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Sample records for adult t-cell leukemia

  1. ADULT T CELL LEUKEMIA LYMPHOMA

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    Neely, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL) is a CD4+ lymphoproliferative malignancy resulting from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV1) infection. It includes differing clinical forms classified as smoldering, chronic, lymphomatous, and acute ATLL. The Tax protein of HTLV-1 has been implicated as a viral oncoprotein which enhances virus replication and alters cellular gene expression, including activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kB), to result in lymphoid transformation. Chemotherapy f...

  2. Tax fingerprint in adult T-cell leukemia.

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    Bazarbachi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of Blood, Fujikawa et al demonstrate that the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax induces an epigenetic-dependent global modification of host gene expression in adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL). Hence, the fingerprint of Tax is all over ATL and this may be used for finally capturing ATL. PMID:27056993

  3. [Hypercalcemia of T-cell leukemia in adults].

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    Jean-Baptiste, G; Arfi, S; Plumelle, Y; Panelatti, G; Mangin, J L; Pascaline, N

    1993-04-01

    A retrospective study of 26 adults with acute T-cell leukemia showed that 14 patients (54%) had hypercalcemia at some point of the disease. Hypercalcemia was found at presentation in nine patients and revealed the disease in one. Eight patients had hypercalcemia at the time of death. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone levels were normal. All patients with hypercalcemia tested positive for the HTLV-1 by Elisa and Western blot. Six patients had focalized or diffuse lytic roentgenographic bone lesions. Hypercalcemia in acute T-cell leukemia may involve production of interleukin-1-alpha and parathyroid hormone-related protein by HTLV-1-infected cells. PMID:8167627

  4. Molecular Pathology of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma.

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    Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm of highly pleomorphic lymphoid cells. ATLL is usually widely disseminated, and it is caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is a disease with a long latency, and affected individuals are usually exposed to the virus very early in life. The cumulative incidence of ATLL is estimated to be 2.5% among HTLV-1 carriers. ATLL cells express CD2, CD3, CD5, CD4, and CD25, as well as CCR4 and FoxP3 of the regulatory T-cell marker. HTLV-1 is causally linked to ATLL, but infection alone is not sufficient to result in neoplastic transformation. A significant finding in this connection is that the Tax viral protein leads to transcriptional activation of many genes, while the HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor is thought to be important for T-cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Half of ATLL cases retain the ability to express HTLV-1 Tax, which is a target of HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). An increase in HTLV-1-specific CTL responses is observed in some asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Although HTLV-1-specific CTL are also present in the peripheral blood of ATLL patients, they do not expand sufficiently. We investigated the clinicopathological features and analyzed the staining of Tax-specific CTL and FoxP3. Tax-specific CTL correlated inversely with FoxP3, an increase in the ratio of CD163+ tumor-associated macrophages was associated with worse clinical prognosis, and ATLL cell lines proliferated significantly following direct co-culture with M2 macrophages. Several clinical variants of ATLL have been identified: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering. Oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization revealed that genomic loss of 9p21.3 was a significant characteristic of acute-type, but not of chronic-type ATLL. Furthermore, we found that genomic alteration of CD58, which is implicated in immune escape, is more frequently observed in acute than in chronic ATLL. Interestingly

  5. Abacavir, an anti–HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia

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    Tada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takiuchi, Yoko; Iwai, Fumie; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Kayoko; Shinohara, Masanobu; Io, Katsuhiro; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Shindo, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Hirota, Kouji; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chrom...

  6. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T cell lymphoma (2): extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma].

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    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T /NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of histologic subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. The first part published in the October issue was focused on the three more frequent entities, i.e. angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second part presented herein will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26576610

  7. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

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    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27215229

  8. HTLV 1 associated adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia a clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic tale of three cases from non-endemic region of south India

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    Faiq Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by human T-cell lymphotrophic virus-1, affects mostly adults with systemic involvement and poor prognosis. Diagnosis of adult T-Cell leukemia/Lymphoma is challenging. The clinico-pathologic and immuno-phenotypic features of the three cases will be presented.

  9. Anti-adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma effects of indole-3-carbinol

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    Okudaira Taeko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a malignancy derived from T cells infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, and it is known to be resistant to standard anticancer therapies. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C, a naturally occurring component of Brassica vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprout, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. The aim of this study was to determine the potential anti-ATLL effects of I3C both in vitro and in vivo. Results In the in vitro study, I3C inhibited cell viability of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and ATLL cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, I3C did not exert any inhibitory effect on uninfected T-cell lines and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. I3C prevented the G1/S transition by reducing the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Cdk4 and Cdk6, and induced apoptosis by reducing the expression of XIAP, survivin and Bcl-2, and by upregulating the expression of Bak. The induced apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. I3C also suppressed IκBα phosphorylation and JunD expression, resulting in inactivation of NF-κB and AP-1. Inoculation of HTLV-1-infected T cells in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency resulted in tumor growth. The latter was inhibited by treatment with I3C (50 mg/kg/day orally, but not the vehicle control. Conclusion Our preclinical data suggest that I3C could be potentially a useful chemotherapeutic agent for patients with ATLL.

  10. Novel dynamin 2 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Ge, Zheng; Li, Min; Zhao, Gang; Xiao, Lichan; Gu, Yan; Zhou, Xilian; Yu, Michael D.; Li, Jianyong; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations on signaling pathways are found in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and act as markers of high-risk leukemia. Mutations in dynamin 2 (DNM2) have been reported in T-ALL, particularly in early T-cell precursor-ALL. In the present study, DNM2 mutations were screened by sequencing DNM2 exons obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification and gel purification in adult T-ALL patients. A total of 4 novel DNM2 mutations were identified in adult T-ALL patients, with a mutation rate of 9.5%, and the DNM2 mutations were found to co-exist with NOTCH1 and PHD finger protein 6, and were also associated with high-risk leukemia. A high rate of silent mutation was also found in the patients, but no significant association was found between the silent mutations and patients' clinical features. The present findings suggested the DNM2 mutations may be involved in the oncogenesis of T-ALL.

  11. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting multiple lymphomatous polyposis

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    Akira Hokama; Nobuyuki Takasu; Jiro Fujita; Takeaki Tomoyose; Yu-ichi Yamamoto; Takako Watanabe; Tetsuo Hirata; Fukunori Kinjo; Seiya Kato; Koichi Ohshima; Hiroshi Uezato

    2008-01-01

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (HLP) is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. It has been reported that most MLP are observed in cases with mantle cell lymphoma of B-cell type. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Colonoscopy revealed MLP throughout the colon and histopathological findings of ATLL cell infiltration. The patient died despite combination of chemotherapy. The literature of manifestations of colonic involvement of ATLL is reviewed and the importance of endoscopic evaluation to differentiate ATLL intestinal lesions from opportunistic infectious enterocolitis is discussed.

  12. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

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    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance. PMID:27383637

  13. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

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    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  14. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

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    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL.

  15. Mogamulizumab for the treatment of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

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    Yoshimitsu M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Yoshimitsu, Naomichi Arima Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan Abstract: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by latent infection of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. The outcome for ATLL is very poor, with a 3-year overall survival of approximately 24% with conventional chemotherapy; thus, there is an unmet need for developing new treatment options. Defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 antibody (KW-0761, mogamulizumab has been clinically available for the treatment of relapsed or refractory ATLL in Japan since 2012, and a Phase II study of mogamulizumab for patients with relapsed CCR4+ ATLL demonstrated a 50% objective response, a 30.8% complete response, and an acceptable safety profile. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used to treat patients with ATLL, and mogamulizumab in combination with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used successfully in a limited number of patients to treat refractory or relapsed ATLL. The efficacy of combining mogamulizumab with standard chemotherapy (mLSG15 for patients with ATLL has also been examined, and the results have shown higher rates of complete response with the combined therapy (52% compared with for chemotherapy alone (33%. Mogamulizumab also has potential application in the treatment of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical paraparesis, Epstein–Barr virus-associated T-cell and natural killer-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, and peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Possible adverse events of mogamulizumab have been reported, such as cutaneous adverse reactions (including Stevens–Johnson syndrome, diffuse panbronchiolitis, reactivation of hepatitis B, and opportunistic infections. The treatment outcome of patients

  16. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent

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    VALLE Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  17. [Smoldering adult T-cell leukemia complicating severe respiratory failure--an autopsy case report].

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    Maekawa, I; Yosida, K; Hirasawa, K; Mayumi, T; Kanda, M

    1987-03-01

    An autopsy case of smoldering adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is presented. 67 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of fever, cough and increasing dyspnea on October 2, 1985. Laboratory findings revealed high LDH, azothermia and slightly leukocytosis with low percentage of flower cells. CRP was strongly positive. Gas disturbance was markedly. Anti-ATLA antibody using indirect immunofluorescence method was X40 positive. Subsets of peripheral lymphocytes showed OKT 4 dominant. (OKT 3; 67.5%, OKT4; 60.6%, OKT8; 8.8%). A chest X-ray film revealed cardiomegaly and fine granular shadows in bilateral lower pulmonary fields. Diagnosis of interstitial pneumonitis was defined in transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) specimen. O2 therapy, steroid therapy added antibiotics were ineffective, respiratory failure and renal failure were progressive, she died by septic shock in 39th hospital days. In autopsy, no characteristic histological changes of ATL were found in lymph node, bone marrow, spleen, liver, kidney and lung. Sepsis was the cause was of death. Finally this case diagnosed smoldering ATL and pulmonary fibrosis due to bronchial ectasia with repeated pulmonary bacterial infections. The pulmonary complications of patients with ATL were discussed. PMID:2886412

  18. [Adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia associated with HTLV-I virus in Martinique: apropos of 2 cases].

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    Gessain, A; Plumelle, Y; Sanhadji, K; Barin, F; Gazzolo, L; Constant-Desportes, M; Pascaline, N; Diebold, J; De-Thé, G

    1986-01-01

    Two HTLV-I associated adult T cell leukemia cases were observed in patient from Martinique (French West Indies). These case are similar to the clinical entity, described by Takatsuki in 1977 in Japan and by Catovsky in Caribbean patients, characterized by a lymphadenopathy, skin lesions and visceral involvement, hypercalcemia, an aggressive course, and poor prognosis. The malignant cells with T4 phenotype and often suppressive function, were pleomorphic, mature, with prominent nuclear irregularities. Systematic research of HTLV-I virus or antibodies in patients with this clinical picture, to measure the influence of this virus in T cell lymphoproliferative diseases in France and in French West Indies is required. PMID:3016639

  19. [Sarcoidosis and leukemia/T-cell lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 virus infection in adults (apropos of a case)].

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    Panelatti, G; Plumelle, Y; Arfi, S; Pascaline, N; Caplanne, D; Jean-Baptiste, G

    1992-01-01

    The HTLV-1 virus causes a disturbance of the immune system, the evaluation of which is often difficult. We report a case of sarcoidosis in a 49 year old woman of Martinique as evidenced by bilateral hilar adenopathy, hypercalcaemia, uveitis and granulomatous lesions on histological examination. Serological was positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Three years later she developed an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The relationships between the HTLV-1 retroviral infection and different pathologies observed are discussed. PMID:1287773

  20. Tax unleashed: fulminant Tax-positive Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma after failed allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

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    Ghez, David; Renand, Amédée; Lepelletier, Yves; Sibon, David; Suarez, Felipe; Rubio, Marie-Thérèse; Delarue, Richard; Buzyn, Agnès; Beljord, Kheira; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Varet, Bruno; Hermine, Olivier

    2009-12-01

    The human retrovirus HTLV-1 causes Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), a malignant lymphoproliferative disease of CD4+ T cells of dismal prognosis, in 3-5% of the 20 million infected individuals (Proietti et al.(1) and Bazarbachi et al.(2)). Infection with HTLV-1 represents a prototypical model of virus-mediated oncogenesis by virtue of the viral transactivator Tax, a potent oncogenic protein that exerts pleiotropic effects through its ability to deregulate the transcription of various cellular genes and signal transduction pathways and inhibit DNA repair enzymes, which are critical for T-cell homeostasis and genetic stability (Matsuoka and Jeang(3)) (et Boxus Retrovirology 2009). However, the oncogenic potential of Tax remains a conundrum. Tax protein expression is undetectable using conventional methods in freshly harvested ATLL cells and in non-malignant infected CD4+ T cells (Furukawa et al.(4)) but is up regulated after only a few hours of culture in vitro (Hanon et al.(5)). These observations strongly suggest that a host-derived mechanism is able to either actively repress the transcription of viral proteins in vivo or refrain the emergence of Tax-expressing cells, which would have a growth advantage. We report herein a unique case of CD4+ T-cell leukemia highly expressing Tax following rejection of an allogenic peripheral blood stem cell graft for an HTLV-1 associated lymphoma. PMID:19836302

  1. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan induces apoptosis and autophagy in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

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    Kozako, Tomohiro; Soeda, Shuhei; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi; Kuroki, Ayako; Hirata, Shinya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Imakyure, Osamu; Tone, Nanako; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Soeda, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1), requires new treatments. Drug repositioning, reuse of a drug previously approved for the treatment of another condition to treat ATL, offers the possibility of reduced time and risk. Among clinically available angiotensin II receptor blockers, telmisartan is well known for its unique ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which plays various roles in lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, telmisartan reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells via caspase activation in ex vivo peripheral blood monocytes from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) or via caspase-independent cell death in acute-type ATL, which has a poor prognosis. Telmisartan also induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines via caspase activation, whereas other angiotensin II receptor blockers did not induce cell death. Interestingly, telmisartan increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation and autophagy. Thus, telmisartan simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. A hypertension medication with antiproliferation effects on primary and leukemia cells is intriguing. Patients with an early diagnosis of ATL are generally monitored until the disease progresses; thus, suppression of progression from AC and indolent ATL to acute ATL is important. Our results suggest that telmisartan is highly effective against primary cells and leukemia cell lines in caspase-dependent and -independent manners, and its clinical use may suppress acute transformation and improve prognosis of patients with this mortal disease. This is the first report demonstrating a cell growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients. PMID:27419050

  2. Controversies in Targeted Therapy of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma: ON Target or OFF Target Effects?

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    Hugues de Thé

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL represents an ideal model for targeted therapy because of intrinsic chemo-resistance of ATL cells and the presence of two well identified targets: the HTLV-I retrovirus and the viral oncoprotein Tax. The combination of zidovudine (AZT and interferon-alpha (IFN has a dramatic impact on survival of ATL patients. Although the mechanism of action remains unclear, arguments in favor or against a direct antiviral effect will be discussed. Yet, most patients relapse and alternative therapies are mandatory. IFN and arsenic trioxide induce Tax proteolysis, synergize to induce apoptosis in ATL cells and cure Tax-driven ATL in mice through specific targeting of leukemia initiating cell activity. These results provide a biological basis for the clinical success of arsenic/IFN/AZT therapy in ATL patients and suggest that both extinction of viral replication (AZT and Tax degradation (arsenic/IFN are needed to cure ATL.

  3. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: new directions in clinical research.

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    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tobinai, Kensei

    2014-10-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct malignancy of regulatory T cell (Treg)/TH2 cells caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), with a high frequency of expression of CD3/CD4/CD25/CCR4 and FoxP3 in about half of the cells. However, in primary ATL cells, although expression of the virus, including the Tax oncoprotein, appears just after an in vitro culture, integration sites of the provirus into the host genome are random, and chromosomal/genetic abnormalities are complex. ATL is thus a single disease entity that is caused by HTLV-1 and possesses diverse molecular features. The clinical features and prognosis of ATL vary, and this has led to subtypes classified into four categories: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering types, based on lactate dehydrogenase and calcium values and organ involvement. Approximately 15 to 20 million individuals are infected with HTLV-1 worldwide, 1.1 million of whom reside in Japan, and the annual incidence of ATL has been estimated to be approximately 1,000. HTLV-1 infection early in life, mainly from breast feeding, is crucial for the development of ATL. The age-specific occurrence of ATL and complex genome abnormalities that accumulate with disease progression suggest a multistep carcinogenesis model following HTLV-1 infection. Various treatment options are available for ATL and consist of watchful waiting for indolent ATL, intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive ATL, and a combination of IFNα and zidovudine for ATL with leukemic manifestation. Several promising new agents, including an anti-CCR4 antibody, are currently undergoing clinical trials associated with translational research. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Paradigm Shifts in Lymphoma." PMID:25320371

  4. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  5. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

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    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Yufu, Oita (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  6. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-06-16

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10-20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%-5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling-the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)-to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided.

  8. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  9. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10-20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%-5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling-the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)-to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  10. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Zen Giam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ, encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8 and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided.

  11. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; Ptransplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  12. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a clinico-pathologic study of twenty-six patients from Martinique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumelle, Y; Pascaline, N; Nguyen, D; Panelatti, G; Jouannelle, A; Jouault, H; Imbert, M

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) were identified between 1983 and 1991 in Martinique (French West Indies). There were 14 men and 12 women, all of mixed racial descent and born in Martinique. Their ages ranged from 23 to 95 years. The main clinical and laboratory features at initial presentation were peripheral lymphadenopathy (22 cases), hepatomegaly (11 cases), splenomegaly (10 cases), cutaneous lesions (12 cases), hypercalcemia (16 cases), refractory infection by Strongyloides stercoralis (12 cases), and pre-existing autoimmune disorders (4 cases). All patients had absolute lymphocytosis with circulating pleomorphic abnormal lymphocytes. The prognosis was poor, with most patients (20 cases) surviving for less than 6 months. Although the overall clinicopathologic features of ATLL in this series are similar to those described in previous reports, we observed three additional points of interest: a high association with Strongyloides infection, an increased incidence of tropical spastic paresis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) among the relatives of the patients (5 cases), and the presence of prior collagen vascular diseases. PMID:8113152

  13. Dual-Positive (CD4+/CD8+ Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Associated with Complex Karyotype and Refractory Hypercalcemia: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahzad Raza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a rare case of adult T-cell leukemia characterized by an expansion of CD4+ CD8+ double-positive lymphocytes associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and a complex karyotype in a 43-year-old Caribbean male who was initially admitted to our hospital with significant lethargy, visual disturbances, dysphagia, right facial palsy and numbness in both feet for 3 days. He was found to have severe hypercalcemia (15.6 mg/dl. Peripheral blood smear showed multilobulated clover-shaped nuclei. Bone marrow and CSF flow cytometries revealed abnormal monoclonal expansion of T cells positive for CD4, CD5, CD8 and CD25 but negative for CD7, CD20, CD56, CD68 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. The polymerase chain reaction analysis showed a distinct band of the T-cell receptor γ gene, revealing T-cell clonal integration of the proviral DNA of HTLV-1, thus confirming the diagnosis of acute adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Cytogenetic study revealed a male karyotype with monosomy 12, unbalanced translocation 5q and 13q and additional material on 5q, 7q, 14q and 17q. The patient underwent prednisone (EPOCH chemotherapy followed by autologous transplantation with BEAM regimen. Although patients with a rare mixed CD4+ CD8+ immunophenotype usually present with an aggressive clinical course and have a poor prognosis, our patient was able to survive for 2.5 years.

  14. A Case of Pneumonia Caused by Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Cryptococcus Neoformans in a Patient with HTLV-1 Associated Adult T- Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma: Occam's Razor Blunted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Anish; Fe, Alexander; Desai, Amishi; Ilowite, Jonathan; Cunha, Burke A; Mathew, Joseph P

    2016-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is usually preceded by infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I). Patients with ATLL frequently get opportunistic infections of the lungs, intestines, and central nervous system. Pneumocystis pneumonia is commonly known as an AIDS defining illness. Grocott's methenamine silver stain of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples obtained via bronchoscopy remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Pulmonary cryptococcosis is seen in patients with T-cell deficiencies and a diagnosis is made by culture of sputum, BAL, or occasionally of pleural fluid. We present the second case of coinfection with these two organisms in a patient with ATLL who was successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, corticosteroids, and fluconazole. We illustrate the need for high clinical vigilance for seeking out an additional diagnosis, especially in immunocompromised patients if they are not improving despite receiving appropriate treatment. PMID:27024978

  15. A case of post-mogamulizumab relapse of acute-type adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma successfully treated with mogamulizumab and etoposide

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Ichikawa, Kunimo; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Kinoshita, Ayako; Suga, Yasushi; Tomita, Shigeki; Izumi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Ohta, Yasunori; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented to us with the chief complaints of a generalized rash and a mass in the right clavicular region that he first noticed in the year 2012. Biopsy of the mass led to the diagnosis of cutaneous nodular mass-type adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in March 2013. Phototherapy was started, and the symptoms improved temporarily. However, in late June 2013, the serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level increased to 358 IU/L, which was 1.6 times higher than the upper limit o...

  16. Characteristics of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Patients with Long Survival: Prognostic Significance of Skin Lesions and Possible Beneficial Role of Valproic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Plumelle Yves; Michel Stephane; Banydeen Rishika; Delaunay Christine; Panelatti Gérard

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biological features of ten patients with a survival superior to ten years (long survival), out of 175 patients diagnosed with Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL) in Martinique (1983–2013). There were 5 lymphoma and 5 chronic subtypes. Five of them (3 chronic, 2 lymphoma) had been treated with valproic acid (VA) for neurological disorders developed before or after ATL diagnosis, suggesting a beneficial role for VA as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) in ATL tr...

  17. C7a, a Biphosphinic Cyclopalladated Compound, Efficiently Controls the Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Figueiredo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a highly aggressive disease that occurs in individuals infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1. Patients with aggressive ATLL have a poor prognosis because the leukemic cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(−C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppeCl2}, termed C7a, in a patient-derived xenograft model of ATLL, and investigated the mechanism of C7a action in HTLV-1-positive and negative transformed T cell lines in vitro. In vivo survival studies in immunocompromised mice inoculated with human RV-ATL cells and intraperitoneally treated with C7a led to significantly increased survival of the treated mice. We investigated the mechanism of C7a activity in vitro and found that it induced mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, nuclear condensation and DNA degradation. These results suggest that C7a triggers apoptotic cell death in both HTLV-1 infected and uninfected human transformed T-cell lines. Significantly, C7a was not cytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy donors and HTLV-1-infected individuals. C7a inhibited more than 60% of the ex vivo spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HTLV-1-infected individuals. These results support a potential therapeutic role for C7a in both ATLL and HTLV-1-negative T-cell lymphomas.

  18. Adult Leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Lyall K.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past several years, advances have been made in the classification, diagnosis and therapy of the adult leukemias. The overall prognosis and quality of life have improved greatly, especially for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemias. Some of the advances are described in this article. The importance of the clinical, laboratory and diagnostic tests for acute, chronic granulocytic and chronic lymphocytic leukemia are stressed. The therapy and prognosis for patients with the vari...

  19. T- cell prolymphocytic leukemia - A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sharmila

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available T- cell Prolymhocytic leukemia (T-PLL is a rare mature post-thymic T-cell malignancy that is usually reported in the elderly and follows an aggressive course. A 68 year old male presented with a history of weakness and weight loss of two months duration. Clinical examination revealed pallor, enlarged cervical and axillary lymph nodes and splenomegaly. He also had a maculo- papular skin rash. There was marked leucocytosis, anemia and thrombocytopenia (WBC 445 x103sub/ml, Hb 8.5gm/dl, Platelet 25x103/µl with 60% prolymphocytes in the peripheral blood. Bone marrow was hypercellular with an excess of prolymphocytes. Flow cytometric analysis of the bone marrow showed positivity for CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5 and CD7. T- PLL is a rare T cell disorder with characteristic clinical and laboratory features.Currently, no optimal treatment exists although there has been some success with 2′- deoxycoformycin or Campath-1H

  20. Microenvironmental cues for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Diana; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens have led to a substantial improvement in the cure rate of patients suffering from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite this progress, about 15% and 50% of pediatric and adult cases, respectively, show resistance to treatment or relapse with dismal prognosis, calling for further therapeutic investigations. T-ALL is an heterogeneous disease, which presents intrinsic alterations leading to aberrant expression of transcription factors normally involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development and mutations in genes implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and T-cell development. Gene expression profiling allowed the classification of T-ALL into defined molecular subgroups that mostly reflects the stage of their differentiation arrest. So far this knowledge has not translated into novel, targeted therapy. Recent evidence points to the importance of extrinsic signaling cues in controlling the ability of T-ALL to home, survive, and proliferate, thus offering the perspective of new therapeutic options. This review summarizes the present understanding of the interactions between hematopoietic cells and bone marrow/thymic niches during normal hematopoiesis, describes the main signaling pathways implicated in this dialog, and finally highlights how malignant T cells rely on specific niches to maintain their ability to sustain and propagate leukemia. PMID:27088913

  1. Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-I Oncogenesis: Molecular Aspects of Virus and Host Interactions in Pathogenesis of Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Ahmadi Ghezeldasht

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     The study of tumor viruses paves the way for understanding the mechanisms of virus pathogenesis, including those involved in establishing infection and dissemination in the host tumor affecting immune-compromised patients. The processes ranging from viral infection to progressing malignancy are slow and usually insufficient for establishment of transformed cells that develop cancer in only a minority of infected subjects. Therefore, viral infection is usually not the only cause of cancer, and further environmental and host factors, may be implicated. HTLV-I, in particular, is considered as an oncovirus cause of lymphoproliferative disease such as adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and disturbs the immune responses which results in HTLV-I associated meylopathy/tropical spastic parapresis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-I infection causes ATL in a small proportion of infected subjects (2-5% following a prolonged incubation period (15-30 years despite a strong adaptive immune response against the virus.   Overall, these conditions offer a prospect to study the molecular basis of tumorgenicity in mammalian cells. In this review, the oncogencity of HTLV-I is being considered as an oncovirus in context of ATL.    

  2. Characteristics of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Patients with Long Survival: Prognostic Significance of Skin Lesions and Possible Beneficial Role of Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plumelle Yves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical and biological features of ten patients with a survival superior to ten years (long survival, out of 175 patients diagnosed with Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL in Martinique (1983–2013. There were 5 lymphoma and 5 chronic subtypes. Five of them (3 chronic, 2 lymphoma had been treated with valproic acid (VA for neurological disorders developed before or after ATL diagnosis, suggesting a beneficial role for VA as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI in ATL treatment. Total duration of uninterrupted VA treatment ranged from 8 to 37 years. Overall, the 175 incident ATL cases presented with a median survival of 5.43 months. The five VA-treated (VA+ patients presented with longer survival compared to VA treatment-free patients (VA−. For chronic subtypes, survival periods were of 213 months for 3 VA+ patients and of 33 months for 11 VA− patients (p=0.023. For lymphoma subtypes, survival periods were of 144 months for 2 VA+ patients versus 6 months for 49 VA− patients (p=0.0046. ATL cases with skin lesions, particularly lymphoma subtypes, had a longer survival (13.96 months compared to those without skin lesions (6.06 months, p=0.002. Eight out of the 10 patients presenting with long survival had skin lesions.

  3. Is There a Role for HTLV-1-Specific CTL in Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen G. Rowan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ATLL is an aggressive malignancy of T cells that affects about 5% of individuals infected with HTLV-1. The precise mechanism of oncogenesis is not known, but there is evidence that two regulatory viral proteins, Tax and HBZ, are involved. A high set point proviral load is associated with development of ATLL or a chronic inflammatory condition, HAM/TSP. Several lines of evidence, including HLA class 1 association studies and in vitro killing assays, indicate that cytotoxic T lymphocytes are instrumental in determining this proviral load set point. Prior studies have focused chiefly on the CTL response to the immunodominant Tax protein: efficient lysis of Tax-expressing cells inversely correlates with proviral load in nonmalignant infection. However, a recent study showed that strong binding of peptides from HBZ, but not Tax, to HLA class 1 molecules was associated with a low proviral load and a reduced risk of developing HAM/TSP, indicating an important role for HBZ-specific CTL in determining infection outcome. In comparison with nonmalignant infection, HTLV-1-specific CTLs in ATLL patients are reduced in frequency and functionally deficient. Here we discuss the nature of protective CTL responses in nonmalignant HTLV-1 infection and explore the potential of CTLs to protect against ATLL.

  4. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  5. Transformation of human fetal thymus and spleen lymphocytes by human t-cell leukemia virus type Ι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Tadaatsu

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Co-cultivation of human thymus and spleen lymphocytes, which were obtained from 26-week and 27-week fetuses, with a lethally-irradiated human cord T-cell line harboring human T-cell leukemia virus type Ι(HTLV-Ι resultes in the establishment of T-cell lines positive for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens and producing HTLV-Ι. These cell lines had the phenotype of a helper/inducer subset of peripheral T-cells as evidenced by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to human T-cells.

  6. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  7. Detection of HLA-D-region-associated antigens on the surface of adult T-cell leukemia virus particles by immunoelectron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtsuki,Yuji

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available To search for lymphocyte marker antigens on the surface of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV, an immunoelectron microscopic study was performed on a HTLV-producing human T-cell line, MT-2, using monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-Leu-1, -Leu-2b, -Leu-3a, -Leu-5, -Leu-10 and -HLA-DR and OKIal. The reactivity of each antibody with MT-2 cells was tested by the immunoperoxidase method at the light microscopic level. OKIal, anti-HLA-DR and -Leu-10 gave positive results. At the ultrastructural level, the surface of HTLV as well as the plasma membranes of MT-2 cells were labeled with ferritin by the monoclonal antibodies OKIal, anti-HLA-DR and -Leu-10, but not by anti-Leu-1 and -Leu-3a. These findings suggest that HLA-D region -associated antigens are common antigenic determinants shared by the surface of HTLV and the plasma membranes of MT-2 cells. These antigens on the virus surface are probably picked up selectively from the plasma membranes and may play an important role in the interaction of HTLV and target T-cells.

  8. PD-L1 expression on neoplastic or stromal cells is respectively a poor or good prognostic factor for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kiyasu, Junichi; Kato, Takeharu; Yoshida, Noriaki; Shimono, Joji; Yokoyama, Shintaro; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yuya; Kurita, Daisuke; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Kato, Koji; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) is expressed on both tumor and tumor-infiltrating nonmalignant cells in lymphoid malignancies. The programmed cell death 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 pathway suppresses host antitumor responses, although little is known about the significance of PD-1/PD-L1 expression in the tumor microenvironment. To investigate the clinicopathological impact of PD-L1 expression in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), we performed PD-L1 immunostaining in 135 ATLL biopsy samples. We observed 2 main groups: 1 had clear PD-L1 expression in lymphoma cells (nPD-L1(+), 7.4% of patients), and the other showed minimal expression in lymphoma cells (nPD-L1(-), 92.6%). Within the nPD-L1(-) group, 2 subsets emerged: the first displayed abundant PD-L1 expression in nonmalignant stromal cells of the tumor microenvironment (miPD-L1(+), 58.5%) and the second group did not express PD-L1 in any cell (PD-L1(-), 34.1%). nPD-L1(+) ATLL (median survival time [MST] 7.5 months, 95% CI [0.4-22.3]) had inferior overall survival (OS) compared with nPD-L1(-) ATLL (MST 14.5 months, 95% CI [10.1-20.0]) (P = .0085). Among nPD-L1(-) ATLL, miPD-L1(+) ATLL (MST 18.6 months, 95% CI [11.0-38.5]) showed superior OS compared with PD-L1(-) ATLL (MST 10.2 months, 95% CI [8.0-14.7]) (P = .0029). The expression of nPD-L1 and miPD-L1 maintained prognostic value for OS in multivariate analysis (P = .0322 and P = .0014, respectively). This is the first report describing the clinicopathological features and outcomes of PD-L1 expression in ATLL. More detailed studies will disclose clinical and biological significance of PD-L1 expression in ATLL. PMID:27418641

  9. Long-term maintenance combination chemotherapy with OPEC/MPEC (vincristine or methotrexate, prednisolone, etoposide and cyclophosphamide) or with daily oral etoposide and prednisolone can improve survival and quality of life in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, K; Matsumoto, T; Ohtsubo, H; Fujiwara, H; Imamura, N; Hidaka, S; Kukita, T; Tei, C; Matsumoto, M; Arima, N

    1999-12-01

    Acute leukemia and lymphoma varieties of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) usually carry a poor prognosis. While etoposide is generally useful for treating ATL, especially as a daily oral maintenance regimen, etoposide has not proven effective in severe types of ATL efficient in some patients. Of 87 ATL patients whom we have treated, 51 had acute leukemia, 22 lymphoma and 14 progressive chronic leukemia. Seventy-nine patients were treated with a long term maintenance combination protocol, OPEC/MPEC (weekly doses of vincristine, 0.7 mg/m2 or methotrexate, 14 mg/m2; prednisolone, 20 mg/m2; etoposide, 70 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide, 200 mg/m2). The other 8 patients, 3 with acute leukemia, 2 with lymphoma and 3 with progressive chronic leukemia, were treated with daily oral administration of 25 mg of etoposide and 10 mg of prednisolone (DOEP). The dose administered was modified in individual cases to maintain the granulocyte count and reduce the number of ATL cells. Considering both protocols, a complete response and a partial response were achieved in 31.0% and 58.6% patients, respectively. Median survival times (MST) of all patients and, acute leukemia, lymphoma and progressive chronic leukemia types were 7.5, 6.7, 9.6 and 12.4 months, respectively. Respective MST of patients treated with OPEC/MPEC or DOEP protocols were 7.1 and 18.0 months. Relatively normal WBC counts, lower lactate dehydrogenase concentration and normal calcium concentration, limited numbers of anatomic sites involved, good performance status and good response to chemotherapy were significantly associated with long survival time. Drug toxicity was not apparent, and about half of patients were treated in an outpatient setting. PMID:10613451

  10. A transgenic mouse model of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1–associated diseases

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    Takeo eOhsugi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL and several inflammatory diseases. Tax, the protein encoded by HTLV-1, may be responsible for the development of the diseases caused by this virus. To investigate the pathogenic role of Tax, several transgenic mouse strains expressing Tax have been developed in recent years. These mice develop various tumors including large granular lymphocytic leukemia, as well as inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. These results suggest that Tax expression alone is sufficient to cause both malignant neoplastic diseases and inflammatory diseases. However, until recently, there were no tax transgenic mice that develop T-cell leukemia and lymphoma resembling ATLL. The first successful induction of leukemia in T cells was pre–T-cell leukemia generated in transgenic mice in which a mouse lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase p56lck (lck proximal promoter was used to express the tax gene in immature T cells. Subsequently, transgenic mice were established in which the lck-distal promoter was used to express Tax in mature T cells; these mice developed mature T-cell leukemia and lymphoma that more closely resembled ATLL than did earlier mouse models.

  11. A novel unbalanced de novo translocation der(5t(4;5(q26;q21.1 in adult T-cell precursor lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Kjeldsen Eigil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We here describe a novel unbalanced de novo translocation der(5t(4;5(q26;q21.1 in a 39-year-old male diagnosed with acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. Bone marrow (BM was massively infiltrated with 85 % highly proliferative polymorphic T-cell precursors. Immunologically, the malignant cells stained positive for CD7, CD34, intracytoplasmic CD3+, TdT + and negative for CD3 and CD5. G-banded chromosome analysis of BM cells showed the normal karyotype 46,XY[25] whereas BAC-based aCGH analysis revealed partial gain of 4q and partial loss of 5q. Multicolor karyotyping confirmed the presence of an unbalanced der(5t(4;5 as the sole structural abnormality. Subsequent high-resolution oligonucleotide-based aCGH analysis showed that the der(5t(4;5(q26;q21.1 resulted in partial trisomy of 4q26qter (117,719,015-190,613,014 and partial monosomy of 5q21.1qter (100,425,442-180,857,866 and that there was no indication of any gene disruptions resulting from the breakages. Interphase FISH analysis using BAC-based specific probes for 4q26 and 5q21.1 confirmed the breakpoints and revealed approximately 80 % abnormal cells accordingly. At 4q26 the MIR1973 gene is located centromeric to the breakpoint in the copy number neutral region and the TRAM1L1 gene is located within the gained region. At 5q21.1 the genes ST8SIA4 and MIR548p are located centromeric to the breakpoint and no known genes up to approximately 1 Mb telomeric to the breakpoint in the copy number loss region. Interestingly, only the gene ST8SIA4 at 5q21.1 have been implicated in T-cell regulation as it encodes one of the key enzymes for polysialysation of surface proteins on dendritic cells which are important regulators for T-cell proliferation. The der(5t(4;5 is thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute T-ALL due to either gain of 4q, the loss of 5q, or deregulation of genes in proximity to the breakpoints.

  12. Induction of IL-10- and IFN-gamma-producing T-cell responses by autoreactive T-cells expressing human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Natsuko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Takamori, Ayako; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kato, Hirotomo; Ohashi, Takashi; Amagasa, Teruo; Masuda, Takao; Kannagi, Mari

    2009-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia, HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and various autoimmune-like disorders. T-cell immune suppression is also associated with HTLV-I infection. Mechanisms of diverse immune dysregulation in HTLV-I infection are obscure. Here, we investigated a potential link between autoimmunity and immune suppression in HTLV-I infection. G14, an IL-2-dependent HTLV-I-negative CD4(+)CD8(+) T-cell line previously established from an HTLV-I-infected rat, constantly proliferated and produced IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma production by G14 cells was dependent on interactions between CD4 and MHC-II, suggesting that G14 cells recognized self-antigens presented by MHC-II on themselves. To examine immune response to G14 cells, we inoculated G14 cells into syngeneic naive rats. Interestingly, T-cells isolated from these rats vigorously proliferated when stimulated with G14-Tax cells that stably expressed HTLV-I Tax, but not with G14 cells. G14-Tax-mediated T-cell proliferation was abrogated by antibodies to CD80 and CD86 that were up-regulated in G14-Tax cells. T-cells propagated by repetitive G14-Tax cell stimulations in culture with IL-2 expressed CD4, CD25 and cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), produced abundant amounts of IL-10 and IFN-gamma in response to G14 cells and suppressed growth of G14 cells mainly through supernatant-mediated mechanisms. Similar IL-10- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+)CD25(+)CTLA-4(+) T-cells were predominantly induced in culture of splenocytes from HTLV-I-infected rats following stimulation with G14-Tax cells. These results implied that expression of Tax in the otherwise low immunogenic autoreactive T-cells induced IL-10- and IFN-gamma-producing T-cell responses with regulatory effects against the autoreactive cells. Our findings provide new insights into the complex immune conditions underlying HTLV-I-associated diseases. PMID:19654198

  13. Improved anti-leukemia activities of adoptively transferred T cells expressing bispecific T-cell engager in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Barrett, D M; Jiang, S; Fang, C; Kalos, M; Grupp, S A; June, C H; Zhao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Despite the impressive clinical efficacy of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-Ts), the current applications of CAR-T cell therapy are limited by major treatment-related toxicity. Thus, safer yet effective alternative approaches must be developed. In this study, we compared CD19 bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE)-transferred T cells that had been transfected by RNA electroporation with CD19 CAR RNA-transferred T cells both in vitro and in an aggressive Nalm6 leukemia mouse model. BiTEs were secreted from the transferred T cells and enabled both the transferred and bystander T cells to specifically recognize CD19(+) cell lines, with increased tumor killing ability, prolonged functional persistence, increased cytokine production and potent proliferation compared with the CAR-T cells. More interestingly, in comparison with CD3/CD28 bead-stimulated T cells, T cells that were expanded by a rapid T-cell expansion protocol (REP) showed enhanced anti-tumor activities for both CAR and BiTE RNA-electroporated T cells both in vitro and in a Nalm6 mouse model (P<0.01). Furthermore, the REP T cells with BiTE RNAs showed greater efficacy in the Nalm6 leukemia model compared with REP T cells with CAR RNA (P<0.05) and resulted in complete leukemia remission. PMID:27258611

  14. Type C virus particles produced in human T-cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oda,Takuzo

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy of four human T-cell lines revealed the production of type C virus particles in two T-cell lines: one derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the other from a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy. Virus particles isolated from these cells had reverse transcriptase activity and the major internal structural protein of 30,000 daltons (p30. The indirect immunofluorescence test of these virus-producing cells with sera of patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL was negative. The data indicate that these retroviruses are different from adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV.

  15. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-03-31

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  16. A Review of Nelarabine in the Treatment of T-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Czuczman, Myron S.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with relapsed/refractory T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) have a dismal prognosis. Prior to the development of novel purine analogs, salvage chemotherapy was of limited efficacy. Nelarabine, and more recently, clofarabine and forodesine have demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity in relapsed/refractory T-ALL and T-LBL. As a single agent, nelarabine induces response rates in between 33% to 50% of adult or pediatric patients with...

  17. Toxoplasma gondii myelitis in a patient with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma Mielite por Toxoplasma gondii em um paciente com leucemia-linfoma de células T do adulto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELVES MACIEL

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL caused by HTLV-I may be associated with severe immunosupression and several opportunistic infections. Toxoplasmic encephalitis is a common central nervous system opportunistic infection in severely immunosupressed patients, however spinal cord involvement by this parasite is rare. In this paper, we report a case of toxoplasmic myelitis in a patient with ATL.Leucemia de células T do adulto (ATL, causada pelo HTLV-I, pode estar associada com imunossupressão severa e muitas infecções oportunistas. Encefalite por toxoplasmose é uma infecção oportunista do sistema nervoso central em pacientes imunossuprimidos, no entanto o envolvimento da medula espinal por este parasita é raro. Neste artigo, apresentamos um caso de mielite em um paciente com ATL.

  18. Advanced lymphoblastic clones detection in T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervina, A A; Komkov, A Y; Mamedov, I Z; Lebedev, Y B

    2016-03-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignant neoplasm of the lymphocyte precursors that suffered malignant transformation arresting the lymphoid cell differentiation. Clinical studies revealed monoor, more rarely, oligoclonal nature of the disease. A precise identification of malignant clone markers is both the crucial stage of early diagnostics and the essential prognostic factor for therapeutic treatment. Here we present an improved system for unbiased detection of lymphoblastic clones in bone marrow aspirates of T-ALL patients. The system based on multiplex PCR of rearranged T-cell receptor locus (TRB) and straightforward sequencing of the resulted PCR fragments. Testing of the system on genomic DNA from Jurkat cell line and four clinical bone marrow aspirates revealed a set of unique TRB rearrangements that precisely characterize each of tested samples. Therefore, the outcome of the system produces highly informative molecular genetic markers for further monitoring of minimal residual disease in T-ALL patients. PMID:27193704

  19. Association between decreasing trend in the mortality of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants in Japan: analysis of Japanese vital statistics and Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (JSHCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm with a very poor outcome. However, several studies have shown a progress in the treatment. To evaluate the effect of the progress in the treatment of ATLL in a whole patient population, we used vital statistics data and estimated age-adjusted mortality and trends in the mortality from 1995 to 2009. Since allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has been introduced as a modality with curative potential during study period, we also evaluated the association of the annual number of allo-HSCT and the trend of the mortality of ATLL. Endemic (Kyushu) and non-endemic areas (others) were evaluated separately. Significance in the trend of mortality was evaluated by joinpoint regression analysis. During the study period, a total of 14 932 patients died of ATLL in Japan, and mortality decreased significantly in both areas (annual percent change (95% confidence interval (CI)): Kyushu, −3.1% (−4.3, −1.9); others, −3.4% (−5.3, −1.5)). This decreasing trend in mortality seems to be associated with an increase in the number of allo-HSCTs (Kyushu, R-squared=0.70, P=0.003; and others, R-squared=0.55, P=0.058). This study reveals that the mortality of ATLL is now significantly decreasing in Japan and this decreasing trend might be associated with allo-HSCT

  20. Impact of conditioning with TBI in adult patients with T-cell ALL who receive a myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a report from the acute leukemia working party of EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahu, X; Labopin, M; Giebel, S; Aljurf, M; Kyrcz-Krzemien, S; Socié, G; Eder, M; Bonifazi, F; Bunjes, D; Vigouroux, S; Michallet, M; Stelljes, M; Zuckerman, T; Finke, J; Passweg, J; Yakoub-Agha, I; Niederwieser, D; Sucak, G; Sengeløv, H; Polge, E; Nagler, A; Esteve, J; Mohty, M

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a therapeutic option for adult patients with T-cell ALL (T-ALL). Meanwhile, few allo-SCT data specific to adult T-ALL have been described thus far. Specifically, the optimal myeloablative conditioning regimen is unknown. In this retrospective study, 601 patients were included. Patients received allo-SCT in CR1, CR2, CR >2 or in advanced disease in 69%, 15%, 2% and 14% of cases, respectively. With an overall follow-up of 58 months, 523 patients received a TBI-based regimen, whereas 78 patients received a chemotherapy-based regimen including IV busulfan-cyclophosphamide (IV Bu-Cy) (n=46). Unlike patients aged ⩾35 years, patients aged <35 years who received a TBI-based regimen displayed an improved outcome compared with patients who received a chemotherapy-based regimen (5-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 50% for TBI versus 18% for chemo-only regimen or IV Bu-Cy regimens, P=10(-5) and 10(-4), respectively). In multivariate analysis, use of TBI was associated with an improved LFS (hazard ratio (HR)=0.55 (0.34-0.86), P=0.01) and overall survival (HR=0.54 (0.34-0.87), P=0.01) in patients aged <35 years. In conclusion, younger adult patients with T-ALL entitled to receive a myeloablative allo-SCT may benefit from TBI-based regimens. PMID:26618548

  1. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J.; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27151989

  2. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. REGULATORY T-CELLS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

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    Giovanni D'arena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T-cells (Tregs constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in either cancer and autoimmune disorders.

  4. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in a patient with HTLV-I/II associated myelopathy Leucemia - linfoma de células T do adulto em um paciente com mielopatia associada a HTLV-I/II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Freitas

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelopathy associated with T-lymphotropic virus type I (HAM has been described as an endemic disease in several areas of the world, meanwhile there are few papers describing the association between HAM and adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. We report the case of a man that, after four years of progressive spastic paraparesis and neurogenic bladder, developed a clinical picture of a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by dermal and systemic envolvement, mimicking mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.Apesar da infecção pelo HTLV-I ser endêmica em várias regiões do mundo, poucos são os relatos da associação entre leucemia-linfoma de células T do adulto (ATLL e encefalomieloneuropatia pelo HTLV-I. No presente artigo é descrito um paciente que no curso do comprometimento neurológico pelo HTLV-I desenvolveu quadro de leucemia com infiltração de tecido dérmico semelhante ao encontrado na micose fungóide/síndrome de Sézary.

  5. Production of antigen-specific suppressive T cell factor by radiation leukemia virus-transformed suppressor T cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Doria, G; Adorini, L

    1981-01-01

    Hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL)-specific suppressor T cells induced in C57BL/6 mice have been selected by sequential passage over plates coated with goat anti-mouse Ig and HEL. These suppressor T cells, 80% I-J+, were infected in vitro with radiation leukemia virus (RadLV/Nu1) and injected intravenously into sublethally irradiated syngeneic recipients. After 4-6 months, 6 out of 20 injected mice developed thymic lymphomas, which were maintained by transplantation into histocompatible hosts and s...

  6. Curcumin induces growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the inhibition of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway in T cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult T cell leukemia is an aggressive and frequently fatal malignancy that expressess constitutively activated growth-signaling pathways in association with deregulated growth and resistance to apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a naturally occurring yellow pigment, isolated from the rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used in the treatment of injury and inflammation. But the effect and mechanism of action of curcumin on T cell leukemia is not known. To investigate the antitumor activity of curcumin in T cell leukemia, we examined its effect on constitutive phosphorylation of JAK and STAT proteins, proliferation, and apoptosis in HTLV-I-transformed T cell lines. HTLV-I-transformed T cell leukemia lines, MT-2, HuT-102, and SLB-1, express constitutively phosphorylated JAK3, TYK2, STAT3, and STAT5 signaling proteins. In vitro treatment with curcumin induced a dose-dependent decrease in JAK and STAT phosphorylation resulting in the induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in T cell leukemia. The induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the blockade of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway suggests this be a mechanism by which curcumin induces antitumor activity in T cell leukemia

  7. A T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia case with central nervous system involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Yayar, Okan; Demiroglu, Haluk; Yesilirmak, Aysun; Uner, Aysegul

    2015-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is an aggressive mature T cell neoplasm that typically involves peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen. It is a rare disease that comprises 2-5% of mature lymphocytic leukemia in adults. Here we present a T-PLL patient with CNS involvement. A 74-year-old man admitted to a hospital in April 2014 with vomiting. He was diagnosed as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and R-CVP (Rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone) chemotherapy protocol was started. After the first two cycles of chemotherapy, the patient’s mental functions improved. However after the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy was given in July 2014 the general situation of the patient deteriorated and ptosis of the left eye and facial paralysis developed. Then the patient was referred to our medical center. An MR of the brain revealed linear contrast enhancement around the bilateral 3rd, 7th and 8th cranial nerves which indicated cranial involvement by the lymphoproliferative process (Figure 1). Cerebrospinal fluid cytological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Based on these and bone marrow aspiration and biopsy findings a diagnosis of T-PLL was rendered (Figure 3). In September 2014 the patient died suddenly due to a cardiac arrest. Differential diagnosis is very important in T-PLL. Both T-PLL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may present with splenomegaly and lymphocytosis as well as circulating prolymphocytes in blood. Typical CLL cells are like mature lymphocytes with dense nucleus and aggregated chromatin. To conclude, CNS involvement in T-PLL is a rare finding and differential diagnosis of T-PLL is very important. PMID:26550397

  8. Epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F

    2010-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review.

  9. Induction of T-cell immunity against leukemia by dendritic cells pulsed with total RNA isolated from leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李牧; 尤胜国; 葛薇; 马双; 马楠; 赵春华

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and efficacy of eliciting leukemia-specific T-cell responses in syngeneic mice in vitro and in vivo using dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with total RNA from leukemia cells.Methods DCs generated from bone marrow culture in vitro in the presence of combined cytokines were pulsed with cellular total RNA isolated from cultured L615 cells by cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP). T-cell responses were evaluated by in vitro proliferation, and cytotoxicity assay. And in vivo immune protection and proghosis of mice with leukemia were studied.Conclusions These data support the use of DCs/RNA vaccine as a feasible and effective route to elicit leukemia immunity against unidentified leukemia-associated antigens for treatment of leukemia-bearing animals.

  10. Type C virus particles produced in human T-cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, Takuzo; Watanabe,Sekiko; Nakamura,Takashi

    1983-01-01

    Electron microscopy of four human T-cell lines revealed the production of type C virus particles in two T-cell lines: one derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the other from a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy. Virus particles isolated from these cells had reverse transcriptase activity and the major internal structural protein of 30,000 daltons (p30). The indirect immunofluorescence test of these virus-producing cells with sera of patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was negative....

  11. Production of antigen-specific suppressive T cell factor by radiation leukemia virus-transformed suppressor T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hen egg-white lysozyme-specific suppressor T cells induced in C57BL/6 mice have been selected by sequential passage over plates coated with goat anti-mouse Ig and HEL. These suppressor T cells, 80% I-J+, were infected in vitro with radiation leukemia virus and injected intravenously into sublethally irradiated syngeneic recipients. After 4 to 6 months, 6 out of 20 injected mice developed thymic lymphomas, which were maintained by transplantation into histocompatible hosts and subsequently established as permanent cell lines. Cells of these six thymomas were screened for the presence of Thy 1.2, Lyt 1, Lyt 2, I-J/sup b/, and Ig cell surface antigens by direct or indirect immunofluorescence. One tumor was found to express the expected phenotype of suppressor T cells. High-speed supernatants of extracts obtained from L4 cells were able to induce HEL-specific suppression in a T cell proliferative assay, demonstrating the presence of an antigen-specific suppressive T cell factor

  12. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We investiga...... of calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  13. Unusual immunophenotype of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Rabade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large granular lymphocytes (LGL leukemias are commonly of the T-cell or NK-cell type. T-cell LGL leukemia is typically a disorder of mature CD3, CD8 and T-cell receptor TCR (TCR - T cell receptor-αβ positive cytotoxic T-cells. Rare variants include TCRγδ+ variants and CD4 + TCRαβ+ cases. We report a case of each of these rare variants. An 83-year-old female presented with anemia and lymphocytosis with LGLs on peripheral smear. Six-color multiparametric flowcytometric analysis showed expression of CD3, heterogeneous CD7, dim CD2 and TCRγδ and lacked expression of CD5, TCRαβ, CD56, CD4 and CD8. A final diagnosis of TCRγδ+ T-cell LGL leukemia was made. Differentiation between TCRγδ+ T-cell LGL leukemia and other γδ+ T-cell malignancies is of utmost importance due to the indolent nature of the former as compared to the highly aggressive behavior of the latter. An 85-year-old male diagnosed with liposarcoma was identified to have lymphocytosis during preoperative evaluation. Peripheral smear showed presence of LGLs. Flowcytometric immunophenotyping showed expression of TCRαβ, CD3, CD2, CD5, CD4, dim CD8, CD56 with aberrant loss of CD7 expression. Vβ repertoire analysis by flowcytometry showed 97% cells with Vβ14 clonality. A final diagnosis of TCRαβ+ CD4 + T-cell LGL leukemia was made. CD4 + T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemias have an indolent, less aggressive course when compared to their CD8 + counterparts and are not necessarily associated with cytopenias. However, their association with secondary neoplasia (29% of the cases warrants a high degree of suspicion in the diagnosis as also noted in the index case. Use of a wide panel of antibodies and newer modalities such as Vβ repertoire analysis helps in accurate subtyping of LGL leukemia.

  14. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone marrow necrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnaw Najmaddin SH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bone marrow necrosis is a clinicopathological condition diagnosed most often at postmortem examination, but it is also seen during the course of malignancy and is not always associated with a poor prognosis. The morphological features of bone marrow necrosis are disruption of the normal marrow architecture and necrosis of myeloid tissue and medullary stroma. Non-malignant conditions associated with bone marrow necrosis are sickle cell anemia, infections, drugs (sulfasalazine, interferon α, all-trans retinoic acid, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and fludarabine, disseminated intravascular coagulation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute graft versus host diseases. The malignant causes are leukemia, lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. Herein we report the case of a patient with precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow necrosis at initial presentation. Case presentation A 10-year-old Kurdish boy was presented with generalized bone pain and fever of 1 month’s duration which was associated with sweating, easy fatigability, nose bleeding, breathlessness and severe weight loss. On examination, we observed pallor, tachypnea, tachycardia, low blood pressure, fever, petechial hemorrhage, ecchymoses, tortuous dilated veins over the chest and upper part of abdomen, multiple small cervical lymph node enlargements, mildly enlarged spleen, palpable liver and gross abdominal distention. Blood analysis revealed pancytopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging results showed mediastinal widening on a planar chest X-ray and diffuse focal infiltration of the axial bone marrow on magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral vertebrae. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy examination showed extensive bone marrow necrosis. Immunophenotyping analysis of the bone marrow biopsy confirmed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as CD3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl

  15. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  16. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  17. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  18. AZD1775 sensitizes T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to cytarabine by promoting apoptosis over DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James B; Baturin, Dmitry; Burleson, Tamara M; Van Linden, Annemie A; Kim, Yong-Mi; Porter, Christopher C

    2015-09-29

    While some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have excellent prognoses, the prognosis for adults and children with T cell ALL is more guarded. Treatment for T-ALL is heavily dependent upon antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, including cytarabine. Targeted inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 has emerged as a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to cytarabine and other chemotherapeutics. We sought to determine if this strategy would be effective for T-ALL with clinically relevant anti-leukemia agents. We found that AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL cells to several traditional anti-leukemia agents, acting synergistically with cytarabine by enhancing DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), AZD1775 led to increased phosphorylation of H2AX at tyrosine 142, a signaling event associated with promotion of apoptosis over DNA repair. In a xenograft model of T-ALL, the addition of AZD1775 to cytarabine slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of WEE1 with AZD1775 sensitizes T-ALL to several anti-leukemia agents, particularly cytarabine and that mechanistically, AZD1775 promotes apoptosis over DNA repair in cells treated with cytarabine. These data support the development of clinical trials including AZD1775 in combination with conventional chemotherapy for acute leukemia. PMID:26334102

  19. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-10-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  20. Upregulation of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factor Expression in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Sayitoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is associated with recurrent chromosomal aberrations and abnormal ectopic gene expression during T-cell development. In order to gain insight into the pathogenesis of T-ALL this study aimed to measure the level of expression of 7 T-cell oncogenes (LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, and CALM-AF10 in pediatric T-ALL patients. METHODS: LMO2, LYL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, TAL1, and CALM-AF10 expression was measured using quantitative real-time PCR in 43 pediatric T-ALL patients. RESULTS: A high level of expression of LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, and BMI1 genes was observed in a large group of T-ALL. Several gene expression signatures indicative of leukemic arrest at specific stages of normal thymocyte development (LYL1 and LMO2 were highly expressed during the cortical and mature stages of T-cell development. Furthermore, upregulated TAL1 and BMI1 expression was observed in all phenotypic subgroups. In all, 6 of the patients had TLX1 and TLX3 proto-oncogene expression, which does not occur in normal cells, and none of the patients had CALM-AF10 fusion gene transcription. Expression of LYL1 alone and LMO2-LYL1 co-expression were associated with mediastinal involvement; however, high-level oncogene expression was not predictive of outcome in the present pediatric T-ALL patient group, but there was a trend towards a poor prognostic impact of TAL1 and/or LMO2 and/or LYL1 protooncogene expression. CONCLUSION: Poor prognostic impact of TAL1 and/or LMO2 and/or LYL1 proto-oncogene expression indicate the need for extensive study on oncogenic rearrangement and immunophenotypic markers in T-ALL, and their relationship to treatment outcome.

  1. Prognostic relevance of RUNX1 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Grossmann, Vera; Kern, Wolfgang; Harbich, Stefan; Alpermann, Tamara; Jeromin, Sabine; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The runt-related transcription factor 1, RUNX1, is crucial in the development of myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages and has been reported to be mutated in myeloid malignancies in approximately 30% of cases. In this study, the mutational status of RUNX1 was investigated in 128 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. We detected a mutation rate of 18.3% (13 of 71) in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 3.8% (2 of 52) in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and no muta...

  2. Oral Manifestations of T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna-Eirini Arvanitidou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: T-cell large granular lymphocytic (T-LGL leukemia is a rare, chronic, often indolent lymphoproliferative disorder of mature T cells (CD3+. Severe neutropenia and other cytopenias are common features in patients with T-LGL leukemia and may cause infections, thus representing a major cause of morbidity in this disease. Immunosuppressive therapy with low-dose regimes of methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids or cyclosporine A is the treatment of choice. Amongst the variety of T-LGL leukemia complications, oral manifestations such as ulcers have been rarely reported. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia with oral manifestations and to discuss their pathogenesis and management.Methods: In the present case, a 65 year old female with a two-month history of diagnosed T-LGL leukemia presented with oral lesions, including ulcerations on the ventral tongue and soft palate as well as swollen, erythematous and ulcerated gingiva. The patient was under treatment with methotrexate, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and erythropoietin.Results: Considering patients’ medical history and clinical appearance of the lesions, a clinical diagnosis of a neutropenic ulcer of the tongue was established. The oral lesions resolved after treatment with antibiotics, topical steroids and antiseptics combined with improvement of the hematological condition. The pertinent literature related to T-LGL leukemia ethiopathology, diagnostics and treatment was discussed.Conclusions: Although rare, T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia should be included in the list of lymphoproliferative disorders, which may present with oral manifestations as a result of the disease and its treatment complications.

  3. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  4. T cell-prolymphocytic leukemia detected in a patient of breast cancer at the time of recurrence: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Manish; Raina, Vinod; GUPTA Ritu; Das, Prasenjit

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Therapy related second malignancy of the hematological system is small but real risk after adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. It includes acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); however T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) has not been described earlier in relation to breast cancer and its therapy. T-PLL is a rare chronic T-cell lymphoproliferative disease with a mature post-thymic T-cell immunophenotype and aggressive clinical course. Case presen...

  5. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  6. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  7. Late recurrence of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia frequently represents a second leukemia rather than a relapse: first evidence for genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szczepanski, T.; Velden, V.H. van der; Waanders, E.; Kuiper, R.P.; Vlierberghe, P. Van; Gruhn, B.; Eckert, C.; Panzer-Grumayer, R.; Basso, G.; Cave, H.; Stadt, U.Z.; Campana, D.; Schrauder, A.; Sutton, R.; Wering, E. van; Meijerink, J.P.P.; Dongen, J.J. van

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Relapse of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) often occurs during treatment, but in some cases, leukemia re-emerges off therapy. On the basis of previous analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns, we hypothesized that some late recurrences of T-ALL mig

  8. CD19 CAR–T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A.; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M.; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N.; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Maloney, David G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR–T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. METHODS. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR–T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after lymphodepletion chemotherapy. RESULTS. The defined composition product was remarkably potent, as 27 of 29 patients (93%) achieved BM remission, as determined by flow cytometry. We established that high CAR–T cell doses and tumor burden increase the risks of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Moreover, we identified serum biomarkers that allow testing of early intervention strategies in patients at the highest risk of toxicity. Risk-stratified CAR–T cell dosing based on BM disease burden decreased toxicity. CD8+ T cell–mediated anti-CAR transgene product immune responses developed after CAR–T cell infusion in some patients, limited CAR–T cell persistence, and increased relapse risk. Addition of fludarabine to the lymphodepletion regimen improved CAR–T cell persistence and disease-free survival. CONCLUSION. Immunotherapy with a CAR–T cell product of defined composition enabled identification of factors that correlated with CAR–T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity and facilitated design of lymphodepletion and CAR–T cell dosing strategies that mitigated toxicity and improved disease-free survival. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01865617. FUNDING. R01-CA136551; Life Science Development Fund; Juno Therapeutics; Bezos Family Foundation. PMID:27111235

  9. Successful Treatment of Fanconi Anemia and T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrie Flatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. Patients are sensitive to the toxic effects of chemotherapy. We report the case of a patient with Fanconi anemia who developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He experienced chemotherapy-related complications including prolonged neutropenia, grade IV vincristine neuropathy, and disseminated aspergillosis. He was successfully treated with modified dosing of cytarabine and intrathecal methotrexate followed by allogeneic bone marrow transplant. The aspergillosis was treated with systemic antifungal treatment and surgical resection. Now 30 months after bone marrow transplant the patient is without evidence of aspergillosis or leukemia.

  10. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  11. Chromosomal translocation involving the beta T cell receptor gene in acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    DNA spanning a t(7;19) chromosomal translocation breakpoint was isolated from the human T cell line SUP-T7 established from an acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the point of crossover on chromosome 7 occurred immediately adjacent to joining segment J beta 1.1 within the TCR-beta gene, suggesting that this translocation resulted from an error in TCR gene rearrangement. On chromosome 19, the translocation occurred within a previously uncharacterized transcri...

  12. Identification of Interconnected Markers for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Guven Maiorov; Ozlem Keskin; Ozden Hatirnaz Ng; Ugur Ozbek; Attila Gursoy

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation BioMed Research International Volume 2013, Article ID 210253, 20 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/210253 Research Article Identification of Interconnected Markers for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Emine Guven Maiorov,1 Ozlem Keskin,1 Ozden Hatirnaz Ng,2 Ugur Ozbek,2 and Attila Gursoy1 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, 34450 Istanbu...

  13. Identification of a novel SEPT9-ABL1 fusion gene in a patient with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikio Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL, a rare type of peripheral T-cell leukemia, is characterized by marked splenomegaly with rapidly progressive lymphocytosis and a poor prognosis. Nine kinds of ABL1 chimeric genes have been identified in various kinds of hematological malignancies, such as chronic myeloid leukemia and B- or T-lymphoblastic leukemia. However, there have been no reports describing T-PLL cases with ABL1 rearrangements. We herein report a case of T-PLL with a novel SEPT9-ABL1 fusion gene which induced strong resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib and dasatinib.

  14. Armed and accurate: engineering cytotoxic T cells for eradication of leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radic Marko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Translational medicine depends on a rapid and efficient exchange of results between the bench and the bedside. A recent example from the field of cancer immunotherapy highlights the essential nature of this exchange. Methods have been developed to convert a patient's cytotoxic T cells into efficient and specific killers of cancer cells in patients with leukemia. By using recombinant DNA techniques, a lentiviral vector was constructed to express chimeric antigen receptors in cytotoxic T cells from patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The purpose of the chimeric receptors was to direct the cytotoxic T cell activity against cells causing the cancer. The effect of infusing the engineered T cells back into the cancer patients was tested in a Phase I trial at the University of Pennsylvania, and the initial results were described in two articles from the research team of Dr. Carl June. The remarkable success of this trial should energize further applications of biotechnology in the development of new cancer immunotherapies.

  15. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  18. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  19. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  20. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  1. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  2. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  3. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Regulatory T-cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: actor or innocent bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; D’Auria, Fiorella; Statuto, Teodora; Sanzo, Paola Di; Martino, Laura De; Marandino, Aurelio; Sangiorgio, Michele; Musto, Pellegrino; Feo, Vincenzo De

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are now under extensive investigation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This small subset of T-cells has been, in fact, considered to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of CLL. However, whether Treg dysregulation in CLL plays a key role or it rather represents a simple epiphenomenon is still matter of debate. In the former case, Treg cells could be appealing for targeting therapies. Finally, Treg cells have also been proposed as a prognostic indicator of the disease clinical course. PMID:23358515

  6. Precursor T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with rare presentation in the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the 16th reported case of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL with involvement in the bladder. Our patient was a 22 yearold man with T-cell ALL with a mediastinal mass. He received hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (HyperCVAD with mediastinal radiation. Prior to starting maintenance, he relapsed in the bladder and marrow. He received a nelarabine- based induction regimen and achieved remission. This was followed by an unrelated 11/12 HLA-matched myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant. He is in complete remission for the past 409 days.

  7. [Ribonuclease binase induces death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnysheva, K M; Petrushanko, I Yu; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S; Makarov, A A; Mitkevich, V A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease binase is a potential anticancer agent. In the present study, we have determined the toxic effect of binase towards cell lines of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat and CEMss. We have shown that binase induces apoptosis in these cells. At the same time, binase does not cause toxic effects in leukocytes of healthy donors, which suggests that binase activity towards leukemic cells is selective. We have found that the treatment of cancer cells with binase leads to a reduction in reactive oxygen species and transcription factor NFκB levels, and demonstrated that these effects are a common feature of the action of RNases on cancer cells.

  8. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia.

  9. Potential antileukemic effect of gamma delta T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, M; Yotnda, P; Bensussan, A; Oudhiri, N; Guidal, C; Rohrlich, P; Boumsell, L; Grandchamp, B; Vilmer, E

    1995-05-01

    The immune response to leukemia is poorly understood. We postulated that nonmalignant T lymphocytes remaining within bone marrow from children with newly diagnosed ALL could be involved in this immune response. T lymphocytes which expressed gamma delta TCR comprised less than 1% of ALL marrow cells. A preferential outgrowth of gamma delta T cells within the CD3 population was observed when marrow cells were cultured with IL-2 alone or with stimulating feeder cells. These results, obtained in a series of 14 patients with precursor B-ALL, were significantly different when compared with expansions from normal marrow cells. In one patient, the clones established from the expanded population displayed different patterns of cytotoxicity against tumoral targets of the B cell lineage. Some clones expressing the TCR V delta 1 segment showed cytotoxic activity against a cell line derived from a pre-B ALL without activity against a LAK-sensitive B cell line. Using PCR amplification, one such clone was detected at high frequency, in the primary expansion of ALL marrow cells. These results suggest a prior activation in vivo of some gamma delta T cells by leukemic cells and provide some evidence on the role of these subsets in the immune response to leukemia.

  10. MicroRNA181a Is Overexpressed in T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma and Related to Chemoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Xun Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs play an important role in tumorogenesis and chemoresistance in lymphoid malignancies. Comparing with reactive hyperplasia, miR181a was overexpressed in 130 patients with T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (n=32, T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (n=16, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (n=45, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (n=15, and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (n=22. Irrespective to histological subtypes, miR181a overexpression was associated with increased AKT phosphorylation. In vitro, ectopic expression of miR181a in HEK-293T cells significantly enhanced cell proliferation, activated AKT, and conferred cell resistance to doxorubicin. Meanwhile, miR181a expression was upregulated in Jurkat cells, along with AKT activation, during exposure to chemotherapeutic agents regularly applied to T-cell leukemia/lymphoma treatment, such as doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, and cisplatin. Isogenic doxorubicin-resistant Jurkat and H9 cells were subsequently developed, which also presented with miR181a overexpression and cross-resistance to cyclophosphamide and cisplatin. Meanwhile, specific inhibition of miR181a enhanced Jurkat and H9 cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, further indicating that miR181a was involved in acquired chemoresistance. Collectively, miR181a functioned as a biomarker of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma through modulation of AKT pathway. Related to tumor cell chemoresistance, miR181a could be a potential therapeutic target in treating T-cell malignancies.

  11. Potential for bispecific T-cell engagers: role of blinatumomab in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jeune, Caroline; Thomas, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and patients whose minimal residual disease persists during treatment have a poor leukemia-free survival. Despite improvements in front-line therapy, the outcome in these patients remains poor, especially after relapse. As there are no standard chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of patients with R/R B-precursor ALL, T-cell-based therapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have been developed to target specific antigens expressed in B-lineage blast cells. In this setting, CD19 is of great interest as this antigen is expressed in B-lineage cells. Therefore, it has been selected as the target antigen for blinatumomab, a new bi-specific T-cell engager antibody. This sophisticated antibody binds sites for both CD19 and CD3, leading to T-cell proliferation and activation and B-cell apoptosis. Owing to its short serum half-life, blinatumomab has been administrated by continuous intravenous infusion with a favorable safety profile. The most significant toxicities were central nervous system events and the cytokine release syndrome. This new therapeutic approach using blinatumomab has been shown to be effective in patients with positive minimal residual disease and in patients with R/R B-precursor ALL leading to a recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated review process. This review focuses on the profile of blinatumomab and its efficacy and safety.

  12. Transgenic mice for MTCP1 develop T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, C; Dastot, H; Soulier, J; Janin, A; Daniel, M T; Madani, A; Grimber, G; Briand, P; Sigaux, F; Stern, M H

    1998-07-15

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare form of mature T-cell leukemia associated with chromosomal rearrangements implicating MTCP1 or TCL1 genes. These genes encode two homologous proteins, p13(MTCP1) and p14(TCL1), which share no similarity with other known protein. To determine the oncogenic role of MTCP1, mice transgenic for MTCP1 under the control of CD2 regulatory regions (CD2-p13 mice) were generated. No abnormality was detected during the first year after birth. A late effect of the transgene was searched for in a cohort of 48 CD2-p13 mice aged 15 to 20 months, issued from 3 independent founders. Lymphoid hemopathies, occurring in the three transgenic lines, were characterized by lymphoid cells with an irregular nucleus, a unique and prominent nucleolus, condensed chromatin, a basophilic cytoplasm devoid of granules, and an immunophenotype of mature T cells. The molecular characterization of Tcrb rearrangements demonstrated the monoclonal origin of these populations. Histopathological analysis of the cohort demonstrated early splenic and hepatic infiltrations, whereas lymphocytosis and medullar infiltrations were found infrequently. The engraftment of these proliferations in H2-matched animals demonstrated their malignant nature. Cumulative incidence of the disease at 20 months was 100%, 50%, and 21% in F3, F4, and F7 lines, respectively, and null in the control group. The level of expression of the transgene, as estimated by Western blotting in the transgenic lines correlated with the tumoral incidence, with the highest expression of p13(MTCP1) being found in F3 mice. CD2-p13 transgenic mice developed an hemopathy similar to human T-PLL. These data demonstrate that p13(MTCP1) is an oncoprotein and that CD2-p13 transgenic mice represent the first animal model for mature T-PLL.

  13. ORP4L is essential for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wenbin; Yi, Qing; Xu, Bing; Li, Shiqian; Wang, Tong; Liu, Fupei; Zhu, Biying; Hoffmann, Peter R; Ji, Guangju; Lei, Pingsheng; Li, Guoping; Li, Jiwei; Li, Jian; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are reprogrammed in cancer to support cell survival. Here, we report that T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells are characterized by increased oxidative phosphorylation and robust ATP production. We demonstrate that ORP4L is expressed in T-ALL but not normal T-cells and its abundance is proportional to cellular ATP. ORP4L acts as an adaptor/scaffold assembling CD3ɛ, Gαq/11 and PLCβ3 into a complex that activates PLCβ3. PLCβ3 catalyzes IP3 production in T-ALL as opposed to PLCγ1 in normal T-cells. Up-regulation of ORP4L thus results in a switch in the enzyme responsible for IP3-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release and oxidative phosphorylation. ORP4L knockdown results in suboptimal bioenergetics, cell death and abrogation of T-ALL engraftment in vivo. In summary, we uncovered a signalling pathway operating specifically in T-ALL cells in which ORP4L mediates G protein-coupled ligand-induced PLCβ3 activation, resulting in an increase of mitochondrial respiration for cell survival. Targeting ORP4L might represent a promising approach for T-ALL treatment. PMID:27581363

  14. Deregulated WNT signaling in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WNT signaling has been implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells and plays an important role during T-cell development in thymus. Here we investigated WNT pathway activation in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. To evaluate the potential role of WNT signaling in T-cell leukomogenesis, we performed expression analysis of key components of WNT pathway. More than 85% of the childhood T-ALL patients showed upregulated β-catenin expression at the protein level compared with normal human thymocytes. The impact of this upregulation was reflected in high expression of known target genes (AXIN2, c-MYC, TCF1 and LEF). Especially AXIN2, the universal target gene of WNT pathway, was upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in ∼40% of the patients. When β-CATENIN gene was silenced by small interfering RNA, the cancer cells showed higher rates of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that abnormal WNT signaling activation occurs in a significant fraction of human T-ALL cases independent of known T-ALL risk factors. We conclude that deregulated WNT signaling is a novel oncogenic event in childhood T-ALL

  15. Breakpoint sites disclose the role of the V(D)J recombination machinery in the formation of T-cell receptor (TCR) and non-TCR associated aberrations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmonie, Nicole S D; Dik, Willem A; Meijerink, Jules P P; Homminga, Irene; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Langerak, Anton W

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant recombination between T-cell receptor genes and oncogenes gives rise to chromosomal translocations that are genetic hallmarks in several subsets of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. The V(D)J recombination machinery has been shown to play a role in the formation of these T-cell receptor translocations. Other, non-T-cell receptor chromosomal aberrations, such as SIL-TAL1 deletions, have likewise been recognized as V(D)J recombination associated aberrations. Despite the postulated role of V(D)J recombination, the extent of the V(D)J recombination machinery involvement in the formation of T-cell receptor and non-T-cell receptor aberrations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is still poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive in silico and ex vivo evaluation of 117 breakpoint sites from 22 different T-cell receptor translocation partners as well as 118 breakpoint sites from non-T-cell receptor chromosomal aberrations. Based on this extensive set of breakpoint data, we provide a comprehensive overview of T-cell receptor and oncogene involvement in T-ALL. Moreover, we assessed the role of the V(D)J recombination machinery in the formation of chromosomal aberrations, and propose an up-dated mechanistic classification on how the V(D)J recombination machinery contributes to the formation of T-cell receptor and non-T-cell receptor aberrations in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. Formation of infectious hybrid virions with gibbon ape leukemia virus and human T-cell leukemia virus retroviral envelope glycoproteins and the gag and pol proteins of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    C. Wilson; Reitz, M S; Okayama, H; Eiden, M V

    1989-01-01

    The gibbon ape leukemia virus, SEATO strain, and human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoproteins can be functionally assembled with a Moloney murine leukemia virus core into infectious particles. The envelope-host cell receptor interaction is the major determinant of the host cell specificity for these hybrid virions.

  17. A novel post-transcriptional splicing form of the acute T cell leukemia proto-oncogene Lmo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Tianhui; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Feuerstein, R., Wang, X., Song, D. et al., The LIM/double zinc-finger motif: A novel protein dimerization domain, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1994, 91: 10655-10659.[2]Schmeichel, K. L., Beckerle, M. C., The LIM domain is a modular protein-binding interface, Cell, 1994, 79: 211-219.[3]Boehm, T., Foroni, L., Kaneko, Y. et al., The rhombotin family of cystein-rich LIM-domain oncogenes: distinct members are involved in T-cell translocations to human chromosome 11p15 and 11p13, Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1991, 88: 4367-4371.[4]Royer-Pokora, B., Uschi, L., Ludwig, W. D. et al., TTG-2,a new gene encoding a cysteine-rich protein with LIM motif, is overexpressed in acute T-cell leukaemia with the t(11;14)(p13;q11), Oncogene, 1991, 6: 1887-1893.[5]Warren, A. J., Colledge, W. H., Carlton, M. B. et al., The oncogenic cysteine-rich LIM domain protein Rbtn2 is essential for erythroid development, Cell, 1994, 78: 45-57.[6]Visvader, J. E., Mao, X. H., Fujuwara, Y. et al., The LIM-domain binding protein Ldb1 and its partner LMO2 act as negative regulators of erythroid differentiation, Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1997, 94: 13707-13712 .[7]Yamada, Y., Warren, A. J., Dobson, C. et al., The T cell leukemia LIM protein Lmo2 is necessary for adult mouse hematopoiesis, Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1998, 95: 3890-3895.[8]Yamada, Y., Pannell, R., Alan, F. et al., The oncogenic LIM-only transcription factor Lmo2 regulates angiogenesis but not vasculogenesis in mice, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2000, 97: 320-324.[9]Royer-Pokora, B., Rogers, M., Zhu, T. H. et al., The TTG-2/RBTN-2 T cell oncogene encodes two alternative transcripts from two promoters: the distal promoter is removed by most 11p13 translocations in acute T cell leukaemia's (T-ALL), Oncogene, 1995, 10: 1353-1360.[10]Carninci, P., Nishiyama, Y., Westover, A. et al., Thermostabilization and thermo-activation of thermolabile enzymes by trehalose and its application for the synthesis of full

  18. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Hong-yun; MA Li; MENG Min-jie; YAO Xin-sheng; LIN Ying; WU Zhen-qiang; HE Xiao-wei; WANG Ju-fang; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether the receptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkat human T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene recombination.Methods TCR Dβ-Jβ signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVβ chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVβ chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique.Results RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dβ2-Jβ2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dβ25' and Dβ 23' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVβ chain did not change during cell proliferation.Conclusions RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire. However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  19. Downregulation of IL-17-producing T cells is associated with regulatory T cell expansion and disease progression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Memarian, Ali; Asgarian-Omran, Hossein; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sarrafnejad, Abdolfattah; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the immunobiology of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing T cells and regulatory T cells (Treg) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In this study, the frequencies of Th17, Tc17, and CD39(+) Treg cells were enumerated in peripheral T cells isolated from 40 CLL patients and 15 normal subjects by flow cytometry. Our results showed a lower frequency of Th17 and Tc17 cells in progressive (0.99 ± 0.12 % of total CD3(+)CD4(+) cells; 0.44 ± 0.09 % of total CD8(+) cells) compared to indolent patients (1.57 ± 0.24 %, p = 0.042; 0.82 ± 0.2 %, p = 0.09) and normal subjects (1.78 ± 0.2 %, p = 0.003; 0.71 ± 0.09 %, p = 0.04). Decrease in IL-17-producing T cells was associated with CD39(+) Treg cells expansion. Variation of IL-17-producing cells and Treg cells in indolent and progressive patients was neither associated to the expression levels of Th1- and Th2-specific transcription factors T-bet and GATA-3 nor to the frequencies of IFN-γ and IL-4-producing CD4(+) T cells in a selected number of samples. Additionally, suppressive potential of CD4(+) Treg was similar in CLL patients and normal subjects. Our data indicate that progression of CLL is associated with downregulation of IL-17-producing T cells and expansion of Treg cells, implying contribution of these subsets of T cells in the progression of CLL. PMID:23269607

  20. Expression of S100 Protein in CD4-positive T-cell Lymphomas Is Often Associated With T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Nidhi; Pongpruttipan, Tawatchai; Patel, Snehal; Bayerl, Michael G; Alkan, Serhan; Nathwani, Bharat; Surti, Urvashi; Kitahara, Sumire; Chinthammitr, Yingyong; Swerdlow, Steven H

    2015-12-01

    S100 T-cell lymphomas are infrequent, and except 1 all have been CD4 negative. On the basis of an index case of CD4 S100 T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), we studied S100 protein expression in 19 additional T-PLLs and 56 other T-cell lymphomas that are usually CD4, including 15 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas, 24 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (16 ALK and 8 ALK), 7 mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome, and 10 peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS). Two additional S100 CD4 PTCL, NOS cases were also reviewed. Thirty percent (6/20) of T-PLLs were S100 compared with 0/56 other T-cell lymphomas with previously unstudied S100 reactivity (40 CD4, 2 CD8, 11 CD4/CD8, 3 unknown) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between the S100 and S100 T-PLLs with regard to the male:female ratio (2:1 vs. 1:1), age (71.6±7.7 vs. 65.4±9.3), peripheral blood lymphocyte count (67.2±116.6 vs. 101.1±159.7×10/L), or median survival (463 vs. 578 d, where known). The 2 S100 PTCL, NOS cases occurred in a 7-year-old boy and a 45-year-old woman. Both had involvement of the bone marrow and peripheral blood but were morphologically unlike T-PLL and lacked TCL1 gene rearrangement. These results demonstrate that S100 T-cell lymphomas include a subset that are CD4 and most often, but not exclusively, are T-PLL. Although having diagnostic implications, there were no documented clinical differences between the S100 and S100 T-PLLs. PMID:26379148

  1. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine. PMID:26552001

  2. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine.

  3. SIRT1 Suppresses Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Gao, Wei-Wei; Chan, Chi-Ping; Cheng, Yun; Deng, Jian-Jun; Yuen, Kit-San; Iha, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated diseases are poorly treatable, and HTLV-1 vaccines are not available. High proviral load is one major risk factor for disease development. HTLV-1 encodes Tax oncoprotein, which activates transcription from viral long terminal repeats (LTR) and various types of cellular promoters. Counteracting Tax function might have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits. In this work, we report on the suppression of Tax activation of HTLV-1 LTR by SIRT1 deacetylase. The transcriptional activity of Tax on the LTR was largely ablated when SIRT1 was overexpressed, but Tax activation of NF-κB was unaffected. On the contrary, the activation of the LTR by Tax was boosted when SIRT1 was depleted. Treatment of cells with resveratrol shunted Tax activity in a SIRT1-dependent manner. The activation of SIRT1 in HTLV-1-transformed T cells by resveratrol potently inhibited HTLV-1 proviral transcription and Tax expression, whereas compromising SIRT1 by specific inhibitors augmented HTLV-1 mRNA expression. The administration of resveratrol also decreased the production of cell-free HTLV-1 virions from MT2 cells and the transmission of HTLV-1 from MT2 cells to uninfected Jurkat cells in coculture. SIRT1 associated with Tax in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. Treatment with resveratrol prevented the interaction of Tax with CREB and the recruitment of CREB, CRTC1, and p300 to Tax-responsive elements in the LTR. Our work demonstrates the negative regulatory function of SIRT1 in Tax activation of HTLV-1 transcription. Small-molecule activators of SIRT1 such as resveratrol might be considered new prophylactic and therapeutic agents in HTLV-1-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes a highly lethal blood cancer or a chronic debilitating disease of the spinal cord. Treatments are unsatisfactory, and vaccines are not available. Disease progression is associated with robust expression of HTLV-1 genes

  4. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nuno R. dos, E-mail: nrsantos@ualg.pt; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-11-05

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL.

  5. Effects of NANOG gene down-regulation on the apoptosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹江

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore gene expression of NANOG in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia(T-ALL)cell lines and the effects of NANOG gene down-regulation on apoptosis of leukemia cells.Methods Real-time PCR(RtPCR)and Western blot were used to detect the expression level of NANOG gene and protein in MOLT-4,CCRF-HSB2 and Jurkat cells.

  6. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation

  7. Renal Calculi: An Unusual Presentation of T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Gemma F; Barnard, Edward B G; Thoreson, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome is a rare initial presentation of hematologic malignancy in children that typically presents with complications of electrolyte derangement, specifically hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hyperuricemia. We report a case of a 5-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with gross hematuria, abdominal pain, and vomiting and was ultimately diagnosed with uric acid nephrolithiasis and acute renal failure secondary to spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome in the setting of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Tumor lysis syndrome is considered an oncologic emergency, and in this case, the child required urgent treatment with potassium-binding agents, rasburicase, and hemodialysis. This case demonstrates that occult hematologic malignancy should be suspected in cases of nephrolithiasis and acute renal failure when found in conjunction with hyperuricemia despite a normal complete blood count at the time of presentation. PMID:26644483

  8. Regulatory T-Cells in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Rossi, Giovanni; Vannata, Barbara; Deaglio, Silvia; Mansueto, Giovanna; D’Auria, Fiorella; Statuto, Teodora; Simeon, Vittorio; De Martino, Laura; Marandino, Aurelio; Del Poeta8, Giovanni; De Feo, Vincenzo; Musto, Pellegrino

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in cancer and autoimmune disorders, as well. PMID:22973497

  9. Anti-leukemia activity of in vitro-expanded human gamma delta T cells in a xenogeneic Ph+ leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle M Siegers

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells (GDTc lyse a variety of hematological and solid tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and are thus promising candidates for cellular immunotherapy. We have developed a protocol to expand human GDTc in vitro, yielding highly cytotoxic Vgamma9/Vdelta2 CD27/CD45RA double negative effector memory cells. These cells express CD16, CD45RO, CD56, CD95 and NKG2D. Flow cytometric, clonogenic, and chromium release assays confirmed their specific cytotoxicity against Ph(+ cell lines in vitro. We have generated a fluorescent and bioluminescent Ph(+ cell line, EM-2eGFPluc, and established a novel xenogeneic leukemia model. Intravenous injection of EM-2eGFPluc into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG mice resulted in significant dose-dependent bone marrow engraftment; lower levels engrafted in blood, lung, liver and spleen. In vitro-expanded human GDTc injected intraperitoneally were found at higher levels in blood and organs compared to those injected intravenously; GDTc survived at least 33 days post-injection. In therapy experiments, we documented decreased bone marrow leukemia burden in mice treated with GDTc. Live GDTc were found in spleen and bone marrow at endpoint, suggesting the potential usefulness of this therapy.

  10. The immunological effect of 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA treatment on murine T-cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    8-Methoxyproralen (8-MOP) plus long-wavelength UV radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) have been used to treat various diseases such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, systemic scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis and rejection of heart transplants. However, the immunological mechanism of this treatment remains unknown. In this report, we investigated the effect of 8-MOP/UVA on the modulation of the immunogenicity of a T-cell leukemia cell line (RL ''male'' 1 cells). The results demonstrated that the stimulator function of the in vitro 8-MOP/UVA-treated RL ''male'' 1 cells was enhanced in both RL ''male'' 1-specific allogeneic and syngeneic immune responses. Furthermore, the enhancement of the immunogenicity of the 8-MOP/UVA-treated RL ''male'' 1 cells was found to be strongly associated with the increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on these 8-MOP/UVA-treated tumor cells. Therefore, our findings suggested that the alteration of the expression of the immune-related cell surface molecules might be an important effect of 8-MOP/UVA treatment on the elevation of the immunogenicity of the 8-MOP/UVA-treated tumor cells. (Author)

  11. Central Nervous System Involvement of T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed with Stereotactic Brain Biopsy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Göçmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL is a generalized malignancy of the lymphoid tissue characterized by the accumulation of monoclonal lymphocytes, usually of B cell type. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is an extremely rare complication of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL. We describe a case of T-PLL presenting with symptomatic infiltration of the brain that was histopathologically proven by stereotactic brain biopsy. We emphasize the importance of rapid diagnosis and immediate treatment for patients presenting with CNS involvement and a history of leukemia or lymphoma.

  12. Clinical Significance of Immuno phenotypic Markers in Pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cell-marker profiling has led to conflicting conclusions about its prognostic significance in T-ALL. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of the expression of CD34, CD10 and myeloid associated antigens (CD13/ CD33) in childhood T-ALL and to relate their presence to initial clinical and biologic features and early response to therapy. Patients and Methods: This study included 67 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T-ALL recruited from the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt during the time period from July 2007 to June 2008. Immuno phenotypic markers and minimal residual disease (MRD) were studied by five-color flow cytometry. Results: The frequency of CD34 was 34.9%, CD10 33.3%, while CD13/CD33 was 18.8%. No significant association was encountered between CD34, CD10 or myeloid antigen positivity and the presenting clinical features as age, sex, TLC and CNS leukemia. Only CD10+ expression had significant association with initial CNS involvement (p=0.039). CD34 and CD13/CD33 expression was significantly associated with T-cell maturation stages (p<0.05). No relationship was observed for age, TLC, gender, NCI risk or CNS involvement with early response to therapy illustrated by BM as well as MRD day 15 and day 42. CD34+, CD13/CD33+ and early T-cell stage had high MRD levels on day 15 that was statistically highly significant (p<0.01), but CD10+ had statistically significant lower MRD level on day 15 (p=0.049). However, only CD34 retained its significance at an MRD cut-off level of 0.01%. Conclusion: CD34, CD10, CD13/CD33 expression, as well as T-cell maturation stages, may have prognostic significance in pediatric T-ALL as they have a significant impact on early clearance of leukemic cells detected by MRD day 15.

  13. [Epstein-Barr virus-specific immunity in asymptomatic carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, K W

    1995-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients are immunosuppressed as evidenced by anergy to recall antigens and the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The immunosuppression appears to be a critical factor or a predictive sign for the development of ATL in carriers of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). This study was aimed at assessing the immune status of asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers with the immunity specific to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential. Forty-three asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers were examined for their EBV serology and EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cell (EBV-CTL) activity, in comparison with 10 HTLV-I-non-infected normal controls. Both carriers and controls were all positive for EBV capsid antigen (VCA) IgG. Significantly elevated titer of VCAIgG and lower titer of EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) antibodies were observed in asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers, suggesting reactivation of EBV. Among the HTLV-I carriers, 9 (20.9%) had reduced activity of EBV-CTL as revealed by lower incidence of regression of in vitro EBV-induced B-cell transformation. Accordingly, asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers were divided into three groups: the carriers with reduced EBV-specific cellular immunity (group I), the carriers showing normal cellular immunity but aberrant EBV-specific antibody titers (group II), and the carriers with normal EBV-specific cellular immunity and serology (group III). Higher positive rate of anti-HTLV-I Tax antibody was found in the former two groups (44.4% and 56.5%, respectively) compared with group III (18.2%). An immunosuppressive agent, 4-deoxyphorbol ester induced a remarkable decrease of EBV-CTL activity in the carriers of group II and III at the concentration that affected none of the normal controls. These findings indicate that asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers suffer stepwise impairment of EBV-specific immunities, which may be caused by HTLV-I infection.

  14. Human T cell leukemia virus-I (HTLV-I) Tax-mediated apoptosis in activated T cells requires an enhanced intracellular prooxidant state

    OpenAIRE

    Los, Marek Jan; Khazaie, K; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Baeuerle, P A; Schirrmacher, V.; Chlichlia, K.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that an estradiol-dependent activation of human T cell leukemia virus-I Tax leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and to the induction of apoptosis, The present study demonstrates that a hormone-dependent activation of Tax promotes an enhanced prooxidant state in stably transfected Jurkat cells as measured by changes in the intracellular levels of glutathione and H2O2; these changes are followed by apoptotic cell death. Additional stimulation of the CD3/TCR pathway enhan...

  15. A novel post-transcriptional splicing form of the acute T cell leukemia proto-oncogene Lmo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Lmo2 is a T cell leukemia-related proto-oncogene, which belongs to the LIM protein family. Previous work has established its key role in yolk sac erythropoiesis and adult hematopoiesis, and it is also necessary for regulating angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that this gene encodes a protein of 158 amino acids, consisting of two tandem cysteine-rich LIM domains, but the detailed mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. To further investigate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of Lmo2, we combined SMART PCR technology with 5′RACE and found a novel post-transcriptional splicing form of Lmo2 in adult human kidney. This alternative transcript contains only two exons, encoding a smaller protein of 151 amino acids. Interestingly, it shares the same reading frame as the original Lmo2, but differs in 7 amino acids at the N-terminus. A genomic DNA fragment (from ?294 nts to +180 nts) containing the putative promoter region has been inserted into the luciferase reporter gene vector pGL3-basic and showed stable promoter activity when transfected into COS7. RT-PCR analysis revealed that this variant transcript was expressed widely in human tissues and cell lines, suggesting its potential basic functional importance.

  16. CD19 CAR-targeted T cells induce long-term remission and B Cell Aplasia in an immunocompetent mouse model of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco L Davila

    Full Text Available Although many adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL are induced into remission, most will relapse, underscoring the dire need for novel therapies for this disease. We developed murine CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs and an immunocompetent mouse model of B-ALL that recapitulates the disease at genetic, cellular, and pathologic levels. Mouse T cells transduced with an all-murine CD3ζ/CD28-based CAR that is equivalent to the one being used in our clinical trials, eradicate B-ALL in mice and mediate long-term B cell aplasias. In this model, we find that increasing conditioning chemotherapy increases tumor eradication, B cell aplasia, and CAR-modified T cell persistence. Quantification of recipient B lineage cells allowed us to estimate an in vivo effector to endogenous target ratio for B cell aplasia maintenance. In mice exhibiting a dramatic B cell reduction we identified a small population of progenitor B cells in the bone marrow that may serve as a reservoir for long-term CAR-modified T cell stimulation. Lastly, we determine that infusion of CD8+ CAR-modified T cells alone is sufficient to maintain long-term B cell eradication. The mouse model we report here should prove valuable for investigating CAR-based and other therapies for adult B-ALL.

  17. MiR-146b negatively regulates migration and delays progression of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Nádia C; Fragoso, Rita; Carvalho, Tânia; Enguita, Francisco J; Barata, João T

    2016-01-01

    Previous results indicated that miR-146b-5p is downregulated by TAL1, a transcription factor critical for early hematopoiesis that is frequently overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it has an oncogenic role. Here, we confirmed that miR-146b-5p expression is lower in TAL1-positive patient samples than in other T-ALL cases. Furthermore, leukemia T-cells display decreased levels of miR-146b-5p as compared to normal T-cells, thymocytes and other hematopoietic progenitors. MiR-146b-5p silencing enhances the in vitro migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, associated with increased levels of filamentous actin and chemokinesis. In vivo, miR-146b overexpression in a TAL1-positive cell line extends mouse survival in a xenotransplant model of human T-ALL. In contrast, knockdown of miR-146b-5p results in leukemia acceleration and decreased mouse overall survival, paralleled by faster tumor infiltration of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that miR-146b-5p is a functionally relevant microRNA gene in the context of T-ALL, whose negative regulation by TAL1 and possibly other oncogenes contributes to disease progression by modulating leukemia cell motility and disease aggressiveness. PMID:27550837

  18. CEOP/IVE/GDP Compared With CEOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Adult Patients With PTCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma; Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  19. Definition of a minimal activation domain in human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, O J; Jeang, K T

    1995-03-01

    Fourteen mutants were used to delineate a minimal activation domain in the Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I. In an assay using a Gal4-Tax (GalTx) fusion protein and a responsive promoter containing Gal4 consensus binding sites, we found that activation was "squelched" by coexpression of wild-type Tax protein in trans. When Tax mutants were tested for squelching, many competed effectively against GalTx. However, those containing changes in amino acids 289 to 322 failed to inhibit activity. In particular, three mutants that were expressed stably, with changes at amino acids 289, 296, and 320 respectively, did not squelch GalTx activity. On the other hand, mutants with individual changes at amino acid 3, 9, 29, 41, 273, and 337 efficiently inhibited GalTx function. Three other mutants failed to be stably expressed. In separate experiments, when fused alone to the DNA-binding domain of Gal4, amino acids 289 to 322 of Tax conferred trans activation ability. This fusion protein was able to activate a core promoter. These findings suggest that amino acids 289 to 322 define a region that contacts an essential transcription factor and that this region is a modular activation domain. PMID:7853523

  20. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Mónica T.; dos Santos, Nuno R.; da Silva, Ricardo C.; Marinella N. Ghezzo

    2010-01-01

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been report...

  2. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (HTLV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients both during and after treatment to be proactive in their healthcare, including keeping a master file ... are done to study new drugs and treatment strategies. Examples of what clinical trials might investigate include ...

  3. Characterization of the genome-wide TLX1 binding profile in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinck, K; Van Loocke, W; Van der Meulen, J; Van de Walle, I; Ongenaert, M; Rondou, P; Wallaert, A; de Bock, C E; Van Roy, N; Poppe, B; Cools, J; Soulier, J; Taghon, T; Speleman, F; Van Vlierberghe, P

    2015-12-01

    The TLX1 transcription factor is critically involved in the multi-step pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and often cooperates with NOTCH1 activation during malignant T-cell transformation. However, the exact molecular mechanism by which these T-cell specific oncogenes cooperate during transformation remains to be established. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to establish the genome-wide binding pattern of TLX1 in human T-ALL. This integrative genomics approach showed that ectopic TLX1 expression drives repression of T cell-specific enhancers and mediates an unexpected transcriptional antagonism with NOTCH1 at critical target genes, including IL7R and NOTCH3. These phenomena coordinately trigger a TLX1-driven pre-leukemic phenotype in human thymic precursor cells, reminiscent of the thymus regression observed in murine TLX1 tumor models, and create a strong genetic pressure for acquiring activating NOTCH1 mutations as a prerequisite for full leukemic transformation. In conclusion, our results uncover a functional antagonism between cooperative oncogenes during the earliest phases of tumor development and provide novel insights in the multi-step pathogenesis of TLX1-driven human leukemia. PMID:26108691

  4. APOBEC3G targets human T-cell leukemia virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imada Kazunori

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G is a host cellular protein with a broad antiviral activity. It inhibits infectivitiy of a wide variety of retroviruses by deaminating deoxycytidine (dC into deoxyuridine (dU in newly synthesized minus strand DNA, resulting in G-to-A hypermutation of the viral plus strand DNA. To clarify the mechanism of its function, we have examined the antiviral activity of APOBEC3G on human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, the first identified human retrovirus. Results In this study, we have demonstrated that overexpressed as well as endogenous APOBEC3G were incorporated into HTLV-1 virions and that APOBEC3G inhibited the infection of HTLV-1. Interestingly, several inactive mutants of APOBEC3G also inhibited HTLV-1 and no G-to-A hypermutation was induced by APOBEC3G in HTLV-1 genome. Furthermore, we introduced the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 vif gene into HTLV-1 producing cell line, MT-2, to antagonize APOBEC3G by reducing its intracellular expression and virion incorporation, which resulted in upregulation of the infectivity of produced viruses. Conclusion APOBEC3G is incorporated into HTLV-1 virions and inhibits the infection of HTLV-1 without exerting its cytidine deaminase activity. These results suggest that APOBEC3G might act on HTLV-1 through different mechanisms from that on HIV-1 and contribute to the unique features of HTLV-1 infection and transmission.

  5. [Changes of T-cell clonality after induction-cultivation of peripheral T lymphocytes in adoptive immunotherapy for leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Gu, Jiang-Ying; Ou, Yuan; Li, Mian-Yang; Wang, He; Jin, Xian; Tao, Xiu-Yan; Liu, Zhao-Li; Ma, Xing-Fan; Wang, Xiu-Li; Ma, Si-Kun; Kang, Rui; Cai, Peng; Tong, Chun-Rong; Zhu, Ping

    2009-06-01

    This study was purposed to analyze the changes of T-cell clonality after induction of peripheral T lymphocytes by autogenous DC and cytokines in the preparation of adoptive immunotherapy for leukemias. The bone marrow and peripheral blood from 21 leukemia patients at remission stage after treatment and subjected to adoptive immunotherapy were collected. Their DCs and T-cells were stimulated with cytokines and then were mixed to activate T-cells. T-cell receptor beta variable region (TCRBV) families were amplified by RT-PCR, and genescan method and sequencing of the PCR products were used to observe the clonality changes of T-cells before and after the induction and cultivation of T-cells. The flow cytometry was used to identify CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD4(+)CD25str(+)FOXP3(+) cells to disclose the ratio change of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), helper T-cells, regulatory T-cells and NK T-cells before and after induction and cultivation of T-cells. The results showed that in the 21 patients, most of the 24 TCRBV families presented as oligoclonal distribution on genescan, several families were not expressed, and only a few families remained polyclonal. TCRBV24 was found to be oligoclonal in all of the 21 patients. DNA sequence analysis of TCRBV24 revealed a common motif of VAG in CDR3 in 3 cases and a common motif of GGG in CDR3 in 2 cases. In patient 5, both TCRBV 24 and TCRBV8 contained the same motif of GGG in CDR3. The identical motif in these patients may suggest that these T-cells recognize the same antigen. The peripheral lymphocytes demonstrated recovery of clonal profile on genescan from oligoclonal profile and absence of several families before the induction and cultivation to typical polyclonal profile in all TCRBV families after the induction by DC and cytokines for 13 days. After the induction and cultivation, the number of lymphocytes increased to 3.38 +/- 1.20 times. CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD4(+)CD25str(+)FOX P3

  6. Elimination of human T cell leukemia virus type-1-infected cells by neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-inducing antibodies against human t cell leukemia virus type-1 envelope gp46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuetsu; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Kodama, Akira; Fujii, Hideki; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kannagi, Mari; Ansari, Aftab A; Saito, Mineki

    2014-06-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is prevalent worldwide with foci of high prevalence. However, to date no effective vaccine or drug against HTLV-1 infection has been developed. In efforts to define the role of antibodies in the control of HTLV-1 infection, we capitalized on the use of our previously defined anti-gp46 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone LAT-27) and high titers of human anti-HTLV-1 IgG purified from HAM/TSP patients (HAM-IgG). LAT-27 and HAM-IgG completely blocked syncytium formation and T cell immortalization mediated by HTLV-1 in vitro. The addition of these antibodies to cultures of CD8(+) T cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HAM/TSP patients at the initiation of culture not only decreased the numbers of Tax-expressing cells and the production of HTLV-1 p24 but also inhibited the spontaneous immortalization of T cells. Coculture of in vitro-HTLV-1-immortalized T cell lines with autologous PBMCs in the presence of LAT-27 or HAM-IgG, but not an F(ab')2 fragment of LAT-27 or nonneutralizing anti-gp46 mAbs, resulted in depletion of HTLV-1-infected cells. A 24-h (51)Cr release assay showed the presence of significant antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity in LAT-27 and HAM-IgG, but not F(ab')2 of LAT-27, resulting in the depletion of HTLV-1-infected T cells by autologous PBMCs. The depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from the effector PBMCs reduced this ADCC activity. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that the neutralizing and ADCC-inducing activities of anti-HTLV-1 antibodies are capable of reducing infection and eliminating HTLV-1-infected cells in the presence of autologous PBMCs. PMID:24524420

  7. Sustained First Remission in an Adolescent With Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma Treated With T-Cell Leukemia Induction, Nucleoside Analog-Based Consolidation, and Early Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Schafer, Eric; Chen, Allen; Arceci, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HTCL) is a rare malignancy. Prognosis is poor with only a few case reports of long-term survivors. While HTCL universally involves the bone marrow, the condition has been most often treated with multimodal lymphoma specific chemotherapy. We report a durable, sustained first remission in an adolescent treated for HTCL who received induction therapy according to a high risk T-cell leukemia regimen, a nucleoside analog-based consolidation, and allogeneic transplant...

  8. Antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat by cell cycle arrest and telomerase inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-min ZHAO; Qian ZHOU; Yun XU; Xiao-yu LAI; He HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To examine the ability of rapamycin to suppress growth and regulate telomerase activity in the human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. Methods:Cell proliferation was assessed after exposure to rapamycin by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. The proteins important for cell cycle progres-sion and Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade were assessed by Western blotting. Telomerase activity was quantified by telomeric repeat amplication protocol assay. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results:Rapamycin inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat, induced G1 phase arrest, unregulated the pro-tein level of p21 as well as p27, and downregulated cyclinD3, phospho-p70s6k, and phospho-s6, but had no effect on apoptosis. Treatment with rapamycin reduced telomerase activity, and reduced hTERT mRNA and protein expression. Conclusion:Rapamycin displayed a potent antileukemic effect in the human T-cell leukemia cell line by inhibition of cell proliferation through G1 cell cycle arrest and also through the suppression of telomerase activity, suggesting that rapamycin may have potential clinical implications in the treatment of some leukemias.

  9. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B and T cells differ in their response to cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, John A; Su, Derrick W; Lerner, Adam

    2009-05-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitors, which activate cAMP signaling by reducing cAMP catabolism, are known to induce apoptosis in B lineage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells but not normal human T cells. The explanation for such differential sensitivity remains unknown. In this study, we report studies contrasting the response to PDE4 inhibitor treatment in CLL cells and normal human T and B cells. Affymetrix gene chip analysis in the three cell populations following treatment with the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram identified a set of up-regulated transcripts with unusually high fold changes in the CLL samples, several of which are likely part of compensatory negative feedback loops. The high fold changes were due to low basal transcript levels in CLL cells, suggesting that cAMP-mediated signaling may be unusually tightly regulated in this cell type. Rolipram treatment augmented cAMP levels and induced ATF-1/CREB serine 63/133 phosphorylation in both B lineage cell types but not T cells. As treatment with the broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine induced T cell CREB phosphorylation, we tested a series of family-specific PDE inhibitors for their ability to mimic 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-induced ATF-1/CREB phosphorylation. Whereas PDE3 inhibitors alone had no effect, the combination of PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors induced ATF-1/CREB serine 63/133 phosphorylation in T cells. Consistent with this observation, PDE3B transcript and protein levels were low in CLL cells but easily detectable in T cells. Combined PDE3/4 inhibition did not induce T cell apoptosis, suggesting that cAMP-mediated signal transduction that leads to robust ATF-1/CREB serine 63/133 phosphorylation is not sufficient to induce apoptosis in this lymphoid lineage.

  10. Activation of endogenous c-fos proto-oncogene expression by human T-cell leukemia virus type I-encoded p40tax protein in the human T-cell line, Jurkat.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, K.(Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan); Ohtani, K; Nakamura, M.; Sugamura, K

    1989-01-01

    We examined the ability of the trans-acting factor p40tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), which is thought to be a crucial molecule in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I, to activate expression of a set of endogenous cellular genes related to T-cell proliferation. For this purpose we established a subclone (JPX-9) of Jurkat cells that was stably transfected with an expression plasmid containing the p40tax gene, whose expression is definitely dependent on heavy-metal ions. Express...

  11. Comparative Study of Regulatory T Cell Function of Human CD25+CD4+ T Cells from Thymocytes, Cord Blood, and Adult Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakae Fujimaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells suppress T cell activation and regulate multiple immune reactions in in vitro and in vivo studies. To define the regulatory function of human CD25+CD4+ T cells at various stages of maturity, we investigated in detail the functional differences of CD25+CD4+ T cells from thymocytes, cord blood (CB, and adult peripheral blood (APB. CB CD25+CD4+ T cells displayed low-FOXP3 protein expression level and had no suppressive activity. In contrast, CD25+CD4+ T cells from thymocytes or APB expressed high expression level of FOXP3 protein associated with significant suppressive activity. Although CB CD25+CD4+ T cells exhibited no suppressive activity, striking suppressive activity was observed following expansion in culture associated with increased FOXP3 expression and a shift from the CD45RA+ to the CD45RA− phenotype. These functional differences in CD25+CD4+ T cells from Thy, CB, and APB hence suggest a pathway of maturation for Treg in the peripheral immune system.

  12. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a population-based consecutive series of 285 pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias: rare T-cell receptor gene rearrangements are associated with poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karrman, Kristina; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats;

    2009-01-01

    Clinical characteristics and cytogenetic aberrations were ascertained and reviewed in a population-based consecutive series of 285 pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 in the Nordic countries. Informative karyotypic results were obtained in 249 (...

  13. A facile, branched DNA assay to quantitatively measure glucocorticoid receptor auto-regulation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason R. Schwartz; Purvaba J. Sarvaiya; Lily E. Leiva; Maria C. Velez; Tammuella C. Singleton; Lolie C. Yu; Wayne V. Vedeckis

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) steroid hormones are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because of their pro-apoptotic effects in hematopoietic cells.However,not all leukemia cells are sensitive to GC,and no assay to stratify patients is available.In the GC-sensitive T-cell ALL cell line CEM-C7,auto-up-regulation of RNA transcripts for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) correlates with increased apoptotic response.This study aimed to determine if a facile assay of GR transcript levels might be promising for stratifying ALL patients into hormone-sensitive and hormone-resistant populations.The GR transcript profiles of various lymphoid cell lines and 4 bone marrow samples from patients with T-cell ALL were analyzed using both an optimized branched DNA (bDNA) assay and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.There were significant correlations between both assay platforms when measuring total GR (exon 5/6) transcripts in various cell lines and patient samples,but not for a probe set that detects a specific,low abundance GR transcript (exon 1A3).Our results suggest that the bDNA platform is reproducible and precise when measuring total GR transcripts and,with further development,may ultimately offer a simple clinical assay to aid in the prediction of GC-sensitivity in ALL patients.

  14. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood

  15. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Siddiqui, Rafat A., E-mail: rsiddiqu@iuhealth.org [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. The pathogenesis of tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casseb J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM is caused by a human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I after a long incubation period. TSP/HAM is characterized by a chronic progressive paraparesis with sphincter disturbances, no/mild sensory loss, the absence of spinal cord compression and seropositivity for HTLV-I antibodies. The pathogenesis of this entity is not completely known and involves a multivariable phenomenon of immune system activation against the presence of HTLV-I antigens, leading to an inflammatory process and demyelination, mainly in the thoracic spinal cord. The current hypothesis about the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is: 1 presence of HTLV-I antigens in the lumbar spinal cord, noted by an increased DNA HTLV-I load; 2 CTL either with their lytic functions or release/production of soluble factors, such as CC-chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules; 3 the presence of Tax gene expression that activates T-cell proliferation or induces an inflammatory process in the spinal cord; 4 the presence of B cells with neutralizing antibody production, or complement activation by an immune complex phenomenon, and 5 lower IL-2 and IFN-gamma production and increased IL-10, indicating drive to a cytokine type 2 pattern in the TSP/HAM subjects and the existence of a genetic background such as some HLA haplotypes. All of these factors should be implicated in TSP/HAM and further studies are necessary to investigate their role in the development of TSP/HAM.

  17. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesic Matthew

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF II (p30 and p28, respectively acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. Results In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Δp28 was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Δp28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Δp28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for

  19. Natural killer cell (NK) subsets and NK-like T-cell populations in acute myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, N; Swerdlow, S H; TenEyck, S P; Boyiadzis, M; Felgar, R E

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the immune microenvironment on the behavior and therapeutic strategies for hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms is being increasingly recognized. Many functional studies of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic responses in myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) exist, but with limited data on these lymphocyte proportions and related T-cell subsets. The proportions of these cells and their prognostic implications were therefore investigated in 89 AML, 51 MDS, and 20 control marrows by flow cytometry. The median proportion of NK cells (relative to the total lymphocytes) was lower in AML versus controls (P = 0.01). Among AML, a lower proportion of NK cells predicted better survival, whereas a higher NK cell proportion was associated with the poor prognostic AML category (P = 0.002). NK cell proportions were similar in MDS, MDS subgroups, and control marrows. The relative proportion of the mature NK cell subset (CD56(dim) CD16/57(bright) ) was lower in AML and MDS versus controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.0002, respectively). The proportion of mature NK cells was not a prognostic indicator although fewer were seen in poor prognosis AML. In contrast, a lower proportion of mature NK cells correlated with worse survival in MDS (P = 0.027). A higher proportion of NK-like T-cells (of total lymphoid cells) was found in MDS compared to controls (P = 0.01). A lower proportion of NK-like T-cells predicted better survival in AML but not in MDS. Thus, the proportions of NK, NK-cell subsets, and NK-like T-cells vary in myeloid neoplasms, may potentially impact immunomodulatory therapies, and may impact outcome. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26648320

  20. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  1. Functional impairment of Tax-specific but not cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in a minor population of asymptomatic human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamori Ayako

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in a small percentage of infected individuals. ATL is often associated with general immune suppression and an impaired HTLV-1-specific T-cell response, an important host defense system. We previously found that a small fraction of asymptomatic HTLV-1-carriers (AC already showed impaired T-cell responses against the major target antigen, Tax. However, it is unclear whether the impaired HTLV-1 Tax-specific T-cell response in these individuals is an HTLV-1-specific phenomenon, or merely reflects general immune suppression. In this study, in order to characterize the impaired HTLV-1-specific T-cell response, we investigated the function of Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells in various clinical status of HTLV-1 infection. Results By using tetramers consisting of HLA-A*0201, -A*2402, or -A*1101, and corresponding Tax epitope peptides, we detected Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells in the peripheral blood from 87.0% of ACs (n = 20/23 and 100% of HAM/TSP patients (n = 18/18 tested. We also detected Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells in 38.1% of chronic type ATL (cATL patients (n = 8/21, although its frequencies in peripheral blood CD8+ T cells were significantly lower than those of ACs or HAM/TSP patients. Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells detected in HAM/TSP patients proliferated well in culture and produced IFN-γ when stimulated with Tax peptides. However, such functions were severely impaired in the Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells detected in cATL patients. In ACs, the responses of Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells were retained in most cases. However, we found one AC sample whose Tax-specific CD8+ T-cells hardly produced IFN-γ, and failed to proliferate and express activation (CD69 and degranulation (CD107a markers in response to Tax peptide. Importantly, the same AC sample contained cytomegalovirus (CMV pp65-specific CD8+ T-cells

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax1 oncoprotein but not HTLV-2 Tax2 induces the expression of OX40 ligand by interacting with p52/p100 and RelB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motai, Yosuke; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takachi, Takayuki; Higuchi, Masaya; Hara, Toshifumi; Mizuguchi, Mariko; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a causative retrovirus of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. Unlike HTLV-1, the same group of retrovirus HTLV-2 has not been found to be associated with these diseases. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 encode transforming proteins Tax1 and Tax2, and a few distinct activities of Tax1 from those of Tax2 have been proposed to contribute to the HTLV-1-specific pathogenesis of disease. One significant difference of Tax1 from Tax2 is the activation of transcription factor NF-κB2/p100/p52. We found that Tax1 but not Tax2 induces the expression of OX40 ligand (OX40L) in a human T-cell line. To induce the OX40L expression, Tax1 but not Tax2 was observed to interact with NF-κB2/p100/p52 and RelB and the distinct interaction activity was mediated by the Tax1 amino acid region of 225-232. In addition, Tax1 but not Tax2 or Tax1/225-232 interacted with p65, p50, and c-Rel; however, the interactions were much less than those noted with NF-κB2/p100/p52 and RelB. OX40L is a T-cell costimulatory molecule of the tumor necrosis factor family, and its signal plays a critical role in establishing adaptive immunity by inducing the polarized differentiation of T-cells to cells such as T helper type 2 and T follicular helper cells. Therefore, the present findings suggest that Tax1 might alter the immune response to HTLV-1 and/or differentiation of HTLV-1-infected T-cells via OX40L induction, thereby acting as a factor mediating the distinct phenotypes and pathogenesis of HTLV-1 from that of HTLV-2. PMID:26739459

  3. NOTCH1 signaling promotes human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia initiating cell regeneration in supportive niches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxue Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukemia initiating cells (LIC contribute to therapeutic resistance through acquisition of mutations in signaling pathways, such as NOTCH1, that promote self-renewal and survival within supportive niches. Activating mutations in NOTCH1 occur commonly in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and have been implicated in therapeutic resistance. However, the cell type and context specific consequences of NOTCH1 activation, its role in human LIC regeneration, and sensitivity to NOTCH1 inhibition in hematopoietic microenvironments had not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established humanized bioluminescent T-ALL LIC mouse models transplanted with pediatric T-ALL samples that were sequenced for NOTCH1 and other common T-ALL mutations. In this study, CD34(+ cells from NOTCH1(Mutated T-ALL samples had higher leukemic engraftment and serial transplantation capacity than NOTCH1(Wild-type CD34(+ cells in hematopoietic niches, suggesting that self-renewing LIC were enriched within the NOTCH1(Mutated CD34(+ fraction. Humanized NOTCH1 monoclonal antibody treatment reduced LIC survival and self-renewal in NOTCH1(Mutated T-ALL LIC-engrafted mice and resulted in depletion of CD34(+CD2(+CD7(+ cells that harbor serial transplantation capacity. CONCLUSIONS: These results reveal a functional hierarchy within the LIC population based on NOTCH1 activation, which renders LIC susceptible to targeted NOTCH1 inhibition and highlights the utility of NOTCH1 antibody targeting as a key component of malignant stem cell eradication strategies.

  4. The relevance of PTEN-AKT in relation to NOTCH1-directed treatment strategies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rui D; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling and is often inactivated by mutations (including deletions) in a variety of cancer types, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we review mutation-associated mechanisms that inactivate PTEN together with other molecular mechanisms that activate AKT and contribute to T-cell leukemogenesis. In addition, we discuss how Pten mutations in mouse models affect the efficacy of gamma-secretase inhibitors to block NOTCH1 signaling through activation of AKT. Based on these models and on observations in primary diagnostic samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we speculate that PTEN-deficient cells employ an intrinsic homeostatic mechanism in which PI3K-AKT signaling is dampened over time. As a result of this reduced PI3K-AKT signaling, the level of AKT activation may be insufficient to compensate for NOTCH1 inhibition, resulting in responsiveness to gamma-secretase inhibitors. On the other hand, de novo acquired PTEN-inactivating events in NOTCH1-dependent leukemia could result in temporary, strong activation of PI3K-AKT signaling, increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis, and consequently gamma-secretase inhibitor resistance. Due to the central role of PTEN-AKT signaling and in the resistance to NOTCH1 inhibition, AKT inhibitors may be a promising addition to current treatment protocols for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27582570

  5. FLT3 mutations in early T-cell precursor ALL characterize a stem cell like leukemia and imply the clinical use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Neumann

    Full Text Available Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL has been identified as high-risk subgroup of acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL with a high rate of FLT3-mutations in adults. To unravel the underlying pathomechanisms and the clinical course we assessed molecular alterations and clinical characteristics in a large cohort of ETP-ALL (n = 68 in comparison to non-ETP T-ALL adult patients. Interestingly, we found a high rate of FLT3-mutations in ETP-ALL samples (n = 24, 35%. Furthermore, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL was characterized by a specific immunophenotype (CD2+/CD5-/CD13+/CD33-, a distinct gene expression pattern (aberrant expression of IGFBP7, WT1, GATA3 and mutational status (absence of NOTCH1 mutations and a low frequency, 21%, of clonal TCR rearrangements. The observed low GATA3 expression and high WT1 expression in combination with lack of NOTCH1 mutations and a low rate of TCR rearrangements point to a leukemic transformation at the pluripotent prothymocyte stage in FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL. The clinical outcome in ETP-ALL patients was poor, but encouraging in those patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (3-year OS: 74%. To further explore the efficacy of targeted therapies, we demonstrate that T-ALL cell lines transfected with FLT3 expression constructs were particularly sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In conclusion, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL defines a molecular distinct stem cell like leukemic subtype. These data warrant clinical studies with the implementation of FLT3 inhibitors in addition to early allogeneic stem cell transplantation for this high risk subgroup.

  6. [Aggressive NK/T cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with EBV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Jamira; Cabezuelo, Lourdes; Almeida, Sérgio; Filipe, Carlos; Simão, Adélia; Carvalho, Armando; Nascimento Costa, J

    2011-12-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of a young man presenting with fever, asthenia, anorexia and jaundice, associated to hepatosplenomegaly, evolving rapidly to multiorganic failure. Final diagnosis revealed an aggressive NK cell leukemia/lymphoma associated to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The diagnosis, suggested clinically and after bone marrow immunophenotyping, was confirmed by morphologic and immunohistochemical findings on the post-mortem hepatic and splenic biopsy .The tumor cells were positive for CD3 and cytotoxic molecules, TIA, granzyme B and perforin. The herein reported case is a rare clinical entity, only recently recognized and with a difficult early diagnosis. We emphasize the necessity to exclude a Natural Killer cell malignancy in cases with identical characteristics.

  7. Bexarotene Is Active Against Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma in Adult and Pediatric Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Neha; Wayne, Alan S.; Kim, Youn H.; Hale, Gregory A.; Alvarado, Carlos S; Myskowski, Patricia; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Busam, Klaus J.; Pulitzer, Melissa; Zwerner, Jeffrey; Horwitz, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTL-AB) and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma (CGD-TCL) are rare cutaneous T-cell lymphomas for which no standard treatment exists. We report our experience with bexarotene, an oral retinoid, in 15 adults and children with these disorders. In this series, we found a 77% overall response rate of bexarotene with limited toxicity for these disorders.

  8. Activation of endogenous c-fos proto-oncogene expression by human T-cell leukemia virus type I-encoded p40 sup tax protein in the human T-cell line, Jurkat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Kinya; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Masataka; Sugamura, Kazuo (Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    The authors examined the ability of the trans-acting factor p40{sup tax} of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), which is thought to be a crucial molecule in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I, to activate expression of a set of endogenous cellular genes related to T-cell proliferation. For this purpose, they established a subclone (JPX-9) of Jurkat cells that was stably transfected with an expression plasmid containing the p40{sup tax} gene, whose expression is definitively dependent on heavy-metal ions. Expression of the interleukin-2 receptor {alpha} chain in JPX-9 cells was induced in response to the induction of p40{sup tax} expression, as has been demonstrated by others in transient transfection experiments with Jurkat cells. In addition, they found that significant enhancement of expression of the nuclear proto-oncogene c-fos was closely associated with expression of p40{sup tax}. Continuous enhancement in the level of c-fos mRNA was observed in the presence of p40{sup tax}. These results suggest that (i) in addition to the interleukin-2-interleukin-2 receptor system, cellular genes such as c-fos, which regulate normal T-cell growth, are also activated directly or indirectly by p40{sup tax} and (ii) p40{sup tax}-induced modulation of gene expression plays a crucial role in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I.

  9. Persistent changes in circulating and intestinal γδ T cell subsets, invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in children and adults with coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Dunne

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets, natural killer cells, CD56(+ T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity.

  10. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndsey E Shorey

    Full Text Available Certain bioactive food components, including indole-3-carbinol (I3C and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM from cruciferous vegetables, have been shown to target cellular pathways regulating carcinogenesis. Previously, our laboratory showed that dietary I3C is an effective transplacental chemopreventive agent in a dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC-dependent model of murine T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The primary objective of the present study was to extend our chemoprevention studies in mice to an analogous human neoplasm in cell culture. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that I3C or DIM may be chemotherapeutic in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cells. Treatment of the T-ALL cell lines CCRF-CEM, CCRF-HSB2, SUP-T1 and Jurkat with DIM in vitro significantly reduced cell proliferation and viability at concentrations 8- to 25-fold lower than the parent compound I3C. DIM (7.5 µM arrested CEM and HSB2 cells at the G(1 phase of the cell cycle and 15 µM DIM significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells in all T-ALL lines. In CEM cells, DIM reduced protein expression of cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4, CDK6 and D-type cyclin 3 (CCND3; DIM also significantly altered expression of eight transcripts related to human apoptosis (BCL2L10, CD40LG, HRK, TNF, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF25, TNFSF8, TRAF4. Similar anticancer effects of DIM were observed in vivo. Dietary exposure to 100 ppm DIM significantly decreased the rate of growth of human CEM xenografts in immunodeficient SCID mice, reduced final tumor size by 44% and increased the apoptotic index compared to control-fed mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a potential for therapeutic application of DIM in T-ALL.

  11. Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  12. T-cell leukemia 1 expression in nodal Epstein-Barr virus-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M; Barber, Glen N; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-09-01

    The physiologic expression of the product of the proto-oncogene TCL1 (T-cell leukemia 1) is primarily restricted to early embryonic cells. In nonneoplastic B cells, the expression of TCL1 is determined by the differentiation step with silencing at the germinal center stage. TCL1 protein is overexpressed in a wide variety of human diseases. It has been shown that TCL1 is a powerful B-cell oncogene, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various types of mature B-cell lymphomas. There is no comparative information in the literature addressing the expression of TCL1 in pediatric and adult nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. We studied 55 cases of adult and pediatric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma to analyze the phenotypic profile of these lymphomas, including TCL1 expression, and its relationship with clinical outcome in different age groups. The cases were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of TCL1, CD10, BCL-2, BCL-6, and MUM1. We also evaluated c-MYC translocation by fluorescence in situ hybridization. TCL1 was observed in 11 cases, 5 pediatric and 6 adult cases, all but one diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Pediatric cases showed a significant association between TCL1 expression, high proliferative index, and presence of c-MYC translocation. TCL1 positivity was predominantly found in germinal center phenotype diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Overall survival was worse in adult TCL1-positive cases than pediatric ones. Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas infrequently expressed TCL1 in both age groups.

  13. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type I-Mediated Repression of PDZ-LIM Domain-Containing Protein 2 Involves DNA Methylation But Independent of the Viral Oncoprotein Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengrong Yan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Our recent studies have shown that one important mechanism of HTLV-I-Mediated tumorigenesis is through PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2 repression, although the involved mechanism remains unknown. Here, we further report that HTLV-I-Mediated PDLIM2 repression was a pathophysiological event and the PDLIM2 repression involved DNA methylation. Whereas DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3b but not 3a were upregulated in HTLV-I-transformed T cells, the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC restored PDLIM2 expression and induced death of these malignant cells. Notably, the PDLIM2 repression was independent of the viral regulatory protein Tax because neither short-term induction nor long-term stable expression of Tax could downregulate PDLIM2 expression. These studies provide important insights into PDLIM2 regulation, HTLV-I leukemogenicity, long latency, and cancer health disparities. Given the efficient antitumor activity with no obvious toxicity of 5-aza-dC, these studies also suggest potential therapeutic strategies for ATL.

  14. The pan-ErbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib induces caspase-mediated cell death in human T-cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinks, Cecilia, E-mail: Cecilia.trinks@liu.se [Division of Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Severinsson, Emelie A., E-mail: Emelie.severinsson@liu.se [Division of Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Holmlund, Birgitta, E-mail: Birgitta.holmlund@lio.se [Department of Oncology, County Council of Ostergoetland, Linkoeping (Sweden); Green, Anna, E-mail: Anna.green@liu.se [Division of Cell Biology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Green, Henrik, E-mail: Henrik.green@liu.se [Clinical Pharmacology, Division of Drug Research, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Joensson, Jan-Ingvar, E-mail: Jan-ingvar.jonsson@liu.se [Experimental Hematology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta, E-mail: Anna-Lotta.Hallbeck@lio.se [Division of Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Oncology, County Council of Ostergoetland, Linkoeping (Sweden); Walz, Thomas M., E-mail: Thomas.Walz@lio.se [Division of Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Oncology, County Council of Ostergoetland, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Canertinib induces caspase-mediated apoptosis in T-cell leukemia cells in vitro. {yields} Canertinib mediates activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. {yields} Canertinib induces apoptosis in an ErbB receptor independent manner. {yields} Lymphocyte specific proteins as well as survival kinases are inhibited. {yields} Canertinib may act as a multi-kinase inhibiting drug in human T-cell malignancies. -- Abstract: Canertinib is a novel ErbB-receptor inhibitor currently in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumors overexpressing ErbB-receptors. We have recently demonstrated that canertinib displays anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in human myeloid leukemia cells devoid of ErbB-receptors. The mechanism mediating these effects are however unknown. In this study, we show that canertinib is able to act as a multi-kinase inhibitor by inhibition of several intracellular kinases involved in T-cell signaling such as Akt, Erk1/2 and Zap-70, and reduced Lck protein expression in the human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. Treatment with canertinib at a concentration of 2 {mu}M caused accumulation of Jurkat cells in the G{sub 1} cell cycle phase and increased doses induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Apoptotic signs of treated cells were detected by Annexin V staining and cleavage of PARP, caspase-3, -8, -9, -10 and Bid. A subset of the pro-apoptotic signals mediated by canertinib could be significantly reduced by specific caspase inhibitors. Taken together, these results demonstrate the dual ability of canertinib to downregulate important signaling pathways and to activate caspase-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway in human T-cell leukemia cells.

  15. Sequence analysis of the new human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I isolate (HTLV-I) in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilim, Y; Rosenblatt, J D; Danon, Y L

    1994-12-01

    Recent studies have established the presence of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) in Israel. The entire nucleotide sequence of HTLV-I virus from a previously described HE isolate of a Mashadi Jewish Iranian patient was determined. To further characterize the LTR and env genes from the HTLV-I isolate we employed polymerase chain reaction amplification with subsequent cloning and sequencing of the amplified products on both strands. Sequence analyses of amplified LTR regions of this variant showed marked nucleotide homology of 98% compared to Japanese isolates, while African and Indo-Malay (Papua, New Guinea) and Solomon Island isolates showed more divergence with sequence homology of 95% and 91%. Higher homology of 98-99% was conserved in the amplified HTLV-env gene. In this respect the Iranian isolate was most similar to the African and Japanese isolate and divergent from the Melanesian HTLV-I variant, supporting the theory that HTLV-I may have originated in Africa and reached the Far East by overland trade routes. PMID:8002270

  16. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsuoka, M. [Second Division of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Jhono, M. [Department of Dermatology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Eto, K. [The National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  17. Different outcome of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with translocation t(11;14) treated in two consecutive children leukemia group EORTC trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Pauline; Suciu, Stefan; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cave, Hélène; Sirvent, Nicolas; Plat, Geneviève; Thyss, Antoine; Mechinaud, Françoise; Costa, Vitor M; Ferster, Alina; Lutz, Patrick; Mazingue, Françoise; Plantaz, Dominique; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Yves; Benoit, Yves; Dastugue, Nicole; Rohrlich, Pierre S

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T cell lineage (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignant disease which accounts for 15 % of childhood ALL. T(11;14) is the more frequent chromosomal abnormality in childhood T-ALL, but its prognostic value remained controversial. Our aim was to analyze the outcome of childhood T-ALL with t(11;14) to know if the presence of this translocation is associated with a poor prognosis. We conducted a retrospective study from a series of 20 patients with t(11;14), treated in two consecutive trials from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Children Leukemia Group over a 19-year period from 1989 to 2008. There were no significant differences between the 2 consecutive groups of patients with t(11;14) regarding the clinical and biological features at diagnosis. Among 19 patients who reached complete remission, 9 patients relapsed. We noticed 7 deaths all relapse- or failure-related. In the 58881 study, a presence of t(11;14) was associated with a poor outcome with an event-free survival at 5 years at 22.2 % versus 65.1 % for the non-t(11;14) T-ALL (p = 0.0004). In the more recent protocol, the outcome of T-ALL with t(11;14) reached that of non-t(11;14) T-ALL with an event-free survival at 5 years at 65.5 versus 74.9 % (p = 0.93). The presence of t(11;14) appeared as a poor prognostic feature in the 58881 trial whereas this abnormality no longer affected the outcome in the 58951 study. This difference is probably explained by the more intensive chemotherapy in the latest trial.

  18. Rapid T-cell receptor CD4+ repertoire reconstitution and immune recovery in unrelated umbilical cord blood transplanted pediatric leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchi, Andrea; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Di Cesare, Silvia; Puliafito, Pamela; Pensieroso, Simone; Rana, Ippolita; Pinto, Rita; Cancrini, Caterina; De Rossi, Giulio; Caniglia, Maurizio; Rossi, Paolo

    2006-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation has been successfully employed for treatment of many immune and hematologic disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of immune reconstitution after umbilical cord blood transplantation in 6 leukemia children. T-cell receptor Vbeta third complementary region spectratyping was used for monitoring the contribution of the thymic pathway in patients' immune reconstitution. Absolute numbers of lymphocyte subsets (T, B, and natural killer), and lymphoproliferative in vitro response to mitogens, recovered within 12 months after transplantation. Furthermore, an overall diversification of T-cell receptor complexity in the repopulating T cells, with a polyclonal Gaussian profiles in most (74%) of total families was observed. Noteworthy, we showed a wider and more rapid reconstitution of T-cell receptor CD4+ T cell families compared with T-cell receptor CD8+ T ones still exhibiting some perturbations at 24 months. These data show that umbilical cord blood transplantation allows immune reconstitution already within 12 months with generation of newly diversified CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets.

  19. Comparison of immunofluorescence, particle agglutination, and enzyme immunoassays for detection of human T-cell leukemia virus type I antibody in African sera.

    OpenAIRE

    Verdier, M; Denis, F; Leonard, G; Sangare, A; Patillaud, S; Prince-David, M; Essex, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of four screening tests for detecting antibody to human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was determined by using 2,700 African serum specimens. The tests studied were indirect immunofluorescence, particle agglutination from Fujirebio, and two enzyme immunoassays, one from Abbott Laboratories that used virus lysate from HUT 102 cells and the other from Cambridge BioScience Corp. that used an env recombinant protein. Positive and doubtful sera were confirmed by Western im...

  20. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yang T; Yao S; Zhang X; Guo Y

    2016-01-01

    Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a pr...

  1. Acute liver failure due to natural killer-like T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: A case report and review of the Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evan S Dellon; Shannon R Morris; Wozhan Tang; Cherie H Dunphy; Mark W Russo

    2006-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a medical emergency requiring immediate evaluation for liver transplantation. We describe an unusual case of a patient who presented with ascites, jaundice, and encephalopathy and was found to have ALF due to natural killer (NK)-like T cell leukemia/lymphoma. The key immunophenotype was CD2+, CD3+, CD7+, CD56+. This diagnosis, which was based on findings in the peripheral blood and ascitic fluid, was confirmed with liver biopsy, and was a contraindication to liver transplantation. A review of the literature shows that hematologic malignancies are an uncommon cause of fulminant hepatic failure, and that NK-like T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a relatively recently recognized entity which is characteristically CD3+ and CD56+. This case demonstrates that liver biopsy is essential in diagnosing unusual causes of acute liver failure, and that infiltration of the liver with NK-like T-cell lymphoma/leukemia can cause acute liver failure.

  2. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  3. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. Establishment of reference CD4+ T cell values for adult Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Krishnangshu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD4+ T lymphocyte counts are the most important indicator of disease progression and success of antiretroviral treatment in HIV infection in resource limited settings. The nationwide reference range of CD4+ T lymphocytes was not available in India. This study was conducted to determine reference values of absolute CD4+ T cell counts and percentages for adult Indian population. Methods A multicentric study was conducted involving eight sites across the country. A total of 1206 (approximately 150 per/centre healthy participants were enrolled in the study. The ratio of male (N = 645 to female (N = 561 of 1.14:1. The healthy status of the participants was assessed by a pre-decided questionnaire. At all centers the CD4+ T cell count, percentages and absolute CD3+ T cell count and percentages were estimated using a single platform strategy and lyse no wash technique. The data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Scientist (SPSS, version 15 and Prism software version 5. Results The absolute CD4+ T cell counts and percentages in female participants were significantly higher than the values obtained in male participants indicating the true difference in the CD4+ T cell subsets. The reference range for absolute CD4 count for Indian male population was 381-1565 cells/μL and for female population was 447-1846 cells/μL. The reference range for CD4% was 25-49% for male and 27-54% for female population. The reference values for CD3 counts were 776-2785 cells/μL for Indian male population and 826-2997 cells/μL for female population. Conclusion The study used stringent procedures for controlling the technical variation in the CD4 counts across the sites and thus could establish the robust national reference ranges for CD4 counts and percentages. These ranges will be helpful in staging the disease progression and monitoring antiretroviral therapy in HIV infection in India.

  5. Risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adult leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Birgens, Henrik S;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with childhood leukemia surviving into adulthood have elevated risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); these risks cannot automatically be extrapolated to patients surviving adult leukemia. We tested whether survivors of adult leukemia...

  6. Suppression of IL-7-dependent Effector T-cell Expansion by Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells and PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, James L; Vaes, Bart; Hull, Caroline; Sabbah, Shereen; Hayday, Thomas; Wang, Nancy S; DiPiero, Anthony; Lehman, Nicholas A; Taggart, Jen M; Carty, Fiona; English, Karen; Pinxteren, Jef; Deans, Robert; Ting, Anthony E; Tree, Timothy I M

    2015-11-01

    T-cell depletion therapy is used to prevent acute allograft rejection, treat autoimmunity and create space for bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation. The evolved response to T-cell loss is a transient increase in IL-7 that drives compensatory homeostatic proliferation (HP) of mature T cells. Paradoxically, the exaggerated form of this process that occurs following lymphodepletion expands effector T-cells, often causing loss of immunological tolerance that results in rapid graft rejection, autoimmunity, and exacerbated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). While standard immune suppression is unable to treat these pathologies, growing evidence suggests that manipulating the incipient process of HP increases allograft survival, prevents autoimmunity, and markedly reduces GVHD. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) are a clinical grade immunomodulatory cell therapy known to alter γ-chain cytokine responses in T-cells. Herein, we demonstrate that MAPC regulate HP of human T-cells, prevent the expansion of Th1, Th17, and Th22 effectors, and block the development of pathogenic allograft responses. This occurs via IL-1β-primed secretion of PGE2 and activates T-cell intrinsic regulatory mechanisms (SOCS2, GADD45A). These data provide proof-of-principle that HP of human T-cells can be targeted by cellular and molecular therapies and lays a basis for the development of novel strategies to prevent immunopathology in lymphodepleted patients. PMID:26216515

  7. L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1): a therapeutic target supporting growth and survival of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosilio, C; Nebout, M; Imbert, V; Griessinger, E; Neffati, Z; Benadiba, J; Hagenbeek, T; Spits, H; Reverso, J; Ambrosetti, D; Michiels, J-F; Bailly-Maitre, B; Endou, H; Wempe, M F; Peyron, J-F

    2015-06-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer cells is a treasure trove to discover new antitumoral strategies. The gene (SLC7A5) encoding system L amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is overexpressed in murine lymphoma cells generated via T-cell deletion of the pten tumor suppressor, and also in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL)/lymphoma (T-LL) cells. We show here that a potent and LAT1 selective inhibitor (JPH203) decreased leukemic cell viability and proliferation, and induced transient autophagy followed by apoptosis. JPH203 could also alter the in vivo growth of luciferase-expressing-tPTEN-/- cells xenografted into nude mice. In contrast, JPH203 was nontoxic to normal murine thymocytes and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. JPH203 interfered with constitutive activation of mTORC1 and Akt, decreased expression of c-myc and triggered an unfolded protein response mediated by the C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) transcription factor associated with cell death. A JPH203-resistant tPTEN-/-clone appeared CHOP induction deficient. We also demonstrate that targeting LAT1 may be an efficient broad spectrum adjuvant approach to treat deadly T-cell malignancies as the molecule synergized with rapamycin, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, velcade and l-asparaginase to alter leukemic cell viability. PMID:25482130

  8. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  9. Regulation of the tumor marker Fascin by the viral oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) depends on promoter activation and on a promoter-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Caroline F; Gross, Christine; Bros, Matthias; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Biesinger, Brigitte; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a highly infiltrative neoplasia of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes that occurs in about 5% of carriers infected with the deltaretrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral oncoprotein Tax perturbs cellular signaling pathways leading to upregulation of host cell factors, amongst them the actin-bundling protein Fascin, an invasion marker of several types of cancer. However, transcriptional regulation of Fascin by Tax is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a triple mode of transcriptional induction of Fascin by Tax, which requires (1) NF-κB-dependent promoter activation, (2) a Tax-responsive region in the Fascin promoter, and (3) a promoter-independent mechanism sensitive to the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2. Thus, Tax regulates Fascin by a multitude of signals. Beyond, using Tax-expressing and virus-transformed lymphocytes as a model system, our study is the first to identify the invasion marker Fascin as a novel target of PP2, an inhibitor of metastasis.

  10. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, Lymphoma, or T-Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Gonadotroph Adenoma; Pituitary Basophilic Adenoma; Pituitary Chromophobe Adenoma; Pituitary Eosinophilic Adenoma; Prolactin Secreting Adenoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Pituitary Tumor; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; TSH Secreting Adenoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Low degree of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I genetic drift in vivo as a means of monitoring viral transmission and movement of ancient human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessain, A; Gallo, R C; Franchini, G

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the genetic variation of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) isolates in the same individuals over time, as well as of HTLV-I isolates from various parts of the world. The viral DNA fragment studied encodes the carboxy terminus of gp46 and almost all of gp21, both of which are envelope glycoproteins. Samples were obtained from native inhabitants of five African countries, two South American countries, China, the French West Indies, and Haiti and included 14 patients with tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, 10 patients with adult T-cell leukemia, 1 patient with T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 3 healthy HTLV-I-seropositive individuals. DNA analyses of HTLV-I sequences demonstrated that (i) little or no genetic variation occurred in vivo in the same individual or in different hosts from the same region carrying the same virus, regardless of their clinical statuses; (ii) changes in nucleotide sequences in some regions of the HTLV-I genome were diagnostic of the geographical origin of the viruses; (iii) HTLV-I sequences from West African countries (Mauritania and Guinea Bissau) and some from the Ivory Coast and Central African Republic were virtually identical to those from the French West Indies, Haiti, French Guyana, and Peru, strongly suggesting that at least some HTLV-I strains were introduced into the New World through infected individuals during the slave trade events; and (iv) the Zairian HTLV-I isolates represent a separate HTLV-I cluster, in which intrastrain variability was also observed, and are more divergent from the other HTLV-I isolates. Because of the low genetic variability of HTLV-I in vivo, the study of the proviral DNA sequence in selected populations of infected individuals will increase our knowledge of the origin and evolution of HTLV-I and might be useful in anthropological studies. PMID:1548762

  12. Blinatumomab: Bridging the Gap in Adult Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folan, Stephanie A; Rexwinkle, Amber; Autry, Jane; Bryan, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse after frontline therapy have extremely poor outcomes despite advances in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blinatumomab is a first-in-class bispecific T-cell engager that links T cells to tumor cells leading to T-cell activation and tumor cell lysis. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration approved blinatumomab for treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In a phase II trial, blinatumomab produced response rates of 43%, and 40% of patients achieving a complete remission proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Early use of blinatumomab was complicated with adverse effects, including cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Management strategies, including dexamethasone premedication and 2-step dose escalation during the first cycle of blinatumomab, have decreased the incidence and severity of these adverse effects. Blinatumomab currently is being studied for other B-cell malignancies and has the potential to benefit many patients with CD19+ malignancies in the future. PMID:27521320

  13. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P.; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children receiving, respectively, HSC Transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical family donor or an unrelated CB donor, for both malignant (46) and non-malignant disorders (11). Relative and absolute sj and beta-TREC values indicated comparable thymic function reconstitution at 3 and 6 months after the allograft in both groups. Compared to children with non-malignant disorders, those with hematological malignancies had significantly lower pre-transplantation TREC counts. Patients who relapsed after HSCT had a significantly less efficient thymic function both before and 6 months after HSCT with especially low beta-TREC values, this finding suggesting an impact of early intra-thymic T-cell differentiation on the occurrence of leukemia relapse. PMID:23459761

  14. JAK3 mutants transform hematopoietic cells through JAK1 activation, causing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Degryse, Sandrine; de Bock, Charles E.; Cox, Luk; Demeyer, Sofie; Gielen, Olga; Mentens, Nicole; Jacobs, Kris; Geerdens, Ellen; Gianfelici, Valentina; Hulselmans, Gert; Fiers, Mark; Aerts, Stein; Meijerink, Jules P.; Tousseyn, Thomas; Cools, Jan

    2014-01-01

    JAK3 is a tyrosine kinase that associates with the common γ chain of cytokine receptors and is recurrently mutated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We tested the transforming properties of JAK3 pseudokinase and kinase domain mutants using in vitro and in vivo assays. Most, but not all, JAK3 mutants transformed cytokine-dependent Ba/F3 or MOHITO cell lines to cytokine-independent proliferation. JAK3 pseudokinase mutants were dependent on Jak1 kinase activity for cellular transfo...

  15. Effectiveness of high-dose methotrexate in T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma: a randomized study by the Children's Oncology Group (POG 9404)

    OpenAIRE

    Asselin, Barbara L; Devidas, Meenakshi; Wang, Chenguang; Pullen, Jeanette; Borowitz, Michael J.; Hutchison, Robert; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Camitta, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    The Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) phase 3 trial 9404 was designed to determine the effectiveness of high-dose methotrexate (HDM) when added to multi-agent chemotherapy based on the Dana-Farber backbone. Children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or advanced lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-NHL) were randomized at diagnosis to receive/not receive HDM (5 g/m2 as a 24-hour infusion) at weeks 4, 7, 10, and 13. Between 1996 and 2000, 436 patients were enrolled in the methotrexate randomiz...

  16. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-07-11

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo.

  17. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I Trans-Activator (Tax Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kunihiro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT. In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo.

  18. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  19. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  20. T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    T Cells - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign ... Is MS? Definition of MS T Cells T Cells Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this ...

  1. Reconstitution of naive T cells during antiretroviral treatment of HIV-infected adults is dependent on age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, James; Hamann, Dörte; Borleffs, Jan; Roos, Marijke; Miedema, Frank; Boucher, Charles; de Boer, Rob

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of age on the regeneration rate of naive and memory T cells in the blood of 45 adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 57 years. Naive cells were defined as CD45RA+CD27+. Cells negative for CD45R

  2. Decrease of FOXP3 mRNA in CD4~+ T cells in latent autoimmune diabetes in adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨治芳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the percentage of peripheral blood CD4+ CD25+ T cells and the expression of F0XP3 mRNA in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adult (LADA). Methods Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 60 patients with LADA,30 patients with type 2 diabetes and 30 age- and sex-matched

  3. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  4. Bioinformatic Description of Immunotherapy Targets for Pediatric T-Cell Leukemia and the Impact of Normal Gene Sets Used for Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas J Orentas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric lymphoid leukemia has the highest cure rate of all pediatric malignancies, yet due to its prevalence, still accounts for the majority of childhood cancer deaths and requires long-term highly toxic therapy. The ability to target B-cell ALL with immunoglobulin-like binders, whether anti-CD22 antibody or anti-CD19 CAR-Ts, has impacted treatment options for some patients. The development of new ways to target B cell antigens continues at rapid pace. T-cell ALL accounts for up to 20% of childhood leukemia but has yet to see a set of high value immunotherapeutic targets identified. To find new targets for T-ALL immunotherapy, we employed a bioinformatic comparison to broad normal tissue arrays, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, and mature lymphocytes, then filtered the results for transcripts encoding plasma membrane proteins. T-ALL bears a core T cell signature and transcripts encoding TCR/CD3 components and canonical markers of T cell development predominate, especially when comparison was made to normal tissue or HSC. However, when comparison to mature lymphocytes was also undertaken, we identified two antigens that may drive, or be associated with leukemogenesis; TALLA-1 and hedgehog interacting protein, HHIP. In addition, TCR subfamilies, CD1, activation and adhesion markers, membrane organizing molecules, and receptors linked to metabolism and inflammation were also identified. Of these, only CD52, CD37, and CD98 are currently being targeted clinically. This work provides a set of targets to be considered for future development of immunotherapies for T-ALL.

  5. Inverted duplication of JH associated with chromosome 14 translocation and T-cell leukemia in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J P; Gatti, R A; Sears, T S; White, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A specific 14q32 breakpoint is observed in a homologous chromosome 14 translocation [t(14;14)q12q32] occurring in the T-cells of about 10% of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). To investigate whether the 14q32 breakpoint in AT occurs within the immunoglobulin gene cluster as is frequently detected in B-cell lymphoma, immunoglobulin clones were hybridized to Southern blots of DNA isolated from the T-cells of two AT patients with this chromosome 14 translocation. The 14q32 translocation ...

  6. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  7. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 tax requires CADM1/TSLC1 for inactivation of the NF-κB inhibitor A20 and constitutive NF-κB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshree Pujari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activation of NF-κB by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 oncoprotein, Tax, is vital for the development and pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. K63-linked polyubiquitinated Tax activates the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid raft microdomain. Tax also interacts with TAX1BP1 to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulatory ubiquitin-editing A20 enzyme complex. However, the molecular mechanisms of Tax-mediated IKK activation and A20 protein complex inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that membrane associated CADM1 (Cell adhesion molecule1 recruits Ubc13 to Tax, causing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Tax, and IKK complex activation in the membrane lipid raft. The c-terminal cytoplasmic tail containing PDZ binding motif of CADM1 is critical for Tax to maintain persistent NF-κB activation. Finally, Tax failed to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulator ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 complex, and activate the IKK complex in the lipid raft in absence of CADM1. Our results thus indicate that CADM1 functions as a critical scaffold molecule for Tax and Ubc13 to form a cellular complex with NEMO, TAX1BP1 and NRP, to activate the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid rafts, to inactivate NF-κB negative regulators, and maintain persistent NF-κB activation in HTLV-1 infected cells.

  9. Evolution of Ig- and T-cell receptor gene configuration in a Ph1+ hybrid leukemia patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Arne Willy; Hokland, Peter; Kristensen, J S;

    1992-01-01

    the configuration of the Ig heavy and light chain lambda genes remained constant during the whole period of treatment, that of the Ig light chain kappa gene and TCR beta gene displayed extensive rearrangements after initiation of ALL therapy. Since this patient represents a de novo acute leukemia as evaluated...

  10. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kum Ja Lee,1 Vivian Chow,1 Ashley Weissman,2 Sunil Tulpule,3 Ibrahim Aldoss,4 Mojtaba Akhtari5 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, University of Southern California, 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Southern California Norris Cancer Hospital, Los Angeles, CA, 3Department of Medicine, Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, NJ, 4Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, 5Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for the Study of Blood Diseases, University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug

  11. Competitive Transfer of αCD19-TCRz-CD28 and αCD19-TCRz-CD137 CAR-T Cells for B-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  12. Coinfection by Strongyloides stercoralis in blood donors infected with human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 in São Paulo city, Brazil

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    Pedro P Chieffi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of coinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis and human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTML-1 was determined in 91 blood donors examined at the blood bank of a large hospital in São Paulo city, Brazil. As control group 61 individuals, not infected by HTLV-1, were submitted to the same techniques for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. In HTLV-1 infected patients the frequency of S. stercoralis infection was 12.1%; on the other hand, the control group showed a frequency significantly lower of S. stercoralis infection (1.6%, suggesting that HTLV-1 patients shoud be considered as a high risk group for strongyloidiasis in São Paulo city.

  13. Clinical relevance of sensitive and quantitative STAT3 mutation analysis using next-generation sequencing in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Larsen, Martin; Rewes, Annika;

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL) is often challenging because clinical and laboratory characteristics are overlapping with nonneoplastic conditions. Recently, mutation in the STAT3 gene has been identified as a recurrent genetic abnormality in T-LGL. STAT3 mutation......, therefore, represents a promising marker in T-LGL diagnostics. We developed a new quantitative next-generation sequencing assay that allows sensitive analysis of the STAT3 gene. The assay was used to study the utility of STAT3 mutation analysis as a diagnostic tool in T-LGL. The study included 16 T...... donors all tested negative, thus demonstrating the specificity of the assay. The results also indicated that mutation levels in blood and bone marrow are not systematically different, and next-generation sequencing-based STAT3 mutation analysis represents a sensitive method for monitoring residual...

  14. HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected adults in early HIV-1 infection have elevated CD4+ T cell counts.

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    Jason D Barbour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV-1 is often acquired in the presence of pre-existing co-infections, such as Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2. We examined the impact of HSV-2 status at the time of HIV-1 acquisition for its impact on subsequent clinical course, and total CD4+ T cell phenotypes. METHODS: We assessed the relationship of HSV-1/HSV-2 co-infection status on CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 RNA levels over time prior in a cohort of 186 treatment naïve adults identified during early HIV-1 infection. We assessed the activation and differentiation state of total CD4+ T cells at study entry by HSV-2 status. RESULTS: Of 186 recently HIV-1 infected persons, 101 (54% were sero-positive for HSV-2. There was no difference in initial CD8+ T cell count, or differences between the groups for age, gender, or race based on HSV-2 status. Persons with HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infection sustained higher CD4+ T cell counts over time (+69 cells/ul greater (SD = 33.7, p = 0.04 than those with HIV-1 infection alone (Figure 1, after adjustment for HIV-1 RNA levels (-57 cells per 1 log(10 higher HIV-1 RNA, p<0.0001. We did not observe a relationship between HSV-2 infection status with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels over time. HSV-2 acquisition after HIV-1 acquisition had no impact on CD4+ count or viral load. We did not detect differences in CD4+ T cell activation or differentiation state by HSV-2+ status. DISCUSSION: We observed no effect of HSV-2 status on viral load. However, we did observe that treatment naïve, recently HIV-1 infected adults co-infected with HSV-2+ at the time of HIV-1 acquisition had higher CD4+ T cell counts over time. If verified in other cohorts, this result poses a striking paradox, and its public health implications are not immediately clear.

  15. In Vivo T Cell Depletion with Myeloablative Regimens on Outcomes after Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Doris M; Eapen, Mary; Sparapani, Rodney; O'Brien, Tracey A; Chan, Ka Wah; Chen, Junfang; Craddock, John; Schultz, Kirk R; Wagner, John E; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-12-01

    The inclusion of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in cord blood transplantation is controversial. We evaluated outcomes according to ATG inclusion in 297 children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received myeloablative total body irradiation-based conditioning and either single-unit (74%) or double-unit (26%) grafts. Ninety-two patients (31%) received ATG and 205 (69%) did not. ATG recipients were more likely to be cytomegalovirus seronegative. The incidences of day 100 grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; 30% versus 54%, P = .0002) and chronic GVHD (22% versus 43%, P = .0008) were lower with ATG compared with non-ATG regimens. However, day 100 grades III to IV acute GVHD was comparable (11% versus 17%, P = .15). The 3-year incidences of transplant-related mortality (16% versus 17%, P = .98), relapse (17% versus 27%, P = .12), and leukemia-free survival (66% versus 55%, P = .23) in ATG and non-ATG recipients were similar. There were no differences in viral reactivation between treatment groups (60% versus 58%, P = .83). Therefore, the data suggest that incorporation of ATG with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be useful in reducing the risk of acute and chronic GVHD without any deleterious effect on transplant-related mortality, relapse, or leukemia-free survival in children and adolescents with ALL.

  16. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Etienne Danis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients.

  17. Ocular disorders in adult leukemia patients in Nigeria

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    Omoti Afekhide

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Leukemias may present with, or be associated with ocular disorders. Aims: To determine the rates of ophthalmic disorders in adult patients with leukemia. Settings and Design: A prospective study of ocular disorders in adult patients with leukemia at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, between July 2004 and June 2008 was conducted. Methods and Materials: The patients were interviewed and examined by the authors and the ocular findings were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Instat GraphPad™ v2.05a statistical package software. The means, standard deviation, and the Kruskal-Wallis non parametric test were performed. Results: Forty-seven patients with leukemias were seen. Nineteen patients (40.4% had CLL, 14(29.8% had CML, 9(19.1% had AML and 5(10.6% had ALL. Seven patients (14.9% had ocular disorders due to leukemia. The ocular disorders due to the leukemia were proptosis in two patients (4.3%, retinopathy in one patient (2.1%, conjunctival infiltration in one patient (2.1%, periorbital edema in one patient (2.1%, retinal detachment in one patient (2.1%, and subconjunctival hemorrhage in one patient (2.1%. There was no significant difference in rate of the ocular disorders in the various types of leukemia (Kruskal-Wallis KW= 4.019; corrected for ties. P=0.2595. One patient (2.1% was blind from bilateral exudative retinal detachment while 1 patient (2.1% had monocular blindness from mature cataract. Conclusions: Ophthalmic disorders that are potentially blinding occur in leukemias. Ophthalmic evaluation is needed in these patients for early identification and treatment of blinding conditions.

  18. Labdane type diterpenes down-regulate the expression of c-Myc protein, but not of Bcl-2, in human leukemia T-cells undergoing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, K; Demetzos, C; Vaos, V; Ioannidis, P; Trangas, T

    2001-06-01

    Sclareol (1) and ent-3beta-hydroxy-13-epi-manoyl oxide (2) belong to the labdane type diterpenes. They were isolated from the leaves and from the fruits of Cistus creticus subsp. creticus, and were found to be active against human leukemic cell lines. Compound 2 was converted to its thiomidazolide derivative (3). Compounds 1 and 3 were found to induce apoptotic cell death in human T-cell leukemia lines and to interfere with their cell cycle, arresting cells at G(0/1) phase. Apoptosis can involve the activation and/or suppression of critical genes such as c-myc whose reduction or its inappropriate expression can be associated with induction of cell death and bcl-2 whose activation prevents apoptosis in the latter case. In order to detect any concomitant effect (1 and 3) upon c-myc and bcl-2 oncogene expression, we performed Western blot analysis to determine the levels of expression of these two genes upon treatment with the above compounds. Western blot analysis showed that of c-myc proto-oncogene levels were markedly reduced before massive apoptosis ensued in H33AJ-JA1 and MOLT3 cells, while bcl-2 expression remained unaffected. Thus, induction of apoptosis due to compounds 1 and 3 in these T-cell leukemic cell lines is preceded by c-myc down regulation and furthermore sustained bcl-2 expression does not rescue cells from apoptosis under the conditions used. PMID:11337016

  19. Rearrangement and expression of beta-T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin genes in established Ph1 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, J; Koeffler, H P

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the arrangement and expression of immunoglobulin (Ig) and beta-T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in six established Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph1) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines, and correlated these results with their phenotypic characteristics. Three cell lines with nonlymphoid characteristics, EM2, EM3, and K562, did not demonstrate rearrangement or expression of Ig or beta-TCR genes. A new cell line, MB, with a mature B-cell phenotype recently established in our laboratory, contained light and heavy chain immunoglobulin gene rearrangements and expressed mature Ig RNA. In a cell line with an early lymphoid phenotype, BV173, this analysis showed rearrangement of Ig heavy chain and beta-TCR genes, unrearranged Ig light chain DNA, and expression of only an immature beta-TCR transcript. This line provides evidence for T-cell lineage involvement in Ph1 CML. One cell line without markers of any cell type, KCL-22, demonstrated rearranged, unexpressed Ig heavy chain genes, suggesting these cells are at the very earliest stages of lymphoid differentiation. These lines should provide valuable tools to dissect the molecular biology of differentiation in CML and in early lymphocytes.

  20. PR1-specific T cells are associated with unmaintained cytogenetic remission of chronic myelogenous leukemia after interferon withdrawal.

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    Shreya Kanodia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon-alpha (IFN induces complete cytogenetic remission (CCR in 20-25% CML patients and in a small minority of patients; CCR persists after IFN is stopped. IFN induces CCR in part by increasing cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL specific for PR1, the HLA-A2-restricted 9-mer peptide from proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase, but it is unknown how CCR persists after IFN is stopped. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reasoned that PR1-CTL persist and mediate CML-specific immunity in patients that maintain CCR after IFN withdrawal. We found that PR1-CTL were increased in peripheral blood of 7/7 HLA-A2+ patients during unmaintained CCR from 3 to 88 months after IFN withdrawal, as compared to no detectable PR1-CTL in 2/2 IFN-treated CML patients not in CCR. Unprimed PR1-CTL secreted IFNgamma and were predominantly CD45RA+/-CD28+CCR7+CD57-, consistent with functional naïve and central memory (CM T cells. Similarly, following stimulation, proliferation occurred predominantly in CM PR1-CTL, consistent with long-term immunity sustained by self-renewing CM T cells. PR1-CTL were functionally anergic in one patient 6 months prior to cytogenetic relapse at 26 months after IFN withdrawal, and in three relapsed patients PR1-CTL were undetectable but re-emerged 3-6 months after starting imatinib. CONCLUSION: These data support the hypothesis that IFN elicits CML-specific CM CTL that may contribute to continuous CCR after IFN withdrawal and suggest a role for T cell immune therapy with or without tyrosine kinase inhibitors as a strategy to prolong CR in CML.

  1. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Blinatumomab: a bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibody against CD19/CD3 for refractory acute lymphoid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, JingJing; Fu, Jiaping; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy has been the forefront of cancer treatment. Cancer immunotherapy is the most recent focus. In addition, novel immunotherapeutics targeting B cell receptor signaling (e.g., ibrutinib), T cell receptor ( e.g., CART19), and NK cells (e.g., AFM13) are being developed. This review summarized the new development in blinatumomab (MT103/MEDI-538), a first-in-class bispecific T engager (BiTE) antibody against CD19/CD3 in patients with relapsed/refractory precursor B cell acute lymphoi...

  3. C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramides confer mixed cytotoxicity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

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    Michael W Holliday

    Full Text Available We previously reported that fenretinide (4-HPR was cytotoxic to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cell lines in vitro in association with increased levels of de novo synthesized dihydroceramides, the immediate precursors of ceramides. However, the cytotoxic potentials of native dihydroceramides have not been defined. Therefore, we determined the cytotoxic effects of increasing dihydroceramide levels via de novo synthesis in T-cell ALL cell lines and whether such cytotoxicity was dependent on an absolute increase in total dihydroceramide mass versus an increase of certain specific dihydroceramides. A novel method employing supplementation of individual fatty acids, sphinganine, and the dihydroceramide desaturase-1 (DES inhibitor, GT-11, was used to increase de novo dihydroceramide synthesis and absolute levels of specific dihydroceramides and ceramides. Sphingolipidomic analyses of four T-cell ALL cell lines revealed strong positive correlations between cytotoxicity and levels of C22:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.74-0.81, P ≤ 0.04 and C24:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.84-0.90, P ≤ 0.004, but not between total or other individual dihydroceramides, ceramides, or sphingoid bases or phosphorylated derivatives. Selective increase of C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramide increased level and flux of autophagy marker, LC3B-II, and increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay in the absence of an increase of reactive oxygen species; pan-caspase inhibition blocked DNA fragmentation but not cell death. C22:0-fatty acid supplemented to 4-HPR treated cells further increased C22:0-dihydroceramide levels (P ≤ 0.001 and cytotoxicity (P ≤ 0.001. These data demonstrate that increases of specific dihydroceramides are cytotoxic to T-cell ALL cells by a caspase-independent, mixed cell death mechanism associated with increased autophagy and suggest that dihydroceramides may contribute to 4-HPR-induced cytotoxicity. The targeted increase of specific acyl chain dihydroceramides

  4. Clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels are high enough to profoundly alter 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylguanine cytotoxicity for human T-cell acute leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J D; Strock, D J; Teik, J E; LaGuardia, E A; Katz, T B

    1999-01-01

    Plasma deoxycytidine levels can vary markedly during chemotherapy, from < 0.05 microM to at least 10.3 microM in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). This study demonstrates that clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels can dramatically protect human T-ALL cells against 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylguanine (araG), a promising drug in this leukemia. At 0.4, 1.2, 3.6, and 10.8 microM deoxycytidine, the dose of araG required to kill 50% of MOLT3 T-ALL cells increased 4.23 +/- 1.95-(mean +/- SEM), 23.1 +/- 5.42-, 39.3 +/- 19.3-, and 67.0 +/- 11.5-fold compared to araG without deoxycytidine. Such deoxycytidine concentrations sharply reduced intracellular araG levels and blocked inhibition of DNA synthesis even in the presence of 160 and 640 microM araG. These data offer the first evidence that clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels could profoundly modulate araG toxicity in T-ALL.

  5. In vivo expansion of co-transplanted T cells impacts on tumor re-initiating activity of human acute myeloid leukemia in NSG mice.

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    Malte von Bonin

    Full Text Available Human cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients are frequently transplanted into immune-compromised mouse strains to provide an in vivo environment for studies on the biology of the disease. Since frequencies of leukemia re-initiating cells are low and a unique cell surface phenotype that includes all tumor re-initiating activity remains unknown, the underlying mechanisms leading to limitations in the xenotransplantation assay need to be understood and overcome to obtain robust engraftment of AML-containing samples. We report here that in the NSG xenotransplantation assay, the large majority of mononucleated cells from patients with AML fail to establish a reproducible myeloid engraftment despite high donor chimerism. Instead, donor-derived cells mainly consist of polyclonal disease-unrelated expanded co-transplanted human T lymphocytes that induce xenogeneic graft versus host disease and mask the engraftment of human AML in mice. Engraftment of mainly myeloid cell types can be enforced by the prevention of T cell expansion through the depletion of lymphocytes from the graft prior transplantation.

  6. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (1): angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified and anaplastic large cell lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T/NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of the histological subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. It will be published in two parts : the first is focused on the three more frequent entities, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second (which will appear in the november issue) will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. T or NK cell lymphoproliferative disorders with leukemic presentation, primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and very rare subtypes of PTCL whose prevalence is less than 5% (hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma) will not be discussed herein. PMID:26481023

  7. Characterization and functional properties of gastric tissue-resident memory T cells from children, adults and the elderly

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    Jayaum S. Booth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are the main orchestrators of protective immunity in the stomach; however, limited information on the presence and function of the gastric T subsets is available mainly due to the difficulty in recovering high numbers of viable cells from human gastric biopsies. To overcome this shortcoming we optimized a cell isolation method that yielded high numbers of viable lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC from gastric biopsies. Classic memory T (TM subsets were identified in gastric LPMC and compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC obtained from children, adults and the elderly using an optimized 14 color flow cytometry panel. A dominant effector memory (TEM phenotype was observed in gastric LPMC CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in all age groups. We then evaluated whether these cells represented a population of gastric tissue-resident memory T (TRM cells by assessing expression of CD103 and CD69. The vast majority of gastric LPMC CD8+ T cells either co-expressed CD103/CD69 (>70% or expressed CD103 alone (~20%. Gastric LPMC CD4+ T cells also either co-expressed CD103/CD69 (>35% or expressed at least one of these markers. Thus, gastric LPMC CD8+ and CD4+ T cells had the characteristics of TRM cells. Gastric CD8+ and CD4+ TRM cells produced multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A, MIP-1β and up-regulated CD107a upon stimulation. However, marked differences were observed in their cytokine and multi-cytokine profiles when compared to their PBMC TEM counterparts. Furthermore, gastric CD8+ TRM and CD4+ TRM cells demonstrated differences in the frequency, susceptibility to activation and cytokine/multi-cytokine production profiles among the age groups. Most notably, children’s gastric TRM cells responded differently to stimuli than gastric TRM cells from adults or the elderly. In conclusion, we demonstrate the presence of gastric TRM which exhibit diverse functional characteristics in children, adults and the elderly.

  8. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  9. Frequency analysis of TRBV subfamily sjTRECs to characterize T-cell reconstitution in acute leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Yang Lijian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT leads to a prolonged state of immunodeficiency and requires reconstitution of normal T-cell immunity. Signal joint T-cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs are markers of developmental proximity to the thymus that have been used to evaluate thymic function related to T-cell immune reconstitution after HSCT. To assess the proliferative history in different T-cell receptor beta variable region (TRBV subfamilies of T cells after HSCT, expansion of TRBV subfamily-naive T cells was determined by analysis of a series of TRBV-BD1 sjTRECs. Methods sjTRECs levels were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 43 Chinese acute leukemia patients who underwent allo-HSCT. Twenty-three TRBV-BD1 sjTRECs were amplified by semi-nested PCR. Sixteen age-matched healthy volunteers served as normal controls. Results sjTRECs levels were low or undetectable in the first 6 weeks after allo-HSCT and increased after 8 weeks post HSCT; however, sjTRECs levels at week 20 post-HSCT were still less than normal controls. Frequencies of TRBV subfamily sjTRECs in PBMCs from recipients at week 8 post-HSCT (29.17 ± 20.97% or at week 16 post-HSCT (38.33 ± 9.03% were significantly lower than those in donors (47.92 ± 13.82% or recipients at pre-HSCT (45.83 ± 14.03%. However, frequencies of TRBV subfamily sjTRECs in recipients at week 30 post-HSCT (42.71 ± 21.62% were similar to those in donors and recipients at pre-HSCT. sjTRECs levels in donors had a positive linear correlation with sjTRECs levels in recipients within 8-12 weeks post-HSCT. Patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD or chronic GVHD had profoundly reduced TRECs levels during the first year post-HSCT. Frequencies of BV22-BD1 sjTRECs and BV23-BD1 sjTRECs in patients with GVHD were significantly lower than those in recipients at pre-HSCT, and the

  10. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaims, Alison Y; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I; Devadas, Satish; Shi, Yufang; Rabson, Arnold B

    2010-10-21

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4(+) T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4(+)CD25(+)CD3(-) phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4(+) T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax(+), CD4(+) lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4(+) T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1-infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  11. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine;

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well......-conserved among different GAS strains, upregulated in host-pathogen interaction studies, and predicted to be extracellular or associated with the surface of the bacteria. The antigens were tested for both antibody recognition and T cell responses in human adults and children. The antigenicity of a selected group...

  12. Inhibition of proliferation by agricultural plant extracts in seven human adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL)-related cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2011-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of agricultural plants on the proliferation of seven ATL-related human leukaemia cells, using three ATL cell lines (ED, Su9T01 and S1T), two human T-cell lines transformed by HTLV-I infection (HUT-102 and MT-2) and two HTLV-I-negative human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines (Jurkat and MOLT-4). A total of 52 samples of 80% ethanol extracts obtained from 30 types of agricultural plants were examined. On the basis of IC(50) values, we selected samples with greater activity than genistein, which was used as a positive control. The highest inhibitory effect was observed with extracts from leaves of Vaccinium virgatum Aiton (blueberry) on four cell lines (ED, Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat); seeds of Momordica charantia L. (bitter gourd) exhibited the second highest activity. The bitter gourd seeds suppressed the proliferation of three cell lines (Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat). The extracts from edible parts of Ipomea batatas LAM. (sweet potato), edible parts of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (taro), skin of taro and seeds of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc. (mume) showed markedly greater inhibitory effects on Su9T01 than genistein. These findings suggest that ATL-preventative bioactive compounds may exist in these agricultural plants, which are considered to be functional foods. PMID:21293936

  13. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Saghaeian Jazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after   24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27 expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies.

  15. Regulation of gamma T-cell antigen receptor expression by intracellular calcium in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line DND41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Martínez-Valdez, H; Madrid-Marina, V

    1996-01-01

    The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, promotes an increase of intracellular calcium and regulates mRNA expression of gamma/delta-TcR gene in human T lymphocytes. The mechanism of this regulation is not yet clear. Thus, the regulation by intracellular calcium requires elucidation. We studied the gamma-TcR gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line DND41 (CD4- CD8-) by Northern blot and flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA levels of gamma-TcR increased by ionomycin, anti-CD3, and with TPA. TPA had an antagonistic effect to both ionomycin and anti-CD3. Also, TPA inhibits the increased intracellular calcium promoted by ionomycin but not the increase promoted by anti-CD3 and ionomycin. Our results suggest that intracellular calcium induces mRNA and protein expression of gamma-TcR chain. This effect is antagonized by protein kinase C-activation. Thus, we conclude that the target cells of the differential regulation on gamma-TcR mRNA expression by intracellular calcium modulators are the CD4- CD8- cells, and this is due to cytosolic calcium mobilization. PMID:8854386

  16. Cytotoxic T cell response against the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotnda, P; Garcia, F; Peuchmaur, M; Grandchamp, B; Duval, M; Lemonnier, F; Vilmer, E; Langlade-Demoyen, P

    1998-07-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are potent effector cells that could provide long term antitumor immunity if induced by appropriate vaccines. CTL recognize 8-14 amino acid-long peptides processed intracellularly and presented by MHC class I molecules. A well-characterized example of a potential tumor antigen in childhood pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) results from the chromosomal translocation 12;21 leading to the fusion of the ETV6 and AML1 genes. This translocation is observed in > 25% of ALL-patients. In this study, we have examined whether the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein could serve as a tumor specific antigen for CTL in HLA-A2.1 individuals. We have identified a nonapeptide (RIAECILGM), encoded by the fusion region of the ETV6-AML1 protein, that binds to HLA-A2.1 molecules and induces specific primary CTL in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors. These CTL specifically lysed HLA-A2.1 tumor cells endogeneously expressing the ETV6-AML fusion protein. CTL with similar functional capacities were found with high frequencies and cloned from one patient's bone marrow indicating that ETV6-AML1-specific anti-ALL CTL are, at least in some patients, spontaneously stimulated and might participate to host antileukemia defense.

  17. Adult T-cell leukemia cells overexpress Wnt5a and promote osteoclast differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Bellon, Marcia; Ko, Nga Ling; Lee, Min-Jung; Yao, Yuan; Waldmann, Thomas A; Trepel, Jane B; Nicot, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Profiling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway reveals overexpression of Wnt5a, LEF-1 and TCF-1 in ATL patient cells.ATL cells overexpress Wnt5a, which enhances osteoclastogenesis and may contribute to the osteolytic bone lesions and hypercalcemia.

  18. ZnT8-Specific CD4+ T cells display distinct cytokine expression profiles between type 1 diabetes patients and healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Chujo

    Full Text Available Determination of antigen-specific T cell repertoires in human blood has been a challenge. Here, we show a novel integrated approach that permits determination of multiple parameters of antigen-specific T cell repertoires. The approach consists of two assays: the Direct assay and the Cytokine-driven assay. Briefly, human PBMCs are first stimulated with overlapping peptides encoding a given antigen for 48 hours to measure cytokine secretion (Direct assay. Peptide-reactive T cells are further expanded by IL-2 for 5 days; and after overnight starvation, expanded cells are stimulated with the same peptides from the initial culture to analyze cytokine secretion (Cytokine-driven assay. We first applied this integrated approach to determine the type of islet-antigen-specific T cells in healthy adults. Out of ten donors, the Direct assay identified GAD65-specific CD4(+ T cells in three adults and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8-specific CD4(+ T cells in five adults. The intracytoplasmic cytokine staining assay showed that these islet-antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells belonged to the CD45RO(+ memory compartment. The Cytokine-driven assay further revealed that islet-antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells in healthy adults were capable of secreting various types of cytokines including type 1 and type 2 cytokines as well as IL-10. We next applied our integrated assay to determine whether the type of ZnT8-specific CD4(+ T cells is different between Type 1 diabetes patients and age/gender/HLA-matched healthy adults. We found that ZnT8-specific CD4(+ T cells were skewed towards Th1 cells in T1D patients, while Th2 and IL-10-producing cells were prevalent in healthy adults. In conclusion, the Direct assay and the Cytokine-driven assay complement each other, and the combination of the two assays provides information of antigen-specific T cell repertoires on the breadth, type, and avidity. This strategy is applicable to determine the differences in the quality of antigen-specific T

  19. A mouse model for inducible overexpression of Prdm14 results in rapid-onset and highly penetrant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL

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    Brandi L. Carofino

    2013-11-01

    PRDM14 functions in embryonic stem cell (ESC maintenance to promote the expression of pluripotency-associated genes while suppressing differentiation genes. Expression of PRDM14 is tightly regulated and typically limited to ESCs and primordial germ cells; however, aberrant expression is associated with tumor initiation in a wide variety of human cancers, including breast cancer and leukemia. Here, we describe the generation of a Cre-recombinase-inducible mouse model for the spatial and temporal control of Prdm14 misexpression [ROSA26 floxed-stop Prdm14 (R26PR]. When R26PR is mated to either of two Cre lines, Mx1-cre or MMTV-cre, mice develop early-onset T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL with median overall survival of 41 and 64 days for R26PR;Mx1-cre and R26PR;MMTV-cre, respectively. T-ALL is characterized by the accumulation of immature single-positive CD8 cells and their widespread infiltration. Leukemia is preceded by a dramatic expansion of cells resembling hematopoietic stem cells and lymphoid-committed progenitors prior to disease onset, accompanied by a blockage in B-cell differentiation at the early pro-B stage. Rapid-onset PRDM14-induced T-ALL requires factors that are present in stem and progenitor cells: R26PR;dLck-cre animals, which express Prdm14 starting at the double-positive stage of thymocyte development, do not develop disease. PRDM14-induced leukemic cells contain high levels of activated NOTCH1 and downstream NOTCH1 targets, including MYC and HES1, and are sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of NOTCH1 with the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Greater than 50% of human T-ALLs harbor activating mutations in NOTCH1; thus, our model carries clinically relevant molecular aberrations. The penetrance, short latency and involvement of the NOTCH1 pathway will make this hematopoietic R26PR mouse model ideal for future studies on disease initiation, relapse and novel therapeutic drug combinations. Furthermore, breeding R26PR to additional Cre

  20. Transplant Outcomes for Children with T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J; Verneris, Michael R; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A; Auletta, Jeffery J; Ayas, Mouhab; Brown, Valerie I; Cairo, Mitchell S; Chan, Ka Wah; Diaz Perez, Miguel A; Dvorak, Christopher C; Egeler, R Maarten; Eldjerou, Lamis; Frangoul, Haydar; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Hayashi, Robert J; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Kasow, Kimberly A; Leung, Wing H; Olsson, Richard F; Pulsipher, Michael A; Shah, Niketa; Shah, Nirali N; Thiel, Elizabeth; Talano, Julie-An; Kitko, Carrie L

    2015-12-01

    Survival for children with relapsed T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone, and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received an HCT after myeloablative conditioning between 2000 and 2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Median age was 10 years (range, 2 to 18). Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%), or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute (grades II to IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in, respectively, 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% to 45%) and 26% (95% CI, 20% to 33%) of patients. Transplant-related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9% to 18%) and 30% (95% CI, 24% to 37%), respectively. Three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 48% (95% CI, 41% to 55%) and 46% (95% CI, 39% to 52%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse before HCT, were most likely to relapse (hazard ratio, 3.94; P = .005) as compared with isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes, and consideration for HCT is warranted. PMID:26327632

  1. Comparison of immunofluorescence, particle agglutination, and enzyme immunoassays for detection of human T-cell leukemia virus type I antibody in African sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, M; Denis, F; Leonard, G; Sangare, A; Patillaud, S; Prince-David, M; Essex, M

    1990-09-01

    The effectiveness of four screening tests for detecting antibody to human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was determined by using 2,700 African serum specimens. The tests studied were indirect immunofluorescence, particle agglutination from Fujirebio, and two enzyme immunoassays, one from Abbott Laboratories that used virus lysate from HUT 102 cells and the other from Cambridge BioScience Corp. that used an env recombinant protein. Positive and doubtful sera were confirmed by Western immunoblot and radioimmunoprecipitation assay with Food and Drug Administration seropositivity criteria. The best results were obtained with the two enzyme immunoassays, which were more sensitive (100 and 98.6% [Abbott and Cambridge, respectively]) and more specific (98.7 and 96.5%). Indirect immunofluorescence exhibited difficulties for reading and interpretation. With particle agglutination, prozone was observed for 9 of 78 HTLV-I-positive serum specimens. False-positives in any of the tests were not linked to cross-reactions with human immunodeficiency viruses. However, confirmation tests remain necessary for HTLV-I screening.

  2. Deletions of Immunoglobulin heavy chain and T cell receptor gene regions are uniquely associated with lymphoid blast transformation of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valgañon Mikel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML results from the neoplastic transformation of a haematopoietic stem cell. The hallmark genetic abnormality of CML is a chimeric BCR/ABL1 fusion gene resulting from the Philadelphia chromosome rearrangement t(9;22(q34;q11. Clinical and laboratory studies indicate that the BCR/ABL1 fusion protein is essential for initiation, maintenance and progression of CML, yet the event(s driving the transformation from chronic phase to blast phase are poorly understood. Results Here we report multiple genome aberrations in a collection of 78 CML and 14 control samples by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. We found a unique signature of genome deletions within the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH and T cell receptor regions (TCR, frequently accompanied by concomitant loss of sequences within the short arm regions of chromosomes 7 and 9, including IKZF1, HOXA7, CDKN2A/2B, MLLT3, IFNA/B, RNF38, PAX5, JMJD2C and PDCD1LG2 genes. Conclusions None of these genome losses were detected in any of the CML samples with myeloid transformation, chronic phase or controls, indicating that their presence is obligatory for the development of a malignant clone with a lymphoid phenotype. Notably, the coincidental deletions at IGH and TCR regions appear to precede the loss of IKZF1 and/or p16 genes in CML indicating a possible involvement of RAG in these deletions.

  3. Lineage switch with t(6;11)(q27;q23) from T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma to acute monoblastic leukemia at relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Kenji; Watanabe, Yuko; Kawakita, Toshiro; Harada, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Shunichiro; Nosaka, Kisato; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Asou, Norio

    2016-06-01

    We present a patient with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) harboring t(6;11)(q27;q23) that converted to acute monoblastic leukemia at relapse. A 27-year-old man developed T-LBL with a mediastinal mass. He exhibited several recurrences in the central nervous system and marrow. A fifth relapse occurred in the marrow, with 42.8% blasts with CD4, CD5, CD7, CD10, CD33, CD34, HLA-DR and cytoplasmic (cy) CD3. While achieving complete remission with nelarabine, sixth relapse occurred in the marrow with 6.8% blasts, which had characteristics of monoblastic features, 2 months later. Marrow blasts were positive for myeloperoxidase, CD4, CD33, CD56, CD64, and HLA-DR, but were negative for cyCD3, CD5, CD7, CD10, and CD34. Marrow cells at both the 5th lymphoid and 6th myeloid relapses had t(6;11)(q27;q23) and the same MLL-MLLT4 fusion transcript. In addition, the MLL-MLLT4 fusion sequences documented in the initial mediastinal cells were the same as seen in peripheral blood cells at the 6th relapse. The patient continues 7th remission after one course of gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy followed by cord blood transplantation for more than 3 years. Sequential phenotypic and cytogenetic studies may yield valuable insights into the mechanism of leukemic recurrence and possible implications for treatment selection. PMID:27268298

  4. Detailed Analysis of Apoptosis and Delayed Luminescence of Human Leukemia Jurkat T Cells after Proton Irradiation and Treatments with Oxidant Agents and Flavonoids

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    Irina Baran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following previous work, we investigated in more detail the relationship between apoptosis and delayed luminescence (DL in human leukemia Jurkat T cells under a wide variety of treatments. We used menadione and hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress and two flavonoids, quercetin, and epigallocatechin gallate, applied alone or in combination with menadione or H2O2. 62 MeV proton beams were used to irradiate cells under a uniform dose of 2 or 10 Gy, respectively. We assessed apoptosis, cell cycle distributions, and DL. Menadione, H2O2 and quercetin were potent inducers of apoptosis and DL inhibitors. Quercetin decreased clonogenic survival and the NAD(PH level in a dose-dependent manner. Proton irradiation with 2 Gy but not 10 Gy increased the apoptotic rate. However, both doses induced a substantial G2/M arrest. Quercetin reduced apoptosis and prolonged the G2/M arrest induced by radiation. DL spectroscopy indicated that proton irradiation disrupted the electron flow within Complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thus explaining the massive necrosis induced by 10 Gy of protons and also suggested an equivalent action of menadione and quercetin at the level of the Fe/S center N2, which may be mediated by their binding to a common site within Complex I, probably the rotenone-binding site.

  5. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells' apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro's dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. PMID:27114702

  6. Increased PKCα activity by Rack1 overexpression is responsible for chemotherapy resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jie; Li, Qi; Gao, Ying; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Yanbo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistant mechanisms in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients are not clarified. The apoptotic signaling mediated by receptor of activated C kinase 1 (Rack1), protein kinase C (PKC) and FEM1 homolog b (FEM1b) was investigated in two T-ALL-derived cell lines (Jurkat and CCRF-CEM) following treatment with chemotherapy drugs vincristine and prednisone. Serum starvation or chemotherapeutic drugs significantly reduced Rack1 level and PKC activation, while promoted cellular apoptosis in both cell lines. Rack1 overexpression protected T-ALL cell against starvation or chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rack1 overexpression reduced the level of cytochrome c and active caspase 3 as well as FEM1b and apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), and inhibited induction of cellular apoptosis in chemotherapeutic drug-treated Jurkat cell. Interaction of Rack1 and PKCα, not PKCβ, was detected in both cell lines. Of note, Rack1 overexpression abrogated reduction of PKC kinase activity in chemotherapeutic drug-treated T-ALL cell. PKC kinase inhibitor Go6976 or siPKCα inhibited downregulation of FEM1b and/or Apaf-1, and thus increased cellular apoptosis in Rack1-overexpressed T-ALL cell receiving chemotherapeutic drugs. Accordingly, our data provided evidence that increased Rack1-mediated upregulation of PKC kinase activity may be responsible for the development of chemoresistance in T-ALL-derived cell line potentially by reducing FEM1b and Apaf-1 level. PMID:27644318

  7. Transplant Outcomes for Children with T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Second Remission: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J; Verneris, Michael R; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A; Auletta, Jeffery J; Ayas, Mouhab; Brown, Valerie I; Cairo, Mitchell S; Chan, Ka Wah; Diaz Perez, Miguel A; Dvorak, Christopher C; Egeler, R Maarten; Eldjerou, Lamis; Frangoul, Haydar; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Hayashi, Robert J; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Kasow, Kimberly A; Leung, Wing H; Olsson, Richard F; Pulsipher, Michael A; Shah, Niketa; Shah, Nirali N; Thiel, Elizabeth; Talano, Julie-An; Kitko, Carrie L

    2015-12-01

    Survival for children with relapsed T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is poor when treated with chemotherapy alone, and outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not well described. Two hundred twenty-nine children with T-ALL in second complete remission (CR2) received an HCT after myeloablative conditioning between 2000 and 2011 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Median age was 10 years (range, 2 to 18). Donor source was umbilical cord blood (26%), matched sibling bone marrow (38%), or unrelated bone marrow/peripheral blood (36%). Acute (grades II to IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in, respectively, 35% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% to 45%) and 26% (95% CI, 20% to 33%) of patients. Transplant-related mortality at day 100 and 3-year relapse rates were 13% (95% CI, 9% to 18%) and 30% (95% CI, 24% to 37%), respectively. Three-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 48% (95% CI, 41% to 55%) and 46% (95% CI, 39% to 52%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with bone marrow relapse, with or without concurrent extramedullary relapse before HCT, were most likely to relapse (hazard ratio, 3.94; P = .005) as compared with isolated extramedullary disease. In conclusion, HCT for pediatric T-ALL in CR2 demonstrates reasonable and durable outcomes, and consideration for HCT is warranted.

  8. HSP90 inhibition leads to degradation of the TYK2 kinase and apoptotic cell death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, K; Sanda, T; Mansour, M R; Radimerski, T; DeAngelo, D J; Weinstock, D M; Look, A T

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) signaling through its downstream effector phospho-STAT1 acts to upregulate BCL2, which in turn mediates aberrant survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) with a small-molecule inhibitor, NVP-AUY922 (AUY922), leads to rapid degradation of TYK2 and apoptosis in T-ALL cells. STAT1 protein levels were not affected by AUY922 treatment, but phospho-STAT1 (Tyr-701) levels rapidly became undetectable, consistent with a block in signaling downstream of TYK2. BCL2 expression was downregulated after AUY922 treatment, and although this effect was necessary for AUY922-induced apoptosis, it was not sufficient because many T-ALL cell lines were resistant to ABT-199, a specific inhibitor of BCL2. Unlike ABT-199, AUY922 also upregulated the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD, whose increased expression was required for AUY922-induced apoptosis. Thus, the potent cytotoxicity of AUY922 involves the synergistic combination of BCL2 downregulation coupled with upregulation of the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. This two-pronged assault on the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery identifies HSP90 inhibitors as promising drugs for targeting the TYK2-mediated prosurvival signaling axis in T-ALL cells. PMID:26265185

  9. Intracellular reactive oxygen species are essential for PI3K/Akt/mTOR-dependent IL-7-mediated viability of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A; Gírio, A; Cebola, I; Santos, C I; Antunes, F; Barata, J T

    2011-06-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) activates phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway, thereby mediating viability, proliferation and growth of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be upregulated by growth factors and are known to regulate proliferation and viability. Here, we show that IL-7 upregulates ROS in T-ALL cells in a manner that is dependent on PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway activity and that relies on both NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial respiratory chain. Conversely, IL-7-induced activation of PI3K signaling pathway requires mitochondrial respiration and ROS. We have previously shown that IL-7-mediated activation of PI3K pathway drives the upregulation of the glucose transporter Glut1, promoting glucose uptake in T-ALL cells. Using phloretin to inhibit Glut function, we demonstrate that glucose uptake is mandatory for ROS upregulation in IL-7-treated T-ALL cells, suggesting that IL-7 stimulation leads to increased ROS via PI3K pathway activation and consequent upregulation of Glut1 and glucose uptake. Overall, our data reveal the existence of a critical crosstalk between PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and ROS that is essential for IL-7-mediated T-ALL cell survival, and that may constitute a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21455214

  10. Identification of differential PI3K pathway target dependencies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia through a large cancer cell panel screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, James T; McEwen, Robert; Crafter, Claire; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J; Barry, Simon T; Davies, Barry R

    2016-04-19

    Selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR inhibitors are currently under evaluation in clinical studies. To identify tumor types that are sensitive to PI3K pathway inhibitors we screened compounds targeting PI3Kα/δ (AZD8835), PI3Kβ/δ (AZD8186), AKT (AZD5363) and mTORC1/2 (AZD2014) against a cancer cell line panel (971 cell lines). There was an enrichment of hematological malignancies that were sensitive to AKT and mTOR inhibition, with the greatest degree of sensitivity observed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We found that all NOTCH mutant T-ALL cell lines were sensitive to AKT and mTORC1/2 inhibitors, with only partial sensitivity to agents that target the PI3K α, β or δ isoforms. Induction of apoptosis only occurred following AKTi treatment in cell lines with PTEN protein loss and high levels of active AKT. In summary, we have demonstrated that T-ALL cell lines show differential sensitivity to inhibition at different nodes in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and inhibiting AKT or mTOR may have a therapeutic benefit in this disease setting. PMID:26989080

  11. Retrotransposon insertion in the T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1 gene is associated with severe renal disease and patchy alopecia in Hairpatches (Hpt mice.

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    Vishnu Hosur

    Full Text Available "Hairpatches" (Hpt is a naturally occurring, autosomal semi-dominant mouse mutation. Hpt/Hpt homozygotes die in utero, while Hpt/+ heterozygotes exhibit progressive renal failure accompanied by patchy alopecia. This mutation is a model for the rare human disorder "glomerulonephritis with sparse hair and telangiectases" (OMIM 137940. Fine mapping localized the Hpt locus to a 6.7 Mb region of Chromosome 4 containing 62 known genes. Quantitative real time PCR revealed differential expression for only one gene in the interval, T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1, which was highly upregulated in the kidney and skin of Hpt/+ mice. Southern blot analysis of Hpt mutant DNA indicated a new EcoRI site in the Tal1 gene. High throughput sequencing identified an endogenous retroviral class II intracisternal A particle insertion in Tal1 intron 4. Our data suggests that the IAP insertion in Tal1 underlies the histopathological changes in the kidney by three weeks of age, and that glomerulosclerosis is a consequence of an initial developmental defect, progressing in severity over time. The Hairpatches mouse model allows an investigation into the effects of Tal1, a transcription factor characterized by complex regulation patterns, and its effects on renal disease.

  12. [Expression of SET-NUP214 fusion gene in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hai-Ping; Wang, Qian; Wu, Li-Li; Ping, Na-Na; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Xie, Jun-Dan; Pan, Jin-Lan; Xue, Yong-Quan; Wu, De-Pei; Chen, Su-Ning

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the occurrence and clinical significance of the SET-NUP214 fusion gene in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), analyse clinical and biological characteristics in this disease. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of SET-NUP214 fusion gene in 58 T-ALL cases. Interphase FISH and Array-CGH were used to detect the deletion of 9q34. Direct sequencing was applied to detect mutations of PHF6 and NOTCH1. The results showed that 6 out of 58 T-ALL cases (10.3%) were detected to have the SET-NUP214 fusion gene by RT-PCR. Besides T-lineage antigens, expression of CD13 and(or) CD33 were detected in all the 6 cases. Deletions of 9q34 were detected in 4 out of the 6 patients by FISH. Array-CGH results of 3 SET-NUP214 positive T-ALL patients confirmed that this fusion gene was resulted from a cryptic deletion of 9q34.11q34.13. PHF6 and NOTCH1 gene mutations were found in 4 and 5 out of 6 SET-NUP214 positive T-ALL patients, respectively. It is concluded that SET-NUP214 fusion gene is often resulted from del(9)(q34). PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations may be potential leukemogenic event in SET-NUP214 fusion gene.

  13. Expression of the protein product of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat gene in phorbol ester-treated mouse T-cell-leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of C57BL/6 mouse EL-4 T-cell leukemia cells to phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) (TPA) induced the synthesis of protein products encoded by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) region. Analysis of TPA-treated EL-4 cells with antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide predicted by the MMTV LTR open reading frame sequence detected a polypeptide migrating in gels with an apparent molecular weight of 37,000 M/sub r/, as well as three less prominent proteins with apparent molecular weights of 31,000, 34,000, and 39,000. Tryptic peptide analysis established the identity of the immunoprecipitated cellular proteins with the LTR proteins obtained from in vitro translation of MMTV genomic RNA. All four proteins were glycosylated and were derived from one initial nonglycosylated translation product of 21,000 M/sub r/. At least 10 acquired MMTV proviruses are present in the EL-4 genome, and examination of the degree of proviral methylation revealed extensive demethylation. However, no qualitative differences in the state of proviral methylation were apparent between TPA-treated and untreated cells

  14. Transplantations in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia--grounds for optimism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    The large MRC/ECOG Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Study establishes the value of sibling donor allogeneic transplantation in patients with standard risk, demonstrating superior outcome to conventional chemotherapy. The small but significant number of patients having matched unrelated donor transplantations on this study protocol appear to do well and might establish the value of such an approach for those without a sibling. Reduced-intensity conditioning might begin to address the transplantation-related mortality problems of the older patients. The youngest adults might not need to undergo transplantation at all. If they are now treated on pediatric chemotherapy protocols, their outcome appears to improve significantly. PMID:19778843

  15. Clofarabine for the treatment of adult acute lymphoid leukemia: the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia intergroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Rousselot, Philippe; Vey, Norbert; Pigneux, Arnaud; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analog displaying potent inhibition of DNA synthesis and favorable pharmacologic profile, is approved for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after failure of at least two previous regimens in patients up to 21 years of age at diagnosis. Good neurologic tolerance, synergy with alkylating agents, management guidelines defined through pediatric ALL and adult acute myeloid leukemia, have also prompted its administration in more than 100 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and negative B lineage and T lineage ALL, as single agent (40 mg/m(2)/ day for 5 days), or in combination. In a Group for Research on Adult Acute Lympho- blastic Leukemia (GRAALL) retrospective study of two regimens (clofarabine ± cyclophosphamide + / - etoposide (ENDEVOL) ± mitoxantrone ± asparaginase ± dexamethasone (VANDEVOL)), remission was achieved in 50% of 55 relapsed/refractory patients, and 17-35% could proceed to allogeneic stem cell. Clofarabine warrants further exploration in advanced ALL treatment and bridge-to-transplant. PMID:24996442

  16. Antibody to Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) Inhibits Human T-Cell Lymphoptropic Virus Type I (HTLV-I) Production by Transformed Rabbit T-Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Hanan Fallouh; Wahib Mahana

    2012-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia is a fatal malignant transformation caused by the human T-cell lymphoptropic virus type I (HTLV-I). HTLV-I is only associated with the development of this disease in a small percentage of infected individuals. Using two rabbit transformed T-cell lines; RH/K30 (asymptomatic) and RH/K34 (leukemogenic), we have investigated the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) 90 and 70 and the role of anti-HSPs antibodies on virus production. HSPs surface expression was higher on RH...

  17. T cell receptor gamma and delta rearrangements in hematologic malignancies. Relationship to lymphoid differentiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Griesinger, F; Greenberg, J M; Kersey, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied recombinatorial events of the T cell receptor delta and gamma chain genes in hematopoietic malignancies and related these to normal stages of lymphoid differentiation. T cell receptor delta gene recombinatorial events were found in 91% of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia, 68% of non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 80% of mixed lineage acute leukemias. Mature B-lineage leukemias and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias retained the T-cell recepto...

  18. IGF1R Derived PI3K/AKT Signaling Maintains Growth in a Subset of Human T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusscott, Samuel; Jenkins, Catherine E; Lam, Sonya H; Giambra, Vincenzo; Pollak, Michael; Weng, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is a prevalent signaling pathway in human cancer that supports cell growth/survival and thus contributes to aggressive biological behavior. Much work has gone into development of IGF1R inhibitors; however, candidate agents including small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and blocking antibodies have yet to fulfill their promise clinically. Understanding cellular features that define sensitivity versus resistance are important for effective patient selection and anticipation of outgrowth of a resistant clone. We previously identified an important role for IGF signaling in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relying primarily upon genetically defined mouse models. We present here an assessment of IGF1R dependence in human T-ALL using a broad panel of 27 established cell lines that capture a spectrum of the genetic variation that might be encountered in clinical practice. We observed that a subset of cell lines are sensitive to IGF1R inhibition and are characterized by high levels of surface IGF1R expression and PTEN positivity. Interestingly, lentiviral expression or knock-down of PTEN in PTEN-negative/positive cell lines, respectively, had limited effects on their response to IGF1R inhibition, suggesting that PTEN contributes to, but does not define IGF dependence. Additionally, we characterize downstream PI3K/AKT signaling as dominant over RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK in mediating growth and/or survival in this context. Finally, we demonstrate that IGF and interleukin-7 (IL-7) fulfill non-overlapping roles in supporting T-ALL growth. These findings are significant in that they reveal cellular features and downstream mechanisms that may determine the response of an individual patient's tumor to IGF1R inhibitor therapy. PMID:27532210

  19. The role of cyclin D2 and p21/waf1 in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pumfery Anne

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax protein indirectly influences transcriptional activation, signal transduction, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. The function of Tax primarily relies on protein-protein interactions. We have previously shown that Tax upregulates the cell cycle checkpoint proteins p21/waf1 and cyclin D2. Here we describe the consequences of upregulating these G1/S checkpoint regulators in HTLV-1 infected cells. Results To further decipher any physical and functional interactions between cyclin D2 and p21/waf1, we used a series of biochemical assays from HTLV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Immunoprecipitations from HTLV-1 infected cells showed p21/waf1 in a stable complex with cyclin D2/cdk4. This complex is active as it phosphorylates the Rb protein in kinase assays. Confocal fluorescent microscopy indicated that p21/waf1 and cyclin D2 colocalize in HTLV-1 infected, but not in uninfected cells. Furthermore, in vitro kinase assays using purified proteins demonstrated that the addition of p21/waf1 to cyclin D2/cdk4 increased the kinase activity of cdk4. Conclusion These data suggest that the p21/cyclin D2/cdk4 complex is not an inhibitory complex and that p21/waf1 could potentially function as an assembly factor for the cyclin D2/cdk4 complex in HTLV-1 infected cells. A by-product of this assembly with cyclin D2/cdk4 is the sequestration of p21/waf1 away from the cyclin E/cdk2 complex, allowing this active cyclin-cdk complex to phosphorylate Rb pocket proteins efficiently and push cells through the G1/S checkpoint. These two distinct functional and physical activities of p21/waf1 suggest that RNA tumor viruses manipulate the G1/S checkpoint by deregulating cyclin and cdk complexes.

  20. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 µg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. Keywords: andrographolide, PI3K, AKT, Burkitt lymphoma, Jurkat cell

  1. Vitamin E synthetic derivate-TPGS-selectively induces apoptosis in jurkat t cells via oxidative stress signaling pathways: implications for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Moreno, Cristian; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Sierra-Garcia, Ligia; Lopez-Osorio, Betty; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) is a water-soluble derivative of natural vitamin E commonly used as a drug delivery agent. Recently, TPGS alone has been reported to induce cell death in lung, breast and prostate cancer. However, the effect of TPGS on cancer cell viability remains unclear. Thus, this study was aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of TPGS on human periphral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and on T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) Jurkat clone E6-1 cells and its possible mechanism of action. PBL and Jurkat cells were treated with TPGS (10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 μM), and morphological changes in the cell nucleus, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were determined by immune-fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cellular apoptosis markers were also evaluated by immunocytochemistry. In this study, TPGS induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat cells, but not in PBL, in a dose-response manner with increasing nuclear DNA fragmentation, increasing cell cycle arrest, and decreasing ΔΨm. Additionally, TPGS increased dichlorofluorescein fluorescence intensity, indicative of H2O2 production, in a dose-independent fashion. TPGS increased DJ-1 Cys(106)-sulfonate, as a marker of intracellular stress and induced the activation of NF-κB, p53 and c-Jun transcription factors. Additionally, it increased the expression of apoptotic markers Bcl-2 related pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and PUMAand activated caspase-3. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and known pharmacological inhibitors protected the cells from the TPGS induced effects. In conclusion, TPGS selectively induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells through two independent but complementary H2O2-mediated signaling pathways. Our findings support the use of TPGS as a potential treatment for ALL. PMID:27364951

  2. Maturation and Mip-1β Production of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Tanzanian Children, Adolescents and Adults: Impact by HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Portevin

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that aging and HIV infection are associated with quantitative and functional changes of CMV-specific T cell responses. We studied here the expression of Mip-1β and the T cell maturation marker CD27 within CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in relation to age, HIV and active Tuberculosis (TB co-infection in a cohort of Tanzanian volunteers (≤ 16 years of age, n = 108 and ≥ 18 years, n = 79. Independent of HIV co-infection, IFNγ(+ CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ T cell frequencies increased with age. In adults, HIV co-infection further increased the frequencies of these cells. A high capacity for Mip-1β production together with a CD27(low phenotype was characteristic for these cells in children and adults. Interestingly, in addition to HIV co-infection active TB disease was linked to further down regulation of CD27 and increased capacity of Mip-1β production in CMVpp65-specific CD4+ T cells. These phenotypic and functional changes of CMVpp65-specific CD4 T cells observed during HIV infection and active TB could be associated with increased CMV reactivation rates.

  3. Pancytopenic Prodrome (pre-ALL) of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults: Possible Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Jaetae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1998-01-01

    We report two cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with preleukemic phase of pancytopenia with a few abnormal lymphoid cells in bone marrow aspirates. The initial diagnosis of each case was suspicious aplastic anemia and hypoplastic anemia. Both cases progressed to overt acute lymphoblastic leukemia within 1 year. We suggest that initial pancytopenic phase (pre-ALL) may precede the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults and differential diagnosis from myelodyspl...

  4. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  5. Clonal Expansion and Cytotoxicity of TCRVβ Subfamily T Cells Induced by CML and K562 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YupingZHang; YangqiuLi; ShaohuaChen; LijianYang; GengxinLuo; XueliZhang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the anti-leukemia effect, the distribution and clonal expansion of TCRVβ subfamily T cells in T cells from cord blood and adult peripheral blood induced by CML cells and K562 cells in vitro. METHODS Peripheral blood T cells from one adult donor and 3 cases of cord blood were stimulated with CML cells and K562 cells and further amplified by a suspended T cell-bulk culture,in order to induce CML specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The induced T cells were further analyzed for the specific cytotoxicity in CML by LDH assay, the phenotype identification by indirect immunofiuorescence technique and the distribution and clonal expansion of TCRVβ subfamily by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genescan analysis, respectively. RESULTS Oligoclonal and oligoclonal tendency T cells with higher specific cytotoxicity from cord blood and adult peripheral blood could be induced by stimulation with CML cells and K562 cells. CONCLUSIONS Specific cytotoxic T cells for an anti-CML effect could be induced by CML cells and K562 cells .The induced T cells which have the characteristic of specific cytotoxicity against CML cells may come from the clonal expansion of TCRVβ subfamily T cells.

  6. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  7. Resveratrol Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells by Inhibiting Akt/mTOR and Activating p38-MAPK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Jiao; LIU Yan; LI Qiang; GUO Xia; GU Ling; MA Zhi Gui; ZHU Yi Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of resveratrol-induced apoptosis and autophagy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells and potential molecular mechanisms. Methods The anti-proliferation effect of resveratrol-induced, apoptosis and autophagy on T-ALL cells were detected by using MTT test, immunofluorescence, electronic microscope, and flow cytometry, respectively. Western blotting was performed for detecting changes of apoptosis-associated proteins, cell cycle regulatory proteins and state of activation of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, 4E-BP1, and p38-MAPK. Results Resveratrol inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis and autophagy in T-ALL cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. It also induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via up regulating cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21 and p27 and down regulating cyclin A and cyclin D1. Western blotting revealed that resveratrol significantly decreased the expression of antiapoptotic proteins (Mcl-1 and Bcl-2) and increased the expression of proapoptotic proteins (Bax, Bim, and Bad), and induced cleaved-caspase-3 in a time-dependent manner. Significant increase in ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I and Beclin 1 was also detected. Furthermore, resveratrol induced significant dephosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and 4E-BP1, but enhanced specific phosphorylation of p38-MAPK which could be blocked by SB203580. When autophagy was suppressed by 3-MA, apoptosis in T-ALL cells induced by resveratrol was enhanced. Conclusion Our findings have suggested that resveratrol induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy in T-ALL cells through inhibiting Akt/mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 and activating p38-MAPK signaling pathways. Autophagy might play a role as a self-defense mechanism in T-ALL cells treated by resveratrol. Therefore, the reasonable inhibition of autophagy in T-ALL cells may serve as a promising strategy for resveratrol induced apoptosis and can be used as adjuvant chemotherapy for T-ALL.

  8. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Impact of conditioning with TBI in adult patients with T-cell ALL who receive a myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahu, X; Labopin, M; Giebel, S;

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a therapeutic option for adult patients with T-cell ALL (T-ALL). Meanwhile, few allo-SCT data specific to adult T-ALL have been described thus far. Specifically, the optimal myeloablative conditioning regimen is unknown. In this ret...... patients with T-ALL entitled to receive a myeloablative allo-SCT may benefit from TBI-based regimens.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 30 November 2015; doi:10.1038/bmt.2015.278.......Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a therapeutic option for adult patients with T-cell ALL (T-ALL). Meanwhile, few allo-SCT data specific to adult T-ALL have been described thus far. Specifically, the optimal myeloablative conditioning regimen is unknown...

  10. The intestinal T cell response to alpha-gliadin in adult celiac disease is focused on a single deamidated glutamine targeted by tissue transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, H; Körner, R; Molberg, O;

    2000-01-01

    The great majority of patients that are intolerant of wheat gluten protein due to celiac disease (CD) are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2(+), and the remaining few normally express HLA-DQ8. These two class II molecules are chiefly responsible for the presentation of gluten...... for T cell recognition. Gluten-specific T cell lines from 16 different adult patients all responded to one or both of these deamidated peptides, indicating that these epitopes are highly relevant to disease pathology. Binding studies showed that the deamidated peptides displayed an increased affinity...

  11. TREATMENT OF ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep-Maria Ribera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts andthe results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults(AYA. After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALLin the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority ofpediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies inyoung adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewedemphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with eventfreesurvival rates of 60-65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that theunfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescentswith ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensivechemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which aremore frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like,deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents havebeen translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of thesepatients in recent years.

  12. Transcriptional activation of homologous viral long terminal repeats by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or the human T-cell leukemia virus type I tat proteins occurs in the absence of de novo protein synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang, K T; Shank, P R; Kumar, A

    1988-01-01

    The genomes of human retroviruses [human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I)] encode positive trans-activator proteins, named tat. In the presence of tat, the transcriptional activity of the homologous HIV-1 or HTLV-I long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter is markedly increased. We have constructed mammalian cell lines that contain stably integrated copies of a HIV-1 or a HTLV-I LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. When presynthesized HIV-1...

  13. Total chemical synthesis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) protease via native chemical ligation: Reexamination of the functional effect of C-terminal truncation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Changqing; Li, Xiangqun; Lu, Wuyuan

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1) protease - a member of the aspartic acid protease family plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of the virus and is an attractive viral target for therapeutic intervention. HTLV-1 protease consists of 125 amino acid residues and functions as a homodimer stabilized in part by a four-stranded β-sheet comprising the N- and C-termini. Compared with many other viral proteases such as HIV-1 protease, HTLV-1 protease is elongated by an extra 10 amino acid res...

  14. Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus I infection and subsequent cloning of normal human B cells. Direct responsiveness of cloned cells to recombinant interleukin 2 by differentiation in the absence of enhanced proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV)-I-infected B cell clone expressed Tac antigen on its cell surface and responded to recombinant interleukin 2 (IL-2) by increased production of IgM without any increase in proliferation. Anti-Tac antibody completely inhibited the IL-2-induced differentiation of this HTLV-I-infected B cell clone. This study demonstrates that HTLV-I can directly infect normal mature human B cells, and that the Tac antigen, which may be induced by infection with HTLV-...

  15. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P.; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children r...

  16. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Zheng, Guoguang, E-mail: zhengggtjchn@aliyun.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Center for Stem Cell Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  18. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca2+ response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia

  19. A Rare Case of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting with Paraparesis and Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, S P; Dubashi, B.; Basu, D; Dutta, T. K.; Kar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone involvement and multiple osteolytic lesions has been commonly reported in pediatric population. Various myeloid and lymphoid malignancies can rarely present with bony lesions. We are reporting an adult female patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who presented with paraparesis and multiple osteolytic lesions in skull initially giving false impression of multiple myeloma.

  20. Immune competence of cancer-reactive T cells generated de novo in adult tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Kenneth F; Lute, Kenneth; Kocak, Ergun; Abdessalam, Shahab; Yin, Lijie; Li, Ou; Guan, Zhen; Philips, Gary; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    The impact of timing of antigen introduction into fetus and neonates leads to the suggestion that pre-existing antigens are tolerogenic to immunocompetent cells generated thereafter. This hypothesis predicts that in patients with cancer who are undergoing bone marrow transplantation, newly produced T cells with specificity for pre-existing tumor cells will be inactivated by the tumor antigens in the host. Because the effect of tumor cells on developing cancer-reactive T cells has not been investigated, we set out to systematically analyze the impact of tumor cells in the periphery on the development of tumor-reactive T cells in the thymus and their immunocompetence in the periphery. Our data demonstrate that in the host in which a tumor is established in the periphery, the cancer-reactive T cells develop normally, remain fully immunocompetent, become activated in the periphery, and cause regression of large established tumors. The immunocompetence of T cells generated in an antigen-bearing host is also confirmed in a skin graft transplantation model.

  1. Diagnosis, prognosis and management of erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Bláithín; Whittaker, Sean

    2015-04-01

    Erythroderma describes complete or near-complete skin surface erythema of any cause. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma accounts for a minority of cases of erythroderma and consists of erythrodermic mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome. Both adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia can also rarely present with erythroderma. Diagnosis may be extremely challenging because benign disorders may have overlapping features with those of lymphoma. Prognosis is poor with median survival of approximately 2 years. The evidence base for therapeutic approaches relies on cohorts and case series and more recently Phase II trials. Improved patient selection and identification of appropriate conditioning regimens for reduced intensity allogeneic hematopoetic transplant are likely to improve survival, although a significant number of patients may not be fit for transplant because of advanced age and comorbidities.

  2. Diagnosis, prognosis and management of erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Bláithín; Whittaker, Sean

    2015-04-01

    Erythroderma describes complete or near-complete skin surface erythema of any cause. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma accounts for a minority of cases of erythroderma and consists of erythrodermic mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome. Both adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia can also rarely present with erythroderma. Diagnosis may be extremely challenging because benign disorders may have overlapping features with those of lymphoma. Prognosis is poor with median survival of approximately 2 years. The evidence base for therapeutic approaches relies on cohorts and case series and more recently Phase II trials. Improved patient selection and identification of appropriate conditioning regimens for reduced intensity allogeneic hematopoetic transplant are likely to improve survival, although a significant number of patients may not be fit for transplant because of advanced age and comorbidities. PMID:25495961

  3. Effect of Nadir CD4+ T cell count on clinical measures of periodontal disease in HIV+ adults before and during immune reconstitution on HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance T Vernon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The contribution of HIV-infection to periodontal disease (PD is poorly understood. We proposed that immunological markers would be associated with improved clinical measures of PD. METHODS: We performed a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-infected adults who had started highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART 0mm, clinical attachment level (CAL ≥ 4.0mm, and bleeding on probing (BOP at ≥ 4 sites/tooth and microbiologically as specific periodontopathogen concentration. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the associations between immune function and PD. RESULTS: Forty (40 subjects with median 2.7 months on HAART and median nadir CD4+ T-cell count of 212 cells/μl completed a median 3 visits. Over 24 months, CD4+ T-cell count increased by a mean 173 cells/µl (p<0.001 and HIV RNA decreased by 0.5 log10 copies/ml (p<0.001; concurrently, PPD, CAL and BOP decreased by a mean 11.7%, 12.1%, and 14.7% respectively (all p<0.001. Lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with worse baseline REC (-6.72%; p=0.04 and CAL (9.06%; p<0.001. Further, lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with a greater relative longitudinal improvement in PPD in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis (p=0.027, and BOP in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Treponema denticola (p=0.001 and p=0.006 respectively. Longitudinal changes from baseline in CD4+ T-cell count and level of HIV RNA were not independently associated with longitudinal changes in any clinical markers of PD. CONCLUSION: Degree of immunosuppression was associated with baseline gingival recession. After HAART initiation, measures of active PD improved most in those with lower nadir CD4+ T-cell counts and higher baseline levels of specific periodontopathogens. Nadir CD4+ T-cell count differentially influences periodontal disease both before and after HAART in HIV-infected adults.

  4. Analysis of relapse factors and risk assessment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈培翠

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL)recurrence in adult patients and establish a prognosis index(PI)calculation model in order to improve the prevention strategy of ALL in adults.Methods 104 adult ALL patients from Blood Diseases Hospital&Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between August 2008 and November 2011

  5. Role of L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: focus on adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rytting ME

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael E RyttingDepartment of Pediatrics and Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Asparaginase preparations deplete asparagine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL blasts. Asparaginase in its various forms is an important component of treatment regimens for pediatric ALL. Recently, interest and use of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL has increased, particularly in young adults. There is much less information on asparaginase use and toxicity in adult compared with pediatric populations. This review surveys prior published studies of the three most commonly used asparagine preparations as used in adult patients, and discusses important toxicities encountered in adult patients who receive asparaginase preparations.Keywords: asparaginase, leukemia, adults, children

  6. Primary and secondary T-cell lymphomas of the breast: clinico-pathologic features of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-07-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma non otherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous.

  7. Rituximab in B-Lineage Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Sébastien; Chevret, Sylvie; Thomas, Xavier; Heim, Dominik; Leguay, Thibaut; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Hunault, Mathilde; Boissel, Nicolas; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Hess, Urs; Vey, Norbert; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Braun, Thorsten; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chalandon, Yves; Lhéritier, Véronique; Beldjord, Kheira; Béné, Marie C; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2016-09-15

    Background Treatment with rituximab has improved the outcome for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may also have the CD20 antigen, which is targeted by rituximab. Although single-group studies suggest that adding rituximab to chemotherapy could improve the outcome in such patients, this hypothesis has not been tested in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned adults (18 to 59 years of age) with CD20-positive, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative ALL to receive chemotherapy with or without rituximab, with event-free survival as the primary end point. Rituximab was given during all treatment phases, for a total of 16 to 18 infusions. Results From May 2006 through April 2014, a total of 209 patients were enrolled: 105 in the rituximab group and 104 in the control group. After a median follow-up of 30 months, event-free survival was longer in the rituximab group than in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45 to 0.98; P=0.04); the estimated 2-year event-free survival rates were 65% (95% CI, 56 to 75) and 52% (95% CI, 43 to 63), respectively. Treatment with rituximab remained associated with longer event-free survival in a multivariate analysis. The overall incidence rate of severe adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups, but fewer allergic reactions to asparaginase were observed in the rituximab group. Conclusions Adding rituximab to the ALL chemotherapy protocol improved the outcome for younger adults with CD20-positive, Ph-negative ALL. (Funded by the Regional Clinical Research Office, Paris, and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00327678 .). PMID:27626518

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. PROCEDURE: We investigated disease characteristics and outcome...... for de novo AML patients 10-30 years old treated in pediatric or adult departments. We included 166 patients 10-18 years of age with AML treated according to the pediatric NOPHO-protocols (1993-2009) compared with 253 patients aged 15-30 years treated in hematology departments (1996-2009) in the Nordic...... countries. RESULTS: The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients...

  9. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  10. Outcome of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in South East of Iran (Zahedan)

    OpenAIRE

    Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Koushyar, Mohhamad Mahdi; Mohammadi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a lymphoid malignancy, resulting from autonomous proliferation of monoclonal abnormal stem cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response rate and prognostic factor of adult patients suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who were treated with chemotherapy in south east of Iran and demographic methods were used for this study. Methods This study was conducted in Ali Ebne Abitaleb Hospital in south east of Iran (Zahedan) from 2003-2010...

  11. Seroepidemiology of Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-1 (HTLV1) in Mashhad

    OpenAIRE

    Safabakhsh, Hamidreza; Jalalian, Mehrdad; Karimi, Gharib

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The major routes of HTLV-I transmission are mother-to-child, sexual contact, and blood transfusion. Mashhad is one of the main endemic areas in the world for HTLV-I, and minimizing the risk of HTLV-I transmission through blood transfusion is one of the main duties of the Blood Transfusion Center in Mashhad. The ...

  12. A plant-derived quadrivalent virus like particle influenza vaccine induces cross-reactive antibody and T cell response in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Stéphane; Aubin, Éric; Trépanier, Sonia; Bussière, Diane; Dargis, Michèle; Poulin, Jean-François; Yassine-Diab, Bader; Ward, Brian J; Landry, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Recent issues regarding efficacy of influenza vaccines have re-emphasized the need of new approaches to face this major public health issue. In a phase 1-2 clinical trial, healthy adults received one intramuscular dose of a seasonal influenza plant-based quadrivalent virus-like particle (QVLP) vaccine or placebo. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers met all the European licensure criteria for the type A influenza strains at the 3μg/strain dose and for all four strains at the higher dosages 21days after immunization. High HI titers were maintained for most of the strains 6months after vaccination. QVLP vaccine induced a substantial and sustained increase of hemagglutinin-specific polyfunctional CD4 T cells, mainly transitional memory and TEMRA effector IFN-γ(+) CD4 T cells. A T cells cross-reactive response was also observed against A/Hong-Kong/1/1968 H3N2 and B/Massachusetts/2/2012. Plant-based QVLP offers an attractive alternative manufacturing method for producing effective and HA-strain matching seasonal influenza vaccines. PMID:26987887

  13. Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Masetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of 58 new African human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) strains: identification of a new and distinct HTLV-1 molecular subtype in Central Africa and in Pygmies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieux, R; Ibrahim, F; Mauclere, P; Herve, V; Michel, P; Tekaia, F; Chappey, C; Garin, B; Van Der Ryst, E; Guillemain, B; Ledru, E; Delaporte, E; de The, G; Gessain, A

    1997-02-01

    To gain new insights on the origin, evolution, and modes of dissemination of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1), we performed a molecular analysis of 58 new African HTLV-1 strains (18 from West Africa, 36 from Central Africa, and 4 from South Africa) originating from 13 countries. Of particular interest were eight strains from Pygmies of remote areas of Cameroon and the Central African Republic (CAR), considered to be the oldest inhabitants of these regions. Eight long-term activated T-cell lines producing HTLV-1 gag and env antigens were established from peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1 seropositive individuals, including three from Pygmies. A fragment of the env gene encompassing most of the gp21 transmembrane region was sequenced for the 58 new strains, while the complete long terminal repeat (LTR) region was sequenced for 9 strains, including 4 from Pygmies. Comparative sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies performed on both the env and LTR regions by the neighbor-joining and DNA parsimony methods demonstrated that all 22 strains from West and South Africa belong to the widespread cosmopolitan subtype (also called HTLV-1 subtype A). Within or alongside the previously described Zairian cluster (HTLV-1 subtype B), we discovered a number of new HTLV-1 variants forming different subgroups corresponding mainly to the geographical origins of the infected persons, Cameroon, Gabon, and Zaire. Six of the eight Pygmy strains clustered together within this Central African subtype, suggesting a common origin. Furthermore, three new strains (two originating from Pygmies from Cameroon and the CAR, respectively, and one from a Gabonese individual) were particularly divergent and formed a distinct new phylogenetic cluster, characterized by specific mutations and occupying in most analyses a unique phylogenetic position between the large Central African genotype (HTLV-1 subtype B) and the Melanesian subtype (HTLV-1 subtype C). We have

  15. T-cell independent, B-cell receptor-mediated induction of telomerase activity differs among IGHV mutation-based subgroups of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Temburni, Sonal; Banapour, Taraneh; Paul, Santanu; Mongini, Patricia K. A.; Allen, Steven L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Rai, Kanti R; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Although B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) clones with unmutated IGHV genes (U-CLL) exhibit greater telomerase activity than those with mutated IGHV genes (M-CLL), the extent to which B-cell receptor (BCR) triggering contributes to telomerase up-regulation is not known. Therefore, we studied the effect of BCR stimulation on modulating telomerase activity. The multivalent BCR ligand, dextran conjugated anti-μ mAb HB57 (HB57-dex), increased telomerase activity and promoted cell surviv...

  16. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Down-regulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 by bortezomib sensitizes Jurkat leukemia T cells against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tao

    Full Text Available 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases type 2 (11β-HSD2, a key regulator for pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoids (GCs by converting active GC, cortisol, to inactive cortisone, has been shown to be present in a variety of tumors. But its expression and roles have rarely been discussed in hematological malignancies. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been shown to not only possess antitumor effects but also potentiate the activity of other chemotherapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that 11β-HSD2 was highly expressed in two GC-resistant T-cell leukemic cell lines Jurkat and Molt4. In contrast, no 11β-HSD2 expression was found in two GC-sensitive non-hodgkin lymphoma cell lines Daudi and Raji as well as normal peripheral blood T cells. Inhibition of 11β-HSD2 by 11β-HSD inhibitor 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid or 11β-HSD2 shRNA significantly increased cortisol-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Additionally, pretreatment of Jurkat cells with low-dose bortezomib resulted in increased cellular sensitivity to GC as shown by elevated induction of apoptosis, more cells arrested at G1 stage and up-regulation of GC-induced leucine zipper which is an important mediator of GC action. Furthermore, we clarified that bortezomib could dose-dependently inhibit 11β-HSD2 messenger RNA and protein levels as well as activity (cortisol-cortisone conversion through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Therefore, we suggest 11β-HSD2 is, at least partially if not all, responsible for impaired GC suppression in Jurkat cells and also indicate a novel mechanism by which proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may influence GC action.

  18. Improving Cultural Competency and Disease Awareness among Oncology Nurses Caring for Adult T-Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Peske, Marisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign-born residents face significant challenges accessing and receiving quality healthcare in the U.S. These obstacles include a lack of information on how to access care, fear, as well as communication and cultural barriers (Portes, Fernandez-Kelly & Light, 2012). Increasing healthcare providers' knowledge regarding a patient's…

  19. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Clinical significance of high c-MYC and low MYCBP2 expression and their association with Ikaros dysfunction in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zheng; Guo, Xing; Li, Jianyong; Hartman, Melanie; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2015-12-01

    Increased expression of c-MYC is observed in both Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL). MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2) is a probable E3 ubiquitin ligase and its function in leukemia is unknown. IKZF1 deletion is associated with the development and poor outcome of ALL. Here, we observed significant high c-MYC expression and low MYCBP2 expression in adult ALL patients. Patients with high c-MYC expression and/or low MYCBP2 expression had higher WBC counts and a higher percentage of CD34+ or CD33+ cells, as well as splenomegaly, liver infiltration, higher BM blasts, and lower CR rate. Ikaros bound to the regulatory regions of c-MYC and MYCBP2, suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in ALL cells. Expression of c-MYC mRNA was significantly higher in patients with IKZF1 deletion; conversely MYCBP2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in those patients. A CK2 inhibitor, which acts as an Ikaros activator, also suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in an Ikaros (IKZF1) dependent manner in the ALL cells. In summary, our data indicated the correlation of high c-MYC expression, low MYCBP2 expression and high c-MYC plus low MYCBP2 expression with high-risk factors and proliferation markers in adult ALL patients. Our data also revealed an oncogenic role for an Ikaros/MYCBP2/c-MYC axis in adult ALL, providing a mechanism of target therapies that activate Ikaros in adult ALL.

  1. Acute leukemia of adults. Ultrastructural, cytochemical and histologic observations in 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, A D; Paniker, K; Flexner, J M; Graber, S E; Collins, R D

    1980-04-01

    In order to establish guidelines for categorization of acute leukemia, marrow histology, special stains, and electron microscopy were performed in 100 adult leukemia cases. Differential counts for each stain were performed, and the results were combined with those obtained by electron microscopy for final classification. Myeloid (non-lymphoid) leukemia was most common (83 cases), and there were 13 lymphoid cases, two cases of erythroleukemia, and two undifferentiated leukemias. Histologic studies of marrow particles revealed significant admixtures of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and abnormal erythroid elements, particularly in acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Interpretations of cytochemical results were confirmed by ultrastructural studies in 90% of the cases. Clinically significant discrepancies between cytochemical and ultrastructural interpretations were rarely found. Only two myeloid and five lymphoid cases did not mark typically with any cytochemical stain. The single most reliable special stain was the periodic acid-Schiff stain, whereas the stain most difficult to interpret was the alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase stain. Sudan black stain was particularly helpful in demonstrating Auer rods. Five of six cases unclassified by cytochemistry were categorized by electron microscopy. Although patterns of cytochemical staining were delineated for each type of leukemia, significant intragroup variation in cytochemical reactions was recognized. This study indicates that ultrastructural examination should be routinely used for categorization of cases with equivocal cytochemical findings and for analysis of unclassified cases.

  2. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. The effects of ethidium bromide induced loss of mitochondrial DNA on mitochondrial phenotype and ultrastructure in a human leukemia T-cell line (MOLT-4 cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial DNA-deficient (ρ0) cells were generated following a 26-day incubation of MOLT-4 lymphoblastoid T cells in ethidium bromide (3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium bromide). The absence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the resultant MOLT-4 ρ0 cells was confirmed by Southern analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MOLT-4 ρ0 cells proliferated more slowly than parental cells (wild type) and produced significantly more lactate (approximately fourfold increase; P 0 cells also showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity and a reduced cytochrome c oxidase/citrate synthase activity ratio compared to parental wild-type MOLT-4 cells (P -11). Electron microscopy showed elongated mitochondria with parallel cristae in MOLT-4 cells although the mitochondria in MOLT-4 ρ0 cells appeared enlarged, some were vacuolated with either an absent or a grossly distorted cristae pattern. Vital staining with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) was used to image mitochondria in intact cells and study mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm). Flow cytometry using JC-1 indicated that MOLT-4 ρ0 had a lower Δψm than MOLT-4. Sodium fluoride (an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway) at a concentration of 20 mM further reduced the Δψm in MOLT-4-ρ0 cells. This data suggested that a glycolytic pathway product, possibly ATP, was required for the maintenance of Δψm in MOLT-4 ρ0 cells

  4. T-cell independent, B-cell receptor-mediated induction of telomerase activity differs among IGHV mutation-based subgroups of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Rajendra N; Temburni, Sonal; Banapour, Taraneh; Paul, Santanu; Mongini, Patricia K A; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2012-09-20

    Although B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) clones with unmutated IGHV genes (U-CLL) exhibit greater telomerase activity than those with mutated IGHV genes (M-CLL), the extent to which B-cell receptor (BCR) triggering contributes to telomerase up-regulation is not known. Therefore, we studied the effect of BCR stimulation on modulating telomerase activity. The multivalent BCR ligand, dextran conjugated anti-μ mAb HB57 (HB57-dex), increased telomerase activity and promoted cell survival and proliferation preferentially in U-CLL cases, whereas the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked HB57-dex induced telomerase activation. Although both U-CLL and M-CLL clones exhibited similar membrane proximal signaling responses to HB57-dex, telomerase activity and cell proliferation, when inducible in M-CLL, differed. B-CLL cells stimulated using bivalent F(ab')(2) -goat anti-μ antibody (goat anti-μ) exhibited higher membrane proximal response in U-CLL than M-CLL cells, whereas telomerase activity, cell survival, and proliferation were induced to lower levels than those induced by HB57-dex. In normal B lymphocytes, HB57-dex induced less protein phosphorylation but more cell proliferation and survival than goat anti-μ. Although both anti-BCR stimuli induced comparable telomerase activity, normal CD5(+) B cells preferentially exhibited higher hTERT positivity than their CD5(-) counterparts. These findings provide an understanding of how BCR-mediated signals impact telomerase modulation in IGHV mutation-based subgroups of B-CLL and normal B cells. PMID:22875913

  5. The distinct role of guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 in Bcl-2 transcription and apoptosis inhibition in Jurkat leukemia T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie YIN; Ya-juan WAN; Shi-yang LI; Ming-juan DU; Cui-zhu ZHANG; Xing-long ZHOU; You-jia CAO

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate a novel function of proto-oncogene Vavl in the apoptosis of human leukemia Jurkat cells.Methods: Jurkat cells,Jurkat-derived vavl-null cells(J.Vavl)and Vavl-reconstituted J.WT cells were treated with a Fas agonist antibody,IgM clone CH11.Apoptosis was determined using propidium iodide(PI)staining,Annexin-V staining,DNA fragmentation,cleavage of caspase 3/caspase 8,and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase(PARP).Mitochondria transmembrane potential(Δψm)was measured using DiOC6(3)staining.Transcription and expression of the Bcl-2 family of proteins were evaluated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot,respectively.Bcl-2 promoter activity was analyzed using luciferase reporter assays.Results: Cells lacking Vav1 were more sensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis than Jurkat and J.WT cells.J.Vav1 cells lost mitochondria transmembrane potential(Δψm)more rapidly upon Fas induction.These phenotypes could be rescued by re-expression of Vav1 in J.Vav1 cells.The expression of Vav1 increased the transcription of pro-survival Bcl-2.The guanine nucleotide exchange activity of Vav1was required for enhancing Bcl-2 promoter activity,and the Vav1 downstream substrate,small GTPase Rac2,was likely involved in the control of Bcl-2 expression.Conclusion: Vav1 protects Jurkat cells from Fas-mediated apoptosis by promoting Bcl-2 transcription through its GEF activity.

  6. Monosomal karyotype among adult acute myeloid leukemia: clinical characteristic and prognostic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯茹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics and prognostic value of monosomal karyotype(MK)patients in adult acute myeloid leukemia(AML).Methods We retrospectively studied 45 patients of MK+in newly-diagnosed adult AML in our center from Oct 2000 to Dec2012.Clinical characteristics,cytogenetic data and prognostic features were analyzed in the cohort of MK+patients.Results MK was found in 45 patients(19.0%)

  7. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  8. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Genomic Profiling of Adult and Pediatric B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fang Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic landscapes of 92 adult and 111 pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL were investigated using next-generation sequencing and copy number alteration analysis. Recurrent gene mutations and fusions were tested in an additional 87 adult and 93 pediatric patients. Among the 29 newly identified in-frame gene fusions, those involving MEF2D and ZNF384 were clinically relevant and were demonstrated to perturb B-cell differentiation, with EP300-ZNF384 inducing leukemia in mice. Eight gene expression subgroups associated with characteristic genetic abnormalities were identified, including leukemia with MEF2D and ZNF384 fusions in two distinct clusters. In subgroup G4 which was characterized by ERG deletion, DUX4-IGH fusion was detected in most cases. This comprehensive dataset allowed us to compare the features of molecular pathogenesis between adult and pediatric B-ALL and to identify signatures possibly related to the inferior outcome of adults to that of children. We found that, besides the known discrepancies in frequencies of prognostic markers, adult patients had more cooperative mutations and greater enrichment for alterations of epigenetic modifiers and genes linked to B-cell development, suggesting difference in the target cells of transformation between adult and pediatric patients and may explain in part the disparity in their responses to treatment.

  10. Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells From Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts in Preventing GVHD in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-06

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  13. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  15. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated Bronchioloalveolar Disorder Presenting with Mosaic Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Tanoue, Susumu; Sano, Koji; Nishiwaki, Kaichi; Sato, Shun; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated bronchioloalveolar disorder (HABA) is a specific state with chronic and progressive respiratory symptoms caused by bronchiolar or alveolar disorder characterized by smoldering adult T-cell leukemia or the HTLV-I carrier state. We herein report a rare case of HABA with an initial presentation of mosaic perfusion in the lung. The diagnosis was made according to the results of a flow cytometry analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and pathological findings. Clinicians must be careful to recognize that mosaic perfusion may be a radiological finding of HABA. PMID:26631889

  16. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case–control study conducted in 1994–1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO2 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an ‘n-shaped’ response function between exposure to NO2 and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97–1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68–0.93. For PM2.5 we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m3 of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75–1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO2 of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86–1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5 of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42–0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO2. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls. - Highlights: • Analyzed associations between incidence of adult leukemia and PM • We used 20-year residential histories to estimate average annual concentrations

  19. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, Nicholas [Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Goldberg, Mark S., E-mail: mark.goldberg@mcgill.ca [Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, 687 Pine Ave. W., R4.29, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A1 (Canada); Hystad, Perry [College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Villeneuve, Paul J. [Department of Health Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Johnson, Kenneth C. [Science Integration Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case–control study conducted in 1994–1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO{sub 2} and fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an ‘n-shaped’ response function between exposure to NO{sub 2} and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97–1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68–0.93. For PM{sub 2.5} we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m{sup 3} of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75–1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO{sub 2} of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86–1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m{sup 3} of PM{sub 2.5} of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42–0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO{sub 2}. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls. - Highlights: • Analyzed associations between incidence of adult leukemia and PM • We used 20-year residential

  20. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia? Next Topic Normal bone marrow and blood What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  1. T Cells Going Innate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyda, Midas; Elkhal, Abdallah; Quante, Markus; Falk, Christine S; Tullius, Stefan G

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell receptors (NKRs) play a crucial role in the homeostasis of antigen-experienced T cells. Indeed, prolonged antigen stimulation may induce changes in the receptor repertoire of T cells to a profile that features NKRs. Chronic antigen exposure, at the same time, has been shown to trigger the loss of costimulatory CD28 molecules with recently reported intensified antigen thresholds of antigen-experienced CD8(+) T cells. In transplantation, NKRs have been shown to assist allograft rejection in a CD28-independent fashion. We discuss here a role for CD28-negative T cells that have acquired the competency of the NKR machinery, potentially promoting allorecognition either through T cell receptor (TCR) crossreactivity or independently from TCR recognition. Collectively, NKRs can bring about innate-like T cells by providing alternative costimulatory pathways that gain relevance in chronic inflammation, potentially leading to resistance to CD28-targeting immunosuppressants. PMID:27402226

  2. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  3. Inhibition of γ-secretase activity synergistically enhances tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced apoptosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells via upregulation of death receptor 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Lisa M.; Nathwani, Seema M.; Zisterer, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a rare and aggressive hematopoietic malignancy prone to relapse and drug resistance. Half of all T-ALL patients exhibit mutations in Notch1, which leads to aberrant Notch1 associated signaling cascades. Notch1 activation is mediated by the γ-secretase cleavage of the Notch1 receptor into the active intracellular domain of Notch1 (NCID). Clinical trials of γ-secretase small molecule inhibitors (GSIs) as single agents for the treatment of T-ALL have been unsuccessful. The present study demonstrated, using immunofluorescence and western blotting, that blocking γ-secretase activity in T-ALL cells with N-[(3,5-difluorophenyl) acetyl]-L-alanyl-2-phenyl] glycine-1,1-dimethylethyl ester (DAPT) downregulated NCID and upregulated the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5 (DR5). Upregulation of DR5 restored the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to TRAIL. Combination index revealed that the combined treatment of DAPT and TRAIL synergistically enhanced apoptosis compared with treatment with either drug alone. TRAIL combined with the clinically evaluated γ-secretase inhibitor 3-[(1r, 4s)-4-(4-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-4-(2, 5-difluorophenyl) cyclohexyl] propanoic acid (MK-0752) also significantly enhanced TRAIL-induced cell death compared with either drug alone. DAPT/TRAIL apoptotic synergy was dependent on the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and was associated with a decrease in BH3 interacting-domain death agonist and x-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. In conclusion, γ-secretase inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance for the treatment of T-ALL.

  4. Bone marrow ectopic expression of a non-coding RNA in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a novel t(2;11(q11.2;p15.1 translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszl Anna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chromosomal translocations play a crucial role in tumorigenesis, often resulting in the formation of chimeric genes or in gene deregulation through position effects. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is associated with a large number of such rearrangements. We report the ectopic expression of the 3' portion of EST DA926692 in the bone marrow of a childhood T-ALL case showing a t(2;11(q11.2;p15.1 translocation as the sole chromosome abnormality. The breakpoints, defined at the sequence level, mapped within HPS5 (Hermansky Pudlak syndrome 5 intron 1 at 11p15.1, and DA926692 exon 2 at 2q11.2. The translocation was accompanied by a submicroscopic inversion that brought the two genes into the same transcriptional orientation. No chimeric trancript was detected. Interestingly, Real-Time Quantitative (RQ-PCR detected, in the patient's bone marrow, expression of a 173 bp product corresponding to the 3' portion of DA926692. Samples from four T-ALL cases with a normal karyotype and normal bone marrow used as controls were negative. It might be speculated that the juxtaposition of this genomic segment to the CpG island located upstream HPS5 activated DA92669 expression. RQ-PCR analysis showed expression positivity in 6 of 23 human tissues examined. Bioinformatic analysis excluded that this small non-coding RNA is a precursor of micro-RNA, although it is conceivable that it has a different, yet unknown, functional role. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report, in cancer, of the activation of a small non-coding RNA as a result of a chromosomal translocation.

  5. Recombinant human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2 Tax proteins induce high levels of CC-chemokines and downregulate CCR5 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Christy S; Abuerreish, Muna; Lairmore, Michael D; Castillo, Laura; Giam, Chou-Zen; Beilke, Mark A

    2011-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia viruses types 1 (HTLV-1) and 2 (HTLV-2) produce key transcriptional regulatory gene products, known as Tax1 and Tax2, respectively. Tax1 and Tax2 transactivate multiple host genes involved in cellular immune responses within the cellular microenvironment, including induction of genes encoding expression of CC-chemokines. It is speculated that HTLV Tax proteins may act as immune modulators. In this study, recombinant Tax1 and Tax2 proteins were tested for their effects on the viability of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and their ability to induce expression of CC-chemokines and to downregulate the level of CCR5 expression in PBMCs. PBMCs obtained from uninfected donors were cultured in a range of Tax1 and Tax2 concentrations (10-100 pM), and supernatant fluids were harvested at multiple time points for quantitative determinations of MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. Treatment of PBMCs with Tax1 and Tax2 proteins (100 pM) resulted in a significant increase in viability over a 7-d period compared to controls (pTax1 and Tax2 induced high levels of all three CC-chemokines over the dosing range compared to mock-treated controls (pTax2, as well as lymphocytes from HTLV-2-infected donors, showed a significantly lower percentage of CCR5-positive cells compared to those of uninfected donors and from mock-treated lymphocytes, respectively (pTax1 and Tax2 could promote innate immunity in the extracellular environment during HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections via CC-chemokine ligands and receptors. PMID:22111594

  6. Conformation-specific antibodies targeting the trimer-of-hairpins motif of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein recognize the viral envelope but fail to neutralize viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaliotis, Antonis; Nurkiyanova, Kulpash; Lamb, Daniel; Woof, Jenny M; Brighty, David W

    2007-06-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) entry into cells is dependent upon the viral envelope glycoprotein-catalyzed fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. Following receptor activation of the envelope, the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) is thought to undergo a series of fusogenic conformational transitions through a rod-like prehairpin intermediate to a compact trimer-of-hairpins structure. Importantly, synthetic peptides that interfere with the conformational changes of TM are potent inhibitors of membrane fusion and HTLV-1 entry, suggesting that TM is a valid target for antiviral therapy. To assess the utility of TM as a vaccine target and to explore further the function of TM in HTLV-1 pathogenesis, we have begun to examine the immunological properties of TM. Here we demonstrate that a recombinant trimer-of-hairpins form of the TM ectodomain is strongly immunogenic. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the TM immunogen specifically bind to trimeric forms of TM, including structures thought to be important for membrane fusion. Importantly, these antibodies recognize the envelope on virally infected cells but, surprisingly, fail to neutralize envelope-mediated membrane fusion or infection by pseudotyped viral particles. Our data imply that, even in the absence of overt membrane fusion, there are multiple forms of TM on virally infected cells and that some of these display fusion-associated structures. Finally, we demonstrate that many of the antibodies possess the ability to recruit complement to TM, suggesting that envelope-derived immunogens capable of eliciting a combination of neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies would be of value as subunit vaccines for intervention in HTLV infections. PMID:17376912

  7. Chronic myeloid leukemia in an adult ghanaian with sporadic neurofibromatosis 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edeghonghon E Olayemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, a common, progressive, autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder, are predisposed to malignancies. Several types of hematologic malignancies have been described in them. However, to date there has been no report to the best of our knowledge of a patient with NF1 developing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. We present an adult Ghanaian with NF1, who subsequently developed CML. Relevance of the case report is discussed.

  8. Poor adherence to dietary guidelines among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Robien, Kim; Ness, Kirsten K.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Baker, K. Scott; Gurney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, conditions that healthy dietary patterns may help ameliorate or prevent. To evaluate the usual dietary intake of adult survivors of childhood ALL, food frequency questionnaire data were collected from 72 participants, and compared with the 2007 WCRF/AICR Cancer Prevention recommendations, the DASH diet, and the 2005 USDA Food Guide. Mean daily energ...

  9. The incidence of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors: 1950 – 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Preston, Dale L.; Soda, Midori; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kimura, Akiro; Kamada, Nanao; Dohy, Hiroo; Tomonaga, Masao; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Cullings, Harry M.; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-01-01

    A marked increase in leukemia risks was the first and most striking late effect of radiation exposure seen among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. This paper presents analyses of radiation effects on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma incidence in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors updated 14 years since the last comprehensive report on these malignancies. These analyses make use of tumor- and leukemia-registry-based incidence data on 113,011 cohort members with 3.6 million person-years of follow-up from late 1950 through the end of 2001. In addition to a detailed analysis of the excess risk for all leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia (neither of which appear to be radiation-related), we present results for the major hematopoietic malignancy types: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, adult T-cell leukemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Poisson regression methods were used to characterize the shape of the radiation dose response relationship and, to the extent the data allowed, to investigate variation in the excess risks with sex, attained age, exposure age, and time since exposure. In contrast to the previous report that focused on describing excess absolute rates, we considered both excess absolute rate (EAR) and excess relative risk (ERR) models and found that ERR models can often provide equivalent and sometimes more parsimonious descriptions of the excess risk than EAR models. The leukemia results indicated that there was a non-linear dose response for leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia, which varied markedly with time and age at exposure, with much of the evidence for this non-linearity arising from the acute myeloid leukemia risks. Although the leukemia excess risks generally declined with attained age or time since exposure, there was evidence

  10. Haploidentical vs cord blood transplantation for adults with acute myelogenous leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melhem; Solh

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoeitic cell transplantation is established as a curative treatment for patients w acute myelogenous leukemia. Haploidentical family donor and umbilical cord blood(UCB) are alternative sources of stem cells for patients lacking a matched sibling or unrelated do-nor. The early challenges of transplant complications related to poor engraftment and graft-vs-host disease have been overcome with new strategies such as using 2 units and increased cell dose in UCB and T-cell deple-tion and post transplantation cyclophosphamide in hap-loidentical transplantation. The outcomes of alternative transplantation for acute leukemia were compared to other traditional graft sources. For patients lacking a matched sibling or unrelated donor, either strategy is a suitable option. The choice should rely mostly on the urgency of the transplantation and the available cell dose as well as the expertise available at the trans-plant center. This manuscript reviews the options of alternative donor transplantation and highlights recent advances in each of these promising transplantation options.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia cells inhibit the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells and induce the generation of regulatory T cells%急性髓系白血病细胞对树突状细胞分化、成熟和调节性T细胞生成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingbing Wang; Xin Chen; Jun Liu; Zimin Sun; Shiang Huang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of soluble factors secreted by acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells on the phenotypical and functional properties of DCs derived from normal mononuclear cells. Methods: Mononuclear cells were cultured with interleukin-4 (IL-4) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in the presence or absence of 24 h culture supernatants from fresh primary AML cells, to generate immature DCs. The maturation of DCs was induced by cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and prostaglandin-2 (PGE-2). The phenotypic alterations of DCs and DCs-primed CD4+ T cells were evaluated using flow cytometry. Precursor frequency (PF) was calculated to monitor the allostimulatory effects of DCs on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Results:AML cell supernatant-treated DCs showed significantly lower expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, and reduced response to cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha,and PGE-2. The allostimulatory effects of AML cell supernatant-treated DCs on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were significantly lower than those of normal mature DCs [PF: (1.8±0.5)% vs. (5.2±1.6)% for CD4+ T cells, (2.1±0.6)% vs. (6.5±2.0)%for CD8+ T cells, P<0.01]. These AML supematant-induced DCs could also induce allogeneic CD4+ T cells to differentiate into CD4+CD25high T cells, which had immunophenotyping characteristics of regulatory T cells, i.e. they expressed Foxp3 but not active maker CD69. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that soluble factors secreted by AML cells can inhibit development and functions of DCs. In addition, AML supematant-induced DCs can induce the generation of CD4+CD25high T cells from CD4+T cells, which may be a mechanism of increased prevalence of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells and immune dysfunction in AML patients.

  12. Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells From Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts From HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  13. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Nicholas; Goldberg, Mark S; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J; Johnson, Kenneth C

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case-control study conducted in 1994-1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO2 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an 'n-shaped' response function between exposure to NO2 and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97-1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68-0.93. For PM2.5 we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO2 of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86-1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of PM2.5 of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42-0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO2. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls.

  14. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfil, Amanda R; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Howard, Cory M; Mates, Jessica M; Kwiek, Jesse J; Baiocchi, Robert A; Green, Patrick L

    2015-12-30

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2-3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i) in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  15. Treatment of refractory/relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with bortezomib- based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Junmei Zhao,* Chao Wang,* Yongping Song, Yuzhang Liu, Baijun FangHenan Key Lab of Experimental Haematology, Henan Institute of Haematology, Henan Tumor Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nine pretreated patients aged >19 years with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL were treated with a combination of bortezomib plus chemotherapy before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. Eight (88.9% patients, including two Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL patients, achieved a complete remission. Furthermore, the evaluable patients have benefited from allo-HSCT after response to this reinduction treatment. We conclude that bortezomib-based chemotherapy was highly effective for adults with refractory/relapsed ALL before allo-HSCT. Therefore, this regimen deserves a larger series within prospective trials to confirm these results. Keywords: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, refractory, relapsed, bortezomib

  16. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Challenges faced in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine SR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selena R Levine,1 Jennifer L McNeer,2 Michael S Isakoff1 1Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford, CT, 2Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The survival rate for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has dramatically improved over the last 50 years. However, for those in the adolescent and young adult (AYA age-group of 15–30 years with ALL, there has not been the same degree of improvement. Historically, pediatric and adult providers have utilized different treatment approaches based on clinical trials. However, studies that have compared the outcome of AYA patients with ALL treated on pediatric or adult clinical trials have generally shown substantially better outcomes for this patient population treated with the pediatric trials. Additionally, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been considered as part of intensified therapy for AYA patients with ALL. Herein, we review the outcomes with chemotherapy alone and with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and explore the challenges faced in determining the ideal therapy for the AYA population of patients. Keywords: adolescent young adult oncology, leukemia, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  18. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. Comparison of clinical implications of p16 deletion in childhood and adult B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖小珍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the clinical implications of p16 deletion in childhood and adult B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) .Methods A total of 129 cases of de novo childhood (73 cases) and adult (56 cases) B-ALL were examined genetically and immunologically using G-banding techniqhe,interphase

  20. Prognostic Significance of Lymphoid Enhancer-Binding Factor-1 Expression in Egyptian Adult B-Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aly, Rabab M.; Ansaf B. Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEF-1) is a key transcription factor of wingless-type (Wnt) signaling in various tumors and it is associated with a number of malignant diseases such as leukemia. We explored the expression profile of LEF-1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and determined its specific prognostic significance in this disease. Materials and Methods: We studied LEF-1 expression in 56 newly diagnosed B-acute ALL adult patients using real-time quantitative polymer...

  1. Visualizing spatiotemporal dynamics of apoptosis after G1 arrest by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and insights into gene expression changes using microarray-based gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax is a potent activator of viral and cellular gene expression that interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Many reports show that Tax is capable of regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis both positively and negatively. However, it still remains to understand why the Tax oncoprotein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, or whether Tax-induced apoptosis is dependent upon its ability to induce G1 arrest. The present study used time-lapse imaging to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of cell cycle dynamics in Tax-expressing HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator, Fucci2. A large-scale host cell gene profiling approach was also used to identify the genes involved in Tax-mediated cell signaling events related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Results Tax-expressing apoptotic cells showed a rounded morphology and detached from the culture dish after cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Thus, it appears that Tax induces apoptosis through pathways identical to those involved in G1 arrest. To elucidate the mechanism(s by which Tax induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, regulation of host cellular genes by Tax was analyzed using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts. Seventeen genes related to cell cycle regulation were identified as being up or downregulated > 2.0-fold in Tax-expressing cells. Several genes, including SMAD3, JUN, GADD45B, DUSP1 and IL8, were involved in cellular proliferation, responses to cellular stress and DNA damage, or inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, 23 pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were deregulated by Tax, including TNFAIP3, TNFRS9, BIRC3 and IL6. Furthermore, the kinetics of IL8, SMAD3, CDKN1A, GADD45A, GADD45B and IL6 expression were altered following the induction of Tax, and correlated closely with the morphological changes observed by time

  2. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Redirecting T Cell Specificity Using T Cell Receptor Messenger RNA Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sarene; Shimasaki, Noriko; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T lymphocytes genetically modified to express T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors have shown great promise in the treatment of several cancers, including melanoma and leukemia. In addition to tumor-associated antigens and tumor-specific neoantigens, tumors expressing viral peptides can also be recognized by specific T cells and are attractive targets for cell therapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells often have hepatitis B virus DNA integration and can be targeted by hepatitis B virus-specific T cells. Here, we describe a method to engineer hepatitis B virus-specific T cell receptors in primary human T lymphocytes based on electroporation of hepatitis B virus T cell receptor messenger RNA. This method can be extended to a large scale therapeutic T cell production following current good manufacturing practice compliance and is applicable to the redirection of T lymphocytes with T cell receptors of other virus specificities such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and chimeric receptors specific for other antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:27236807

  5. Hyperglycemia increases the complicated infection and mortality rates during induction therapy in adult acute leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina do Nascimento Matias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of hyperglycemia during induction therapy in adult patients with acute leukemia and its effect on complicated infections and mortality during the first 30 days of treatment. METHODS: An analysis was performed in a retrospective cohort of 280 adult patients aged 18 to 60 years with previously untreated acute leukemia who received induction chemotherapy from January 2000 to December 2009 at the Hemocentro de Pernambuco (HEMOPE, Brazil. Hyperglycemia was defined as the finding of at least one fasting glucose measurement > 100 mg/dL observed one week prior to induction therapy until 30 days after. The association between hyperglycemia and complicated infections, mortality and complete remission was evaluated using the Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS in the R software package version 2.9.0. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty-eight patients (67.1% presented hyperglycemia at some moment during induction therapy. Eighty-two patients (29.3% developed complicated infections. Infection-related mortality during the neutropenia period was 20.7% (58 patients. Mortality from other causes during the first 30 days after induction was 2.8%. Hyperglycemia increased the risk of complicated infections (OR 3.97; 95% confidence interval: 2.08 - 7.57; p-value < 0.001 and death (OR 3.55; 95% confidence interval: 1.77-7.12; p-value < 0.001 but did not increase the risk of fungal infections or decrease the probability of achieving complete remission. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an association between the presence of hyperglycemia and the development of complicated infections and death in adult patients during induction therapy for acute leukemia.

  6. The role of Clofarabine in the treatment of adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fozza, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    The therapeutic scenario available for adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has shown only partial progresses over the last few years. This is especially true for refractory and relapsed AML whose outcome is still extremely disappointing. In this context Clofarabine has offered new promising perspectives within first and second line protocols. This review will firstly describe the initial development in monotherapy, considering then the different potential combination strategies which include both polichemotherapeutic regimens and less conventional approaches with new generation drugs. The potential use of Clofarabine as induction treatment for patients candidate to stem cell transplantation and within conditioning regimens will be finally evaluated. PMID:25457773

  7. Spectral karyotyping reveals a comprehensive karyotype in an adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Da, Wan Ming; Fan, Hui; Guo, Bo; Li, Su Xia; Lu, Xue Chun; Zhu, Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are frequently detected in patients with acute lymphoblastic leu-kemia (ALL). Comprehensive karyotype was related to poor prognosis frequently in ALL. We present a comprehensive karyotype in an adult ALL by spectral karyotyping (SKY) and R-banding. SKY not only confirmed the abnormalities previously seen by R-banding but also improved comprehensive karyotype analysis with the following result 47,XY,+9, ins(1;5)(q23;q23q34) t(6;7)(q23;p13). Our report demonstrated tha...

  8. Role of the multichain IL-2 receptor complex in the control of normal and malignant T-cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, T.A.

    1987-11-01

    Antigen-induced activation of resting T-cells induces the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), as well as the expression of specific cell surface receptors for this lymphokine. There are at least two forms of the cellular receptors for IL-2, one with a very high affinity and the other with a lower affinity. The authors have identified two IL-2 binding peptides, a 55-kd peptide reactive with the anti-Tac monoclonal antibody, and a novel 75-kd non-Tac IL-2 binding peptide. Cell lines bearing either the p55, Tac, or the p75 peptide along manifested low-affinity IL-2 binding, whereas cell lines bearing both peptides manifested both high- and low-affinity receptors. Fusion of cell membranes from low-affinity IL-2 binding cells bearing the Tac peptide alone with membranes from a cell line bearing the p75 peptide alone generates hybrid membranes bearing high-affinity receptors. They propose a multichain model for the high-affinity IL-2 receptor in which both the Tac and the p75 IL-2 binding peptides are associated in a receptor complex. In contrast to resting T-cells, human T-cell lymphotropic virus I-associated adult T-cell leukemia cells constitutively express large numbers of IL-2 receptors. Because IL-2 receptors are present on the malignant T-cells but not on normal resting cells, clinical trials have been initiated in which patients with adult T-cell leukemia are being treated with either unmodified or toxin-conjugated forms of anti-Tac monoclonal antibody directed toward this growth factor receptor. Cross-linking studies were done using (/sup 125/I) IL-2.

  9. Abundance and specificity of influenza reactive circulating memory follicular helper and non-follicular helper CD4 T cells in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddon, Scott A; Richards, Katherine A; Treanor, John J; Sant, Andrea J

    2015-09-01

    CD4 T-cell responses are functionally complex and regulate many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. Follicular helper (Tfh) cells are CD4 T cells specialized to support B-cell production of isotype-switched, high-affinity antibody. So far, studies of Tfh cells in humans have focused on their differentiation requirements, with little research devoted to their antigen specificity. Here, after separating circulating human memory CD4 T cells based on expression of CXCR5, a signature marker of Tfh, we have quantified and assayed the influenza protein antigen specificity of blood Tfh cells and CD4 T cells lacking this marker. Through the use of peptide pools derived from nucleoprotein (NP) or haemagglutinin (HA) and a panel of human donors, we have discovered that circulating Tfh cells preferentially recognize peptide epitopes from HA while cells lacking CXCR5 are enriched for specificity toward NP. These studies suggest that reactive CD4 T cells specific for distinct viral antigens may have generalized differences in their functional potential due to their previous stimulation history. PMID:26094691

  10. Risk group assignment differs for children and adults 1-45 yr with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated by the NOPHO ALL-2008 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined....

  11. Incidence of Severe Osteonecrosis Requiring Total Joint Arthroplasty in Children and Young Adults Treated for Leukemia or Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niinimäki, Riitta; Hansen, Lene Mølgaard; Niinimäki, Tuukka;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The population-based incidence of severe osteonecrosis (ON) necessitating total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in patients with hematological cancer is unknown. This study assessed the incidence of ON requiring primary TJA in children and young adults treated for leukemia or lymphoma. Methods......: Patients diagnosed with leukemia or lymphoma before 31 years of age were identified from the Finnish and Danish Cancer Registries. These data were combined with those from the National Hospital Discharge and the Finnish Arthroplasty Registers. Data on the orthopedic procedures performed and the appropriate...... diagnosis codes given before the age of 40 were also retrieved. Results: The estimated cumulative incidence of TJA was 4.5% at 20 years for patients treated for chronic myeloid leukemia, followed by 2.1% for patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia. It was considerably lower in patients with acute...

  12. RBP2 Promotes Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Upregulating BCL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Minran; Fu, Yue; Sun, Ting; Chen, Jin; Qin, Xuemei; Yu, Yuan; Jia, Jihui; Chen, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent increases in the cure rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), adult ALL remains a high-risk disease that exhibits a high relapse rate. In this study, we found that the histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein-2 (RBP2) was overexpressed in both on-going and relapse cases of adult ALL, which revealed that RBP2 overexpression was not only involved in the pathogenesis of ALL but that its overexpression might also be related to relapse of the disease. RBP2 knockdown induced apoptosis and attenuated leukemic cell viability. Our results demonstrated that BCL2 is a novel target of RBP2 and supported the notion of RBP2 being a regulator of BCL2 expression via directly binding to its promoter. As the role of RBP2 in regulating apoptosis was confirmed, RBP2 overexpression and activation of BCL2 might play important roles in ALL development and progression. PMID:27008505

  13. RBP2 Promotes Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Upregulating BCL2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Wang

    Full Text Available Despite recent increases in the cure rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, adult ALL remains a high-risk disease that exhibits a high relapse rate. In this study, we found that the histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein-2 (RBP2 was overexpressed in both on-going and relapse cases of adult ALL, which revealed that RBP2 overexpression was not only involved in the pathogenesis of ALL but that its overexpression might also be related to relapse of the disease. RBP2 knockdown induced apoptosis and attenuated leukemic cell viability. Our results demonstrated that BCL2 is a novel target of RBP2 and supported the notion of RBP2 being a regulator of BCL2 expression via directly binding to its promoter. As the role of RBP2 in regulating apoptosis was confirmed, RBP2 overexpression and activation of BCL2 might play important roles in ALL development and progression.

  14. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. T cell traffic signals

    OpenAIRE

    Van Epps, Heather L.

    2005-01-01

    In 1990, Charles Mackay and colleagues combined classical physiology with modern molecular biology to provide the first concrete evidence that naive and memory T cells follow distinct migratory routes out of the bloodstream— a discovery that helped invigorate the field of lymphocyte homing.

  16. T-cell costimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1996-01-01

    The CD40L molecule expressed by CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes is known to deliver signals that activate B cells and macrophages. It now appears that CD40L regulates T cells themselves, during both their development and their participation in adaptive immune responses....

  17. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Yasuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT, in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1.

  18. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known.

  19. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known. PMID:26800008

  20. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults – from genomics to the clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenderian SS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Saad Sirop Kenderian, Mark R Litzow Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults (AYA represents a unique and challenging disease entity. Despite the recent improvement of survival in this population over the last decade, it is still lagging behind the excellent cure rates obtained in pediatric ALL. This special population of AYA receives care from pediatric as well as adult hematologists and can be treated on pediatric or adult protocols. There is a substantial difference in disease biology, response to chemotherapy, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation between pediatric and AYA patients. This review discusses current controversies in the management of AYA, outcomes following treatment with pediatric and adult protocols, and the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. It focuses on the unique clinical, biological, and socioeconomic characteristics of this population that might partly explain the inferior outcomes. This review also explores recent advances in genomic profiling and emerging treatments in ALL. Keywords: novel agents, monoclonal antibodies, stem cell transplantation, bone marrow transplantation, Philadelphia positive ALL, genomic profile

  1. Vaccination against δ-Retroviruses: The Bovine Leukemia Virus Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerónimo Gutiérrez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukemia virus (BLV and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia. Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy.

  2. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide 'proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  4. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide ‘proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  5. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Cytogenetic findings in adult secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML): frequency of favorable and adverse chromosomal aberrations do not differ from adult de novo AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preiss, Birgitte S; Bergman, Olav J; Friis, Lone S;

    2010-01-01

    During a 15-year period, 161 adult patients were diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (s-AML) in the region of Southern Denmark. In 73 patients, the AML diagnosis was preceded by myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS-AML), in 31 patients by an antecedent hematologic disease, and in 57 patients...... (P = 0.01). We conclude that population-based cytogenetic studies of adult s-AML and age- and sex-matched de novo AML show comparable distributions of chromosome abnormalities....

  7. The epidemiological studies of leukemia around nuclear facilities for children and young adults: critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This objective of this report is to make a review of studies relative to the risk of leukemia among children and young adults less than twenty five years old near the nuclear facilities. the nuclear facilities considered in this report are nuclear power plants (electric power generation), the nuclear research centers, the fuel or weapons fabrication plants, reprocessing plants. This report does not describe the risk analysis near the sites of nuclear weapons test, the consequences of accidents on nuclear facilities such Chernobylsk or the the population near the military and industrial site of Mayak (Ural). The same is for the mining sites and the facilities of uranium extraction that are out of this report. (N.C.)

  8. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis. PMID:25685944

  9. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis. (paper)

  10. Modification of immunocytochemical ZAP-70 assay for potential clinical application in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Kawiak; Jacek Roliński; Agnieszka Bojarska-Junak

    2011-01-01

    The ZAP-70 protein is a member of the Syk/ZAP protein tyrosine kinase family, normally expressed in T cells and NK cells but not found in normal, mature B cells. The protein plays a critical role in the initiation of T-cell signaling. Leukemic cells from patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) that expressed nonmutated immunoglobulin V genes were found to express levels of ZAP-70 protein that were comparable to those detected in T cells of healthy adults. The ZAP-70 protein ...

  11. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D. [Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology, Sydney (Australia)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The Study on BCR/ABL Fusion Gene in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the significance of BCR/ABC fusion gene in adult acute lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), 28 patients who were diagnosed as ALL were enrolled to detect BCR/ABC gene using nested-RT PCR. The results showed that 9 cases (31.25%) were BCR/ABL positive ,and expressed P210 subtype. A mong them 7 cases were B-ALL, and one was T-ALL. The diagnosis was proved by monoclonal antibodies recognition by indirect immunofluorescence. Adult patients with BCR/ABL positive ALL were significantly older (p<0. 01) and had higher WBC count (p<0. 01) as compared with BCR/ABL-negative patients. There was no significant difference in sex, hemoglobin and splenomegaly between two group (p>0. 05). The induc tion failure rate was high in BCR/ABL positive patients and those who achieved complete remission usually relapsed earlier. In conclusion, adult ALL patients with BCR/ABL-positive have poorer prognosis.

  13. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure. (author)

  14. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Homeostasis of T Cell Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinay S. Mahajan; Ilya B. Leskov; Jianzhu Chen

    2005-01-01

    T cell homeostasis commonly refers to the maintenance of relatively stable T cell numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Among the large numbers of T cells in the periphery, T cells exhibit structural diversity, I.e., the expression of a diverse repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs), and functional diversity, I.e., the presence of T cells at na(I)ve, effector, and memory developmental stages. Although the homeostasis of T cell numbers has been extensively studied, investigation of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of structural and functional diversity of T cells is still at an early stage. The fundamental feature throughout T cell development is the interaction between the TCR and either self or foreign peptides in association with MHC molecules. In this review, we present evidence showing that homeostasis of T cell number and diversity is mediated through competition for limiting resources.The number of T cells is maintained through competition for limiting cytokines, whereas the diversity of T cells is maintained by competition for self-peptide-MHC complexes. In other words, diversity of the self-peptide repertoire limits the structural (TCR) diversity of a T cell population. We speculate that cognate low affinity self-peptides,acting as weak agonists and antagonists, regulate the homeostasis of T cell diversity whereas non-cognate or null peptides which are extremely abundant for any given TCR, may contribute to the homeostasis of T cell number by providing survival signals. Moreover, self-peptides and cytokines may form specialized niches for the regulation of T cell homeostasis.

  16. Homeostasis of T Cell Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VinayS.Mahajan; IlyaB.Leskov; JianzhuChen

    2005-01-01

    T cell homeostasis commonly refers to the maintenance of relatively stable T cell numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Among the large numbers of T cells in the periphery, T cells exhibit structural diversity, i.e., the expression of a diverse repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs), and functional diversity, i.e., the presence of T cells at naive, effector, and memory developmental stages. Although the homeostasis of T cell numbers has been extensively studied, investigation of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of structural and functional diversity of T cells is still at an early stage. The fundamental feature throughout T cell development is the interaction between the TCR and either self or foreign peptides in association with MHC molecules. In this review, we present evidence showing that homeostasis of T cell number and diversity is mediated through competition for limiting resources. The number of T cells is maintained through competition for limiting cytokines, whereas the diversity of T cells is maintained by competition for self-peptide-MHC complexes. In other words, diversity of the self-peptide repertoire limits the structural (TCR) diversity of a T cell population. We speculate that cognate low affinity self-peptides, acting as weak agonists and antagonists, regulate the homeostasis of T cell diversity whereas non-cognate or null peptides which are extremely abundant for any given TCR, may contribute to the homeostasis of T cell number by providing survival signals. Moreover, self-peptides and cytokines may form specialized niches for the regulation of T cell homeostasis. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1): 1-10.

  17. Autologous stem cell transplantation for adult acute leukemia in 2015: time to rethink? Present status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, N-C; Giebel, S; Labopin, M; Savani, B N; Mohty, M; Nagler, A

    2015-12-01

    The use of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as consolidation therapy for adult patients with acute leukemia has declined over time. However, multiple randomized studies in the past have reported lower relapse rates after autologous transplantation compared with chemotherapy and lower non-relapse mortality rates compared with allogeneic transplantation. In addition, quality of life of long-term survivors is better after autologous transplantation than after allogeneic transplantation. Further, recent developments may improve outcomes of autograft recipients. These include the use of IV busulfan and the busulfan+melphalan combination, better detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) with molecular biology techniques, the introduction of targeted therapies and post-transplant maintenance therapy. Therefore, ASCT may nowadays be reconsidered for consolidation in the following patients if and when they reach a MRD-negative status: good- and at least intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia in first CR, acute promyelocytic leukemia in second CR, Ph-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia. Conversely, patients with MRD-positive status or high-risk leukemia should not be considered for consolidation with ASCT. PMID:26281031

  18. ANALYSIS OF T CELL CLONALITY BY CDR3 SIZE OF T-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTOR Vβ REPERTOIRE IN HCL AND c-ALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang-qiu; WANG Ming-chun; Siegert W; Schmadt CA

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution and clonality of TCR Vβ subfamily T cells in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and common-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (c-ALL). Methods:Peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from 3 cases of HCL and 1 case of c-ALL were investigated for analysis of complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) size of T cell receptor Vβ repertoire using reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The products were further analyzed by genescan to identify T cell clonality.Results: Some Vβ subfamily PCR products from 4 patients contained monopeak (monoclone) or a dominant peak (oligoclone). In contrast, multipeak (polyclone) distributions were found in all Vβ subfamily PCR products from normal control cases. Conclusion: T cell clonal expansion may be found in HCL and c-ALL cases that may indicate a host response directed against leukemia related antigen. In addition, it may be useful to detect the minimal residual disease.

  19. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Characteristics of T-cell receptor beta gene rearrangement and its role in the detection of minimal residual disease in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia%儿童急性T淋巴细胞白血病T细胞受体β链基因重排的特点及其在微小残留病定量检测中的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婕好; 李志刚; 高超; 崔蕾; 吴敏媛

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristics of T-cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangement in children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and establish a system for quantitative detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) targeting the TCRβ gene rearrangement. Methods Multiplex PCR designed by the BIOMED-2 was used to detect TCRβ gene rearrangement in the bone marrow samples of 26 children with T-ALL. Sequences of junctional region were then compared and analyzed in IMGT database. Allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) upstream primers were designed complementary to the V-D-J or D-J junctional region of TCRβ gene rearrangements. Samples at diagnosis were serially diluted in DNA obtained from mononuclear cells (MNC) from a pool of 20 healthy donors to generate the patient-specific standard curves. Subsequently, TCRβ RQ-PCR was applied to six patients to quantify MRD with germline Jβ primer/probe combinations. To determine the quantity and quality of DNA, we also used RQ-PCR for the N-ras gene.Results Clonal rearrangements were identified in 92.3% of the children with T-ALL ( Vβ-Dβ-Jβ rearrangements in 84.6% and Dβ-Jβ rearrangements in 50% ). Comparative sequence analysis of 42 TCRβ recombination revealed that two downstream Vβ families (BV5, BV6) were preferentially used. The segment Jβ2. 7 was dominant in childhood T-ALL. Jβ1. 3, Jβ2.4, and Jβ2.6 were not detected. The slope of the standard curves was from - 3.54 to -3.37 with the intercepts between 19.35 and 20.51. The correlation coefficients of all the 6 standard curves were ≥0.98. None of the cases had a quantitative range of RQ-PCR lower than 10. During the follow-up, an increased incidence of MRD was found before relapse. Conclusions RQ-PCR, which is a highly sensitive and specific method for detection of TCRβ gene rearrangements, will be of high value to study MRD in T-ALL. Close monitoring of MRD is of great importance for prognosis and

  1. Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase (FLT) 3 and FLT3 Internal Tandem Duplication in Different Types of Adult Leukemia: Analysis of 147 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Hong-ling; Zhang, Guang-Sen; Gong, Fan-Jie; Shen, Jian-Kai; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Yun-Xiao; Zheng, Wen-Li; Dai, Chong-Wen; Pei, Min-Fei; YANG, JUN-JIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim To assess the expression level of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), the incidence of FLT3/internal tandem duplications (ITD) mutation, and prognostic value of FLT3 changes in different types of adult leukemia. Methods Bone marrow mononuclear cells were isolated from 147 adult patients with leukemia. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen FLT3/ITD mutation and quantitative PCR was performed to evaluate the expression of the FLT3 transcri...

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Young Adult Presenting as Hepatitis and Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heincelman, Marc; Karakala, Nithin; Rockey, Don C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults is a relatively rare malignancy. The typical presentation includes signs and symptoms associated with bone marrow failure, including fevers, infections, fatigue, and excessive bruising. In this article, we report an unusual systemic presentation of ALL in a previously healthy 18-year-old man. He initially presented with several-day history of nausea and vomiting, 10-pound weight loss, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain with evidence of acute hepatocellular liver injury (elevations in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase) and elevation in serum creatinine. Further history revealed that he just joined the Marine Corp; in preparation, he had been lifting weights and taking protein and creatine supplements. A complete serological evaluation for liver disease was negative and creatine phosphokinase was normal. His aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase declined, and he was discharged with expected improvement. However, he returned one week later with continued symptoms and greater elevation of aminotransferases. Liver biopsy was nondiagnostic, revealing scattered portal and lobular inflammatory cells (primarily lymphocytes) felt to be consistent with drug-induced liver injury or viral hepatitis. Given his elevated creatinine, unresponsive to aggressive volume expansion, a kidney biopsy was performed, revealing normal histology. He subsequently developed an extensive left lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. Given his deep venous thrombosis, his peripheral blood was sent for flow cytometry, which revealed lymphoblasts. Bone marrow biopsy revealed 78% blasts with markers consistent with acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. This report emphasizes that right upper quadrant abdominal pain with liver test abnormalities may be the initial presentation of a systemic illness such as ALL.

  3. Establishing guidelines for CAR-T cells: challenges and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Di-Yuan; Zhang, Bing-Lan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    T cells, genetically modified by chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-T), are endowed with specificity to a desired antigen and are cytotoxic to cells expressing the targeted antigen. CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapy for curing hematological malignancy, such as acute lymphoid leukemia, and is promising for extending their efficacy to defeat solid tumors. To date, dozens of different CAR-T cells have been evaluated in clinical trials to treat tumors; this necessitates the establishment of guidelines for the production and application of CAR-T cells. However, it is challenging to standardize CAR-T cancer therapy because it involves a combination of gene therapy and cell therapy. In this review, we compare the existing guidelines for CAR-T cells and discuss the challenges and considerations for establishing guidance for CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26965523

  4. Establishing guidelines for CAR-T cells: challenges and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Di-Yuan; Zhang, Bing-Lan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    T cells, genetically modified by chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-T), are endowed with specificity to a desired antigen and are cytotoxic to cells expressing the targeted antigen. CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapy for curing hematological malignancy, such as acute lymphoid leukemia, and is promising for extending their efficacy to defeat solid tumors. To date, dozens of different CAR-T cells have been evaluated in clinical trials to treat tumors; this necessitates the establishment of guidelines for the production and application of CAR-T cells. However, it is challenging to standardize CAR-T cancer therapy because it involves a combination of gene therapy and cell therapy. In this review, we compare the existing guidelines for CAR-T cells and discuss the challenges and considerations for establishing guidance for CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy.

  5. IL-15 improves the cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against leukemia cells by upregulating CD3+CD56+ cells and downregulating regulatory T cells as well as IL-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Chen, Tianping; Tao, Lili; Wang, Huiping; Pan, Ying; Xiong, Shudao; Zhai, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are usually generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the stimulation of IL-2 in vitro. Unlike the conventional IL-2-stimulated CIK cells (IL-2-CIK cells), we investigated the characteristics and potential mechanism of IL-15-stimulated CIK cells (IL-15-CIK cells) in this study. Compared with IL-2-CIK cells, the percentage of CD3CD56 cells was significantly increased in IL-15-CIK cells, but the expression of regulatory T (Treg) cells and IL-35 was significantly decreased in IL-15-CIK cells. Meanwhile, the in vitro cytotoxicity against human myeloid leukemia cells K562 of IL-15-CIK cells was significantly augmented compared with IL-2-CIK cells. These data suggest that IL-15 may improve the cytotoxicity of CIK cells against leukemia cells by upregulating CD3CD56 cells and downregulating Treg cells and IL-35.

  6. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Successful combination treatment of clofarabine, cytarabine and gemtuzumab-ozogamicin in adult refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Papayannidis, Cristina; Derenzini, Enrico; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Curti, Antonio; Paolini, Stefania; Cilloni, Daniela; Baccarani, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Despite relevant advances in survival rates of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), in adult patients the outcome is still dismal, due to a greater drug resistance, a poorer compliance with treatment, and less effective current therapies. The need for more active agents has identified a novel purine nucleoside analogue, clofarabine, which has been approved for the treatment of children with relapsed and refractory ALL, showing also promising clinical benefit in ph...

  8. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Trends in adult leukemia incidence and survival in Denmark, 1943-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Johansen, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of leukemia is largely unknown. Ecological data indicating trends in incidence and survival can provide information about changes in risk factors, can reflect underlying changes in diagnostic classification, and can measure therapeutic advances. From the records of the Danish Cancer...... Registry with registration starting from 1943, we calculated age-specific, period-specific, and age-standardized (world standard) incidence rates of chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for persons above the age...... of 18. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and median survival times were calculated. Between 1943 and 2003, there were 26,036 cases of leukemia reported. The age-specific incidence rates of CLL, CML, and AML were higher for older men and women, while the incidence rates of ALL by age were more homogeneous...

  11. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. "Early NK Cell Reconstitution Predicts Overall Survival in T-Cell Replete Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minculescu, Lia; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Friis, Lone Smidstrups;

    2016-01-01

    Early immune reconstitution plays a critical role in clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocytes to recover after transplantation and are considered powerful effector cells in HSCT. We aimed to evaluate...... the clinical impact of early NK cell recovery in T-cell replete transplant recipients. Immune reconstitution was studied in 298 adult patients undergoing HSCT for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) from 2005 to 2013. In multivariate analysis NK...... cell numbers day 30 (NK30) >150cells/µL were independently associated with superior overall survival (hazard ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.66-0.95, p=0.01). Cumulative incidence analyses showed that patients with NK30 >150cells/µL had significantly less transplant related mortality (TRM), p=0...

  13. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1: does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Wilson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected, 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV and 16 healthy controls (HC, respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS.

  14. Clinical and pharmacologic aspects of blinatumomab in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portell CA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig A Portell, Candice M Wenzell, Anjali S Advani Leukemia Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults remains a challenging disease to treat, and novel therapies are needed. Precursor-B ALL comprises 80% of cases, and the CD19 antigen is expressed in nearly all precursor-B ALL patients. Bispecific T-cell-engaging antibodies are novel bioengineered proteins. The bispecific T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab engages polyclonal T cells to CD19-expressing B cells. By binding to both CD3 and CD19, blinatumomab physically brings these T cells in close proximity to malignant B cells and potentiates T-cell-induced cytotoxic cell kill. Blinatumomab requires continuous intravenous infusion due to its short half-life, the need for continuous exposure for the drug to exert sufficient efficacy, and lessened toxicity. A phase II trial of B-cell ALL patients with persistent or relapsed minimal residual disease demonstrated an 80% rate of complete molecular remission. Cytokine-release syndrome and central nervous system events, such as seizures and encephalopathy, are reversible toxicities. Promising results in B-cell ALL with minimal residual disease have led to further evaluation of this drug in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-cell ALL. Keywords: blinatumomab, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CD19, BiTE antibodies

  15. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18)(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33) with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Rincic, Martina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Alhourani, Eyad; Hunstig, Friederike; Glaser, Anita; Liehr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18)(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33). Besides a translocation t(10;14)(q24;q11) was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95).

  16. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33 with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb A. K. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33. Besides a translocation t(10;14(q24;q11 was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95.

  17. Elevation of Serum KL-6 Glycoprotein or Surfactant Protein-D in Adult T-cell Leukemia with Distinct Pulmonary Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Osaka, Akemi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yamada, Yasuaki; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Inokuchi, Naoko; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Komoda, Minori; Nakamura, Shigeki; Aoyama, Muneo; Sawada, Takashi; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2009-01-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies frequently suffer from lung diseases as a complication. However, it is difficult to discriminate leukemic invasion into the lung from infectious pulmonary complications. The serum level of Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6), which is a mucin-like glycoprotein, is increased in more than 70% of patients with interstitial pneumonia. Surfactant protein-D (SP-D) is produced mainly in the lung by alveolar type II and bronchiolar epithelial cells and is a useful s...

  18. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. T cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The role of allergen-specific CD4+ effector type 2 helper (Th2) cells in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders is an established fact. Th2 cells produce interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, which induce immunoglobulin E production by B cells, and IL-5 that allows recruitment of eosinophils. Two main mechanisms control the Th2-mediated allergic inflammation: immune deviation (or Th1 redirection) and immune regulation. Regulatory T (Treg) cells exhibit a CD4+ phenotype and include Foxp3-positive thymic and induced Tregs, as well as Foxp3-negative IL-10-producing cells. Both immune deviation and immune regulation evoked by the maternal and newborn microbial environment probably operate in preventing allergen-specific Th2 responses. However, microbe-related protection from allergy seems to mainly depend on epigenetically controlled acetylation of the IFNG promoter of CD4+ T cells. Even Th17 and Th9 cells, as well as invariant NKT cells, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders, but their role is certainly more limited. Recently, innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2) have been found to be able to produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13 in response to stimulation with IL-25 and IL-33 produced by non-immune cells. Together with Th2 cells, ILC2 may contribute to the induction and maintenance of allergic inflammation. PMID:24925396

  20. E2a/Pbx1 Induces the Rapid Proliferation of Stem Cell Factor-Dependent Murine Pro-T Cells That Cause Acute T-Lymphoid or Myeloid Leukemias in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sykes, David B.; Kamps, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    Oncoprotein E2a/Pbx1 is produced by the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. E2a/Pbx1 blocks differentiation of primary myeloid progenitors but, paradoxically, induces apoptosis in established pre-B-cell lines, and no transforming function of E2a/Pbx1 has been reported in cultured lymphoid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that E2a/Pbx1 induces immortal proliferation of stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent pro-T thymocytes by a mechanism dependent upon bo...

  1. Mitoxantrone and cytosine arabinoside in previously untreated adult patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, I; Akin, U; Ismet, A; Meral, B; Hamdi, A; Haluk, K

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-five adult patients with previously untreated acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) were treated with mitoxantrone (Mto) 12 mg/m2 daily by 30 minutes intravenous (IV) infusion for 3 days and cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) 200 mg/m2 daily by continuous infusion for 7 days, as an induction therapy. After complete remission (CR) was observed, they were given two more courses of consolidation therapy which was as Mto 12 mg/m2 daily by 30 minutes IV infusion for one day, and Ara-C 200 mg/m2 daily by 30 minutes IV infusion for 5 days. CR was obtained in 18 of 25 patients (72%). Median remission duration was 294 days and length of survival was 366 days. 11 patients (44%) are still in remission. Myelosupression developed in all patients following induction therapy, but it was not observed after consolidation therapies. Non-hematological side-effects consisted of nausea, vomiting, alopecia, stomatitis, and transient elevation in liver enzymes. Our therapeutic responses are similar to those obtained by others. PMID:14651226

  2. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. B cell depletion in HIV-1 subtype A infected Ugandan adults: relationship to CD4 T cell count, viral load and humoral immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Oballah

    Full Text Available To better understand the nature of B cell dysfunctions in subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype A, a rural cohort of 50 treatment-naïve Ugandan patients chronically infected with HIV-1 subtype A was studied, and the relationship between B cell depletion and HIV disease was assessed. B cell absolute counts were found to be significantly lower in HIV-1+ patients, when compared to community matched negative controls (p<0.0001. HIV-1-infected patients displayed variable functional and binding antibody titers that showed no correlation with viral load or CD4+ T cell count. However, B cell absolute counts were found to correlate inversely with neutralizing antibody (NAb titers against subtype A (p = 0.05 and subtype CRF02_AG (p = 0.02 viruses. A positive correlation was observed between subtype A gp120 binding antibody titers and NAb breadth (p = 0.02 and mean titer against the 10 viruses (p = 0.0002. In addition, HIV-1 subtype A sera showed preferential neutralization of the 5 subtype A or CRF02_AG pseudoviruses, as compared with 5 pseudoviruses from subtypes B, C or D (p<0.001. These data demonstrate that in patients with chronic HIV-1 subtype A infection, significant B cell depletion can be observed, the degree of which does not appear to be associated with a decrease in functional antibodies. These findings also highlight the potential importance of subtype in the specificity of cross-clade neutralization in HIV-1 infection.

  5. High functional P-glycoprotein activity is more often present in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemic cells in adults than in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; Vellenga, E; De Bont, ESJM; van der Kolk, D.M.; Veerman, AJP; Sluiter, WJ; Daenen, SMG; De Vries, EGE; Kamps, WA

    2003-01-01

    There is a distinct difference in prognosis between childhood versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). To define whether multidrug resistance (MDR) genes might contribute to this distinction, the expression and functional activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR associated proteins (MRP) w

  6. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 and Regulatory T Cells in HTLV-1-Associated Neuroinflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Yamano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and associated with multiorgan inflammatory disorders, including HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP and uveitis. HTLV-1-infected T cells have been hypothesized to contribute to the development of these disorders, although the precise mechanisms are not well understood. HTLV-1 primarily infects CD4+ T helper (Th cells that play a central role in adaptive immune responses. Based on their functions, patterns of cytokine secretion, and expression of specific transcription factors and chemokine receptors, Th cells that are differentiated from naïve CD4+ T cells are classified into four major lineages: Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory (Treg cells. The CD4+CD25+CCR4+ T cell population, which consists primarily of suppressive T cell subsets, such as the Treg and Th2 subsets in healthy individuals, is the predominant viral reservoir of HTLV-1 in both ATL and HAM/TSP patients. Interestingly, CD4+CD25+CCR4+ T cells become Th1-like cells in HAM/TSP patients, as evidenced by their overproduction of IFN-γ, suggesting that HTLV-1 may intracellularly induce T cell plasticity from Treg to IFN-γ+ T cells. This review examines the recent research into the association between HTLV-1 and Treg cells that has greatly enhanced understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying immune dysregulation in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

  8. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  10. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Analysis on the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia%浅谈成人急性淋巴细胞白血病治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文娟

    2015-01-01

    this paper summarizes the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia negative pH, pH-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the treatment of relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, targeted therapies and new drugs, analyse the treatment progress of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia,summarizes the main treatment strategies of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia,proposed the treatment prospects of acute lymphoblastic leukemia,in order to provide a reference.%急性淋巴细胞白血病(all)是一组生物学和预后不同的异质性疾病。本文从 pH 阴性急性淋巴细胞白血病的治疗、pH 阳性急性淋巴细胞白血病的治疗、复发急性淋巴细胞白血病的治疗、急性淋巴细胞白血病的靶向治疗及新药这几方面分析了成人急性淋巴细胞白血病治疗进展,总结了成人急性淋巴细胞白血病治疗的主要策略,提出了对急性淋巴细胞白血病治疗的展望,以供参考。

  12. The prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in adult Egyptian patients with precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Minimal residual disease (MRD) studies in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) give highly significant prognostic information superior to other standard criteria as Minimal residual disease; age, gender and total leucocytic count (TLC) in distinguishing patients at high and low risk of Flow cytometry relapse. Objectives: We aimed to determine the value of MRD monitoring by flow cytometry (FCM) in predicting outcome in adult Precursor ALL patients. Patients and methods: Bone marrow (BM) samples were analyzed by 4-color FCM collected at diagnosis and after induction therapy (MRD1) to correlate MRD positivity with disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Study included 57 adult ALL patients (44 males and 13 females) with a median age of 22 years (18-49). DFS showed no significant difference with age, gender and initial TLC (p = 0.838, 0.888 and 0.743, respectively). Cumulative DFS at 2 years was 34% for B-lineage ALL (n: 35) and 57% for T-lineage ALL (n: 18) (p = 0.057). Cumulative DFS at 2 years was M.A. Samra et al. 136 7% for MRD1 positive (high risk, HR) versus 57% for MRD1 negative patients (Low risk, LR) (p < 0.001). Cumulative DFS at 2 years was 29% for HR patients (n: 26) versus 55% for LR (n: 27) according to GMALL classification (p = 0.064). Cumulative OS did not differ according to age, gender and TLC (p = 0.526, 0.594 and 0.513, respectively). Cumulative OS at 2 years was 36% for B ALL (n: 39) versus 77% for TALL (n: 18) (p = 0.016) and was 49% for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) negative patients versus 0% for Ph-positive patients (p < 0.001). Regarding MRD1, OS at 2 years was 18% for MRD1 HR (n:17) versus 65% for MRD1 LR (n: 38) (p < 0.001). OS was 35% for high-risk patients (n: 30) and 62% for low-risk patients (n: 27) classified according to GMALL risk stratification (p = 0.017). Conclusion: MRD by FCM is a strong independent predictor of outcome in terms of DFS and OS and is a powerful informative parameter in

  13. Hormone and thalidomide may be effective in the treatment of adult mediastinal T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma:a case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hongyang; Zhao Chenchen; Gu Kangsheng; Jiao Yang; Hao Jiqing; Sun Guoping

    2013-01-01

    A case of a 53-year-old man with adult T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) in mediastinum who survived more than 33 months in our hospital was reported. LBL was more common in school-age and teenage boys than adults. The reported patient manifested progressive dyspnea. Chest CT scanning showed a huge irregular soft tissue shadow in anterior mediastinum which extended into posterior mediastinum and left chest wall. The tumor was 20 cm×15 cm×15 cm in size in left upper mediastinum and its boundaries with pericardium and left lower lung were unclear. The diagnosis of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. After surgery, he received five chemotherapy courses including Gem, CTX and VCR and biological therapies with IL-2 and IFN-α2b. About 16 months later, he complained of diplopia in the left eye without any evidence of recurrence. Blood examination which showed leukemoid reaction twice returned to normal after dehydration, hormone and thalidomide treatments. Finally, his condition became worse and died of pulmonary infection 33 months after ifrst medical service. In summary, T-LBL is a rare disease which may result in poor prognosis even if the patient has received immediate chemotherapy. Hormone and thalidomide can be applied to treat adult T-LBL.

  14. Hormone and thalidomide may be effective in the treatment of adult mediastinal T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 53-year-old man with adult T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL in mediastinum who survived more than 33 months in our hospital was reported. LBL was more common in schoolage and teenage boys than adults. The reported patient manifested progressive dyspnea. Chest CT scanning showed a huge irregular soft tissue shadow in anterior mediastinum which extended into posterior mediastinum and left chest wall. The tumor was 20 cm×15 cm×15 cm in size in left upper mediastinum and its boundaries with pericardium and left lower lung were unclear. The diagnosis of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. After surgery, he received five chemotherapy courses including Gem, CTX and VCR and biological therapies with IL-2 and IFN-α2b. About 16 months later, he complained of diplopia in the left eye without any evidence of recurrence. Blood examination which showed leukemoid reaction twice returned to normal after dehydration, hormone and thalidomide treatments. Finally, his condition became worse and died of pulmonary infection 33 months after first medical service. In summary, T-LBL is a rare disease which may result in poor prognosis even if the patient has received immediate chemotherapy. Hormone and thalidomide can be applied to treat adult T-LBL.

  15. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  17. Immune Thrombocytopenia in a Child with T Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Tokeji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented with persistent thrombocytopenia during maintenance chemotherapy with mercaptopurine and methotrexate for T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. He was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP after thorough investigations for the relapse of lymphoma and was successfully treated with immunoglobulin and steroids. ITP is known to be associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma but rarely with T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or in children. Diagnosis of ITP with lymphoma is challenging due to the many factors affecting platelet counts, and ITP often complicates the diagnosis or treatment course of lymphoma. The underlying mechanism of ITP with NHL is still unclear. Drug-induced immunomodulation with a reduction of regulatory T cells might have contributed to the development of ITP in our case.

  18. Imaging findings of recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults, with emphasis on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Rosalyn P. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Kaste, Sue C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee, College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all childhood malignancies. Current remission rates approach 80%. Recurrent disease can present in a wide variety of ways. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the detection of disease relapse. Because other disorders can mimic recurrence of leukemia, it is important for the radiologist to judge recurrence from non-recurrence accurately in order to avoid unnecessary testing and emotional stress on the patient and family. (orig.)

  19. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia Leucemia linfoblástica do adulto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Foà

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the most recent advances in the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and on their implications in the clinical management of the disease. Over the years, information obtained through extensive immunophenotyping, karyotyping, molecular genetics, multidrug resistance and, more recently, genomic profiling is progressively contributing to a better understanding of the biology of this complex disease, to the identification of subgroups of patients with different clinical outcomes, to a more precise monitoring of minimal residual disease, to the use of different therapeutic protocols based on prognostic indicators and, finally, to the design of innovative and specific treatment strategies. The next few years will tell us if this biologically-guided approach, which is progressively individualizing the management of adult ALL patients, will ultimately impact on the prognosis of a disease that has stagnated over many decade.Esta revisão focaliza os mais recentes avanços no diagnóstico e prognóstico da leucemia linfoblástica aguda do adulto e suas implicações no manuseio clínico desta doença. Com o passar dos anos, informações obtidas através de extensa pesquisa em imunofenotipagem, citogenética, genética molecular, resistência a múltiplas drogas e, mais recentemente, perfil genômico têm contribuído progressivamente para o melhor entendimento da biologia desta doença complexa, na identificação de sub grupos de pacientes com evolução clínica distintas, no mais preciso monitoramento da doença residual mínima, no uso de diferentes protocolos baseados em indicadores prognósticos e, mais recentemente, também no desenho de tratamentos inovativos e específicos. Os próximos anos nos dirão se abordagens baseadas guiadas biologicamente, que será uma individualização progressiva do manuseio dos pacientes adultos com LLA podem causar um impacto favorável em uma doen

  1. Chemical exposure and leukemia clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper draws attention to the heterogeneous distribution of leukemia in childhood and in adults. The topic of cluster reports and generalized clustering is addressed. These issues are applied to what is known of the risk factor for both adult and childhood leukemia. Finally, the significance of parental occupational exposure and childhood leukemia is covered. (author). 23 refs

  2. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  3. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Genetic Modification of T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Morgan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer technology and its application to human gene therapy greatly expanded in the last decade. One area of investigation that appears particularly promising is the transfer of new genetic material into T cells for the potential treatment of cancer. Herein, we describe several core technologies that now yield high-efficiency gene transfer into primary human T cells. These gene transfer techniques include viral-based gene transfer methods based on modified Retroviridae and non-viral methods such as DNA-based transposons and direct transfer of mRNA by electroporation. Where specific examples are cited, we emphasize the transfer of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs to T cells, which permits engineered T cells to recognize potential tumor antigens.

  6. B and T cell screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct immunofluorescence; E-rosetting; T and B lymphocyte assays; B and T lymphocyte assays ... identifiers are added to distinguish between T and B cells. The E-rosetting test identifies T cells ...

  7. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  9. Cutting Edge: Innate Lymphoid Cells Suppress Homeostatic T Cell Expansion in Neonatal Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Ute; Deiser, Katrin; Finke, Daniela; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    In adult mice, lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) leads to T cell activation, memory differentiation, tissue destruction, and a loss of TCR diversity. Neonatal mice are lymphopenic within the first week of life. This enables some recent thymic emigrants to undergo LIP and convert into long-lived memory T cells. Surprisingly, however, most neonatal T cells do not undergo LIP. We therefore asked whether neonate-specific mechanisms prevent lymphopenia-driven T cell activation. In this study, we show that IL-7R-dependent innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) block LIP of CD8(+) T cells in neonatal but not adult mice. Importantly, CD8(+) T cell responses against a foreign Ag are not inhibited by neonatal ILCs. This ILC-based inhibition of LIP ensures the generation of a diverse naive T cell pool in lymphopenic neonates that is mandatory for the maintenance of T cell homeostasis and immunological self-tolerance later in life.

  10. Immunophenotyping of mature T/NK cell neoplasm presenting as leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gujral

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Mature T/NK cell lymphomas (MTNKL presenting as leukemia are rare and show considerable overlapping of clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic features. AIM: Critical analysis of the morphology and immunophenotypic profile of MTNKL. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 380 consecutive cases of mature lymphoid neoplasm that presented as leukemia and were diagnosed on morphology and immunophenotyping of bone marrow and/or peripheral blood samples. Results : Peripheral blood and bone marrow involvement was seen in all cases. MTNKL constituted 4% (nine cases of all mature lymphoid neoplasms presenting as leukemia. It included four cases of T-large granular leukemia (T-LGL, two of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia small cell variant (T-PLL, two of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL and one of primary cutaneous gamma delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGDTCL. T-LGL revealed CD4-/CD8+ phenotype in three, and CD4+/CD8+ phenotype in one case. CD56 was absent in all the cases of T-LGL. One case of T- PLL small cell variant showed CD4+/CD8- phenotype, while the other revealed CD4-/CD8+ phenotype. Both cases of ATLL showed CD4+/CD8+/CD25+ phenotype. The single case of PCGDTCL showed CD4-/CD8- phenotype pattern. CD3 and CD5 were expressed in all MTNKL. CD7 was absent in three cases of T-LGL. TCRα/β was performed in three cases of T-LGL and was positive in all. TCRα/β was also seen in both the cases of T-PLL small variant. However, TCRα/β was seen in the single case of PCGDTCL. Conclusion : Mature nodal T/NK cell neoplasms are rare and MTNKL presenting as leukemia are even rarer. There is an overlap between the immunophenotypic profiles of different MTNKL subtypes and elaborate T/NK cell panels are required for their evaluation.

  11. Cortisol patterns are associated with T cell activation in HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Patterson

    Full Text Available The level of T cell activation in untreated HIV disease is strongly and independently associated with risk of immunologic and clinical progression. The factors that influence the level of activation, however, are not fully defined. Since endogenous glucocorticoids are important in regulating inflammation, we sought to determine whether less optimal diurnal cortisol patterns are associated with greater T cell activation.We studied 128 HIV-infected adults who were not on treatment and had a CD4(+ T cell count above 250 cells/µl. We assessed T cell activation by CD38 expression using flow cytometry, and diurnal cortisol was assessed with salivary measurements.Lower waking cortisol levels correlated with greater T cell immune activation, measured by CD38 mean fluorescent intensity, on CD4(+ T cells (r = -0.26, p = 0.006. Participants with lower waking cortisol also showed a trend toward greater activation on CD8(+ T cells (r = -0.17, p = 0.08. A greater diurnal decline in cortisol, usually considered a healthy pattern, correlated with less CD4(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.018 and CD8(+ (r = 0.24, p = 0.017 activation.These data suggest that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis contributes to the regulation of T cell activation in HIV. This may represent an important pathway through which psychological states and the HPA axis influence progression of HIV.

  12. Differential activation of proliferation and cytotoxicity in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I Tax-specific CD8 T cells by an altered peptide ligand.

    OpenAIRE

    Höllsberg, P; Weber, W E; Dangond, F; Batra, V; Sette, A.; Hafler, D A

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) gives rise to a neurologic disease known as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Although the pathogenesis of the disease is unknown, the presence of a remarkably high frequency of Tax-specific, cytotoxic CD8 T cells may suggest a role of these cells in the development of HAM/TSP. Antigen-mediated signaling in a CD8 T-cell clone specific for the Tax(11-19) peptide of HTLV-I was studied using analog peptides substitute...

  13. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4+ and CD8+ RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4+ T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4+ T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  14. A randomized trial of washed red blood cell and platelet transfusions in adult acute leukemia [ISRCTN76536440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Jacob M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet transfusion is universally employed in acute leukemia. Platelet concentrate supernatants contain high concentrations of biologic mediators that might impair immunity. We investigated whether washed platelet and red cell transfusions could improve clinical outcomes in adult patients with acute leukemia. Methods A pilot randomized trial of washed, leukoreduced ABO identical transfusions versus leukoreduced ABO identical transfusions was conducted in 43 adult patients with acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia during 1991–94. Primary endpoints to be evaluated were platelet transfusion refractoriness, infectious and bleeding complications and overall survival. Results There were no significant differences in infectious or major bleeding complications and only one patient required HLA matched platelet transfusions. Minor bleeding was more frequent in the washed, leukoreduced arm of the study. Confirmed transfusion reactions were more frequent in the leukoreduced arm of the study. Overall survival was superior in the washed arm of the study (40% versus 22% at 5 years, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.36. A planned subset analysis of those ≤50 years of age found that those in the washed, leukoreduced arm (n = 12 had a 75% survival at five years compared with 30% in the leukoreduced arm (n = 10 (p = 0.037 Conclusion This study provides the first evidence concerning the safety and efficacy of washed platelets, and also raises the possibility of improved survival. We speculate that transfusion of stored red cell and platelet supernatant may compromise treatment, particularly in younger patients with curable disease. Larger trials will be needed to assess this hypothesis.

  15. Total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide plus antithymocyte globulin regimen is well tolerated and promotes stable engraftment as a preparative regimen before T cell-replete haploidentical transplantation for acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haixia; Xu, Lanping; Liu, Daihong; Liu, Kaiyan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yuhong; Han, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jingzhi; Wang, Fengrong; Huang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-01

    We compared total body irradiation (TBI, 700 cGy)/cyclophosphamide (Cy, 3.6 g/m(2))/simustine (250 mg/m(2)) plus antithymocyte globulin (ATG) (TBI/Cy plus ATG) with cytarabine (8 g/m(2))/i.v. busulfan (Bu, 9.6 mg/kg)/Cy (3.6 g/m(2))/simustine (250 mg/m(2)) plus ATG (modified Bu/Cy plus ATG) as preparative therapy in T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) for acute leukemia. From August 2009 to August 2013, 38 consecutive patients using TBI/Cy plus ATG regimen for T cell-replete haplo-HSCT (TBI group) at our center were eligible, which contained 28 high-risk and 10 standard-risk patients. A nested case-control study was designed. Seventy-seven patients using modified Bu/Cy plus ATG regimen (Bu group) were randomly selected in a 1 to 3:1 ratio matching for age, disease and status, year of HSCT (±2 years), and length of follow-up. Only 1 graft failure occurred in the TBI group. The incidence and time of neutrophil and platelet engraftment were comparable between the 2 groups. Severe grades III/IV graft-versus-host disease was observed in 13.4% of Bu group and only 2.6% of TBI group (P = .083). More toxicity of the liver (37.7% versus 10.5%; P = .002) and more hemorrhagic cystitis occurred in the Bu group (49.3% versus 23.7%, P = .008). Diarrhea was more common in the TBI group (44.7% versus 22.1%; P = .031). No significant differences were found in the 2-year incidences of relapse (26.5% for TBI group versus 32.3% for Bu group, P = .742), 1-year transplant-related mortality (12.6% versus 16.2%, P = .862), 2-year overall survival (60.2% versus 57.0%, P = .937), and 2-year incidence of disease-free survival (57.9% versus 56.6%, P = .845) between the 2 groups. We conclude that the TBI/Cy plus ATG regimen seems to be feasible in T cell-replete haplo-HSCT, which promotes stable engraftment and a lower incidence of liver toxicity and hemorrhagic cystitis. However, longer follow-up is necessary to

  16. Lineage switch from acute myeloid leukemia to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: report of an adult case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounici, A; Cony-Makhoul, P; Dubus, P; Lacombe, F; Merlio, J P; Reiffers, J

    2000-12-01

    Lineage switch from AML to ALL is an extremely rare phenomenon, and we report the case of an adult diagnosed with AML at 46 years of age who relapsed with ALL. At initial diagnosis, blast cell morphology and immunophenotyping were consistent with the diagnosis of M4-AML. Complete remission was achieved, and the patient underwent autologous BMT. At relapse, six months after ABMT, blast cells were different from those seen at initial diagnosis, for morphology (L2-ALL), cytochemistry, and immunophenotyping. The karyotype was normal at both diagnosis and relapse. No evidence of bcr-abl fusion genes was found by RT-PCR. Monoclonal IgH and TCR gamma gene rearrangement were evidenced by PCR analysis at relapse but not on blast cells at AML diagnosis.

  17. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    OpenAIRE

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  18. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with near haploidy, hyperdiploidy and Ph positive lines: a rare entity with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Sidharthan K; Prakash, Purushothaman N; Hariharan, Sreedharan; Vinod, Gopalakrishnan; Preethi, Ramadas T; Geetha, Narayanan; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2006-03-01

    Chromosomal ploidies provide a wealth of information with respect to the prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognosis is favourable in hyperdiploidy (>50 ALL), whereas pseudodiploidy and hypodiploidy have an overall poor clinical outcome. Near haploid ALL with less than 30 chromosomes in the leukemic blasts has been reported. This is an extremely rare malignancy with an adverse clinical course compared to other lymphoblastic leukemias. We present a case of near haploid ALL in an adult male with a diagnosis of pre-B-cell ALL. The presenting features and relevance to the progression of disease are discussed with respect to the near haploid lines. Occurrence in an adult male and the presence of additional clones with structural abnormalities are both unique to the present study. Caution must be exercised when the hyperdiploid metaphases consists exclusively of tetrasomic chromosomes and morphological examination reveals definite dual populations of large and small lymphoblasts. Despite current developments in ALL therapy, near haploid ALL continues to be a disease with an adverse clinical outcome and newer therapeutic strategies are warranted for better management of the disease. PMID:16396782

  19. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  20. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver [Charite University Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Martus, Peter [University Tuebingen, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Arnold, Renate [Charite University Medicine, Campus CVK, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  1. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  2. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  3. An adult case of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe,Akiharu

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia, who developed myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system during acute myeloblastic transformation of the disease, was treated with methotrexate intrathecally. The therapy produced prompt clinical response and complete reversal of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings. However, the patient expired 10 months following the acute blastic crisis.

  4. The role of ABC-transporters in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, Sabine Louise Anne

    2005-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation and maturation arest of lymphoid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, resulting in an excesso f malignant cells. The disease has a peak incidence between the age of 2-5 years, and a low and steady rise from the

  5. The role of ABC-transporters in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Plasschaert, Sabine Louise Anne

    2005-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation and maturation arest of lymphoid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, resulting in an excesso f malignant cells. The disease has a peak incidence between the age of 2-5 years, and a low and steady rise from the age of 40 ... Zie: Summary

  6. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  7. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the exp

  8. Memory CD4+ T cells do not induce graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Britt E; McNiff, Jennifer; Yan, Jun; Doyle, Hester; Mamula, Mark; Shlomchik, Mark J; Shlomchik, Warren D

    2003-07-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). Donor T cells that accompany stem cell grafts cause GVHD by attacking recipient tissues; therefore, all patients receive GVHD prophylaxis by depletion of T cells from the allograft or through immunosuppressant drugs. In addition to providing a graft-versus-leukemia effect, donor T cells are critical for reconstituting T cell-mediated immunity. Ideally, immunity to infectious agents would be transferred from donor to host without GVHD. Most donors have been exposed to common pathogens and have an increased precursor frequency of memory T cells against pathogenic antigens. We therefore asked whether memory CD62L-CD44+ CD4+ T cells would induce less GVHD than unfractionated or naive CD4+ T cells. Strikingly, we found that memory CD4 cells induced neither clinical nor histologic GVHD. This effect was not due to the increased number of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells found in the CD62L-CD44+ fraction because memory T cells depletion of these cells did not cause GVHD. Memory CD4 cells engrafted and responded to antigen both in vivo and in vitro. If these murine results are applicable to human alloSCT, selective administration of memory T cells could greatly improve post-transplant immune reconstitution.

  9. Characteristics of T-cell Lineage Immunophenotype in 95 Patients with Acute Lymphoid Leukemia%95例初治急性T淋巴细胞白血病患者免疫表型特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁婷婷; 刘艳荣; 常艳; 郝乐; 王亚哲; 江滨; 黄晓军

    2011-01-01

    本研究分析我国急性T淋巴细胞白血病(T-ALL)的免疫表型特点及其临床意义.利用4色多参数流式细胞术检测95例T-ALL患者免疫表型,回顾性分析患者的临床及实验室指标.结果表明:①T-ALL患者以年轻男性(<30岁)为主,发病时常伴有外周血高WBC和髓外浸润;发病时年龄<30岁的患者CR1率明显高于≥30岁的患者(p =0.049);②据wHO(2008)造血和淋巴组织肿瘤分类标准,本组患者Pro-T-ALL占31.0%,Pre-T-ALL占35.6%,皮质T-ALl占26.4%,髓质T-ALL占6.9%;CD34在Pre-T-ALL中的表达率显著低于Pro-T-ALL(p=0.001);Pre-T-ALL的CRI率显著高于Pro-T-ALL(p =0.001);不成熟T-ALL(包括Pro-T-ALL和Pre-T-ALL)的CRI率显著低于成熟T-ALL(皮质-T-AL和髓质T-ALL) (p=0.029);③髓系抗原CD13、CD33在与T-ALL亚型及治疗效果的关系方面存在差异.66.7%的CD13+患者属于Pre-T-ALL,而大多数CD33+患者归为Pro-T-ALL;CD13+与CD13 -患者的CR1率差别无统计学意义,而CD33+患者的CR1率显著低于CD33-组(p=0.00l);④以≥20%为阳性界线,CD117在本组T-ALL的表达率高达26.7%,且阳性患者集中分布(95.0%)于Pro-T-ALL和Pre-T-ALL中;⑤CD34-患者的CD117表达较均一,73.2%患者CD117表达水平<l0%;而CD34+组中CD117的表达不一,CD117表达水平<10%、10% - 20%、>20%的患者分别占44.2%、17.3%、38.5%,与CD34-组相比,CD117表达水平<10%、>20%的患者在CD34+组中的比例均较高,两组差别显著(P值分别为0.006和0.019).结论:T-ALL的抗原表达情况与疾病的免疫分型、亚型判断以及临床治疗效果密切相关,利用流式细胞术有助于发现在T-ALL临床及生物学研究方面有潜在价值的免疫标记.%The objective of this study was to investigate the immunophenotye of T-lineage acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL) and to find valuable immunologic markers in T-ALL diagnosis and therapy. Four-color multiparametric flow cytometry

  10. The Effect of Arthrospira platensis Capsules on CD4 T-Cells and Antioxidative Capacity in a Randomized Pilot Study of Adult Women Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Not under HAART in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Stéphane Winter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplements are often used to improve the nutritional status of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV. Arthrospira platensis (Asp, also known as Spirulina, is a cyanobacterium rich in proteins and micronutrients. Cell and animal trials described immune-modulating, antiretroviral and antioxidant activities. This pilot study describes the effects of the supplementation of 5 g/day of Asp on a pre-highly-active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART, HIV-infected, adult female population. It was conducted as a three-month randomized controlled trial (RCT that compared a cup supplementation of five grams/day of Asp with a placebo of equal protein content and energy. The study included 73 HIV-infected women. The immediate outcome variables were CD4 T-cells, viral load and immune activation by CD8 T-cells expressing CD38. The antioxidant status was assessed by way of the total antioxidant capacity of the serum (TAOS. The renal function was documented by way of creatinine, urea and the calculated glomerular filtration rate. Statistical analyses were carried out with non-parametric tests, and the effect size of each interaction was calculated. No differences in the immunological and virological markers between the Asp and the placebo group could be observed. In the placebo group, 21 of 30 patients (70% developed concomitant events, while in the Asp group, only 12 of 28 patients (43% did. Both groups registered a significant weight increase; 0.5 kg (p < 0.05 in the Asp group and 0.65 kg (p < 0.05 in the placebo group. The antioxidant capacity increase of 56 (1–98 µM for Asp was significantly different from the decrease observed in the placebo group (p < 0.001. A slight increase in the creatinine level of 0.1 g/dL (p < 0.001 was observed in the Asp group, and no effect was observed in the urea levels. The improvement of the antioxidant capacity under Asp, shown for the first time on PLHIV, could become a focus for future research on the nutritional and

  11. Toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008-comparing adults and children with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cure rates improve when adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated according to pediatric protocols. Assumed risks of toxicities and associated delays in treatment have played a role in setting upper age limits. The aim of this study was to examine...

  12. Myeloablative allogeneic versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission: A prospective sibling donor versus no-donor comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); B. van der Holt (Bronno); G.E.G. Verhoef (Gregor); M.B. van 't Veer (Mars); M.H.J. van Oers (Marinus); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); J. Maertens (Johan); M. van Marwijk Kooy (Marinus); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); P.W. Wijermans (Pierre); D.H. Biesma (Douwe); S. Wittebol (Shulamit); P.J. Voogt (Paul); J.W. Baars (Joke); P. Zachée (Pierre); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); B. Löwenberg (Bob); A.W. Dekker (Adriaan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhile commonly accepted in poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is still disputed in adult patients with standard-risk ALL. We evaluated outcome of patients with ALL in first complete remission (CR1), acco

  13. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  14. Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  15. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  18. Rosacea-Like Leukemia Cutis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Manzano, Mariana; Ramírez García, Lilliana; Sánchez Pont, Julio E; Velázquez Mañana, Ana I; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2016-08-01

    Leukemia cutis describes the infiltration and dissemination of neoplastic leukemic cells into the epidermis, dermis, or subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Depending on the type of leukemia, a wide range of clinical and histopathological findings may be encountered. This report describes a patient with a rosacea-like eruption as a unique clinical presentation of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. PMID:27043335

  19. Classification of distinct subtypes of peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified, identified by chemokine and chemokine receptor expression: Analysis of prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Koichi; Karube, Kennosuke; Kawano, Riko; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Kikuchii, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    WHO classification for malignant lymphoma was recently proposed. However, PTCL is heterogeneous. Chemokines and its receptors are closely associated with the T-cell subtypes. To clarify the T-cell subtype in PTCL, we conducted DNA chips of chemokine, its receptor (R) and cytokines. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILD, n=4), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, n=4), adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL, n=7), NK-cell lymphoma (NKL, n=2) and PTCL, unspecified (PTCL-U, n=6) were analyzed using DNA chips. In addition, immunological stainings were performed in 280 cases. In DNA chip, AILD, ALCL, NKL and ATLL showed a tendency for respective clusters, otherwise, PTCL-U clustered with AILD, ALCL and ATLL. From the gene expression profiling, CCR4, CCR3, MIG, CXCR3 and BLC were selected for immunohistochemistry. ATLL (n=48) expressed CCR4. ALCL (n=26) expressed CCR3, NKL (n=20) expressed MIG, and AILD (n=29) expressed CXCR3 and/or BLC. From the expression patterns, PTCL-U (n=134) were classified into three groups; CCR4 type (CCR4(+), n=42), CCR3 type (CCR3(+), n=31) and CXCR3 type (CXCR3(+) BLC(+/-), n=54). The prognosis was poor for ATLL, intermediate for AILD and favorable for ALCL (P=0.0014). Among PTCL-U, CCR4 type, CXCR3 type and CCR3 type had prognoses equivalent to ATLL, AILD and ALCL, respectively (P<0.0001).

  20. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards. PMID:25675873

  2. Trends in management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Influence of insurance based healthcare and treatment compliance on the outcome of adolescents and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Sankar Arigela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we attempted to analyze the impact of insurance based health care system and treatment compliance on the outcome of adolescent and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent treatment for ALL during the period 2003-2011 were enrolled into this retrospective study. Patients on supportive or palliative care only and patients with age <10 years were excluded. The hospital records and tumor registry records were studied. Patients were stratified into two groups, Group A (prior to the introduction of state health insurance [SHI], 2003-2007 and Group B (after the introduction of SHI, 2008-2011. Overall survival (OS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 420 patients with suspected or confirmed ALL visited our center during the study period and 179 patients (87 in Group A and 92 in Group B were considered for inclusion. The median age in years (range was 18 (10-57 and 18 (10-58 respectively in Groups A and B with males more than females. Median OS (95% CI was 9 (6.7-11.2 and 12 (7.3-16.7 months in the Groups A and B respectively (P = 0.265. Poor treatment compliance in both groups was high (36% in Group A and 41% in Group B, [P = 0.107] with lower default rates in Group B (P = 0.019. Patients with good compliance in the total study population and the individual study groups had significantly better OS. Conclusions: Insurance based health care has improved outcomes in the present study but not compliance to treatment. Significantly better OS was observed in patients with good compliance.

  3. MicroRNA-9 promotes proliferation of leukemia cells in adult CD34-positive acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype by downregulation of Hes1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chen; You, M James; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Guoguang; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic malignancies sustained by leukemic stem cells (LSCs) that can resist treatment. Previously, we found that low expression of Hes1 was a poor prognostic factor for AML. However, the activation status of Hes1 and its regulation in LSCs and leukemic progenitors (LPs) as well as normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in Hes1-low AML patients have not been elucidated. In this study, the expression of Hes1 in LSCs and LPs was analyzed in adult CD34(+) Hes1-low AML with normal karyotype and the upstream microRNA (miRNA) regulators were screened. Our results showed that the level of either Hes1 or p21 was lower in LSCs or LPs than in HSCs whereas the level of miR-9 was highest in LPs and lowest in HSCs. An inverse correlation was observed in the expression of Hes1 and miR-9. Furthermore, we validated miR-9 as one of the regulators of Hes1 by reporter gene analysis. Knockdown of miR-9 by lentivirus infection suppressed the proliferation of AML cells by the induction of G0 arrest and apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of miR-9 resulted in decreased circulating leukemic cell counts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, attenuated splenomegaly, and prolonged survival in a xenotransplant mouse model. Our results indicate that the miR-9 plays an important role in supporting AML cell growth and survival by downregulation of Hes1 and that miR-9 has potential as a therapeutic target for treating AML. PMID:26678889

  4. Central review of cytogenetics is necessary for cooperative group correlative and clinical studies of adult acute leukemia: The Cancer and Leukemia Group B experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mrózek, Krzysztof; Carroll, Andrew J.; Maharry, Kati; Rao, Kathleen W.; Patil, Shivanand R.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Watson, Michael S.; Arthur, Diane C.; Tantravahi, Ramana; Heerema, Nyla A.; Koduru, Prasad R. K.; Block, AnneMarie W; Qumsiyeh, Mazin B.; Edwards, Colin G.; Sterling, Lisa J.

    2008-01-01

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B has performed central review of karyotypes submitted by institutional cytogenetics laboratories from patients with acute myeloid (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia since 1986. We assessed the role of central karyotype review in maintaining accurate, high quality cytogenetic data for clinical and translational studies using two criteria: the proportion of karyotypes rejected (i.e. inadequate), and, among accepted (i.e. adequate) cases, the proportion o...

  5. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. A High-avidity WT1-reactive T-Cell Receptor Mediates Recognition of Peptide and Processed Antigen but not Naturally Occurring WT1-positive Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaigirdar, Adnan; Rosenberg, Steven A; Parkhurst, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) is an attractive target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in many hematologic malignancies and solid tumors but has limited, low-level expression in normal adult tissues. Multiple HLA class I and class II restricted epitopes have been identified in WT1, and multiple investigators are pursuing the treatment of cancer patients with WT1-based vaccines and adoptively transferred WT1-reactive T cells. Here we isolated an HLA-A*0201-restricted WT1-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) by stimulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors with the peptide WT1:126-134 in vitro. This TCR mediated peptide recognition down to a concentration of ∼0.1 ng/mL when pulsed onto T2 cells as well as recognition of HLA-A*0201 target cells transfected with full-length WT1 cDNA. However, it did not mediate consistent recognition of many HLA-A*0201 tumor cell lines or freshly isolated leukemia cells that endogeneously expressed WT1. We dissected this pattern of recognition further and observed that WT1:126-134 was more efficiently processed by immunoproteasomes compared with standard proteasomes. However, pretreatment of WT1 tumor cell lines with interferon gamma did not appreciably enhance recognition by our TCR. In addition, we highly overexpressed WT1 in several leukemia cell lines by electroporation with full-length WT1 cDNA. Some of these lines were still not recognized by our TCR suggesting possible antigen processing defects in some leukemias. These results suggest WT1:126-134 may not be a suitable target for T-cell based tumor immunotherapies. PMID:26938944

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: potential benefit of medium-dose etoposide conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Masahiro; Shigematsu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with chemotherapy or autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are unsatisfactory. Therefore, allogeneic (allo) HSCT has been applied to those patients in first complete remission (CR1), and has shown a long-term survival rate of approximately 50 %. In terms of myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen, higher dose of cyclophosphamide (CY) and total body irradiation (TBI) (the standard CY + TBI) has been generally applied to allo HSCT. Other MAC regimens such as busulfan-based or etoposide-based regimens have also been used. Among those, medium-dose etoposide (ETP) in addition to the standard CY + TBI conditioning regimen appears to be promising for allo HSCT in adult ALL when transplanted in ALL patients aged under 50 years in CR1 and also in CR2, showing an excellent outcome without increasing relapse or transplant-related mortality (TRM) rates. By contrast, reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have also been applied to adult ALL patients and favorable outcomes have been obtained; however, relapse and TRM rates remain high. Therefore, an allo HSCT conditioning regimen which deserves further study for adult ALL patients aged under 50 years in CR1 and CR2 appears to be medium-dose ETP + CY + TBI and RIC is suitable for patients aged over 50 years or for younger patients with comorbid conditions. On the contrary, new therapeutic strategies for adult ALL patients are increasingly utilized with better outcomes; namely, various tyrosine kinase inhibitors for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive ALL, human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical HSCT, and pediatric-inspired regimens for Ph-negative ALL. Therefore, the optimal treatment modality should be selected considering patient's age, Ph-positivity, donor availability, risk classification, efficacy, and safety. PMID:26322249

  9. A Good Manufacturing Practice procedure to engineer donor virus-specific T cells into potent anti-leukemic effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loenen, Marleen M; de Boer, Renate; van Liempt, Ellis; Meij, Pauline; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M

    2014-04-01

    A sequential, two-step procedure in which T-cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation is followed by treatment with donor lymphocyte infusion at 6 months can significantly reduce the risk and severity of graft-versus-host disease, with postponed induction of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, patients with high-risk leukemia have a substantial risk of relapse early after transplantation, at a time when administration of donor lymphocytes has a high likelihood of resulting in graft-versus-host disease, disturbing a favorable balance between the graft-versus-leukemia effect and graft-versus-host disease. New therapeutic modalities are, therefore, required to allow early administration of T cells capable of exerting a graft-versus-leukemia effect without causing graft-versus-host disease. Here we describe the isolation of virus-specific T cells using Streptamer-based isolation technology and subsequent transfer of the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1-specific T-cell receptor using retroviral vectors. Isolation of virus-specific T cells and subsequent transduction with HA-1-T-cell receptor resulted in rapid in vitro generation of highly pure, dual-specific T cells with potent anti-leukemic reactivity. Due to the short production procedure of only 10-14 days and the defined specificity of the T cells, administration of virus-specific T cells transduced with the HA-1-T-cell receptor as early as 8 weeks after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is feasible. (This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu as EudraCT number 2010-024625-20).

  10. Analysis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus in CD25+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Weiss, Lawrence M; Harrington, William J; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-07-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is recognized as 2 distinct diseases: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)+ ALCL and ALK- ALCL. ALK+ ALCL occurs in younger patients and has a better prognosis. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), which frequently expresses CD25. CD25 is significantly expressed in childhood ALCL. In Brazil, HTLV-1 infection is endemic, and vertical transmission is responsible for spread to children. Of HTLV-1 carriers, 90% or more remain asymptomatic. Some cases of adult HTLV-1-related lymphomas have characteristics of ALCL but are considered CD30+ ATLL subtypes. No similar cases have been described in children. We analyzed 33 cases of pediatric ALCL, CD25+ and CD25-, for proviral HTLV-1 DNA. All cases corresponded to the common histologic ALCL type and were CD30+ in virtually all neoplastic cells. ALK expression was observed in 31 (94%) of 33 cases; CD25 was positive in 27 (82%), including 1 ALK- ALCL case. There was a strong positive correlation between ALK and CD25 expression. None of the cases showed proviral HTLV-1 DNA. ALCL in children has no relationship with HTLV-1; the frequent CD25 expression must be explained by a mechanism different from that in ATLL.

  11. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    OpenAIRE

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, ...

  12. STAT3-mediated constitutive expression of SOCS-3 in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K;

    2001-01-01

    ) obtained from affected skin from a patient with mycosis fungoides (MF) and from peripheral blood from a patient with Sezary syndrome (SS). In contrast, constitutive SOCS-3 expression is not found in the leukemic Jurkat T-cell line, the MOLT-4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, and the monocytic...

  13. Markedly improved outcomes and acceptable toxicity in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with a pediatric protocol: a phase II study by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superiority of the pediatric protocol for adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has already been demonstrated, however, its efficacy in young adults remains unclear. The ALL202-U protocol was conducted to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a pediatric protocol in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with BCR–ABL-negative ALL. Patients aged 15–24 years (n=139) were treated with the same protocol used for pediatric B-ALL. The primary objective of this study was to assess the disease-free survival (DFS) rate and its secondary aims were to assess toxicity, the complete remission (CR) rate and the overall survival (OS) rate. The CR rate was 94%. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 67% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58–75%) and 73% (95% CI 64–80%), respectively. Severe adverse events were observed at a frequency that was similar to or lower than that in children treated with the same protocol. Only insufficient maintenance therapy significantly worsened the DFS (hazard ratio 5.60, P<0.001). These results indicate that this protocol may be a feasible and highly effective treatment for AYA with BCR–ABL-negative ALL

  14. Induction of differentiation and apoptosis- a possible strategy in the treatment of adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Huang, Ts

    2000-01-01

    A differentiation block with accumulation of immature myeloid cells characterizes acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, native AML cells often show some morphological signs of differentiation that allow a classification into different subsets, and further differentiation may be induced by exposure to various soluble mediators, e.g., all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and several cytokines. Combination therapy with ATRA and chemotherapy should now be regarded as the standard treatment for the acute promyelocytic leukemia variant of AML. Several agents can induce leukemic cell differentiation for other AML subtypes, although these effects differ between patients. Differentiation may then be associated with induction of apoptosis, and differentiation-inducing therapy may therefore become useful in combination with intensive chemotherapy to increase the susceptibility of AML blasts to drug-induced apoptosis. However, it should be emphasized that differentiation and apoptosis can occur as separate events with different regulation in AML cells, and future studies in AML should therefore focus on: A) the identification of new agents with more predictable effects on differentiation and apoptosis; B) the use of clinical and laboratory parameters to define new subsets of AML patients in which differentiation/apoptosis induction has a predictable and beneficial effect, and C) further characterization of how AML blast sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis is modulated by differentiation induction.

  15. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette;

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58......) in addition to use of TCR negative T cell lines. The expression of IL2R-alpha -beta and -gamma chains of activated T cells was analysed by flow cytometry after incubation of T cells alone or with RPE cells. Human RPE cells were found to inhibit the proliferation of activated T cells by a cell contact...

  16. Influence of detection of pretreatment cytogenetic abnormalities on first complete remission and survival in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Georgieva Velizarova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults focuses on the initial assessment of the prognostic relevant cytogenetic features as well as a response-guided therapy based on molecular data. We examined the importance of molecular-cytogenetic abnormalities for complete remission (CR rates and the overall survival (OS in adult ALLs.Materials and Methods: Conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed on bone marrow cells from 33 newly-diagnosed ALL adults. Two karyotype categories [standard- risk group- normal karyotype, hyperdiplody and other structural aberrations, and high-risk group-t(11q23/MLL, t(9;22/bcr-abl, t(1;19, t(8;14, C-MYC and complex karyotype] and the biologically and clinically relevant ALL ploidy subgroups were prospectively defined.Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 52% of the cases with a high rate of poor-risk translocations - t(9;22, t(8q24, t(11q23, t(1;19. The total CR rate was 67% and the median time for achievement 2.33 months. Male sex, an age below 35 years and the absence of high risk translocations might have contributed to the high CR rates. Female patients, hyperdiplody, low white blood cells (WBC, and random cytogenetic aberrations had the longest OS. OS, 3- and 5-years survival periods were significantly shorter for poor-risk than standard risk group (p=.015, p=.001 and p=.005, respectively.Conclusion: This study emphasizes the lack of influence of cytogenetic aberrations on the CR and the time to achieve CR. However, our observations show that these aberrations are an independent prognostic factor in adult ALL - they allow predicting therapy resistance and the OS time after intensetreatment.

  17. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Analysis of the Clonal Expansion of TCR VβT Cells in Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYangqiu; YANGLijian; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clonal expansion of T cell receptor(TCR)Vβ subfamily T cells which were considered as GVL effective cells after donor lymphocytes infusion(DLI)in patients with relapse chronic myelogenous leukemia(CML)after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation(allo-BMT).Methods The CDR3 of TCR Vβ24 subfamily genes were amplified in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells at different time points before and after DLI,which were drawn from 2 cases of relapse CML treated by allo-BMT,to observe the usage of TCR Vβrepertoire.The PCR products were further labeled with fluorescent and analyzed by genescan technique for identification of the CDR3 size,to evaluate the clonality of the detectable TCR VβT cells.Results Only 4-11 VβT subfamily T cells could be identified in CML cases before DLI,and 12-21 Vβ subfamily T cells could be deected in samples from CML which display remission after DLI.Genescan analysis showed that new clonal expansion TCR Vβ subfamily T cells could be found in samples after DLI.Conclusion The skew distribution of TCR Vβ subfamily T cells could be found on patients with relapse CML after allo-BMT,and this skewing pattern may stage to stage to normal pattern during the complete remission.The GVL effect may exert through some clonal expansion TCR Vβ subfamily T cells during the treatment of DLI in relapse CML.

  19. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mut

  20. Myeloablative allogeneic versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission: A prospective sibling donor versus no-donor comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Jan; Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor; Veer, Mars; Oers, Marinus; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Sonneveld, Pieter; Maertens, Johan; Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Schaafsma, Martijn; Wijermans, Pierre; Biesma, Douwe; Wittebol, Shulamit; Voogt, Paul; Baars, Joke

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhile commonly accepted in poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is still disputed in adult patients with standard-risk ALL. We evaluated outcome of patients with ALL in first complete remission (CR1), according to a sibling donor versus no-donor comparison. Eligible patients (433) were entered in 2 consecutive, prospective studies, of whom 288 (67%) were younger than 55 years, in CR1, and eligible t...

  1. Unrelated marrow transplantation for adult patients with poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia: strong graft-versus-leukemia effect and risk factors determining outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); M. Carston; C. Kollman; R. King (Roberta); A.W. Dekker (Adriaan); C. Anasetti; B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBetween 1988 and 1999, 127 patients with poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) received a matched unrelated donor transplant using marrow procured by National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) collection centers and sent out to 46 transplant centers worldwi

  2. Unrelated marrow transplantation for adult patients with poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia : strong graft-versus-leukemia effect and risk factors determining outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, JJ; Carston, M; Kollman, C; King, R; Dekker, AW; Lowenberg, B; Anasetti, C

    2001-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1999, 127 patients with poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) received a matched unrelated donor transplant using marrow procured by National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) collection centers and sent out to 46 transplant centers worldwide. Poor risk was defined by the presence

  3. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina Søndergård; Nielsen, Anne Staal;

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent...

  4. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    -specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  5. Chimeric antigen receptors T cells in treatment of a relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relapse after allogenetic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case report and review of literature review%嵌合抗原受体T细胞治疗儿童急性B淋巴细胞白血病异基因造血干细胞移植后复发一例报告并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左英熹; 王静波; 陆爱东; 贾月萍; 吴珺; 董陆佳; 张隆基; 张乐萍

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨嵌合抗原受体(CAR)T细胞技术治疗儿童急性B淋巴细胞白nL病(B-ALL)的临床疗效和不良反应.方法 报道1例CAR-T细胞治疗儿童B-ALL异基因造血干细胞移植(allo-HSCT)后复发患者,并复习相关文献.结果 1例伴TEL-AML1融合基因阳性11岁B-ALL患儿,规律化疗后早期复发,于第2次完全缓解(CR)期给予allo-HSCT.治疗后骨髓微小残留病(MRD)反复阳性,化疗以及供者淋巴细胞输注(DLI)治疗无明显疗效,故给予供者来源的抗CD19的CAR-T细胞输注.该患儿经输注CAR-T细胞1×106/kg后骨髓MRD转阴,后又反复输注3次CAR-T细胞[(0.83~1.65)×106/kg],患儿持续无病生存达10个月,随后输注CAR-T细胞2次,监测外周血TEL-AML1融合基因拷贝持续升高,最终骨髓复发,因脑出血死亡.输注CAR-T细胞的主要不良反应为细胞因子释放综合征.结论 抗CD19的CAR-T细胞技术治疗复发B-ALL安全有效,为复发及难治性B-ALL患儿提供了新的治疗手段.%Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptors T cells (CAR-T) in childhood acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL).Methods A relapsed B-ALL child after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) was treated with CAR-T,and the related literatures were reviewed.Result An l 1-year-old girl with TEL-AML1 fusion gene positive BALL who suffered a bone marrow relapse 28 months after remission from conventional chemotherapy.During the second remission,the patient received haploidentical allo-HSCT.She relapsed with detectable TEL-AML1 fusion gene even after chemotherapy and donor leukocyte infusions.She received an experimental donor-derived fourth generation CD19 CAR-T therapy.After infusion of 1 × 106/kg CAR-T cells,she experienced only mild or moderate cytokine-release syndrome and the minimal residual disease turned negative.Then three maintenance of CAR-T cell infusions [(0.83-1.65) × 106/kg] was administered,and the disease

  6. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Regulatory T cells as immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin David Singer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress exuberant immune system activation and promote immunologic tolerance. Because Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, the biomedical community has developed intense interest in using Tregs for immunotherapy. Conditions that require clinical tolerance to improve outcomes—autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation—may benefit from Treg immunotherapy. Investigators have designed ex vivo strategies to isolate, preserve, expand, and infuse Tregs. Protocols to manipulate Treg populations in vivo have also been considered. Barriers to clinically feasible Treg immunotherapy include Treg stability, off-cell effects, and demonstration of cell preparation purity and potency. Clinical trials involving Treg adoptive transfer to treat graft versus host disease preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Treg immunotherapy in humans. Future work will need to confirm the safety of Treg immunotherapy and establish the efficacy of specific Treg subsets for the treatment of immune-mediated disease.

  8. Molecular prognostic markers for adult acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Tara K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogenous disorder that results from a block in the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells along with uncontrolled proliferation. In approximately 60% of cases, specific recurrent chromosomal aberrations can be identified by modern cytogenetic techniques. This cytogenetic information is the single most important tool to classify patients at their initial diagnosis into three prognostic categories: favorable, intermediate, and poor risk. Currently, favorable risk AML patients are usually treated with contemporary chemotherapy while poor risk AML patients receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation if suitable stem cell donors exist. The largest subgroup of AML patients (~40% have no identifiable cytogenetic abnormalities and are classified as intermediate risk. The optimal therapeutic strategies for these patients are still largely unclear. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that it is possible to identify a subgroup of poorer risk patients among those with normal cytogenic AML (NC-AML. Molecular risk stratification for NC-AML patients may be possible due to mutations of NPM1, FLT3, MLL, and CEBPα as well as alterations in expression levels of BAALC, MN1, ERG, and AF1q. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm if poorer risk NC-AML patients have improved clinical outcomes after more aggressive therapy.

  9. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation are associated with HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie R Cockerham

    Full Text Available The association between the host immune environment and the size of the HIV reservoir during effective antiretroviral therapy is not clear. Progress has also been limited by the lack of a well-accepted assay for quantifying HIV during therapy. We examined the association between multiple measurements of HIV and T cell activation (as defined by markers including CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5 and PD-1 in 30 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected adults. We found a consistent association between the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing HLA-DR and the frequency of resting CD4+ T cells containing HIV DNA. This study highlights the need to further examine this relationship and to better characterize the biology of markers commonly used in HIV studies. These results may also have implications for reactivation strategies.

  10. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  11. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Increasing intensity of therapies assigned at diagnosis does not improve survival of adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, U; Berdel, W E; Gale, R P; Haferlach, C; Schnittger, S; Müller-Tidow, C; Braess, J; Spiekermann, K; Staib, P; Beelen, D; Serve, H; Schliemann, C; Stelljes, M; Balleisen, L; Maschmeyer, G; Grüneisen, A; Eimermacher, H; Giagounidis, A; Rasche, H; Hehlmann, R; Lengfelder, E; Thiel, E; Reichle, A; Aul, C; Ludwig, W-D; Kern, W; Haferlach, T; Köpcke, W; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M C; Heinecke, A; Wörmann, B J; Hiddemann, W; Büchner, T

    2016-06-01

    We randomized 3375 adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome to test whether increasingly intensive chemotherapies assigned at study-entry and analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis improved outcomes. In total, 1529 subjects consolidation courses; and (3) high-dose therapy and an autotransplant or maintenance chemotherapy. In total, 1846 subjects ⩾60 years were randomized to receive: (1) a first induction course of HAM or TAD and second induction course of HAM (if they had bone marrow blasts ⩾5% after the first course); and (2) G-CSF or no G-CSF as above. Median follow-up was 7.4 years (range, 1 day to 14.7 years). Five-year event-free survivals (EFSs) for subjects receiving a first induction course of HAM vs TAD were 17% (95% confidence interval, 15, 18%) vs 16% (95% confidence interval 14, 18%; P=0.719). Five-year EFSs for subjects randomized to receive or not receive G-CSF were 19% (95% confidence interval 16, 21%) vs 16% (95% confidence interval 14, 19%; P=0.266). Five-year relapse-free survivals (RFSs) for subjects <60 years receiving an autotransplant vs maintenance therapy were 43% (95% confidence interval 40, 47%) vs 40 (95% confidence interval 35, 44%; P=0.535). Many subjects never achieved pre-specified landmarks and consequently did not receive their assigned therapies. These data indicate the limited impact of more intensive therapies on outcomes of adults with AML. Moreover, none of the more intensive therapies we tested improved 5-year EFS, RFS or any other outcomes. PMID:26859081

  13. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Estey, Elihu

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of the elderly and the numbers of these patients are increasing. Patients ≥60 years of age continue to have poor prognosis. Preliminary results suggest benefit from reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in selected patients 60-80 years of age. However, although patients in this age range comprise >50% of those with AML, they currently constitute only 17% of those offered HCT. In the absence of prospective randomized studies comparing HCT and chemotherapy, the decision to recommend HCT rests on retrospective analyses of the risks of relapse and nonrelapse mortality after each approach. There is strong evidence that pre-HCT comorbidities can predict HCT-related morbidity and mortality. Age alone does not appear predictive and, particularly if the risk of relapse with chemotherapy is high, should not be the sole basis for deciding against HCT. Use of geriatric assessment tools, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetic polymorphism data may further aid in predicting nonrelapse mortality after HCT. Disease status and pretreatment cytogenetics with FLT3-TID, NPM-1, and CEBP-α status are the main factors predicting relapse and these are likely to be supplemented by incorporation of other molecular markers and the level of minimal residual disease after chemotherapy. HLA-matched related and unrelated donor grafts seem preferable to those from other donor sources. Donor age is of no clear significance. Models combining comorbidities with AML risk factors are useful in risk assessment before HCT. In this chapter, we integrated information on AML-specific, HCT-specific, and patient-specific risk factors into a risk-adapted approach to guide decisions about HCT versus no HCT.

  14. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Rani Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects.

  15. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana de França Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 break point clusterregion-Abelson (BCR-ABL rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods: Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results: At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%. The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%. BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34% patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%, p210 (50% and double positive (22%. Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44% and positive BCR-ABL (28%. Conclusion: These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  17. Age Difference in Immunophenotype of Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakase

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the immunophenotype of 880 cases with acute leukemia and analyzed their age difference in relation to the morphological subtype and the karyotype. We divided the patients into 3 age groups: child (0-15 years, adult (16-59 years and elderly (60 years and older group. The diagnoses based on the French-American-British (FAB criteria and the immunophenotype as follows: 453 patients as acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 366 as precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (24 CD10- cases and 342 CD10+ cases, 10 B-cell ALL and 51 T-cell ALL. In AML, there were no significant age differences in the frequency of FAB subtypes. Karyotypically, the frequencies of t(8;21 and 11q23 decreased with age and that of 5/7/8 abnormality increased with age. As for the immunophenotype in each FAB subtype, CD11b in M2 (0% and CD34 in M3 (0% were less commonly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Whereas Both CD11b (100% and CD34 (60% in M4 were more predominantly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Lymphoid antigen, CD19 showed a higher frequency (38.5% in the child M2 than did other age M2 groups, reflecting the distribution pattern of t(8;21 among the 3 age groups. Additionally, the child group more frequently expressed this antigen (33.3% than the older groups among CD7+ AML. In ALL, the frequency of CD10+ precursor B ALL was more common in the child group (84% than in the adult group. On the other hand, B-cell ALL showed a lower frequency (0.7% in the child group and T-cell ALL did a higher frequency (18.3% in the adult group than any other age groups, respectively. Although the frequency of t(9;22 increased with age in CD10+ precursor-B ALL, myeloid antigen (CD13/CD33 expression evenly distributed among the 3 age groups. Our results suggest that phenotypic heterogeneity gradually emerged with age irrespective of the pattern of karyotype.

  18. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy from third-party donors: Characterization of donors and set up of a T-cell donor registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta eEiz-Vesper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with and reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (CMV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and adenovirus (ADV are frequent and severe complications in immunocompromised recipients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT or solid organ transplantation (SOT. These serious adverse events are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs are often used to treat both viral infections and leukemia relapses after transplantation but are associated with potentially life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. Adoptive immunotherapy with virus-specific cytotoxic effector T cells (CTLs derived from seropositive donors can rapidly reconstitute antiviral immunity after HSCT and organ transplantation. Therefore, it can effectively prevent the clinical manifestation of these viruses with no significant acute toxicity or increased risk of GvHD. In conditions, where patients receiving an allogeneic cord blood transplant or a transplant from a virus-seronegative donor and since donor blood is generally not available for solid organ recipients, allogeneic third party T-cell donors would offer an alternative option. Recent studies showed that during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilization, the functional activity of antiviral memory T cells is impaired for a long period. This finding suggests that even stem cell donors may not be the best source of T cells.Under these circumstances, partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched virus-specific CTLs from healthy seropositive individuals may be a promising option. Therefore frequency assessments of virus-specific memory T cells in HLA-typed healthy donors as well as in HSCT/SOT donors using a high throughput T-cell assay were performed over a period of 4 years at Hannover Medical School. This chapter will address the relevance and potential of a third-party T-cell donor registry and will discuss its clinical implication for adoptive T-cell

  19. Intracellular Signals of T Cell Costimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxun Song; Fengyang Tylan Lei; Xiaofang Xiong; Rizwanul Haque

    2008-01-01

    Ligation of T cell receptor (TCR) alone is insufficient to induce full activation of T lymphocytes. Additional ligand-receptor interactions (costimulation) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T cells are required. T cell costimulation has been shown to be essential for eliciting efficient T cell responses, involving all phases during T cell development. However, the mechanisms by which costimulation affects the function of T cells still need to be elucidated. In recent years, advances have been made in studies of costimulation as potential therapies in cancer, infectious disease as well as autoimmune disease. In this review, we discussed intracellular costimulation signals that regulate T cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cytokine production, survival, and memory development. In general, the pathway of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PBK)/protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) might be central to many costimulatory effects. Through these pathways, costimulation controls T-cell expansion and proliferation by maintenance of survivin and aurora B expression, and sustains long-term T-cell survival and memory development by regulating the expression of bci-2 family members. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2008;5(4):239-247.

  20. Increasing Secretion of a Bivalent Anti-T-Cell Immunotoxin by Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Jung Hee; Liu, Yuan Yi; Stavrou, Scott; Neville, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The bivalent anti-T-cell immunotoxin A-dmDT390-bisFv(G4S) was developed for treatment of T-cell leukemia and autoimmune diseases and for tolerance induction for transplantation. This immunotoxin was produced extracellularly in toxin-sensitive Pichia pastoris JW102 (Mut+) under control of the AOX1 promoter. There were two major barriers to efficient immunotoxin production, the toxicity of the immunotoxin for P. pastoris and the limited capacity of P. pastoris to secrete the immunotoxin. The im...