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Sample records for adp receptor blocking

  1. A mitochondrial import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Söllner, Thomas; Griffiths, Gareth; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a mitochondrial outer membrane protein of 72 kd (MOM72) that exhibits the properties of an import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC), the most abundant mitochondrial protein. Monospecific antibodies and Fab fragments against MOM72 selectively inhibit import of AAC at the level of specific binding to the mitochondria. AAC bound to the mitochondrial surface is coprecipitated with antibodies against MOM72 after lysis of mitochondria with detergent. MOM72 thus has a complem...

  2. Inhibition of Nuclear Receptor Signalling by Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Takahide; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Mammalian poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear chromatin-associated protein with a molecular mass of 114 kDa that catalyzes the transfer of ADP-ribose units from NAD+ to nuclear proteins that are located within chromatin. We report here the identification of a novel property of PARP as a modulator of nuclear receptor signalling. PARP bound directly to retinoid X receptors (RXR) and repressed ligand-dependent transcriptional activities mediated by heterodimers of RXR and thyroid hor...

  3. Membrane coordination of receptors and channels mediating the inhibition of neuronal ion currents by ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafar, Hend; Dominguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Chandaka, Giri K; Salzer, Isabella; Boehm, Stefan; Schicker, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    ADP and other nucleotides control ion currents in the nervous system via various P2Y receptors. In this respect, Cav2 and Kv7 channels have been investigated most frequently. The fine tuning of neuronal ion channel gating via G protein coupled receptors frequently relies on the formation of higher order protein complexes that are organized by scaffolding proteins and harbor receptors and channels together with interposed signaling components. However, ion channel complexes containing P2Y receptors have not been described. Therefore, the regulation of Cav2.2 and Kv7.2/7.3 channels via P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors and the coordination of these ion channels and receptors in the plasma membranes of tsA 201 cells have been investigated here. ADP inhibited currents through Cav2.2 channels via both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors with phospholipase C and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins being involved, respectively. The nucleotide controlled the gating of Kv7 channels only via P2Y1 and phospholipase C. In fluorescence energy transfer assays using conventional as well as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors were found juxtaposed to Cav2.2 channels, but only P2Y1, and not P2Y12, was in close proximity to Kv7 channels. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in TIRF microscopy, evidence for a physical interaction was obtained for the pair P2Y12/Cav2.2, but not for any other receptor/channel combination. These results reveal a membrane juxtaposition of P2Y receptors and ion channels in parallel with the control of neuronal ion currents by ADP. This juxtaposition may even result in apparent physical interactions between receptors and channels.

  4. Import of ADP/ATP carrier into mitochondria: two receptors act in parallel

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    We have identified the yeast homologue of Neurospora crassa MOM72, the mitochondrial import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC), by functional studies and by cDNA sequencing. Mitochondria of a yeast mutant in which the gene for MOM72 was disrupted were impaired in specific binding and import of AAC. Unexpectedly, we found a residual, yet significant import of AAC into mitochondria lacking MOM72 that occurred via the receptor MOM19. We conclude that both MOM72 and MOM19 can direct AAC into ...

  5. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Promotes Oxidative-Stress-Induced Liver Cell Death via Suppressing Farnesoid X Receptor α

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Fengxiao; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Xiangrao; Huang, Kun; Du, Meng; Liu, Fangmei; Huang, Shizheng; Guan, Youfei; Huang, Dan; Huang, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor α (FXR) is highly expressed in the liver and regulates the expression of various genes involved in liver repair. In this study, we demonstrated that activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) promoted hepatic cell death by inhibiting the expression of FXR-dependent hepatoprotective genes. PARP1 could bind to and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ate FXR. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation dissociated FXR from the FXR response element (FXRE), present in the promoters of target genes, and suppress...

  6. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-05-26

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogrel is a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist. This dual antiplatelet therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of stented patients. However, due to pharmacological limitations of clopidogrel (interindividual variability in its biological efficacy, slow onset of action, mild platelet reactivity inhibition) ischemic recurrences remained high following stent implantation especially in acute coronary syndrome patients. Thus, more potent P2Y12-ADP receptor inhibitors were developped including prasugrel, ticagrelor and more recently cangrelor to overcome these pitfalls. These new agents reduced the rate of thrombotic events in acute coronary syndrome patients at the cost of an increased bleeding risk. The abundance in antiplatelet agents allow us to tailor our strategy based on the thrombotic/bleeding profile of each patient. Recently, the ACCOAST trial cast a doubt on the benefit of pre treatment in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The aim of the present review is to summarize the results of the main studies dealing with antiplatelet therapy in stented/acute coronary syndromes patients. PMID:27231519

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptor activation and intracellular cyclic ADP-ribose release Ca2+ from the same store in cultured DRG neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, J; Crawford, J H; Wootton, J F; Seabrook, G R; Scott, R H

    1999-01-01

    The whole cell patch clamp technique has been used to record Ca(2+)-activated cation and chloride conductances evoked by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores of cultured neonatal dorsal root ganglion neurones. The aim of this study was to investigate metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) mechanisms and evaluate a possible role for cyclic ADP-ribose as an intracellular signalling molecule. Glutamate and the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (1S, 3R)-ACPD-evoked transient depolarizations, Ca(2+)-activated inward currents and rises in intracellular Ca2+. The (1S, 3R)-ACPD-activated currents were insensitive to InsP3 signalling inhibitors, heparin and pentosan polysulphate. Intracellular application of ryanodine alone activated currents in this study and proved a difficult tool to use as a potential inhibitor of cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated responses. However, intracellular dantrolene did attenuate both (1S, 3R)-ACPD and cyclic ADP-ribose responses. Intracellular photo-release of cGMP and cyclic ADP-ribose mimicked the responses to mGluR receptor activation. Intracellular application of nicotinamide and W7 inhibited the responses to photo-released cGMP but did not prevent responses to mGluR activation. The cyclic ADP-ribose receptor antagonist 8-amino cyclic ADP-ribose attenuated responses to (1S, 3R)-ACPD, cGMP and cyclic ADP-ribose, but some Ca(2+)-activated inward currents were still observed in the presence of this antagonist. In conclusion, mGluR receptor activation, cGMP and cyclic ADP-ribose release Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Some evidence suggests that pharmacologically related pathways are involved. PMID:10598278

  8. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. PMID:20230806

  9. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on the Efficacy of ADP Receptor Blockers in Patients with Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Galajda, Peter; Bolek, Tomáš; Stančiaková, Lucia; Fedorová, Jana; Staško, Ján; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D) on the platelet reactivity in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blockers. Methods. A pilot prospective study was performed. Totally 67 patients were enrolled. 21 patients had T2D. Among all study population, 33 patients received clopidogrel and 34 patients received prasugrel. The efficacy of ADP receptor blocker therapy had been tested in two time intervals using light transmission aggregometry with specific inducer and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P) flow cytometry assay. Results. There were no significant differences in platelet aggregability among T2D and nondiabetic (ND) group. The platelet reactivity index of VASP-P did not differ significantly between T2D and ND group (59.4 ± 30.9% versus 60.0 ± 25.2% and 33.9 ± 25.3% versus 38.6 ± 29.3% in second testing). The number of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders did not differ significantly between T2D and ND patients. The time interval from ADP receptor blocker loading dosing to the blood sampling was similar in T2D and ND patients in both examinations. Conclusion. This prospective study did not confirm the higher platelet reactivity and higher prevalence of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders in T2D acute STEMI patients. PMID:27493970

  10. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on the Efficacy of ADP Receptor Blockers in Patients with Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Samoš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D on the platelet reactivity in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI treated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP receptor blockers. Methods. A pilot prospective study was performed. Totally 67 patients were enrolled. 21 patients had T2D. Among all study population, 33 patients received clopidogrel and 34 patients received prasugrel. The efficacy of ADP receptor blocker therapy had been tested in two time intervals using light transmission aggregometry with specific inducer and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P flow cytometry assay. Results. There were no significant differences in platelet aggregability among T2D and nondiabetic (ND group. The platelet reactivity index of VASP-P did not differ significantly between T2D and ND group (59.4±30.9% versus 60.0±25.2% and 33.9±25.3% versus 38.6±29.3% in second testing. The number of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders did not differ significantly between T2D and ND patients. The time interval from ADP receptor blocker loading dosing to the blood sampling was similar in T2D and ND patients in both examinations. Conclusion. This prospective study did not confirm the higher platelet reactivity and higher prevalence of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders in T2D acute STEMI patients.

  11. The proposed channel-enzyme transient receptor potential melastatin 2 does not possess ADP ribose hydrolase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanov, Iordan; Mihályi, Csaba; Tóth, Balázs; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel essential for immunocyte activation, insulin secretion, and postischemic cell death. TRPM2 is activated by ADP ribose (ADPR) binding to its C-terminal cytosolic NUDT9-homology (NUDT9H) domain, homologous to the soluble mitochondrial ADPR pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) NUDT9. Reported ADPR hydrolysis classified TRPM2 as a channel-enzyme, but insolubility of isolated NUDT9H hampered further investigations. Here we developed a soluble NUDT9H model using chimeric proteins built from complementary polypeptide fragments of NUDT9H and NUDT9. When expressed in E.coli, chimeras containing up to ~90% NUDT9H sequence remained soluble and were affinity-purified. In ADPRase assays the conserved Nudix-box sequence of NUDT9 proved essential for activity (kcat~4-9s(-1)), that of NUDT9H did not support catalysis. Replacing NUDT9H in full-length TRPM2 with soluble chimeras retained ADPR-dependent channel gating (K1/2~1-5 μM), confirming functionality of chimeric domains. Thus, TRPM2 is not a 'chanzyme'. Chimeras provide convenient soluble NUDT9H models for structural/biochemical studies. PMID:27383051

  12. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  13. Crystallographic Analysis of Tapering of ADP Crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of crystallographic characteristics of ADP (ammonium dihydrogen phosphate) crystals and the selected growth conditions, the growth habit of ADP crystals was studied. In comparison with pyramidal planes, the growth rate of prismatic faces is slower and more sensitive to the additives and impurities for ADP crystals. When the supersaturation is low, the advance of growth steps on prismatic face can be blocked by ethanol or impurities, the crystal morphology is changed from the tetragonal prism to shuttle (i.e., the tapered shape). The tapering formation of ADP crystallites was structurally studied in a novel view.

  14. Insulin action is blocked by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits insulin receptor kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin

  15. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (FXR-KO) mice treated with a FXR synthetic ligand or vehicle was performed. The results identified five proteins as novel FXR targets. Since FXR deficiency in mice leads to liver tumorigenesis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, member 1 (Parp1) that is important for DNA repair, was validated in the current study by quantitative real-time PCR, and 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis/western blot. The results showed that Parp1 mRNA levels were not altered by FXR genetic status or by agonist treatment. However, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in FXR-KO mice as early as 3 month old. Interestingly, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in WT mice in an age-dependent manner (from 3 to 18 months), but not in FXR-KO mice. Finally, activation of FXR in WT mice resulted in reduction of phosporylated Parp1 protein in the liver without affecting total Parp1 protein levels. In conclusion, this study reveals that FXR genetic status and agonist treatment affects basal levels and phosphorylation state of Parp1, respectively. These alterations, in turn, may be associated with the hepatobiliary alterations observed in FXR-KO mice and participate in FXR agonist-induced protection in the liver. -- Highlights: ► Proteomic analysis identified novel FXR targets. ► FXR modification altered post-translational modification of the Parp1 protein. ► Altered Parp1 function may contribute to mechanisms of FXR regulation of liver functions.

  16. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yan [Department of General Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Guodong [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Treatment Center, Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen H. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologic, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kong, Bo; Aleksunes, Lauren M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R. [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ—Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Li, Fei, E-mail: xw_lifei@yahoo.com.cn [Department of General Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Guo, Grace L., E-mail: guo@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (FXR-KO) mice treated with a FXR synthetic ligand or vehicle was performed. The results identified five proteins as novel FXR targets. Since FXR deficiency in mice leads to liver tumorigenesis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, member 1 (Parp1) that is important for DNA repair, was validated in the current study by quantitative real-time PCR, and 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis/western blot. The results showed that Parp1 mRNA levels were not altered by FXR genetic status or by agonist treatment. However, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in FXR-KO mice as early as 3 month old. Interestingly, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in WT mice in an age-dependent manner (from 3 to 18 months), but not in FXR-KO mice. Finally, activation of FXR in WT mice resulted in reduction of phosporylated Parp1 protein in the liver without affecting total Parp1 protein levels. In conclusion, this study reveals that FXR genetic status and agonist treatment affects basal levels and phosphorylation state of Parp1, respectively. These alterations, in turn, may be associated with the hepatobiliary alterations observed in FXR-KO mice and participate in FXR agonist-induced protection in the liver. -- Highlights: ► Proteomic analysis identified novel FXR targets. ► FXR modification altered post-translational modification of the Parp1 protein. ► Altered Parp1 function may contribute to mechanisms of FXR regulation of liver functions.

  17. Dextromethorphan and its metabolite dextrorphan block alpha3beta4 neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, S C; Bertolino, M; Xiao, Y; Pringle, K E; Caruso, F S; Kellar, K J

    2000-06-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM), a structural analog of morphine and codeine, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for more than 40 years. DM is not itself a potent analgesic, but it has been reported to enhance analgesia produced by morphine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Although DM is considered to be nonaddictive, it has been reported to reduce morphine tolerance in rats and to be useful in helping addicted subjects to withdraw from heroin. Here we studied the effects of DM on neuronal nicotinic receptors stably expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. Studies were carried out to examine the effects of DM on nicotine-stimulated whole cell currents and nicotine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux. We found that both DM and its metabolite dextrorphan block nicotinic receptor function in a noncompetitive but reversible manner, suggesting that both drugs block the receptor channel. Consistent with blockade of the receptor channel, neither drug competed for the nicotinic agonist binding sites labeled by [(3)H]epibatidine. Although DM is approximately 9-fold less potent than the widely used noncompetitive nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine in blocking nicotinic receptor function, the block by DM appears to reverse more slowly than that by mecamylamine. These data indicate that DM is a useful antagonist for studying nicotinic receptor function and suggest that it might prove to be a clinically useful neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist, possibly helpful as an aid for helping people addicted to nicotine to refrain from smoking, as well as in other conditions where blockade of neuronal nicotinic receptors would be helpful. PMID:10869398

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor block insulin binding and inhibit insulin action.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, R A; Cassell, D J; Wong, K. Y.; Maddux, B A; Goldfine, I D

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies to the insulin receptor were prepared in BALB/c mice by immunization with IM-9 human lymphocytes, a cell type that has a large number of plasma membrane insulin receptors. The spleens of these mice were then removed, and their lymphocytes were fused to a mouse myeloma cell line, FO cells. After screening over 1,200 resulting hybrids, one stable hybrid was obtained that produced IgG1 antibodies directed towards the insulin receptor. This antibody blocked 125I-labeled insulin binding...

  19. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering. PMID:23954806

  20. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering.

  1. Activation and block of recombinant GABAA receptors by pentobarbitone: a single-channel study

    OpenAIRE

    Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant GABAA receptors (α1β2γ2L) were transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells. We have investigated activation and block of these receptors by pentobarbitone (PB) using cell-attached single-channel patch clamp.Clusters of single-channel activity elicited by 500 μM PB were analysed to estimate rate constants for agonist binding and channel gating. The minimal model able to describe the kinetic data involved two sequential binding steps, followed by channel opening. The estimated channel op...

  2. Antagonist of the amylin receptor blocks beta-amyloid toxicity in rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhamandas, Jack H; MacTavish, David

    2004-06-16

    Salvage of cholinergic neurons in the brain through a blockade of the neurotoxic effects of amyloidbeta protein (Abeta) is one of the major, but still elusive, therapeutic goals of current research in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, no receptor has been unequivocally identified for Abeta. Human amylin, which acts via a receptor composed of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor and a receptor-associated membrane protein, possesses amyloidogenic properties and has a profile of neurotoxicity that is strikingly similar to Abeta. In this study, using primary cultures of rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, we show that acetyl-[Asn30, Tyr32] sCT(8-37) (AC187), an amylin receptor antagonist, blocks Abeta-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of cultures with AC187 before exposure to Abeta results in significantly improved neuronal survival as judged by MTT and live-dead cell assays. Quantitative measures of Abeta-evoked apoptotic cell death, using Hoechst and phosphotidylserine staining, confirm neuroprotective effects of AC187. We also demonstrate that AC187 attenuates the activation of initiator and effector caspases that mediate Abeta-induced apoptotic cell death. These data are the first to show that expression of Abeta toxicity may occur through the amylin receptor and suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:15201330

  3. Progesterone-induced blocking factor activates STAT6 via binding to a novel IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Noemi; Halasz, Melinda; Polgar, Beata; Poehlmann, Tobias G; Markert, Udo R; Palkovics, Tamas; Keszei, Marton; Par, Gabriella; Kiss, Katalin; Szeberenyi, Jozsef; Grama, Laszlo; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2006-01-15

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) induces Th2-dominant cytokine production. Western blotting and EMSA revealed phosphorylation as well as nuclear translocation of STAT6 and inhibition of STAT4 phosphorylation in PIBF-treated cells. The silencing of STAT6 by small interfering RNA reduced the cytokine effects. Because the activation of the STAT6 pathway depends on the ligation of IL-4R, we tested the involvement of IL-4R in PIBF-induced STAT6 activation. Although PIBF does not bind to IL-4R, the blocking of the latter with an Ab abolished PIBF-induced STAT6 activation, whereas the blocking of the IL-13R had no effect. PIBF activated suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and inhibited IL-12-induced suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 activation. The blocking of IL-4R counteracted all the described effects, suggesting that the PIBF receptor interacts with IL-4R alpha-chain, allowing PIBF to activate the STAT6 pathway. PIBF did not phosphorylate Jak3, suggesting that the gamma-chain is not needed for PIBF signaling. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed a colocalization and at 37 degrees C a cocapping of the FITC PIBF-activated PIBF receptor and PE anti-IL-4R-labeled IL-4R. After the digestion of the cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, the STAT6-activating effect of PIBF was lost, whereas that of IL-4 remained unaltered. These data suggest the existence of a novel type of IL-4R composed of the IL-4R alpha-chain and the GPI-anchored PIBF receptor. PMID:16393965

  4. ADP's ABCs of Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company's core competence is processing data, it is sometimes easy to lose sight of the obvious--the information right under its nose. In the case of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP), a business outsourcing company specializing in human resources, payroll, tax, and benefits administrations solutions, that is not a problem. Through…

  5. Blocking 5-HT2 receptor restores cardiovascular disorders in type 1 experimental diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; Ferreira-Santos, Pedro; Aparicio, Rubén; Montero, María-José; Morán, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the serotonergic modulation, through selective 5-HT2 receptor blockade, restores cardiovascular disturbances in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by alloxan (150 mg/kg, s.c.) and maintained for 4 weeks. 5-HT2 receptor was blocked by sarpogrelate (30 mg/kg.day; 14 days; p.o.). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), glycaemia and body weight (BW) were monitored periodically. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study and the heart, right kidney and thoracic aorta were removed; plasma samples were also obtained. Left ventricular hypertrophy index (LVH) and renal hypertrophy index (RH) were determined. Vascular function was studied in aorta rings; additionally, superoxide anion (O2•−) production (by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence) and lipid peroxidation (by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay) were measured. Neither alloxan nor sarpogrelate treatments altered HR, LVH or endothelium-independent relaxation. SBP, glycaemia, BW, RH, O2•− production and lipid peroxidation were significantly altered in diabetic animals compared with controls. Sarpogrelate treatment considerably decreased SBP, RH, O2•− production and lipid peroxidation. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was severely reduced in diabetic animal aortas compared to controls; sarpogrelate treatment markedly improved it. Our outcomes show that selectively blocking 5-HT2 receptors has beneficial effects on impaired cardiovascular parameters in diabetes. PMID:27659784

  6. Recent advances in the Okamoto model: the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose signal system and the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Shin

    2002-12-01

    Twenty years ago, we first proposed our hypothesis on beta-cell damage and its prevention (the Okamoto model), according to which poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase/polymerase (PARP) activation is critically involved in the consumption of NAD(+), leading to energy depletion and cell death by necrosis. Recently, the model was reconfirmed by results using PARP knockout mice and has been recognized as providing the basis for necrotic death of various cells and tissues. Based on the model, we proposed two signal systems in beta-cells: one is the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) signal system for insulin secretion, and the other is the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system for beta-cell regeneration. The physiological and pathological significance of the two signal systems in a variety of cells and tissues as well as in pancreatic beta-cells has recently been recognized. Here, we describe the Okamoto model and its descendents, the CD38-cADPR signal system and the Reg-Reg receptor system, focusing on recent advances and how their significance came to light. Because PARP is involved in Reg gene transcription to induce beta-cell regeneration, and the PARP activation reduces the cellular NAD(+) to decrease the formation of cADPR (a second messenger for insulin secretion) and further to cause necrotic beta-cell death, PARP and its inhibitors have key roles in the induction of beta-cell regeneration, the maintenance of insulin secretion, and the prevention of beta-cell death. PMID:12475791

  7. Blocking and binding folate receptor alpha autoantibodies identify novel autism spectrum disorder subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eugene Frye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Folate receptor α (FRα autoantibodies (FRAAs are prevalent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD. They disrupt the transportation of folate across the blood-brain barrier by binding to the FRα. Children with ASD with FRAAs have been reported to respond well to treatment with a form of folate known as folinic acid, suggesting that they may be an important ASD subgroup to identify and treat. There has been no investigation of whether they manifest unique behavioral and physiological characteristics. Thus, in this study we measured both blocking and binding FRAAs, physiological measurements including indices of redox and methylation metabolism and inflammation as well as serum folate and B12 concentrations and measurements of development and behavior in 94 children with ASD. Children positive for the binding FRAA were found to have higher serum B12 levels as compared to those negative for binding FRAAs while children positive for the blocking FRAA were found to have relatively better redox metabolism and inflammation markers as compared to those negative for blocking FRAAs. In addition, ASD children positive for the blocking FRAA demonstrated better communication on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, stereotyped behavior on the Aberrant Behavioral Checklist and Mannerisms on the Social Responsiveness Scale. This study suggests that FRAAs are associated with specific physiological and behavioral characteristics in children with ASD and provides support for the notion that these biomarkers may be useful for subgrouping children with ASD, especially with respect to targeted treatments.

  8. Blocking and Binding Folate Receptor Alpha Autoantibodies Identify Novel Autism Spectrum Disorder Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Richard E; Delhey, Leanna; Slattery, John; Tippett, Marie; Wynne, Rebecca; Rose, Shannon; Kahler, Stephen G; Bennuri, Sirish C; Melnyk, Stepan; Sequeira, Jeffrey M; Quadros, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Folate receptor α (FRα) autoantibodies (FRAAs) are prevalent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They disrupt the transportation of folate across the blood-brain barrier by binding to the FRα. Children with ASD and FRAAs have been reported to respond well to treatment with a form of folate known as folinic acid, suggesting that they may be an important ASD subgroup to identify and treat. There has been no investigation of whether they manifest unique behavioral and physiological characteristics. Thus, in this study we measured both blocking and binding FRAAs, physiological measurements including indices of redox and methylation metabolism and inflammation as well as serum folate and B12 concentrations and measurements of development and behavior in 94 children with ASD. Children positive for the binding FRAA were found to have higher serum B12 levels as compared to those negative for binding FRAAs while children positive for the blocking FRAA were found to have relatively better redox metabolism and inflammation markers as compared to those negative for blocking FRAAs. In addition, ASD children positive for the blocking FRAA demonstrated better communication on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, stereotyped behavior on the Aberrant Behavioral Checklist and mannerisms on the Social Responsiveness Scale. This study suggests that FRAAs are associated with specific physiological and behavioral characteristics in children with ASD and provides support for the notion that these biomarkers may be useful for subgrouping children with ASD, especially with respect to targeted treatments. PMID:27013943

  9. Detachment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 from Germinal Centers by Blocking Complement Receptor Type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Kacani, Laco; Prodinger, Wolfgang M.; Sprinzl, Georg M.; Michael G Schwendinger; Spruth, Martin; Stoiber, Heribert; Döpper, Susanne; Steinhuber, Sabine; Steindl, Franz; Manfred P Dierich

    2000-01-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 6...

  10. Role of CD38, a cyclic ADP-ribosylcyclase, in morphine antinociception and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Lynn C; Rabender, Christopher; Gabra, Bichoy H; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan; Dewey, William L

    2010-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an increase in intracellular levels of Ca(2+) in neurons is an important component of both the antinociception produced by morphine and morphine's tolerance. The present study tested the hypothesis that the Ca(2+) signaling second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), derived from CD38 activation participates in morphine antinociception and tolerance. We first showed that morphine's antinociceptive potency was increased by the intracerebroventricular injection of CD38 substrate beta-NAD(+) in mice. Furthermore, morphine tolerance was reversed by intracerebroventricular administration of each of three different inhibitors of the CD38-cADPR-ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) signaling pathway. These inhibitors were the ADP-ribosylcyclase inhibitor nicotinamide, cADPR analog 8-bromo-cADPR, and a large dose of ryanodine (>50 muM) that blocks the ryanodine receptor. In CD38 gene knockout [CD38(-/-)] mice, the antinociceptive action of morphine was found to be less potent compared with wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by tail-flick response, hypothermia assay, and observations of straub tail. However, there was no difference in locomotor activation between CD38(-/-) and WT animals. It was also found that less tolerance to morphine developed in CD38(-/-) mice compared with WT animals. These results indicate that cADRP-ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) signaling associated with CD38 plays an important role in morphine tolerance. PMID:20551293

  11. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  12. Different binding of stimulatory-type and blocking-type TSH receptor antibody with guinea-pig testis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, T; Ochi, Y; Hachiya, T; Chen, W; Nakajima, Y; Kajita, Y; Ogura, H

    1991-11-01

    A receptor assay using [125I]bTSH-binding to guinea-pig testis membrane was developed. Unlabelled hCG and FSH inhibited [125I]bTSH binding. In patients with Graves' disease and in untreated hyperthyroid patients, almost all long-acting thyroid stimulators and thyroid-stimulating antibodies, respectively did not inhibit [125I]bTSH binding, which on the other hand was inhibited by thyroid stimulation blocking antibodies in patients with primary hypothyroidism. When the inhibitory effect on the binding of [125I]hCG and 125I-synthetic alpha-subunit peptide (alpha 26-46) of hCG to testis membrane was examined, bTSH resulted in a significant inhibition. However, all three kinds of TSH receptor antibodies had no inhibitory effect. This study demonstrated 1. interaction of alpha-subunit of TSH and hCG with the testicular receptor; 2. binding of thyroid stimulation-blocking antibody and lack of binding of thyroid-stimulating antibody to the testicular TSH receptor in spite of binding of these TSH receptor antibodies to the thyroidal TSH receptor, and 3. lack of binding of thyroid-stimulating antibody and thyroid stimulation-blocking antibody to the testicular gonadotropin receptor. PMID:1684686

  13. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen H.; Kong, Bo; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Li, Fei; Guo, Grace L.

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of w...

  14. Plant extracts inhibit ADP-induced platelet activation in humans: their potential therapeutic role as ADP antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagroop, Indera Anita

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) plays a pivotal role in platelet activation. Platelet hyperactivity is associated with vascular disease and also has a key role in haemostasis and thrombosis. ADP activates platelets through three purinoceptor subtypes, the G(q)-coupled P2Y(1) receptor, G(i)-coupled P2Y(12) receptor and P2X(1) ligand-gated cation channel. Platelet ADP purinergic receptors are therefore suitable targets for antiplatelet drugs. Thienopyridines such as clopidogrel and ticlopidine, as well as other ADP receptor antagonists like prasugrel, ticagrelor, cangrelor and elinogrel have demonstrated clinical benefits via the inhibition of the selective purinergic ADP receptor, P2Y(12). However, they still have limitations in their mode of action and efficacy, like increased risk of bleeding. Thus, the ongoing pursuit to develop newer and more effective antiplatelet agents continues. There is a growing interest in the purinergic antiplatelet properties exhibited by plant extracts. This article considers the following: pomolic acid isolated from Licania pittieri, brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L, phylligenin isolated from the twigs of Muraltia vulpina, bark oil of Gonystylus velutinus, seed and bark extracts from Aesculus hippocastanum L. and red wine phenolics and catechins isolated from green tea. Moreover, the method used to investigate platelet purinergic receptors should be considered, since using a more sensitive, high-resolution platelet sizer can sometimes detect platelet variations when the light transmission method was not able to do so. The exact mechanisms by which these plant extracts work need further investigation. They all however inhibit ADP-induced activation in human platelets. This could explain, at least in part, the protective effect of plant extracts as antiplatelet agents. PMID:24190032

  15. Scintigraphic findings of the thyroid in hypothyroid patients with blocking-type TSH-receptor antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to analyse the scintigraphic appearance of the thyroid in hypothyroid patients with blocking-type TSH receptor antibodies (TRAbs). Eleven hypothyroid patients with autoimmune thyroiditis positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulins (TBII) [80% ± 12 (SD)%; normal 99mTc than those in group 2 (P<0.05). Interestingly, three patients in group 1 were positive for thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) (249% ± 17%; normal <145%), which were not detected in the remaining eight patients. Antibodies against thyroglobulin and microsomal antigens were detected in nine (81.8%) and 11 (100%) patients, respectively, but neither of these titres correlated with the scan image. Three patients in group 1 underwent scintigraphy again after treatment with thyroxine, at which time the functioning lesion was not noted. Fourteen hypothyroid patients with negative TBII displayed no such scintigraphic findings. Chronic stimulation of the thyroid by TSAbs and/or TSH might be responsible for the presence of the functioning lesion, but clarification of the mechanism requires further studies. In summary (1) TSAbs were detected in three (27.3%) of 11 hypothyroid patients with blocking TRAbs; (2) thyroid scintigraphy revealed the presence of localized functioning area(s) in approximately half of these cases. (orig.)

  16. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC. PMID:10933708

  17. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  18. Scintigraphic findings of the thyroid in hypothyroid patients with blocking-type TSH-receptor antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasagi, K. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Hatabu, H. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Miyamoto, S. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Takeuchi, R. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Misaki, T. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Sakahara, H. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Iida, Y. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan)); Konishi, J. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. Hospital (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    The present study was designed to analyse the scintigraphic appearance of the thyroid in hypothyroid patients with blocking-type TSH receptor antibodies (TRAbs). Eleven hypothyroid patients with autoimmune thyroiditis positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulins (TBII) [80% [+-] 12 (SD)%; normal <11%] and for thyroid stimulation-blocking antibodies (TSBAbs) (90% [+-] 9%; normal <32%) were studied. Thyroid scanning was performed using technetium-99m or iodine-123, when the patients were hypothyroid. Analysis of the scan images revealed the presence of localized functioning areas in six patients (group 1), and no visualization of the thyroid in the remaining five patients (group 2). Patients in group 1 showed significantly higher uptake of [sup 99m]Tc than those in group 2 (P<0.05). Interestingly, three patients in group 1 were positive for thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) (249% [+-] 17%; normal <145%), which were not detected in the remaining eight patients. Antibodies against thyroglobulin and microsomal antigens were detected in nine (81.8%) and 11 (100%) patients, respectively, but neither of these titres correlated with the scan image. Three patients in group 1 underwent scintigraphy again after treatment with thyroxine, at which time the functioning lesion was not noted. Fourteen hypothyroid patients with negative TBII displayed no such scintigraphic findings. Chronic stimulation of the thyroid by TSAbs and/or TSH might be responsible for the presence of the functioning lesion, but clarification of the mechanism requires further studies. In summary (1) TSAbs were detected in three (27.3%) of 11 hypothyroid patients with blocking TRAbs; (2) thyroid scintigraphy revealed the presence of localized functioning area(s) in approximately half of these cases. (orig.)

  19. Blocking transforming growth factor- receptor signaling down-regulates transforming growth factor-β1 autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 蔡泽浩; 王丹茹; 武小莉; 崔磊; 商庆新; 钱云良; 曹谊林

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts and theregulation effect of blocking TGF-β intracellular signalingon rhTGF-β1 autoproduction.Methods: Keloid fibroblasts cultured in vitro weretreated with either rhTGF-β1 (5 ng/ml ) or recombinantadenovirus containing a truncated type II TGF-β receptorgene (50 pfu/cell ). Their effects of regulating geneexpression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I and II wereobserved with Northern blot.Results: rhTGF-β1 up-regulated the gene expressionof TGF-β1 and receptor I, but not receptor II. Over-expression of the truncated receptor II down-regulated thegene expression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I, but notreceptor II.Conclusions: TGF-β1 autoproduction was observed inkeloid fibroblasts. Over-expression of the truncated TGF-βreceptor H decreased TGF-β1 autoproduction via blockingTGF-β receptor signaling.

  20. Bisphenol A binds to the local anesthetic receptor site to block the human cardiac sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrias O O'Reilly

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA has attracted considerable public attention as it leaches from plastic used in food containers, is detectable in human fluids and recent epidemiologic studies link BPA exposure with diseases including cardiovascular disorders. As heart-toxicity may derive from modified cardiac electrophysiology, we investigated the interaction between BPA and hNav1.5, the predominant voltage-gated sodium channel subtype expressed in the human heart. Electrophysiology studies of heterologously-expressed hNav1.5 determined that BPA blocks the channel with a K(d of 25.4±1.3 µM. By comparing the effects of BPA and the local anesthetic mexiletine on wild type hNav1.5 and the F1760A mutant, we demonstrate that both compounds share an overlapping binding site. With a key binding determinant thus identified, an homology model of hNav1.5 was generated based on the recently-reported crystal structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb. Docking predictions position both ligands in a cavity delimited by F1760 and contiguous with the DIII-IV pore fenestration. Steered molecular dynamics simulations used to assess routes of ligand ingress indicate that the DIII-IV pore fenestration is a viable access pathway. Therefore BPA block of the human heart sodium channel involves the local anesthetic receptor and both BPA and mexiletine may enter the closed-state pore via membrane-located side fenestrations.

  1. 2´,3´-Dialdehyde of ATP, ADP, and adenosine inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Valadao, Ana Luiza Chaves; Aguiar, Renato Santana; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Rossi, Atila Duque; Arantes, Pablo Ricardo; Verli, Hugo; Quintana, Paula Gabriela; Heise, Norton; Tanuri, Amilcar; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis

    2014-01-01

    The 2´3´-dialdehyde of ATP or oxidized ATP (oATP) is a compound known for specifically making covalent bonds with the nucleotide-binding site of several ATP-binding enzymes and receptors. We investigated the effects of oATP and other oxidized purines on HIV-1 infection and we found that this compound inhibits HIV-1 and SIV infection by blocking early steps of virus replication. oATP, oxidized ADP (oADP), and oxidized Adenosine (oADO) impact the natural activity of endogenous reverse transcriptase enzyme (RT) in cell free virus particles and are able to inhibit viral replication in different cell types when added to the cell cultures either before or after infection. We used UFLC-UV to show that both oADO and oATP can be detected in the cell after being added in the extracellular medium. oATP also suppresses RT activity and replication of the HIV-1 resistant variants M184V and T215Y. We conclude that oATP, oADP and oADO display anti HIV-1 activity that is at in least in part due to inhibitory activity on HIV-1 RT.

  2. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  3. Effect of forced treadmill exercise and blocking of opioid receptors with naloxone on memory in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Atefeh Asadi Rizi; Parham Reisi; Nooshin Naghsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The forced treadmill running can influence the opioid contents of the brain, through both effects of exercise and the effects of stress caused by coercion. Since opioids can cause negative effects on brain functions, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of forced treadmill exercise and blocking of opioid receptors with naloxone on memory in male rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were the control, the exercise, the naloxone, and the naloxone exercise. The exerc...

  4. Unilaterally blocking the muscarinic receptors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in proestrus rats prevents pre-ovulatory LH secretion and ovulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vieyra, Elizabeth; Ramírez, Deyra A; Lagunas, Noé; Cárdenas, Mario; Chavira, Roberto; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Trujillo, Angélica; Domínguez, Roberto; Morales-Ledesma, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Background The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the cholinergic system of various regions of the hypothalamus participate in the regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin secretion, which are necessary for the occurrence of ovulation. In the present study, our goal was to analyse the effects of unilaterally blocking the muscarinic receptors in the SCN on ovulation and steroid secretion. Methods Cyclic rats were randomly allotted to one of the experimental groups. G...

  5. An atypical residue in the pore of Varroa destructor GABA-activated RDL receptors affects picrotoxin block and thymol modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kerry L; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2014-12-01

    GABA-activated RDL receptors are the insect equivalent of mammalian GABAA receptors, and play a vital role in neurotransmission and insecticide action. Here we clone the pore lining M2 region of the Varroa mite RDL receptor and show that it has 4 atypical residues when compared to M2 regions of most other insects, including bees, which are the major host of Varroa mites. We create mutant Drosophila RDL receptors containing these substitutions and characterise their effects on function. Using two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we show that one substitution (T6'M) ablates picrotoxin inhibition and increases the potency of GABA. This mutation also alters the effect of thymol, which enhances both insect and mammalian GABA responses, and is widely used as a miticide. Thymol decreases the GABA EC50 of WT receptors, enhancing responses, but in T6'M-containing receptors it is inhibitory. The other 3 atypical residues have no major effects on either the GABA EC50, the picrotoxin potency or the effect of thymol. In conclusion we show that the RDL 6' residue is important for channel block, activation and modulation, and understanding its function also has the potential to prove useful in the design of Varroa-specific insecticidal agents. PMID:25460510

  6. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  7. GabaB receptors activation in the NTS blocks the glycemic responses induced by carotid body receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Mónica; Montero, Sergio; Cadenas, José Luis; Lara, José Jesús; Tejeda-Chávez, Héctor Rafael; Alvarez-Buylla, Ramón; de Alvarez-Buylla, Elena Roces

    2008-08-18

    The carotid body receptors participate in glucose regulation sensing glucose levels in blood entering the cephalic circulation. The carotid body receptors information, is initially processed within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and elicits changes in circulating glucose and brain glucose uptake. Previous work has shown that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in NTS modulates respiratory reflexes, but the role of GABA within NTS in glucose regulation remains unknown. Here we show that GABA(B) receptor agonist (baclofen) or antagonists (phaclofen and CGP55845A) locally injected into NTS modified arterial glucose levels and brain glucose retention. Control injections outside NTS did not elicit these responses. In contrast, GABA(A) agonist and antagonist (muscimol or bicuculline) produced no significant changes in blood glucose levels. When these GABAergic drugs were applied before carotid body receptors stimulation, again, only GABA(B) agonist or antagonist significantly affected glycemic responses; baclofen microinjection significantly reduced the hyperglycemic response and brain glucose retention observed after carotid body receptors stimulation, while phaclofen produced the opposite effect, increasing significantly hyperglycemia and brain glucose retention. These results indicate that activation of GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors in the NTS modulates the glycemic responses after anoxic stimulation of the carotid body receptors, and suggest the presence of a tonic inhibitory mechanism in the NTS to avoid hyperglycemia.

  8. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  9. Decoy receptors block TRAIL sensitivity at a supracellular level: the role of stromal cells in controlling tumour TRAIL sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, L; van der Sloot, A M; Reis, C R; Deegan, S; Ryan, A E; Dhami, S P S; Murillo, L S; Cool, R H; Correa de Sampaio, P; Thompson, K; Murphy, G; Quax, W J; Serrano, L; Samali, A; Szegezdi, E

    2016-03-10

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death ligand cytokine known for its cytotoxic activity against malignantly transformed cells. TRAIL induces cell death through binding to death receptors DR4 and DR5. The inhibitory decoy receptors (DcR1 and DcR2) co-expressed with death receptor 4 (DR4)/DR5 on the same cell can block the transmission of the apoptotic signal. Here, we show that DcRs also regulate TRAIL sensitivity at a supracellular level and thus represent a mechanism by which the microenvironment can diminish tumour TRAIL sensitivity. Mathematical modelling and layered or spheroid stroma-extracellular matrix-tumour cultures were used to model the tumour microenvironment. By engineering TRAIL to escape binding by DcRs, we found that DcRs do not only act in a cell-autonomous or cis-regulatory manner, but also exert trans-cellular regulation originating from stromal cells and affect tumour cells, highlighting the potent inhibitory effect of DcRs in the tumour tissue and the necessity of selective targeting of the two death-inducing TRAIL receptors to maximise efficacy. PMID:26050621

  10. Import of ADP/ATP carrier into mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, Heinrich F.; Söllner, Thomas; Kiebler, Michael; Dietmeier, Klaus A.; Pfaller, Rupert; Trülzsch, Konrad S.; Tropschug, Maximilian; Neupert, Walter; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    1990-01-01

    We have identified the yeast homologue of Neurospora crassa MOM72, the mitochondrial import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC), by functional studies and by cDNA sequencing. Mitochondria of a yeast mutant in which the gene for MOM72 was disrupted were impaired in specific binding and import of AAC. Unexpectedly, we found a residual, yet significant import of AAC into mitochondria lacking MOM72 that occurred via the receptor MOM19. We conclude that both MOM72 and MOM19 can direct AAC into ...

  11. Orally active vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist, SRX251, selectively blocks aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Craig F; Lu, Shi-Fang; Messenger, Tara; Guillon, Christophe D; Heindel, Ned; Miller, Marvin; Koppel, Gary; Robert Bruns, F; Simon, Neal G

    2006-02-01

    Arginine vasopressin functions as a neurochemical signal in the brain to affect social behavior. There is an expanding literature from animal and human studies showing that vasopressin, through the vasopressin 1A receptor (V1A), can stimulate aggressive behavior. Using a novel monocylic beta lactam platform, a series of orally active vasopressin V1a antagonists was developed with high affinity for the human receptor. SRX251 was chosen from this series of V1a antagonists to screen for effects on serenic activity in a resident-intruder model of offensive aggression. Resident, male Syrian golden hamsters were given oral doses of SRX251 or intraperitoneal Manning compound, a selective V1a receptor antagonist with reduced brain penetrance, at doses of 0.2 microg, 20 microg, 2 mg/kg or vehicle. When tested 90-120 min later, SRX251, but not Manning compound, caused a significant dose-dependent reduction in offensive aggression toward intruders as measured by latency to bite and number of bites. The reduction in aggression persisted for over 6 h and was no longer present 12 h post treatment. SRX251 did not alter the amount of time the resident investigated the intruder, olfactory communication, general motor activity, or sexual motivation. These data corroborate previous studies showing a role for vasopressin neurotransmission in aggression and suggest that V1a receptor antagonists may be used to treat interpersonal violence co-occurring with such illness as ADHD, autism, bipolar disorder, and substance abuse. PMID:16504276

  12. Waking action of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA involves histamine and GABAA receptor block.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgenij Yanovsky

    Full Text Available Since ancient times ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, a constituent of bile, is used against gallstone formation and cholestasis. A neuroprotective action of UDCA was demonstrated recently in models of Alzheimer's disease and retinal degeneration. The mechanisms of UDCA action in the nervous system are poorly understood. We show now that UDCA promotes wakefulness during the active period of the day, lacking this activity in histamine-deficient mice. In cultured hypothalamic neurons UDCA did not affect firing rate but synchronized the firing, an effect abolished by the GABA(AR antagonist gabazine. In histaminergic neurons recorded in slices UDCA reduced amplitude and duration of spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In acutely isolated histaminergic neurons UDCA inhibited GABA-evoked currents and sIPSCs starting at 10 µM (IC(50 = 70 µM and did not affect NMDA- and AMPA-receptor mediated currents at 100 µM. Recombinant GABA(A receptors composed of α1, β1-3 and γ2L subunits expressed in HEK293 cells displayed a sensitivity to UDCA similar to that of native GABA(A receptors. The mutation α1V256S, known to reduce the inhibitory action of pregnenolone sulphate, reduced the potency of UDCA. The mutation α1Q241L, which abolishes GABA(AR potentiation by several neurosteroids, had no effect on GABA(AR inhibition by UDCA. In conclusion, UDCA enhances alertness through disinhibition, at least partially of the histaminergic system via GABA(A receptors.

  13. Inhibition of PKC activity blocks the increase of ETB receptor expression in cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Marie; Vikman, Petter; Stenman, Emelie;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that there is a time-dependent upregulation of contractile endothelin B (ETB) receptors in middle cerebral arteries (MCA) after organ culture. This upregulation is dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases and possibly protein kinase C (PKC). The aim o...

  14. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  15. Nucleolin down-regulation is involved in ADP-induced cell cycle arrest in S phase and cell apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenmeng Wang

    Full Text Available High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin.

  16. Blocking and Binding Folate Receptor Alpha Autoantibodies Identify Novel Autism Spectrum Disorder Subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Richard E; Delhey, Leanna; Slattery, John; Tippett, Marie; Wynne, Rebecca; Rose, Shannon; Kahler, Stephen G.; Bennuri, Sirish C.; Melnyk, Stepan; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Quadros, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Folate receptor α (FRα) autoantibodies (FRAAs) are prevalent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They disrupt the transportation of folate across the blood-brain barrier by binding to the FRα. Children with ASD and FRAAs have been reported to respond well to treatment with a form of folate known as folinic acid, suggesting that they may be an important ASD subgroup to identify and treat. There has been no investigation of whether they manifest unique behavioral and physiological characteristic...

  17. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  18. Toxicity of the synthetic polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt (APS3) is due to specific block of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandič, Marjana; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Turk, Tom; Sepčić, Kristina; Benoit, Evelyne; Frangež, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro toxic effects of the synthetic polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt (APS3), from the Mediterranean marine sponge Reniera sarai, were evaluated on mammals, with emphasis to determine its mode of action. The median lethal doses of APS3 were 7.25 and higher that 20mg/kg in mouse and rat, respectively. Intravenous administration of 7.25 and 20mg/kg APS3 to rat caused a significant fall followed by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure accompanied by tachycardia. In addition, cumulative doses of APS3 (up to 60 mg/kg) inhibited rat nerve-evoked skeletal muscle contraction in vivo, with a median inhibitory dose (ID(50)) of 37.25mg/kg. When administrated locally by intramuscular injection to mouse, APS3 decreased the compound muscle action potential recorded in response to in vivo nerve stimulation, with an ID(50) of 0.5mg/kg. In vitro experiments confirmed the inhibitory effect of APS3 on mouse hemidiaphragm nerve-evoked muscle contraction with a median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 20.3 μM, without affecting directly elicited muscle contraction. The compound inhibited also miniature endplate potentials and nerve-evoked endplate potentials with an IC(50) of 7.28 μM in mouse hemidiaphragm. Finally, APS3 efficiently blocked acetylcholine-activated membrane inward currents flowing through Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) incorporated to Xenopus oocytes, with an IC(50) of 0.19 μM. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that APS3 blocks muscle-type nAChRs, and show for the first time that in vivo toxicity of APS3 is likely to occur through an antagonist action of the compound on these receptors.

  19. Inhibition of insulitis and prevention of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by blocking L-selectin and very late antigen 4 adhesion receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, X D; Karin, N; Tisch, R; Steinman, L; McDevitt, H O

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to the endothelial venules in the pancreatic islets is thought to be one of the initial steps in the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that leukocyte adhesion to endothelium is a sequential multistep process involving various different homing receptors. We report here that blocking different homing receptors--namely, L-selectin and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4)--which function during different stages of the adhesion process, by specific...

  20. L-653,328: an ocular hypotensive agent with modest beta receptor blocking activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugrue, M.F.; Gautheron, P.; Grove, J.; Mallorga, P.; Viader, M.P.; Baldwin, J.J.; Ponticello, G.S.; Varga, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    L-653,328 is the acetate ester of L-652,698 ((S)-3-tert-butylamino-1-(4-(2(hydroxy)ethyl)phenoxy)2-propanol). The penetration of L-652,698 into the albino rabbit eye was enhanced when the compound was instilled as its prodrug acetate ester. The instillation (one drop of 50 microliter) of 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1% solutions of L-653,328 significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner the elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) of alpha-chymotrypsinized rabbits by 3.2, 4.7 and 6.1 mm Hg, respectively. A 0.01% solution of L-652,698 failed to significantly lower IOP, whereas this dose of timolol (3.8 mm Hg) and betaxolol (3.3 mm Hg) was effective. L-652,698 was active at 0.05% and 0.1%. Extraocular beta-adrenoceptor blockade was quantified in ganglion-blocked, conscious rabbits by determining effects on heart rate and blood pressure changes to i.v. isoproterenol (0.5 microgram/kg). Doses of timolol blocking isoproterenol-induced hypotension and tachycardia by 50% were 0.0065% and 0.03%, respectively. The corresponding doses for betaxolol were greater than 3% (43% inhibition) and 0.3%. Heart rate and blood pressure changes to isoproterenol were blocked by 18 and 36%, respectively, after the instillation of a 3% solution of L-653,328. The reduced propensity of L-653,328 for extraocular beta-adrenoceptor blockade stems from the modest affinity of L-652,698, its active moiety, for beta-adrenoceptors. The Ki values of L-652,698 for displacement of 125I-iodocyanopindolol binding to beta 1-(left ventricle) and beta 2-binding sites (iris + ciliary body) in the rabbit were 5.7 microM and 7.3 microM, respectively. In marked contrast, the corresponding values for timolol were 12 nM and 1.8 nM.

  1. Determination of beta-adrenergic receptor blocking pharmaceuticals in united states wastewater effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggett, D.B.; Khan, I.A.; Foran, C.M.; Schlenk, D

    2003-02-01

    This is the first report of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist pharmaceuticals in United States wastewater effluent. - Beta adrenergic receptor antagonists ({beta}-Blockers) are frequently prescribed medications in the United States and have been identified in European municipal wastewater effluent, however no studies to date have investigated these compounds in United States wastewater effluent. Municipal wastewater effluent was collected from treatment facilities in Mississippi, Texas, and New York to investigate the occurrence of metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol. Propranolol was identified in all wastewater samples analyzed (n=34) at concentrations {<=}1.9 {mu}g/l. Metoprolol and nadolol were identified in {>=}71% of the samples with concentrations of metoprolol {<=}1.2 {mu}g/l and nadolol {<=}0.36 {mu}g/l. Time course studies at both Mississippi plants and the Texas plant indicate that concentrations of propranolol, metoprolol, and nadolol remain relatively constant at each sampling period. This study indicates that {beta}-Blockers are present in United States wastewater effluent in the ng/l to {mu}g/l range.

  2. Effects of pharmacological block of GABAA receptors on pallidal neurons in normal and parkinsonian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xue

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The globus pallidus plays a central integrative role in the basal ganglia circuitry. Morphological studies have revealed a high level of GABA and GABAA receptors in the globus pallidus. To further investigate the effects of endogenous GABAA neurotransmission in the globus pallidus of normal and parkinsonian rats, in vivo extracellular recording and behavioral tests were performed in the present studies. In normal rats, micro-pressure ejection of GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine (0.1 mM increased the spontaneous firing rate of pallidal neurons by 28.3%. Furthermore, in 6-hydroxydopamine parkinsonian rats, gabazine increased the firing rate by 46.0% on the lesioned side, which was significantly greater than that on the unlesioned side (21.5%, P<0.05, as well as that in normal rats (P<0.05. In the behaving rats, unilateral microinjection of gabazine (0.1 mM evoked consistent contralateral rotation in normal rats, and significantly potentiated the number of apomorphine-induced contralateral rotations in parkinsonian rats. The present electrophysiological and behavioral findings may provide a rational for further investigations into the potential of pallidal endogenous GABAA neurotransmission in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

  3. Determination of beta-adrenergic receptor blocking pharmaceuticals in united states wastewater effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first report of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist pharmaceuticals in United States wastewater effluent. - Beta adrenergic receptor antagonists (β-Blockers) are frequently prescribed medications in the United States and have been identified in European municipal wastewater effluent, however no studies to date have investigated these compounds in United States wastewater effluent. Municipal wastewater effluent was collected from treatment facilities in Mississippi, Texas, and New York to investigate the occurrence of metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol. Propranolol was identified in all wastewater samples analyzed (n=34) at concentrations ≤1.9 μg/l. Metoprolol and nadolol were identified in ≥71% of the samples with concentrations of metoprolol ≤1.2 μg/l and nadolol ≤0.36 μg/l. Time course studies at both Mississippi plants and the Texas plant indicate that concentrations of propranolol, metoprolol, and nadolol remain relatively constant at each sampling period. This study indicates that β-Blockers are present in United States wastewater effluent in the ng/l to μg/l range

  4. Update on D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA): a viral entry inhibitor that blocks CCR5 chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Michael R; Polianova, Maria; Yang, Quan-en; Leoung, Gifford S; Ruscetti, Francis W; Pert, Candace B

    2003-01-01

    Peptide T, named for its high threonine content (ASTTTNYT), was derived by a database search which assumed that a relevant receptor binding epitope within env (gp120) would have sequence homology to a known signaling peptide. Binding of radiolabeled gp120 to brain membranes was displaced by peptide T and three octapeptide analogs (including "DAPTA", Dala1-peptide T-amide, the protease-resistant analog now in Phase II clinical trials) with the same potency that these four octapeptides blocked infectivity of an early passage patient isolate. This 1986 report was controversial due to a number of laboratories' failure to find peptide T antiviral effects; we now know that peptide T is a potent HIV entry inhibitor selectively targeting CCR5 receptors with minimal effects on the X4 tropic lab adapted virus exclusively in use at that time. Early clinical trials, which demonstrated lack of toxicity and focused on neurological and neurocognitive benefits, are reviewed and data from a small ongoing Phase II trial--the first to assess peptide T's antiviral effects--are presented. Studies using infectivity, receptor binding, chemotaxis, and blockade of gp120-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, discussed and presented here. Peptide T and analogs of its core pentapeptide, present near the V2 stem of numerous gp120 isolates, are potent ligands for CCR5. Clinical data showing peptide T's immunomodulation of plasma cytokine levels and increases in the percentage of IFNgamma secreting CD8+ T cells in patients with HIV disease are presented and suggests additional therapeutic mechanisms via regulation of specific immunity.

  5. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile.

  6. Mechanism of direct Cav2.2 channel block by the κ-opioid receptor agonist U50488H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecki, Géza; Motin, Leonid; Adams, David J

    2016-10-01

    U50488H is a benzeneacetamide κ-opioid receptor (κ-OR) agonist analgesic, widely used for investigating the pharmacology of G protein-coupled κ-ORs. However, U50488H is also known to directly block various voltage-gated ion channels in a G protein-independent manner. We investigated the direct actions of U50488H on various high voltage-activated (HVA) and low voltage-activated (LVA) neuronal Ca(2+) channels heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. U50488H inhibited HVA rat Cav1.3 (rCav1.3), human Cav2.1 (hCav2.1), hCav2.2, hCav2.3, and LVA hCav3.1 and hCav3.2 channels in a concentration-dependent manner, with similar potencies characterised with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of ∼30 μM. U50488H concentrations causing direct Cav inhibition are typically >100 times higher than those producing κ-OR activation. Investigation of the mechanism of U50488H block of the Cav2.2 channel revealed that U50488H interacted with all major kinetic states of the channel - resting, open, and inactivated. U50488H did not affect the voltage dependence of activation but shifted the steady-state inactivation curve by ∼11 mV to more hyperpolarized potentials. U50488H also increased the rate of Ba(2+) current inactivation during a step depolarization and significantly delayed recovery from slow inactivation, compared with control. Cav2.2 current inhibition was frequency dependent during repetitive step depolarization at 1 Hz and 3 Hz, consistent with use-dependent block. In summary, our results suggest that preferential interaction of U50488H with inactivated Cav2.2 channels significantly contributes to reduced Cav2.2 channel availability and slow recovery form inactivation. We conclude that U50488H non-selectively blocks heterologously expressed neuronal HVA and LVA Cav channels in the absence of κ-ORs. This cross-reactivity also suggests potentially common U50488H binding motifs across Cav channel targets. PMID:27245500

  7. Screening system of blocking agents of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts in cells using fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong Ho; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) triggers cellular responses implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications; blockade of RAGE has been shown to inhibit the development of diabetic complications. To develop a screening system to identify novel disruptors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE)-RAGE binding, we used an AGE-RAGE binding system in RAGE-overexpressing cells; test compounds were screened using this system. To construct human RAGE-overexpressing cells, mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were stably transfected with the pcDNA-human RAGE (hRAGE) vector and selected under 1 mg/mL gentamicin (G418). RAGE expression in hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs was analyzed by Western blotting with specific RAGE antibody. To identify novel disruptors of AGE-RAGE binding, 50 single compounds and AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Alexa 488 (AGE-BSA labeled with Alexa 488) were treated to the hRAGE-overexpressing MMCs. Nonbinding AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 was washed and fluorescence measured by microtiter plate reader (excitation wavelength, 485 nm; emission wavelength, 528 nm). In hRAGE-overexpressing cells, only treatment with AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 significantly increased fluorescence intensity in a dose-dependent manner. Of 50 compounds tested, genistein disrupted AGE-RAGE binding in a dose-dependent manner. This AGE-RAGE binding system using AGE-BSA-Alexa 488 in hRAGE-overexpressing cells was suitable for screening of agents that disrupt AGE-hRAGE binding.

  8. Swim stress differentially blocks CRF receptor mediated responses in dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Christophe M; Beck, Sheryl G

    2010-10-01

    Modulation of the serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmitter system arising from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) is thought to support the behavioral effects of swim stress, i.e., immobility. In vivo pharmacological and anatomical studies suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synaptic transmission closely interact to set the response of the DR to swim stress. To investigate the cellular basis of these physiological mechanisms the effects of ovine CRF (oCRF) on GABA(A)-dependent miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons in acute mesencephalic slices obtained from rats either naïve or 24h after a 15 min swim stress session were tested. In this study, the effect of swim stress alone was to decrease the holding current, i.e., hyperpolarize the neuron, and to increase the amplitude and charge of mIPSCs recorded from non-5-HT neurons. Ovine CRF (10 nM) induced an increase in mIPSC frequency in 5-HT neurons recorded from naïve rats, an effect that was suppressed by swim stress. The inward current elicited by oCRF in both 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons was also blocked by swim stress. Ovine CRF increased mIPSCs amplitude and charge in both 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons, but this effect was not modified by swim stress. In concert with our previous findings that swim stress decreased input resistance, action potential threshold and action potential duration and increased glutamatergic synaptic activity the overall primary effect of swim stress is to increase the excitability of 5-HT neurons. These data provide a mechanism at the cellular level for the immobility induced by swim stress and identifies critical components of the raphe circuitry responsible for the altered output of 5-HT neurons induced by swim stress.

  9. The novel Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor KB-R7943 also blocks native and expressed neuronal nicotinic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, Antonio J; Herrero, Carlos J; García, Antonio G; Montiel, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effects of the novel Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor KB-R7943, 2-[2-[4-(4-nitrobenzyloxy)phenyl]ethyl]isothiourea methanesulphonate, on the native nicotinic receptors present at the bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, as well as on rat brain α3β4 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes.As expected, KB-R7943 blocked the Na+-gradient dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells (IC50 of 5.5 μM); but in addition, the compound also inhibited the 45Ca2+ entry and the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]c, stimulated by 5 s pulses of ACh (IC50 of 6.5 and 1.7 μM, respectively).In oocytes expressing α3β4 and α7 nicotinic AChRs, voltage-clamped at −60 mV, inward currents elicited by 1 s pulses of 100 μM ACh (IACh) were blocked by KB-R7943 with an IC50 of 0.4 μM and a Hill coefficient of 0.9.Blockade of α3β4 currents by KB-R7943 was noncompetitive; moreover, the blocker (0.3 μM) became more active as the ACh concentration increased (34 versus 66% blockade at 30 μM and 1 mM ACh, respectively).Inhibition of α3β4 currents by 0.3 μM KB-R7943 was more pronounced at hyperpolarized potentials. If given within the ACh pulse (10 μM), the inhibition amounted to 33, 64 and 80% in oocytes voltage-clamped at −40, −60 and −100 mV, respectively. The onset of blockade was faster and the recovery slower at −100 mV; the reverse was true at −40 mV.In conclusion, KB-R7943 is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChRs; moreover, it displays many features of an open-channel blocker at the rat brain α3β4 AChR. These results should be considered when KB-R7943 is to be used to study Ca2+ homeostasis in cells expressing nicotinic AChRs and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. PMID:10952680

  10. Naloxone's pentapeptide binding site on filamin A blocks Mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling and CREB activation of acute morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoau-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Chronic morphine causes the mu opioid receptor (MOR to switch its coupling from Gi/o to Gs, resulting in excitatory signaling via both Galphas and its Gbetagamma dimer. Ultra-low-dose naloxone (NLX prevents this switch and attenuates opioid tolerance and dependence. This protective effect is mediated via a high-affinity interaction of NLX to a pentapeptide region in c-terminal filamin A (FLNA, a scaffolding protein interacting with MOR. In organotypic striatal slice cultures, we now show that acute morphine induces a dose-dependent Go-to-Gs coupling switch at 5 and 15 min that resolves by 1 hr. The acute Gs coupling induced by 100 microM morphine was completely prevented by co-treatment with 100 pM NLX, (+NLX, or naltrexone (NTX, or their pentapeptide binding site (FLNA(2561-2565, which we show can act as a decoy for MOR or bind to FLNA itself. All of these co-treatments presumably prevent the MOR-FLNA interaction. Since ultra-low-dose NTX also attenuates the addictive properties of opioids, we assessed striatal cAMP production and CREB phosphorylation at S(133. Correlating with the Gs coupling, acute morphine induced elevated cAMP levels and a several-fold increase in pS(133CREB that were also completely blocked by NLX, NTX or the FLNA pentapeptide. We propose that acute, robust stimulation of MOR causes an interaction with FLNA that allows an initially transient MOR-Gs coupling, which recovers with receptor recycling but persists when MOR stimulation is repeated or prolonged. The complete prevention of this acute, morphine-induced MOR-Gs coupling by 100 pM NLX/NTX or 10 microM pentapeptide segment of FLNA further elucidates both MOR signaling and the mechanism of action of ultra-low-dose NLX or NTX in attenuating opioid tolerance, dependence and addictive potential.

  11. Hepatitis B virus polymerase blocks pattern recognition receptor signaling via interaction with DDX3: implications for immune evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Wang

    Full Text Available Viral infection leads to induction of pattern-recognition receptor signaling, which leads to interferon regulatory factor (IRF activation and ultimately interferon (IFN production. To establish infection, many viruses have strategies to evade the innate immunity. For the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which causes chronic infection in the liver, the evasion strategy remains uncertain. We now show that HBV polymerase (Pol blocks IRF signaling, indicating that HBV Pol is the viral molecule that effectively counteracts host innate immune response. In particular, HBV Pol inhibits TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1/IkappaB kinase-epsilon (IKKepsilon, the effector kinases of IRF signaling. Intriguingly, HBV Pol inhibits TBK1/IKKepsilon activity by disrupting the interaction between IKKepsilon and DDX3 DEAD box RNA helicase, which was recently shown to augment TBK1/IKKepsilon activity. This unexpected role of HBV Pol may explain how HBV evades innate immune response in the early phase of the infection. A therapeutic implication of this work is that a strategy to interfere with the HBV Pol-DDX3 interaction might lead to the resolution of life-long persistent infection.

  12. PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles as Tumor Ecrosis Factor-α Receptor Blocking Peptide Carriers: Preparation,Characterization and Release in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; YANG Anshu; LI Zhuoya; XU Huibi; YANG Xiangliang

    2007-01-01

    To assess the merits of PEGylated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles as drug carriers for tumor necrosis factor-α receptor blocking peptide (TNFR-BP), PEG-PLGA copolymer,which could be used to prepare the stealth nanoparticles, was synthesized with methoxypolyethyleneglycol,DL-lactide and glycolide. The structure of PEG-PLGA was confirmed with 1H-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy,and the molecular weight (MW) was determined by gel permeation chromatography. Fluorescent FITC-TNFR-BP was chosen as model protein and encapsulated within PEG-PLGA nanoparticles using the double emulsion method. Atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy were employed to characterize the stealth nanoparticles fabricated for morphology, size with polydispersity index and zeta potential. Encapsulation efficiency (EE) and the release of FITC-TNFR-BP in nanoparticles in vitro were measured by the fluorescence measurement. The stealth nanoparticles were found to have the mean diameter less than 270 nm and zeta potential less than-20 mV. In all nanoparticle formulations, more than 45% of EE were obtained. FITC-TNFR-BP release from the PEG-PLGA nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern, initial burst release and consequently sustained release. The experimental results show that PEG-PLGA nanoparticles possess the potential to develop as drug carriers for controlled release applications of TNFR-BP.

  13. Point mutations at the local anesthetic receptor site modulate the state-dependent block of rat Na v1.4 sodium channels by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2007-05-01

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides (PTIs) selectively block sodium channels at membrane potentials that promote slow sodium channel inactivation and are proposed to interact with a site that overlaps the local anesthetic (LA) receptor site. Mutagenesis studies identified two amino acid residues in the S6 segment of homology domain IV (Phe-1579 and Tyr-1586 in the rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channel) as principal elements of the LA receptor. To test the hypothesis that PTIs bind to the LA receptor, we constructed mutated Na(v)1.4/F1579A and Na(v)1.4/Y1586A cDNAs, expressed native and mutated channels in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effects of these mutations on channel block by three PTIs (indoxacarb, its bioactivation product DCJW, and RH3421) by two-electrode voltage clamp. DCJW and RH3421 had no effect on Na(v)1.4 channels held at -120mV but caused a slowly developing block upon depolarization to -30mV. Estimated IC(50) values following 15min of exposure were 1 and 4muM for DCJW and RH3421, respectively. Indoxacarb failed to block Na(v)1.4 channels under all experimental conditions. Sensitivity to block by DCJW and RH3421 at -30mV was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.4/F1579A channels, a finding that is consistent with the impact of this mutation on drug binding. In contrast to its effect on drug binding, the Y1586A mutation increased the sensitivity of Na(v)1.4 channels held at -30mV to all three compounds, conferring modest sensitivity to indoxacarb and increasing sensitivity to DCJW and RH3421 by 58- and 16-fold, respectively. These results provide direct evidence for the action of PTIs at the LA receptor.

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in formalin-fixed breast carcinoma cell block preparations: correlation of results to corresponding tissue block (needle core and excision) samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Mary D; Birdsong, George G; Siddiqui, Momin T; Cohen, Cynthia; Hanley, Krisztina Z

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of ER, PR and Her 2 are routinely performed on breast carcinomas. For accurate detection of these markers, compliance with the ASCO/CAP guidelines is recommended. Our previous study showed that alcohol fixation did not affect ER results when alcohol-fixed cell block (CB) sections were compared to formalin-fixed tissue sections, while PR and Her2 showed less concordance. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare ER, PR and Her2 IHC results on formalin-fixed CB sections to those observed on subsequent surgical (needle core or resection) specimens (SS). Fifty cases of formalin fixed CB samples obtained from primary (18%) and metastatic (82%) breast carcinomas were studied, all of which had subsequent SS available. ER, PR, and Her2 IHC studies were done on all samples and results were compared. ER results on formalin-fixed CB samples showed excellent correlation with SS (correlation coefficient cc = 0.82). While there was minimal improvement in PR results (cc = 0.433), Her2 detection did not improve by formalin fixation (cc = 0.439). Formalin fixation for CB preparations does not significantly improve the already good detection of ER positive breast tumors. The concordance rate in PR and IHC results between formalin-fixed CB and SS samples showed improvement as compared with the alcohol-fixed CB results. However, there was no improvement in detection of Her2 overexpression by using formalin fixation on cytology specimens.

  15. The Dinoflagellate Toxin 20-Methyl Spirolide-G Potently Blocks Skeletal Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Aráoz, Rómulo; Iorga, Bogdan I.; Benoit, Evelyne; Reynaud, Morgane; Servent, Denis; Molgó, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic imine toxin 20-methyl spirolide G (20-meSPX-G), produced by the toxigenic dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii/Alexandrium peruvianum, has been previously reported to contaminate shellfish in various European coastal locations, as revealed by mouse toxicity bioassay. The aim of the present study was to determine its toxicological profile and its molecular target selectivity. 20-meSPX-G blocked nerve-evoked isometric contractions in isolated mouse neuromuscular preparations, while it had no action on contractions elicited by direct electrical stimulation, and reduced reversibly nerve-evoked compound muscle action potential amplitudes in anesthetized mice. Voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes revealed that 20-meSPX-G potently inhibited currents evoked by ACh on Torpedo muscle-type and human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), whereas lower potency was observed in human α4β2 nAChR. Competition-binding assays showed that 20-meSPX-G fully displaced [3H]epibatidine binding to HEK-293 cells expressing the human α3β2 (Ki = 0.040 nM), whereas a 90-fold lower affinity was detected in human α4β2 nAChR. The spirolide displaced [125I]α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo membranes (Ki = 0.028 nM) and in HEK-293 cells expressing chick chimeric α7-5HT3 nAChR (Ki = 0.11 nM). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that 20-meSPX-G is a potent antagonist of nAChRs, and its subtype selectivity is discussed on the basis of molecular docking models. PMID:27563924

  16. Characterization of Inhibitory Anti-insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor Antibodies with Different Epitope Specificity and Ligand-blocking Properties: IMPLICATIONS FOR MECHANISM OF ACTION IN VIVOS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Doern, Adam; Cao, Xianjun; Sereno, Arlene; Reyes, Christopher L.; Altshuler, Angelina; Huang, Flora; Hession, Cathy; Flavier, Albert; Favis, Michael; Tran, Hon; Ailor, Eric; Levesque, Melissa; MURPHY, TRACEY; Berquist, Lisa; Tamraz, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies directed against the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have recently gained significant momentum in the clinic because of preliminary data generated in human patients with cancer. These antibodies inhibit ligand-mediated activation of IGF-1R and the resulting down-stream signaling cascade. Here we generated a panel of antibodies against IGF-1R and screened them for their ability to block the binding of both IGF-1 and IGF-2 at es...

  17. Analysis of Onset Mechanisms of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulator Fingolimod-Induced Atrioventricular Conduction Block and QT-Interval Prolongation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Yukihiro [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Nakamura, Yuji [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Kitahara, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8541 (Japan); Harada, Takuma [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Kato, Kazuhiko; Ninomiya, Tomohisa [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Cao, Xin [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Ohara, Hiroshi [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8541 (Japan); Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Suzuki, Kokichi [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Ando, Kentaro [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); and others

    2014-11-15

    Fingolimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype 1, 3, 4 and 5 modulator, has been used for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, but atrioventricular conduction block and/or QT-interval prolongation have been reported in some patients after the first dose. In this study, we directly compared the electropharmacological profiles of fingolimod with those of siponimod, a modulator of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 and 5, using in vivo guinea-pig model and in vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) assay to better understand the onset mechanisms of the clinically observed adverse events. Fingolimod (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) or siponimod (0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg) was intravenously infused over 10 min to the halothane-anaesthetized guinea pigs (n = 4), whereas the effects of fingolimod (1 μmol/L) and siponimod (1 μmol/L) on hERG current were examined (n = 3). The high doses of fingolimod and siponimod induced atrioventricular conduction block, whereas the low dose of siponimod prolonged PR interval, which was not observed by that of fingolimod. The high dose of fingolimod prolonged QT interval, which was not observed by either dose of siponimod. Meanwhile, fingolimod significantly inhibited hERG current, which was not observed by siponimod. These results suggest that S1P receptor subtype 1 in the heart could be one of the candidates for fingolimod- and siponimod-induced atrioventricular conduction block since S1P receptor subtype 5 is localized at the brain, and that direct I{sub Kr} inhibition may play a key role in fingolimod-induced QT-interval prolongation. - Highlights: • Fingolimod and siponimod are S1P{sub 1,3,4,5} and S1P{sub 1,5} receptor modulators, respectively. • Fingolimod and siponimod induced AV block in the halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs. • S1P{sub 1} in the hearts may be the target of fingolimod- and siponimod-induced AV block. • Fingolimod directly inhibited hERG current, which was not

  18. D-aspartate and NMDA, but not L-aspartate, block AMPA receptors in rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Xiang-Qun; Frandsen, Anne; Lu, Wei-Yang;

    2005-01-01

    to the right. Schild plot analysis indicated that D-aspartate acts competitively to block AMPARs. The K(b) for D-aspartate was estimated to be 0.93 mM. 4 D-aspartate also blocked L-glutamate-induced current in Xenopus laevis oocytes that expressed recombinant homomeric AMPARs. 5 NMDA possessed similar...

  19. Exchange of glutamine-217 to glutamate of Clostridium limosum exoenzyme C3 turns the asparagine-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase into an arginine-modifying enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsgesang, Martin; Aktories, Klaus

    2006-01-24

    C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferaseses are produced by Clostridium species, Bacillus cereus, and various Staphylococcus aureus strains. The exoenzymes modify the low-molecular-mass GTPases RhoA, B, and C. In structural studies of C3-like exoenzymes, an ARTT-motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) was identified that appears to be involved in substrate specificity and recognition (Han, S., Arvai, A. S., Clancy, S. B., Tainer, J. A. (2001) J. Mol. Biol. 305, 95-107). Exchange of Gln217, which is a key residue of the ARTT-motif, to Glu in C3 from Clostridium limosum results in inhibition of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity toward RhoA. The mutant protein is still capable of NAD-binding and possesses NAD+ glycohydrolase activity. Whereas recombinant wild-type C3 modifies Rho proteins specifically at an asparagine residue (Asn41), Gln217Glu-C3 is capable of ADP-ribosylation of poly-arginine but not poly-asparagine. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, a model substrate for many arginine-specific ADP-ribosyltransferases, is modified by the Gln217Glu-C3 transferase. Also in C3 ADP-ribosyltransferases from Clostridium botulinum and B. cereus, the exchange of the equivalent Gln residue to Glu blocked asparagine modification of RhoA but elicited arginine-specific ADP-ribosylation. Moreover, the Gln217Glu-C3lim transferase was able to ADP-ribosylate recombinant wild-type C3lim at Arg86, resulting in decrease in ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the wild-type enzyme. The data indicate that the exchange of one amino acid residue in the ARTT-motif turns the asparagine-modifying ADP-ribosyltransferases of the C3 family into arginine-ADP-ribosylating transferases.

  20. Insulin/insulin like growth factors in cancer: new roles for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, tumor resistance mechanisms and new blocking strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Salisbury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R and the insulin receptor (IR are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs that are expressed in cancer cells. The results of different studies indicate that tumor proliferation and survival is dependent on the IGF1R and IR, and that their inhibition leads to reductions in proliferation and increases in cell death. Molecular targeting therapies that have been used in solid tumors include: anti-IGF1R antibodies, anti-IGF1/IGF2 antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that suppress IGF1R and IR kinase activity. New advances in the molecular basis of anti-IGF1R blocking antibodies reveal they are biased agonists and promote the binding of IGF1 to integrin β3 receptors in some cancer cells. Our recent reports indicate that pharmacological aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR ligands inhibit breast cancer cell responses to IGFs, suggesting that targeting AHR may have benefit in cancers whose proliferation and survival are dependent on insulin/IGF signaling. Novel aspects of IGF1R/IR in cancer, such as biased agonism, integrin β3 signaling, AHR and new therapeutic targeting strategies will be discussed.

  1. 45 CFR 95.619 - Use of ADP systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Data Processing Equipment and Services-Conditions for Federal Financial Participation (FFP) Specific Conditions for Ffp § 95.619 Use of ADP systems. ADP systems designed, developed, or installed with FFP...

  2. Dielectric, thermal and mechanical properties of ADP doped PVA composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Jagadish; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Rathod, Sunil G.; Sheela, T.; Naik, Ishwar

    2015-06-01

    Polymer composites of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), doped with different concentrations of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) has been prepared by solution casting. The formation of complexation between ADP and PVA was confirmed with the help of Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows thermal stability of the prepared composites. Impedance analyzer study revealed the increase in dielectric constant and loss with increase the ADP concentration and the strain rate of the prepared composites decreases with ADP concentration.

  3. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part 95... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP for State ADP expenditures. 457.230 Section 457...; Reduction of Federal Medical Payments § 457.230 FFP for State ADP expenditures. FFP is available for...

  4. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Belyy

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia.

  5. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod (Guelph); (NIH); (UCSD)

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  6. Characterization of inhibitory anti-insulin-like growth factor receptor antibodies with different epitope specificity and ligand-blocking properties: implications for mechanism of action in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, Adam; Cao, Xianjun; Sereno, Arlene; Reyes, Christopher L; Altshuler, Angelina; Huang, Flora; Hession, Cathy; Flavier, Albert; Favis, Michael; Tran, Hon; Ailor, Eric; Levesque, Melissa; Murphy, Tracey; Berquist, Lisa; Tamraz, Susan; Snipas, Tracey; Garber, Ellen; Shestowsky, William S; Rennard, Rachel; Graff, Christilyn P; Wu, Xiufeng; Snyder, William; Cole, Lindsay; Gregson, David; Shields, Michael; Ho, Steffan N; Reff, Mitchell E; Glaser, Scott M; Dong, Jianying; Demarest, Stephen J; Hariharan, Kandasamy

    2009-04-10

    Therapeutic antibodies directed against the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have recently gained significant momentum in the clinic because of preliminary data generated in human patients with cancer. These antibodies inhibit ligand-mediated activation of IGF-1R and the resulting down-stream signaling cascade. Here we generated a panel of antibodies against IGF-1R and screened them for their ability to block the binding of both IGF-1 and IGF-2 at escalating ligand concentrations (>1 microm) to investigate allosteric versus competitive blocking mechanisms. Four distinct inhibitory classes were found as follows: 1) allosteric IGF-1 blockers, 2) allosteric IGF-2 blockers, 3) allosteric IGF-1 and IGF-2 blockers, and 4) competitive IGF-1 and IGF-2 blockers. The epitopes of representative antibodies from each of these classes were mapped using a purified IGF-1R library containing 64 mutations. Most of these antibodies bound overlapping surfaces on the cysteine-rich repeat and L2 domains. One class of allosteric IGF-1 and IGF-2 blocker was identified that bound a separate epitope on the outer surface of the FnIII-1 domain. Using various biophysical techniques, we show that the dual IGF blockers inhibit ligand binding using a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from highly allosteric to purely competitive. Binding of IGF-1 or the inhibitory antibodies was associated with conformational changes in IGF-1R, linked to the ordering of dynamic or unstructured regions of the receptor. These results suggest IGF-1R uses disorder/order within its polypeptide sequence to regulate its activity. Interestingly, the activity of representative allosteric and competitive inhibitors on H322M tumor cell growth in vitro was reflective of their individual ligand-blocking properties. Many of the antibodies in the clinic likely adopt one of the inhibitory mechanisms described here, and the outcome of future clinical studies may reveal whether a particular inhibitory mechanism

  7. The natural history of ADP-ribosyltransferases and the ADP-ribosylation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, L; Zhang, Dapeng; de Souza, Robson F; Anand, Swadha; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of proteins, nucleic acids, or small molecules has evolved in at least three structurally unrelated superfamilies of enzymes, namely ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART), the Sirtuins, and probably TM1506. Of these, the ART superfamily is the most diverse in terms of structure, active site residues, and targets that they modify. The primary diversification of the ART superfamily occurred in the context of diverse bacterial conflict systems, wherein ARTs play both offensive and defensive roles. These include toxin-antitoxin systems, virus-host interactions, intraspecific antagonism (polymorphic toxins), symbiont/parasite effectors/toxins, resistance to antibiotics, and repair of RNAs cleaved in conflicts. ARTs evolving in these systems have been repeatedly acquired by lateral transfer throughout eukaryotic evolution, starting from the PARP family, which was acquired prior to the last eukaryotic common ancestor. They were incorporated into eukaryotic regulatory/epigenetic control systems (e.g., PARP family and NEURL4), and also used as defensive (e.g., pierisin and CARP-1 families) or immunity-related proteins (e.g., Gig2-like ARTs). The ADP-ribosylation system also includes other domains, such as the Macro, ADP-ribosyl glycohydrolase, NADAR, and ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which appear to have initially diversified in bacterial conflict-related systems. Unlike ARTs, sirtuins appear to have a much smaller presence in conflict-related systems.

  8. The natural history of ADP-ribosyltransferases and the ADP-ribosylation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, L; Zhang, Dapeng; de Souza, Robson F; Anand, Swadha; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of proteins, nucleic acids, or small molecules has evolved in at least three structurally unrelated superfamilies of enzymes, namely ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART), the Sirtuins, and probably TM1506. Of these, the ART superfamily is the most diverse in terms of structure, active site residues, and targets that they modify. The primary diversification of the ART superfamily occurred in the context of diverse bacterial conflict systems, wherein ARTs play both offensive and defensive roles. These include toxin-antitoxin systems, virus-host interactions, intraspecific antagonism (polymorphic toxins), symbiont/parasite effectors/toxins, resistance to antibiotics, and repair of RNAs cleaved in conflicts. ARTs evolving in these systems have been repeatedly acquired by lateral transfer throughout eukaryotic evolution, starting from the PARP family, which was acquired prior to the last eukaryotic common ancestor. They were incorporated into eukaryotic regulatory/epigenetic control systems (e.g., PARP family and NEURL4), and also used as defensive (e.g., pierisin and CARP-1 families) or immunity-related proteins (e.g., Gig2-like ARTs). The ADP-ribosylation system also includes other domains, such as the Macro, ADP-ribosyl glycohydrolase, NADAR, and ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which appear to have initially diversified in bacterial conflict-related systems. Unlike ARTs, sirtuins appear to have a much smaller presence in conflict-related systems. PMID:25027823

  9. Parainfluenza virus 3 blocks antiviral mediators downstream of the interferon lambda receptor by modulating stat1 phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramyxoviruses are known to inhibit type I interferon (IFN) production, however there is a lack of information regarding the type III IFN response during infection. Type III IFNs signal through a unique heterodimeric receptor, the IFN-'R1/IL-10R2, which is primarily expressed by epithelial cells. ...

  10. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor production and early endotoxin tolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Henricson, B E; Neta, R; Vogel, S N

    1991-01-01

    In this report, administration of a recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein to mice was found to inhibit induction of colony-stimulating factor as well as induction of early endotoxin tolerance by lipopolysaccharide. These findings provide direct evidence that interleukin-1 is an intermediate in these two lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena.

  11. Blocking glucocorticoid receptors at adolescent age prevents enhanced freezing between repeated cue-exposures after conditioned fear in adult mice raised under chronic early life stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, J Marit; Ter Horst, Judith P; Loi, Manila; den Blaauwen, Jan; Bangert, Eline; Fernández, Guillén; Joëls, Marian; Oitzl, Melly S; Krugers, Harm J

    2016-09-01

    Early life adversity can have long-lasting impact on learning and memory processes and increase the risk to develop stress-related psychopathologies later in life. In this study we investigated (i) how chronic early life stress (ELS) - elicited by limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal day 2 to 9 - affects conditioned fear in adult mice and (ii) whether these effects can be prevented by blocking glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) at adolescent age. In adult male and female mice, ELS did not affect freezing behavior to the first tone 24h after training in an auditory fear-conditioning paradigm. Exposure to repeated tones 24h after training also resulted in comparable freezing behavior in ELS and control mice, both in males and females. However, male (but not female) ELS compared to control mice showed significantly more freezing behavior between the tone-exposures, i.e. during the cue-off periods. Intraperitoneal administration of the GR antagonist RU38486 during adolescence (on postnatal days 28-30) fully prevented enhanced freezing behavior during the cue-off period in adult ELS males. Western blot analysis revealed no effects of ELS on hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid receptors, neither at postnatal day 28 nor at adult age, when mice were behaviorally tested. We conclude that ELS enhances freezing behavior in adult mice in a potentially safe context after cue-exposure, which can be normalized by brief blockade of glucocorticoid receptors during the critical developmental window of adolescence. PMID:27246249

  12. A fungal metabolite asperparaline a strongly and selectively blocks insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: the first report on the mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hirata

    Full Text Available Asperparalines produced by Aspergillus japonicus JV-23 induce paralysis in silkworm (Bombyx mori larvae, but the target underlying insect toxicity remains unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of asperparaline A on ligand-gated ion channels expressed in cultured larval brain neurons of the silkworm using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Bath-application of asperparaline A (10 µM had no effect on the membrane current, but when delivered for 1 min prior to co-application with 10 µM acetylcholine (ACh, it blocked completely the ACh-induced current that was sensitive to mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR-selective antaogonist. In contrast, 10 µM asperparaline A was ineffective on the γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-induced responses of the Bombyx larval neurons. The fungal alkaloid showed no-use dependency in blocking the ACh-induced response with distinct affinity for the peak and slowly-desensitizing current amplitudes of the response to 10 µM ACh in terms of IC(50 values of 20.2 and 39.6 nM, respectively. Asperparaline A (100 nM reduced the maximum neuron response to ACh with a minimal shift in EC(50, suggesting that the alkaloid is non-competitive with ACh. In contrast to showing marked blocking action on the insect nAChRs, it exhibited only a weak blocking action on chicken α3β4, α4β2 and α7 nAChRs expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a high selectivity for insect over certain vertebrate nAChRs.

  13. Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-agonist, blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory pathways in mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Tae Wan

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims During the acute phase response, cytokines induce marked alterations in lipid metabolism including an increase in serum triglyceride levels and a decrease in hepatic fatty acid oxidation, in bile acid synthesis, and in high-density lipoprotein levels. Methods Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs: PPARα, β/δ, and γ) regulate fatty acid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, cell proliferation, differentiation and inflammation. Proinflammatory profiles including tumor n...

  14. Heterologous desensitization of bombesin-induced mitogenesis by prolonged exposure to vasopressin: a post-receptor signal transduction block.

    OpenAIRE

    Millar, J B; Rozengurt, E

    1989-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells to vasopressin prevents mitogenic stimulation on subsequent addition of bombesin. This heterologous desensitization is selective and can be mimicked by vasopressin agonists, including [Lys8]vasopressin and oxytocin but not by the V1-type-specific vasopressin receptor antagonist [Pmp1,O-Me-Tyr2,Arg8]vasopressin [where Pmp is 1-(beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopenthamethylene propionic acid)]. Furthermore, vasopressin-induced loss of responsiveness t...

  15. Systemic or intra-amygdala infusion of an endocannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 blocked propofol-induced anterograde amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y; Wang, J; Xu, P B; Xu, Y J; Miao, C H

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is well-known for its anterograde amnesic actions. However, a recent experiment showed that propofol can also produce retrograde memory enhancement effects via an interaction with the endocannabinoid CB1 system. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that the regulating effect of propofol on the endocannabinoid CB1 system might also decrease the anterograde amnesic effect of propofol under some conditions, which might be a risk factor for intraoperative awareness. Since, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) has been confirmed to mediate propofol-induced anterograde amnesia and the BLA contains a high concentration of CB1 receptors, the authors investigated whether and how the endocannabinoid system, particularly the CB1 receptor within BLA, influences propofol-induced anterograde amnesia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats trained with inhibitory avoidance (IA) were systematically pre-trained using a memory-impairing dose of propofol (25 mg/kg). Before propofol administration, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of a CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (1 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) or a bilateral intra-BLA injection of AM251 (0.6 ng or 6 ng per 0.5 μl). Twenty-four hours after IA training, the IA retention latency was tested. It was found that systemic or intra-BLA injection of a non-regulating dose of AM251 (2 mg/kg or 6 ng per 0.5 μl, respectively) blocked the memory-impairing effect of propofol. These results indicate that the anterograde amnesic effect of propofol is mediated, in part, by activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the BLA.

  16. Clinical significance of proliferation, apoptosis and senescence of nasopharyngeal cells by the simultaneously blocking EGF, IGF-1 receptors and Bcl-xl genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Guodong [Anatomy and Embryology, Wuhan University School of Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Peng, Tao; Zhou, Xuhong [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhu, Jun; Kong, Zhihua; Ma, Li; Xiong, Zhi [Anatomy and Embryology, Wuhan University School of Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Yuan, Yulin, E-mail: yuanyulin19620120@126.com [Anatomy and Embryology, Wuhan University School of Medicine, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Highlight: •Construction of shRNA segments expression vectors is valid by the investigation of RT-PCR for IGF1R, EGFR and Bcl-xl mRNA and protein expression. •Studies have suggested that the vectors in blocking these genes of the growth factor receptors and anti- apoptosis is capable of breaking the balance of tumor growth so that tumor trend apoptosis and senescence. •Simultaneously blocking multiple genes that are abnormally expressed may be more effective in treating cancer cells than silencing a single gene. -- Abstract: Background: In previous work, we constructed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmids that targeted human EGF and IGF-1 receptors messenger RNA, respectively, and demonstrated that these vectors could induce apoptosis of human nasopharyngeal cell lines (CNE2) and inhibit ligand-induced pAkt and pErk activation. Method: We have constructed multiple shRNA expression vectors of targeting EGFR, IGF1R and Bcl-xl, which were transfected to the CNE2 cells. The mRNA expression was assessed by RT-PCR. The growth of the cells, cell cycle progression, apoptosis of the cells, senescent tumor cells and the proteins of EGFR, IGF1R and Bcl-xl were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometry, cytochemical therapy or Western blot. Results: In group of simultaneously blocking EGFR, IGF1R and Bcl-xl genes, the mRNA of EGFR, IGF1R and Bcl-xl expression was decreased by (66.66 ± 3.42)%, (73.97 ± 2.83)% and (64.79 ± 2.83)%, and the protein expressions was diminished to (67.69 ± 4.02)%, (74.32 ± 2.30)%, and (60.00 ± 3.34)%, respectively. Meanwhile, the cell apoptosis increased by 65.32 ± 0.18%, 65.16 ± 0.25% and 55.47 ± 0.45%, and senescent cells increased by 1.42 ± 0.15%, 2.26 ± 0.15% and 3.22 ± 0.15% in the second, third and fourth day cultures, respectively. Conclusions: Simultaneously blocking EGFR, IGF1R and Bcl-xl genes is capable of altering the balance between proliferating versus apoptotic and senescent cells in the favor of both of apoptosis and

  17. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge Blocks Ethanol-Induced Synaptic Dysfunction through Regulation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Jin; Lee, Seungheon; Jung, Ji Wook; Lee, Young Choon; Choi, Seong-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Consumption of high doses of ethanol can lead to amnesia, which often manifests as a blackout. These blackouts experienced by ethanol consumers may be a major cause of the social problems associated with excess ethanol consumption. However, there is currently no established treatment for preventing these ethanol-induced blackouts. In this study, we tested the ethanol extract of the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) for its ability to mitigate ethanol-induced behavioral and synaptic deficits. To test behavioral deficits, an object recognition test was conducted in mouse. In this test, ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) impaired object recognition memory, but SM (200 mg/kg) prevented this impairment. To evaluate synaptic deficits, NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the mouse hippocampal slices were tested, as they are known to be vulnerable to ethanol and are associated with ethanol-induced amnesia. SM (10 and 100 μg/ml) significantly ameliorated ethanol-induced long-term potentiation and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSP deficits in the hippocampal slices. Therefore, these results suggest that SM prevents ethanol-induced amnesia by protecting the hippocampus from NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity deficits induced by ethanol. PMID:27257009

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a dual kappa-delta opioid receptor agonist analgesic blocking cocaine reward behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Subrath, Joan J; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-11-18

    3-Iodobenzoyl naltrexamine (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic belonging to the pharmacologically diverse 6β-amidoepoxymorphinan group of opioids. We present the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of five analogs of IBNtxA. The scaffold of IBNtxA was modified by removing the 14-hydroxy group, incorporating a 7,8 double bond and various N-17 alkyl substituents. The structural modifications resulted in analogs with picomolar affinities for opioid receptors. The lead compound (MP1104) was found to exhibit approximately 15-fold greater antinociceptive potency (ED50 = 0.33 mg/kg) compared with morphine, mediated through the activation of kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. Despite its kappa agonism, this lead derivative did not cause place aversion or preference in mice in a place-conditioning assay, even at doses 3 times the analgesic ED50. However, pretreatment with the lead compound prevented the reward behavior associated with cocaine in a conditioned place preference assay. Together, these results suggest the promise of dual acting kappa- and delta-opioid receptor agonists as analgesics and treatments for cocaine addiction.

  19. Blocking of orexin receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus has no effect on conditioned fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwen eDong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT projects to the central nucleus of the amygdala and recent experimental evidence indicates a role for the PVT in conditioned fear. Furthermore, the PVT contains a high density of orexin receptors and fibers and acute injections of orexin antagonist into the PVT produce anxiolytic effects. The present study was done to determine if administration of a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA in the region of the PVT interfered with the expression of conditioned fear in rats exposed to cued and contextual conditioning paradigms. Infusion of 0.5 µl of the DORA N-biphenyl-2-yl-1-{[(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2yl sulfanyl] acetyl}-L-prolinamide at a concentration of 0.1, 1.0, and 10 nmol had no effect on the freezing produced by exposing rats to an auditory cue or the context associated with foot shock. In contrast, the 1.0 and 10 nmol doses were anxiolytic in the social interaction test. The results of the present study do not support a role for orexin receptors in the PVT in the expression of learned fear. The finding that the 1.0 and 10 nmol doses of DORA in the PVT region were anxiolytic in the social interaction test is consistent with other studies indicating a role for orexins in the PVT in anxiety-like behaviors.

  20. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code.

  1. ADP Analysis project for the Human Resources Management Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The ADP (Automated Data Processing) Analysis Project was conducted for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of NASA's Langley Research Center. The three major areas of work in the project were computer support, automated inventory analysis, and an ADP study for the Division. The goal of the computer support work was to determine automation needs of Division personnel and help them solve computing problems. The goal of automated inventory analysis was to find a way to analyze installed software and usage on a Macintosh. Finally, the ADP functional systems study for the Division was designed to assess future HRMD needs concerning ADP organization and activities.

  2. The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor agonist G-1 suppresses proliferation of ovarian cancer cells by blocking tubulin polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C; Lv, X.; C. He; Hua, G; Tsai, M-Y; Davis, J S

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) has recently been reported to mediate the non-genomic action of estrogen in different types of cells and tissues. G-1 (1-[4-(6-bromobenzo[1,3] dioxol-5yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone) was developed as a potent and selective agonist for GPER. G-1 has been shown to induce the expression of genes and activate pathways that facilitate cancer cell proliferation by activating GPER. Here we demonstrate that G-1 has an ...

  3. Interaction of ADP, atractyloside, and gummiferin on the ADP translocase of the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignais, P.V.; Vignais, P.M.; Defaye, G.; Lauquin, G.; Doussiere, J.; Chabert, J.; Brandolin, G.

    1972-05-01

    From international conference on mechanism in bioenergetica; Bari, Italy (1 May 1972). Two specific inhibitors of the adenine nucleotide translocation, gummiferin (GUM), identified to 4-carboxyatractyloside and atractyloside (ATR), were labeled with /sup 35/S and their binding properties to whole mitochondria and inner mitochondrial membrane vesicles used to monitor changes of membrane conformation induced by ADP. (auth)

  4. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonists block the noxious effects of toxic industrial isocyanates and tear gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Caceres, Ana I; Escalera, Jasmine; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-04-01

    The release of methyl isocyanate in Bhopal, India, caused the worst industrial accident in history. Exposures to industrial isocyanates induce lacrimation, pain, airway irritation, and edema. Similar responses are elicited by chemicals used as tear gases. Despite frequent exposures, the biological targets of isocyanates and tear gases in vivo have not been identified, precluding the development of effective countermeasures. We use Ca(2+) imaging and electrophysiology to show that the noxious effects of isocyanates and those of all major tear gas agents are caused by activation of Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in mustard oil-sensitive sensory neurons. These responses are mediated by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an ion channel serving as a detector for reactive chemicals. In mice, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1 dramatically reduces isocyanate- and tear gas-induced nocifensive behavior after both ocular and cutaneous exposures. We conclude that isocyanates and tear gas agents target the same neuronal receptor, TRPA1. Treatment with TRPA1 antagonists may prevent and alleviate chemical irritation of the eyes, skin, and airways and reduce the adverse health effects of exposures to a wide range of toxic noxious chemicals. PMID:19036859

  5. Down-regulation of complement receptors on the surface of host monocyte even as in vitro complement pathway blocking interferes in dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Cintia Ferreira; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Marins-Dos-Santos, Alessandro; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; de Souza, Luiz José; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria

    2014-01-01

    In dengue virus (DENV) infection, complement system (CS) activation appears to have protective and pathogenic effects. In severe dengue fever (DF), the levels of DENV non-structural-1 protein and of the products of complement activation, including C3a, C5a and SC5b-9, are higher before vascular leakage occurs, supporting the hypothesis that complement activation contributes to unfavourable outcomes. The clinical manifestations of DF range from asymptomatic to severe and even fatal. Here, we aimed to characterise CS by their receptors or activation product, in vivo in DF patients and in vitro by DENV-2 stimulation on monocytes. In comparison with healthy controls, DF patients showed lower expression of CR3 (CD11b), CR4 (CD11c) and, CD59 on monocytes. The DF patients who were high producers of SC5b-9 were also those that showed more pronounced bleeding or vascular leakage. Those findings encouraged us to investigate the role of CS in vitro, using monocytes isolated from healthy subjects. Prior blocking with CR3 alone (CD11b) or CR3 (CD11b/CD18) reduced viral infection, as quantified by the levels of intracellular viral antigen expression and soluble DENV non-structural viral protein. However, we found that CR3 alone (CD11b) or CR3 (CD11b/CD18) blocking did not influence major histocompatibility complex presentation neither active caspase-1 on monocytes, thus probably ruling out inflammasome-related mechanisms. Although it did impair the secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon alpha. Our data provide strategies of blocking CR3 (CD11b) pathways could have implications for the treatment of viral infection by antiviral-related mechanisms.

  6. Down-regulation of complement receptors on the surface of host monocyte even as in vitro complement pathway blocking interferes in dengue infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Ferreira Marinho

    Full Text Available In dengue virus (DENV infection, complement system (CS activation appears to have protective and pathogenic effects. In severe dengue fever (DF, the levels of DENV non-structural-1 protein and of the products of complement activation, including C3a, C5a and SC5b-9, are higher before vascular leakage occurs, supporting the hypothesis that complement activation contributes to unfavourable outcomes. The clinical manifestations of DF range from asymptomatic to severe and even fatal. Here, we aimed to characterise CS by their receptors or activation product, in vivo in DF patients and in vitro by DENV-2 stimulation on monocytes. In comparison with healthy controls, DF patients showed lower expression of CR3 (CD11b, CR4 (CD11c and, CD59 on monocytes. The DF patients who were high producers of SC5b-9 were also those that showed more pronounced bleeding or vascular leakage. Those findings encouraged us to investigate the role of CS in vitro, using monocytes isolated from healthy subjects. Prior blocking with CR3 alone (CD11b or CR3 (CD11b/CD18 reduced viral infection, as quantified by the levels of intracellular viral antigen expression and soluble DENV non-structural viral protein. However, we found that CR3 alone (CD11b or CR3 (CD11b/CD18 blocking did not influence major histocompatibility complex presentation neither active caspase-1 on monocytes, thus probably ruling out inflammasome-related mechanisms. Although it did impair the secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon alpha. Our data provide strategies of blocking CR3 (CD11b pathways could have implications for the treatment of viral infection by antiviral-related mechanisms.

  7. EWS-FLI1 impairs aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation by blocking tryptophan breakdown via the kynurenine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Cornelia N; Schwentner, Raphaela; Kauer, Maximilian O; Katschnig, Anna M; Kromp, Florian; Aryee, Dave N T; Erhardt, Sophie; Goiny, Michel; Alonso, Javier; Fuchs, Dietmar; Kovar, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive pediatric tumor driven by the fusion protein EWS-FLI1. We report that EWS-FLI1 suppresses TDO2-mediated tryptophan (TRP) breakdown in ES cells. Gene expression and metabolite analyses reveal an EWS-FLI1-dependent regulation of TRP metabolism. TRP consumption increased in the absence of EWS-FLI1, resulting in kynurenine and kynurenic acid accumulation, both aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Activated AHR binds to the promoter region of target genes. We demonstrate that EWS-FLI1 knockdown results in AHR nuclear translocation and activation. Our data suggest that EWS-FLI1 suppresses autocrine AHR signaling by inhibiting TDO2-catalyzed TRP breakdown. PMID:27282934

  8. Inhibition of protein synthesis but not β-adrenergic receptors blocks reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated cue memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Amber B; Taylor, Jane R

    2016-08-01

    Previously consolidated memories have the potential to enter a state of lability upon memory recall, during which time the memory can be altered before undergoing an additional consolidation-like process and being stored again as a long-term memory. Blocking reconsolidation of aberrant memories has been proposed as a potential treatment for psychiatric disorders including addiction. Here we investigated of the effect of systemically administering the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide or the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol on reconsolidation. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, during which each lever press resulted in the presentation of a cue paired with an intravenous infusion of cocaine. After undergoing lever press extinction to reduce operant responding, the cue memory was reactivated and rats were administered systemic injections of propranolol, cycloheximide, or vehicle. Post-reactivation cycloheximide, but not propranolol, resulted in a reactivation-dependent decrease in cue-induced reinstatement, indicative of reconsolidation blockade by protein synthesis inhibition. The present data indicate that systemically targeting protein synthesis as opposed to the β-adrenergic system may more effectively attenuate the reconsolidation of a drug-related memory and decrease drug-seeking behavior. PMID:27421890

  9. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  10. Antibody against recombinant heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (rLTB could block LT binding to ganglioside M1 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Moazzeni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is one of the most common agents of diarrhea among other bacterial agents. Designing and producing vaccine against these bacteria is one of the major purposes of World Health Organization (WHO. Due to presence of diverse clones of ETEC strains in the world, the use of global vaccines for ETEC infection is controversial. B subunit of heat labile toxin (LTB was introduced as a vaccine candidate molecule by several investigators. The expression of LTB gene isolated from a local bacterial strain and investigation of its immunological property was the objective of this study."nMaterials and Methods: LTB gene was isolated from a local isolated ETEC, cloned and expressed using pET28a expression vector. For LTB gene expression, the three main expression parameters (IPTG concentration, time and temperature of induction were investigated. The recombinant protein was purified ( > 95% with Ni-NTA column using 6XHis-tag and used as an antigen in ELISA test."nResults: The immunological analyses showed production of high titer of specific antibody in immunized mice. Anti LTB Antibody could bind to whole toxin and neutralize the toxin through inhibition of its binding to the Ganglioside M1 receptor."nConclusion: The recombinant LTB protein is a highly immunogenic molecule. Considering the LTB role in ETEC pathogenesis, it can be taken into account as one of the most important components of vaccines against local ETEC.

  11. ADP is a vasodilator component from Lasiodora sp. mygalomorph spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, C C; Rezende, B A; Oliveira-Mendes, B B R; Carmo, A O; Capettini, L S A; Silva, J F; Gomes, M T; Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Bravo, C E S; Lemos, V S; Kalapothakis, E

    2013-09-01

    Members of the spider genus Lasiodora are widely distributed in Brazil, where they are commonly known as caranguejeiras. Lasiodora spider venom is slightly harmful to humans. The bite of this spider causes local pain, edema and erythema. However, Lasiodora sp. spider venom may be a source of important pharmacological tools. Our research group has described previously that Lasiodora sp. venom produces bradycardia in the isolated rat heart. In the present work, we sought to evaluate the vascular effect of Lasiodora sp. venom and to isolate the vasoactive compounds from the venom. The results showed that Lasiodora spider venom induced a concentration-dependent vasodilation in rat aortic rings, which was dependent on the presence of a functional endothelium and abolished by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME. Western blot experiments revealed that the venom also increased endothelial NOS function by increasing phosphorylation of the Ser¹¹⁷⁷ residue. Assay-directed fractionation isolated a vasoactive fraction from Lasiodora sp. venom. Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays identified a mixture of two compounds: adenosine diphosphate (ADP, approximately 90%) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP, approximately 10%). The vasodilator effects of Lasiodora sp. whole venom, as well as ADP, were significantly inhibited by suramin, which is a purinergic P2-receptor antagonist. Therefore, the results of the present work indicate that ADP is a main vasodilator component of Lasiodora sp. spider venom.

  12. Hematopoietic deletion of transferrin receptor 2 in mice leads to a block in erythroid differentiation during iron-deficient anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Gautam; Secondes, Eriza S; Wallace, Daniel F; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2016-08-01

    Iron metabolism and erythropoiesis are inherently interlinked physiological processes. Regulation of iron metabolism is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin limits the amount of iron released into the blood by binding to and causing the internalization of the iron exporter, ferroportin. A number of molecules and physiological stimuli, including erythropoiesis, are known to regulate hepcidin. An increase in erythropoietic demand decreases hepcidin, resulting in increased bioavailable iron in the blood. Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) is involved in the systemic regulation of iron metabolism. Patients and mice with mutations in TFR2 develop hemochromatosis due to inappropriate hepcidin levels relative to body iron. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have suggested an additional role for TFR2 in response to iron-restricted erythropoiesis. These studies used mouse models with perturbed systemic iron metabolism: anemic mice lacking matriptase-2 and Tfr2, or bone marrow transplants from iron-loaded Tfr2 null mice. We developed a novel transgenic mouse model which lacks Tfr2 in the hematopoietic compartment, enabling the delineation of the role of Tfr2 in erythroid development without interfering with its role in systemic iron metabolism. We show that in the absence of hematopoietic Tfr2 immature polychromatic erythroblasts accumulate with a concordant reduction in the percentage of mature erythroid cells in the spleen and bone marrow of anemic mice. These results demonstrate that erythroid Tfr2 is essential for an appropriate erythropoietic response in iron-deficient anemia. These findings may be of relevance in clinical situations in which an immediate and efficient erythropoietic response is required. Am. J. Hematol. 91:812-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27169626

  13. Inhalation of nitric oxide inhibits ADP-induced platelet aggregation and alpha-granule release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, I A; Sølvik, U Ø; Opdahl, H; Roald, H E; Lyberg, T

    1999-01-01

    To gather further information about the effects on blood platelet activation of in vivo exposure to nitric oxide (NO), platelet reactivity was studied in blood from healthy, non-smoking male volunteers before and after 30 min inhalation of 40 ppm NO. Whole blood was stimulated in vitro with adenosine diphosphate or thrombin receptor activation peptide (TRAP-6). In an ex vivo perfusion model, non-anticoagulated blood was exposed to immobilised collagen at arterial blood flow conditions (2600 s(-1)). Blood samples from both the in vitro and ex vivo experiments were stained with fluorochrome-labelled Annexin-V and antibodies against CD42a, CD45, CD49b, CD61, CD62P and fibrinogen, and analysed with a three-colour flow cytometry technique. NO inhalation reduced the platelet activation response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation by decreasing platelet-platelet aggregation, alpha-granule release and platelet-leukocyte conjugate formation. TRAP-stimulated platelet activation, collagen-induced platelet activation and thrombus growth was unaffected by NO inhalation. We therefore suggest an ADP receptor inhibitor mode of action of inhaled NO, selective on the newly suggested G protein- and phospholipase C-coupled P2Y1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that blood platelet activation in healthy subjects is modulated by inhalation of NO in therapeutically relevant doses, although the clinical impact of our findings remains unclear. PMID:16801117

  14. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor:an evolving paradigm in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingsong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Recent phase I studies have reported single-agent activities of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor in sporadic and in BRCA-mutant prostate cancers. Two of the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, ETS gene rearrangement and loss of PTEN, have been linked to increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitor in preclinical models. Emerging evidence also suggests that PARP1 plays an important role in mediating the transcriptional activities of androgen receptor (AR) and ETS gene rearrangement. In this article, the preclinical work and early-phase clinical trials in developing PARP inhibitor-based therapy as a new treatment paradigm for metastatic prostate cancer are reviewed.

  15. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor: an evolving paradigm in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsong Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent phase I studies have reported single-agent activities of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor in sporadic and in BRCA-mutant prostate cancers. Two of the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, ETS gene rearrangement and loss of PTEN, have been linked to increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitor in preclinical models. Emerging evidence also suggests that PARP1 plays an important role in mediating the transcriptional activities of androgen receptor (AR and ETS gene rearrangement. In this article, the preclinical work and early-phase clinical trials in developing PARP inhibitor-based therapy as a new treatment paradigm for metastatic prostate cancer are reviewed.

  16. Changes in NAD/ADP-ribose metabolism in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yalcintepe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The extent of ADP-ribosylation in rectal cancer was compared to that of the corresponding normal rectal tissue. Twenty rectal tissue fragments were collected during surgery from patients diagnosed as having rectal cancer on the basis of pathology results. The levels of ADP-ribosylation in rectum cancer tissue samples (95.9 ± 22.1 nmol/ml was significantly higher than in normal tissues (11.4 ± 4 nmol/ml. The level of NAD+ glycohydrolase and ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities in rectal cancer and normal tissue samples were measured. Cancer tissues had significantly higher NAD+ glycohydrolase and ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities than the control tissues (43.3 ± 9.1 vs 29.2 ± 5.2 and 6.2 ± 1.6 vs 1.6 ± 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1. Approximately 75% of the NAD+ concentration was consumed as substrate in rectal cancer, with changes in NAD+/ADP-ribose metabolism being observed. When [14C]-ADP-ribosylated tissue samples were subjected to SDS-PAGE, autoradiographic analysis revealed that several proteins were ADP-ribosylated in rectum tissue. Notably, the radiolabeling of a 113-kDa protein was remarkably greater than that in control tissues. Poly(ADP-ribosylation of the 113-kDa protein in rectum cancer tissues might be enhanced with its proliferative activity, and poly(ADP-ribosylation of the same protein in rectum cancer patients might be an indicator of tumor diagnosis.

  17. Examples of doping control analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: ephedrines, beta-receptor blocking agents, diuretics, sympathomimetics, and cross-linked hemoglobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2005-01-01

    The application of modern and powerful analytical instruments consisting of liquid chromatographs (LCs), sophisticated atmospheric pressure ion sources, and sensitive mass analyzers has improved quality as well as speed of doping control analyses markedly during the last 5 years. Numerous compounds such as beta-receptor blocking agents or diuretics require derivatization prior to gas chromatographic (GC) and mass spectrometric (MS) measurement, which is the reason for extended sample preparation periods. In addition, several substances demonstrate poor GC-MS properties even after chemical modification, and peptide hormones such as cross-linked hemoglobins cannot be analyzed at all by means of GC-MS. With the availability of electrospray ionization and robust tandem MSs (e.g., triple-stage quadrupole or ion trap instruments) many new or complementary screening and confirmation assays have been developed, providing detailed qualitative and quantitative information on prohibited drugs. With selected categories of compounds (ephedrines, beta-blockers, b2-agonists, diuretics, and bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen therapeutics) that are banned according to the rules of the World Anti-Doping Agency and International Olympic Committee, the advantages of LC-MS-MS procedures over conventional GC-MS assays are demonstrated, such as enhanced separation of analytes, shorter sample pretreatment, and identification of substances that are not identified by GC-MS. PMID:15808003

  18. Further characterization of a high affinity thyrotropin binding site on the rat thyrotropin receptor which is an epitope for blocking antibodies from idiopathic myxedema patients but not thyroid stimulating antibodies from Graves' patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, S; Ban, T; Akamizu, T; Kohn, L D

    1991-10-31

    Cysteine 390 of the rat thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, when mutated to serine, results in a receptor with a reduced ability of TSH to bind and increase cAMP levels but a preserved ability of thyroid stimulating autoantibodies (TSAbs) from hyperthyroid Graves' patients to increase cAMP levels. The ability of receptor autoantibodies from hypothyroid patients with idiopathic myxedema to inhibit the TSAb activity which is preserved is, however, like TSH binding, significantly reduced. Cysteine 390, together with tyrosine 385, thus appears to be an important determinant in a high affinity TSH binding site which is an epitope for receptor autoantibodies which block TSH or TSAb action and cause hypothyroidism rather than TSAbs which increase cAMP levels and are associated with hyperthyroidism. Threonine 388 and aspartic acid 403 may contribute to this ligand interaction site. PMID:1719963

  19. Issues on stability of ADP feedback controllers for dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S N; Ding, Jie; Lewis, Frank L

    2008-08-01

    This paper traces the development of neural-network (NN)-based feedback controllers that are derived from the principle of adaptive/approximate dynamic programming (ADP) and discusses their closed-loop stability. Different versions of NN structures in the literature, which embed mathematical mappings related to solutions of the ADP-formulated problems called "adaptive critics" or "action-critic" networks, are discussed. Distinction between the two classes of ADP applications is pointed out. Furthermore, papers in "model-free" development and model-based neurocontrollers are reviewed in terms of their contributions to stability issues. Recent literature suggests that work in ADP-based feedback controllers with assured stability is growing in diverse forms. PMID:18632377

  20. ADP Security Plan: Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This ADP Security Plan established the policies and procedures to protect the integrity of computer-based resources at this site. Specifically, the purpose of this...

  1. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12734.001

  2. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-07-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27226584

  3. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki, E-mail: y.fujii@po.rd.taisho.co.jp [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Igarashi, Yasuyuki [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Goitsuka, Ryo [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  4. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the signal causes the heart to contract and pump blood. Heart block occurs if the electrical signal is ... degree heart block limits the heart's ability to pump blood to the rest of the body. This type ...

  5. Intracerebroventricular injection of mu- and delta-opiate receptor antagonists block 60 Hz magnetic field-induced decreases in cholinergic activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H; Carino, M

    1998-01-01

    In previous research, we have found that acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field decreased cholinergic activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat as measured by sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake activity. We concluded that the effect was mediated by endogenous opioids inside the brain because it could be blocked by pretreatment of rats before magnetic field exposure with the opiate antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral antagonist naloxone methiodide. In the present study, the involvement of opiate receptor subtypes was investigated. Rats were pretreated by intracerebroventricular injection of the mu-opiate receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine, or the delta-opiate receptor antagonist, naltrindole, before exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field (2 mT, 1 hour). It was found that the effects of magnetic field on high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were blocked by the drug treatments. These data indicate that both mu- and delta-opiate receptors in the brain are involved in the magnetic field-induced decreases in cholinergic activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

  6. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  7. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  8. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixi Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  9. Nimotuzumab enhances radiation sensitivity of NSCLC H292 cells in vitro by blocking epidermal growth factor receptor nuclear translocation and inhibiting radiation-induced DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kai Teng,1,2,* Yong Zhang,1,* Xiaoyan Hu,1 Yihui Ding,1 Rui Gong,1 Li Liu1,* 1Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center of Wuhan Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Hainan Cancer Hospital, Haikou, Hainan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway plays a significant role in radiation resistance. There is evidence that EGFR nuclear translocation is associated with DNA double-strand breaks (DSB repair. Nimotuzumab has shown the effect of radiosensitization in various cancer cells, but little is known about the relationship between nimotuzumab and EGFR nuclear translocation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines. In this study, we selected two NSCLC cell lines, namely, H292 (with high EGFR expression and H1975 (with low EGFR expression and explored the mechanisms underlying radiation sensitivity.Methods: MTT assay, clonogenic survival assay, and flow cytometry were performed separately to test cell viability, radiation sensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis. Protein γ-H2AX, DNA-PK/p-DNA-PK, and EGFR/p-EGFR expression were further compared both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus with the western blot.Results: Nimotuzumab reduced the viability of H292 cells and sensitized H292 cells to ionizing radiation. The radiation sensitivity enhancement ratio (SER was 1.304 and 1.092 for H292 and H1975 cells, respectively. H292 cells after nimotuzumab administration were arrested at the G0/G1 phase in response to radiation. Apoptosis was without statistical significance in both cell lines. γ-H2AX formation in the combination group (nimotuzumab and radiation increased both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus along with the decreased expression of nuclear EGFR/p-EGFR and p-DNA-PK in H292 cells (P<0.05 that

  10. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  11. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, César A.; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Bonifaz, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) recognize pathogens and initiate the T-cell response. The DC-helminth interaction induces an immature phenotype in DCs; as a result, these DCs display impaired responses to TLR stimulation and prime Th2-type responses. However, the DC receptors and intracellular pathways targeted by helminth molecules and their importance in the initiation of the Th2 response are poorly understood. In this report, we found that products excreted/secreted by Taenia crassiceps (TcES) triggered cRAF phosphorylation through MGL, MR, and TLR2. TcES interfered with the LPS-induced NFκB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. In addition, TcES-induced cRAF signaling pathway was critical for down-regulation of the TLR-mediated DC maturation and secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, we show for the first time that blocking cRAF in DCs abolishes their ability to induce Th2 polarization in vitro after TcES exposure. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminths target intracellular pathways to block DC maturation and efficiently program Th2 polarization.—Terrazas, C. A., Alcántara-Hernández, M., Bonifaz, L., Terrazas, L. I., Satoskar, A. R. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway. PMID:23907435

  12. Platelet P2 receptors: from curiosity to clinical targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, N J; Hourani, S M

    2000-07-01

    Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) is a paracrine mediator that activates human blood platelets, causing them to become adhesive and thereby contributing to their role in hemostasis. The actions of ADP were initially thought to be mediated by a unique ADP receptor termed P2(T) found only on platelets and antagonized by ATP, but it appears that at least two P2Y receptor subtypes are involved, a P2Y(1) receptor linked in some way to control of intracellular-free calcium levels and another P2Y receptor linked via an inhibitory G protein to adenylate cyclase. In addition, the presence of excitatory P2X(1) receptors that mediate the influx of monovalent and divalent cations in response to both ADP and ATP has been demonstrated. The precise contribution that each of these P2 receptors make to the overall phenomena associated with platelet aggregation, adhesion and hemostasis is yet to be defined. Antithrombotic agents that interfere with the actions of ADP are marketed, and P2 receptor antagonists are entering clinical trials for acute treatments of thrombosis. This review seeks to summarize the present state of knowledge of platelet P2 receptor pharmacology and therapeutics.

  13. Modes of action of ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 in inhibiting the polypeptide elongation cycle: a modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C Chen

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that ADP-ribosylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (EF2 leads to inhibition of protein synthesis, the mechanism by which ADP-ribosylated EF2 (ADPR•EF2 causes this inhibition remains controversial. Here, we applied modeling approaches to investigate the consequences of various modes of ADPR•EF2 inhibitory actions on the two coupled processes, the polypeptide chain elongation and ADP-ribosylation of EF2. Modeling of experimental data indicates that ADPR•EF2 fully blocks the late-phase translocation of tRNAs; but the impairment in the translocation upstream process, mainly the GTP-dependent factor binding with the pretranslocation ribosome and/or the guanine nucleotide exchange in EF2, is responsible for the overall inhibition kinetics. The reduced ADPR•EF2-ribosome association spares the ribosome to bind and shield native EF2 against toxin attack, thereby deferring the inhibition of protein synthesis inhibition and inactivation of EF2. Minimum association with the ribosome also keeps ADPR•EF2 in an accessible state for toxins to catalyze the reverse reaction when nicotinamide becomes available. Our work underscores the importance of unveiling the interactions between ADPR•EF2 and the ribosome, and argues against that toxins inhibit protein synthesis through converting native EF2 to a competitive inhibitor to actively disable the ribosome.

  14. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. An adpA homologue in Streptomyces avermitilis is involved in regulation of morphogenesis and melanogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO JinLei; WEN Ying; CHEN Zhi; SONG Yuan; LI JiLun

    2007-01-01

    In Streptomyces griseus, AdpA, the key transcriptional activator in the A-factor regulatory cascade, switches on the transcription of multiple genes required for secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation. Streptomyces avermitilis also contains an ortholog of adpA, which is named adpA-a. To clarify the in vivo function of adpA-a, an adpA-a-disrupted strain was constructed by double crossover recombination. No difference in avermectin production was found between the adpA-a-disruptant and the wild-type strain. However, this disruptant neither formed spores nor produced melanin and its phenotype was restored to the original wild-type by a single copy of the adpA-a gene integrated into the chromosome. This report shows that adpA-a is involved in regulation of morphological differentiation and melanin production in S. avermitilis.

  2. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. BIG2, A Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for ADP-Ribosylation Factors: Its Localization to Recycling Endosomes and Implication in the Endosome IntegrityD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hye-Won; Morinaga, Naoko; NODA, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2004-01-01

    Small GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family play a key role in membrane trafficking by regulating coated vesicle formation, and guanine nucleotide exchange is essential for the ARF function. Brefeldin A blocks the ARF-triggered coat assembly by inhibiting the guanine nucleotide exchange on ARFs and causes disintegration of the Golgi complex and tubulation of endosomal membranes. BIG2 is one of brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the ARF GTPases and is a...

  7. Impact of Dabigatran versus Phenprocoumon on ADP Induced Platelet Aggregation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation with or without Concomitant Clopidogrel Therapy (the Dabi-ADP-1 and Dabi-ADP-2 Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadea M. Martischnig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A relevant number of patients receive triple therapy with clopidogrel, aspirin, and oral anticoagulation. Clopidogrel’s efficacy on ADP induced platelet function may be influenced by concomitant antithrombotic therapies. Data regarding the effect of dabigatran on platelet function is limited to in vitro studies and healthy individuals. Methods. The “Dabi-ADP-1” and “Dabi-ADP-2” trials randomized patients with atrial fibrillation to either dabigatran or phenprocoumon for a 2-week period. In Dabi-ADP-1 (n=70 patients with clopidogrel therapy were excluded and in Dabi-ADP-2 (n=46 patients had to be treated concomitantly with clopidogrel. The primary endpoint was ADP-induced platelet aggregation between dabigatran and phenprocoumon at 14 days. Secondary endpoints were ADPtest HS-, TRAP-, and COL-induced platelet aggregation. Results. There was no significant difference regarding the primary endpoint between both groups in either trial (Dabi-ADP-1: Dabigatran: 846 [650–983] AU × min versus phenprocoumon: 839 [666–1039] AU × min, P=0.90 and Dabi-ADP-2: 326 [268–462] versus 350 [214–535], P=0.70 or regarding the secondary endpoints, ADPtest HS-, TRAP-, and COL-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion. Dabigatran as compared to phenprocoumon has no impact on ADP-induced platelet aggregation in atrial fibrillation patients neither with nor without concomitant clopidogrel therapy.

  8. Abiogenic photophosphorylation of ADP to ATP sensitized by flavoproteinoid microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Michael P; Telegina, Taisiya A; Lyudnikova, Tamara A; Kritsky, Mikhail S

    2008-06-01

    A model for abiogenic photophosphorylation of ADP by orthophosphate to yield ATP was studied. The model is based on the photochemical activity of flavoproteinoid microspheres that are formed by aggregation in an aqueous medium of products of thermal condensation of a glutamic acid, glycine and lysine mixture (8:3:1) and contain, along with amino acid polymers (proteinoids), abiogenic isoalloxazine (flavin) pigments. Irradiation of aqueous suspensions of microspheres with blue visible light or ultraviolet in the presence of ADP and orthophosphate resulted in ATP formation. The yield of ATP in aerated suspensions was 10-20% per one mol of starting ADP. Deaeration reduced the photophosphorylating activity of microspheres five to 10 times. Treatment of aerated microsphere suspensions with superoxide dismutase during irradiation partially suppressed ATP formation. Deaerated microspheres restored completely their photophosphorylating activity after addition of hydrogen peroxide to the suspension. The photophosphorylating activity of deaerated suspensions of flavoproteinoid microspheres was also recovered by introduction of Fe3+-cytochrome c, an electron acceptor alternative to oxygen. On the basis of the results obtained, a chemical mechanism of phosphorylation is proposed in which the free radical form of reduced flavin sensitizer (F1H*) and ADP are involved. PMID:18386156

  9. Structure-activity relationship of cyclic ADP-ribose, an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas H.Guse

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is a universal Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger in many different cell types and organisms.cADPR activates Ca2+ release from endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum via ryanodine receptors.In addition,Ca2+ entry secondary to Ca2+ depletion is at least one of the mechanisms in which cADPR triggers Ca2+ inflow,too.Analogues of cADPR have been prepared by chemical and chemo-enzymatic routes.Most of the analogues were analyzed for biological activity in intact or permeabilized Jurkat T cells (a human T-lymphoma cell line).As a systematic approach,analogues were grouped according to alterations in the base,the northern ribose,the southern ribose,the pyrophosphate backbone,or in complex modifications,comprising more than one part of the molecule.Biological activity of the analogues is reviewed,with special emphasis on Jurkat T cells.

  10. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo eOtvos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC. In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399. The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400 was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400 at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  11. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-10-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  12. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Marco, Ario de, E-mail: ario.demarco@ung.si [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Dept. Environmental Sciences, University of Nova Gorica (UNG), Vipavska 13, P.O. Box 301-SI-5000, Rozna Dolina, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  13. Zitongxi Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Zitongxi Block (Western Zitong Block), is located in Zitong County, northwest of Sichuan Province (as shown on Fig. 8 ). Geologically. it is situated in the Zitong Depression, southwest of the middle Longmenshan faulted and folded belt, covering an area of 1 830 km2. Transportation is very convenient. A crisscross network of highways run through the block and the Baocheng railway is nearby. The climate is moderate. Most area belongs to hilly land with the elevation of 500-600 m.The Tongjiang River runs across the area.

  14. TRPM2 channel opening in response to oxidative stress is dependent on activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Fonfria, Elena; Marshall, Ian C B; Benham, Christopher D; Boyfield, Izzy; Brown, Jason D; Hill, Kerstin; Hughes, Jane P; Skaper, Stephen D.; McNulty, Shaun

    2004-01-01

    TRPM2 (melastatin-like transient receptor potential 2 channel) is a nonselective cation channel that is activated under conditions of oxidative stress leading to an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and cell death. We investigated the role of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated TRPM2 activation using a tetracycline-inducible TRPM2-expressing cell line.In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, intracellular adenine...

  15. mADP-RTs: Versatile virulence factors from bacterial pathogens of plants and mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Lennart eWirthmueller; Banfield, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Mono ADP-ribosyltransferases (mADP-RTs) are a family of enzymes that cleave NAD+ and covalently attach the ADP-ribosyl moiety to target proteins. mADP-RTs are well established as important virulence factors of bacteria that infect mammals. Cholera toxin, pertussis toxin and diphteria toxin are three of the best-known examples of mADP-RTs. They modify host target proteins in order to promote infection and/or killing of the host cell. Despite low sequence similarity at the primary amino acid le...

  16. Metabolic consequences of DNA damage: The role of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase as mediator of the suicide response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies show that DNA damage can produce rapid alterations in steady state levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools, for example, MNNG or uv-irradiation cause rapid increases in dATP and dTTP pools without significant changes in dGTP or dCTP pools. In vitro, studies with purified eukaryotic DNA polymerases show that the frequency of nucleotide misincorporation was affected by alterations in relative concentrations of the deoxynucleoside triphosphates. Thus the alterations in dNTP pool sizes that occur consequent to DNA damage may contribute to an increased mutagenic frequency. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase mediated suicide mechanism may participate in the toxicity of adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immune deficiency disease in humans. Individuals with this disease suffer severe lymphopenia due to the toxic effects of deoxyadenosine. The lymphocytotoxic effect of adenosine deaminase deficiency can be simulated in lymphocyte cell lines from normal individuals by incubating them with the adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformycin. Incubation of such leukocytes with deoxycoformycin and deoxyadenosine results in the gradual accumulation of DNA strand breaks and the depletion of NAD+ leading to cell death over a period of several days. This depletion of NAD and loss of cell viability were effectively blocked by nicotinamide or 3-amino benzamide. Thus, persistent activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase by unrepaired or recurrent DNA strand breaks may activate the suicide mechanism of cell death. This study provides a basis for the interesting suggestion that treatment with nicotinamide could block the persistent activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and may help preserve lymphocyte function in patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. mADP-RTs: Versatile virulence factors from bacterial pathogens of plants and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart eWirthmueller

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mono ADP-ribosyltransferases (mADP-RTs are a family of enzymes that cleave NAD+ and covalently attach the ADP-ribosyl moiety to target proteins. mADP-RTs are well established as important virulence factors of bacteria that infect mammals. Cholera toxin, pertussis toxin and diphteria toxin are three of the best-known examples of mADP-RTs. They modify host target proteins in order to promote infection and/or killing of the host cell. Despite low sequence similarity at the primary amino acid level, mADP-RTs share a conserved core catalytic fold and structural biology has made important contributions to elucidating how mADP-RTs modify mammalian host targets. Recently, mADP-RTs were shown to be present in plant pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that mADP-RTs are also important virulence factors of plant pathogens. Crystal structures of plant pathogenic bacterial mADP-RTs are also now available. Here we review the structure/function of mADP-RTs from pathogens of mammals and plants, highlighting both commonalities and differences.

  18. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  19. The Receptor Approach: A New Human Rights Kid on the Block or Old Wine in New Bags? A Commentary on Professor Zwart's Article in HRQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Donders; V. Vleugel

    2013-01-01

    In his article in the HRQ (Vol. 34, No. 2, May 2012, p. 546-569), "Using Local Culture to Further the Implementation of International Human Rights: The Receptor Approach", Professor Tom Zwart introduces what he calls an alternative view on the implementation of international human rights, the recept

  20. Consensus statement on blocking the effects of interleukin-6 and in particular by interleukin-6 receptor inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Schoels, Monika M; Nishimoto, Norihiro;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since approval of tocilizumab (TCZ) for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), interleukin 6 (IL-6) pathway inhibition was evaluated in trials of TCZ and other agents targeting the IL-6 receptor and ligand in various RA populations and other in...

  1. Chemo-nociceptive signalling from the colon is enhanced by mild colitis and blocked by inhibition of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrovic, Martina; Shahbazian, Anaid; Bock, Elisabeth;

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels are expressed by primary afferent neurones and activated by irritant chemicals including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). Here we investigated whether intracolonic AITC causes afferent input to the spinal cord and whether this response is modifi...

  2. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB); (NIMR)

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  3. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  4. Ghost Block

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Filmed on the English south coast 'Ghost Block' depicts the uncanny and eerie atmosphere at the site of a WW2 coastal defence line. The concrete cubes were used as an anti-invasion blockade against potential landing forces. This protection line now slowly decaying and becoming enmeshed into the environment still acts as a defence to repel unwanted visitors. The area is a natural reserve to nesting birds that often lay eggs directly onto the beach surface. The blocks act as a final barrier ...

  5. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eBeneke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose, the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1, was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor.

  6. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J. (CH-PA); (UPENN); (Danforth)

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  7. Green tea polyphenols control dysregulated glutamate dehydrogenase in transgenic mice by hijacking the ADP activation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-30

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic β-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  8. Epidural block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home ... It numbs or causes a loss of feeling in the lower half your body. This lessens the pain of contractions during childbirth. An epidural block may also be used to ...

  9. Nicotine blocks apomorphine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle in rats: possible involvement of central nicotinic α7 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Suemaru, Katsuya; Yasuda, Kayo; Umeda, Kenta; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Choshi, Tominari; Hibino, Satoshi; Gomita, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    Nicotine has been reported to normalize deficits in auditory sensory gating in the cases of schizophrenia, suggesting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in attentional abnormalities. However, the mechanism remains unclear. The present study investigated the effects of nicotine on the disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response induced by apomorphine or phencyclidine in rats.Over the dose range tested, nicotine (0.05–1 mg kg−1, s.c.) did not disrup...

  10. Acquisition of contextual Pavlovian fear conditioning is blocked by application of an NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid to the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanselow, M S; Kim, J J

    1994-02-01

    Rats, with chronic cannula placed bilaterally in the amygdala, received infusions of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) before contextual Pavlovian fear conditioning. Administration of APV to the basolateral nucleus prevented acquisition of fear. Central nucleus infusions had no effect. It is concluded that an NMDA-mediated process near the basolateral region of the amygdala (e.g., lateral or basolateral nucleus) is essential for the learning of fear.

  11. Blocking of orexin receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus has no effect on the expression of conditioned fear in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinwen; Li, Yonghui; Kirouac, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) projects to the central nucleus of the amygdala and recent experimental evidence indicates a role for the PVT in conditioned fear. Furthermore, the PVT contains a high density of orexin receptors and fibers and acute injections of orexin antagonist into the PVT produce anxiolytic effects. The present study was done to determine if administration of a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) in the region of the PVT interferes with the expression of conditioned fear in rats exposed to cued and contextual conditioning paradigms. Infusion of 0.5 μl of the DORA N-biphenyl-2-yl-1-[(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2yl) sulfanyl] acetyl-L-prolinamide at a concentration of 0.1, 1.0, and 10 nmol had no effect on the freezing produced by exposing rats to an auditory cue or the context associated with foot shock. In contrast, the 1.0 and 10 nmol doses were anxiolytic in the social interaction test. The results of the present study do not support a role for orexin receptors in the PVT in the expression of learned fear. The finding that the 1.0 and 10 nmol doses of DORA in the PVT region were anxiolytic in the social interaction test is consistent with other studies indicating a role for orexins in the PVT in anxiety-like behaviors.

  12. Dopamine D1 receptor antagonism in the prelimbic cortex blocks the reinstatement of heroin-seeking in an animal model of relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Ronald E

    2009-04-01

    In brain regions that have been implicated in the reinstatement of drug-seeking, the prelimbic cortex has emerged as a critical regulator of relapse behaviours. Here, the effects of prelimbic cortex dopamine (DA) D(1) receptor antagonism on drug-seeking produced by heroin-paired cues, or by a single priming dose of heroin are examined. Rats lever-pressed daily for i.v. heroin discretely paired with a conditioned stimulus during 3-h sessions for a period of 2 wk, followed by extinction and reinstatement of drug-seeking by previously heroin-paired cues (tone+light) or heroin-priming injections (0.25 mg/kg) in the absence of heroin reinforcement. Intracranial infusion of the DA D(1) receptor antagonist, SCH 23390 (0.02-2.0 microg/side), into the prelimbic cortex potently and dose dependently attenuated heroin-seeking in response to either cue presentations or a priming dose of heroin. These results suggest that DA D1 receptors regulate prefrontal cortex pathways necessary for the reinstatement of heroin-seeking. PMID:19236732

  13. Huhe Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Huhe Block is located in the mid-west part of Inner Mogolia Autonomous Region, covering an area of 15 079km2, in the range of 109°40'-112°00'E and 39°23()-40°40'N. Topographically. the Fengzhen hill is to the east, the Yinshan Mounts is to the north, the Hetao Plain and Ordos Plateau are respectively in its west and south.The Yellow River flows across this block. The elevation is 1 000 m in the flat area and in the range of 1 000-1 300m. in the plateau area, good for the development of agriculture and industry as well as husbandry. It belongs to inland plateau climate with annually averaged temperature of 8℃, the minimum being -12℃ in winter and the maximum 22℃ in summer.

  14. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D. [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Furlong, Suzanne J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Lin, Tong-Jun [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Hoskin, David W., E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  15. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Curcumin inhibits CD4+ T-lymphocyte proliferation. → Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4+ T-lymphocytes. → Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. → IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4+ T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 (α chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca2+ release to inhibit IκB phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  16. Microinjections of a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist into the ventral tegmental area block the expression of cocaine conditioned place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaj, E; Manuszak, M; Arastehmanesh, D; Ranaldi, R

    2014-10-01

    Stimulation of dopamine (DA) D1 receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is involved in primary rewards. In the current study we investigated whether VTA D1 receptor stimulation likewise plays a role in mediating the rewarding effects of cocaine-associated stimuli, using the cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Rats were prepared with cannulae so as to allow microinjections in the VTA and later conditioned to a cocaine-associated environment using the CPP paradigm. Prior to each conditioning session rats were injected with either saline or cocaine (10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and then placed in one of the two sides of the CPP apparatus. Sessions lasted 30min a day over a period of eight days, such that rats alternated daily between consistently experiencing cocaine in one side and saline in the other. On the test day, which was conducted one day after conditioning, rats were given bilateral microinjections of one of four doses of the D1 antagonist, SCH 23390, (0, 2, 4 or 8μg/0.5μl) directly into the VTA and allowed free access to both sides of the apparatus. Preference for either side was measured as time spent in each side and compared to the same measures taken before conditioning. The D1 antagonist produced a dose-related, significant reduction in the preference for the cocaine-paired side compared to vehicle. These data suggest that the expression of cocaine conditioned place preference requires stimulation of VTA D1 receptors and, as such, are the first to suggest a role for VTA dendritically released DA in cocaine-, or other reward-, related learning. PMID:25017572

  17. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  18. 基于趋化因子受体CCR5阻断HIV-1感染的方法%Methods for blocking HIV-1 infection based on chemokine receptor 5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季海艳; 夏海滨

    2013-01-01

    获得性免疫缺陷综合征(acquired immunodeficiency syndrome,AIDS)主要是由HIV-1感染人体免疫细胞所造成,而介导HIV-1病毒进入机体细胞的主要辅助受体为趋化因子受体CCR5 [chemokine (C-Cmotif) receptor 5],目前以CCR5为研究靶点阻断HIV-l感染的方法在医学和生物学领域备受关注,主要包括CCR5拮抗剂、RNA干扰(RNA interference,RNAi)、锌指核酸酶(zinc-finger nuclease,ZFN)和转录激活因子样效应物核酸酶(transcription activator-like effectors nuclease,TALEN)技术.趋化因子受体CCR5阻断HIV-1感染方法的相关研究进展有必要进行综述.%Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is mainly caused by HIV-1 infection of the human immune cell. The entry of HIV-1 into target cells is mediated by a major coreceptor, CCR5. Currently, a lot of interest has been focused on the methods for blocking HIV-1 infection using CCR5 as a target in medical and biological research. These methods include CCR5 antagonists, small interfering RNA, and ZFNs (zinc finger nucleases) and TALENs (transcription activator-like effectors nucleases) techniques. It is necessary to review the progress on the methods for blocking HIV-1 infection based on chemokine receptor 5.

  19. Antibodies and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to μ-opioid receptors, selectively block the effects of μ-opioid agonists on intestinal transit and permeability in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pol, Olga; Valle, Lluís; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Garzón, Javier; Puig, Margarita M.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the effects of μ and δ opioids on intestinal function (permeability, PER; gastrointestinal transit, GIT), and their antagonism after the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of specific antibodies (ABs) or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) to μ-receptors (OR). Central versus peripheral site/s of action of subcutaneous (s.c.) μ-opioids, were also assessed.Male Swiss CD-1 mice were used. GIT was measured with charcoal and PER by the passage of 51Cr-EDTA from blood...

  20. Dopamine D1 receptor antagonism in the prelimbic cortex blocks the reinstatement of heroin-seeking in an animal model of relapse

    OpenAIRE

    See, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    In brain regions that have been implicated in the reinstatement of drug-seeking, the prelimbic cortex has emerged as a critical regulator of relapse behaviours. Here, the effects of prelimbic cortex dopamine (DA) D1 receptor antagonism on drug-seeking produced by heroin-paired cues, or by a single priming dose of heroin are examined. Rats lever-pressed daily for i.v. heroin discretely paired with a conditioned stimulus during 3-h sessions for a period of 2 wk, followed by extinction and reins...

  1. Block of voltage-dependent sodium currents by the substance P receptor antagonist (+/-)-CP-96,345 in neurones cultured from rat cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Caeser, M; Seabrook, G. R.; Kemp, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    1. Whole cell patch clamp recordings of voltage- and tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ currents were made from cultured rat neocortical neurones (E18). The effects of the non-peptide NK1 receptor antagonist, (+/-)-CP-96,345 on Na+ currents was examined, relative to the effect of the local anaesthetic lignocaine and tetrodotoxin. 2. Sodium currents were reversibly depressed by bath application of (+/-)-CP-96,345 with a half-maximally effective concentration of 18 +/- 2 microM at a stimulation frequen...

  2. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, César A; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Bonifaz, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) recognize pathogens and initiate the T-cell response. The DC-helminth interaction induces an immature phenotype in DCs; as a result, these DCs display impaired responses to TLR stimulation and prime Th2-type responses. However, the DC receptors and intracellular pathways targeted by helminth molecules and their importance in the initiation of the Th2 response are poorly understood. In this report, we found that products excreted/secreted by Taenia crassiceps (TcES) triggered cRAF phosphorylation through MGL, MR, and TLR2. TcES interfered with the LPS-induced NFκB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. In addition, TcES-induced cRAF signaling pathway was critical for down-regulation of the TLR-mediated DC maturation and secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, we show for the first time that blocking cRAF in DCs abolishes their ability to induce Th2 polarization in vitro after TcES exposure. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminths target intracellular pathways to block DC maturation and efficiently program Th2 polarization.

  3. The epitope of monoclonal antibodies blocking erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum map to the dimerization and receptor glycan binding sites of EBA-175.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Ambroggio

    Full Text Available The malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and related parasites use a variety of proteins with Duffy-Binding Like (DBL domains to bind glycoproteins on the surface of host cells. Among these proteins, the 175 kDa erythrocyte binding antigen, EBA-175, specifically binds to glycophorin A on the surface of human erythrocytes during the process of merozoite invasion. The domain responsible for glycophorin A binding was identified as region II (RII which contains two DBL domains, F1 and F2. The crystal structure of this region revealed a dimer that is presumed to represent the glycophorin A binding conformation as sialic acid binding sites and large cavities are observed at the dimer interface. The dimer interface is largely composed of two loops from within each monomer, identified as the F1 and F2 β-fingers that contact depressions in the opposing monomers in a similar manner. Previous studies have identified a panel of five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs termed R215 to R218 and R256 that bind to RII and inhibit invasion of erythrocytes to varying extents. In this study, we predict the F2 β-finger region as the conformational epitope for mAbs, R215, R217, and R256, and confirm binding for the most effective blocking mAb R217 and R215 to a synthetic peptide mimic of the F2 β-finger. Localization of the epitope to the dimerization and glycan binding sites of EBA-175 RII and site-directed mutagenesis within the predicted epitope are consistent with R215 and R217 blocking erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum by preventing formation of the EBA-175- glycophorin A complex.

  4. Structures of the human poly (ADP-ribose glycohydrolase catalytic domain confirm catalytic mechanism and explain inhibition by ADP-HPD derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Tucker

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG. Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR, adenosine 5'-diphosphate (hydroxymethylpyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors.

  5. Insights into the Mechanism of ADP Action on Flagellar Motility Derived from Studies on Bull Sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Lesich, Kathleen A.; Pelle, Dominic W.; Lindemann, Charles B.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is known to have interesting effects on flagellar motility. Permeabilized and reactivated bull sperm exhibit a marked reduction in beating frequency and a greatly increased beat amplitude in the presence of 1–4 mM ADP. In this study we examined the force production of sperm reactivated with 0.1 mM ATP with and without 1 mM ADP and found that there is little or no resulting change in the stalling force produced by a bull sperm flagella in response to ADP. Because bu...

  6. Cyclic ADP-ribose and hydrogen peroxide synergize with ADP-ribose in the activation of TRPM2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolisek, Martin; Beck, Andreas; Fleig, Andrea; Penner, Reinhold

    2005-04-01

    The melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel TRPM2 is a plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable cation channel that is activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR) binding to the channel's enzymatic Nudix domain. Channel activity is also seen with nicotinamide dinucleotide (NAD+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but their mechanisms of action remain unknown. Here, we identify cyclic adenosine diphosphoribose (cADPR) as an agonist of TRPM2 with dual activity: at concentrations above 100 microM, cADPR can gate the channel by itself, whereas lower concentrations of 10 microM have a potentiating effect that enables ADPR to gate the channel at nanomolar concentrations. ADPR's breakdown product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) specifically inhibits ADPR, but not cADPR-mediated gating of TRPM2, whereas the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR exhibits the reverse block specificity. Our results establish TRPM2 as a coincidence detector for ADPR and cADPR signaling and provide a functional context for cADPR as a second messenger for Ca2+ influx.

  7. Hot Water Extracts of the Royal Sun Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Higher Basidiomycetes), Inhibit Platelet Activation via the P2Y1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, Katsuyuki; Satoh, Kaneo; Ohta, Masato; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Hot water extracts of the medicinal mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis were investigated for their inhibition of platelet aggregation. The extracts significantly inhibited human platelet aggregation induced by adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), but not by collagen or thrombin receptor-activating peptide. The extracts also had a significant inhibitory effect on shape change and intracellular calcium mobilization induced by ADP via inhibition of ADP binding to the P2Y1 receptor. In addition, oral administration of the extracts resulted in prolonged tail bleeding time in mice. The marked antiplatelet activity of the mushroom extracts involving the P2Y1 receptor suggests their potential therapeutic use against vascular disorders. PMID:26559862

  8. Discovery of novel poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors by a quantitative assay system using dot-blot with anti-poly(ADP-ribose)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Naoyuki, E-mail: nokita7@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Genome and Drug Research Center, Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Ashizawa, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan); Abe, Hideaki [Genome and Drug Research Center, Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan); Tanuma, Sei-ichi, E-mail: tanuma@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Genome and Drug Research Center, Tokyo University of Science (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

    2010-02-19

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which is mainly regulated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), is a unique protein modification involved in cellular responses such as DNA repair and replication. PARG hydrolyzes glycosidic linkages of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized by PARP and liberates ADP-ribose residues. Recent studies have suggested that inhibitors of PARG are able to be potent anti-cancer drug. In order to discover the potent and specific Inhibitors of PARG, a quantitative and high-throughput screening assay system is required. However, previous PARG assay systems are not appropriate for high-throughput screening because PARG activity is measured by radioactivities of ADP-ribose residues released from radioisotope (RI)-labeled poly(ADP-ribose). In this study, we developed a non-RI and quantitative assay system for PARG activity based on dot-blot assay using anti-poly(ADP-ribose) and nitrocellulose membrane. By our method, the maximum velocity (V{sub max}) and the michaelis constant (k{sub m}) of PARG reaction were 4.46 {mu}M and 128.33 {mu}mol/min/mg, respectively. Furthermore, the IC50 of adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD), known as a non-competitive PARG inhibitor, was 0.66 {mu}M. These kinetics values were similar to those obtained by traditional PARG assays. By using our assay system, we discovered two novel PARG inhibitors that have xanthene scaffold. Thus, our quantitative and convenient method is useful for a high-throughput screening of PARG specific inhibitors.

  9. Chemical Bond Calculations of Crystal Growth of KDP and ADP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to calculate the crystal morphology (or growth habit) on the basis of chemical bond analysis. All constituent chemical bonds were distinguished as relevant and independent bonds according to their variations during the crystallization process. By employing the current method, the influence of specific growth conditions on the crystal morphology can be considered in the structure analysis process. The ideal morphologies of both KDP (KH2PO4) and ADP (NH4H2PO4) crystals were calculated and compared with our obtained crystallites at room temperature, which validates the present calculation method very well.

  10. Reversible Fetal Renal Impairment following Angiotensin Receptor Blocking Treatment during Third Trimester of Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Tal; Levitt, Lorinne; Amsalem, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Background. Late pregnancy usage of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) may cause severe oligohydramnios due to fetal renal impairment. Affected neonates will often suffer from fatal, renal, and respiratory failure. Case. A 39-year-old multigravida admitted due to anhydramnios secondary to valsartan (ARB) exposure at 30 weeks' gestation. Following secession of treatment amniotic fluid volume returned to normal. Delivery was induced at 34 weeks' gestation following premature rupture of membranes and maternal fever. During the two-year follow-up, no signs of renal insufficiency were noted. Conclusions. This description of reversible fetal renal damage due to ARB intake during pregnancy is the first to show no adverse renal function in a two-year follow-up period. This case may help clinicians counsel patients with pregnancies complicated by exposure to these drugs. PMID:27672462

  11. Reversible Fetal Renal Impairment following Angiotensin Receptor Blocking Treatment during Third Trimester of Pregnancy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Tal; Levitt, Lorinne

    2016-01-01

    Background. Late pregnancy usage of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) may cause severe oligohydramnios due to fetal renal impairment. Affected neonates will often suffer from fatal, renal, and respiratory failure. Case. A 39-year-old multigravida admitted due to anhydramnios secondary to valsartan (ARB) exposure at 30 weeks' gestation. Following secession of treatment amniotic fluid volume returned to normal. Delivery was induced at 34 weeks' gestation following premature rupture of membranes and maternal fever. During the two-year follow-up, no signs of renal insufficiency were noted. Conclusions. This description of reversible fetal renal damage due to ARB intake during pregnancy is the first to show no adverse renal function in a two-year follow-up period. This case may help clinicians counsel patients with pregnancies complicated by exposure to these drugs. PMID:27672462

  12. AZD9496: An Oral Estrogen Receptor Inhibitor That Blocks the Growth of ER-Positive and ESR1-Mutant Breast Tumors in Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Hazel M; Bradbury, Robert H; Lawson, Mandy; Rabow, Alfred A; Buttar, David; Callis, Rowena J; Curwen, Jon O; de Almeida, Camila; Ballard, Peter; Hulse, Michael; Donald, Craig S; Feron, Lyman J L; Karoutchi, Galith; MacFaul, Philip; Moss, Thomas; Norman, Richard A; Pearson, Stuart E; Tonge, Michael; Davies, Gareth; Walker, Graeme E; Wilson, Zena; Rowlinson, Rachel; Powell, Steve; Sadler, Claire; Richmond, Graham; Ladd, Brendon; Pazolli, Ermira; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; De Savi, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Fulvestrant is an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist administered to breast cancer patients by monthly intramuscular injection. Given its present limitations of dosing and route of administration, a more flexible orally available compound has been sought to pursue the potential benefits of this drug in patients with advanced metastatic disease. Here we report the identification and characterization of AZD9496, a nonsteroidal small-molecule inhibitor of ERα, which is a potent and selective antagonist and downregulator of ERα in vitro and in vivo in ER-positive models of breast cancer. Significant tumor growth inhibition was observed as low as 0.5 mg/kg dose in the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 xenograft model, where this effect was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in PR protein levels, demonstrating potent antagonist activity. Combining AZD9496 with PI3K pathway and CDK4/6 inhibitors led to further growth-inhibitory effects compared with monotherapy alone. Tumor regressions were also seen in a long-term estrogen-deprived breast model, where significant downregulation of ERα protein was observed. AZD9496 bound and downregulated clinically relevant ESR1 mutants in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in an ESR1-mutant patient-derived xenograft model that included a D538G mutation. Collectively, the pharmacologic evidence showed that AZD9496 is an oral, nonsteroidal, selective estrogen receptor antagonist and downregulator in ER(+) breast cells that could provide meaningful benefit to ER(+) breast cancer patients. AZD9496 is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical trial. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3307-18. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020862

  13. Topographic study of the ADP/ATP transport protein. Localization of ADP and atractyloside fixation sites. Identification of the antigenic domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research thesis were: to determine the intramolecular localisation of binding sites of atractyloside and adenine-nucleotides; to determine whether antibodies obtained against the ADP/ATP carrier protein and isolated from beef heart mitochondria possess a reactivity specific to the organ or the species, where antigenic determinants are localized and whether there is conservation of the antigenic structure from one species to the other; to study how to follow and interpret conformational changes of the protein under the effect of ADP and inhibitors (carboxy-atractyloside or bongkrekic acid), and where the SH group unmasked by ADP and bongkrekic acid is localized

  14. Targeting downstream transcription factors and epigenetic modifications following Toll-like receptor 7/8 ligation to forestall tissue injury in anti-Ro60 associated heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Reed, Joanne H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Halushka, Marc K; Buyon, Jill P

    2016-02-01

    Based on the consistent demonstration of fibrosis of the atrioventricular node surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in anti-Ro antibody exposed fetuses dying with heart block, this study focuses on macrophage signaling stimulated by ssRNA associated with the Ro60 protein and the impact of antagonizing innate cell drivers such as TLR7/8. Transcriptome and epigenetic modifications which affect transcription factors, NF-κB and STAT1, were selected to evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in which TLR7/8 was ligated following treatment with either anti-Ro60/Ro60/hY3 RNA immune complexes or transfection with hY3. Based on microarray, TNF and IL6 were among the most highly upregulated genes in both stimulated conditions, each of which was significantly inhibited by preincubation with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). In contrast, following stimulation of macrophages with either TNF-α or IFN-α, which do not signal through TLR, the resultant gene expression was refractory to HCQ. Ligation of TLR7/8 resulted in increased histone methylation as measured by increased H3K4me2, a requirement for binding of NF-κB at certain promoters, specifically the kB1 region in the TNF promoter (ChIP-qPCR), which was significantly decreased by HCQ. In summary, these results support that the HCQ-sensitive phenotype of hY3 stimulated macrophages reflects the bifurcation of TLR downstream signals involving NF-κB and STAT 1 pathways and for the former dimethylation of H3K4. Accordingly, HCQ may act more as a preventive measure in downregulating the initial production of IFN-α or TNF-α and not affect the resultant autocoid stimulation reflected in TNF-α and IFN-α responsive genes. The beneficial scope of antimalarials in the prevention of organ damage, inclusive of heart block in an anti-Ro offspring or more broadly SLE, may include in part, a mechanism targeting TLR-dependent epigenetic modification.

  15. 8-Bromo-cyclic inosine diphosphoribose: towards a selective cyclic ADP-ribose agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Tanja; Moreau, Christelle; Wagner, Gerd K.; Fliegert, Ralf; Siebrands, Cornelia C.; Nebel, Merle; Schmid, Frederike; Harneit, Angelika; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    cADPR (cyclic ADP-ribose) is a universal Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger. In T-cells cADPR is involved in sustained Ca2+ release and also in Ca2+ entry. Potential mechanisms for the latter include either capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by cADPR, or direct activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPM2 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily melastatin, member 2). Here we characterize the molecular target of the newly-described membrane-permeant cADPR agonist 8-Br-N1-cIDPR (8-bromo-cyclic IDP-ribose). 8-Br-N1-cIDPR evoked Ca2+ signalling in the human T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat and in primary rat T-lymphocytes. Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR consisted of Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry. Whereas Ca2+ release was sensitive to both the RyR (ryanodine receptor) blocker RuRed (Ruthenium Red) and the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose), Ca2+ entry was inhibited by the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ (gadolinium ion) and SKF-96365, as well as by 8-Br-cADPR. To unravel a potential role for TRPM2 in sustained Ca2+ entry evoked by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR, TRPM2 was overexpressed in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. However, though activation by H2O2 was enhanced dramatically in those cells, Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR was almost unaffected. Similarly, direct analysis of TRPM2 currents did not reveal activation or co-activation of TRPM2 by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. In summary, the sensitivity to the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ and SKF-96365 is in favour of the concept of capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. Taken together, 8-Br-N1-cIDPR appears to be the first cADPR agonist affecting Ca2+ release and secondary Ca2+ entry, but without effect on TRPM2. PMID:19492987

  16. Myeloblastic leukemia cells conditionally blocked by myc-estrogen receptor chimeric transgenes for terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, M; Liebermann, D; Hoffman-Liebermann, B

    1993-05-01

    Conditional mutants of the myeloblastic leukemic M1 cell line, expressing the chimeric mycer transgene, have been established. It is shown that M1 mycer cells, like M1, undergo terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and programmed cell death (apoptosis) after treatment with the physiologic differentiation inducer interleukin-6. However, when beta-estradiol is included in the culture medium, M1 mycer cells respond to differentiation inducers like M1 myc cell lines, where the differentiation program is blocked at an intermediate stage. By manipulating the function of the mycer transgene product, it is shown that there is a 10-hour window during myeloid differentiation, from 30 to 40 hours after the addition of the differentiation inducer, when the terminal differentiation program switches from being dependent on c-myc suppression to becoming c-myc suppression independent, where activation of c-myc has no apparent effect on mature macrophages. M1 mycer cell lines provide a powerful tool to increase our understanding of the role of c-myc in normal myelopoiesis and in leukemogenesis, also providing a strategy to clone c-myc target genes.

  17. Blocking Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in HTR-8/SVneo First Trimester Trophoblast Cells Results in Dephosphorylation of PKBα/AKT and Induces Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bolnick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified a major peptide signaling target of EGF/EGFR pathway and explored the consequences of blocking or activating this pathway in the first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells, HTR-8/SVneo. A global analysis of protein phosphorylation was undertaken using novel technology (Kinexus Kinetworks that utilizes SDS-polyacrylamide minigel electrophoresis and multi-lane immunoblotting to permit specific and semiquantitative detection of multiple phosphoproteins. Forty-seven protein phosphorylation sites were queried, and the results reported based on relative phosphorylation at each site. EGF- and Iressa-(gefitinib, ZD1839, an inhibitor of EGFR treated HTR-8/SVneo cells were subjected to immunoblotting and flow cytometry to confirm the phosphoprotein screen and to assess the effects of EGF versus Iressa on cell cycle and apoptosis. EGFR mediates the phosphorylation of important signaling proteins, including PKBα/AKT. This pathway is likely to be central to EGFR-mediated trophoblast survival. Furthermore, EGF treatment induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis, while Iressa induces apoptosis.

  18. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  19. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrer, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.fahrer@uni-ulm.de [Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz (Germany); Wagner, Silvia [Clinic of General, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, ZMF, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Buerkle, Alexander [Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz (Germany); Koenigsrainer, Alfred [Clinic of General, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, ZMF, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  20. Correlation between increased platelet ADP aggregability and silent brain infarcts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between platelet aggregability and silent brain infarcts. The study subjects were 445 people (264 men, 181 women; mean age, 53±14 years) with no neurologic signs, history of brain tumor, trauma, cerebrovascular disease, or antiplatelet medications. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was measured by the aggregation-size analytic method. Platelet aggregability was classified into 9 classes. The presence of headache/vertigo, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or smoking was elicited by questioning or blood sampling. A head MRI scan was performed, and if marked atherosclerosis or obvious stenosis in the intracranial vessels was detected, it was defined as a positive MR angiography (MRA) finding. Silent brain infarcts were detected in 26.3% of subjects. Hyperaggregability defined as that above class 6, 7, and 8 was present in 43.8%, 30.8%, and 15.7% of subjects, respectively. The risk factors for silent brain infarcts by multiple logistic regression analysis were aging, hypertension, positive MRA findings, and hyperaggregability. Platelet ADP hyperaggregability might be a risk factor for silent brain infarcts. (author)

  1. Non-Dioxin-Like Polychlorinated Biphenyls Inhibit G-Protein Coupled Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ Signaling by Blocking Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Young Choi

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are ubiquitous pollutants which accumulate in the food chain. Recently, several molecular mechanisms by which non-dioxin-like (NDL PCBs mediate neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral toxicity have been elucidated. However, although the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR is a significant target for neurobehavioral disturbance, our understanding of the effects of PCBs on GPCR signaling remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NDL-PCBs on GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling in PC12 cells. We found that ortho-substituted 2,2',6-trichlorinated biphenyl (PCB19 caused a rapid decline in the Ca2+ signaling of bradykinin, a typical Gq- and phospholipase Cβ-coupled GPCR, without any effect on its inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. PCB19 reduced thapsigargin-induced sustained cytosolic Ca2+ levels, suggesting that PCB19 inhibits SOCE. The abilities of other NDL-PCBs to inhibit store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE were also examined and found to be of similar potencies to that of PCB19. PCB19 also showed a manner equivalent to that of known SOCE inhibitors. PCB19-mediated SOCE inhibition was confirmed by demonstrating the ability of PCB19 to inhibit the SOCE current and thapsigargin-induced Mn2+ influx. These results imply that one of the molecular mechanism by which NDL-PCBs cause neurobehavioral disturbances involves NDL-PCB-mediated inhibition of SOCE, thereby interfering with GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling.

  2. Cordycepin Suppresses Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Expression via Blocking Caspase-1 and Receptor-Interacting Protein 2 Signaling Pathways in Mast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoou, Myoung-schook; Jin, Mu Hyun; Lee, So Young; Lee, Sang Hwa; Kim, Byunghyun; Roh, Seok Seon; Choi, In Hwa; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine) is one of the active components isolated from Cordyceps militaris, and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-aging, and anti-cancer effects. Mast cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory reactions. Here, we investigated the regulatory effect and mechanisms of cordycepin on the expression of TSLP in the human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells, and in the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells. Cordycepin significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of TSLP through the inhibition of caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB activation. Cordycepin also significantly reduced the phosphorylation of receptor-interacting protein 2 and inhibitory kappa B (IκB) kinase β. Cordycepin significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in activated HMC-1 cells. Moreover, cordycepin significantly decreased the levels of TSLP in activated HaCaT cells. Our studies suggest that cordycepin can be applied to the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases exacerbated by TSLP. PMID:26725432

  3. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Bashir

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV. Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection.

  4. Differential Role of Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase in D. discoideum growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begum Rasheedunnisa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase is evolutionarily conserved as a responder to various forms of stress. Though PARP's role in cell death is well addressed, its role in development and multicellularity is still an enigma. We have previously reported the role of PARP in oxidative stress induced delayed development of D. discoideum. Results In the current study we highlight the involvement of PARP during D. discoideum development. Oxidative stress affects expression of aca and cAR1 thus affecting aggregation. Although parp expression is not affected during oxidative stress but it is involved during normal development as confirmed by our PARP down-regulation studies. Constitutive PARP down-regulation resulted in blocked development while no effect was observed on D. discoideum growth. Interestingly, stage specific PARP down-regulation arrested development at the slug stage. Conclusion These results emphasize that PARP is essential for complex differentiation and its function may be linked to multicellularity. This is the first report where the involvement of PARP during normal multicellular development in D. discoideum, an ancient eukaryote, is established which could be of evolutionary significance. Thus our study adds one more role to the multitasking function of PARP.

  5. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs ...

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  1. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes mm9 All antigens Adipocyte Brown preadipocytes...RX341420,SRX341421,SRX341046,SRX478161,SRX341027,SRX478160 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Brown preadipocyt...341766,SRX341418,SRX341023,SRX341419,SRX341767 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes mm9 All antigens Adipocyte Brown preadipocytes...RX341420,SRX478161,SRX478160,SRX341040,SRX341041,SRX341039 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Brown preadipocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte Brown preadipocyte...058,SRX341056,SRX478161 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_preadipocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760...968,SRX760970,SRX760967,SRX760971,SRX760969 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 Histone Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760965,SRX...760962,SRX760966,SRX760964,SRX760963 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825364,SRX8253...85,SRX825371 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SRX8253...72,SRX825365 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SR...X825372,SRX825365 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825364,SR...X825385,SRX825392,SRX825371 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825371,SRX8253...64,SRX825385 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SR...X825365,SRX825372 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825364,SRX8253...85,SRX825371 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SR...X825372,SRX825365 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SRX8253...72,SRX825365 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SRX8253...65,SRX825372 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825364,SR...X825385,SRX825371,SRX825392 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825371,SR...X825364,SRX825385,SRX825392 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-2 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-2 SRX825386,SRX825379,SRX8253...65,SRX825372 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Capan-2.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 Histone Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825371,SRX8253...64,SRX825385 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-1 hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Capan-1 SRX825378,SRX825371,SR...X825364,SRX825385,SRX825392 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Capan-1.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...019496,SRX019511,SRX019518,SRX019504,SRX019497,SRX019503 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose Tissue..., White http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose Tissue..., White http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX134...732 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX134...732 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX13473...2 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, ...White http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX13473...2 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose Tissue...SRX821810,SRX821806,SRX821809,SRX821817,SRX821816,SRX821807 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX13473...2 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, ...X821817,SRX821821,SRX821815,SRX821811,SRX821810,SRX821809 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX13473...2 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose Tissue...SRX821821,SRX821815,SRX821811,SRX821817,SRX821809,SRX821810 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, Whi...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX134...732 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose Tissue SRX134...732 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Adipocy...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Adp.50.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.50.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX18587...27367 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.50.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.Adp.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX0194...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX800016,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Adp.50.NA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.50.NA.AllCell hg19 No description NA Adipocyte SRX134732,SRX031428,SRX08865...0,SRX031386,SRX056801,SRX031444,SRX312175,SRX056800,SRX088647,SRX312171 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.50.NA.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.Adp.20.NA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.20.NA.AllCell hg19 No description NA Adipocyte SRX088650,SRX134732,SRX31217...5,SRX031428,SRX031386,SRX056801,SRX031444,SRX312171,SRX056800,SRX088647 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.20.NA.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Adp.20.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Adipocyte SRX978685,S...RX800022 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Adp.05.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Adipocyte SRX978685,S...RX800022 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progen...itor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127409,SRX127394,SRX127396,SRX127407,SRX127383,SRX127381 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127394,SRX127409,SRX127396,SRX127407,SRX127381,SRX127383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell S...15,SRX019508,SRX019494 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Adipocyte Adipose progenitor ...cells SRX127409,SRX127407,SRX127394,SRX127396,SRX127383,SRX127381 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX682086,SRX6...82084,SRX682083,SRX682085 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX027402,SRX0...27403,SRX027401 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 Histone Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760966,SRX...760963,SRX760964,SRX760965,SRX760962 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX027402,SRX682...084,SRX682086,SRX682083,SRX682085,SRX027401,SRX027400,SRX027403,SRX027404 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX682084,SRX6...82086,SRX682083,SRX682085 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760...967,SRX760968,SRX760971,SRX760969,SRX760970 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 Histone Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760962,SRX...760966,SRX760963,SRX760965,SRX760964 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX682084,SRX682...086,SRX027402,SRX682085,SRX682083,SRX027401,SRX027400,SRX027404,SRX027403 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX027402,SRX682...086,SRX682084,SRX027400,SRX682085,SRX682083,SRX027403,SRX027401,SRX027404 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 Histone Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760966,SRX...760964,SRX760963,SRX760965,SRX760962 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX682086,SRX6...82084,SRX682085,SRX682083 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX027402,SRX0...27403,SRX027401 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX027402,SRX0...27401,SRX027403 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760...967,SRX760968,SRX760971,SRX760969,SRX760970 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Pre-adipocytes SRX760...968,SRX760967,SRX760971,SRX760969,SRX760970 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Pre-adipocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipocytes SRX027402,SRX027...403,SRX027400,SRX682086,SRX682084,SRX682083,SRX682085,SRX027401,SRX027404 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipocytes.bed ...

  1. 7 CFR 277.18 - Establishment of an Automated Data Processing (ADP) and Information Retrieval System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) and Information Retrieval System. 277.18 Section 277.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Data Processing (ADP) and Information Retrieval System. (a) Scope and application. This section... costs of planning, design, development or installation of ADP and information retrieval systems if...

  2. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 All antigens Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX80...X800019,SRX185797,SRX478163,SRX478162 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 All antigens Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX80...X185879,SRX978689,SRX978688,SRX478162 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX97...8685,SRX800022 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte Brown adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...RX978688,SRX800015,SRX800014,SRX800018,SRX800019 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte Brown adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...800010,SRX800016,SRX800017 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX97...8685,SRX800022 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...RX978689,SRX800015,SRX800014,SRX800018,SRX800019 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte Brown adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  12. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte Brown adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX1...85879,SRX143805,SRX478163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...800010,SRX800016,SRX800017 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...RX800014,SRX978690,SRX978689,SRX978688,SRX800019 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX1...43805,SRX185879,SRX478163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 All antigens Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX80...X800018,SRX800019,SRX185797,SRX478162 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 All antigens Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX80...X978688,SRX800019,SRX478163,SRX478162 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX97...8685,SRX800022 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...800010,SRX800016,SRX800017 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...RX800019,SRX978691,SRX978690,SRX978689,SRX978688 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX1...85879,SRX143805,SRX478163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX4...78163,SRX143805,SRX185879 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX97...8685,SRX800022 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Brown adipocytes SRX...800010,SRX800016,SRX800017 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Brown_adipocytes.bed ...

  6. A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY TO MEASURE RUBISCO ACTIVASE ACTIVATION ACTIVITY UNDER VARYING ATP:ADP RATIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ratio of ATP to ADP in the stroma is an important regulatory mechanism for controlling the activation state of Rubisco via Rubisco activase (activase). Understanding the response of activase to a varying ATP:ADP ratio should reveal insights into the regulation of photosynthesis. However, the cur...

  7. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.SGBS [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.SGBS hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte SGBS SRX813768,SRX813771,SRX813...X813775,SRX032891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.SGBS.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Fetal_Heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Fetal_Heart hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Fetal Heart SRX040387,SRX0404...0390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Fetal_Heart.bed ...

  9. NMR resonance assignments of NarE, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin from Neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlier, L.P.A.; Köhler, Christian; Veggi, D.; Pizza, M.; Soriani, M.; Boelens, R.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    NarE is a 16 kDa protein identified from Neisseria meningitidis, one of the bacterial pathogens responsible for meningitis. NarE belongs to the ADP-ribosyltransferase family and catalyses the transfer of ADP-ribose moieties to arginine residues in target protein acceptors. Many pathogenic bacteria u

  10. Structural and biochemical characterization of NAR E, an iron containing ADP-ribosyltransferase from neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, C.; Carlier, L.P.A.; Veggi, D.; Balducci, C.; Di Marcello, F.; Ferrer-Navarro, M.; Pizza, M.; Daura, X.; Soriani, M.; Boelens, R.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    NarE is a 16 kDa protein identified from Neisseria meningitidis, one of the bacterial pathogens responsible for meningitis. NarE belongs to the family of ADP-ribosyltransferases (ADPRT) and catalyzes the transfer of ADP-ribose moieties to arginine residues in target protein acceptors. Many pathogeni

  11. REDUCED THROMBOGENICITY OF VASCULAR PROSTHESES BY COATING WITH ADP-ASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEI, B; ROBINSON, PH; BAKKER, WW; Bartels, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this pilot study ADP-ase coated polyurethane (PL) vascular prostheses and noncoated (control) PU vascular prostheses (all vascular prostheses: ID 1.5 mm, length 1,5 cm) were implanted into the carotid artery of the rabbit to test wheter ADP-ase might function as an adequate anti-thrombogenic coat

  12. File list: InP.Adp.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX0194...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Adp.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.20.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX0194...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Adp.20.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.20.AllAg.AllCell hg19 Input control Adipocyte SRX019491,SRX660092,SRX660091...,SRX1272789,SRX1272801,SRX032892,SRX196110,SRX469459,SRX469457,SRX825392,SRX027404 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.20.AllAg.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Adp.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.20.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX99775...78161 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Adp.10.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.AllAg.AllCell hg19 Input control Adipocyte SRX019491,SRX660092,SRX127280...1,SRX196110,SRX660091,SRX032892,SRX825392,SRX1272789,SRX469459,SRX469457,SRX027404 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.10.AllAg.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Adp.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX99775...78161 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Adp.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Adipocyte SRX99775...27370 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Fetal_Heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Fetal_Heart hg19 No description Adipocyte Fetal Heart SRX088650,SR...X088647,SRX056801,SRX031428,SRX031386,SRX031444,SRX056800 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Fetal_Heart.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart hg19 Histone Adipocyte Fetal Heart SRX860893,SRX860898...,SRX860890,SRX860889,SRX860894,SRX860892,SRX860896,SRX860895,SRX860891,SRX860897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart hg19 No description Adipocyte Fetal Heart SRX088650,SR...X031428,SRX031386,SRX056801,SRX031444,SRX056800,SRX088647 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Fetal_Heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Fetal_Heart hg19 Histone Adipocyte Fetal Heart SRX860893,SRX860894...,SRX860897,SRX860898,SRX860892,SRX860890,SRX860889,SRX860896,SRX860895,SRX860891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Fetal_Heart.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Fetal Heart SRX040387,SRX0404...0390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Fetal_Heart.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte White adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte White adipocytes SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White...X821810,SRX821806,SRX821809,SRX821817,SRX821816,SRX821807 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White...SRX821815,SRX821821,SRX821816,SRX821809,SRX821817,SRX821810 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte White adipocytes SRX...800011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White...SRX821817,SRX821821,SRX821815,SRX821811,SRX821810,SRX821809 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  18. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte White adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte White adipocytes SRX9...97757,SRX821800,SRX821801,SRX268023,SRX821799 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.05.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Adipocyte White adipocytes SRX...800011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White...X821821,SRX821815,SRX821811,SRX821817,SRX821809,SRX821810 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White...X821815,SRX821821,SRX821816,SRX821809,SRX821817,SRX821810 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 No description Adipocyte White adipocytes htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 Input control Adipocyte White adipocytes SRX2...68023,SRX997757,SRX821800,SRX821801,SRX821799 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte White adipocytes SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.AllAg.White_adipocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  9. The inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth by denbinobin is associated with the blocking of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, An-Chi; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lai, Chin-Yu; Wang, Chih-Ya; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Teng, Che-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Denbinobin, which is a phenanthraquinone derivative present in the stems of Ephemerantha lonchophylla, has been demonstrated to display antitumor activity. Recent reports suggest that the enhanced activity of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is closely associated with tumor angiogenesis and growth. This study aims at investigating the roles of denbinobin in suppressing these effects and at further elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, we used an in vivo xenograft model antitumor and the Matrigel implant assays to show that denbinobin suppresses lung adenocarcinoma A549 growth and microvessel formation. Additionally, crystal violet and capillary-like tube formation assays indicated that denbinobin selectively inhibits insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced proliferation (GI50=1.3×10⁻⁸ M) and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) without influencing the effect of epidermal growth factor; vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Furthermore, denbinobin inhibited the IGF-1-induced migration of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent fashion. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that denbinobin causes more efficient inhibition of IGF-1-induced activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling targets, including , extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, 4EBP and cyclin D1. All of our results provide evidences that denbinobin suppresses the activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathway, which leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that denbinobin may be a novel IGF-1R kinase inhibitor and has potential therapeutic abilities for angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. PMID:20951021

  10. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes. PMID:27465490

  11. Current Status of Poly(ADP-ribose Polymerase Inhibitors as Novel Therapeutic Agents for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Hiller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer that is clinically defined as lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors, as well as being ERBB2 (HER-2 negative. Without specific therapeutic targets, TNBC carries a worse prognosis than other types of breast cancer in the absence of therapy. Research has now further differentiated breast cancer into subtypes based on genetic expression patterns. One of these subtypes, basal-like, frequently overlaps with the clinical picture of TNBC. Additionally, both TNBC and basal-like breast cancer link to BRCA mutations. Recent pharmaceutical advances have created a class of drugs, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors, which are showing potential to effectively treat these patients. The aim of this paper is to summarize the basis behind PARP inhibitors and update the current status of their development in clinical trials for the treatment of TNBC.

  12. Higher cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression in familial than in sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Marie-Luise; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Budczies, Jan; Bult, Peter; Prinzler, Judith; Radke, Cornelia; van Krieken, J Han J M; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten; Müller, Berit Maria

    2012-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) is a key element of the single-base excision pathway for repair of DNA single-strand breaks. To compare the cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) expression between familial (BRCA1, BRCA2, or non BRCA1/2) and sporadic breast cancer, we investigated 39 sporadic and 39 familial breast cancer cases. The two groups were matched for hormone receptor status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status. Additionally, they were matched by grading with a maximum difference of ±1 degree (e.g., G2 instead of G3). Cytoplasmic PARP (cPARP) expression was significantly higher in familial compared to sporadic breast cancer (P = 0.008, chi-squared test for trends) and a high nuclear PARP expression (nPARP) was significantly more frequently observed in familial breast cancer (64 %) compared with sporadic breast cancer (36 %) (P = 0.005, chi-squared test). The overall PARP expression was significantly higher in familial breast cancer (P = 0.042, chi-squared test). In familial breast cancer, a combination of high cPARP and high nPARP expression is the most common (33 %), whereas in sporadic breast cancer, a combination of low cPARP and intermediate nPARP expression is the most common (39 %). Our results show that the overall PARP expression in familial breast cancer is higher than in sporadic breast cancer which might suggest they might respond better to treatment with PARP inhibitors.

  13. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated 32P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. 32P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuininga, J E; Verhees, C H; van der Oost, J; Kengen, S W; Stams, A J; de Vos, W M

    1999-07-23

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway involving two ADP-dependent kinases. Using the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the previously purified ADP-dependent glucokinase, the corresponding gene as well as a related open reading frame were detected in the genome of P. furiosus. Both genes were successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, yielding highly thermoactive ADP-dependent glucokinase and phosphofructokinase. The deduced amino acid sequences of both kinases were 21.1% identical but did not reveal significant homology with those of other known sugar kinases. The ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase was purified and characterized. The oxygen-stable protein had a native molecular mass of approximately 180 kDa and was composed of four identical 52-kDa subunits. It had a specific activity of 88 units/mg at 50 degrees C and a pH optimum of 6.5. As phosphoryl group donor, ADP could be replaced by GDP, ATP, and GTP to a limited extent. The K(m) values for fructose 6-phosphate and ADP were 2.3 and 0.11 mM, respectively. The phosphofructokinase did not catalyze the reverse reaction, nor was it regulated by any of the known allosteric modulators of ATP-dependent phosphofructokinases. ATP and AMP were identified as competitive inhibitors of the phosphofructokinase, raising the K(m) for ADP to 0.34 and 0.41 mM, respectively. PMID:10409652

  15. Structure of the Escherichia coli heptosyltransferase WaaC: binary complexes with ADP and ADP-2-deoxy-2-fluoro heptose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Salem, Michèle; Vongsouthi, Vanida; Durand, Lionel; Moreau, François; Dohi, Hirofumi; Vincent, Stéphane; Escaich, Sonia; Ducruix, Arnaud

    2006-10-20

    Lipopolysaccharides constitute the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and are therefore essential for cell growth and viability. The heptosyltransferase WaaC is a glycosyltransferase (GT) involved in the synthesis of the inner core region of LPS. It catalyzes the addition of the first L-glycero-D-manno-heptose (heptose) molecule to one 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of the Kdo2-lipid A molecule. Heptose is an essential component of the LPS core domain; its absence results in a truncated lipopolysaccharide associated with the deep-rough phenotype causing a greater susceptibility to antibiotic and an attenuated virulence for pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, WaaC represents a promising target in antibacterial drug design. Here, we report the structure of WaaC from the Escherichia coli pathogenic strain RS218 alone at 1.9 A resolution, and in complex with either ADP or the non-cleavable analog ADP-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-heptose of the sugar donor at 2.4 A resolution. WaaC adopts the GT-B fold in two domains, characteristic of one glycosyltransferase structural superfamily. The comparison of the three different structures shows that WaaC does not undergo a domain rotation, characteristic of the GT-B family, upon substrate binding, but allows the substrate analog and the reaction product to adopt remarkably distinct conformations inside the active site. In addition, both binary complexes offer a close view of the donor subsite and, together with results from site-directed mutagenesis studies, provide evidence for a model of the catalytic mechanism.

  16. Fine-tuning of Smad protein function by poly(ADP-ribose polymerases and poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase during transforming growth factor β signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Initiation, amplitude, duration and termination of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signaling via Smad proteins is regulated by post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and acetylation. We previously reported that ADP-ribosylation of Smads by poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1 negatively influences Smad-mediated transcription. PARP-1 is known to functionally interact with PARP-2 in the nucleus and the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG can remove poly(ADP-ribose chains from target proteins. Here we aimed at analyzing possible cooperation between PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG in regulation of TGFβ signaling. METHODS: A robust cell model of TGFβ signaling, i.e. human HaCaT keratinocytes, was used. Endogenous Smad3 ADP-ribosylation and protein complexes between Smads and PARPs were studied using proximity ligation assays and co-immunoprecipitation assays, which were complemented by in vitro ADP-ribosylation assays using recombinant proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA levels and promoter-reporter assays provided quantitative analysis of gene expression in response to TGFβ stimulation and after genetic perturbations of PARP-1/-2 and PARG based on RNA interference. RESULTS: TGFβ signaling rapidly induces nuclear ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 that coincides with a relative enhancement of nuclear complexes of Smads with PARP-1 and PARP-2. Inversely, PARG interacts with Smads and can de-ADP-ribosylate Smad3 in vitro. PARP-1 and PARP-2 also form complexes with each other, and Smads interact and activate auto-ADP-ribosylation of both PARP-1 and PARP-2. PARP-2, similar to PARP-1, negatively regulates specific TGFβ target genes (fibronectin, Smad7 and Smad transcriptional responses, and PARG positively regulates these genes. Accordingly, inhibition of TGFβ-mediated transcription caused by silencing endogenous PARG expression could be relieved after simultaneous depletion of PARP-1. CONCLUSION

  17. Identification of an enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes protein-bound ADP-ribose in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y C; Soman, G; Graves, D J

    1986-09-30

    An enzymatic activity present in high-speed supernatant fluids of rat skeletal muscle was found that catalyzes the release of ADP-ribose from ADP-ribosylated-modified lysozyme. The nature of the product was proved by chromatographic studies and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The enzyme activity is stimulated by Mg2+, dithioerythritol, and flouride. These results and those published earlier (Soman, G., Mickelson, J.R., Louis, C.F., and Graves, D.J. (1984) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 120, 973-980) show that ADP-ribosylation is a reversible process in skeletal muscle.

  18. Insights into the mechanism of ADP action on flagellar motility derived from studies on bull sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesich, Kathleen A; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2008-07-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is known to have interesting effects on flagellar motility. Permeabilized and reactivated bull sperm exhibit a marked reduction in beating frequency and a greatly increased beat amplitude in the presence of 1-4 mM ADP. In this study we examined the force production of sperm reactivated with 0.1 mM ATP with and without 1 mM ADP and found that there is little or no resulting change in the stalling force produced by a bull sperm flagella in response to ADP. Because bull sperm bend to a higher curvature after ADP treatment we explored the possibility that ADP-treated sperm flagella are more flexible. We measured the stiffness of 50 muM sodium vanadate treated bull sperm in the presence of 4 mM ADP, but found no change in the passive flagellar stiffness. When we analyzed the torque that develops in ADP-treated sperm at the point of beat reversal we found that the torque developed by the flagellum is significantly increased. Our torque estimates also allow us to calculate the transverse force (t-force) acting on the flagellum at the point of beat direction reversal. We find that the t-force at the switch-point of the beat is increased significantly in the ADP treated condition, averaging 0.7 +/- 0.29 nN/microm in 0.1 mM ATP and increasing to 2.9 +/- 1.2 nN/microm in 0.1 mM ATP plus 4 mM ADP. This suggests that ADP is exerting its effect on the beat by increasing the tenacity of dynein attachment at the B-subtubule. This could be a direct result of a regulatory effect of ADP on the binding affinity of dynein for the B-subtubule of the outer doublets. This result could also help to explain a number of previous experimental observations, as discussed. PMID:18375503

  19. Yeast Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins are but adaptor protein-1 is not required for cell-free transport of membrane proteins from the trans-Golgi network to the prevacuolar compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazeed, Mohamed E; Fuller, Robert S

    2008-11-01

    Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN-PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the beta subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Delta membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Delta mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  20. Yeast Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-Ribosylation Factor-binding Proteins Are but Adaptor Protein-1 Is Not Required for Cell-free Transport of Membrane Proteins from the Trans-Golgi Network to the Prevacuolar Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.

    2008-01-01

    Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN–PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the β subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Δ membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Δ mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  1. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  2. Inhibition of tumor vasculogenic mimicry and prolongation of host survival in highly aggressive gallbladder cancers by norcantharidin via blocking the ephrin type a receptor 2/focal adhesion kinase/paxillin signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Vasculogenic mimicry (VM is a newly-defined tumor microcirculation pattern in highly aggressive malignant tumors. We recently reported tumor growth and VM formation of gallbladder cancers through the contribution of the ephrin type a receptor 2 (EphA2/focal adhesion kinase (FAK/Paxillin signaling pathways. In this study, we further investigated the anti-VM activity of norcantharidin (NCTD as a VM inhibitor for gallbladder cancers and the underlying mechanisms. In vivo and in vitro experiments to determine the effects of NCTD on tumor growth, host survival, VM formation of GBC-SD nude mouse xenografts, and vasculogenic-like networks, malignant phenotypes i.e., proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration of GBC-SD cells. Expression of VM signaling-related markers EphA2, FAK and Paxillin in vivo and in vitro were examined by immunofluorescence, western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that after treatment with NCTD, GBC-SD cells were unable to form VM structures when injecting into nude mouse, growth of the xenograft was inhibited and these observations were confirmed by facts that VM formation by three-dimensional (3-D matrix, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, migration of GBC-SD cells were affected; and survival time of the xenograft mice was prolonged. Furthermore, expression of EphA2, FAK and Paxillin proteins/mRNAs of the xenografts was downregulated. Thus, we concluded that NCTD has potential anti-VM activity against human gallbladder cancers; one of the underlying mechanisms may be via blocking the EphA2/FAK/Paxillin signaling pathway.

  3. Apparent genetic difference between hypothyroid patients with blocking-type thyrotropin receptor antibody and those without, as shown by restriction fragement length polymorphism analyses of HLA-DP loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Sugawa, Hideo; Akamizu, Takashi; Mori, Toru (Kyoto Univ. School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)); Sato, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Tsuji, Kimiyoshi (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)); Maeda, Masahiro (Nichirei Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    HLA types in Japanese patients with primary hypothyroidism were analyzed to see whether those with blocking-type TSH receptor antibody (TSH-R BAb M) differed genetically from those with idiopathic myxedema (IM). HLA typings of -A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ (73 antigens) were performed serologically, and those of -D and -DP (29 antigens) were analyzed by the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Thirty patients were studied with TSH-R BAb M, and 28 with IM. The data were analyzed and compared with previous results from 88 Graves' patients, 46 Hashimoto patients, and 186 control subjects. Overall, 192 patients with 4 autoimmune thyroid disorders showed a decrease in -Aw19 and an increase in -DQw4 (corrected P < 0.05) and significant associations of -Aw33, -Bw46, -Cw3, -DRw8, -DR9, and -DQw3. In TSH-R BAb M patients, increases in -B35, -Bw60, and -Dw8 and decreases in -DR4 and -DPw2 were seen, whereas IM patients showed increased -DPw2, -Bw61, and -Dw23. In comparisons between TSH-R-BAb M and IM, the difference in -DPw2 was highly significant. HLA-B35 differed significantly in these 2 types of hypothyroidism. In conclusion, TSH-R BAb M patients have decreased frequency of -DPw2 and are genetically similar to Graves' disease, whereas IM patients are characterized by high frequency of -DPw2 and are genetically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The energetics of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Del R; Baker, Josh E

    2009-06-28

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as a mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force-generating and force-sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force-sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin-myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, DeltaDeltaG(-D), in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Deltamicro(mech), performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or DeltaDeltaG(-D) = Deltamicro(mech). We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires approximately 4 kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only approximately 0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights

  5. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M.; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K. C.; Adamik, R; H. C. Chen; Moss, J; M. Vaughan

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on th...

  6. Multiple forms of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from tomato fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) was purified from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit to apparent homogeneity. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme migrated as two close bands with molecular weights of 50,000 and 51,000. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme, however, revealed at least five major protein spots that could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. Whereas all of the spots were recognized by the antiserum raised against tomato fruit AGP holoenzyme, only three of them reacted strongly with antiserum raised against the potato tuber AGP large subunit, and the other two spots (with lower molecular weights) reacted specifically with antisera raised against spinach leaf AGP holoenzyme and the potato tuber AGP small subunit. The results suggest the existence of at least three isoforms of the AGP large subunit and two isoforms of the small subunit in tomato fruit in vivo. The native molecular mass of the enzyme determined by gel filtration was 220 +/- 10 kD, indicating a tetrameric structure for AGP from tomato fruit. The purified enzyme is very sensitive to 3-phosphoglycerate/inorganic phosphate regulation.

  7. Modification of ADP extinguishing powder by siliconization in spray drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Zhang; Zhigang Shen; Chujiang Cai; Xiaozheng Yu; Jun Du; Yushan Xing; Shulin Ma

    2012-01-01

    Superfine spherical fire-extinguishing powder,ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP,NH4H2PO4),was prepared by spray drying and modified in situ with methyl hydrogen silicone oil (MHSO) emulsion and the fluorinated surfactant FK-510.The influences of the MHSO mass ratio on the hydrophobicity,surface composition,surface morphology,dispersion and particle-size distribution of the NH4H2PO4 were studied,and the influence of the drying air temperature on the decomposition of the NH4H2PO4 was also researched.The results indicate that the MHSO and FK-510 congregate on the particle surfaces and then form a hydrophobic shell.This shell improves the particle hydrophobicity and leads to a fine dispersion of the particles.During the process of preparing the precursor solution,3 wt% (based on the weight of NH4H2PO4) was chosen as the optimum value of the MHSO mass ratio.During the spray drying,a low absolute humidity of the air should be maintained,and it is very important to keep the exit-air temperature below 100℃ to avoid decomposition.

  8. An affinity matrix for the purification of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassin, H; Jacobson, M K; Guay, J; Verreault, A; Aboul-Ela, N; Menard, L.; Poirier, G G

    1990-01-01

    The preparation of quantities of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sufficient for detailed structural and enzymatic characterizations has been difficult due to the very low tissue content of the enzyme and its lability in late stages of purification. To date, the only purification of this enzyme to apparent homogeneity has involved a procedure requiring 6 column chromatographic steps. Described here is the preparation of an affinity matrix which consists of ADP-ribose polymers bound to dihydrox...

  9. File list: Oth.Adp.50.Kmt2d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.Kmt2d.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Kmt2d Adipocyte SRX339719,SRX339718,SRX...339717,SRX339721,SRX339722,SRX341764,SRX341418,SRX339720,SRX341766,SRX341765,SRX341419,SRX341767 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.Kmt2d.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Adp.05.Kmt2d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.Kmt2d.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Kmt2d Adipocyte SRX339719,SRX339722,SRX...339717,SRX339718,SRX339721,SRX341764,SRX341765,SRX339720,SRX341766,SRX341418,SRX341419,SRX341767 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.Kmt2d.AllCell.bed ...

  11. Analytical Design Package (ADP2): A computer aided engineering tool for aircraft transparency design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerer, J. E.; Gran, M.; Held, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Analytical Design Package (ADP2) is being developed as a part of the Air Force Frameless Transparency Program (FTP). ADP2 is an integrated design tool consisting of existing analysis codes and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software. The objective of the ADP2 is to develop and confirm an integrated design methodology for frameless transparencies, related aircraft interfaces, and their corresponding tooling. The application of this methodology will generate high confidence for achieving a qualified part prior to mold fabrication. ADP2 is a customized integration of analysis codes, CAE software, and material databases. The primary CAE integration tool for the ADP2 is P3/PATRAN, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software tool. The open architecture of P3/PATRAN allows customized installations with different applications modules for specific site requirements. Integration of material databases allows the engineer to select a material, and those material properties are automatically called into the relevant analysis code. The ADP2 materials database will be composed of four independent schemas: CAE Design, Processing, Testing, and Logistics Support. The design of ADP2 places major emphasis on the seamless integration of CAE and analysis modules with a single intuitive graphical interface. This tool is being designed to serve and be used by an entire project team, i.e., analysts, designers, materials experts, and managers. The final version of the software will be delivered to the Air Force in Jan. 1994. The Analytical Design Package (ADP2) will then be ready for transfer to industry. The package will be capable of a wide range of design and manufacturing applications.

  12. Arginine ADP-ribosylation mechanism based on structural snapshots of iota-toxin and actin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Tsumori, Yayoi; Qiu, Hao; Oda, Masataka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin (Ia) mono-ADP ribosylates Arg177 of actin, leading to cytoskeletal disorganization and cell death. To fully understand the reaction mechanism of arginine-specific mono-ADP ribosyl transferase, the structure of the toxin-substrate protein complex must be characterized. Recently, we solved the crystal structure of Ia in complex with actin and the nonhydrolyzable NAD+ analog βTAD (thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide); however, the structures of the NAD+...

  13. File list: InP.Adp.05.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.AllAg.AllCell mm9 Input control Adipocyte SRX997757,SRX478163,SRX821800,...0,SRX341056,SRX341058,SRX821799,SRX341057,SRX341783,SRX341781,SRX478161,SRX127367,SRX127370 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.05.AllAg.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.50.AllAg.AllCell mm9 Input control Adipocyte SRX185879,SRX143805,SRX268023,...7,SRX341056,SRX341058,SRX821800,SRX821801,SRX821799,SRX478163,SRX478161,SRX127370,SRX127367 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.50.AllAg.AllCell.bed ...

  15. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Young Park; Mei Hong; Qi Jia; Young-Chul Lee; Taddesse Yayeh; Eujin Hyun; Dong-Mi Kwak; Jae Youl Cho; Man Hee Rhee

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis (Chinese pistache) is a widely grown plant in southern China where the galls extract is a common practice in folk medicine. However, extracts from this plant have never been attempted for their cardiovascular protective effects in experimental setting. Here therefore we aimed to investigate the antiplatelet activity of Pistacia chinensis methanolic extract (PCME) in ADP stimulated rat platelets in vitro. PCME (2.5–20 μg/mL) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While ...

  16. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Park

    2012-01-01

    (2.5–20 μg/mL inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca2+]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology.

  17. Two Arabidopsis ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunits (APL1 and APL2) are catalytic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglia, Tiziana; Kuhn, Misty L; Ruiz, Ma Teresa; Ribeiro-Pedro, Marina; Valverde, Federico; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M

    2008-09-01

    ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in starch biosynthesis. Higher plant ADP-Glc PPase is a heterotetramer (alpha(2)beta(2)) consisting of two small and two large subunits. There is increasing evidence that suggests that catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme from higher plants result from the synergy of both types of subunits. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes encode small subunits (APS1 and APS2) and four large subunits (APL1-APL4). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, APL1 and APL2, besides their regulatory role, have catalytic activity. Heterotetramers formed by combinations of a noncatalytic APS1 and the four large subunits showed that APL1 and APL2 exhibited ADP-Glc PPase activity with distinctive sensitivities to the allosteric activator (3-phosphoglycerate). Mutation of the Glc-1-P binding site of Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum) isoforms confirmed these observations. To determine the relevance of these activities in planta, a T-DNA mutant of APS1 (aps1) was characterized. aps1 is starchless, lacks ADP-Glc PPase activity, APS1 mRNA, and APS1 protein, and is late flowering in long days. Transgenic lines of the aps1 mutant, expressing an inactivated form of APS1, recovered the wild-type phenotype, indicating that APL1 and APL2 have catalytic activity and may contribute to ADP-Glc synthesis in planta. PMID:18614708

  18. Two Arabidopsis ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Large Subunits (APL1 and APL2) Are Catalytic1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglia, Tiziana; Kuhn, Misty L.; Ruiz, Ma Teresa; Ribeiro-Pedro, Marina; Valverde, Federico; Ballicora, Miguel A.; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M.

    2008-01-01

    ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in starch biosynthesis. Higher plant ADP-Glc PPase is a heterotetramer (α2β2) consisting of two small and two large subunits. There is increasing evidence that suggests that catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme from higher plants result from the synergy of both types of subunits. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes encode small subunits (APS1 and APS2) and four large subunits (APL1–APL4). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, APL1 and APL2, besides their regulatory role, have catalytic activity. Heterotetramers formed by combinations of a noncatalytic APS1 and the four large subunits showed that APL1 and APL2 exhibited ADP-Glc PPase activity with distinctive sensitivities to the allosteric activator (3-phosphoglycerate). Mutation of the Glc-1-P binding site of Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum) isoforms confirmed these observations. To determine the relevance of these activities in planta, a T-DNA mutant of APS1 (aps1) was characterized. aps1 is starchless, lacks ADP-Glc PPase activity, APS1 mRNA, and APS1 protein, and is late flowering in long days. Transgenic lines of the aps1 mutant, expressing an inactivated form of APS1, recovered the wild-type phenotype, indicating that APL1 and APL2 have catalytic activity and may contribute to ADP-Glc synthesis in planta. PMID:18614708

  19. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity.

  20. Creative Construction: Unit Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of unit blocks with young children in early childhood education (ECE) settings to expand all areas of the curriculum. Discusses the origin of blocks in ECE programs, presents developmental stages of block play, describes children's building styles, and makes recommendations for getting started in block play for children of…

  1. P2X receptor channels in endocrine glands

    OpenAIRE

    Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Zemkova, Hana

    2013-01-01

    The endocrine system is the system of ductless glands and single cells that synthetize hormones and release them directly into the bloodstream. Regulation of endocrine system is very complex and ATP and its degradable products ADP and adenosine contribute to its regulation acting as extracellular messengers for purinergic receptors. These include P2X receptors, a family of ligand-gated ion channels which expression and roles in endocrine tissues are reviewed here. There are seven mammalian pu...

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibition protects human aortic endothelial cells against LPS-induced inflammation response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaonu Peng; Wenjun Li; Wei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease.Tolllike receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important signaling receptor and plays a critical role in the inflammatory response.Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a nuclear enzyme that can regulate the expression of various inflammatory genes.In this study,we investigated the role and the underlying mechanisms of PARP1 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in human aortic endothelial cells.Compared with the control,LPS stimulation increased the protein expression of TLR4 and PARP1.TLR4 inhibition reduced LPS-induced upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and ICAM-1 as well as PARP1. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibition decreased ICAM-1 and iNOS expression.Inhibition of PARP1 decreased protein expression of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS stimulation,probably through preventing NF-KB nuclear translocation. Our study demonstrated that LPS increased ICAM-1 and iNOS expression via TLR4/PARP1/NF-KB pathway.PARP1 might be an indispensable factor in TLR4-mediated inflammation after LPS stimulation.PARP1 inhibition might shed light on the treatment of LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines expression during atherosclerosis.

  3. Accurate determination of the oxidative phosphorylation affinity for ADP in isolated mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Gouspillou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunctions appear strongly implicated in a wide range of pathologies. Therefore, there is a growing need in the determination of the normal and pathological integrated response of oxidative phosphorylation to cellular ATP demand. The present study intends to address this issue by providing a method to investigate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation affinity for ADP in isolated mitochondria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proposed method is based on the simultaneous monitoring of substrate oxidation (determined polarographically and phosphorylation (determined using the glucose-hexokinase glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-NADP(+ enzymatic system rates, coupled to the determination of actual ADP and ATP concentrations by bioluminescent assay. This enzymatic system allows the study of oxidative phosphorylation during true steady states in a wide range of ADP concentrations. We demonstrate how the application of this method allows an accurate determination of mitochondrial affinity for ADP from both oxidation (K(mVox and phosphorylation (K(mVp rates. We also demonstrate that determination of K(mVox leads to an important overestimation of the mitochondrial affinity for ADP, indicating that mitochondrial affinity for ADP should be determined using phosphorylation rate. Finally, we show how this method allows the direct and precise determination of the mitochondrial coupling efficiency. Data obtained from rat skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria illustrate the discriminating capabilities of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because the proposed method allows the accurate determination of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation affinity for ADP in isolated mitochondria, it also opens the route to a better understanding of functional consequences of mitochondrial adaptations/dysfunctions arising in various physiological/pathophysiological conditions.

  4. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogre...

  5. Mutant with diphtheria toxin receptor and acidification function but defective in entry of toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Kenji (National Institute for Basic Biology, Aichi (Japan)); Hayes, H.; Mekada, Eisuke (Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Uchida, Tsuyoshi (National Institute for Basic Biology, Aichi (Japan) Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1987-09-01

    A mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells, GE1, that is highly resistant to diphtheria toxin was isolated. The mutant contains 50% ADP-ribosylatable elongation factor 2, but its protein synthesis was not inhibited by the toxin even at concentrations above 100 {mu}g/ml. {sup 125}I-labeled diphtheria toxin was associated with GE1 cells as well as with the parent cells but did not block protein synthesis of GE1 cells even when the cells were exposed to low pH in the presence or absence of NH{sub 4}Cl. The infections of GE1 cells and the parent cells by vesicular stomatitis virus were similar. GE1 cells were cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and so were about 1,000 times more resistant to this toxin than the parent cells. Hybrids of GE1 cells and the parent cells or mutant cells lacking a functional receptor were more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than GE1 cells. These results suggest that entry of diphtheria toxin into cells requires a cellular factor(s) in addition to those involved in receptor function and acidification of endosomes and that GE1 cells do not express this cellular factor. This character is recessive in GE1 cells.

  6. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  7. Adenovirus Ad-p53AIP1-mediated gene therapy and its regulation of p53-MDM2 interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yunbo; Chen, Huihua; JIA, HAIQUAN; XU, YUANJI; Liu, Gang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xiaohe; Yinglin LU

    2010-01-01

    We generated replication-defective adenovirus Ad-p53AIP1 and studied its anti-tumor efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that Ad-p53AIP1 infection elicited high levels of p53AIP1 expression in cancer cells. We also found that Ad-p53AIP1 expression induced marked apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells. Moreover, Ad-p53AIP1 infection significantly inhibited the tumorigenesis of 4T1 mouse mammary cancer cells in vivo. In particular, we discovered that p53AIP1 overexpressio...

  8. Synergistic role of ADP and Ca(2+) in diastolic myocardial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Vasco; Najafi, Aref; McConnell, Mark; Fowler, Ewan D; Bollen, Ilse A E; Wüst, Rob C I; dos Remedios, Cris; Helmes, Michiel; White, Ed; Stienen, Ger J M; Tardiff, Jil; Kuster, Diederik W D; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-09-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in heart failure patients is evident from stiffening of the passive properties of the ventricular wall. Increased actomyosin interactions may significantly limit diastolic capacity, however, direct evidence is absent. From experiments at the cellular and whole organ level, in humans and rats, we show that actomyosin-related force development contributes significantly to high diastolic stiffness in environments where high ADP and increased diastolic [Ca(2+) ] are present, such as the failing myocardium. Our basal study provides a mechanical mechanism which may partly underlie diastolic dysfunction. Heart failure (HF) with diastolic dysfunction has been attributed to increased myocardial stiffness that limits proper filling of the ventricle. Altered cross-bridge interaction may significantly contribute to high diastolic stiffness, but this has not been shown thus far. Cross-bridge interactions are dependent on cytosolic [Ca(2+) ] and the regeneration of ATP from ADP. Depletion of myocardial energy reserve is a hallmark of HF leading to ADP accumulation and disturbed Ca(2+) handling. Here, we investigated if ADP elevation in concert with increased diastolic [Ca(2+) ] promotes diastolic cross-bridge formation and force generation and thereby increases diastolic stiffness. ADP dose-dependently increased force production in the absence of Ca(2+) in membrane-permeabilized cardiomyocytes from human hearts. Moreover, physiological levels of ADP increased actomyosin force generation in the presence of Ca(2+) both in human and rat membrane-permeabilized cardiomyocytes. Diastolic stress measured at physiological lattice spacing and 37°C in the presence of pathological levels of ADP and diastolic [Ca(2+) ] revealed a 76 ± 1% contribution of cross-bridge interaction to total diastolic stress in rat membrane-permeabilized cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of creatine kinase (CK), which increases cytosolic ADP, in enzyme-isolated intact rat cardiomyocytes impaired

  9. Selective down-regulation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Burns

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The formation of ADP-ribose polymers on target proteins by poly(ADP-ribose polymerases serves a variety of cell signaling functions. In addition, extensive activation of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a dominant cause of cell death in ischemia-reperfusion, trauma, and other conditions. Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG degrades the ADP-ribose polymers formed on acceptor proteins by PARP-1 and other PARP family members. PARG exists as multiple isoforms with differing subcellular localizations, but the functional significance of these isoforms is uncertain. METHODS / PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary mouse astrocytes were treated with an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO targeted to exon 1 of full-length PARG to suppress expression of this nuclear-specific PARG isoform. The antisense-treated cells showed down-regulation of both nuclear PARG immunoreactivity and nuclear PARG enzymatic activity, without significant alteration in cytoplasmic PARG activity. When treated with the genotoxic agent MNNG to induced PARP-1 activation, the antisense-treated cells showed a delayed rate of nuclear PAR degradation, reduced nuclear condensation, and reduced cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a preferentially nuclear localization for full-length PARG, and suggest a key role for this isoform in the PARP-1 cell death pathway.

  10. Study on A.C. electrical properties of pure and L-serine doped ADP crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, J. H.; Dixit, K. P.; Joshi, M. J.; Parikh, K. D.

    2016-05-01

    Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADP) crystals have a wide range of applications in integrated and nonlinear optics. Amino acids having significant properties like molecular chirality, zwitter ionic nature, etc. attracted many researchers to dope them in various NLO crystals. In the present study, pure and different weight percentage L-serine doped ADP crystals were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The A.C. electrical study was carried out for palletized samples at room temperature. The Nyquist plot showed two semi circles for pure ADP indicated the effect of grain and grain boundary, whereas the doped ADP samples exhibited the single semi circle suggesting the effect of grain. The values resistance and capacitance for grain and grain boundary were calculated. The effect of doping was clearly seen in the grain capacitance and resistance values. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreased with increase in frequency for all samples. The Jonscher power law was applied for A.C. conductivity for pure and doped ADP samples. The imaginary part of modulus and impedance versus frequency were drawn and the value of stretch exponent (β) was calculated for all the samples.

  11. A fluorometric assay for measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebl, B M; Pette, D

    1996-08-01

    Using 1,N6-etheno NAD, a fluorescent analog of NAD, we extended an existing assay for NAD glycohydrolase to the measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mADP-RT) activity using agmatine as acceptor for ADP-ribose. The reaction products were analyzed by reversed-phase chromatography. In the presence of agmatine two newly formed fluorescent products were tentatively identified as ADP-ribosylagmatine anomers. Fluorescence intensity increased upon splitting the N-glycoside bondage of 1,N6-etheno NAD. Therefore, 1, N6-etheno AMP could be used for calibration. The nonradioactive assay yielded values nearly identical to those obtained with the [carbonyl-14C]NAD method. It proved to be highly reproducible, rapid, and suitable for an improved purification protocol yielding a 76,000-fold enriched mADP-RT preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle. The identity and high purity of the enzyme were confirmed immunochemically. The assay served to determine the pH optimum of the enzyme (pH 9.0) and its KM for 1,N6-etheno NAD (287 microM). PMID:8811894

  12. Effect of Co2+ doping on solubility, crystal growth and properties of ADP crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, V.; Shkir, Mohd.; AlFaify, S.; Yahia, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Bulk size crystal growth of ADP with different concentrations doping of cobalt (Co2+) has been done by low cost slow evaporation technique at ambient conditions. The solubility measurement was carried out on pure and doped crystals and found that the solubility is decreasing with doping concentrations. The presence of Co2+ ion in crystalline matrix of ADP has been confirmed by structural, vibrational and elemental analyses. Scanning electron microscopic study reveals that the doping has strong effect on the quality of the crystals. The optical absorbance and transmission confirms the enhancement of quality of ADP crystals due to Co2+ doping and so the optical band gap. Further the dislocation, photoluminescence, dielectric and mechanical studies confirms that the properties of grown crystals with Co2+ doping has been enriched and propose it as a better candidate for optoelectronic applications.

  13. Bacillus cereus Certhrax ADP-ribosylates vinculin to disrupt focal adhesion complexes and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nathan C; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2014-04-11

    Bacillus cereus is often associated with mild to moderate gastroenteritis; however, some recent isolates cause inhalational anthrax-like diseases and death. These potential emerging human pathogens express multiple virulence factors. B. cereus strain G9241 expresses anthrax toxin, several polysaccharide capsules, and the novel ADP-ribosyltransferase, Certhrax. In this study, we show that Certhrax ADP-ribosylates Arg-433 of vinculin, a protein that coordinates actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix interactions. ADP-ribosylation of vinculin disrupted focal adhesion complexes and redistributed vinculin to the cytoplasm. Exogenous vinculin rescued these phenotypes. This provides a mechanism for strain G9241 to breach host barrier defenses and promote bacterial growth and spread. Certhrax is the first bacterial toxin to add a post-translational modification to vinculin to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton.

  14. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Young; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi; Lee, Young-Chul; Yayeh, Taddesse; Hyun, Eujin; Kwak, Dong-Mi; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis (Chinese pistache) is a widely grown plant in southern China where the galls extract is a common practice in folk medicine. However, extracts from this plant have never been attempted for their cardiovascular protective effects in experimental setting. Here therefore we aimed to investigate the antiplatelet activity of Pistacia chinensis methanolic extract (PCME) in ADP stimulated rat platelets in vitro. PCME (2.5-20 μg/mL) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca(2+)]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:22899962

  15. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  16. Blocking and associability change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed. PMID:23668185

  17. Blocking and associability change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed.

  18. Poly(ADP-ribosepolymerase-1 modulates microglial responses to amyloid β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauppinen Tiina M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid β (Aβ accumulates in Alzheimer's disease (AD brain. Microglial activation also occurs in AD, and this inflammatory response may contribute to disease progression. Microglial activation can be induced by Aβ, but the mechanisms by which this occurs have not been defined. The nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 regulates microglial activation in response to several stimuli through its interactions with the transcription factor, NF-κB. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether PARP-1 activation is involved in Aβ-induced microglial activation, and whether PARP-1 inhibition can modify microglial responses to Aβ. Methods hAPPJ20 mice, which accumulate Aβ with ageing, were crossed with PARP-1-/- mice to assess the effects of PARP-1 depletion on microglial activation, hippocampal synaptic integrity, and cognitive function. Aβ peptide was also injected into brain of wt and PARP-1-/- mice to directly determine the effects of PARP-1 on Aβ-induced microglial activation. The effect of PARP-1 on Aβ-induced microglial cytokine production and neurotoxicity was evaluated in primary microglia cultures and in microglia-neuron co-cultures, utilizing PARP-1-/- cells and a PARP-1 inhibitor. NF-κB activation was evaluated in microglia infected with a lentivirus reporter gene. Results The hAPPJ20 mice developed microglial activation, reduced hippocampal CA1 calbindin expression, and impaired novel object recognition by age 6 months. All of these features were attenuated in hAPPJ20/PARP-1-/- mice. Similarly, Aβ1-42 injected into mouse brain produced a robust microglial response in wild-type mice, and this was blocked in mice lacking PARP-1 expression or activity. Studies using microglial cultures showed that PARP-1 activity was required for Aβ-induced NF-κB activation, morphological transformation, NO release, TNFα release, and neurotoxicity. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibition increased release of the

  19. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is recognized by ECT2 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is an unique posttranslational modification and required for spindle assembly and function during mitosis. However, the molecular mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in mitosis remains elusive. Here, we show the evidence that PAR is recognized by ECT2, a key guanine nucleotide exchange factor in mitosis. The BRCT domain of ECT2 directly binds to PAR both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that α-tubulin is PARylated during mitosis. PARylation of α-tubulin is recognized by ECT2 and recruits ECT2 to mitotic spindle for completing mitosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PAR regulates mitosis.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is recognized by ECT2 during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mo; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is an unique posttranslational modification and required for spindle assembly and function during mitosis. However, the molecular mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in mitosis remains elusive. Here, we show the evidence that PAR is recognized by ECT2, a key guanine nucleotide exchange factor in mitosis. The BRCT domain of ECT2 directly binds to PAR both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that α-tubulin is PARylated during mitosis. PARylation of α-tubulin is recogni...

  1. Multiple origins of hydrogenosomes : functional and phylogenetic evidence from the ADP/ATP carrier of the anaerobic chytrid Neocallimastix sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voncken, F; Boxma, B; Tjaden, J; Akhmanova, A; Huynen, M; Tielens, AGM; Haferkamp, [No Value; Neuhaus, HE; Vogels, G; Veenhuis, M; Hackstein, JHP; Tielens, Aloysius G.M.; Haferkamp, Ilka; Hackstein, Johannes H.P.

    2002-01-01

    A mitochondrial-type ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) has been identified in the hydrogenosomes of the anaerobic chytridiomycete fungus Neocallimastix sp. L2. Biochemical and immunocytochemical studies revealed that this ADP/ATP carrier is an integral component of hydrogenosomal membranes. Expression of the co

  2. File list: His.Adp.05.H2BS112GlcNAc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.H2BS112GlcNAc.AllCell hg19 Histone H2BS112GlcNAc Adipocyte SRX760966,SRX...760963,SRX760964,SRX760965,SRX760962 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.H2BS112GlcNAc.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Adp.20.H2BS112GlcNAc.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Higher cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression in familial than in sporadic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, M.L.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Budczies, J.; Bult, P.; Prinzler, J.; Radke, C.; Krieken, J.H. van; Dietel, M.; Denkert, C.; Muller, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) is a key element of the single-base excision pathway for repair of DNA single-strand breaks. To compare the cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) expression between familial (BRCA1, BRCA2, or non BRCA1/2) and sporadic breast cancer, we investigated 39 sporadic

  6. File list: InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose Tissue,... White http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 No description Adipocyte Adipose prog...enitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Input control Adipocyte Adipose proge...nitor cells SRX127367,SRX127370 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  20. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the plastidic ADP-glucose transporter (ZmBT1) from Zea mays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchberger, S.; Leroch, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Wahl, M.; Neuhaus, H.E.; Tjaden, J.

    2007-01-01

    Physiological studies on the Brittle1 maize mutant have provided circumstantial evidence that ZmBT1 (Zea mays Brittle1 protein) is involved in the ADP-Glc transport into maize endosperm plastids, but up to now, no direct ADP-Glc transport mediated by ZmBT1 has ever been shown. The heterologous synth

  1. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the plastidic ADP-glucose transporter (ZmBT1) from Zea mays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchberger, S.; Leroch, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Wahl, M.; Neuhaus, H.E.; Tjaden, J.

    2007-01-01

    Physiological studies on the Brittle1 maize mutant have provided circumstantial evidence that ZmBT1 (Zea mays Brittle1 protein) is involved in the ADP-Glc transport into maize endosperm plastids, but up to now, no direct ADP-Glc transport mediated by ZmBT1 has ever been shown. The heterologous synth

  2. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose Tissue, White... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_Tissue,_White.bed ...

  6. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  7. Correlations of serum levels of leptin and other related factor (NPY, ADP) in female children with simple obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the changes of serum levels of leptin, NPY and ADP in female children with simple obesity. Methods: Serum levels of leptin, NPY and ADP were measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA) in 32 female children with simple obesity and 35 controls. Results: The serum levels of leptin, NPY were significantly higher in the obese children than those in controls (P<0.01), while the serum levels of ADP were significantly lower (P<0.01). Serum leptin levels were significantly positively correlated (r=0.6014, P<0.01) with NPY levels but were negatively correlated (r=-0.4786, P<0.01) with adiponectin (ADP) levels. Conclusion: Determination of serum leptin, NPY and ADP levels is of help for judgement of degree of obesity as wen as outcome prediction in female children. (authors)

  8. ADP-bildende Acetyl-CoA Synthetasen aus hyperthermophilen Archaea: Molekularbiologische und biochemische Charakterisierung von neuartigen Enzymen der Acetat-Bildung und ATP-Synthese

    OpenAIRE

    Musfeldt, Meike

    2001-01-01

    Keine deutschsprachige Zusammenfassung vorhanden. Acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming) (ADP-ACS) represents a novel enzyme of acetate formation and energy conservation (acetyl-CoA + ADP + Pi -> acetate + ATP + CoA) in Archaea and eukaryotic protists. The only characterized ADP-ACS in Archaea, two isoenzymes from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, constitute 145 kDa heterotetramers (a2, b2). By using the N-terminal amino acid sequences of both subunits, which are located at different ...

  9. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  10. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  11. BLOCK H-MATRICES AND SPECTRUM OF BLOCK MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄廷祝; 黎稳

    2002-01-01

    The block H-matrices are studied by the concept of G-functions, several concepts of block matrices are introduced. Equivalent characters of block H-matrices are obtained. Spectrum localizations claracterized by Gfunctions for block matrices are got.

  12. Improved Triacylglycerol Production in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 by Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Matti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triacylglycerols are used in various purposes including food applications, cosmetics, oleochemicals and biofuels. Currently the main sources for triacylglycerol are vegetable oils, and microbial triacylglycerol has been suggested as an alternative for these. Due to the low production rates and yields of microbial processes, the role of metabolic engineering has become more significant. As a robust model organism for genetic and metabolic studies, and for the natural capability to produce triacylglycerol, Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 serves as an excellent organism for modelling the effects of metabolic engineering for energy molecule biosynthesis. Results Beneficial gene deletions regarding triacylglycerol production were screened by computational means exploiting the metabolic model of ADP1. Four deletions, acr1, poxB, dgkA, and a triacylglycerol lipase were chosen to be studied experimentally both separately and concurrently by constructing a knock-out strain (MT with three of the deletions. Improvements in triacylglycerol production were observed: the strain MT produced 5.6 fold more triacylglycerol (mg/g cell dry weight compared to the wild type strain, and the proportion of triacylglycerol in total lipids was increased by 8-fold. Conclusions In silico predictions of beneficial gene deletions were verified experimentally. The chosen single and multiple gene deletions affected beneficially the natural triacylglycerol metabolism of A. baylyi ADP1. This study demonstrates the importance of single gene deletions in triacylglycerol metabolism, and proposes Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 as a model system for bioenergetic studies regarding metabolic engineering.

  13. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 is required for protein localization to Cajal body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kotova

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the nuclear protein known as Poly (ADP-ribose Polymerase1 (PARP1 was shown to play a key role in regulating transcription of a number of genes and controlling the nuclear sub-organelle nucleolus. PARP1 enzyme is known to catalyze the transfer of ADP-ribose to a variety of nuclear proteins. At present, however, while we do know that the main acceptor for pADPr in vivo is PARP1 protein itself, by PARP1 automodification, the significance of PARP1 automodification for in vivo processes is not clear. Therefore, we investigated the roles of PARP1 auto ADP-ribosylation in dynamic nuclear processes during development. Specifically, we discovered that PARP1 automodification is required for shuttling key proteins into Cajal body (CB by protein non-covalent interaction with pADPr in vivo. We hypothesize that PARP1 protein shuttling follows a chain of events whereby, first, most unmodified PARP1 protein molecules bind to chromatin and accumulate in nucleoli, but then, second, upon automodification with poly(ADP-ribose, PARP1 interacts non-covalently with a number of nuclear proteins such that the resulting protein-pADPr complex dissociates from chromatin into CB.

  14. Aero-Propulsion Technology (APT) Task V Low Noise ADP Engine Definition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, V.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify and evaluate noise reduction technologies for advanced ducted prop propulsion systems that would allow increased capacity operation and result in an economically competitive commercial transport. The study investigated the aero/acoustic/structural advancements in fan and nacelle technology required to match or exceed the fuel burned and economic benefits of a constrained diameter large Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) compared to an unconstrained ADP propulsion system with a noise goal of 5 to 10 EPNDB reduction relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 at each of the three measuring stations namely, takeoff (cutback), approach and sideline. A second generation ADP was selected to operate within the maximum nacelle diameter constrain of 160 deg to allow installation under the wing. The impact of fan and nacelle technologies of the second generation ADP on fuel burn and direct operating costs for a typical 3000 nm mission was evaluated through use of a large, twin engine commercial airplane simulation model. The major emphasis of this study focused on fan blade aero/acoustic and structural technology evaluations and advanced nacelle designs. Results of this study have identified the testing required to verify the interactive performance of these components, along with noise characteristics, by wind tunnel testing utilizing and advanced interaction rig.

  15. 32 CFR Appendix J to Part 154 - ADP Position Categories and Criteria for Designating Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Designating Positions J Appendix J to Part 154 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM REGULATION Pt. 154, App. J Appendix J to Part 154—ADP Position Categories and Criteria for Designating Positions OMB Circular...

  16. Impaired ADP channeling to mitochondria and elevated reactive oxygen species in hypertensive hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Amelia S C; Pham, Toan; Loiselle, Denis S; Crossman, David H; Ward, Marie-Louise; Hickey, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Systemic hypertension initially promotes a compensatory cardiac hypertrophy, yet it progresses to heart failure (HF), and energetic deficits appear to be central to this failure. However, the transfer of energy between the mitochondria and the myofibrils is not often considered as part of the energetic equation. We compared hearts from old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar controls. SHR hearts showed a 35% depression in mitochondrial function, yet produced at least double the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in all respiration states in left ventricular (LV) homogenates. To test the connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils, respiration was further tested in situ with LV permeabilized fibers by addition of multiple substrates and ATP, which requires hydrolysis to mediate oxidative phosphorylation. By trapping ADP using a pyruvate kinase enzyme system, we tested ADP channeling towards mitochondria, and this suppressed respiration and elevated ROS production more in the SHR fibers. The ADP-trapped state was also less relieved on creatine addition, likely reflecting the 30% depression in total CK activity in the SHR heart fibers. Confocal imaging identified a 34% longer distance between the centers of myofibril to mitochondria in the SHR hearts, which increases transverse metabolite diffusion distances (e.g., for ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate). We propose that impaired connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils may contribute to elevated ROS production. Impaired energy exchange could be the result of ultrastructural changes that occur with hypertrophy in this model of hypertension. PMID:27084386

  17. Skeletal muscle contractile performance and ADP accumulation in adenylate kinase-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, C.R.; Janssen, E.E.W.; Terjung, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    The production of AMP by adenylate kinase (AK) and subsequent deamination by AMP deaminase limits ADP accumulation during conditions of high-energy demand in skeletal muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the consequences of AK deficiency (-/-) on adenine nucleotide management and whole

  18. 45 CFR 95.625 - Increased FFP for certain ADP systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-D program are contained in 45 CFR Part 307. The applicable regulations for the Title IV-E program are contained in 45 CFR 1355.55. The applicable regulations for the Title XIX program are contained in 42 CFR Part 433, Subpart C. Federal Financial Participation in Costs of ADP Acquisitions...

  19. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent Transient Chromatin Decondensation and Histone Displacement following Laser Microirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Kruhlak, Michael J; Haince, Jean-Francois; Th'ng, John P H; Rouleau, Michele; Ishibashi, Toytaka; Corry, Gareth N; Ausio, Juan; Underhill, D Alan; Poirier, Guy G; Hendzel, Michael J

    2016-01-22

    Chromatin undergoes a rapid ATP-dependent, ATM and H2AX-independent decondensation when DNA damage is introduced by laser microirradiation. Although the detailed mechanism of this decondensation remains to be determined, the kinetics of decondensation are similar to the kinetics of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We used laser microirradiation to introduce DNA strand breaks into living cells expressing a photoactivatable GFP-tagged histone H2B. We find that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation mediated primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is responsible for the rapid decondensation of chromatin at sites of DNA damage. This decondensation of chromatin correlates temporally with the displacement of histones, which is sensitive to PARP inhibition and is transient in nature. Contrary to the predictions of the histone shuttle hypothesis, we did not find that histone H1 accumulated on poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in vivo. Rather, histone H1, and to a lessor extent, histones H2A and H2B were rapidly depleted from the sites of PAR accumulation. However, histone H1 returns to chromatin and the chromatin recondenses. Thus, the PARP-dependent relaxation of chromatin closely correlates with histone displacement.

  20. NAADP-mediated Ca2+ signaling via type 1 ryanodine receptor in T cells revealed by a synthetic NAADP antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammermann, Werner; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Kirchberger, Tanja; Kawakami, Naoto; Dowden, James; Schmid, Frederike; Dornmair, Klaus; Hohenegger, Martin; Flügel, Alexander; Guse, Andreas H.; Potter, Barry V. L.

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide NAADP was recently discovered as a second messenger involved in the initiation and propagation of Ca2+ signaling in lymphoma T cells, but its impact on primary T cell function is still unknown. An optimized, synthetic, small molecule inhibitor of NAADP action, termed BZ194, was designed and synthesized. BZ194 neither interfered with Ca2+ mobilization by d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate or cyclic ADP-ribose nor with capacitative Ca2+ entry. BZ194 specifically and effectively blocked NAADP-stimulated [3H]ryanodine binding to the purified type 1 ryanodine receptor. Further, in intact T cells, Ca2+ mobilization evoked by NAADP or by formation of the immunological synapse between primary effector T cells and astrocytes was inhibited by BZ194. Downstream events of Ca2+ mobilization, such as nuclear translocation of “nuclear factor of activated T cells” (NFAT), T cell receptor-driven interleukin-2 production, and proliferation in antigen-experienced CD4+ effector T cells, were attenuated by the NAADP antagonist. Taken together, specific inhibition of the NAADP signaling pathway constitutes a way to specifically and effectively modulate T-cell activation and has potential in the therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:19541638