneously inoculated with WNv on the 5th day of CORT treatment. Compared to controls, CORT treatment extended and elevated viremia, enhanced WNv-specific antibody and increased the percentage of birds that shed oral virus, whereas SR treatment extended viremia, depressed WNv-specific IgG, and increased the percentage of CORT-treated birds that shed oral virus. Corticosterone and SR

  20. Synergistic effect of some essential oils on toxicity and knockdown effects, against mosquitos, cockroaches and housefly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idin Zibaee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity and knockdown effect of Eucalyptus globulus, Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils and their mixed formulation on Periplaneta Americana (L., Blattella germanica (L., Supella longipalpa, Culex pipiens, Anopheles stephensi and Musca domestica were evaluated in a series of laboratory experiments. In all bioassay five different doses (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% were used by filter paper (cm2 and aerosol (cm3 bioassay methods, all essential oils was toxic to cockroaches, mosquitos and housefly species the lowest and the highest LC50 belong to mixed formulation on B. germanica (LC50 6.1 and E. globulus on P. americana (LC50 27.7 respectively. In continuous exposure experiments, Mortality (LT50 values for cockroaches ranged from 1403.3 min with 0.625% E. globulus (for P. americana to 2.2 min with 10% mixed formulation for A. stephensi. The KT50 values ranged from 0.1 to 1090.8 min for 10% and 0.625 for mixed formulation and R. officinalis respectively. The mortality after 24 h for mixed formulation was 100% but for single essential oils ranged from 81.5 to 98.3 for P. americana treated with R. officinalis and A. stephensi treated with E. globulus respectively. Studies on persistence of essential oils on impregnated paper revealed that it has more adulticidal activity for longer period at low storage temperature. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of essential oil showed 14 and 16 peaks for E. globules and R. officinalis respectively. α-Pinene (39.8%, 1, 8-Cineole (13.2%, Camphene (9.1% and Borneol (3.7% were present in major amounts for R. officinalis and 1,8-Cineole (31.4%, α-Pinene (15.3%, d-Limonene (9.7% and α-Terpinolen (5.3% were present in major amounts for E. globulus respectively. Our results showed that two surveyed essential oils has compatible with synergistic effect on various insect species, furthermore it is useful for applying as integrated pest management tool for studied insects management, especially in

  1. Tackling the growing threat of dengue: Phyllanthus niruri-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their mosquitocidal properties against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Udaiyan; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Marcello; Barnard, Donald R; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Dinesh, Devakumar; Chandramohan, Balamurugan

    2015-04-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of devastating pathogens and parasites, causing millions of deaths every year. Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. Recently, transmission has strongly increased in urban and semiurban areas, becoming a major international public health concern. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of dengue. The use of synthetic insecticides to control Aedes mosquitoes lead to high operational costs and adverse nontarget effects. In this scenario, eco-friendly control tools are a priority. We proposed a novel method to synthesize silver nanoparticles using the aqueous leaf extract of Phyllanthus niruri, a cheap and nontoxic material. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver nanostructures showed a peak at 420 nm corresponding to the surface plasmon resonance band of nanoparticles. SEM analyses of the synthesized nanoparticles showed a mean size of 30-60 nm. EDX spectrum showed the chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles. XRD highlighted that the nanoparticles are crystalline in nature with face-centered cubic geometry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of nanoparticles exhibited prominent peaks 3,327.63, 2,125.87, 1,637.89, 644.35, 597.41, and 554.63 cm(-1). In laboratory assays, the aqueous extract of P. niruri was toxic against larval instars (I-IV) and pupae of A. aegypti. LC50 was 158.24 ppm (I), 183.20 ppm (II), 210.53 ppm (III), 210.53 ppm (IV), and 358.08 ppm (pupae). P. niruri-synthesized nanoparticles were highly effective against A. aegypti, with LC50 of 3.90 ppm (I), 5.01 ppm (II), 6.2 ppm (III), 8.9 ppm (IV), and 13.04 ppm (pupae). In the field, the application of silver nanoparticles (10 × LC50) lead to A. aegypti larval reduction of 47.6%, 76.7% and 100%, after 24, 48, and 72 h, while the P. niruri extract lead to 39.9%, 69.2 % and 100 % of reduction, respectively. In adulticidal experiments, P. niruri extract

  2. Cardiopulmonary and inflammatory biomarkers in the assessment of the severity of canine dirofilariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretón, E; Morchón, R; Simón, F; Juste, M C; Méndez, J C; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2014-11-15

    The prognosis and success of adulticide treatment depends on the baseline severity of infection with Dirofilaria immitis in dogs and can influence the therapeutic protocol to choose. A study was conducted to assess the utility of the cardiopulmonary biomarkers N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin, and D-dimer, as well as the biomarker of inflammation C-reactive protein (CRP) to evaluate the severity of canine heartworm disease in different stages. Serum samples were collected from 20 heartworm-infected dogs for measurement of these biomarkers. Dogs were assigned to four groups (n=5/group) according to the severity of the disease: Class I and Class II dogs showed concentrations of biomarkers generally within normal ranges for healthy dogs, except CRP in dogs classified as Class II, which showed values slightly above laboratory reference values (19.46±5.69mg/l). Dogs of Class III showed elevated levels of NT-proBNP (1220.12±465.18pmol/l) (p2530.8pmol/l), cTnI (1.99±0.32ng/ml), and CRP (80.24±47.69mg/l); all Class IV dogs showed pathological elevations of D-dimer (0.81±0.46ng/ml), and 60% (3/5) of these dogs showed pathological elevations of myoglobin (significant elevations [pheartworm disease, chronic presence of D. immitis causes a proliferative endoarteritis, thromboembolisms, pulmonary hypertension, and right-sided congestive heart failure. As the severity of the disease worsens, serum values of cTnI, myoglobin, and NT-proBNP increase, indicating significant cardiac damage. The finding of pathological concentrations of D-dimer suggests the presence of thromboembolism and/or disseminated intravascular coagulation. CRP increases according to the severity of the disease, indicating inflammatory processes that could contribute to the progression of the disease. These preliminary results demonstrate the utility of cardiopulmonary and inflammation biomarkers to assist in the establishment of the

  3. Efficacy of a new combination of fipronil and permethrin (Effitix®) against Phlebotomus perniciosus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, M; Liénard, E; Jacquiet, P; Bonneau, S; Navarro, C; Bouhsira, E

    2015-09-15

    Two controlled clinical trials were carried out to assess the anti-feeding and adulticidal effects of a spot-on combining fipronil and permethrin (Effitix(®), Virbac, Carros, France) against Phlebotomus perniciosus in dogs. The first study (Exp. A) was a dose-determination study in which 3 doses of permethrin (30 mg/kg, 60 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg) were compared. The second study (Exp. B) was an efficacy study using commercial dose of permethrin contained in Effitix(®) (the minimum dose of permethrin applied to dogs was 60 mg/kg). Twenty four and twelve Beagle dogs with equal sensitivity to sandflies were included in Exp. A and in Exp. B, respectively. Dogs were challenged with female sandflies (50 per dogs in Exp. A and 80 in Exp. B) for 60±5 min on Days - 7, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 (Day 0 being treatment day). Counts and engorgement determination of dead and alive sandflies were performed after each exposure to treated and untreated dogs. Dead sandflies were also counted 24 h after exposure. In Exp. A, the repellency induced by an administration of 30 mg/kg of permethrin to dogs was above 91% for the first two weeks and then dropped to 82.2, 83.1 and 81.1% on Days 14, 21 and 28, respectively. For dogs receiving 60 mg/kg of permethrin, the repellency was a bit higher with 95.8, 97.6, 92.1, 91.4, and 86.8%, for Days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28, respectively. The repellency induced by 120 mg/kg of permethrin was significantly higher than that induced by 60 mg/kg of permethrin on Day 14 only. In Exp. B the anti-feeding effect of the spot-on formulation was 94.1, 97.8, 96.3, 90.8 and 87% on Days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28, respectively. The mortality effect was 98.9, 99.1, 99.8, 97.0 and 89.7% on Days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28, respectively. At each challenge point, the mortality and anti-feeding effects on sandflies were significantly different between control and treatment group (p<0.05). The results indicate that a monthly administration of this new combination of permethrin and fipronil

  4. Essential oils as biological alternatives to protect date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. against Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Amri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to determine the chemical composition of the essential oil of three Tunisian plants and to evaluate their biological activity against eggs, larvae, and adult insects of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller. The essential oils extracted from leaves of Thymus capitatus (L. Hoffmanns. & Link, Rosmarinus officinalis L. and needles of Pinus halepensis Mill. were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; 34, 16, and 56 constituents were identified, respectively. The major constituents were (Z-caryophyllene (23.8%, β-myrcene (20.5% and α-pinene (13.3% in P. halepensis oil, carvacrol (66.9%, p-cymene (9.1%, and δ-terpinene (6.2% in T. capitatus oil and 1,8-cineole (47.5%, camphor (14.9%, α-pinene (14.1%, and borneol (13.1% in R. officinalis oil. The insecticidal effects of essential oils on eggs, larvae, and adults of E. ceratoniae were investigated. Ovicidal activity of oils was studied by spray on eggs while larvicidal and adulticidal activities were assessed by fumigation and spray. Number of hatched eggs was verified after 10 d, larva and adult mortalities were observed after 6, 12, and 24 h. Globally, eggs and larvae were the most resistant to the three different oils, needing higher doses to obtain a higher mortality. The spray method was most effective than fumigation. Essential oil extracted from T. capitatus proved to be very toxic towards E. ceratoniae on all three phases at the dose of 20 μL mL-1 (100% inhibition, followed by the oil from R. officinalis (90-100% inhibition, nevertheless, weak activity was obtained with P. halepensis oil (68.3-85% inhibition. Results obtained may suggest that the essential oils of T. capitatus and R. officinalis possess high insecticidal activity and therefore, can be used in biotechnological application as natural preservative in stored dates and could be useful in managing populations of E. ceratoniae in field.

  5. 41种植物精油对淡色库蚊的熏蒸活性%Fumigation activity of 41 essential oils against Culex pipiens pallens (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付臣臣; 万涛; 江志利; 吴华; 冯俊涛; 马志卿; 张兴

    2013-01-01

    为发现具有较高杀蚊活性的精油,推动植物精油类卫生杀虫剂的创制,本研究采用三角瓶熏蒸法测定了17科41种植物精油对淡色库蚊Culex pipiens pallens雌成蚊的熏蒸活性,并进一步采用密闭圆筒法验证其杀虫毒力大小.三角瓶熏蒸法测定表明,在12μL/L浓度下,留兰香油(spearmint oil)、薰衣草油(lavender oil)、山苍子油(Litsea cubeba oil)等26种精油均有较强的熏蒸作用,KT50小于15 min.该26种精油用密闭圆筒熏蒸法进一步测定表明,在浓度为10 μL/L时,冬青油(wintergreen oil)、艾叶油(blumea oil)、薄荷油(peppermint oil)、桉叶油(Eucalyptus robusta oil)和蓝桉油(E.globulus oil)等植物精油熏蒸活性较强,其KT50分别为16.91,21.20,22.57,18.43和19.48 min.结果证明冬青油、艾叶油、薄荷油、桉叶油和蓝桉油等5种精油对淡色库蚊具有较强的熏蒸活性,具备作为淡色库蚊防控剂开发的潜力,值得进一步研究.%To find the essential oils with high insecticidal activity and promote the development of hygienic insecticides,essential oils from 41 plants belonging to 17 families were evaluated for adulticidal activity against female adults of Culex pipiens pallens by airtight fumigation in conical flask and hermetic round canister method.The results showed that 26 essential oils (12 μL/L) including spearmint oil,lavender oil and Litsea cubeba oil were very toxic to the mosquito (KT50 < 15 min) by airtight fumigation in conical flask.Further assay using hermetic round canister method indicated that 5 essential oils (wintergreen oil,blumea oil,peppermint oil,Eucalyptus robusta oil and E.globulus oil) had high fumigation toxicity at the concentration of 10 μL/L,and their KT50 values were 16.91,21.20,22.57,18.43 and 19.48 min,respectively.The results demonstrate that wintergreen oil,blumea oil,peppermint oil,E.robusta oil and E.globulus oil all have high fumigation activity against C.pipiens pallens,with the

  6. Recent rapid rise of a permethrin knock down resistance allele in Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ponce García

    heterogeneity in Ile1,016 frequencies among 2007-2008 collections, which ranged from 45.7% (+ or - 2.00% CI95 in the state of Veracruz to 51.2% (+ or - 4.36% CI95 in the Yucatán peninsula and 14.5% (+ or - 2.23% CI95 in and around Tapachula in the state of Chiapas. Spatial heterogeneity was also evident at smaller geographic scales. For example within the city of Chetumal, Quintana Roo, Ile1,016 frequencies varied from 38.3%-88.3%. A linear regression analysis based on seven collections from 2007 revealed that the frequency of Ile1,016 homozygotes accurately predicted knockdown rate for mosquitoes exposed to permethrin in a bioassay (R(2 = 0.98. CONCLUSIONS: We have recorded a dramatic increase in the frequency of the Ile1,016 mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti in México from 1996 to 2009. This may be related to heavy use of permethrin-based insecticides in mosquito control programs. Spatial heterogeneity in Ile1,016 frequencies in 2007 and 2008 collections may reflect differences in selection pressure or in the initial frequency of Ile1,016. The rapid recent increase in Ile1,016 is predicted by a simple model of positive directional selection on a recessive allele. Unfortunately this model also predicts rapid fixation of Ile1,016 unless there is negative fitness associated with Ile1,016 in the absence of permethrin. If so, then spatial refugia of susceptible Ae. aegypti or rotational schedules of different classes of adulticides could be established to slow or prevent fixation of Ile1,016.

  7. Recent Rapid Rise of a Permethrin Knock Down Resistance Allele in Aedes aegypti in México

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gustavo Ponce; Flores, Adriana E.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Saavedra-Rodríguez, Karla; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Guillermo Bond, J.; Casas-Martínez, Mauricio; Ramsey, Janine M.; García-Rejón, Julián; Domínguez-Galera, Marco; Ranson, Hilary; Hemingway, Janet; Eisen, Lars; Black, William C.

    2009-01-01

    in Ile1,016 frequencies among 2007–2008 collections, which ranged from 45.7% (±2.00% CI95) in the state of Veracruz to 51.2% (±4.36% CI95) in the Yucatán peninsula and 14.5% (±2.23% CI95) in and around Tapachula in the state of Chiapas. Spatial heterogeneity was also evident at smaller geographic scales. For example within the city of Chetumal, Quintana Roo, Ile1,016 frequencies varied from 38.3%–88.3%. A linear regression analysis based on seven collections from 2007 revealed that the frequency of Ile1,016 homozygotes accurately predicted knockdown rate for mosquitoes exposed to permethrin in a bioassay (R2 = 0.98). Conclusions We have recorded a dramatic increase in the frequency of the Ile1,016 mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti in México from 1996 to 2009. This may be related to heavy use of permethrin-based insecticides in mosquito control programs. Spatial heterogeneity in Ile1,016 frequencies in 2007 and 2008 collections may reflect differences in selection pressure or in the initial frequency of Ile1,016. The rapid recent increase in Ile1,016 is predicted by a simple model of positive directional selection on a recessive allele. Unfortunately this model also predicts rapid fixation of Ile1,016 unless there is negative fitness associated with Ile1,016 in the absence of permethrin. If so, then spatial refugia of susceptible Ae. aegypti or rotational schedules of different classes of adulticides could be established to slow or prevent fixation of Ile1,016. PMID:19829709