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Sample records for adjuvants anesthesia

  1. Intravenous dex medetomidine or propofol adjuvant to spinal anesthesia in total knee replacement surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlOweidi, A.S.; Al-Mustafa, M.M.; Alghanem, S.M.; Qudaisat, Y.; Halaweh, S.A.; Massad, I.M.; Al Ajlouni, J.M; Mas'ad, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effect of intravenous dex medetomidine with the intravenous propofol adjuvant to spinal intrathecal anesthesia on the duration of spinal anesthesia and hemodynamic parameters during total knee replacement surgery. Supplementation of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexemedetomidine or propofol produces good sedation levels without significant clinical hemodynamic changes. Adding dex medetomidine produces significantly longer sensory and motor block than propofol . (authors).

  2. Intravenous lidocaine as adjuvant to general anesthesia in renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Said Nakhli

    2018-02-13

    Feb 13, 2018 ... dizziness, blurred vision, tinnitus, perioral numbness, drowsiness, restlessness) in the post anesthesia unit care. Regarding the BIS which was measured every. 10 minutes, its value was comparable in both groups in the different measurement points, p > 0.05. (Figure 1). Mean blood pressure was similar ...

  3. Tramadol as an adjuvant to intravenous regional anesthesia with lignocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Ahsan K.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Al-Ghamdi, A.; Ismail, Salah A.; Abuzeid, Haitham A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess the effect of different doses of tramadol when added to lignocaine during intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Sixty patients, scheduled for hand surgery under IVRA in King Fahd University Hospital, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia from January 2006 to January 2007 were randomly allocated into 3 groups (20 patients each) in a double blind controlled study. All patients received 0.5% lignocaine, 40ml plus 2ml of a study solution containing either isotonic saline (control group), or tramadol 50mg (group T50) or tramadol100mg (group T100). Hemodynamic changes, sensory and motor block onset and recovery time, tourniquet tolerance time, the quality of intraoperative anesthesia and the duration of postoperative analgesia were assessed. All patients 20 in each group completed the study period. Patients who received tramadol had earlier onset of sensory block (5.2+-1.2; 4.9+-1.2 min in the T50; and T100 groups) compared with the control group (7.6+-1.4 min). Patients who received 100mg of tramadol had better tolerance of tourniquet (p=0.011), and less intraoperative fentanyl supplementation (p=0.042). They had also a longer time to the first postoperative analgesic request (p=0.001) compared with the control group. Tramadol 100 mg is a beneficial additive to lignocaine for IVRA since it shortened the onset of sensory block, enhanced the tourniquet tolerance and improved the perioperative analgesia. (author)

  4. Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  5. The influence of adjuvants used in regional anesthesia on lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werdehausen, Robert; Braun, Sebastian; Hermanns, Henning; Kremer, David; Küry, Patrick; Hollmann, Markus W.; Bauer, Inge; Stevens, Markus F.

    2011-01-01

    Neurotoxic properties of local anesthetics can rarely lead to irreversible neuronal damage as in cauda equina syndrome. Clinically, local anesthetics are often combined with adjuvants to improve or prolong the anesthetic effect, whereas the impact of such adjuvants on lidocaine-induced apoptosis is

  6. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Wiesmann,1 Stefan Müller,1,2 Hans-Helge Müller,3 Hinnerk Wulf,1 Thorsten Steinfeldt1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, 3Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Philipps University, Marburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Diakoniekrankenhaus Schwäbisch Hall, Schwäbisch Hall, Germany Background: Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear.Methods: Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S, bupivacaine (Bupi, bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi, and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni were applied topically.Results: Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67–1.18, median (25th–75th percentile; Bupi: 0.33 (0.25–0.60; BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38–0.63; and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30–0.54. The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry

  7. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Thomas; Müller, Stefan; Müller, Hans-Helge; Wulf, Hinnerk; Steinfeldt, Thorsten

    2018-01-01

    Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear. Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S), bupivacaine (Bupi), bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi), and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni) were applied topically. Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67-1.18), median (25th-75th percentile); Bupi: 0.33 (0.25-0.60); BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38-0.63); and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30-0.54). The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry values (saturation values in percent at T60, S: 91.5 [84-95]; Bupi: 76 [61-86]; BupiCloni: 84.5 [76-91]; and BupiEpi: 91 [56-92]). The application of bupivacaine results in lower nerve blood flow, but does not induce relevant ischemia. Despite significant reductions in nerve blood flow, the addition of clonidine or epinephrine to bupivacaine had no significant impact on nerve tissue oximetry compared with bupivacaine alone. Nerve ischemia due to local anesthetics is not enhanced by the adjuvants clonidine or epinephrine.

  8. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy/American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Recommendations on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Santhanam; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Lonnqvist, Per-Anne; de Oliveira, Gildasio S; de Leon Casasola, Oscar; de Andrés, José; Ivani, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Dosage of local anesthetics (LAs) used for regional anesthesia in children is not well determined. In order to evaluate and come to a consensus regarding some of these controversial topics, The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) developed a Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia. Representatives from both ASRA and ESRA composed the joint committee practice advisory. Evidence-based recommendations were based on a systematic search of the literature. In cases where no literature was available, expert opinion was elicited. Spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine can be performed with a dose of 1 mg/kg for newborn and/or infant and a dose of 0.5 mg/kg in older children (>1 year of age). Tetracaine 0.5% is recommended for spinal anesthesia (dose, 0.07-0.13 mL/kg). Ultrasound-guided upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (eg, axillary, infraclavicular, interscalene, supraclavicular) in children can be performed successfully and safely using a recommended LA dose of bupivacaine or ropivacaine of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/kg. Dexmedetomidine can be used as an adjunct to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks in children. High-level evidence is not yet available to guide dosage of LA used in regional blocks in children. The ASRA/ESRA recommendations intend to provide guidance in order to reduce the large variability of LA dosage currently observed in clinical practice.

  9. Ankle Nerve Block Adjuvant to General Anesthesia Reduces Post-surgical Pain and Improves Functional Outcomes in Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kir, Mustafa; Kir, Gulay

    2018-03-12

    Postoperative pain is a frequently problem after orthopedic procedures like hallux valgus surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ankle block improves early and mid-term functional outcomes and postoperative pain management after hallux valgus surgery in patients receiving general anesthesia. This randomized controlled trial investigated 60 patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were prospectively randomized into two groups; general anesthesia only (Group A) and ankle block added to general anesthesia (Group B). Age, body-mass index (BMI), tourniquet time (TT), duration of surgery (DOS), first analgesic need time (FANT), perioperative analgesic regimen and visual analog scale (VAS), The Ankle Score American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) and length of hospital stay were recorded. Independent variables were analyzed by t-test. Non-parametric data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney-U test. Patient's age, demographics and body mass indices were similar between the two groups. Average length of hospital stay was significantly longer in Group A (p < 0,01). Group B had longer time to first analgesic need than Group A (p < 0,01) Patients in Group B required less analgesic in postoperative period. Preoperative VAS and AOFAS scores were not statistically different between the two groups. Postoperative day 1 VAS score was significantly lower in Group B than in Group A. Follow-up visits at 3, 6 and 12 months showed significantly lower VAS and higher AOFAS scores in Group B than Group A. Ankle block added to general anaesthesia may improve early and mid-term postoperative functional outcomes and postoperative pain management in patients who undergo hallux valgus surgery. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. General anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally safe because of modern equipment, medicines, and safety standards. Most people recover completely and do not have any complications. Alternative Names Surgery - general anesthesia Patient Instructions Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult ...

  11. Anesthesia Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia Basics What's in ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  12. [The anesthesia of anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, G

    2005-03-01

    Viewed from a cultural-ethical perspective, anesthesiology can be understood as a comprehensive concept of medicine in general. As such it contains two dilemmas: very often pain must be inflicted in order to alleviate pain and this can only be done by somebody who is himself relatively free of pain. The necessary apathy or anesthesia of the anesthetist is correlated with a general twentieth century-type of perception: the cool observer. Nevertheless, it is also a modern variation of the original religious constellation of the priest in relationship to the sick person. Curing occurs by representation. The weak self of the sick person is able to take over the strong self, represented by the therapist. In twentieth century art and literature this process of self-therapy by representation was often illustrated. On the background of a phenomenological philosophy that process can be understood as the regaining of a balance between body and soul. In the psalms of the biblical Book of Job there a variety of fundamental forms of pain which may be helpful even in this secular age.

  13. Effects of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media ASA Member Toolkit Anesthesia 101 Effects of Anesthesia Explore this page: Effects of Anesthesia How can ... of anesthesia and their side effects? Effects of Anesthesia If you’re having surgery, you most likely ...

  14. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Anesthesia Anesthesia Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area En español ... Version (464 KB) Other Fact Sheets What is anesthesia? Anesthesia is a medical treatment that prevents patients ...

  15. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  16. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental ... evaluate patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post- ...

  17. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  18. Obesity and Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely. How does being overweight affect surgery and anesthesia? If you are overweight, you may also have ... can lead to challenges with a number of anesthesia-related processes: Locating veins to deliver anesthesia and ...

  19. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and Training Part III The OMS Anesthesia ...

  20. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... disease. Click here to find out more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ...

  1. Topical anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  2. Topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mritunjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  3. Types of Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Types of Anesthesia KidsHealth / For Teens / Types of Anesthesia What's in ... Get? Print en español Tipos de anestesia About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: ...

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Part III The OMS Anesthesia Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ( ...

  5. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  6. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Anesthesia Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office ... comfortable as possible when you get home. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  8. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  10. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four ... complications and emergencies that may arise during the administration of anesthesia. Before your surgery, your OMS will ...

  11. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS ... administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. They are ... your surgery, your OMS will review the type of anesthetic ...

  12. [Local and regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigel, W; Lengen, W

    1988-10-15

    Operations on the cutaneous surfaces are mainly performed under local anesthesia. Local infiltrative anesthesia is the most frequently used form in cutaneous surgery. Nerve or field block anesthesia can be used in areas like the external ear, nose, digits or penis. Local anesthesia is easy to administer, rapidly effective and relatively free of side effects. In contrast to general anesthesia it can be used in risk patients e.g. with ischemic heart disease or respiratory illnesses. Adverse reactions must be taken into account, especially toxic effects, allergy, drug interactions or traumatic lesions of nerves or blood vessels.

  13. Dexmedetomidine: Expanding role in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna S Paranjpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential uses of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a highly selective α2 - adrenoceptor agonist are very diverse. DEX appears to mimic many of the actions of mythical ′ideal′ sedative/analgesic agent. Although not orally active, DEX shows good bioavailability when administered via various other routes like intranasal, buccal, IM than intra-venous. DEX has similar pharmacokinetics in all age groups. Its side effects are predictable and easily treatable, hence it has found place as a part of fast-tracking anesthesia regimens in children. DEX is the sedative of choice for peri-operative use in high risk patients, since it is cardioprotective, neuroprotective and renoprotective. Premedication with DEX obtunds the autonomic pressor responses due to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation when used as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. DEX in high doses offers another approach to managing morbidly obese patients and patients with a compromised airway; without causing any cardio-respiratory depression. It is near ideal hypotensive agent used for controlled hypotension. Its value as a primary sedative and analgesic is becoming more accepted and evident in critically ill patients; in adult and paediatric intensive care units. Besides use in locoregional anesthesia, it is also used as an opioid substitute, for treatment of substance withdrawal, as an anti-shivering agent, for treatment of delirium and as an end of life medication. Availability of an antidote (Atipamezole with similar elimination half life is taking the drug into new frontiers. However, use of DEX is contraindicated in patients with hepatic failure, hypovolemic shock, advanced heart block or ventricular dysfunction.

  14. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  15. Elimination of aluminum adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Stanley L

    2002-05-31

    In vitro dissolution experiments although perhaps not at typical body concentrations and temperatures demonstrated that the alpha-hydroxycarboxylic acids present in interstitial fluid (citric acid, lactic acid, and malic acid) are capable of dissolving aluminum-containing adjuvants. Amorphous aluminum phosphate adjuvant dissolved more rapidly than crystalline aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Intramuscular administration in New Zealand White rabbits of aluminum phosphate and aluminum hydroxide adjuvants, which were labelled with 26Al, revealed that 26Al was present in the first blood sample (1 h) for both adjuvants. The area under the blood level curve for 28 days indicated that three times more aluminum was absorbed from aluminum phosphate adjuvant than aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. In vivo studies using 26Al-labelled adjuvants are relatively safe because accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) can quantify quantities of 26Al as small as 10(-17) g. A similar study in humans would require a whole-body exposure of 0.7 microSv per year compared to the natural background exposure of 3000 microSv per year. The in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption studies indicate that aluminum-containing adjuvants which are administered intramuscularly are dissolved by alpha-hydroxycarboxylic acids in interstitial fluid, absorbed into the blood, distributed to tissues, and eliminated in the urine.

  16. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  17. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... patients for anesthesia, deliver the anesthetic and monitor post-anesthetic patients. Your OMS trained alongside medical anesthesia ... of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of ...

  18. Spinal anesthesia in children: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even after a vast safety record, the role of spinal anesthesia (SA as a primary anesthetic technique in children remains contentious and is mainly limited to specialized pediatric centers. It is usually practiced on moribund former preterm infants (<60 weeks post-conception to reduce the incidence of post-operative apnea when compared to general anesthesia (GA. However, there is ample literature to suggest its safety and efficacy for suitable procedures in older children as well. SA in children has many advantages as in adults with an added advantage of minimal cardio-respiratory disturbance. Recently, several reports from animal studies have raised serious concerns regarding the harmful effects of GA on young developing brain. This may further increase the utility of SA in children as it provides all components of balanced anesthesia technique. Also, SA can be an economical option for countries with finite resources. Limited duration of surgical anesthesia in children is one of the major deterrents for its widespread use in them. To overcome this, several additives like epinephrine, clonidine, fentanyl, morphine, neostigmine etc. have been used and found to be effective even in neonates. But, the developing spinal cord may also be vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, though this has not been systematically evaluated in children. So, adjuvants and drugs with widest therapeutic index should be preferred in children. Despite its widespread use, incidence of side-effects is low and permanent neurological sequalae have not been reported with SA. Literature yields encouraging results regarding its safety and efficacy. Technical skills and constant vigilance of experienced anesthesia providers is indispensable to achieve good results with this technique.

  19. Clonidine versus fentanyl as adjuvants to bupivacaine in peribulbar anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha M.I. Youssef

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The addition of either clonidine or fentanyl to the local anesthetic during peribulbar block results in a faster onset and longer duration of the block with a longer period of postoperative analgesia. The addition of clonidine was found to prolong the duration of the block more than fentanyl.

  20. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  1. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Download Download the ebook for further information Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I ... Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety and Comfort Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are ...

  2. Guideline implementation: local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    It is not uncommon in perioperative settings for patients to receive local anesthesia for a variety of procedures. It is imperative for patient safety that the perioperative RN has a comprehensive understanding of best practices associated with the use of local anesthesia. The updated AORN "Guideline for care of the patient receiving local anesthesia" provides guidance on perioperative nursing assessments and interventions to safely care for patients receiving local anesthesia. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel become knowledgeable regarding best practice as they care for this patient population. The key points address patient assessment, the importance of having an overall understanding of the local agent being used, recommended monitoring requirements, and potential adverse events, including life-threatening events. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disma, Nicola; Hansen, Tom G.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a neurodegenerative effect of anesthetic drugs in cubs and young animals, raising the concern that similar effects can happen in children, and that the administration of anesthesia in young children undergoing surgical or diagnostic procedures may cause long- Term...... neurocognitive impairment. Thus, several epidemiological studies have been performed with the aim to find a possible association between early anesthesia exposure and poor long- Term outcome, like learning disabilities or worse school grading and two prospective trials are currently running, the GAS...... and the PANDA study. Interim results from the GAS study, which compared infants undergoing general and regional anesthesia for hernia repair, have demonstrated that a single exposure of about one hour of anesthesia does not affect the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Nowadays, most of the knowledge...

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  5. Administration of Anesthesia

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    ... OMSs) are trained in all aspects of anesthesia administration. Following dental school, they complete at least four years of training in a hospital-based surgical residency program alongside medical residents in ...

  6. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Your OMS trained alongside medical anesthesia residents. Extensive Training and Experience As a result of their extensive training, every Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon is well-prepared ...

  7. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... Team and Patient Care Part IV Office Anesthesia Evaluation Part V Broad Access to Care, Patient Safety ... and jaw surgery Contact Us Sitemap Terms of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter ...

  8. Anesthesia information management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feri Štivan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS is on the increase. This is particularly true for academic anesthesia departments. The main reasons for slow adoption of these systems in the past are financial barriers associated with implementation of these systems and their not so traditionally obvious potential to improve patient care. In addition, a major obstacle to acceptance of this technology is the concern of users over the impact of the electronic anesthesia record on malpractice exposure.Conclusions: The experience reported by departments using AIMS indicates that these systems are useful for managing malpractice risk. AIMS can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative anesthesia care. However, AIMS are able to increase the quality of care and improve operating room efficiency only with careful planning, installation, and customization. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT analysis performed for AIMS could help departments in making better decisions when implementing AIMS.

  9. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the OMS Office Part I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS Education and ... 2008-2018 Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest YouTube Vimeo American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons American Association ...

  10. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth or become ... I Introduction and History of Dental Anesthesia Part II OMS ...

  11. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... general surgery, anesthesia and other specialties. During this time, OMS residents serve on the medical anesthesiology service, ... during and after the operation. This is the time to discuss any concerns you may have about ...

  12. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth or become ... Anesthesia: Safety and Comfort in the OMS Office Part I ...

  13. Administration of Anesthesia

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    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Anesthesia Download ...

  14. Anesthesia training in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Angela

    2007-11-01

    In 2006 a program leading to a Master's degree in Anesthesia (MMed) was established in Rwanda as a joint venture between the National University of Rwanda (NUR), the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society International Education Fund (CASIEF) and the American Society of Anesthesiologists Overseas Teaching Programme (ASAOTP). A MMed in Anesthesia is similar to a Fellowship in Canada and is common in many African countries. Most training programs are of three years duration. Rwanda has decided on a four-year program. The background, organization and problems of the program are described. Challenges exist in recruiting residents and in developing an academic culture and evaluation system. Inadequate equipment and drug shortages limit the types of anesthesia provided. There is need for improvement in biomedical support. Volunteer Canadian and American anesthesiologists visit Rwanda to teach for a minimum period of one month. They instruct in the operating room and also in the classroom. While the focus of the program is on residents in anesthesia, the volunteers also teach the nurse anesthetists. The program has been in existence for only one year but progress has been made. The CASIEF will devote special attention to improving the management of pain. In time, it is hoped that Rwanda will become self-sufficient in training its own anesthesiologists and in retaining them to provide anesthesia services throughout the country. As anesthesia and surgery evolve, there will be a need for subspecialty training in anesthesia. It is hoped that, with continued assistance from the CASIEF and ASAOTP, the goal of the NUR will be achieved.

  15. Risk management in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, L; Levati, A

    2009-11-01

    Anesthesia is considered a leading discipline in the field of patient safety. Nevertheless, complications still occur and can be devastating. A substantial portion of anesthesia-related adverse events are preventable since risk factors can be detected and eliminated. Risk management (RM) in anesthesia includes preventive and remedial measures to minimize patient anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. RM involves all aspects of anesthesia care. Classically, the following four steps are needed to prevent critical incidents or to learn from them: (1) detection of problems, (2) assessment, (3) implementation of solutions, and (4) verification of effectiveness. Problems and solutions can be identified into the fields of structures, processes and personnel. Authoritative agencies like the World Health Organization, the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists, the Section and Board of Anesthesiology of the European Union of Medical Specialties and the Italian Scientific Society of Anesthesiologists (Società Italiana di Anestesia, Analgesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Intensiva SIAARTI) have proposed initiatives addressing safety in the operating room. The central role of a well-trained, constantly present anesthesiologist and the usefulness of checklists have been highlighted. Cost cutting and production pressure in medical care are potential threats to safety. A shared knowledge of the best standards of care and of the potential consequences of unscrupulous actions could make the daily management of conflicting interests easier. A correctly applied RM can be a powerful, highly beneficial aid to our practice.

  16. Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) in pediatric cardiac anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong , Grace Lai Sze

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Inhalational anesthesia with moderate to high-dose opioid analgesia has been the mainstay of pediatric cardiac anesthesia but the advances in understanding of pharmacology and availability of new fast-acting drugs coupled with the advanced concepts in pharmacokinetic modeling and computer technology have made total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) an attractive option. In this article, we review some of the TIVA techniques used in pediatric cardiac anesthesia. gracewong531...

  17. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  18. ERM immersion vaccination and adjuvants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, J.; Chettri, J. K.; Jaafar, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Two candidate adjuvants were tested with a commercial ERM dip vaccine (AquaVac™ Relera, MSD Animal Health) for rainbow trout in an experimental design compatible with common vaccination practices at farm level, i.e. immersion of fish in vaccine (±adjuvant) for 30 s. The adjuvants were the commerc......Two candidate adjuvants were tested with a commercial ERM dip vaccine (AquaVac™ Relera, MSD Animal Health) for rainbow trout in an experimental design compatible with common vaccination practices at farm level, i.e. immersion of fish in vaccine (±adjuvant) for 30 s. The adjuvants were...

  19. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  20. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur sahin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia procedure in obesity were assessed with current literatures. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 234-236

  1. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Develoment of Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Audrey B.

    1982-01-01

    Until the eighteenth century, doctors were reluctant to use chemicals to alleviate pain because they accepted the religious/moral beliefs of their day, claiming that pain was beneficial for the body. Traces technical developments in the control of pain, discussing relationships of anesthesia to social, cultural, and scientific factors and…

  3. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  4. Defining depth of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S L; Stanski, D R

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, drawn largely from the synthesis of material that we first presented in the sixth edition of Miller's Anesthesia, Chap 31 (Stanski and Shafer 2005; used by permission of the publisher), we have defined anesthetic depth as the probability of non-response to stimulation, calibrated against the strength of the stimulus, the difficulty of suppressing the response, and the drug-induced probability of non-responsiveness at defined effect site concentrations. This definition requires measurement of multiple different stimuli and responses at well-defined drug concentrations. There is no one stimulus and response measurement that will capture depth of anesthesia in a clinically or scientifically meaningful manner. The "clinical art" of anesthesia requires calibration of these observations of stimuli and responses (verbal responses, movement, tachycardia) against the dose and concentration of anesthetic drugs used to reduce the probability of response, constantly adjusting the administered dose to achieve the desired anesthetic depth. In our definition of "depth of anesthesia" we define the need for two components to create the anesthetic state: hypnosis created with drugs such as propofol or the inhalational anesthetics and analgesia created with the opioids or nitrous oxide. We demonstrate the scientific evidence that profound degrees of hypnosis in the absence of analgesia will not prevent the hemodynamic responses to profoundly noxious stimuli. Also, profound degrees of analgesia do not guarantee unconsciousness. However, the combination of hypnosis and analgesia suppresses hemodynamic response to noxious stimuli and guarantees unconsciousness.

  5. [Anesthesia and Angelman syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, W; Nobel, C; Hilpert, J

    2011-07-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with an incidence of 1:10,000-1:40,000 caused by deficient genetic imprinting in the chromosomal segment 15q11-q13. Experimental data suggest that the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptor as well as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors may be affected by this condition. The first description of the syndrome goes back to 1965 when the British pediatrician Harry Angelman (1915-1996) recognized similar clinical features in three children. Angelman's description of puppet children was changed to happy puppet syndrome 2 years later before this euphemistic denotation was replaced by the concept Angelman syndrome over the years. Angelman syndrome is characterized by ataxia, jerky movements especially hand flapping, a seizure disorder with a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG), severe learning difficulties, a happy disposition, lack of verbal communication and dysmorphic facial features. Most hospitalizations are caused by epilepsy and the most common indications for surgical procedures are in dental medicine. The first anesthesiology case report to be published dates back to 2001. A total of 13 cases have now been published and in 11 cases the age was registered (mean age 11.6 years, standard deviation 11.7 and 2 outliers aged 27 and 40 years). In this paper, the published case reports are contrasted with 15 cases of anesthesia in 6 patients with AS who underwent surgery during 14 years of routine operations at a Berlin anesthesiology clinic (mean age 15.9 years, standard deviation 4.2 with no outliers). Besides neurosurgical and orthopedic operations most were dental interventions. Summarized, these cases of anesthesia and the results of the published case reports allow the formulation of guidelines for administration of anesthesia in AS cases but do not permit conclusions on which method of anesthesia is the safest for AS

  6. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  7. Anesthesia and cor triatriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Yeoh, Tze Yeng; Welch, Tasha L; Weingarten, Toby N; Sprung, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS) and cor triatriatum dextrum (CTD) are rare congenital anomalies characterized by the presence of a perforated septum which divides the respective atrium into a proximal and distal chamber. This report reviews the perioperative course of patients with uncorrected cor triatriatum (CT) undergoing procedures requiring anesthesia. In addition, we performed a literature search that examines the experience of others regarding the peri-operative course of patients with CT. A computerized search of a medical record database was conducted to identify patients with a clinical diagnosis of uncorrected CTD and CTS undergoing surgical procedures. Descriptive statistics were used. We identified 12 adult patients with asymptomatic CTS (n = 7) and CTD (n = 5) who underwent 23 anesthetics. There were no perioperative complications which could be attributed directly to the anatomy of CT. Our observation and review of the literature suggest that patients with asymptomatic CT typically tolerate anesthesia and surgical procedures well.

  8. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  9. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  10. Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Markus; Vutskits, Laszlo; Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'safe use of anesthesia in children is ill-defined and requires definition of and focus on the 'safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia'. RECENT FINDINGS: The Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot initiative (www.safetots.org) has been set up during the last year to focus...... on the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia. This initiative aims to provide guidance on markers of quality anesthesia care. The introduction and implementation of national regulations of 'who, where, when and how' are required and will result in an improved perioperative outcome in vulnerable children....... The improvement of teaching, training, education and supervision of the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia are the main goals of the safetots.org initiative. SUMMARY: This initiative addresses the well known perioperative risks in young children, perioperative causes for cerebral morbidity as well as gaps...

  11. Acute Paraplegia After General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Ghaedi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute paraplegia is a rare but catastrophic complication of surgeries performed on aorta and corrective operations of vertebral column. Trauma to spinal cord after spinal anesthesia and ischemia of spinal cord also may lead to acute paraplegia. Acute paraplegia as a complication of general anesthesia in surgeries performed on sites other than aorta and vertebral column is very rare. Here we present a 56 year old woman with acute paraplegia due to spinal cord infarction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia probably caused by atherosclerosis of feeding spinal arteries and ischemia of spinal cord after reduction of blood flow possibly due to hypotension during general anesthesia.

  12. Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Risks Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery Explore this page: ... do you reduce the risk of anesthesia awareness? Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery If you’re ...

  13. Anesthesia -- What to Expect (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia - What to Expect KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia - What ... Operating Room After Surgery Print Different Kinds of Anesthesia If you're having any kind of procedure ...

  14. Anesthesia: What to Expect (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or any blood relative has had to anesthesia any allergies (especially to foods, medicines, or latex) your child ... from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used? Will my child feel pain and/ ...

  15. Adjuvant therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinsky, P.

    2009-01-01

    Outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) in high risk prostate cancer are suboptimal. Intensification of local therapy as well as early administration of systemic treatment adjuvant to RP is subject of clinical research. Results of randomised studies are presented. Improvement in overall survival has been reported in adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in pT3 (extracapsular extension and seminal vesicles invasion) or positive resection margin (R1) and in adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in pN+ disease. (author)

  16. Fucosidosis and anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Alireza E.; Moharari, Reza S.; Ghaffari, R.; Zahedi, H.; Hajmahmoodi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare, autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a severe deficiency of alpha -L-fucosidase. Patients usually have some problems with glycoprotein storage in the brain and other organs and some structural abnormalities that need special consideration in anesthesia. It has 2 types, the early onset or infantile and the juvenile. Here we present 8-year-old girl with deformities in the maxillofacial region, with big tongue, small and retracted chin, saddle nose and short neck that could not be extended, causing difficult intubation and congenital cardiac problems requiring a special anesthetic strategy. (author)

  17. Anesthesia for intellectually disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetizing an intellectually disabled patient is a challenge due to lack of cognition and communication which makes perioperative evaluation difficult. The presence of associated medical problems and lack of cooperation further complicates the anesthetic technique. An online literature search was performed using keywords anesthesia, intellectually disabled, and mentally retarded and relevant articles were included for review. There is scarcity of literature dealing with intellectually disabled patients. The present review highlights the anesthetic challenges, their relevant evidence-based management, and the role of caretakers in the perioperative period. Proper understanding of the associated problems along with a considerate and unhurried approach are the essentials of anesthetic management of these patients.

  18. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  19. [Anesthesia and bodybuilding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokema, Frank; Pietsch, Uta-Carolin; Führer, Dagmar; Kaisers, Udo

    2008-05-01

    A strong tendency toward body enhancement and body forming in western industrial societies makes it more likely for each anesthesiologist to get involved in the care of bodybuilders. These patients quite frequently consume androgenic anabolic steroids, human growth hormone and other drugs or substances which are believed to accelerate muscle gain. Cardiovascular, hepatic, psychiatric, hormonal and infectious side effects or complications are common and rarely monitored by health care professionals. The anesthesia risk is not exactly known but seems to be determined mainly by cardiovascular events like myocardial ischemia and dysrhythmias.

  20. Allergic reactions during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J H

    1988-01-01

    Any drug or blood product administered in the perioperative period has the potential to produce a life-threatening allergic (immune reaction) called anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic reactions represent adverse reactions mediated by immunospecific antibodies (IgE and IgG) that interact with mast cells, basophils, or the complement system to liberate vasoactive mediators and recruit other inflammatory cells. Activation of humoral and cellular pathways produces characteristic responses in the respiratory (bronchospasm and upper airway edema), cardiovascular (vasodilation and increased capillary permeability), and cutaneous systems (wheal and flare). Other predictable adverse drug reactions may mimic anaphylaxis to produce similar physiologic consequences independent of allergy (immune responses). Rapid and timely cardiopulmonary intervention with airway maintenance, epinephrine, and volume expansion is essential to avoid an adverse outcome. Severe reactions may be protracted, especially during anesthesia, requiring even larger doses of catecholamines and intensive care observation.

  1. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  2. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  3. Alzheimer disease and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Gözde; Özköse Satirlar, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and the most prevalent form of dementia. Some factors in the development of AD, age being the best-known one, have been suggested; however, no causes have been found yet. The pathophysiology of the disease is highly complex, current therapies are palliative, and a cure is still lacking. Adverse effects of anesthetics in the elderly have been reported since the 1950s; however, awareness of this old problem has recently gained inportance again. Whether exposure to surgery and general anesthesia (GA) is associated with the development of AD has been questioned. As the population is aging, many elderly patients will need to be anesthetized, and maybe some were already anesthetized before they were diagnosed. Exposure to anesthetics has been demonstrated to promote pathogenesis of AD in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to date, there have not been any clinical trials to address a link between exposure to GA and the development of AD in humans. Therefore, before making any conclusions we need further studies, but we should be aware of the potential risks and take cautions with vulnerable elderly patients.

  4. Turner syndrome and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a frequent and complex genetic abnormality affecting women, being associated with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological changes, especially related with the airways and cardiovascular system. The objective of this report was to review the anatomopathologic changes of this syndrome that concern the anesthesiologist the most, discuss the perioperative management and review the literature regarding the anesthetic conduct in those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by an abnormality in the number or morphology of the sex chromosome. The most frequent abnormality is the absence of a sex chromosome, resulting in the 45X karyotype and a phenotype composed of gonadal dysgenesis. The main anatomo-physiological changes pertaining the anesthesiologist include a short neck, and maxillary and mandibular hipoplasia, which might be responsible for difficult airways. The shorter length of the trachea, as well as the higher location of its bifurcation, can predispose to bronchial intubation and accidental endotracheal extubation when the tracheal cannula is under traction. The presence of cardiopathies, endocrine and gastrointestinal disorders, liver and kidney changes, as well as osteoarticular involvement, besides ophthalmologic and hearing impairments, are very frequent, and should be detected during the pre-anesthetic evaluation. General or regional anesthesia seems to be safe for those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic abnormality with important anatomo-physiological abnormalities important to the anesthesiologist. The knowledge of this disorder allows for a safer anesthetic management with low perioperative morbimortality.

  5. [Allergic reactions during anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, F; Sierra, P

    1996-01-01

    Anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia is a constant source of concern for anesthesiologists, given that the rates of death and serious complications are high and predicting which patients will be susceptible is impossible. All substances used in the perioperative period carry a certain risk of releasing histamine and triggering an allergic reaction, though muscle relaxants are the drugs usually implicated. The incidence of serious anaphylaxis ranges between 1:4,000 and 1:23,000 anesthetic procedures, with mortality set at 3-9% and morbidity 10 times higher. Clinical signs vary from mild symptoms to anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest. The diagnostic procedure to follow upon observing an allergic reaction is to first identify the responsible mechanism and later the responsible agent, as well as drugs that can be used safely. Prophylaxis is based mainly on recognizing predisposed patients before surgery and following recommendations and pharmacological protocols based on better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause anaphylactic reaction and on experience in managing them.

  6. How to define green adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Bert; Steurbaut, Walter; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    The concept 'green adjuvants' is difficult to define. This paper formulates an answer based on two approaches. Starting from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) definition for green chemistry, production-based and environmental-impact-based definitions for green adjuvants are proposed. According to the production-based approach, adjuvants are defined as green if they are manufactured using renewable raw materials as much as possible while making efficient use of energy, preferably renewable energy. According to the environmental impact approach, adjuvants are defined as green (1) if they have a low human and environmental impact, (2) if they do not increase active ingredient environmental mobility and/or toxicity to humans and non-target organisms, (3) if they do not increase the exposure to these active substances and (4) if they lower the impact of formulated pesticides by enhancing the performance of active ingredients, thus potentially lowering the required dosage of active ingredients. Based on both approaches, a tentative definition for 'green adjuvants' is given, and future research and legislation directions are set out. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “ ...

  8. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  9. Spinal Anesthesia is Associated with Lower Recurrence Rates after Resection of Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpan, Yuri; Jaeger, Melanie; Mizubuti, Glenio Bitencourt; Tanzola, Rob; Jain, Kunal; Hosier, Gregory; Hopman, Wilma; Siemens, D Robert

    2017-11-14

    We sought to determine whether anesthetic type (general vs spinal) would influence cancer recurrence following transurethral resection of bladder tumors. With institutional ethics board approval we examined the electronic medical records of all patients who underwent transurethral bladder tumor resection for nonmuscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer between 2011 and 2013 at a single tertiary care center. Followup information was gathered on all patients in December 2016. The time to first cancer recurrence and the incidence of cancer recurrence were the main outcome measures. A total of 231 patients underwent 1 or more transurethral bladder tumor resections between 2011 and 2013. Of the 231 patients 135 received spinal anesthesia and 96 received general anesthesia. On univariable analysis the 135 patients who received spinal anesthesia had a longer median time to recurrence than the 96 who received general anesthesia (42.1 vs 17.2 months, p = 0.014). As anticipated, adjuvant therapies and risk category were associated with recurrence rates (p = 0.003 and 0.042, respectively). On multivariable analyses incorporating a priori variables of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification and postoperative therapies the patients who received general anesthesia had a higher incidence of recurrence (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.14-3.74, p = 0.017) and an earlier time to recurrence (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.13-2.19, p = 0.008) than those who received spinal anesthesia. Anesthetic type was not associated with cancer progression or overall mortality. Patients who received spinal anesthesia had a lower incidence of recurrence and a delayed time to recurrence following transurethral bladder tumor resection for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. These findings should prompt large-scale prospective studies to confirm this association. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidural Combined with General Anesthesia versus General Anesthesia Alone in Patients Undergoing Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Feifei; Sun, Zhirong; Huang, Naisi; Hu, Zhen; Cao, Ayong; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Yu, Peirong; Miao, Changhong; Wu, Jiong

    2016-03-01

    Addition of epidural anesthesia may have several benefits. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of epidural anesthesia combined with general anesthesia in patients undergoing free flap breast reconstruction. A retrospective chart review identified 99 patients who underwent free flap breast reconstruction under general anesthesia alone (46 patients) or general anesthesia plus epidural anesthesia (53 patients) between 2011 and 2014. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured before induction, after flap elevation but before flap transfer, 15 minutes after flap revascularization, and at the end of surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. The incidence of flap thrombosis was 3.8 percent in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group versus 4.3 percent in the general anesthesia group (p = 1). Flap failure was 0 percent in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group versus 4.3 percent in the general anesthesia group (p = 0.213). Patients in the epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia group had lower visual analogue scale scores at 2 hours (0.76 ± 0.62 versus 2.58 ± 0.99; p surgery. Epidural anesthesia/general anesthesia combination improves postoperative pain and side effects without increasing the risk of flap thrombosis. Therapeutic, III.

  11. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF ANESTHESIA METHODS FOR GYNECOLOGIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Khusainova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: to improve the quality of anesthesia for gynecologic cancer surgery. materials and methods. The study included 421 patients who underwent a routine hysterectomy. The patients were divided into 3 groups with respect to analgesic method. The method of multimodal balanced analgesia was used in all cases. Group I patients additionally received epidural analgesia. Group II patients did not receive epidural analgesia (the control group. Group III patients received 600 mg of gabapentin as an adjuvant to opioid analgesia. Results. A significant difference in pain intensity within the first 72 hours after surgery between 3 groups of patients was found. Oral gabapentin as an adjunct to patient-controlled epidural analgesia provided efficient pain relief, reduction in the need for opioid analgesics in the perioperative period, as well as reduction in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting after surgery.

  12. [Pediatric caudal anesthesia: importance and aspects of safety concerns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, J; Weiss, M

    2012-08-01

    Caudal block is a safe procedure commonly used for pediatric perioperative analgesia. Complications are extremely rare but nevertheless local and systemic contraindications must be excluded. Optimal safety and quality result when strict attention is paid to technical details. A local anesthetic (LA) containing epinephrine allows early detection of inadvertent intravascular LA administration; therefore an epinephrine/LA mixture is recommended at least for the test dose. In terms of safety the choice of LA itself is probably of secondary importance. Clonidine as an adjuvant has an excellent risk/benefit profile with minimal side effects. Inadvertent systemic LA intoxication is a rare but potentially fatal complication of regional anesthesia and measures for prevention and early detection are essential. Should circulatory arrest occur, immediate resuscitation following standard guidelines is to be initiated including the use of epinephrine as the first line drug. Intravenous administration of lipid solutions may be beneficial as a secondary adjunct to stabilize hemodynamics but is not an alternative to epinephrine.

  13. Effect of General Anesthesia Compared to Regional Anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: cesarean section (CS) is one of the common operations performed in obstetric practice worldwide; it can be conducted as elective or emergency operation. Objective: to assess the effect of different types of anesthesia used during conducting elective cesarean sections (CS) on the health of neonates by using ...

  14. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving an...

  15. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room. (b...

  16. Adding magnesium to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Kashefi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Magnesium (Mg has been used as an adjuvant medication in postoperative analgesia. We planed this study to assess the effects of Mg, when added to lidocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA on the tourniquet pain.
    • METHODS: Forty patients undertaking hand surgery were randomly allocated into 2 groups to be given IVRA. They received 20 ml lidocaine 1% diluted with 20 ml saline to a total of 40 ml in the group L (n = 20 or 7.5 ml magnesium sulfate 20% plus 20 ml lidocaine 1% diluted with 12.5 ml saline to a total of 40 ml in the group M (n = 20. Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times, anesthesia and operation qualities were recorded. Before and after the tourniquet use at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes, hemodynamic variables, tourniquet pain, and analgesic use were noted. Subsequent to the tourniquet deflation, at 6, 12, and 24 hours, hemodynamic variables, pain, time to first analgesic requirement, analgesic use and side effects were recorded.
    • RESULTS: Shortened sensory and motor block onset times were established in group M (P < 0.05. Visual analog scale (VAS scores were less in group M at 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes after tourniquet inflation (P < 0.05. Intraoperative, analgesic requirement was less in group M (P < 0.05. Anesthesia excellence, as determined by the anesthesiologist and surgeon, was significantly better in group M (P < 0.05. Time to the first analgesic requirement in group M was 53.75 ± 6.94 minutes and in group L was 40.76 ± 14.55 minutes (P < 0.05. Postoperative VAS scores were higher at 6, 12, and 24 hours in group L (P < 0.05.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Adding Mg to lidocaine for IVRA enhanced the quality of anesthesia and analgesia without causing side effects.
    • KEYWORDS: Magnesium sulfate, intravenous regional anesthesia, postoperative pain.

  17. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  18. Anesthesia and the developing brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Becke, Karin; de Graaff, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that many general anesthetics have a variety of effects on the developing brain in animal models. In contrast, human cohort studies show mixed evidence for any association between neurobehavioural outcome and anesthesia exposure in early childhood. In spite of large...

  19. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of 86 Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with 141 Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO 2 ) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines

  20. How to teach regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröking, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2006-10-01

    The demand for peripheral nerve blocks and neuroaxial blocks from both patients and surgeons has increased over the last few years. This change in attitude towards regional anesthesia is prompted by the insight that adequate perioperative pain management leads to earlier ambulation, shorter hospital stay, reduced cost and increased patient satisfaction. To avoid serious complications of these techniques structured residency programs need to be available. Until 2004, the Residency Review Committee for Anesthesiology in the United States required a minimum of 50 epidurals, 40 spinals and 40 peripheral nerve blocks during residency. Similarly, the German Society for Anesthesia and Intensive Care required 100 neuroaxial blocks and 50 peripheral nerve blocks. In 2004 the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine endorsed standardized guidelines for regional anesthesia fellowships which regulate the administrative, equipment and educational demands. This review introduces the reader to the different teaching methods available, including cadaver workshops, three-dimensional videoclips, video filming, ultrasound guidance and acoustic assist devices as well as demonstrating their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, an overview is given of future residency training programs, which integrate administrative, material and educative demands as well as the teaching means into the daily clinical routine.

  1. [Complications of peripheral regional anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuburger, M; Büttner, J

    2011-11-01

    Peripheral regional anesthesia is a commonly used and safe procedure and eneral complications or side effects are generally rare. Nerve damage has an incidence allergies, dislocation of catheters and knotting or loops in catheters. Besides the general complications, there are some specific complications depending on the puncture site, such as pneumothorax or renal puncture.

  2. Providing value in ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnot, Caroline D; Fleisher, Lee A; Keogh, John

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss current practices and changes in the field of ambulatory anesthesia, in both hospital and ambulatory surgery center settings. New trends in ambulatory settings are discussed and a review of the most current and comprehensive guidelines for the care of ambulatory patients with comorbid conditions such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus are reviewed. Future direction and challenges to the field are highlighted. Ambulatory anesthesia continues to be in high demand for many reasons; patients and surgeons want their surgical procedures to be swift, involve minimal postoperative pain, have a transient recovery time, and avoid an admission to the hospital. Factors that have made this possible for patients are improved surgical equipment, volatile anesthetic improvement, ultrasound-guided regional techniques, non-narcotic adjuncts for pain control, and the minimization of PONV. The decrease in time spent in a hospital also decreases the risk of wound infection, minimizes missed days from work, and is a socioeconomically favorable model, when possible. Recently proposed strategies which will allow surgeons and anesthesiologists to continue to meet the growing demand for a majority of surgical cases being same-day include pharmacotherapies with less undesirable side-effects, integration of ultrasound-guided regional techniques, and preoperative evaluations in appropriate candidates via a telephone call the night prior to surgery. Multidisciplinary communication amongst caregivers continues to make ambulatory settings efficient, safe, and socioeconomically favorable.It is also important to note the future impact that healthcare reform will have specifically on ambulatory anesthesia. The enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will allow 32 million more people to gain access to preventive services that will require anesthesia such as screening

  3. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Science.gov (United States)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  4. Postoperative pain management following ambulatory anesthesia: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schug SA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephan A Schug,1,2 Chandani Chandrasena2 1School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; 2Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Worldwide, there is an increasing trend toward performing more and more complex surgery in an ambulatory setting, partially driven by economic considerations. Provision of appropriate pain relief is still often inadequate in this setting; poor pain control and adverse effects of opioids provided for pain control are common reasons for readmission, with human and economic consequences. Therefore, improved analgesia after ambulatory surgery is an important goal; appropriate strategies include identification of at-risk patients, provision of multimodal analgesia, and early use of rescue strategies. Multimodal analgesia is based on the combined use of multiple medications or techniques for pain control, which have different mechanisms of action or act on different sites at the pain pathways. Thereby, such an approach improves analgesia, reduces opioid requirements, and reduces adverse effects of opioids. Important components of multimodal analgesia are nonopioids (acetaminophen and anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alpha-2-delta modulators (gabapentin, pregabalin, but most importantly the use of local and regional anesthesia techniques. Here, the use of adjuvants is one way to increase the duration of pain relief, but, increasingly, continuous peripheral nerve blocks via catheters are used in ambulatory patients, too. Finally, the planning of discharge medications needs a balancing act between the requirements for provision of good analgesia and the risk of opioids going out into the community. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, short-stay surgery, multimodal analgesia, nonopioids, local anesthetics, regional anesthesia

  5. Physical exercise during adjuvant chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waart, H.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the effect of physical exercise during chemotherapy. In chapter two the study design, rationale and methods of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Study (PACES) are described. Chapter three presents the effects of the randomized controlled trial evaluating a

  6. Comparison of Postoperative Pain between Infiltrative Local Anesthesia plus Paracetamol and Total Intravenous Anesthesia plus Paracetamol in Ambulatory Breast Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasra Karvandian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute postoperative pain is an important surgical side effect that may delay patient discharge in ambulatory operations; moreover, the strategies used to alleviate pain may cause side effects that require longer hospitalization to recover. In this clinical trial, we compared two current anesthetic methods with special concerns about postoperative pain intensity beside other important components of ambulatory anesthesia.Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on two age-matched groups of 75 members who underwent ambulatory breast surgery. Patients in the first group (GA underwent general anesthesia with propofol plus remifentanil by employing a laryngeal mask airway. In the second group (LA, the surgeon used infiltration of 2% lidocaine in the breast tissue and midazolam was applied as premedication. At the end of surgery, paracetamol was administered to all patients in both groups. The pain score was evaluated when the patients were fully awake using a numerical pain rating scale. Patients with severe pain received analgesia. The length of postanesthesia care unit (PACU stay was recorded for each patient.Results: None of the patients in the LA group were satisfied because of the experience of needle insertion into their breast tissue (P = 0.001. The patients in the LA group experienced more pain in PACU requiring adjuvant analgesia (P = 0.001. Patients in the LA group had longer PACU admission (P = 0.001.Conclusions: Patients in the LA group had higher pain scores and were dissatisfied with the plan of their anesthesia. This may confirm the role of preemptive analgesia or the effect of emotional stress of breast tissue needling in wakeful patient.

  7. The elderly and general anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2010-01-01

    Due to the aging population, the number of elderly patients taking advantage of healthcare services is increasing. A general physical decline of all organ systems and a high frequency of chronic disease accompanying aging.Comorbidity and polypharmacy are therefore common in the elderly. Hence, th......, the administration of general anesthesia to the elderly can be a very challenging task. This paper aims to highlight some of the important issues presented to the elderly undergoing surgery and to suggest some strategies for management....

  8. Anesthesia for minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Mahajan, Charu; Kapoor, Indu

    2017-10-01

    With an ultimate aim of improving patients overall outcome and satisfaction, minimally invasive surgical approach is becoming more of a norm. The related anesthetic evidence has not expanded at the same rate as surgical and technological advancement. This article reviews the recent evidence on anesthesia and perioperative concerns for patients undergoing minimally invasive neurosurgery. Minimally invasive cranial and spinal surgeries have been made possible only by vast technological development. Points of surgical interest can be precisely located with the help of stereotaxy and neuronavigation and special endoscopes which decrease the tissue trauma. The principles of neuroanethesia remain the same, but few concerns are specific for each technique. Dexmedetomidine has a favorable profile for procedures carried out under sedation technique. As the new surgical techniques are coming up, lesser known anesthetic concerns may also come into light. Over the last year, little new information has been added to existing literature regarding anesthesia for minimally invasive neurosurgeries. Neuroanesthesia goals remain the same and less invasive surgical techniques do not translate into safe anesthesia. Specific concerns for each procedure should be taken into consideration.

  9. Fatal anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidor Kern

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of anaphylactic reactions occuring during anesthesia is not known. They occur most often in the induction  phase and can present with different levels of severity, also as an anaphylactic shock. Neuromuscular blocking drugs are the most frequently involved substances.Case presentation: We  report a case of a 77-year old female patient with granulomatous inflammation of unknown etiology. Surgical  biopsy of a neck lymph node was indicated. During the induction of anesthesia using propofol and succinylcholine she developed severe anaphylactic reaction presented with bronchospasm and cardiac arrest. Despite 80 min continous cardiopulmonary resuscitation the patient died. Elevated tryptase level in the patient’s blood sample taken before death confirmed anaphylactic reaction. On autopsy we confirmed the tuberculous etiology of generalized granulomatous inflammation.Conclusions: It is important to recognize anaphylactic reaction during anesthesia early and to take adequate measures in order to prevent unfavorable outcome. Tryptase assay of a blood sample taken during life or postmortem may help to identify anaphylactic reaction.

  10. Preventing and managing awareness during general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Berger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: General anesthesia is a reversible state of a temporary loss of consciousness, analgesia, muscle paralysis, blunted autonomic responses and amnesia. To achieve this, an adequate depth of anesthesia should be maintained throughout the surgery. Awareness is a serious complication of general anesthesia, which occurs when the depth of anesthesia is not appropriate due to various causes.In this paper the underlying neurobiology of intraoperative awareness is presented, as well as risk factors for awareness and methods for assessing the depth of anesthesia. Possible psychological consequences of awareness and their management are also discussed. At the end, the recommendations for preventing intraoperative awareness are given.Conclusions: Awareness during general anesthesia may have adverse psychological sequelae in individual patients, therefore guidelines for preventing and managing of intraoperative awareness need to be adopted. In case of a possible awareness, the recommendations for offering a psychological support should also be followed.

  11. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Simpson, Colleen; Roof, James; Arthurs, Sandy; Korssjoen, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  12. Presbycusis: reversible with anesthesia drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Carl A

    2009-02-01

    Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is a degenerative condition not currently treatable by medication. It is therefore significant that the author, as a patient, experienced a reversal of high-frequency hearing loss during a 2-day period following abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. This report documents the surgery and the subsequent restoration of hearing, which was bilateral and is estimated to have exceeded 50dB at 4kHz. A possible role is noted for anesthetic agents such as lidocaine, propofol, or fentanyl. This experience may hold a clue for research toward the development of medical treatments for presbycusis.

  13. Chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Kübra Mehel; Güzel, Is Il; Oskovi, Aslı; Guzel, Ali Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia is a rare and life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is the postdural puncture headache. When severe and persistent headache after spinal anesthesia occur, differential diagnosis can be explored. In this report, we aimed to evaluate a patient with persistent headache following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a 31-year-old woman ,and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma.

  14. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; De Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Lee, Katherine; Sheppard, Suzette; Hartmann, Penelope; Ragg, Philip; Backstrom, Marie; Costi, David; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Knottenbelt, Graham; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mameli, Leila; Giribaldi, Gaia; Prato, Alessio Pini; Mattioli, Girolamo; Wolfler, Andrea; Izzo, Francesca; Sonzogni, Valter; Van Gool, Jose T D G; Numan, Sandra C.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Hagenaars, J. H M; Absalom, Anthony R.; Hoekstra, Frouckje M.; Volkers, Martin J.; Furue, Koto; Gaudreault, Josee; Berde, Charles; Soriano, Sulpicio; Young, Vanessa; Sethna, Navil; Kovatsis, Pete; Cravero, Joseph P.; Bellinger, David; Marmor, Jacki; Lynn, Anne; Ivanova, Iskra; Hunyady, Agnes; Verma, Shilpa; Polaner, David; Thomas, Joss; Meuller, Martin; Haret, Denisa; Szmuk, Peter; Steiner, Jeffery; Kravitz, Brian; Suresh, Santhanam; Hays, Stephen R.; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Williams, Robert K.; Bell, Graham T.; Dorris, Liam; Adey, Claire; Bagshaw, Oliver; Chisakuta, Anthony; Eissa, Ayman; Stoddart, Peter; Davis, Annette; Myles, Paul; Wolf, Andy; McIntosh, Neil; Carlin, John; Leslie, Kate; De Lima, Jonathan; Hammer, Greg; Field, David; Gebski, Val; Tibboel, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  15. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  16. Providing anesthesia in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohlman, Lena E

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews the reality of anesthetic resource constraints in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Understanding these limitations is important to volunteers from high-income countries who desire to teach or safely provide anesthesia services in these countries. Recently published information on the state of anesthetic resources in LMICs is helping to guide humanitarian outreach efforts from high-income countries. The importance of using context-appropriate anesthesia standards and equipment is now emphasized. Global health experts are encouraging equal partnerships between anesthesia health care providers working together from different countries. The key roles that ketamine and regional anesthesia play in providing well tolerated anesthesia for cesarean sections and other common procedures is increasingly recognized. Anesthesia can be safely given in LMICs with basic supplies and equipment, if the anesthesia provider is trained and vigilant. Neuraxial and regional anesthesia and the use of ketamine as a general anesthetic appear to be the safest alternatives in low-resource countries. Environmentally appropriate equipment should be encouraged and pulse oximeters should be in every anesthetizing location. LMICs will continue to need support from outside sources until capacity building has made more progress.

  17. Simulation for Nurse Anesthesia Program Selection: Redesigned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, John Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This project is meant to answer the research question: What applicant character traits do Nurse Anesthesia Program Directors and Faculty identify as favorable predictors for successful completion of a nurse anesthesia program, and what evaluation methods are best to evaluate these traits in prospective students? Methods: A prospective…

  18. Comparative Study of Intrathecal Dexamethasone with Epinephrine as Adjuvants to Lidocaine in Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Naziri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used with local anesthetics to provide prolonged duration of sensory block in spinal anesthesia. The aim of present study was to evaluate the onset and duration of sensory block of intrathecal dexamethasone and epinephrine as adjuvants to lidocaine in patients who were candidate for cesarean section. Materials and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial research was conducted on 90 pregnant women candidate for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated to receive intrathecally either 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine plus 100 μg epinephrine or 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine plus 4 mg dexamethasone or 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine. The onset and duration of sensory block as well as postoperative analgesia were assessed. Results: The time to reach the peak sensory block in lidocaine group was shorter than that of other two groups (p<0.001. Duration of sensory block in the control group, dexamethasone group, and epinephrine group were 64.16±7.99 min, 74.79±12.78 min, and 99.30±10.93 min, respectively (p<0.001. Conclusion: The present research shows that intrathecal dexamethasone and intrathecal epinephrine as adjuvant to lidocaine increases sensory block duration in the women candidate for cesarean section.

  19. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably

  20. [Spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia in the surgical treatment of inguinal hernia. Cost-effectiveness analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ordóñez, M; Tenías, J M; Picazo-Yeste, J

    2014-05-01

    To compare the costs related to the clinical effectiveness of general anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in inguinal hernioplasty ambulatory surgery. An observational, retrospective cohort study measurement and analysis of cost-effectiveness, in the ambulatory surgery unit of a general hospital. All patients over 18 years of age diagnosed with primary inguinal hernia and scheduled for unilateral hernioplasty between January 2010 and December 2011 were included. Duration of anesthetic induction, length of stay in both the operating room, and in the post-anesthesia care unit, the anesthetic effectiveness (the incidence of adverse effects and the patient's comfort level), and variable economic costs associated with the use of drugs, as well as the use of human resources, were compared. The final analysis included 218 patients, 87.2% male, with a mean age of 53 years (range: 18-85 years). Of these, 139 (63.76%) received subarachnoid anesthesia and 79,(36.2%) general anesthesia. The length of time a patient remained in the post-anesthesia care unit was 337.6±160.2min in the subarachnoid anesthesia group, and 210.0±97.5min for the general anesthesia group (P<.001). Costs of drugs for general anesthesia were higher than that for subarachnoid anesthesia (86.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±7.2). The total cost difference between the 2 techniques was €115.8 more for subarachnoid anesthesia (P<.001). Both techniques showed similar effectiveness. The overall costs for subarachnoid anesthesia were greater than for the general. The cost-effectiveness of general anesthesia is better for outpatient inguinal hernia repair surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Historical development of modern anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel H; Toledo, Alexander H

    2012-06-01

    Of all milestones and achievements in medicine, conquering pain must be one of the very few that has potentially affected every human being in the world. It was in 1846 that one of mankind's greatest fears, the pain of surgery, was eliminated. This historical review article describes how the various elements of anesthesiology (gasses, laryngoscopes, endotracheal tubes, intravenous medications, masks, and delivery systems) were discovered and how some brilliant entrepreneurs and physicians of the past two centuries have delivered them to humanity. One name stands out amongst all others when the founder of modern anesthesia is discussed, William T.G. Morton (1819-1868). A young Boston Dentist, Dr. Morton had been in the search for a better agent than what had been used by many dentists: nitrous oxide. With Dr. Morton's tenacity driven by enthusiasm and discovery, he and renowned surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, John Collins Warren (1778-1856) made history on October 16, 1846 with the first successful surgical procedure performed with anesthesia. Dr. Morton had single-handedly proven to the world that ether is a gas that when inhaled in the proper dose, provided safe and effective anesthesia. One of the first accounts of an endotracheal tube being used for an airway comes from the pediatrician Joseph O'Dwyer (1841-1898). He used the metal "O'dwyer" tubes in diphtheria cases and passed them into the trachea blindly. Adding a cuff to the tube is credited to Arthur Guedel (1883-1956) and Ralph M. Waters (1883-1979) in 1932. This addition suddenly gave the practitioner the ability to provide positive pressure ventilation. The anesthesiologist Chevalier Jackson (1865-1958) promoted his handheld laryngoscope for the insertion of endotracheal tubes and its popularity quickly caught hold. Sir Robert Reynolds Macintosh's (1897-1989) breakthrough technique of direct laryngoscopy came after being appointed Nuffield professor of anesthetics at the University of Oxford

  2. Regional anesthesia practice in China: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey; Gao, Huan

    2016-11-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia has been widely used in China. Recently, Chinese anesthesiologists have applied nerve stimulator and ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. Nationwide surveys about regional anesthesia practices in China are lacking. We surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about regional anesthesia techniques, preference, drug selections, complications, and treatments. A survey was sent to all anesthesiologist members by WeChat. The respondents can choose mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. Each IP address is allowed to complete the survey once. A total of 6589 members read invitations. A total of 2654 responses were received with fully completed questionnaires, which represented an overall response rate of 40%. Forty-one percent of the respondents reported that more than 50% of surgeries in their hospitals were done under regional anesthesia. Most of the participants used test dose after epidural catheter insertion. The most common drug for test dose was 3-mL 1.5% lidocaine; 2.6% of the participants reported that they had treated a patient with epidural hematoma after neuraxial anesthesia. Most anesthesiologists (68.2%) performed peripheral nerve blocks as blind procedures based on the knowledge of anatomical landmarks. A majority of hospitals (80%) did not stock Intralipid; 61% of the respondents did not receive peripheral nerve block training. The current survey can serve as a benchmark for future comparisons and evaluation of regional anesthesia practices in China. This survey revealed potential regional anesthesia safety issues in China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clonidine in pediatric caudal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, S; Monin, S; Begon, C; Dubousset, A M; Ecoffey, C

    1994-04-01

    Extradural clonidine produces analgesia in adults. To assess its efficacy in children, we randomized 45 pediatric patients aged 1-7 yr presenting for a subumbilical surgery into three groups of 15 each. After halothane and N2O/O2 induction, and with a double-blind protocol, caudal anesthesia was performed with 1 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. Epinephrine 1/200,000 was added in one group (EG), 1 microgram/kg of clonidine in another group (CG), and no additional medication in the last group (BG). Postoperative analgesia was evaluated using the Broadman "objective pain/discomfort scale" (OPS) at 1-h intervals until the first analgesic administration. There were no differences among the groups in age, weight, duration of surgery, baseline systolic arterial pressure, and heart rate. The mean (+/- SD) duration of analgesia was longer in the CG (987 +/- 573 min) than in the EG (377 +/- 341 min) and BG (460 +/- 439 min); P < 0.01. The maximal OPS scores were lower in the CG than in the EG and BG (2.3 +/- 1.6 vs 3.4 +/- 1.4 and 3.4 +/- 1.8, respectively; P < 0.05). More patients in the CG (n = 7) than in the EG (n = 1) and BG (n = 2) required no postoperative analgesia; P < 0.05. No differences were found among the groups for the minimal respiratory rate and minimal Spo2 values in the postoperative phase, and there were no differences among the groups for heart rate and systolic arterial pressure during the 3 h after caudal anesthesia. We conclude that the duration of postoperative analgesia with caudal bupivacaine was significantly increased by the addition of 1 microgram/kg of clonidine.

  4. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  5. Adjuvant analgesics for spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke

    2018-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicate that pain is insufficiently treated following surgical procedures. It is essential that pain treatment is effective with a minimum of side effects in order to promote postoperative rehabilitation. Multimodal analgesia is most likely an important strategy in reducing postoperative pain. Combinations of different analgesics with different mechanisms of action may have an additive analgesic effect with fewer side effects compared to using a single drug. However, there is still a pronounced lack of documentation for the effect and side effects of these multimodal analgesic regimes. More than 6,000 spine surgeries are performed annually in Denmark and spine surgery has been associated with high levels of pain compared to other surgical procedures. Therefore, we considered spine surgery to pose a group of well-defined surgical procedures and we used this model to investigate the efficacy of 3 adjuvant analgesics aiming to improve the multimodal approach in pain management.
 
In study I and II we hypothesized that preoperative IV dexamethasone 16 mg would reduce acute postoperative pain, opioid consumption and persistent pain after lumbar disk surgery. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced acute pain during mobilization. The clinical relevance is however debatable and we could not demonstrate an opioid sparing effect. Further, we discovered significantly higher pain levels in the dexamethasone group compared to placebo 1 year postoperatively.
 
In study III we explored the effect of 500 mg of oral chlorzoxazone on acute postoperative pain and opioid consumption in patients with moderate to severe pain after spine surgery and found no effect of chlorzoxazone compared to placebo.
 
In study IV we hypothesized that intraoperative ketamine would reduce postoperative opioid consumption and persistent pain after spinal fusion surgery in chronic pain patients with opioid dependency. We found a significantly reduced opioid

  6. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the effect of anesthesia and surgery on serum tryptase in the absence of anaphylaxis....

  7. Supplemental pulpal anesthesia for mandibular teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel Boopathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pulpal anesthesia is dependent on the interaction of three major factors. (1 the dentist (2 the patient and (3 local anesthesia. Many patients fear endodontic treatment due to a concern about pain. Although pain treatment is well managed in many endodontic patients, there exists a group of patients who do not receive adequate local anesthesia. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the possible reasons for pulpal anesthetic failures and also to focus on the measures for developing effective approaches for the same.

  8. Anesthesia for tracheal resection and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Chhangani, Sanjeev V; Alfille, Paul H

    2012-12-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) is the treatment of choice for most patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheal tumors. Anesthesia for TRR offers distinct challenges, especially for the less experienced practitioner. This article explores the preoperative assessment, strategies for induction and emergence from anesthesia, the essential coordination between the surgical and anesthesia teams during airway excision and anastomosis, and postoperative care. The most common complications are reviewed. Targeted readership is practitioners with less extensive experience in managing airway surgery cases. As such, the article focuses first on the most common proximal tracheal resection. Final sections discuss specific considerations for more complicated cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alzheimer’s disease and anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Amélie ePapon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive disorders such as post-operative cognitive dysfunction, confusion, and delirium, are common following anesthesia in the elderly, with symptoms persisting for months or years in some patients. Alzheimer's disease (AD patients appear to be particularly at risk of cognitive deterioration following anesthesia, and some studies suggest that exposure to anesthetics may increase the risk of AD. Here, we review the literature linking anesthesia to AD, with a focus on the biochemical consequences of anesthetic exposure on AD pathogenic pathways.

  10. Hypotensive Anesthesia versus Normotensive Anesthesia during Major Maxillofacial Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoav, Leiser; Abu el-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Steady blood pressure within normal limits during surgery is one of the markers of the ideal and skillful anesthesia. Yet, reduced blood pressure is advantageous in some settings because it can contribute to a reduction in overall blood loss and improve the surgical field conditions. Controlled hypotension during anesthesia or hypotensive anesthesia is often used in major maxillofacial operations. Since hypotensive anesthesia carries the risk of hypoperfusion to important organs and tissues, mainly the brain, heart, and kidneys, it cannot be applied safely in all patients. In this paper we review the medical literature regarding hypotensive anesthesia during major maxillofacial surgery, the means to achieve it, and the risks and benefits of this technique, in comparison to normotensive anesthesia. PMID:25811042

  11. Modern technologies of local injection anesthesia in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohov S.Т.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the importance of using the new system Quick Sleeper for local anesthesia, to highlight benefits of quick and comfortable anesthesia. Material and Methods. The examination of effectiveness, convenience of this kind of anesthesia has been carried out. Results. All patients, taking part in this examination, confirmed more comfortable condition after this anesthesia than conductor and infiltration methods of anesthesia. The effect of anesthesia is better than after conductor anesthesia. Conclusion. This technology guarantees equal introduction and spread of anesthetic, independently of tissue density, eliminating the risk of carpule breakage.

  12. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Are Anesthesia Providers Ready for Hypnosis? Anesthesia Providers' Attitudes Toward Hypnotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Alexander B; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Bertram, Amanda; Seymour, Anastasia Rowland

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to measure current attitudes toward hypnosis among anesthesia providers using an in-person survey distributed at a single grand rounds at a single academic teaching hospital. One hundred twenty-six anesthesia providers (anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists) were included in this study. A 10-question Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved questionnaire was developed. One hundred twenty-six (73% of providers at the meeting) anesthesia providers completed the survey. Of the respondents, 54 (43%) were anesthesiologists, 42 (33%) were trainees (interns/residents/fellows) in anesthesia, and 30 (24%) were nurse anesthetists. Over 70% of providers, at each level of training, rated their knowledge of hypnosis as either below average or having no knowledge. Fifty-two (42%) providers agreed or strongly agreed that hypnotherapy has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia, while 103 (83%) believed that positive suggestion has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia (p hypnosis were that it is too time consuming (41%) and requires special training (34%). Only three respondents (2%) believed that there were no reasons for using hypnosis in their practice. These data suggest that there is a self-reported lack of knowledge about hypnosis among anesthesia providers, although many anesthesia providers are open to the use of hypnosis in their clinical practice. Anesthesia providers are more likely to support the use of positive suggestion in their practice than hypnosis. Practical concerns should be addressed if hypnosis and therapeutic verbal techniques are to gain more widespread use.

  14. Conscious awareness and memory during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, K

    1994-10-01

    Conscious awareness is an infrequent complication of general anesthesia. All methods of anesthesia have been implicated, and no method guarantees amnesia. This article examines implicit and explicit memory and discusses factors associated with awareness. Common methods of detection are unreliable, and symptoms resembling post-traumatic stress disorder may result if awareness goes unrecognized and untreated. Patients who experience awareness may sue on grounds of malpractice, breach of contract, and lack of consent. Overhearing negative stimuli may affect patient outcome, because learning and language comprehension can occur during what appears to be clinically adequate anesthesia. Strategies to block threatening auditory stimuli include use of earphones, music tapes, white noise, reassuring statements, or positive suggestion. Behavioral anesthesia decreases patient stress to enhance recovery. Evidence of patient benefit resulting from therapeutic suggestion is inconclusive.

  15. Open hemorrhoidectomy under local anesthesia for symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    standard treatment for prolapsed hemorrhoids. The procedure is commonly done under general or regional anesthesia. This study is aimed to assess the feasibility and tolerability of open – hemorrhoidectomy under local anaesthesia in our setting.

  16. Successful pulpal anesthesia for symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara

    2017-04-01

    Profound pulpal anesthesia after a successful inferior alveolar nerve block can be difficult to achieve when the clinical condition is a pulpal diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors reviewed the literature as it relates to the anesthesia necessary for endodontic therapy of patients with painful, vital, mandibular teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Supplemental anesthetic techniques and medications are available that can be used to improve pulpal anesthesia for patients with the clinical condition of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors identified treatment recommendations for anesthesia in the case of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis based on a review of the available evidence. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. "Acupuncture anesthesia"--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, J H; Lee, P K; Bingham, H G; Greer, D M; Habal, M B

    1976-01-01

    Forty-two patients who were to undergo plastic surgical procedures were asked whether they would accept acupuncture as a substitute for local anesthesia. Eight patients agreed to acupuncture; one of these had 2 operative procedures with acupuncture. Five of the 9 procedures were successful; the remaining 4 required conversion to local anesthesia. After interviewing the patients, we felt that the success of "acupuncture anesthesia" was largely dependent on patient motivation, and that a patient may experience pain during surgical procedures without any change in facial expression or vital signs. We concluded that "acupuncture anesthesia" is of little value in our patient population at present. Its results are unpredictable; therefore, we anticipate that patient acceptance will be small.

  18. Anesthesia related Complications in Pediatric GI Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sabzevari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elective upper and lower GI endoscopy is usually performed in children on an outpatient basis with the child under sedation or general anesthesia (GA. The objective of this study was to describe Anesthesia related complications in   children undergoing elective GI endoscopy.   Materials and Methods: The study design was descriptive on 1388 patients undergoing elective GI endoscopy in Sheikh Hospital from 2009 to 2013. All patient received propofol or standard inhalational anesthesia. We examined patients’ demographic data  ,  location of GI endoscopy ,  perioperative vital singe ,  recovery time , respiratory and cardiac complications , post operative nausea and vomiting , agitation , diagnosis and outcome   Results: Pediatric patients aged 2 to 17 years. 29 % of elective GI endoscopy was upper GI endoscopy and 70.3 % was lower GI endoscopy and 0.7 was both of them. 47.7 % of Pediatric patients were female and 52.3 % was male. We haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related respiratory and cardiac complications (no apnea, no cardiac arrest. 8 patients (0.5% have transient bradicardia in post operative care Unit. 83 patients (5.9% have post operative nausea and vomiting controlled by medication.  6 patients (0.4% have post operative agitation controlled by medication.   Conclusions: General anesthesia and deep sedation in children undergoing elective GI endoscopy haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related complications. We suggest Anesthesia for infants, young children, children with neurologic impairment, and some anxious older children undergoing elective GI endoscopy. Keyword: Anesthesia, Complication, Endoscopy, Pediatric.

  19. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a t...

  20. Anesthesia for Pediatric Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Sebeo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients refractory to medical therapy, deep brain stimulations (DBSs have emerged as the treatment of movement disorders particularly Parkinson's disease. Their use has also been extended in pediatric and adult patients to treat epileptogenic foci. We here performed a retrospective chart review of anesthesia records from 28 pediatric cases of patients who underwent DBS implantation for dystonia using combinations of dexmedetomidine and propofol-based anesthesia. Complications with anesthetic techniques including airway and cardiovascular difficulties were analyzed.

  1. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  2. Potential anesthesia protocols for space exploration missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Matthieu; Watkins, Sharmila D; Lebuffe, Gilles; Clark, Jonathan B

    2013-03-01

    In spaceflight beyond low Earth's orbit, medical conditions requiring surgery are of a high level of concern because of their potential impact on crew health and mission success. Whereas surgical techniques have been thoroughly studied in spaceflight analogues, the research focusing on anesthesia is limited. To provide safe anesthesia during an exploration mission will be a highly challenging task. The research objective is thus to describe specific anesthesia procedures enabling treatment of pre-identified surgical conditions. Among the medical conditions considered by the NASA Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability element, those potentially necessitating anesthesia techniques have been identified. The most appropriate procedure for each condition is thoroughly discussed. The substantial cost of training time necessary to implement regional anesthesia is pointed out. Within general anesthetics, ketamine combines the unique advantages of preservation of cardiovascular stability, the protective airway reflexes, and spontaneous ventilation. Ketamine side effects have for decades tempered enthusiasm for its use, but recent developments in mitigation means broadened its indications. The extensive experience gathered in remote environments, with minimal equipment and occasionally by insufficiently trained care providers, confirms its high degree of safety. Two ketamine-based anesthesia protocols are described with their corresponding indications. They have been designed taking into account the physiological changes occurring in microgravity and the specific constraints of exploration missions. This investigation could not only improve surgical care during long-duration spaceflights, but may find a number of terrestrial applications in isolated or austere environments.

  3. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive

  4. Anesthesia care for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaman, Michael J; Hevesi, Zoltan G

    2011-01-01

    Intraoperative transfusion practices for liver transplantation have evolved dramatically since the first transplants of the 1960s. It is important for today's clinicians to be current in their understanding of how transplant patients should be managed with regard to their coagulation profile, volume status, and general hemodynamic state. The anesthesia team is presented with the unique task of manipulating this tenuous balance in a rapid and precise manner when managing patients undergoing liver transplantation. Although significant progress has been made in reducing blood product administration, it is still common to encounter large volume blood loss in these cases. Increasingly, clinicians are challenged to justify transfusion practices with a stronger evidentiary base. The current state of the literature for transfusion guidelines and blood product management in this particular patient subset will be discussed, as well as a variety of means (both pharmacologic and otherwise) used to reduce the need for transfusion. The aim was to review the latest evidence on these topics, as well as to highlight areas that need further clarification regarding their role in the optimal care of these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  6. Proteoliposome derived cochleate as novel adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Gustavo; Lastre, Miriam; del Campo, Judith; Zayas, Caridad; González, Domingo; Gil, Danay; Acevedo, Reinaldo; Taboada, Carlos; Solís, Rosa L; Pérez, Oliver

    2006-04-12

    Cochleate structures (CS) consist in a highly stable lipid structures that have been reported to be a good antigen delivery system. The incorporation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) from bacterial membranes into CS became in a promising approach to develop adjuvants, particularly mucosal adjuvants. Therefore, we prepare CS from proteoliposome (PL) obtained from Neisseria meningitidis B (PLCS) and evaluated it for its capability to stimulate the immune system as well as the adjuvant activity. The ability of PLCS to induce Thl polarization was also explored. The results and the easy capability for new antigen incorporation on CS support its use as adjuvant for immunization with a large variety of pathogen derived antigens and different routes of immunization.

  7. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  8. Novel Adjuvants and Immunomodulators for Veterinary Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Fang, Yongxiang; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial for efficacy of vaccines, especially subunit and recombinant vaccines. Rational vaccine design, including knowledge-based and molecularly defined adjuvants tailored for directing and potentiating specific types of host immune responses towards the antigens included...... in the vaccine is becoming a reality with our increased understanding of innate and adaptive immune activation. This will allow future vaccines to induce immune reactivity having adequate specificity as well as protective and recallable immune effector mechanisms in appropriate body compartments, including...

  9. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials’ physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25483497

  10. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Herrera, Ileana

    2002-01-01

    The main objetives of this work are to determine the tolerability of the adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy's treatment in Costa Rican patients in the Hospital San Juan de Dios, as well as to value the toxicity's level presented. A bibliographic review is realized to justify the use of this treatment's type and to determine the feasibility of its performance with the different services that are involved. The treatment's plan consisted on: after an undergoing of a gastrectomy, the patients were appointed to receive post-operative treatment combined of 5-F U plus leucovorin and radiation. The fluoracil was injected intravenous in continue infusion. The obtained results prove that the use of a lineal accelerator must be recommended as a standard treatment for this pathology by the region to treat and the complexity of the fields. The ganglion dissection performed with more frequency is inferior to one D 2, and the treatment with radiotherapy cobalt 60 and infusion al 5-F U is well tolerated with moderate-light toxicity and easily manageable [es

  11. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  12. Legal abortion mortality and general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrash, H K; Cheek, T G; Hogue, C J

    1988-02-01

    Legal abortion-related mortality as reported to the Centers for Disease Control declined eightfold between 1972 and 1981. However, the causes of legal abortion mortality have changed over time. We reviewed all legal abortion-related deaths that occurred between 1972 and 1985 in the United States. We found that, although the absolute number of legal abortion-related deaths caused by general anesthesia complications did not increase, the proportion of such deaths increased significantly, from 7.7% between 1972 and 1975 to 29.4% between 1980 and 1985. Women who died of general anesthesia complications did not differ by age, presence of preexisting medical conditions, or type of facility from women who died of other causes. However, the proportion of deaths from general anesthesia complications was significantly higher among women of black and other races, women obtaining abortions during the first trimester, and women obtaining abortions in the Northeast. Our results indicate that at least 23 of the 27 deaths were due to hypoventilation and/or loss of airway resulting in hypoxia. Persons administering general anesthesia for abortion must be skilled in airway management as well as the provision of general anesthesia.

  13. Anesthesia related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of intraoperative anesthesia-related complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: One hundred patients with male to female ratio of 1:8.09 in the age range of 20-80 years (mean 39 years) underwent general anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The duration of operation in 94 laparoscopic cholecystectomy was from 20 to 80 minutes (mean 60.63 minutes). The incidence of intraoperative hypotension was 9%. Four percent of the patients developed arrhythmias. Increase in end-tidal-carbon dioxide (ETCO/sub 2/) was observed in 3% of cases. Conversion rate to open cholecystectomy was 6%. Damage to intraabdominal vessels with trocar insertion occurred in 1% of cases. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has major surgical and anesthetic advantages, there are anesthesia related complications requiring specific anesthetic interventions to improve patients outcome without compromising their safety. (author)

  14. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  15. Pulmonary Hypertensive Crisis on Induction of Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schisler, Travis; Marquez, Jose M; Hilmi, Ibtesam; Subramaniam, Kathirvel

    2017-03-01

    Anesthesia for lung transplantation remains one of the highest risk surgeries in the domain of the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist. End-stage lung disease, pulmonary hypertension, and right heart dysfunction as well as other comorbid disease factors predispose the patient to cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic dysfunction during general anesthesia. Perhaps the highest risk phase of surgery in the patient with severe pulmonary hypertension is during the induction of anesthesia when the removal of intrinsic sympathetic tone and onset of positive pressure ventilation can decompensate a severely compromised cardiovascular system. Severe hypotension, cardiac arrest, and death have been reported previously. Here we present 2 high-risk patients for lung transplantation, their anesthetic induction course, and outcomes. We offer suggestions for the safe management of anesthetic induction to mitigate against hemodynamic and respiratory complications.

  16. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  17. [Allergic reaction during anesthesia: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shinji; Futagawa, Koichi; Sugiura, Junko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Okuda, Takahiko; Koga, Yoshihisa

    2009-10-01

    We experienced two cases of serious and potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. The first patient was a 28-year-old male patient scheduled for surgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations and another patient was a 66-year-old male patient scheduled for hepatic resection. After uneventful anesthetic induction, anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, air and oxygen. Both patients developed allergic reactions characterized by cardiovascular failure during anesthesia. Resuscitative treatment included rapid fluid infusion, administration of adrenaline and steroid. Both patients were successfully resuscitated without any lasting sequelae. The causative agent in one of these cases was probably a prophylactically used antibiotic, while that of the other case was a reaction to latex. Both patients showed elevated histamine and tryptase concentrations in blood samples. Recently, the incidence of allergic reactions to antibiotics and latex during anesthesia is increasing. Anesthesiologists should, therefore, be aware of the possibility of allergic reactions to all drugs and substances, especially to latex, during the perioperative period.

  18. The optimal anesthetic depth for interventional neuroradiology: comparisons between light anesthesia and deep anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo Sun; Han, Ye-Reum; Choi, Eun-Su; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Hwang, Jung-Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal anesthetic depth for the maintenance and recovery in interventional neuroradiology. Eighty-eight patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology were randomly allocated to light anesthesia (n = 44) or deep anesthesia (n = 44) groups based on the value of the bispectral index (BIS). Anesthesia was induced with propofol, alfentanil, and rocuronium and maintained with 1-3% sevoflurane. The concentration of sevoflurane was titrated to maintain BIS at 40-49 (deep anesthesia group) or 50-59 (light anesthesia group). Phenylephrine was used to maintain the mean arterial pressure within 20% of preinduction values. Recovery times were recorded. The light anesthesia group had a more rapid recovery to spontaneous ventilation, eye opening, extubation, and orientation (4.1 ± 2.3 vs. 5.3 ± 1.8 min, 6.9 ± 3.2 min vs. 9.1 ± 3.2 min, 8.2 ± 3.1 min vs. 10.7 ± 3.3 min, 10.0 ± 3.9 min vs. 12.9 ± 5.5 min, all P neuroradiology were associated with a more rapid recovery and favorable hemodynamic response, but also with more patient movement. We suggest that maintaining BIS values between 40 and 49 is preferable for the prevention of patient movement during anesthesia for interventional neuroradiology.

  19. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  20. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Spinal Anesthesia with Marcaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.R. Rabani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The efficacy of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL in the treatment of renal stones has been proven in its indications. The main method of anesthesia in this procedure is general anesthesia. We used spinal anesthesia (SA as an alternative method of anesthesia with many benefits. This study was intended to show the possibility of SA as a more comfortable method of anesthesia for the surgeon , the anesthesiologist and the patient via more cooperation of the patient during changing the position and prevention of some complications mostly in upper extremities and neck. Materials & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial study, a total of 112 patients underwent PCNL under SA with marcaine , from Nov 2004 till Feb 2009. Their mean age was 36 years (22-48, at first the syringe was stained by epinephrine and then 2 -3.5 ml marcaine was used for SA and addition of analgesics , sedatives or both., if needed. The rest of the procedure was done as routine.Results: Stone clearance was achieved in 82% of the patients and the rest were managed by ESWL. The mean operation time was 126 minutes (90-220, 36% of the patients needed sedation, analgesia, or both, specially those with bigger stones. 6% of the patients had upper pole stones .Blood transfusion was needed only in one patient. No significant complication was observed in this study.Conclusion: PCNL under SA afforded the surgeon and the anesthesiologist the opportunity of more patient cooperation during position changes and precludes some morbidities that may happen under general anesthesia because the patient is awake and able to portend.

  1. Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics and sedation. ... Libyan Journal of Medicine ... evaluated the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, sedpain, and compared them with those of saline infusion.

  2. 76 FR 16796 - Pediatric Anesthesia Safety Initiative (PASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... central nervous system, as well as memory and learning deficits. Anesthetic agents that have been... of anesthesia and sedation, including stakeholders from industry, professional organizations... aforementioned experts in the fields of anesthesia and sedation, including stakeholders from industry...

  3. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jennifer T.; Halperin, Edward C.; Hertz, Caryn M.; Schulman, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O 2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O 2 (57%), and end-tidal CO 2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a

  4. Spinal Anesthesia in a Patient with Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Simsek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma, a multisystem connective tissue disease and etiology is still unclear. In the pathogenesis, it is charcterized by increased fibroblast proliferation with activation of immunological mechanisms and accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Patients might have anesthesia-related potential problems because many systems affected and have functional disorders due to accumulation of collagen. For this reason, anesthetic management is extremely important. A careful preoperative evaluation is essential. In this article, we will be discuss in the light of the literature a cachectic 60-year-old female patient who had urethral polyp excision with scleroderma applied spinal anesthesia.

  5. PERIPHERAL BLOCK ANESTHESIA OF UPPER EXTREMITY AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Tapar; Mustafa Suren; Ziya Kaya; Semih Arici; Serkan Karaman; Mursel Kahveci

    2012-01-01

    Successful peripheral blocks and selection of appropriate technique according to surgery is possible with a good knowledge of anatomy. Regional peripheral block anesthesia of upper extremity which applied by single injection to plexus brachialis is the most recommended method of anesthesia in daily surgical procedures. The most important advantages of peripheral nerve blocks which are type of regional anesthesia according to general anesthesia and central blocks are less effect ...

  6. Mycophenolate mofetil as adjuvant in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Nilendu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a life threatening autoimmune blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes. Advent of systemic steroids has greatly reduced the mortality rate. However, steroids and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy are nowadays frequent contributory agents of morbidity and mortality of PV. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has been reported to be an effective adjuvant to systemic steroids. It helps in increasing the immunosuppressive effect and minimizing the toxicities by steroid sparing effect. However, its efficacy in refractory cases of PV is not well documented. The lowest possible dose with satisfactory therapeutic efficacy and least side effects is known. We used MMF 1 g/day and systemic steroids in 3 Indian patients with pemphigus vulgaris who were resistant to systemic steroid monotherapy or combination treatment with azathioprine. In our experience, MMF offers an effective adjuvant with minimal side-effects in the treatment of resistant PV.

  7. Surgical adjuvant immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enker, W.E.; Jacobitz, J.L.; Craft, K.; Wissler, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    One hundred forty-four Wistar-Furth rats in 12 therapeutic groups have been studied in a long-term comparison of the effectiveness of nonspecific immunotherapy with MER (methanol extraction residue) vs active-specific immunotherapy with neuraminidase-modified tumor cells. Six months after surgical adjuvant immunotherapy a 100% improvement in survival was achieved with MER immunotherapy compared to untreated control animals. In addition, the use of MER enhanced the value of active-specific immunotherapy where both modalities were combined in sequence. The predicted value of MER-BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) for the immunotherapy of solid tumors was borne out by these results suggesting that present ongoing clinical trials of MER as adjuvant therapy for large bowel cancer should prove to be successful if properly controlled. The pattern of survival in these experiments suggests that surgical adjuvant immunotherapy is cytostatic rather than cytocidal, and implies the need for long-term, repeated immunizations.

  8. Adjuvants for anti-parasite vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomford, R

    1989-02-01

    To date the most successful human vaccines use attenuated living pathogens, but the advent of techniques in genetic engineering has meant that pure antigen can be provided in quantity. This has allowed the development of combined vaccines that use only the parasite antigens that convey protective immunity. However, isolated antigens lose immunogenicity so to regain potency, living attenuated carriers like Vaccinia or Salmonella can be used. To avoid the attendant drawbacks of carriers as immunopotentiating agents, adjuvants are under investigation as alternatives for use in vaccines against parasitic infections. In this review, Robert Bomford describes the adjuvants currently being examined for use in vaccines for both protozoan and helminth infections including Leishmania, malaria and Schistosoma. He also points out the drawbacks of using adjuvants and the dilemma of needing to stimulate cell'-mediated immunity while avoiding the immunopathological consequences of doing so.

  9. The adjuvant potential of synthetic alkylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Gil, Danay; del Campo, Judith; Bracho, Gustavo; Valdés, Yolanda; Pérez, Oliver

    2006-04-12

    Alkylglycerols (AGs) have shown immune stimulant and adjuvant activity in many studies, but natural sources are not so accessible and their extraction from them is very complicated. Therefore, a group of chemists at IFAL have synthesized AG analogs. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adjuvant potential of different synthetic AGs. A mix of ovoalbumin (Ova) and AGs increase anti-Ova IgG antibodies production in sera of immunized mice. The predominant subclass was IgG1 although higher levels of IgG2a were observed as the carbon chain length of AGs increased. AGs also induced the production of IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO) in the U937 human histiocyte and J774 mouse macrophage cell lines, respectively. These results indicate that synthetic AGs are effective adjuvants for the standardized antigen, Ova.

  10. Antibiotic Adjuvants: Rescuing Antibiotics from Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2016-11-01

    Rooted in the mechanism of action of antibiotics and subject to bacterial evolution, antibiotic resistance is difficult and perhaps impossible to overcome. Nevertheless, strategies can be used to minimize the emergence and impact of resistance. Antibiotic adjuvants offer one such approach. These are compounds that have little or no antibiotic activity themselves but act to block resistance or otherwise enhance antibiotic action. Antibiotic adjuvants are therefore delivered in combination with antibiotics and can be divided into two groups: Class I agents that act on the pathogen, and Class II agents that act on the host. Adjuvants offer a means to both suppress the emergence of resistance and rescue the activity of existing drugs, offering an orthogonal strategy complimentary to new antibiotic discovery VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Single-tooth anesthesia: pressure-sensing technology provides innovative advancement in the field of dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Mark N

    2007-04-01

    This article will review standard techniques for intraligamentary injection and describe the technology and technique behind a new single-tooth anesthesia system. This system and technique represents a technological advancement and a greater understanding of intraligamentary anesthesia.

  12. Inguinal hernioraphy under local anesthesia in the elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Kahramansoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The incidence of inguinal hernia and the frequencyof comorbidity increase in the elderly. Therefore,in operations of these patients, anesthesia methods areimportant. The aim of our study was to investigate the feasibilityof local anesthesia in the operation of the elderly.Materials and methods: The patients operated for inguinalhernia were analyzed retrospectively. They weredivided into two groups: the elderly (>60 years and theyounger. Anesthesia methods, additional anesthesia requirementand complications were compared.Results: Of totally 177 patients, 30.5% were elderly.Operation type, anesthesia method and score of operationalrisk differed between groups. The percentage of comorbidity (55.6% in the elderly was significantly high (p<0.001. Among elderly, the frequency of co morbidity wasslightly higher in patients who had local anesthesia comparedto spinal and general anesthesia. Patients in youngand middle ages preferred to be operated less under localanesthesia (34.1% compared to elderly (70.4%. Therewas one case (2.6% converted to general anesthesiaas an additional anesthesia in the elderly group. Postoperativecomplications were slight more frequent in elderly.These cases were five in number (31.3% and were operatedunder spinal or general anesthesia (p=0.002.Conclusions: The frequency of co morbidity and riskscore of operation (ASA category rise in the elderly.However, inguinal hernioraphy can be performed underlocal anesthesia without complication and conversion togeneral anesthesia.Key words: Inguinal hernia; aged; comorbidity; local anesthesia

  13. Nurse Anesthetists' Perceptions Regarding Utilization of Anesthesia Support Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Mary Bryant

    2010-01-01

    Anesthesia support personnel (ASP) provide direct support to health care providers administering anesthesia (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists [CRNAs] and anesthesiologists). Because these anesthesia providers are caring for a patient whom they cannot legally or ethically leave unattended, ASP are employed to bring them extra supplies or…

  14. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5170 - Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator. 868... topical anesthesia applicator. (a) Identification. A laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator is a device used to apply topical anesthetics to a patient's laryngotracheal area. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  17. Outcome after regional anesthesia: weighing risks and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Regional anesthesia has become a widely used method to provide intraoperative anesthesia, and postoperative analgesia. This review seeks to address the question whether patient outcomes are improved to an extent that justifies using regional anesthesia as a routine method. During the past decade, a

  18. 21 CFR 868.5130 - Anesthesia conduction filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction filter. 868.5130 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5130 Anesthesia conduction filter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction filter is a microporous filter used while administering to a patient...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional, or...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral, and...

  1. 42 CFR 482.52 - Condition of participation: Anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Anesthesia services... Optional Hospital Services § 482.52 Condition of participation: Anesthesia services. If the hospital furnishes anesthesia services, they must be provided in a well-organized manner under the direction of a...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5150 - Anesthesia conduction needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction needle. 868.5150 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5150 Anesthesia conduction needle. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction needle is a device used to inject local anesthetics into a patient to...

  3. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study was to inve...

  4. Experience with caudal block regional anesthesia for transurethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that caudal anesthesia with 2% xylocaine with 1 in 80,000 adrenaline gives adequate anesthesia for transurethral resection of the prostate gland. Keywords: Caudal regional anesthesia, Turp. Résumé Quatre vingt quinze patients consécutifs avec lobliteration hypertrophie prostatique exigent d' être opéré ont ...

  5. [YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgar, Serkan; Selvi, Onur; Serifsoy, Talat Ercan; Senturk, Ozgur; Ozer, Zeliha

    Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1) evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2) was designed for evaluating patient information. After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p>0.05). Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87±4.28 vs. 5.84±2.90, p=0.044 and 3.89±5.43 vs. 1.19±3.35, p=0.01 respectively). Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. YouTube as an information source of spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia and combined spinal and epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Tulgar

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Social media as YouTube have become a part of daily life and many studies evaluated health-related YouTube videos. Our aim was to evaluate videos available on YouTube for the conformity to textbook information and their sufficiency as a source for patient information. Material and method A search of the YouTube website was performed using the keywords "spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia". Firstly, 180 videos were evaluated and the characteristics of the video were noted, and the features of the video too were noted if the video was regarding neuraxial anesthesia. Questionnaire 1 (Q1 evaluating the video quality relating to neuraxial anesthesia was designed using a textbook as reference and questionnaire 2 (Q2 was designed for evaluating patient information. Results After exclusions, 40 videos were included in the study. There was no difference in Q1 or Q2 scores when videos were grouped into 4 quarters according to their appearance order, time since upload or views to length rate (p > 0.05. There was no statistical difference between Q1 or Q2 scores for spinal, epidural or combined videos (p > 0.05. Videos prepared by a healthcare institute have a higher score in both Questionnaires 1 and 2 (10.87 ± 4.28 vs. 5.84 ± 2.90, p = 0.044 and 3.89 ± 5.43 vs. 1.19 ± 3.35, p = 0.01 respectively. Conclusion Videos prepared by institutes, societies, etc. were of higher educational value, but were still very lacking. Videos should be prepared in adherence to available and up-to-date guidelines taking into consideration appropriate step by step explanation of each procedure, patient safety and frequently asked questions.

  7. Mixed adjuvant formulations reveal a new combination that elicit antibody response comparable to Freund's adjuvants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P J Lai

    Full Text Available Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA, are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (p<0.05. Sequential prime-boost immunizations with different adjuvants did not offer improvements over the use of FCA/FIA or MF59. Remarkably however, the concurrent use of the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (p<0.05. This combination was not associated with any obvious local or systemic adverse effects. Antibody competition indicated that the majority of the neutralizing activities were directed to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs. Increased antibody titers to the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER and gp120 V3 were detected when the more potent adjuvants were used. These data reveal that the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes.

  8. Adjuvanted vaccines: Aspects of immunosafety and modes of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalst, S.

    2017-01-01

    New developments in vaccine design shift towards safe, though sometimes less immunogenic, subunit and synthetic antigens. Therefore, the majority of current vaccines require adjuvants to increase immunogenicity. Most adjuvants available were developed empirically and their mode of action is only

  9. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  10. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding...

  11. Anesthesia: A Topic for Interdisciplinary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary approach for teaching the topic of anesthesia as one aspect of a chemistry-oriented course for nonscience majors which focuses on timely topics such as the energy crisis and drugs. Historical treatment with the examination of literature is emphasized in teaching. (HM)

  12. Syringe-delivered tumescent anesthesia made easier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapid, Oren

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for the infiltration of tumescent anesthesia is presented. An assembly is made using an infusion set, a three-way tap, and two unidirectional valves. The assembly and use of this system are straightforward and easy. The addition of unidirectional valves prevents the risk of reverse

  13. Testing haptic sensations for spinal anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    Having identified key determinants of teaching and learning spinal anesthesia, it was necessary to characterize and render the haptic sensations (feeling of touch) associated with needle insertion in the lower back. The approach used is to match recreated sensations (eg, "pop" through skin or dura mater) with experts\\' perceptions of the equivalent clinical events.

  14. The Biochemical Impact of Surgery and Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Hol (Jaap Willem)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ General anesthesia has been considered by some medical historians as one of the most important contributions to modern medicine second to perhaps the concept of antiseptic medicine and hygiene. The first historical mention of a deep unnatural sleep so that surgery

  15. [Anesthesia and Alzheimer disease - Current perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ana Filipa Vieira da Silva Ferreira; Lapa, Teresa Alexandra Santos Carvalho

    It has been speculated that the use of anesthetic agents may be a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer disease. The objective of this review is to describe and discuss pre-clinical and clinical data related to anesthesia and this disease. Alzheimer disease affects about 5% of the population over 65 years old, with age being the main risk factor and being associated with a high morbidity. Current evidence questions a possible association between anesthesia, surgery, and long-term cognitive effects, including Alzheimer disease. Although data from some animal studies suggest an association between anesthesia and neurotoxicity, this link remains inconclusive in humans. We performed a review of the literature in which we selected scientific articles in the PubMed database, published between 2005 and 2016 (one article from 1998 due to its historical relevance), in English, which address the possible relationship between anesthesia and Alzheimer disease. 49 articles were selected. The possible relationship between anesthetic agents, cognitive dysfunction, and Alzheimer disease remains to be clarified. Prospective cohort studies or randomized clinical trials for a better understanding of this association will be required. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimizing anesthesia techniques in the ambulatory setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Galvin (Eilish)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAmbulatory surgery refers to the process of admitting patients, administering anesthesia and surgical care, and discharging patients home following an appropriate level of recovery on the same day. The word ambulatory is derived from the latin word ambulare, which means ''to walk''. This

  17. Human mediotemporal EEG characteristics during propofol anesthesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fell, J.; Widman, G.; Rehberg, B.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for a response-control-related kind of declarative memory during deep propofol anesthesia has recently been reported. Connectivity within the mediotemporal lobe (MTL), and in particular rhinal-hippocampal synchronization within the gamma band, has been shown to be crucial for declarative

  18. General anesthesia for horses with specific problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, D.S.; Dunlop, C.I.

    1990-01-01

    We have discussed anesthetic techniques, special considerations, and expected complications involved in anesthetizing horses for abdominal, orthopedic, and head and neck surgery, and myelography and have described expected physiologic dysfunction that may require changes in anesthetic technique or supportive measures. The objective is high-quality patient care and reduction in anesthesia-related morbidity and death

  19. Side effects and complications of intraosseous anesthesia and conventional oral anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier; Oltra-Moscardó, María J.; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the side effects and complications following intraosseous anesthesia (IA), comparing them with those of the conventional oral anesthesia techniques. Material and method: A simple-blind, prospective clinical study was carried out. Each patient underwent two anesthetic techniques: conventional (local infiltration and locoregional anesthetic block) and intraosseous, for respective dental operations. In order to allow comparison of IA versus conventional anesthesia, the two operations were similar and affected the same two teeth in opposite quadrants. Heart rate was recorded in all cases before injection of the anesthetic solution and again 30 seconds after injection. The complications observed after anesthetic administration were recorded. Results: A total of 200 oral anesthetic procedures were carried out in 100 patients. Both IA and conventional anesthesia resulted in a significant increase in heart rate, though the increase was greater with the latter technique. Incidents were infrequent with either anesthetic technique, with no significant differences between them. Regarding the complications, there were significant differences in pain at the injection site, with more intense pain in the case of IA (x2=3.532, p=0.030, Φ2=0.02), while the limitation of oral aperture was more pronounced with conventional anesthesia (x2=5.128, p<0.05, Φ2=0.014). Post-anesthetic biting showed no significant differences (x2=4.082, p=0.121, Φ2=0.009). Conclusions: Both anesthetic techniques significantly increased heart rate, and IA caused comparatively more pain at the injection site, while limited oral aperture was more frequent with conventional anesthesia. Post-anesthetic biting showed no significant differences between the two techniques. Key words:Intraosseous anesthesia, oral anesthesia, mandibular block, heart rate, adrenalin, complications. PMID:22143716

  20. Anesthesia Providers’ Perspectives Regarding Parental Presence During Anesthesia Induction: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    was to ascertain anesthesia providers’ perspectives regarding parental presence during anesthesia induction. The work of Dr. John Bowlby (1973) laid...their parental surrogates. Bowlby looked at how orphans bonded with nurses and staff members. He found that children of all ages formed strong...during episodes of extreme stress only amplifies that stress ( Bowlby , 1973). Bowlby studied post World War II orphans in England and observed the

  1. Correlation of bupivacaine 0.5% dose and conversion from spinal anesthesia to general anesthesia in cesarean sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seljogi, D; Wolff, A P; Scheffer, G J; van Geffen, G J; Bruhn, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Failed spinal anesthesia for cesarean sections may require conversion to general anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administered spinal bupivacaine dose for performing a cesarean section under spinal anesthesia was related to the conversion rate to general

  2. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants after General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study - A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCANN, M.E.; Withington, Davinia E.; Arnup, Sarah J.; Davidson, Andrew J.; DISMA, N.; FRAWLEY, G.; Morton, Neil S.; BELL, G.; Hunt, Rodney W.; Bellinger, David C; Polaner, D. M.; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Absalom, Anthony R.; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Izzo, Francesca; Szmuk, Peter; Young, Vanessa; Soriano, S. G.; De Graaff, J. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/249966271

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  3. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methods Using adult rats we tested the effect of methylphenidate IV on time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then performed experiments to test separately for methylphenidate-induced changes in arousal and changes in minute ventilation. A dose-response study was performed to test for methylphenidate–induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. Surface electroencephalogram recordings were performed to observe neurophysiological changes. Plethysmography recordings and arterial blood gas analysis were performed to assess methylphenidate-induced changes in respiratory function. Droperidol IV was administered to test for inhibition of methylphenidate's actions. Results Methylphenidate decreased median time to emergence from 280 to 91 s. The median difference in time to emergence without compared to with methylphenidate was 200 [155, 331] s (median, [95% confidence interval]). During continuous inhalation of isoflurane, methylphenidate induced return of righting in a dose-dependent manner, induced a shift in electroencephalogram power from delta to theta, and induced an increase in minute ventilation. Administration of droperidol (0.5 mg/kg IV) prior to methylphenidate (5 mg/kg IV) largely inhibited methylphenidate-induced emergence behavior, electroencephalogram changes, and changes in minute ventilation. Conclusions Methylphenidate actively induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia by increasing arousal and respiratory drive, possibly through activation of dopaminergic and adrenergic arousal circuits. Our findings suggest that methylphenidate may be clinically

  4. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  5. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  6. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alister U.; Sanchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Collado, Paloma; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odors and whether they can be investigated under anesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odor smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odor under anesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes) electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odor was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odor during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odor. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50%) of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odors prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odor many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odors as well as in evoked glutamate and GABA

  7. Using digital media to keep anesthesia history alive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rafael A; Rengasamy, Sundara K

    2005-01-01

    Multimedia applications have been developed to explain many aspects of anesthesiology, including anesthesia machines, cardiopulmonary bypass systems, airway management, anesthetic pharmacology, regional anesthesia, and more recently, the history of the specialty. This article describes how computer-assisted instruction and multimedia have made it possible for an anesthesia department in a teaching hospital to become involved in the preservation, publication, and distribution of historically related anesthesia materials. The production of a digital video disc (DVD) based on the career of Leroy D. Vandam is discussed to illustrate the value of digital media in preserving, rejuvenating, and distributing anesthesia-related historical materials.

  8. Postoperative Visual Analog Pain Scores and Overall Anesthesia Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tony; Seipel, Scott J; Coyle, Nina; Ortega, Keri H; DeJesus, Ozzie

    2017-12-01

    Patient satisfaction is evolving into an important measure of high-quality health care and anesthesia care is no exception. Pain management is an integral part of anesthesia care and must be assessed to determine patient satisfaction; therefore, it is a measure for quality of care. One issue is how patients reflect individual experiences into their overall anesthesia experience. There is a need to identify how postoperative pain scores correlate with anesthesia patient satisfaction survey results. Postoperative pain is not a dominant measure in determining anesthesia patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analgesic and adjuvant anesthetic effect of submucosal tramadol after mandibular third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccheti, Marcelo Minharro; Negrato, Giovana Vigário; Peres, Maria Paula Siqueira de Melo; Deboni, Maria Cristina Zindel; Naclério-Homem, Maria da Graça

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess analgesic and adjuvant anesthetic effects of submucosal tramadol after third molar extraction. In this double-blind, split-mouth, placebo-controlled, single-dose, crossover investigation, 52 patients underwent mandibular third molar extraction under local anesthesia. Surgical side was randomly assigned to submucosal 2 mL 100 mg tramadol injection (group T) or normal saline solution (group P) immediately after surgery. Anesthetic blockade duration, time of intake and amount of analgesic rescue drug, and postoperative pain intensity were recorded immediately after anesthesia cessation and 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests. Anesthetic blockade duration between groups was similar. Group T took significantly less rescue drug after 72 hours (P = .008). Time elapsed before first intake of rescue drug was longer (P = .006), and pain intensity was significantly lower (P = .001) in group T. Submucosal tramadol injection after oral surgery improved postoperative analgesia, but did not extend anesthetic action duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbohydrate-based vaccine adjuvants - discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Qiu, Liying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zou, Xiaopeng; Lu, Mengji; Yin, Jian

    2015-10-01

    The addition of a suitable adjuvant to a vaccine can generate significant effective adaptive immune responses. There is an urgent need for the development of novel po7tent and safe adjuvants for human vaccines. Carbohydrate molecules are promising adjuvants for human vaccines due to their high biocompatibility and good tolerability in vivo. The present review covers a few promising carbohydrate-based adjuvants, lipopolysaccharide, trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate, QS-21 and inulin as examples, which have been extensively studied in human vaccines in a number of preclinical and clinical studies. The authors discuss the current status, applications and strategies of development of each adjuvant and different adjuvant formulation systems. This information gives insight regarding the exciting prospect in the field of carbohydrate-based adjuvant research. Carbohydrate-based adjuvants are promising candidates as an alternative to the Alum salts for human vaccines development. Furthermore, combining two or more adjuvants in one formulation is one of the effective strategies in adjuvant development. However, further research efforts are needed to study and develop novel adjuvants systems, which can be more stable, potent and safe. The development of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry can improve the study of carbohydrate-based adjuvants.

  11. Trends in adjuvant development for vaccines: DAMPs and PAMPs as potential new adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, E N; Carvalho, E; Oliveira, M L S; Raw, I; Ho, P L

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum salts have been widely used in vaccine formulations and, after their introduction more than 80 years ago, only few vaccine formulations using new adjuvants were developed in the last two decades. Recent advances in the understanding of how innate mechanisms influence the adaptive immunity opened up the possibility for the development of new adjuvants in a more rational design. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances in this field regarding the attempts to determine the molecular basis and the general mechanisms underlying the development of new adjuvants, with particular emphasis on the activation of receptors of innate immune recognition. One can anticipate that the use of these novel adjuvants will also provide a window of opportunities for the development of new vaccines.

  12. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  13. Adjuvant Biological Therapies in Chronic Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Burgos-Alonso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current biological treatments for non-healing wounds aim to address the common deviations in healing mechanisms, mainly inflammation, inadequate angiogenesis and reduced synthesis of extracellular matrix. In this context, regenerative medicine strategies, i.e., platelet rich plasmas and mesenchymal stromal cell products, may form part of adjuvant interventions in an integral patient management. We synthesized the clinical experience on ulcer management using these two categories of biological adjuvants. The results of ten controlled trials that are included in this systematic review favor the use of mesenchymal stromal cell based-adjuvants for impaired wound healing, but the number and quality of studies is moderate-low and are complicated by the diversity of biological products. Regarding platelet-derived products, 18 controlled studies investigated their efficacy in chronic wounds in the lower limb, but the heterogeneity of products and protocols hinders clinically meaningful quantitative synthesis. Most patients were diabetic, emphasizing an unmet medical need in this condition. Overall, there is not sufficient evidence to inform routine care, and further clinical research is necessary to realize the full potential of adjuvant regenerative medicine strategies in the management of chronic leg ulcers.

  14. Robotic anesthesia: not the realm of science fiction any more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Terrasini, Nora

    2012-12-01

    Robots are present in surgery, to a much lesser extent in the field of anesthesia. The purpose of this review is to show the latest and most important findings in robotic anesthesia. Moreover, this review argues the importance and utility of robots in anesthesia. Over the years, many closed-loop systems have been developed; they were able to control only one or two of the three components of anesthesia: hypnosis, analgesia, or muscle relaxation. McSleepy controls all three components of anesthesia, from induction to emergence of anesthesia. Telemedical applications have not only led to remote monitoring but even to remotely controlled anesthesia, such as transcontinental anesthesia. A new closed-loop system for sedation, called Sedasys, could revolutionize the field of nonoperating room sedation. 'Manual robots' are used to help and replace anesthesiologists performing anesthesia procedures. Specific robots for intubation and nerve blocks have been developed and tested in humans. Robots can improve performance in anesthesia and healthcare. Closed-loop systems are the basis for pharmacological robots. Safe anesthetic care might be delivered through teleanesthesia whenever qualified personnel are not available or need support. Mechanical robots are being developed for anesthesia care.

  15. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, G; Fareed, W M; Zafar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003), and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine), and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine) are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  16. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gazal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003, and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine, and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  17. When Only Buccal Anesthesia Was Done for Maxillary Teeth Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay Isik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Recently, some authors reported that maxillary teeth could be extracted without using palatal anesthesia, but they did not clearly specify the extracted teeth. This is important, because apparently the local anesthetic solution infiltrates the maxilla and achieves a sufficient anesthesia in the palatal side. Thus, thickness of the bone may affect the depth of anesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare the depth of anesthesia in different parts of the maxilla when only a buccal infiltration anesthesia was done. Patients and Method. The maxilla was divided into anterior, premolar, and molar regions. In each region, 15 teeth were extracted with a single buccal infiltration. The patient marked the pain level on a numerical rating scale. Results. Anesthesia depth was sufficient and was not significantly different (>0.05 among three maxillary regions. Conclusion. Except for surgical interventions, all maxillary teeth can be extracted using only a buccal infiltration anesthesia.

  18. Adjuvant mitotane treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzolo, Massimo; Angeli, Alberto; Fassnacht, Martin; Daffara, Fulvia; Tauchmanova, Libuse; Conton, Pier Antonio; Rossetto, Ruth; Buci, Lisa; Sperone, Paola; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Reimondo, Giuseppe; Bollito, Enrico; Papotti, Mauro; Saeger, Wolfgang; Hahner, Stefanie; Koschker, Ann-Cathrin; Arvat, Emanuela; Ambrosi, Bruno; Loli, Paola; Lombardi, Gaetano; Mannelli, Massimo; Bruzzi, Paolo; Mantero, Franco; Allolio, Bruno; Dogliotti, Luigi; Berruti, Alfredo

    2007-06-07

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare neoplasm characterized by a high risk of recurrence after radical resection. Whether the use of mitotane is beneficial as an adjuvant treatment has been controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant mitotane in prolonging recurrence-free survival. We performed a retrospective analysis involving 177 patients with adrenocortical cancer who had undergone radical surgery at 8 centers in Italy and 47 centers in Germany between 1985 and 2005. Adjuvant mitotane was administered to 47 Italian patients after radical surgery (mitotane group), whereas 55 Italian patients and 75 German patients (control groups 1 and 2, respectively) did not receive adjuvant treatment after surgery. Baseline features in the mitotane group and the control group from Italy were similar; the German patients were significantly older (P=0.03) and had more stage I or II adrenocortical carcinomas (P=0.02) than did patients in the mitotane group. Recurrence-free survival was significantly prolonged in the mitotane group, as compared with the two control groups (median recurrence-free survival, 42 months, as compared with 10 months in control group 1 and 25 months in control group 2). Hazard ratios for recurrence were 2.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77 to 4.78; P<0.001) and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.20; P=0.005), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that mitotane treatment had a significant advantage for recurrence-free survival. Adverse events associated with mitotane were mainly of grade 1 or 2, but temporary dose reduction was needed in 13% of patients. Adjuvant mitotane may prolong recurrence-free survival in patients with radically resected adrenocortical carcinoma. Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  19. Pharmacologic Considerations for Pediatric Sedation and Anesthesia Outside the Operating Room: A Review for Anesthesia and Non-Anesthesia Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Kraus, Molly; Trentman, Terrence

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the pharmacologic options for pediatric sedation outside the operating room will allow practitioners to formulate an ideal anesthetic plan, allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. The authors identified relevant medical literature by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases for English language publications covering a period from 1984 to 2017. Search terms included pediatric anesthesia, pediatric sedation, non-operating room sedation, sedation safety, and pharmacology. As a narrative review of common sedation/anesthesia options, the authors elected to focus on studies, reviews, and case reports that show clinical relevance to modern day sedation/anesthesia practice. A variety of pharmacologic agents are available for sedation/anesthesia in pediatrics, including midazolam, fentanyl, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, etomidate, and propofol. Dosing ranges reported are a combination of what is discussed in the reviewed literature and text books along with personal recommendations based on our own practice. Several reports reveal that ketofol (a combination of ketamine and propofol) is quite popular for short, painful procedures. Fospropofol is a newer-generation propofol that may confer advantages over regular propofol. Remimazolam combines the pharmacologic effects of remifentanil and midazolam. A variety of etomidate derivatives such as methoxycarbonyl-etomidate, carboetomidate, methoxycarbonyl-carboetomidate, and cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl metomidate are in development stages. The use of nitrous oxide as a mild sedative, analgesic, and amnestic agent is gaining popularity, especially in the ambulatory setting. Utilizing a dedicated and experienced team to provide sedation enhances safety. Furthermore, limiting sedation plans to single-agent pharmacy appears to be safer than using multi-agent plans.

  20. Single tooth anesthesia versus conventional anesthesia: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Vincenzo; Libonati, Antonio; Nardi, Roberto; Angotti, Vincenzo; Gallusi, Gianni; Montemurro, Edoardo; D'Amario, Maurizio; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2018-03-10

    The aim of the present study was to compare an electronic device, the Wand Injection System (Milestone Scientific Livingstone), with conventional anesthesia in terms of the following: pain sensation during anesthetic injection; effectiveness in achieving adequate anesthesia for a complete painless dental treatment; post-operative discomfort; and patient's anxiety toward dental treatment. Eighty adults from 18 to 70 years were enrolled in this cross-over study. Each patient served as his/her own control being subject to two anesthesia techniques: conventional and Single Tooth Anesthesia (STA) performed with the Wand. A split-mouth design was adopted in which each tooth undergoing conservative restorative or endodontic treatment received anesthesia with both techniques at 1-week interval. Before anesthetic administration, the patients' anxiety levels were determined. Physiological parameteres were measured before, during, and after the two injection procedures, and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to assess pain of injection, discomfort, and anesthetic efficacy. Differences in assessment of pain's injection, discomfort, anesthetic efficacy, vital parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation), and state anxiety levels were analyzed using Student's t test (p value < 0.001). The mean injection pain and post-operative discomfort ratings with Wand were lower than those with conventional syringe (p = 0.022 and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were found in the assessment of anesthetic efficacy. Blood pressure and heart rate mean values were lower during the anesthesia performed with the Wand than with the conventional syringe (p < 0.001). The anxiety level was higher during the first appointment, independently from the device used for the injections. The STA technique resulted in lower pain, discomfort, and lower intensity of physiological parameters. Single Tooth Anesthesia could be an efficacious alternative to

  1. Comparative study between manual injection intraosseous anesthesia and conventional oral anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Oltra-Moscardó, María J.; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare intraosseous anesthesia (IA) with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques. Materials and methods: A simple-blind, prospective clinical study was carried out. Each patient underwent two anesthetic techniques: conventional (local infiltration and locoregional anesthetic block) and intraosseous, for res-pective dental operations. In order to allow comparison of IA versus conventional anesthesia, the two operations were similar and affected the same two teeth in opposite quadrants. Results: A total of 200 oral anesthetic procedures were carried out in 100 patients. The mean patient age was 28.6±9.92 years. Fifty-five vestibular infiltrations and 45 mandibular blocks were performed. All patients were also subjected to IA. The type of intervention (conservative or endodontic) exerted no significant influence (p=0.58 and p=0.62, respectively). The latency period was 8.52±2.44 minutes for the conventional techniques and 0.89±0.73 minutes for IA – the difference being statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding patient anesthesia sensation, the infiltrative techniques lasted a maximum of one hour, the inferior alveolar nerve blocks lasted between 1-3 hours, and IA lasted only 2.5 minutes – the differences being statistically significant (p≤0.0000, Φ=0.29). Anesthetic success was recorded in 89% of the conventional procedures and in 78% of the IA. Most patients preferred IA (61%) (p=0.0032). Conclusions: The two anesthetic procedures have been compared for latency, duration of anesthetic effect, anesthetic success rate and patient preference. Intraosseous anesthesia has been shown to be a technique to be taken into account when planning conservative and endodontic treatments. Key words: Anesthesia, intraosseous, oral anesthesia, Stabident®, infiltrative, mandibular block. PMID:22143700

  2. Anesthesia for cesarean section in pregnancies complicated by placenta previa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imarengiaye, Charles O.; Osaigbovo, Etinosa P.; Tudjegbe, Sampson O.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the factors affecting the choice of anesthetic technique for cesarean section in women with placenta previa. In this retrospective study, the records of the labor Ward Theatre of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria were examined from January 2000 to December 2004 to identify all the women who had cesarean section for placenta previa. The patient's socio-demographic characteristics, type of placenta previa, anesthesia technique, estimated blood loss, maternal and fetal outcomes were recorded. One hundred and twenty-six patients had cesarean section for placenta previa, however, only 81 patients 64.3% were available for analysis. General anesthesia was administered to 52/81 patients 64.2% and 29/81 patients 35.8% received spinal anesthesia. A history of antepartum bleeding was recorded in 61.7% n=50. Of 31 patients without antepartum hemorrhage APH, 15/31 had general anesthesia and 16/31 had spinal anesthesia. The patients who had APH, 37/50 had general anesthesia and 1/50 had spinal anesthesia. There was an increased chance of using general anesthesia and if APH were present p=0.03, odds ratio=3.1, 95% confidence interval=1.2-7.7. Spinal anesthesia may useful in patients with placenta previa. The presence of APH may encourage the use of general anesthesia for cesarean delivery. (author)

  3. Thyroid and parathyroid surgery performed with patient under regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, A W; Brown, E; Hamburger, S W

    1988-04-01

    Thyroid and parathyroid surgery is usually performed with the patient under general anesthesia; however, for selected patients regional anesthesia may be preferable. Between September 1977 and March 1986 regional anesthesia was used successfully as the sole anesthetic technique in 17 patients who underwent thyroid surgery and two patients who underwent parathyroid surgery. Procedures included two total thyroidectomies, 14 lobectomies or lobectomies with isthmusectomies, and one isthmusectomy. These 17 operations represent approximately 5% of the thyroid operations performed by the senior surgeon over the corresponding time. One patient underwent combined completion thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy, and another patient underwent successful parathyroidectomy under regional anesthesia. In two additional patients, procedures could not be completed under regional anesthesia alone. In one of these two patients regional anesthesia appeared to effect a transient recurrent nerve paralysis. The indications for use of regional anesthesia have been primarily patient preference and associated cardiac or pulmonary disease. We now consider as contraindications to regional anesthesia patient apprehension about the technique, deafness, high spinal cord injury, recurrent laryngeal or phrenic nerve palsy, and allergy to local anesthesia. During this period, from 1977 to 1986, our administration of regional anesthesia has evolved from bilateral deep and superficial cervical plexus blocks to bilateral superficial blocks alone using bupivacaine with epinephrine, 1:200,000.

  4. Preoperative anesthesia clinic in Japan: a nationwide survey of the current practice of preoperative anesthesia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Shimamoto, Saki; Matsuda, Megumi; Kageyama, Kyoko; Sawa, Teiji

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the current practice of preoperative anesthesia assessment in Japan, we conducted a nationwide survey of the preoperative anesthesia clinic (PAC). A written questionnaire was sent to anesthesia teaching hospitals certified by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists. Completed questionnaires were received from 789 hospitals (response rate 62.5 %). PACs were conducted in 52.0 % of these hospitals and were more frequently implemented in large hospitals. Services covered by the PAC included medical history taking, physical examination, review of laboratory data, and obtaining informed consent. Majority of the anesthesiologists at hospitals that did not have a PAC responded that although they acknowledged that a PAC is necessary, they were unable to set one up. The main obstacle preventing establishment of the PAC was shortage of human resources. Half the anesthesia teaching hospitals in Japan use a PAC for preoperative assessment. At such hospitals, all the procedures required before anesthesia are performed in the clinic. Lack of human resources is the major obstacle preventing establishment of PACs in all hospitals.

  5. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB versus spinal anesthesia (SA in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001 and at discharge (P < 0.001 in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001, with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients.

  6. Anesthesia for myelomeningocele surgery in fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, Juan Carlos; Alcalde, Juan Luis; Otayza, Felipe; Sepulveda, Waldo

    2017-07-01

    Administering anesthesia for prenatal repair of myelomeningocele reveals several issues that are unique to this new form of treatment. This includes issues such as fetal well-being, surgical conditions and monitoring, among others. Exploring, analyzing, and understanding the different variables that are involved will help us reduce the high level of risk associated with this surgery. This review provides a systematic approach to the issues that are faced by anesthesiologists during fetal surgery.

  7. Evaluation of a computerized anesthesia report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamper, Raffael Pereira Cezar; Torres, Marcelo Luís Abramides; Ferraz, Janice Leão; Neto, Silvio Mori; Holzhacker, Rafael; Shimada, Vanessa; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil, the use of information systems that allows filling out anesthesia reports automatically is still in its initial stages. The objective of this study was to validate an automated anesthesia record. This study was approved by the Ethics Commission of the institution; an industry-university partnership (Dixtal, São Paulo, Brazil and Universidade de São Paulo) was developed, and the study received a grant from FINEP (Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos do Ministério de Ciência e Tecnologia). The integration of hospital information systems for recovery of data regarding identification, preoperative evaluation, and laboratorial exams was the premise of this study. The applicability of the final version of the prototype of the automated system was evaluated by applying a semi-structured tool to 33 physicians, residents, and/or anesthesiologists during surgery procedures in 66 patients. Descriptive evaluation of the data was undertaken. The computerized system was considered reliable even for large surgeries by 81% of the participants. The majority of the anesthesiologists considered the prototype of great value for future studies and capable of meeting the requirements of anesthesia reports, bringing benefits for anesthesiologists, patients, and hospitals. The full use of the system requires training and some of its aspects can be improved. Validation of this prototype of a computerized system for elaboration of anesthesia reports showed the viability of this type of solution to help anesthesiologists in their daily tasks, increasing the reliability of the data. Besides, when evaluating the applicability, anesthesiologists considered that the prototype could be useful for patients, physicians, and hospitals. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. ANESTHESIA AND INTENSIVE CARE IN HEART RETRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we describe our own experience of anesthetic management and early intensive care of two patients after heart retransplantation. As shown in this article, preretransplant clinical condition (severity of organs dys- function influences on character of intra- and postoperative periods including duration of anesthesia, surgery, postoperative ventilation and ICU stay, intra- and postoperative bleeding, volume of blood product transfusion, infection complications, need in renal replacement therapy, selective LPS-adsorption and other therapeutic op- tions. 

  9. HEMODYNAMIC EFFECTS OF XENON ANESTHESIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bykov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at hemodynamic effects of xenon on operative interventions in children. Patients and methods: the study involved 30 5-17-year-old children – 10 (33.3% girls and 20 (66.7% boys with ASA score 1-3 admitted for surgical treatment. The children underwent endotracheal anesthesia with xenon-oxygen mixture (Xe:O2 = 60-65:30% and fentanyl (2.5‑3.5  mcg/kg per hour for the following operations: appendectomy – 10 (33.3% patients, herniotomy – 8 (26.7% patients, Ivanissevich procedure – 6 (20.0% patients, plastic surgery of posttraumatic defects of skin and soft tissues – 4 (13.3% patients, abdominal adhesiotomy – 2 (6.7% patients. Central hemodynamics was studied echocardiographically (Philips HD 11, the Netherlands using the Teichholz technique along the cephalocaudal axis (parasternal access. Results: the anesthesia was notable for hemodynamic stability during the operation: as a result, a statistically significant (p < 0.05 increase in systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure by 10, 18 and 17%, respectively, was observed. Conclusion: the analysis demonstrated that xenon anesthesia improves lusitropic myocardial function statistically significantly increasing cardiac output by 12% by way of increasing stroke volume by 30%. 

  10. Ultrasound-guided ophthalmic regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, Steven; Palte, Howard D

    2016-12-01

    Needle-based and cannula-based eye blocks are 'blind' techniques prone to rare but serious complications. Ultrasound, an established adjunct for peripheral nerve block, may be beneficial for ophthalmic anesthesia application. The present review details the evolution of ultrasound-guided eye blocks, outlines safety issues, and reviews recent studies and editorial opinions. Ultrasound-assisted ophthalmic regional anesthesia allows imaging of key structures such as the globe, orbit, and optic nerve. Recent findings reveal that needle path is not reliably predictable by clinical evaluation. Needle tips are frequently found to be intraconal, extraconal, or transfixed in the muscle cone independent of the intended type of block. In addition, contemporary human and animal studies confirm that real-time observation of local anesthetic spread inside of the muscle cone correlates directly with block success. Ultrasound-guided ophthalmic regional anesthesia is evolving beyond simple visualization of the anatomy. Recent research emphasizes the imprecision of needle tip location without ultrasound and the key role of imaging local anesthetic dispersion. There is ongoing debate in the literature regarding the utility of routine ultrasound for eye blocks.

  11. Anesthesia Practices for Interventional Radiology in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vari, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.vari@uniroma1.it [University La Sapienza, Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine (Italy); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Les Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Chef de Pôle, Imagerie (France)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeThe Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) prompted an initiative to frame the current European status of anesthetic practices for interventional radiology, in consideration of the current variability of IR suite settings, staffing and anesthetic practices reported in the literature and of the growing debate on sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists, in Europe.MethodsAnonymous online survey available to all European CIRSE members to assess IR setting, demographics, peri-procedural care, anesthetic management, resources and staffing, pain management, data collection, safety, management of emergencies and personal opinions on the role CIRSE should have in promoting anesthetic care for interventional radiology.ResultsPredictable differences between countries and national regulations were confirmed, showing how significantly many “local” factors (type and size of centers, the availability of dedicated inpatient bed, availability of anesthesia staff) can affect the routine practice and the expansion of IR as a subspecialty. In addition, the perception of the need for IR to acquire more sedation-related skills is definitely stronger for those who practice with the lowest availability of anesthesia care.ConclusionSignificant country variations and regulations along with a controversial position of the anesthesia community on the issue of sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists substantially represent the biggest drawbacks for the expansion of peri-procedural anesthetic care for IR and for potential initiatives at an European level.

  12. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses.

  13. [Streptococcus salivarius meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conangla, G; Rodríguez, L; Alonso-Tarrés, C; Avila, A; de la Campa, A G

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a usual commensal of skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, oral cavity and paranasal sinuses. Although it is usually considered to have low virulence, S. salivarius may cause life-threatening infections, particularly endocarditis. On the other hand, bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia is very rare, there being some reported cases caused by S. salivarius, S. mitis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We report a 57 year old man who developed meningitis symptoms within 10 h of an uncomplicated inguinal herniorrhaphy performed during spinal anesthesia. Cerebrospinal cultures grew S. salivarius sensitive to penicillin. The patient was successfully treated with penicillin G and left the hospital without sequelae. In the literature, bacterial meningitis due to S. salivarius is rarely reported. Of the 28 cases, 18 occurred after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or for spinal anesthesia, 5 occurred following a bacteriemia for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or intestinal neoplasia, and the other 5 in patients who had dural defects. We discuss the possible etiological causes of the meningitis due to S. salivarius cases reports. The early recognition of this entity and the aseptic precautions likely to reduce the incidence of infectious complications after lumbar puncture are stressed.

  14. Anesthesia Practices for Interventional Radiology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Alessandra; Gangi, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) prompted an initiative to frame the current European status of anesthetic practices for interventional radiology, in consideration of the current variability of IR suite settings, staffing and anesthetic practices reported in the literature and of the growing debate on sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists, in Europe.MethodsAnonymous online survey available to all European CIRSE members to assess IR setting, demographics, peri-procedural care, anesthetic management, resources and staffing, pain management, data collection, safety, management of emergencies and personal opinions on the role CIRSE should have in promoting anesthetic care for interventional radiology.ResultsPredictable differences between countries and national regulations were confirmed, showing how significantly many “local” factors (type and size of centers, the availability of dedicated inpatient bed, availability of anesthesia staff) can affect the routine practice and the expansion of IR as a subspecialty. In addition, the perception of the need for IR to acquire more sedation-related skills is definitely stronger for those who practice with the lowest availability of anesthesia care.ConclusionSignificant country variations and regulations along with a controversial position of the anesthesia community on the issue of sedation administered by non-anesthesiologists substantially represent the biggest drawbacks for the expansion of peri-procedural anesthetic care for IR and for potential initiatives at an European level.

  15. [Shivering associated with general anesthesia using remifentanil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Kenichiro; Kitamura, Takayuki; Tagami, Megumi

    2014-09-01

    General anesthesia using remifentanil is accompanied with post-operative shivering at a high incidence. Post-operative shivering can be divided into thermoregulatory and non-thermoregulatory. Hypothermia causes thermoregulatory shivering. The interthreshold range is defined as the difference between the sweating threshold and the vasoconstriction threshold. Generally, the interthreshold range is shifted to higher temperatures immediately after surgery under general anesthesia. Thus, thermoregulatory shivering can be exaggerated in patients without hypothermia. The application of patient warming devices and the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as effective treatments for the prevention of thermoregulatory shivering. Remifentanil is an ultra-short acting agent. Pharmacological effects of remifentanil quickly disappear just after the discontinuing of remifentanil infusion, leading to a kind of opioid withdrawal syndrome resulting in non-thermoregulatory shivering. In addition, postoperative pain shifts the shivering threshold to higher temperatures, resulting in non-thermoregulatory shivering. Thus, opioid transition using fentanyl and/or morphine during anesthetic management is essential for the prevention of non-thermoregulatory shivering. It is also reported that magnesium, ketamine and pethidine have preventive effects on non-thermoregulatory shivering. The mechanism underlying post-operative shivering associated with general anesthesia using remifentanil is very complicated; therefore, we speculate that multimodal approach is required for its prevention.

  16. The comparison of anesthesia effect of lung surgery through video-assisted thoracic surgery: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Dong Ke

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicated that epidural anesthesia can save operating time and postoperative hospital stay time. But epidural anesthesia and general anesthesia have the same effect on complications.

  17. The adjuvant mechanism of cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Karen Smith; Agger, Else Marie; Foged, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are being used increasingly as efficient adjuvants for subunit vaccines but their precise mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we investigated the adjuvant mechanism of cationic liposomes based on the synthetic amphiphile dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA). The liposomes...... concentrations. This efficient adsorption onto the liposomes led to an enhanced uptake of OVA by BM-DCs as assessed by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy. This was an active process, which was arrested at 4 degrees and by an inhibitor of actin-dependent endocytosis, cytochalasin D....... In vivo studies confirmed the observed effect because adsorption of OVA onto DDA liposomes enhanced the uptake of the antigen by peritoneal exudate cells after intraperitoneal injection. The liposomes targeted antigen preferentially to antigen-presenting cells because we only observed a minimal uptake...

  18. DNA Vaccine Electroporation and Molecular Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Suschak and Schmaljohn DNA Vaccine Electroporation and Molecular Adjuvants 1 Abstract To date, there is no protective vaccine for Ebola virus...infection. Safety concerns have prevented the use of live-attenuated vaccines , and forced researchers to examine new vaccine formulations. DNA... vaccination is an attractive method for inducing protective immunity to a variety of pathogens, but the low immunogenicity seen in larger animals and

  19. Severe Bradycardia Possibly due to a Local Anesthetic Oral Mucosal Injection during General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthesia may induce systemic complications leading to parasympathetic activity leading to bradycardia and hypotension. We report a case of a 50-year-old man undergoing dental surgery under general anesthesia who experienced severe bradycardia and hypotension after local anesthesia infiltration. Concerns regarding the utilization of a relatively large lumen injection needle for local anesthesia during general anesthesia are discussed.

  20. Inflammatory responses following intramuscular and subcutaneous immunization with aluminum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Maeda, Mika; Kawashima, Hisashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-06-05

    Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines are administered through an intramuscular injection (IM) in the US and EU, however, a subcutaneous injection (SC) has been recommended in Japan because of serious muscle contracture previously reported following multiple IMs of antibiotics. Newly introduced adjuvanted vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, have been recommended through IM. In the present study, currently available vaccines were evaluated through IM in mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines induced inflammatory nodules at the injection site, which expanded into the intra-muscular space without any muscle degeneration or necrosis, whereas non-adjuvanted vaccines did not. These nodules consisted of polymorph nuclear neutrophils with some eosinophils within the initial 48h, then monocytes/macrophages 1 month later. Inflammatory nodules were observed 6 months after IM, had decreased in size, and were absorbed 12 months after IM, which was earlier than that after SC. Cytokine production was examined in the injected muscular tissues and AS04 adjuvanted HPV induced higher IL-1β, IL-6, KC, MIP-1, and G-CSF levels in muscle tissues than any other vaccine, but similar serum cytokine profiles were observed to those induced by the other vaccines. Currently available vaccines did not induce muscular degeneration or fibrotic scar as observed with muscle contracture caused by multiple IMs of antibiotics in the past. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair under spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia: a randomized prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donmez T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Turgut Donmez,1 Vuslat Muslu Erdem,2 Oguzhan Sunamak,3 Duygu Ayfer Erdem,2 Huseyin Imam Avaroglu1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Lutfiye Nuri Burat State Hospital, 3Department of General Surgery, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Background: Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP inguinal hernia repair is a well-known approach to inguinal hernia repair that is usually performed under general anesthesia (GA. To date, no reports compare the efficacy of spinal anesthesia (SA with that of GA for laparoscopic hernia repairs. The purpose of this study was to compare the surgical outcome of TEP inguinal hernia repair performed when the patient was treated under SA with that performed under GA. Materials and methods: Between July 2015 and July 2016, 50 patients were prospectively randomized to either the GA TEP group (Group I or the SA TEP group (Group II. Propofol, fentanyl, rocuronium, sevoflurane, and tracheal intubation were used for GA. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg and fentanyl (10 µg were used for SA to achieve a sensorial level of T3. Intraoperative events related to SA, operative and anesthesia times, postoperative complications, and pain scores were recorded. Each patient was asked to evaluate the anesthetic technique by using a direct questionnaire filled in 3 months after the operation. Results: All the procedures were completed by the allocated method of anesthesia as there were no conversions from SA to GA. Pain was significantly less for 1 h (P<0.0001 and 4 h (P=0.002 after the procedure for the SA and GA groups, respectively. There was no difference between the two groups regarding complications, hospital stay, recovery, or surgery time. Generally, patients were more satisfied with SA than GA (P<0.020. Conclusion: TEP inguinal hernia repair can be safely performed under SA, and SA was associated with less postoperative pain, better recovery, and better

  2. [History of anesthesia : "From narcosis to perioperative homeostasis"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, H; Goerig, M

    2016-10-01

    In the western World 16 October 1846 is often called "Ether Day", marking the beginning of anesthesia. Before that date, for physicians there was only a struggle against pain. In the following 170 years all fields of general anesthesia as well as regional and local anesthesia were continuously developed. Pharmacological developments and technical innovations made this evolution possible. The complexity of this field of medicine requires a specialist: the anesthesiologist, whose selection of the most suitable form of anesthesia for the patient makes the surgical intervention painless. In addition, the history of anesthesia was characterized by personalities who were responsible for the progress of this medical field. Anesthesia is one part of the discipline of anesthesiology, which also includes resuscitation, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy.

  3. [Percutaneous maxillary nerve block anesthesia in maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1999-01-01

    Personal experience in percutaneous maxillary nerve block anesthesia in association with transmucosal anesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in oral and maxillofacial surgery, is presented. Six Caldwell-Luc, 9 anthrotomies and biopsies of maxillary sinus, 8 removals of extensive odontogenic cysts and 12 surgical maxillary expansions were performed from 1994 to 1996 at our Department. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block in association with transmucosal anesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion were performed. Carbocaine without adrenaline in association with NaCO3 1/10 for maxillary nerve block anesthesia and lidocaineoprilocaine cream (EMLA) for transmucosal anesthesia were employed. Intra- and post-operative pain were evaluated by visual analogue scale in all the patients. Anesthesiological procedures revealed to be effective in all surgical interventions and postoperative analgesia allowed easier pain control. The simplicity of execution, the effective pre- and postoperative anesthesia and the absence of side effects make this procedure particularly indicated in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  4. Anesthesia Quality and Patient Safety in China: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Gao, Huan; Zhou, Xiangyong; Huang, Jeffrey

    There has been no nationwide investigation into anesthesia quality and patient safety in China. The authors surveyed Chinese anesthesiologists about anesthesia quality by sending a survey to all anesthesiologist members of the New Youth Anesthesia Forum via WeChat. The respondents could choose to use a mobile device or desktop to complete the survey. The overall response rate was 43%. Intraoperative monitoring: 77.9% of respondents reported that electrocardiogram monitoring was routinely applied for all patients; only 55% of the respondents reported that they routinely used end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring for their patients under general anesthesia. 10.3% of respondents admitted that they had at least one wrong medicine administration in the past 3 months; 12.4% reported that they had at least one case of cardiac arrest in the past year. This is the first anesthesia quality survey in China. The findings revealed potential anesthesia safety issues in China.

  5. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, W.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluating the results of controlled clinical trials, an attempt has been made to summarize the current status of adjuvant therapy in colorectal cancer. Several different adjuvant treatment approaches including immunotherapy, postoperative fibrinolysis, anticoagulation, pre- and postoperative radiotherapy when used as a single modality, have not resulted in any long-term survival benefit. Rather in contrast to previous experiences, recent prospective randomized trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of chemotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of colon and rectal cancer. Whereas its definitive role in the former disease remains somewhat controversial, for rectal cancer, it seems clear that combined modality therapy including polychemotherapy with or without radiation prolongs the disease-free interval, lowers the local recurrence rate, and may improve survival compared to surgery alone. Questions which remain to be answered by future clinical trials are related to the optimal duration and sequence of combined modality, to the role of different radiation sensitizers, and in both colon and rectal cancer, to the choice of the most effective systemtic chemotherapeutic drugs. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Impact of adjuvant chemotherapy for gliomatosis cerebri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jung-Il; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Won Seog; Kwon, Ki-Hoon; Park, Kwan; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is characterized by a diffuse infiltration of tumor cells throughout CNS, however, few details are available about the chemotherapeutic effect on GC. The aim of this study was to investigate its clinical course and to determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for GC. Between Jan. 1999 and Dec. 2004, 37 GC patients were diagnosed by biopsy and treated with radiotherapy in a single institution. To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for GC, we retrospectively reviewed their clinical courses. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups, those with and without receiving post-radiotherapy adjuvant chemotherapy such as temozolomide or nitrosourea-based chemotherapy. Nineteen patients with adjuvant chemotherapy were assigned to the chemotreatment group and 18 with radiotherapy alone were assigned to the control group. Mean survival for chemotreatment group and control group were 24.2 and 13.1 months, respectively (p = 0.045). Time to progression for these groups were 16.0 and 6.0 months, respectively (p = 0.007). Overall review of the clinical course of patients with GC provided that early appearance of new contrast-enhancing lesions within 6 months from the initial diagnosis and higher histological grade were closely associated with poor survival (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008). Adjuvant chemotherapy following radiotherapy could prolong the survival in patients with GC. In addition, newly developed contrast-enhanced lesions on the follow-up MR images indicate the progression of GC

  7. Liposomal adjuvant development for leishmaniasis vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarizadeh, Anis; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Badiee, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that ranges in severity from skin lesions to fatality. Since long-lasting protection is induced upon recovery from cutaneous leishmaniasis, development of an effective vaccine is promising. However, there is no vaccine for use in humans yet. It seems limited efficacy in leishmaniasis vaccines is due to lack of an appropriate adjuvant or delivery system. Hence, the use of particulate adjuvants such as liposomes for effective delivery to the antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a valuable strategy to enhance leishmaniasis vaccine efficacy. The extraordinary versatility of liposomes because of their unique amphiphilic and biphasic nature allows for using antigens or immunostimulators within the core, on the surface or within the bilayer, and modulates both the magnitude and the T-helper bias of the immune response. In this review article, we attempt to summarize the role of liposomal adjuvants in the development of Leishmania vaccines and describe the main physicochemical properties of liposomes like phospholipid composition, surface charge, and particle size during formulation design. We also suggest potentially useful formulation strategies in order for future experiments to have a chance to succeed as liposomal vaccines against leishmaniasis.

  8. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  9. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Abe, Madoka; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  10. The application of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Liang; Qin Zenghui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the management and feasibility of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy. Methods: A total of 80 pediatric patients were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in group A received sacral block anesthesia together with basic anesthesia with propofol, while patients in group B received intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Small amount of ketamine as maintaining dose was used in both groups when needed. Results: The interventional management was successfully completed in all patients. A marked decrease in blood pressure occurred in three patients of group A receiving sacral block anesthesia. In group B receiving intravenous anesthesia, a decrease of SpO 2 to below 90 percent was seen in 8 cases, and obvious bradycardia developed in 12 cases. All these patients were treated with intravenous medication or by reducing the dose of propofol. Additional small dose of ketamine was needed in 4 patients during the procedure. Conclusion: Sacral block anesthesia combined with intravenous anesthesia is one of the effective anesthesia management schemes for pediatric interventional therapy. (authors)

  11. [General anesthesia for two patients taking methylphenidate (Ritalin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Takaho; Meno, Aki; Honda, Masahiro; Momoeda, Kanako; Nagase, Masaki; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    We experienced anesthesia care for two patients taking methylphenidate (Ritalin), which is a central nervous system stimulant of amphetamine analogues, usually administered for narcolepsy or refractory depression. The proper dose of methylphenidate is 20-60 mg per day. General anesthesia with epidural anesthesia was administered to both cases for total hip replacement. One patient could discontinue taking methylphenidate five days before the operation, but the other patient could not. Both cases needed more anesthetics than usual on induction, but very stable condition could be maintained during and after the operations. We consider that it is possible to perform general anesthesia safely for patients taking a usual dose of methylphenidate.

  12. Anesthesia for cesarean section in a parturient with acute varicella: Is general anesthesia better than neuraxial anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash R Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of varicella infection during pregnancy is low. However, it is associated with a significant risk of morbidity and mortality, both to the mother and the fetus. The risk for any complication is highest for the mother during the third trimester and pneumonia is the leading cause of maternal mortality. Anesthetic management in these patients depends upon the extent of involvement of the disease, associated complications of varicella, duration of antiviral therapy and natural course if the disease. We present the anesthetic management of a case of cesarean section in a patient with acute varicella infection, and discuss the various concerns regarding the choice of anesthesia.

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  14. The Effectiveness of the Human Patient Simulator in Teaching Anesthesia Pharmacology to First Year Nurse Anesthesia Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Annie

    2002-01-01

    .... There is no substitute for case-based experience; however, recent innovations in computer technology provide high fidelity, realistic simulators, which are being used in many anesthesia programs...

  15. Emergence EEG pattern classification in sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Huang, Cheng; Li, Yongwang; Hight, Darren F; Voss, Logan J; Sleigh, Jamie W; Li, Xiaoli; Bai, Yang

    2018-03-07

    Objective. Significant spectral characteristics of electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns exist in individual patients during re-establishing consciousness after general anesthesia. However, these EEG patterns cannot be quantitatively identified using commercially available depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitors. This study proposed an effective classification method and indices to classify these patterns among patients. Approach. Four types of emergence EEG patterns were identified based on EEG data set from 52patients undergoing sevoflurane general anesthesia from two hospitals. Then, the relative power spectrum density (RPSD) of five frequency sub-bands of clinical interest (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma) were selected for emergence state analysis. Finally, the genetic algorithm support vector machine (GA-SVM) was used to identify the emergence EEG patterns. Performance was reported in terms of sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and accuracy (AC). Main results. The combination of the mean and mode of RPSD in delta and alpha band (P (delta)/P (alpha) performed the best with the GA-SVM classification. AC indices obtained by GA-SVM across the four patterns were 90.64±7.61, 81.79±5.84, 82.14±7.99, and 72.86±11.11 respectively. Furthermore, the emergence time of the patients with EEG emergence pattern I and III increased with the increasing of patients' age. While for the patients with EEG emergence pattern IV, the emergence time positively correlates with the patients' age which less than 50, and negatively correlates with the patients' age which more than 50. Significance. The mean and mode of P (delta)/P (alpha) is a useful index to classify the different emergence EEG patterns. In addition, the EEG emergence patterns may correlate with underlying neural substrate which related with patients' age. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  16. Evaluation of different adjuvants formulations for bluetongue vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Ludmila Branco; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela; Fialho, Sílvia Ligório; Viott, Aline de Marco; Guedes, Roberto Maurício Carvalho; Silva-Cunha, Armando

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the adjuvant potential of W/O/W multiple emulsions and microemulsions, comparing them with traditional aluminum hydroxide and oil-in-water emulsion adjuvants against bluetongue vaccine (BTV). Local inflammatory reactions were assessed in rabbits by measuring the temperature of the animals and the skin thickness at the site of application. Antibodies titers were determined by serum-neutralization test. Histological analyses of lesions at the site of adjuvants applicatio...

  17. Anatomy of an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav J; Tremper, Kevin K; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2011-09-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have become more prevalent as more sophisticated hardware and software have increased usability and reliability. National mandates and incentives have driven adoption as well. AIMS can be developed in one of several software models (Web based, client/server, or incorporated into a medical device). Irrespective of the development model, the best AIMS have a feature set that allows for comprehensive management of workflow for an anesthesiologist. Key features include preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative documentation; quality assurance; billing; compliance and operational reporting; patient and operating room tracking; and integration with hospital electronic medical records. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding...... on the use of premedication, choice of anesthetics, and management of postoperative pain. This review reflects on both general considerations concerning geriatric patients but also on the specific features of perioperatively used drugs and anesthetics that might have an impact on patients with Alzheimer...

  19. Toxicity and allergy to local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A H

    1998-09-01

    Considering the amount of local anesthetic administered on a daily basis, dental professionals must be familiar with the factors that influence the dose and type of local anesthetic that induces a toxic or allergic reaction. In addition to the route and rate of administration, the patient's physical condition and health may also influence the dose of local anesthetic that could be safely administered. This article reviews the different causes of local anesthesia toxicity and allergy. With prevention and early recognition of the warning signs, poor prognosis can be avoided.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Anesthesia in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peivandi Yazdi A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radical and peroxide production lead to intracellular damage. On the other hand, free radicals are used by the human immune system to defend against pathogens. The aging process could be limited by oxidative stress in the short term. Chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM are full-stress conditions in which remarkable metabolic functional destructions might happen. There is strong evidence regarding antioxidant impairment in diabetes. Performing a particular method for anesthesia in diabetic patients might prevent or modify excessive free radical formation and oxidative stress. It seems that prescribing antioxidant drugs could promote wound healing in diabetics.  

  1. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation—Session 2 (Plenary II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    On the 15–17th May 2013, the Fourth International Conference on Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation was organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, and gathered stakeholders from academics and from the industry to discuss several challenges, advances and promises in the field of vaccine adjuvants. Plenary session 2 of the meeting was composed of four different presentations covering: (1) the recent set-up of an adjuvant technology transfer and training platform in Switzerland, (2) the proposition to revisit existing paradigms of modern vaccinology, (3) the properties of polyethyleneimine as potential new vaccine adjuvant, and (4) the progresses in the design of HIV vaccine candidates able to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies. PMID:23966098

  2. Towards an understanding of the adjuvant action of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrack, Philippa; McKee, Amy S.; Munks, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of vaccines depends on the presence of an adjuvant in conjunction with the antigen. Of these adjuvants, the ones that contain aluminium, which were first discovered empirically in 1926, are currently the most widely used. However, a detailed understanding of their mechanism of action has only started to be revealed. In this Timeline article, we briefly describe the initial discovery of aluminium adjuvants and discuss historically important advances. We also summarize recent progress in the field and discuss their implications and the remaining questions on how these adjuvants work. PMID:19247370

  3. Personalized cancer vaccines: adjuvants are important, too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Rammensee, Hans-Georg

    2018-04-11

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines have shown limited clinical efficacy so far. Nevertheless, in the meantime, our understanding of immune cell function and the interactions of immune cells with growing tumors has advanced considerably. We are now in a position to invest this knowledge into the design of more powerful vaccines and therapy combinations aimed at increasing immunogenicity and decreasing tumor-induced immunosuppression. This review focuses essentially on peptide-based human vaccines. We will discuss two aspects that are critical for increasing their intrinsic immunogenicity: the selection of the antigen(s) to be targeted, and the as yet unmet need for strong adjuvants.

  4. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  5. The Effect of Neuraxial Anesthesia on Maternal Cerebral Hemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Ineke R.; van Veen, Teelkien R.; Mears, Scott L.; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Haeri, Sina; Belfort, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neuraxial anesthesia is known to reduce sympathetic tone and mean arterial pressure. Effects on cerebral hemodynamics in pregnancy are not well known. We hypothesize that cerebral hemodynamic parameters will change with respect to baseline following regional analgesia/anesthesia. Study

  6. Recent advances and perspectives in topical oral anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz-Montan, Michelle; Ribeiro, Lígia Nunes de Morais; Volpato, Maria Cristina; Cereda, Cintia Maria Saia; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Tofoli, Giovana Randomille; de Araújo, Daniele Ribeiro; Santi, Patrizia; Padula, Cristina; de Paula, Eneida

    2017-05-01

    Topical anesthesia is widely used in dentistry to reduce pain caused by needle insertion and injection of the anesthetic. However, successful anesthesia is not always achieved using the formulations that are currently commercially available. As a result, local anesthesia is still one of the procedures that is most feared by dental patients. Drug delivery systems (DDSs) provide ways of improving the efficacy of topical agents. Areas covered: An overview of the structure and permeability of oral mucosa is given, followed by a review of DDSs designed for dental topical anesthesia and their related clinical trials. Chemical approaches to enhance permeation and anesthesia efficacy, or to promote superficial anesthesia, include nanostructured carriers (liposomes, cyclodextrins, polymeric nanoparticle systems, solid lipid nanoparticles, and nanostructured lipid carriers) and different pharmaceutical dosage forms (patches, bio- and mucoadhesive systems, and hydrogels). Physical methods include pre-cooling, vibration, iontophoresis, and microneedle arrays. Expert opinion: The combination of different chemical and physical methods is an attractive option for effective topical anesthesia in oral mucosa. This comprehensive review should provide the readers with the most relevant options currently available to assist pain-free dental anesthesia. The findings should be considered for future clinical trials.

  7. Effects of combined general anesthesia and thoracic epidural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Severe postoperative pain is not often experienced in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Anesthesia, surgery, and pain are stressful and cause different reactions in neuro‑immuno‑endocrine systems. Many factors such as the pharmacological effect of the drugs used, as well as the type and depth of anesthesia, ...

  8. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The most common side effect of epidural or spinal anesthesia is hypotension with functional hypovolemia prompting fluid infusions or administration of vasopressors. Short-term studies (20 min) in patients undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia suggest that plasma volume may increase wh...

  9. Anesthesia for subglottic stenosis in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid Essam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Any site in the upper airway can get obstructed and cause noisy breathing as well as dyspnea. These include nasal causes such as choanal atresia or nasal stenosis; pharyngeal causes including lingual thyroid; laryngeal causes such as laryngomalacia; tracheobronchial causes such as tracheal stenosis; and subglottic stenosis. Lesions in the oropharynx may cause stertor, while lesions in the laryngotracheal tree will cause stridor. Subglottic stenosis is the third leading cause of congenital stridors in the neonate. Subglottic Stenosis presents challenges to the anesthesiologist. Therefore, It is imperative to perform a detailed history, physical examination, and characterization of the extent and severity of stenosis. Rigid endoscopy is essential for the preoperative planning of any of the surgical procedures that can be used for correction. Choice of operation is dependent on the surgeon′s comfort, postoperative capabilities, and severity of disease. For high-grade stenosis, single-stage laryngotracheal resection or cricotracheal resection are the best options. It has to be borne in mind that the goal of surgery is to allow for an adequate airway for normal activity without the need for tracheostomy. Anesthesia for airway surgery could be conducted safely with either sevofl uraneor propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia.

  10. Anesthesia during and Immediately after Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, Christoph N.; Price, Catherine; Janelle, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing presence of humans in space and long-duration manned missions to the Moon or Mars pose novel challenges to the delivery of medical care. Even now, cumulative person-days in space exceed 80 years and preparations for a return to the Moon are actively underway. Medical care after an emergent de-orbit or an accident during a non-nominal landing must not only address the specific disease or injuries but also the challenges posed by physiologic adaptations to microgravity. In the highly autonomous situation of a long-term space mission the situation is even more complex, because personnel, equipment, specific training, and clinical experience are by definition limited. To summarize our current knowledge specifically for anesthetic care during and immediately after spaceflight, we will review physiologic adaptations to microgravity with particular emphasis on the resulting anesthetic risks, discuss veterinary experiences with anesthesia in weightlessness or in animals adapted to microgravity, describe current research that pertains to anesthesia and spaceflight and point out unresolved questions for future investigation.

  11. Fibromyalgia: A Primer for the Anesthesia Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Chad M.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Review The present review is intended to give an overview of fibromyalgia for the anesthesiologist. While the basics of the treatment of fibromyalgia are included, the intent is to provide context to discuss the potential implications in perioperative management. Recent Findings One of the most important changes in the last year is the new criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Instead of a combination of self-report and a tender point examination, there is a new self-report questionnaire that is now used diagnose fibromyalgia. This tool incorporates aspects of widespread body pain and some of the known comorbid symptoms. A score of 0-31 is given, which allows for the disease to be viewed as a continuum of sensitivity and symptomatology, instead of as a binary diagnosis. This continuum has been termed “fibromyalgia-ness.” This article also reviews the advances in understanding of the pathophysiology and emerging therapies. Little is known about the impact of fibromyalgia in the perioperative period. Summary The impact of fibromyalgia on anesthesia care is not known. Years of quality research have clearly demonstrated multiple pathophysiologic changes that could impact anesthesia care and future study is needed. PMID:21799404

  12. Intraoperative seizures during craniotomy under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John; Lu, Xiaoying; Thompson, Zoe; Peterson, Gordon W; Losey, Travis E

    2016-05-01

    An acute symptomatic seizure is a clinical seizure occurring at the time of or in close temporal association with a brain insult. We report an acute symptomatic seizure occurring during a surgical procedure in a patient who did not have a prior history of epilepsy and who did not have a lesion associated with an increased risk of epilepsy. To characterize the incidence and clinical features of intraoperative seizures during craniotomy under general anesthesia, we reviewed cases where continuous EEG was acquired during craniotomy. Records of 400 consecutive cases with propofol as general anesthesia during craniotomy were reviewed. Demographic data, indication for surgery, clinical history, history of prior seizures, duration of surgery and duration of burst suppression were recorded. Cases where seizures were observed were analyzed in detail. Two out of 400 patients experienced intraoperative seizures, including one patient who appeared to have an acute symptomatic seizure related to the surgical procedure itself and a second patient who experienced two seizures likely related to an underlying diagnosis of epilepsy. This is the first report of an acute symptomatic seizure secondary to a neurosurgical procedure. Overall, 0.5% of patients monitored experienced seizures, indicating that intraoperative seizures are rare, and EEG monitoring during craniotomies is of low yield in detecting seizures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Total intravenous anesthesia: advantages for intracranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Chad D; Gottfried, Oren N; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Couldwell, William T

    2007-11-01

    Although volatile anesthetics have been widely accepted in anesthetic management for neurosurgery, they reduce vascular resistance, resulting in increased cerebral blood flow and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). In patients with elevated ICP who undergo craniotomy, the increase in ICP during surgery from inhaled anesthetics can make the surgery more difficult, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic cerebral insults. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and analgesic drugs (remifentanil or fentanyl) and excluding simultaneous administration of any inhaled drugs is being used in patients undergoing craniotomy because of its potential to reduce ICP and ease access to the operative site. We reviewed the literature and describe our experience with TIVA, with emphasis on hemodynamic stability, effects on ICP, emergence from anesthesia, extubation times, and return of cognitive function in patients undergoing craniotomy for space-occupying lesions. TIVA with propofol is similar to inhaled anesthetics with regard to hemodynamic stability, emergence times, extubation times, early cognitive function, and adverse events. In several prospective, randomized clinical trials, evidence suggests that ICP is decreased and cerebral perfusion pressure is increased in patients receiving TIVA when compared with those receiving volatile anesthetics during elective craniotomy procedures. The impact of TIVA on ICP, brain swelling, and access to the operative site in patients with severely elevated ICP has yet to be evaluated and is the subject of a future study at our institution.

  14. Anesthesia considerations in the obese gravida.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is associated with serious morbidity during pregnancy, and obese women also are at a high risk of developing complications during labor, leading to an increased risk for instrumental and Cesarean deliveries. The engagement of the obstetrical anesthetist in the management of this group of high-risk patients should be performed antenatally so that an appropriate management strategy can be planned in advance to prevent an adverse outcome. Good communication between all care providers is essential. The obese patient in labor should be encouraged to have a functioning epidural catheter placed early in labor. Apart from providing analgesia and alleviating physiological derangements during labor, the presence of a functioning epidural catheter can also be used to induce anesthesia quickly in the event of an emergency cesarean section, thus avoiding a general anesthesia, which has exceedingly high risks in the obese parturient. Successful management of the obese patient necessitates a comprehensive strategy that encompasses a multidisciplinary and holistic approach from all care-providers.

  15. Realistic and unrealistic direst costs in pharmacoeconomic anesthesia studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiplicity of anesthetic services and practice consume few resources individually, but collectively, they mean significant cost. Economic and pharmacoeconomic studies are done in order to rationalize resources. Aim: 1. To calculate the direct expense in anesthesia and reanimation; 2. To compare expenses to the price of anesthesia according to the unit prices of National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF; 3. To compare the duration of general anesthesia with costs in anesthesia departments. Methodology: This paper is a part of the retrospectively-prospective academic study of fourth phase carried out in the Clinical Center of Serbia. With permission of Ethical committee, we have set for 2005 and 2006, the direct cost of 148.876 anesthetic services in 11 departments of Clinical Center of Serbia as tertiary-type institution of medical health care. Research group included all patients of both sexes, children and adults. We compared the direct cost per minute of general anesthesia with average duration of anesthesia in every anesthesia department of surgical clinics. The direct cost was compared with the same, 'unit' prices of NHIF. The direct cost was compared with the same, 'unit' prices of RHIF. We have used linear and regression statistical product and service solutions model for component cost analysis /SPSS 15/. Results: Most budget resources are selected for the employees' sallaries (40%, then the medicines and supplies (31,80% and the other expenses including the analysis and analytic devices (28,20%. Direct costs indicate a linear correlation and statistically marked difference p=0,012, F=9,270 compared to anesthesia duration indicating the coefficient of correlation r=0,694. Direct costs are highest considering longest segment of anesthesia. We have obtained linear correlation R=0,706 for direct costs excluding the neurosurgical anesthesia with 'unit prices'of anesthesia and anesthetic services indicating F=9,951 and p=0

  16. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botney, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  17. [History of rachianesthesia and epidural anesthesia in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo Rodríguez, Victoria; Rivero Martínez, Ma Dolores; Pérez Albacete, Mariano; López López, Ana I; Maluff Torres, Alejandro

    2007-10-01

    To show the beginning of spinal and epidural anesthesia in our country and the contributions of Spanish urologists. We reviewed books and writings of History of Medicine, Urology and Anesthesia and Doctoral thesis about spinal and epidural anesthesia. In the 20th century, surgeons also gave the anesthetic drugs to the patients. Spinal and epidural anesthesia were used for the first time in 1900. A lot of Spanish urologists like F Rusca Doménech, J.M. Batrina, M. Barragán Bonet, R. Lozano Monzón, L. Guedea Calvo, Gil Vernet, Fidel Pagés Miravé, V Sagarra Lascurain, Gómez Ulla, etc, did research, writings in scientific journals and Doctoral thesis about anesthesia.

  18. Progress in simulation education: developing an anesthesia curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David J

    2014-12-01

    Simulation's role in anesthesia education is expanding to include more advanced skills and training for subspecialty practice. This review will provide an overview of many recent studies that expand the simulation curriculum for anesthesia education. Recent studies describe a curriculum that uses a range of simulation modalities, including part-task trainers, mannequin-based simulation, virtual reality, in-situ techniques, screen-based simulations as well as encounters with 'standardized' patients, nurses or physician colleagues. A variety of studies describe the use of task-training devises to more effectively acquire skills, such as fibre-optic intubation, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia and transthoracic echocardiography as well as expand on a variety of teamwork skills particularly in subspecialty anesthesia practice. A curriculum is emerging that utilizes a variety of simulation modalities as part of a more comprehensive educational strategy for anesthesia specialty training.

  19. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  20. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway: Awake or Deep Anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Heidari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to study the influence of depth of anesthesia (awake or deep anesthesia and choice of anesthetic drug (halothane or propofol on the incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity associated with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA removal. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double blind study was done in 156 ASA physical status I and II patients, aged 18-65 years, who had under gone short time elective surgery (<1 hour. Patients were randomly assigned in one of the four subgroups: Hal-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in awaked state, Hal-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in deep anesthesia, Pro-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in awaked state, and Pro-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in deep anesthesia. The incidence of cough and straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, breathholding, vomiting, oxygen desaturation, and severity of airway hyperreactivity (mild, moderate, severe with LMA removal were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences in bronchospasm, larynchospasm, oxygen desaturation among four subgroups. Significant differences were in cough and straining, breath holding, vomiting, and finally severity of airway hyperreactivity among four subgroups. Depth of anesthesia didn’t have any effect on incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity but in those with propofol, they were lower than those with halothane. Conclusion: In short time surgery and with use of LMA, anesthesia with propofol is associated with lower incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity than halothane. Keywords: propofol, halothane, airway hyperreactivity, Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA.

  1. Memory Loss, Alzheimer's Disease and General Anesthesia: A Preoperative Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Adam; Siry, Read; Cai, Lufan; García, Paul S; Chen, Linda; Liu, Renyu

    2012-02-20

    The long-term cognitive effects of general anesthesia are under intense scrutiny. Here we present 5 cases from 2 academic institutions to analyze some common features where the patient's or the patient family member has made a request to address their concern on memory loss, Alzheimer's disease and general anesthesia before surgery. Records of anesthesia consultation separate from standard preoperative evaluation were retrieved to identify consultations related to memory loss and Alzheimer's disease from the patient and/or patient family members. The identified cases were extensively reviewed for features in common. We used Google® (http://www. google.com/) to identify available online information using "anesthesia memory loss" as a search phrase. Five cases were collected as a specific preoperative consultation related to memory loss, Alzheimer's disease and general anesthesia from two institutions. All of the individuals either had perceived memory impairment after a prior surgical procedure with general anesthesia or had a family member with Alzheimer's disease. They all accessed public media sources to find articles related to anesthesia and memory loss. On May 2 nd , 2011, searching "anesthesia memory loss" in Google yielded 764,000 hits. Only 3 of the 50 Google top hits were from peer-reviewed journals. Some of the lay media postings made a causal association between general anesthesia and memory loss and/or Alzheimer's disease without conclusive scientific literature support. The potential link between memory loss and Alzheimer's disease with general anesthesia is an important preoperative concern from patients and their family members. This concern arises from individuals who have had history of cognitive impairment or have had a family member with Alzheimer disease and have tried to obtain information from public media. Proper preoperative consultation with the awareness of the lay literature can be useful in reducing patient and patient family member

  2. Comparison of the effect of lidocaine adding dexketoprofen and paracetamol in intravenous regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, Ali; Eroglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of dexketoprofen and paracetamol added to the lidocaine in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia in terms of hemodynamic effects, motor and sensorial block onset times, intraoperative VAS values, and analgesia requirements. The files of 73 patients between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA I-II risk group who underwent hand and forearm surgery were analyzed and 60 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group D (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 50 mg/2 mL dexketoprofen trometamol; Group P (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 3 mg/kg paracetamol; Group K (n = 20), 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine. Demographic data, motor and sensorial block times, heart rate, mean blood pressure, VAS values, and intraoperative and postoperative analgesia requirements were recorded. Sensorial and motor block onset durations of Group K were significantly longer than other groups. Motor block termination duration was found to be significantly longer in Group D than in Group K. VAS values of Group K were found higher than other groups. There was no significant difference in VAS values between Group D and Group P. Analgesia requirement was found to be significantly more in Group K than in Group P. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rates and mean arterial pressures. We concluded that the addition of 3 mg/kg paracetamol and 50 mg dexketoprofen to lidocaine as adjuvant in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia applied for hand and/or forearm surgery created a significant difference clinically.

  3. Comparison of the Effect of Lidocaine Adding Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol in Intravenous Regional Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akdogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Comparison of dexketoprofen and paracetamol added to the lidocaine in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia in terms of hemodynamic effects, motor and sensorial block onset times, intraoperative VAS values, and analgesia requirements. Method. The files of 73 patients between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA I-II risk group who underwent hand and forearm surgery were analyzed and 60 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group D (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 50 mg/2 mL dexketoprofen trometamol; Group P (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 3 mg/kg paracetamol; Group K (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine. Demographic data, motor and sensorial block times, heart rate, mean blood pressure, VAS values, and intraoperative and postoperative analgesia requirements were recorded. Results. Sensorial and motor block onset durations of Group K were significantly longer than other groups. Motor block termination duration was found to be significantly longer in Group D than in Group K. VAS values of Group K were found higher than other groups. There was no significant difference in VAS values between Group D and Group P. Analgesia requirement was found to be significantly more in Group K than in Group P. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rates and mean arterial pressures. Conclusion. We concluded that the addition of 3 mg/kg paracetamol and 50 mg dexketoprofen to lidocaine as adjuvant in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia applied for hand and/or forearm surgery created a significant difference clinically.

  4. Dexmedetomidine versus propofol for sedation in patients undergoing vitreoretinal surgery under sub-Tenon′s anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ghali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic, respiratory effects, the recovery profile, surgeons, and patients satisfaction with dexmedetomidine sedation compared with those of propofol sedation in patients undergoing vitreoretinal surgery under sub-Tenon′s anesthesia. Methods: Sixty patients were enrolled in this prospective, single-blind, randomized study. The patients were divided into two groups to receive either dexmedetomidine (group D or propofol (group P. Sedation level was titrated to a Ramsay sedation scale (RSS of 3. Hemodynamic and respiratory effects, postoperative recovery time, analgesic effects, surgeons and patients satisfaction were assessed. Results: Both groups provided a similar significant reduction in heart rate and mean arterial pressure compared with baseline values. The respiratory rate values of the dexmedetomidine group were significantly higher than those in the propofol group. The oxygen saturation values of the dexmedetomidine group were significantly higher than those of the propofol group. The expired CO 2 was similar in both groups. Postoperatively, the time to achieve an Aldrete score of 10 was similar in both groups. Dexmedetomidine patients have significantly lower visual analog scale for pain than propofol patients. The surgeon satisfaction with patients′ sedation was similar for both groups. The patients′ satisfaction was higher in the dexmedetomidine group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at similar sedation levels with propofol was associated with equivalent hemodynamic effects, maintaining an adequate respiratory function, similar time of discharge from PACU, better analgesic properties, similar surgeon′s satisfaction, and higher patient′s satisfaction. Thus, dexmedetomidine may prove to be a valuable adjuvant for sedation in patients undergoing vitreoretinal surgery under sub-Tenon′s anesthesia.

  5. Comparison of Sedation With Local Anesthesia and Regional Anesthesia in Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamohammadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP is usually performed under regional or general anesthesia. An alternative to conventional anesthesia is performing of TURP under local anesthetic infiltration with sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication of sedoanalgesia in TURP. Material & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial from September 2006 to December 2007, 60 patients (30 in each group with prostate hypertrophy, candidate for TURP, were randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group, standard spinal anesthesia was done. In the second group, five minutes before the operation, 25 mgs of diazepam plus 25-50 mgs of pethedine was intravenously administered followed by injection of 10 ml lidocaine 2% gel in the urethra and the skin in the suprapubic area was anesthetized with 2 ml of 1% lidocaine. Using a 22 gauge nephrostomy needle, the suprapubic skin was punctured and the needle was directed toward prostate apex and 10-20ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at the serosal aspect of the rectal wall. For dorsal nerve block, 5-10ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at penopubic junction, and then a standard TURP was performed. Patients were switched to another anesthetic technique if the selected technique failed. Severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results: The average prostate size was 25 grs (range10-50grs in the local anesthetic group (group 1 and 27.5 grs (range 10-50 grs in the spinal group (group2. In the local anesthetic group, 82.3% had no or mild pain while moderate to severe pain was reported in 16, 7% of the patients. In the group with spinal anesthesia, these were 93.1% and 6.9% respectively. Intolerable pain was observed in 23.3% and 13.8% of groups 1 and 2 respectively (p>0.05. Two patients in spinal group and 5 in local anesthetic group (3 due to severe pain and 2 for unsatisfaction required conversion to general anesthesia or receiving

  6. Safety assessment of adjuvanted vaccines: Methodological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Fernanda Tavares; Di Pasquale, Alberta; Yarzabal, Juan P; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants mainly interact with the innate immune response and are used to enhance the quantity and quality of the downstream adaptive immune response to vaccine antigens. Establishing the safety of a new adjuvant-antigen combination is achieved through rigorous evaluation that begins in the laboratory, and that continues throughout the vaccine life-cycle. The strategy for the evaluation of safety pre-licensure is guided by the disease profile, vaccine indication, and target population, and it is also influenced by available regulatory guidelines. In order to allow meaningful interpretation of clinical data, clinical program methodology should be optimized and standardized, making best use of all available data sources. Post-licensure safety activities are directed by field experience accumulated pre- and post-licensure clinical trial data and spontaneous adverse event reports. Continued evolution of safety evaluation processes that keep pace with advances in vaccine technology and updated communication of the benefit-risk profile is necessary to maintain public confidence in vaccines. PMID:26029975

  7. Adjuvant Bidirectional Chemotherapy Using an Intraperitoneal Port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Sugarbaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive surgery (CRS and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC have been established as treatment options for patients with peritoneal metastases or peritoneal mesothelioma. However, this novel treatment strategy remains associated with a large percentage of local-regional treatment failures. These treatment failures are attributed to the inadequacy of HIPEC to maintain a surgical complete response. Management strategies to supplement CRS and HIPEC are indicated. A simplified approach to the intraoperative placement of an intraperitoneal port for adjuvant bidirectional chemotherapy (ABC was devised. Four different chemotherapy treatment plans were utilized depending upon the primary site of the malignancy. Thirty-one consecutive patients with an intraoperative placement of the intraperitoneal port were available for study. The incidence of adverse events that caused an early discontinuation of the bidirectional chemotherapy occurred in 75% of the 8 patients who had an incomplete cytoreduction and in 0% of patients who had a complete cytoreduction. All of the patients who had complete cytoreduction completed at least 5 of the scheduled 6 bidirectional chemotherapy treatments. Adjuvant bidirectional chemotherapy is possible following a major cytoreductive surgical procedure using a simplified method of intraoperative intraperitoneal port placement.

  8. Safety assessment of adjuvanted vaccines: Methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda; Di Pasquale, Alberta; Yarzabal, Juan P; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants mainly interact with the innate immune response and are used to enhance the quantity and quality of the downstream adaptive immune response to vaccine antigens. Establishing the safety of a new adjuvant-antigen combination is achieved through rigorous evaluation that begins in the laboratory, and that continues throughout the vaccine life-cycle. The strategy for the evaluation of safety pre-licensure is guided by the disease profile, vaccine indication, and target population, and it is also influenced by available regulatory guidelines. In order to allow meaningful interpretation of clinical data, clinical program methodology should be optimized and standardized, making best use of all available data sources. Post-licensure safety activities are directed by field experience accumulated pre- and post-licensure clinical trial data and spontaneous adverse event reports. Continued evolution of safety evaluation processes that keep pace with advances in vaccine technology and updated communication of the benefit-risk profile is necessary to maintain public confidence in vaccines.

  9. Vaccine Adjuvants: from 1920 to 2015 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Alberta; Preiss, Scott; Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The concept of stimulating the body’s immune response is the basis underlying vaccination. Vaccines act by initiating the innate immune response and activating antigen presenting cells (APCs), thereby inducing a protective adaptive immune response to a pathogen antigen. Adjuvants are substances added to vaccines to enhance the immunogenicity of highly purified antigens that have insufficient immunostimulatory capabilities, and have been used in human vaccines for more than 90 years. While early adjuvants (aluminum, oil-in-water emulsions) were used empirically, rapidly increasing knowledge on how the immune system interacts with pathogens means that there is increased understanding of the role of adjuvants and how the formulation of modern vaccines can be better tailored towards the desired clinical benefit. Continuing safety evaluation of licensed vaccines containing adjuvants/adjuvant systems suggests that their individual benefit-risk profile remains favorable. Adjuvants contribute to the initiation of the innate immune response induced by antigens; exemplified by inflammatory responses at the injection site, with mostly localized and short-lived effects. Activated effectors (such as APCs) then move to draining lymph nodes where they direct the type, magnitude and quality of the adaptive immune response. Thus, the right match of antigens and adjuvants can potentiate downstream adaptive immune responses, enabling the development of new efficacious vaccines. Many infectious diseases of worldwide significance are not currently preventable by vaccination. Adjuvants are the most advanced new technology in the search for new vaccines against challenging pathogens and for vulnerable populations that respond poorly to traditional vaccines. PMID:26343190

  10. Protein antigen adsorption to the DDA/TDB liposomal adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamborg, Mette; Jorgensen, Lene; Bojsen, Anders Riber

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvant-antigen interactions is important for the future design of efficient and safe subunit vaccines, but remains an analytical challenge. We studied the interactions between three model protein antigens and the clinically tested cationic liposomal adjuvant composed...

  11. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  12. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. Design: A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent treatment of a tooth with one of the techniques, and treatment of the homologous contralateral tooth with the other technique. The treatments consisted of restorations, endodontic procedures and simple extractions. Results: The study series comprised 12 females and 18 males with a mean age of 36.8 years. The 30 subjects underwent a total of 60 anesthetic procedures. Intraosseous and conventional oral anesthesia caused discomfort during administration in 46.3% and 32.1% of the patients, respectively. The latency was 7.1±2.23 minutes for the conventional technique and 0.48±0.32 for intraosseous anesthesia – the difference being statistically significant. The depth of the anesthetic effect was sufficient to allow the patients to tolerate the dental treatments. The duration of the anesthetic effect in soft tissues was 199.3 minutes with the conventional technique versus only 1.6 minutes with intraosseous anesthesia – the difference between the two techniques being statistically significant. Most of the patients (69.7%) preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Conclusions: The described intraosseous anesthetic system is effective, with a much shorter latency than the conventional technique, sufficient duration of anesthesia to perform the required dental treatments, and with a much lesser soft tissue anesthetic effect. Most of the patients preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Key words:Anesthesia, intraosseous, oral anesthesia, infiltrating, mandibular block, Quicksleeper®. PMID

  13. Evaluation of different adjuvants formulations for bluetongue vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Branco Macedo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the adjuvant potential of W/O/W multiple emulsions and microemulsions, comparing them with traditional aluminum hydroxide and oil-in-water emulsion adjuvants against bluetongue vaccine (BTV. Local inflammatory reactions were assessed in rabbits by measuring the temperature of the animals and the skin thickness at the site of application. Antibodies titers were determined by serum-neutralization test. Histological analyses of lesions at the site of adjuvants application were done. Results showed that multiple emulsion and microemulsion maintained their stability even in the presence of complex components and presented adequate characteristics for subcutaneous administration. They were able to induce immune response against BTV, but it was smaller than the traditional adjuvants. Despite microemulsion adjuvant showed lower antibodies titre, it was easier to prepare more stable at 4°C and it was the only one that did not induce any local reaction.

  14. Immune adjuvant activity of the olive, soybean and corn oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Marinho da Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last half of the century, a large amount of substances has been used as immune adjuvant. The immune adjuvant effect of olive, soybean and corn oils in Swiss mice immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus aluminum hydroxide or emulsified in Marcol, soybean, olive or corn oils was evaluated through the OVA-specific antibodies determined by ELISA and Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis. In this work the comparison of the intensity of the immune response was established by the Bayesian analysis. The adjuvant effect of the vegetable oils was shown to be more effective than aluminium hydroxide. Regarding to OVA-specific IgE synthesis, olive oil had the slowest adjuvant effect of the three vegetable oils. Accordingly, olive oil was the most convenient among the vegetable oils to be used as immune adjuvant, since it stimulated a higher production of OVA-specific Ig and lower levels of anti-OVA IgE.

  15. [Quality management in regional anesthesia using the example of a Regional Anesthesia Surveillance System (RASS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stübner, S; Czaplik, M

    2013-02-01

    Regional anesthesia and regional analgesia techniques with or without a continuous catheter are frequently utilized in all areas of modern anesthesiology. There are individual and economic benefits but also risks involved with those techniques. While the incidence of severe complications is rare and preventive action not always possible, the consequences can be detrimental especially with hematoma or abscess formation associated with central neuraxial blocks. Therefore, it is important to create national and international databases with large case numbers utilizing standardized definitions of complications in order to allow realistic risk assessment and early discovery of potential dangers and preventive actions. This article shows the integration of standardized codes from the Regional Anesthesia Surveillance System with a software tool to allow high-quality data acquisition and the building of a foundation for national and international data collection and analysis as well as for feedback of institutional data for individual process optimization as part of a quality management system.

  16. Neuraxial anesthesia after local anesthesia for management of percutaneous vertebroplasty complication during vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Balkarlı

    Full Text Available Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a relatively safe, simple and commonly performed interventional procedure for the management of vertebral compression fractures. However, serious complications are rarely reported in the procedure. Those are pulmonary embolism, severe infection, paraplegia and an occurrence of a new fracture in an adjacent vertebra after vertebroplasty. Acute complications are generally associated with the procedure. We present the case of neuraxial anesthesia, developed after local anesthesia with 8 mL of 2% prilocaine, in a 68-year-old woman who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty after an osteoporotic collapsed fracture in the L1 vertebra due to trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature.

  17. Vaxjo: A Web-Based Vaccine Adjuvant Database and Its Application for Analysis of Vaccine Adjuvants and Their Uses in Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sayers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are compounds that enhance host immune responses to co-administered antigens in vaccines. Vaxjo is a web-based central database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes vaccine adjuvants and their usages in vaccine development. Basic information of a vaccine adjuvant stored in Vaxjo includes adjuvant name, components, structure, appearance, storage, preparation, function, safety, and vaccines that use this adjuvant. Reliable references are curated and cited. Bioinformatics scripts are developed and used to link vaccine adjuvants to different adjuvanted vaccines stored in the general VIOLIN vaccine database. Presently, 103 vaccine adjuvants have been curated in Vaxjo. Among these adjuvants, 98 have been used in 384 vaccines stored in VIOLIN against over 81 pathogens, cancers, or allergies. All these vaccine adjuvants are categorized and analyzed based on adjuvant types, pathogens used, and vaccine types. As a use case study of vaccine adjuvants in infectious disease vaccines, the adjuvants used in Brucella vaccines are specifically analyzed. A user-friendly web query and visualization interface is developed for interactive vaccine adjuvant search. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine adjuvants is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO in the Web Ontology Language (OWL format.

  18. Mechanism of immunopotentiation and safety of aluminum adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm eHogenEsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-containing adjuvants are widely used in preventive vaccines against infectious diseases and in preparations for allergy immunotherapy. The mechanism by which they enhance the immune response remains poorly understood. Aluminum adjuvants selectively stimulate a Th2 immune response upon injection of mice and a mixed response in human beings. They support activation of CD8 T cells, but these cells do not undergo terminal differentiation to cytotoxic T cells. Adsorption of antigens to aluminum adjuvants enhances the immune response by facilitating phagocytosis and slowing the diffusion of antigens from the injection site which allows time for inflammatory cells to accumulate. The adsorptive strength is important as high affinity interactions interfere with the immune response. Adsorption can also affect the physical and chemical stability of antigens. Aluminum adjuvants activate dendritic cells via direct and indirect mechanisms. Phagocytosis of aluminum adjuvants followed by disruption of the phagolysosome activates NLRP3-inflammasomes resulting in the release of active IL-1β and IL-18. Aluminum adjuvants also activate dendritic cells by binding to membrane lipid rafts. Injection of aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines causes the release of uric acid, DNA and ATP from damaged cells which in turn activate dendritic cells. The use of aluminum adjuvant is limited by weak stimulation of cell-mediated immunity. This can be enhanced by addition of other immunomodulatory molecules. Adsorption of these molecules is determined by the same mechanisms that control adsorption of antigens and can affect the efficacy of such combination adjuvants. The widespread use of aluminum adjuvants can be attributed in part to the excellent safety record based on a 70-year history of use. They cause local inflammation at the injection site, but also reduce the severity of systemic and local reactions by binding biologically active molecules in vaccines.

  19. Behavior Assessment in Children Following Hospital-Based General Anesthesia versus Office-Based General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaQuia A. Vinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. This retrospective study examined records of a pediatric dental office over a 4 year period. Patients presenting before 48 months of age for an initial exam who were diagnosed with early childhood caries were included in the study. Following an initial exam, patients were treated under HBGA or OBGA. Patients were followed to determine their behavior at 6-, 12- and 18-month recall appointments. Fifty-four patients received treatment under HBGA and 26 were treated under OBGA. OBGA patients were significantly more likely to exhibit positive behavior at the 6- and 12-month recall visits p = 0.038 & p = 0.029. Clinicians should consider future behavior when determining general anesthesia treatment modalities in children with early childhood caries presenting to their office.

  20. Photobiomodulation: Implications for Anesthesia and Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Roberta T; Armati, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    This review examines the evidence of neural inhibition as a mechanism underlying pain relief and anesthetic effect of photobiomodulation (PBM). PBM for pain relief has also been used for more than 30 years; however, the mechanism of its effectiveness has not been well understood. We review electrophysiological studies in humans and animal models and cell culture studies to examine neural responses to PBM. Evidence shows that PBM can inhibit nerve function in vivo, in situ, ex vivo, and in culture. Animal studies using noxious stimuli indicate nociceptor-specific inhibition with other studies providing direct evidence of local conduction block, leading to inhibited translation of pain centrally. Evidence of PBM-disrupted neuronal physiology affecting axonal flow, cytoskeleton organization, and decreased ATP is also presented. PBM changes are reversible with no side effects or nerve damage. This review provides strong evidence in neuroscience identifying inhibition of neural function as a mechanism for the clinical application of PBM in pain and anesthesia.

  1. Recent advances in neuromuscular block during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Martijn; Martini, Christian; Dahan, Albert

    2018-01-01

    Muscle relaxation is a routine part of anesthesia and has important advantages. However, the lingering effects of muscle relaxants in the postoperative period have historically been associated with postoperative adverse events. Neuromuscular reversal, together with neuromuscular monitoring, is a recognized strategy to reduce the rate of postoperative residual relaxation but has only marginally improved outcome in the past few decades. Sugammadex, a novel reversal agent with unique encapsulating properties, has changed the landscape of neuromuscular reversal and opened up new opportunities to improve patient care. By quickly and completely reversing any depth of neuromuscular block, it may reduce the rate of residual relaxation and improve respiratory recovery. In addition, sugammadex has made the use of deep neuromuscular block possible during surgery. Deep neuromuscular block may improve surgical working conditions and allow for a reduction in insufflation pressures during selected laparoscopic procedures. However, whether and how this may impact outcomes is not well established.

  2. Anesthesia in pregnancy with heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Luthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pregnant women with heart disease remains challenging due to the advancement of innovations in cardiac surgery and correction of complex cardiac anomalies, and more recently, with the successful performance of heart transplants, cardiac diseases are not only likely to coexist with pregnancy, but will also increase in frequency over the years to come. In developing countries with a higher prevalence of rheumatic fever, cardiac disease may complicate as many as 5.9% of pregnancies with a high incidence of maternal death. Since many of these deaths occur during or immediately following parturition, heart disease is of special importance to the anesthesiologist. This importance arises from the fact that drugs used for preventing or relieving pain during labor and delivery exert a major influence – for better or for worse – on the prognosis of the mother and newborn. Properly administered anesthesia and analgesia can contribute to the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  3. Colonoscopic polypectomy of colorectal polyps in children under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Heng; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Lin, Wei-Ching; Wu, Shu-Fen; Chen, An-Chyi

    2009-02-01

    In many countries, general anesthesia is not routinely used for colonoscopic polypectomy in children because of either feasibility or cost-effectiveness issues. However, we have been using general anesthesia for colonoscopic polypectomy in pediatric patients in our hospital for the past 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of the procedure and the degree of satisfaction that the patients' parents and endoscopists had with the use of general anesthesia. We retrospectively analyzed the results of colonoscopic polypectomies under general anesthesia in 18 patients performed between January 2001 and December 2005. The removed polyps were examined histologically and the patients were observed to assess complications during the first 24-hour postoperative period. The patients' parents' and endoscopists' satisfaction with the use of general anesthesia was surveyed after the procedure. In our patient group, there were 10 boys and eight girls. The mean age was 5.5 +/- 3.4 years (range, 2-15 years). Seventeen of the 18 patients had rectal bleeding (mean duration, 3.7 months) as the main symptom. There were 12 patients with juvenile polyps, four with hyperplastic polyps, one with juvenile polyposis and one with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The majority (70.6%) of the polyps were located in the rectosigmoid colon. No significant complications related to colonoscopic polypectomy or anesthesia were observed. Satisfaction among parents and endoscopists ranged from good to excellent. General anesthesia is recommended for pediatric patients undergoing colonoscopic polypectomy.

  4. Colonoscopic Polypectomy of Colorectal Polyps in Children Under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Heng Lin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, general anesthesia is not routinely used for colonoscopic polypectomy in children because of either feasibility or cost-effectiveness issues. However, we have been using general anesthesia for colonoscopic polypectomy in pediatric patients in our hospital for the past 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of the procedure and the degree of satisfaction that the patients' parents and endoscopists had with the use of general anesthesia. We retrospectively analyzed the results of colonoscopic polypectomies under general anesthesia in 18 patients performed between January 2001 and December 2005. The removed polyps were examined histologically and the patients were observed to assess complications during the first 24-hour postoperative period. The patients' parents' and endoscopists' satisfaction with the use of general anesthesia was surveyed after the procedure. In our patient group, there were 10 boys and eight girls. The mean age was 5.5 ± 3.4 years (range, 2–15 years. Seventeen of the 18 patients had rectal bleeding (mean duration, 3.7 months as the main symptom. There were 12 patients with juvenile polyps, four with hyperplastic polyps, one with juvenile polyposis and one with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. The majority (70.6% of the polyps were located in the rectosigmoid colon. No significant complications related to colonoscopic polypectomy or anesthesia were observed. Satisfaction among parents and endoscopists ranged from good to excellent. General anesthesia is recommended for pediatric patients undergoing colonoscopic polypectomy.

  5. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli; Valentin, Niels; Wagner, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics during the 1950s initiated a combination of clinical development and technical innovations. Blood gas analyses technology and interpretation in combination with improved positive pressure ventilators were developed in Scandinavia contributing to general and pediatric anesthesia and intensive care practice. Scandinavian specialist training and accreditation includes both anesthesia and intensive care. Although pediatric anesthesia/intensive care is not a separate specialty, an 'informal accreditation' for a specialist position is obtained after training. The pleasure of working in a relatively small group of devoted colleagues and staff has persisted from the pioneering years. It is still one of the most inspiring and pleasant gifts for those working in this demanding specialty. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Total spinal anesthesia in an achondroplasic patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri H R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total spinal anesthesia is a complication of lumbar epidural anesthesia following undiagnosed subarachnoid or subdural injection of local anesthetic. Although many achondroplastic dwarfs have a normal spine, catheter insertion may be more problematic with a narrow epidural space making a subarachnoid tap more probable.  Other malformations associated with achondroplasia, such as prolapsed intervertebral discs, reduced interpedicular distance, shortened pedicles, and osteophyte formation, combined with a narrow epidural space may make identification of the space difficult and increases the risk of dural puncture. Furthermore, subarachnoid tap or dural puncture may be hard to recognize if a free flow of CSF is difficult to achieve due spinal stenosis. Yet, for those who meet the criteria, epidural regional anesthesia is frequently preferred over other forms, which often have more or more dangerous side effects in this type of patient.Case report: A 22-year-old achondroplastic male dwarf patient was scheduled for pelvic mass resection and was considered a candidate for continuous epidural anesthesia. The anesthesia became complicated by total spinal anesthesia, which was reversed following supportive management for about two hours.Conclusion: There is significant debate over the composition and volume of the test dose, especially for patients with achondroplasia. We nevertheless recommend repeated test-doses during the accomplishment of epidural anesthesia to exclude unintended intravascular, intrathecal or subdural injection, keeping in mind that a test dose of local anesthetic does not completely prevent complications.

  7. [Rocuronium anesthesia induced anaphylactic shock: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Min; Zong, Ya-nan; Lu, Jian; Ma, Lu-lin; Zheng, Qing; Guo, Xiang-yang

    2015-10-18

    Anaphylaxis is an acute and fatal systemic allergic reaction to an allergen, and it could be an unpredictable and life-threatening cause during anesthesia. The main purpose of this paper is to report a case of anaphylactic shock during the anesthesia induction and to review the prophylaxis and treatment of anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactoid reactions during the anesthesia period. A 63-year-old man, with a mass on his adrenal, was scheduled to a laparoscopic adrenal tumor excision. During the anesthesia induction period, after administrated sulfentanil, propofol and rocuronium, the blood pressure was decreased and the heart rate was increased. Then, the patient had rash on his whole body and developed an anaphylactic shock. After being treated with the anti-allergic agents and norepinephrine, the rash disappeared and the vital sign become stable. The patient felt nothing uncomfortable during the two weeks'follow-up. Anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactoid reactions are not rare during the anesthesia period. The most common inducements are muscle relaxant, latex and antibiotics. Anaphylactic reactions in the perioperative period are often serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, involving multiple organ systems in which the clinical manifestations are the consequence of the release of preformed mediators from mast cells and basophils. Before anesthesia, we should acquire the allergic history. During the anesthesia period, the vital sign and the skin should be observed carefully.

  8. A holistic view of anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clausen NG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Clausen, Tom G Hansen Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Introduction: Animal studies (including in nonhuman primates have shown that most general anesthetics cause enhanced neuroapoptosis in the immature brain with subsequent long-term neurocognitive deficits later in life. Whether human neurons are equally affected is yet unknown, but a final answer to this issue is still pending. To date, most human studies within the field are of observational nature and the results are conflicting. Some studies indicate an association between exposure to anesthesia and surgery while others do not. Objective: This review summarizes results from preclinical and observational studies. Controversies and challenges regarding the interpretation of these results are presented. Crucial aspects of neurocognitive safety during pediatric anesthesia and surgery are highlighted. International initiatives aiming to improve the safe conductance of pediatric anesthesia are introduced. Conclusion: So far, anesthesia-related neurotoxicity in humans remains an area of concern but it cannot be completely excluded. Clinical practice should not be changed until there are definite proofs that anesthetic exposure causes neurocognitive impairment later in life. Withholding necessary and timely surgeries as a consequence of any such concerns could result in worse harm. Focus of current research should also be redirected to include other factors, than merely anesthetics and surgery, that influence the neurocognitive safety of children perioperatively. Keywords: pediatric anesthesia, neurotoxicity, anesthesia safety, neurocognitive development 

  9. Utilization of Smartphone Applications by Anesthesia Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Green

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care-related apps provide valuable facts and have added a new dimension to knowledge sharing. The purpose of this study is to understand the pattern of utilization of mobile apps specifically created for anesthesia providers. Smartphone app stores were searched, and a survey was sent to 416 anesthesia providers at 136 anesthesiology residency programs querying specific facets of application use. Among respondents, 11.4% never used, 12.4% used less than once per month, 6.0% used once per month, 12.1% used 2-3 times per month, 13.6% used once per week, 21% used 2-3 times per week, and 23.5% used daily. Dosage/pharmaceutical apps were rated the highest as most useful. 24.6% of the participants would pay less than $2.00, 25.1% would pay $5.00, 30.3% would pay $5–$10.00, 9.6% would pay $10–$25.00, 5.1% would pay $25–$50.00, and 5.1% would pay more than $50.00 if an app saves 5–10 minutes per day or 30 minutes/week. The use of mobile phone apps is not limited to reiterating information from textbooks but provides opportunities to further the ever-changing field of anesthesiology. Our survey illustrates the convenience of apps for health care professionals. Providers must exercise caution when selecting apps to ensure best evidence-based medicine.

  10. Effect of Injection Pressure of Infiltration Anesthesia to the Jawbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    To obtain effective infiltration anesthesia in the jawbone, high concentrations of local anesthetic are needed. However, to reduce pain experienced by patients during local anesthetic administration, low-pressure injection is recommended for subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia. Currently, there are no studies regarding the effect of injection pressure on infiltration anesthesia, and a standard injection pressure has not been clearly determined. Hence, the effect of injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia on local anesthetic infiltration to the jawbone was considered by directly measuring lidocaine concentration in the jawbone. Japanese white male rabbits were used as test animals. After inducing general anesthesia with oxygen and sevoflurane, cannulation to the femoral artery was performed and arterial pressure was continuously recorded. Subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia was performed by injecting 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1/80,000 adrenaline, and injection pressure was monitored by a pressure transducer for 40 seconds. After specified time intervals (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), jawbone and blood samples were collected, and the concentration of lidocaine at each time interval was measured. The mean injection pressure was divided into 4 groups (100 ± 50 mm Hg, 200 ± 50 mm Hg, 300 ± 50 mm Hg, and 400 ± 50 mm Hg), and comparison statistical analysis between these 4 groups was performed. No significant change in blood pressure during infiltration anesthesia was observed in any of the 4 groups. Lidocaine concentration in the blood and jawbone were highest 10 minutes after the infiltration anesthesia in all 4 groups and decreased thereafter. Lidocaine concentration in the jawbone increased as injection pressure increased, while serum lidocaine concentration was significantly lower. This suggests that when injection pressure of subperiosteal infiltration anesthesia is low, infiltration of local anesthetic to the jawbone may

  11. Lack of effect of spinal anesthesia on drug metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, E.; Wood, A.J.; Shay, S.; Wood, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of spinal anesthesia on drug disposition was determined in six dogs with chronically implanted vascular catheters using propranolol as a model compound. On the first study day, 40 mg of unlabeled propranolol and 200 microCi of [3H]propranolol were injected into the portal and femoral veins respectively. Arterial blood samples were taken for 4 hr for measurement of plasma concentrations of labeled and unlabeled propranolol by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and of [3H]propranolol by liquid scintillation counting of the HPLC eluant corresponding to each propranolol peak. Twenty-four hr later, spinal anesthesia was induced with tetracaine (mean dose 20.7 +/- 0.6 mg) with low sacral to midthoracic levels and the propranolol infusions and sampling were then repeated. Spinal anesthesia had no significant effect on either the intrinsic clearance of propranolol (2.01 +/- 0.75 L/min before and 1.9 +/- 0.7 L/min during spinal anesthesia), or on mean hepatic plasma flow (2.01 +/- 0.5 L/min before and 1.93 +/- 0.5 L/min during spinal anesthesia). The systemic clearance and elimination half-life of propranolol were also unchanged by spinal anesthesia (0.9 +/- 0.23 L/min on the first day, 0.7 +/- 0.1 L/min during spinal anesthesia; and 101 +/- 21 min on the first day, 115 +/- 16 min during spinal anesthesia, respectively). The volume of distribution (Vd) of propranolol was similarly unaffected by spinal anesthesia

  12. Future considerations for pharmacologic adjuvants in single-injection peripheral nerve blocks for patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian A; Murinson, Beth B; Grable, Benjamin R; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    As the epidemics of obesity and diabetes expand, there are more patients with these disorders requiring elective surgery. For surgery on the extremities, peripheral nerve blocks have become a highly favorable anesthetic option when compared with general anesthesia. Peripheral blocks reduce respiratory and cardiac stresses, while potentially mitigating untreated peripheral pain that can foster physiologic conditions that increase risks for general health complications. However, local anesthetics are generally accepted to be a rare but possible cause of nerve damage, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for dosing local anesthetic nerve blocks in patients with diabetes. This is important because anesthesiologists do not want to potentially accelerate peripheral nerve dysfunction in diabetic patients at risk. This translational vignette (i) examines laboratory models of diabetes, (ii) summarizes the pharmacology of perineural adjuvants (epinephrine, clonidine, buprenorphine, midazolam, tramadol, and dexamethasone), and (iii) identifies areas that warrant further research to determine viability of monotherapy or combination therapy for peripheral nerve analgesia in diabetic patients. Conceivably, future translational research regarding peripheral nerve blocks in diabetic patients may logically include study of nontoxic injectable analgesic adjuvants, in combination, to provide desired analgesia, while possibly avoiding peripheral nerve toxicity that diabetic animal models have exhibited when exposed to traditional local anesthetics.

  13. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services furnished...

  14. 42 CFR 414.46 - Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.46 Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services. (a... each anesthesia code that reflects all activities other than anesthesia time. These activities include...

  15. Caffeine accelerates recovery from general anesthesia via multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Robert; Khokhar, Suhail; Chowdhury, Atif N; Xie, Kelvin G; Wong, Josiah Hiu-Yuen; Fox, Aaron P; Xie, Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Various studies have explored different ways to speed emergence from anesthesia. Previously, we have shown that three drugs that elevate intracellular cAMP (forskolin, theophylline, and caffeine) accelerate emergence from anesthesia in rats. However, our earlier studies left two main questions unanswered. First, were cAMP-elevating drugs effective at all anesthetic concentrations? Second, given that caffeine was the most effective of the drugs tested, why was caffeine more effective than forskolin since both drugs elevate cAMP? In our current study, emergence time from anesthesia was measured in adult rats exposed to 3% isoflurane for 60 min. Caffeine dramatically accelerated emergence from anesthesia, even at the high level of anesthetic employed. Caffeine has multiple actions including blockade of adenosine receptors. We show that the selective A 2a adenosine receptor antagonist preladenant or the intracellular cAMP ([cAMP] i )-elevating drug forskolin, accelerated recovery from anesthesia. When preladenant and forskolin were tested together, the effect on anesthesia recovery time was additive indicating that these drugs operate via different pathways. Furthermore, the combination of preladenant and forskolin was about as effective as caffeine suggesting that both A 2A receptor blockade and [cAMP] i elevation play a role in caffeine's ability to accelerate emergence from anesthesia. Because anesthesia in rodents is thought to be similar to that in humans, these results suggest that caffeine might allow for rapid and uniform emergence from general anesthesia in humans at all anesthetic concentrations and that both the elevation of [cAMP] i and adenosine receptor blockade play a role in this response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Currently, there is no method to accelerate emergence from anesthesia. Patients "wake" when they clear the anesthetic from their systems. Previously, we have shown that caffeine can accelerate emergence from anesthesia. In this study, we show that

  16. Pediatric anesthesia and neurotoxicity. What the radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Katherine; Nickerson, Joshua P.; Higgins, Timothy; Williams, Robert K.

    2018-01-01

    The use of cross-sectional imaging in the pediatric population continues to rise, particularly the use of MRI. Limiting motion artifact requires cooperative subjects who do not move during imaging, so there has been an increase in the need for pediatric sedation or anesthesia. Over the last decade, concern has increased that exposure to anesthesia might be associated with long-term cognitive deficits. In this review we report current understanding of the effects of anesthesia on the pediatric population, with special focus on long-term developmental and cognitive outcomes, and suggest how radiologists can use new technologies or imaging strategies to mitigate or minimize these potential risks. (orig.)

  17. Effects of leucovorin and methylcobalamin with N2O anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Y.; Sakamoto, S.; Sakuraya, K.; Kubota, T.; Taguchi, H.; Miura, Y.; Takaku, F.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the deoxyuridine suppression test, a good marker for defining biochemical megaloblastosis caused by deficiency of folate and vitamin B 12 , became abnormal (> 10%) after 6 hours of administration of nitrous oxide anesthesia. 5-Formyltetrahydrofolate and methylcobalamin administration during nitrous oxide anesthesia have no remarkable effect on the correction of deoxyuridine suppression test values. On the other hand, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate and methylcobalamin administrated at the end of nitrous oxide anesthesia corrected the abnormal deoxyuridine suppression test values nearly to normal range within 1 hour. 19 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  18. Controversies in Anesthesia for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brett J; Levine, Adam

    2017-11-01

    The future of office-based anesthesia for oral and maxillofacial surgery is at risk. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons have been on the forefront of providing safe and effective outpatient anesthesia for decades. Recent changes in Medicare policies have had, and will continue to have, a significant effect on the training of oral and maxillofacial surgery residents regarding anesthesia. The outcome of these changes can have a major effect on the specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery and a cornerstone of the profession. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implicit memory for stimuli presented during inhalation anesthesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalff, A C; Bonke, B; Wolters, G; Manger, F W

    1995-10-01

    During general inhalation anesthesia, neutral phrases including either the color blue or yellow combined with one of two objects, ball or kite, were repeatedly presented to 36 children undergoing eye surgery. Postoperative testing with a coloring and two-choice task was performed to detect preferences for the colors and objects presented under anesthesia. No preference attributable to implicit memory could be demonstrated, and there was no explicit recollection of intraoperative events. Memory of intraoperative events occurring during inhalation anesthesia was not demonstrated with the present methodology in young children.

  20. Complications of local anesthesia used in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David R; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R; McAndrews, James P

    2011-08-01

    Local anesthetics are used routinely in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Local anesthetics are safe and effective drugs but do have risks that practitioners need to be aware of. This article reviews the complications of local anesthesia. A brief history is provided and the regional and systemic complications that can arise from using local anesthesia are discussed. These complications include paresthesia, ocular complications, allergies, toxicity, and methemoglobinemia. Understanding the risks involved with local anesthesia decreases the chances of adverse events occurring and ultimately leads to improved patient care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance...... with the protocol. The patient cohort has been followed continuously without loss of any patient, and a final statistical analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis after more than 5 years; this included a subgroup analysis of perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative infectious complications...... infectious complications (n = 170; HR 0.6 (95 per cent c.i. 0.4 to 0.9), P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis of patients who had a curative resection, including Dukes' stage, age, gender, tumour location, blood transfusion, postoperative infectious complications and treatment, ranitidine still had...

  2. Adjuvant bisphosphonates in early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadji, P; Coleman, R E; Wilson, C

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have been studied in randomised trials in early breast cancer to investigate their ability to prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) and reduce the risk of disease recurrence and metastasis. Treatment benefits have been reported but bisphosphonates do not currently have...... regulatory approval for either of these potential indications. This consensus paper provides a review of the evidence and offers guidance to breast cancer clinicians on the use of bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Using the nominal group methodology for consensus, a systematic review of the literature...... was augmented by a workshop held in October 2014 for breast cancer and bone specialists to present and debate the available pre-clinical and clinical evidence for the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates. This was followed by a questionnaire to all members of the writing committee to identify areas of consensus...

  3. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    infectious complications (n = 170; HR 0.6 (95 per cent c.i. 0.4 to 0.9), P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis of patients who had a curative resection, including Dukes' stage, age, gender, tumour location, blood transfusion, postoperative infectious complications and treatment, ranitidine still had......: Patients scheduled for elective resection of primary tumours were consecutively included in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study designed to evaluate the effect of ranitidine on survival. Before skin incision ranitidine 100 mg or placebo was given intravenously twice daily followed...... by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance...

  4. Opioid adjuvant strategy: improving opioid effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesics continue to be the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment of moderate to severe pain. Many patients, particularly those suffering from chronic pain, require chronic high-dose analgesic therapy. Achieving clinical efficacy and tolerability of such treatment regimens is hampered by the appearance of opioid-induced side effects such as tolerance, hyperalgesia and withdrawal syndrome. Among the therapeutic options to improve the opioid effectiveness, this current review focuses on strategies combining opioids to other drugs that can modulate opioid-mediated effects. We will discuss about experimental evidences reported for several potential opioid adjuvants, including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, 5-HT7 agonists, sigma-1 antagonists, I2-R ligands, cholecystokinin antagonists, neuropeptide FF-R antagonists and toll-like receptor 4 antagonists.

  5. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  6. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byeong Cheol; Kim, Seong Min; Jung, Dong Keun; Kim, Gi Ryon; Lee, He Jeong; Jeon, Gye Rock

    2005-01-01

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, ΔPTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, ΔPTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  7. Dexamethasone as an adjuvant to peripheral nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehora, Carolyne; Pearson, Annabel Me; Kaushal, Alka; Crawford, Mark W; Johnston, Bradley

    2017-11-09

    Peripheral nerve block (infiltration of local anaesthetic around a nerve) is used for anaesthesia or analgesia. A limitation to its use for postoperative analgesia is that the analgesic effect lasts only a few hours, after which moderate to severe pain at the surgical site may result in the need for alternative analgesic therapy. Several adjuvants have been used to prolong the analgesic duration of peripheral nerve block, including perineural or intravenous dexamethasone. To evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of perineural dexamethasone versus placebo, intravenous dexamethasone versus placebo, and perineural dexamethasone versus intravenous dexamethasone when added to peripheral nerve block for postoperative pain control in people undergoing surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, DARE, Web of Science and Scopus from inception to 25 April 2017. We also searched trial registry databases, Google Scholar and meeting abstracts from the American Society of Anesthesiologists, the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia, and the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing perineural dexamethasone with placebo, intravenous dexamethasone with placebo, or perineural dexamethasone with intravenous dexamethasone in participants receiving peripheral nerve block for upper or lower limb surgery. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 35 trials of 2702 participants aged 15 to 78 years; 33 studies enrolled participants undergoing upper limb surgery and two undergoing lower limb surgery. Risk of bias was low in 13 studies and high/unclear in 22. Perineural dexamethasone versus placeboDuration of sensory block was significantly longer in the perineural dexamethasone group compared with placebo (mean difference (MD) 6.70 hours, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.54 to 7.85; participants1625

  8. Involvement of gamma interferon in antibody enhancement by adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odean, M J; Frane, C M; Van derVieren, M; Tomai, M A; Johnson, A G

    1990-02-01

    In a previous study the adjuvant action of a monophosphoryl lipid A, a nontoxic derivative of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was found to be negated by a monoclonal anti-gamma interferon (anti-IFN-gamma) antibody. The present investigation centered on three other adjuvants of diverse microbial origins, testing for their capacity to affect the release of IFN-gamma as an explanation for their antibody-enhancing action. The adjuvant action of each of the three, a wild-type LPS, synthetic poly(A)-poly(U) complexes, and a synthetic muramyl dipeptide, n-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-glutaminyl-n-butyl ester (murabutide), was transferable by adjuvant-stimulated T cells to normal spleen cells on coculture. Supernatant fluids from these T cells contained increased levels of IFN-gamma. Addition of a monoclonal anti-IFN-gamma antibody to adjuvant-stimulated spleen cell cultures reduced the adjuvant action by approximately one-half. Removal of natural killer cells from spleen cell populations prior to culture with antigen had no effect on the enhancement induced by LPS and monophosphoryl lipid A. It was concluded that the enhancement induced by the adjuvants LPS, poly(A)-poly(U), and murabutide is mediated in part by their action on T cells resulting in release of IFN-gamma suggesting activation of a common transmembrane signal.

  9. AS03- and MF59-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccines in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Amanda L.; Kazmin, Dmitri; Napolitani, Giorgio; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A.; Pulendran, Bali; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory disease leading to hospitalization in young children. However, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) have been shown to be ineffective and poorly immunogenic in this population. The development of live-attenuated influenza vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines are important advances in the prevention of influenza in young children. The oil-in-water emulsions MF59 and adjuvant systems 03 (AS03) have been used as adjuvants in both seasonal adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines (ATIVs) and pandemic monovalent influenza vaccines. Compared with non-adjuvanted vaccine responses, these vaccines induce a more robust and persistent antibody response for both homologous and heterologous influenza strains in infants and young children. Evidence of a significant improvement in vaccine efficacy with these adjuvanted vaccines resulted in the use of the monovalent (A/H1N1) AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in children in the 2009 influenza pandemic and the licensure of the seasonal MF59 ATIV for children aged 6 months to 2 years in Canada. The mechanism of action of MF59 and AS03 remains unclear. Adjuvants such as MF59 induce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, but independently of type-1 interferon. This proinflammatory response is associated with improved recruitment, activation and maturation of antigen presenting cells at the injection site. In young children MF59 ATIV produced more homogenous and robust transcriptional responses, more similar to adult-like patterns, than did TIV. Early gene signatures characteristic of the innate immune response, which correlated with antibody titers were also identified. Differences were detected when comparing child and adult responses including opposite trends in gene set enrichment at day 3 postvaccination and, unlike adult data, a lack of correlation between magnitude of plasmablast response at day 7 and antibody titers at day 28 in children. These insights show the utility

  10. AS03- and MF59-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccines in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Wilkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of respiratory disease leading to hospitalization in young children. However, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs have been shown to be ineffective and poorly immunogenic in this population. The development of live-attenuated influenza vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines are important advances in the prevention of influenza in young children. The oil-in-water emulsions MF59 and adjuvant systems 03 (AS03 have been used as adjuvants in both seasonal adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines (ATIVs and pandemic monovalent influenza vaccines. Compared with non-adjuvanted vaccine responses, these vaccines induce a more robust and persistent antibody response for both homologous and heterologous influenza strains in infants and young children. Evidence of a significant improvement in vaccine efficacy with these adjuvanted vaccines resulted in the use of the monovalent (A/H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in children in the 2009 influenza pandemic and the licensure of the seasonal MF59 ATIV for children aged 6 months to 2 years in Canada. The mechanism of action of MF59 and AS03 remains unclear. Adjuvants such as MF59 induce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, but independently of type-1 interferon. This proinflammatory response is associated with improved recruitment, activation and maturation of antigen presenting cells at the injection site. In young children MF59 ATIV produced more homogenous and robust transcriptional responses, more similar to adult-like patterns, than did TIV. Early gene signatures characteristic of the innate immune response, which correlated with antibody titers were also identified. Differences were detected when comparing child and adult responses including opposite trends in gene set enrichment at day 3 postvaccination and, unlike adult data, a lack of correlation between magnitude of plasmablast response at day 7 and antibody titers at day 28 in children. These insights

  11. AS03- and MF59-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccines in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Amanda L; Kazmin, Dmitri; Napolitani, Giorgio; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Pulendran, Bali; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory disease leading to hospitalization in young children. However, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) have been shown to be ineffective and poorly immunogenic in this population. The development of live-attenuated influenza vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines are important advances in the prevention of influenza in young children. The oil-in-water emulsions MF59 and adjuvant systems 03 (AS03) have been used as adjuvants in both seasonal adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines (ATIVs) and pandemic monovalent influenza vaccines. Compared with non-adjuvanted vaccine responses, these vaccines induce a more robust and persistent antibody response for both homologous and heterologous influenza strains in infants and young children. Evidence of a significant improvement in vaccine efficacy with these adjuvanted vaccines resulted in the use of the monovalent (A/H1N1) AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in children in the 2009 influenza pandemic and the licensure of the seasonal MF59 ATIV for children aged 6 months to 2 years in Canada. The mechanism of action of MF59 and AS03 remains unclear. Adjuvants such as MF59 induce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, but independently of type-1 interferon. This proinflammatory response is associated with improved recruitment, activation and maturation of antigen presenting cells at the injection site. In young children MF59 ATIV produced more homogenous and robust transcriptional responses, more similar to adult-like patterns, than did TIV. Early gene signatures characteristic of the innate immune response, which correlated with antibody titers were also identified. Differences were detected when comparing child and adult responses including opposite trends in gene set enrichment at day 3 postvaccination and, unlike adult data, a lack of correlation between magnitude of plasmablast response at day 7 and antibody titers at day 28 in children. These insights show the utility

  12. Adjuvant radiation for vulvar carcinoma: improved local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faul, Clare M.; Mirmow, Dwight; Huang Qingshon; Gerszten, Kristina; Day, Roger; Jones, Mirka W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a significant problem following primary surgery for advanced vulva carcinoma. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of adjuvant vulvar radiation on local control in high risk patients and the impact of local recurrence on overall survival. Methods and Materials: From 1980-1994, 62 patients with invasive vulva carcinoma and either positive or close (less 8 mm) margins of excision were retrospectively studied. Thirty-one patients were treated with adjuvant radiation therapy to the vulva and 31 patients were observed after surgery. Kaplan-Meier estimates and the Cox proportional hazard regression model were used to evaluate the effect of adjuvant radiation therapy on local recurrence and overall survival. Independent prognostic factors for local recurrence and survival were also assessed. Results: Local recurrence occurred in 58% of observed patients and 16% in patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy. Adjuvant radiation therapy significantly reduced local recurrence rates in both the close margin and positive margin groups (p = 0.036, p = 0.0048). On both univariate and multivariate analysis adjuvant radiation and margins of excision were significant prognostic predictors for local control. Significant determinants of actuarial survival included International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) stage, percentage of pathologically positive inguinal nodes and margins of excision. The positive margin observed group had a significantly poorer actuarial 5 year survival than the other groups (p = 0.0016) and adjuvant radiation significantly improved survival for this group. The 2 year actuarial survival after developing local recurrence was 25%. Local recurrence was a significant predictor for death from vulva carcinoma (risk ratio 3.54). Conclusion: Local recurrence is a common occurrence in high risk patients. In this study adjuvant radiation therapy significantly reduced local recurrence rates and

  13. Adjuvants for vaccines to drugs of abuse and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R; Torres, Oscar; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan

    2014-09-22

    Immunotherapeutic vaccines to drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine, heroin, oxycodone, methamphetamine, and others are being developed. The theoretical basis of such vaccines is to induce antibodies that sequester the drug in the blood in the form of antibody-bound drug that cannot cross the blood brain barrier, thereby preventing psychoactive effects. Because the drugs are haptens a successful vaccine relies on development of appropriate hapten-protein carrier conjugates. However, because induction of high and prolonged levels of antibodies is required for an effective vaccine, and because injection of T-independent haptenic drugs of abuse does not induce memory recall responses, the role of adjuvants during immunization plays a critical role. As reviewed herein, preclinical studies often use strong adjuvants such as complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant and others that cannot be, or in the case of many newer adjuvants, have never been, employed in humans. Balanced against this, the only adjuvant that has been included in candidate vaccines in human clinical trials to nicotine and cocaine has been aluminum hydroxide gel. While aluminum salts have been widely utilized worldwide in numerous licensed vaccines, the experience with human responses to aluminum salt-adjuvanted vaccines to haptenic drugs of abuse has suggested that the immune responses are too weak to allow development of a successful vaccine. What is needed is an adjuvant or combination of adjuvants that are safe, potent, widely available, easily manufactured, and cost-effective. Based on our review of the field we recommend the following adjuvant combinations either for research or for product development for human use: aluminum salt with adsorbed monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA); liposomes containing MPLA [L(MPLA)]; L(MPLA) adsorbed to aluminum salt; oil-in-water emulsion; or oil-in-water emulsion containing MPLA. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Diatoms and diatomaceous earth as novel poultry vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazmi, A; Hauck, R; Davis, A; Hildebrand, M; Corbeil, L B; Gallardo, R A

    2017-02-01

    Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae; their surface possesses a porous nanostructured silica cell wall or frustule. Diatomaceous earth (DE) or diatomite is a natural siliceous sediment of diatoms. Since silica has been proved to have adjuvant capabilities, we propose that diatoms and DE may provide an inexpensive and abundant source of adjuvant readily available to use in livestock vaccines.In a first experiment, the safety of diatoms used as an adjuvant for in-ovo vaccination was investigated. In a second experiment, we assessed the humoral immune response after one in-ovo vaccination with inactivated Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and DE as adjuvant followed by 2 subcutaneous boosters on d 21 and 29 of age. In both experiments, results were compared to Freund's incomplete adjuvant and aluminum hydroxide.No detrimental effects on hatchability and chick quality were detected after in-ovo inoculation of diatoms and DE in experiments 1 and 2 respectively. In experiment 2 no humoral responses were detected after the in-ovo vaccination until 29 d of age. Seven d after the second subcutaneous booster an antibody response against NDV was detected in chickens that had received vaccines adjuvanted with Freund's incomplete adjuvant, aluminum hydroxide, and DE. These responses became significantly higher 10 d after the second booster. Finally, 15 d after the second booster, the humoral responses induced by the vaccine with Freund's incomplete adjuvant were statistically higher, followed by comparable responses induced by vaccines containing DE or aluminum hydroxide that were significantly higher than DE+PBS, PBS+INDV and PBS alone. From an applied perspective, we can propose that DE can serve as a potential adjuvant for vaccines against poultry diseases. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Adjuvant potential of selegiline in attenuating organ dysfunction in septic rats with peritonitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ming Tsao

    Full Text Available Selegiline, an anti-Parkinson drug, has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects. To explore the effect of selegiline on sepsis, we used a clinically relevant animal model of polymicrobial sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP or sham operation was performed in male rats under anesthesia. Three hours after surgery, animals were randomized to receive intravenously selegiline (3 mg/kg or an equivalent volume of saline. The administration of CLP rats with selegiline (i increased arterial blood pressure and vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine, (ii reduced plasma liver and kidney dysfunction, (iii attenuated metabolic acidosis, (iv decreased neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung, and (v improved survival rate (from 44% to 65%, compared to those in the CLP alone rats. The CLP-induced increases of plasma interleukin-6, organ superoxide levels, and liver inducible nitric oxide synthase and caspase-3 expressions were ameliorated by selegiline treatment. In addition, the histological changes in liver and lung were significantly attenuated in the selegiline -treated CLP group compared to those in the CLP group. The improvement of organ dysfunction and survival through reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in peritonitis-induced sepsis by selegiline has potential as an adjuvant agent for critical ill.

  16. Factors associated with Taiwan anesthesiologists' intention to leave anesthesia practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-O Wang

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Unfavorable working conditions were considered to lower the satisfaction of anesthesiologists in Taiwan. In particular, an inability to take care of the family and a low salary were major factors in deterring anesthesiologists in Taiwan from continuing in anesthesia.

  17. Outcomes of cancer surgery after inhalational and intravenous anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltanizadeh, Sinor; Degett, Thea H; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative factors are probably essential for different oncological outcomes. This systematic review investigates the literature concerning overall mortality and postoperative complications after cancer surgery with inhalational (INHA) and intravenous anesthesia (TIVA). A search was conducted...

  18. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli

    2015-01-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second...... World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were...... created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics...

  19. The febrile parturient: choice of anesthesia | Kuczkowski | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. No Abstratct. Key words: Pregnancy, Fever, Infection, Herpes simplex virus, Hepatitis, Human immunodeficiency virus, Urinary tract infections, Chorioamnionitis, Pneumonia, Septic shock, Anesthesia; regional, general, Epidural analgesia and maternal fever ...

  20. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Shoko; Goto, Yukimi; Nagai, Michiyo; Hashiguchi, Chikako; Fujii, Osamu; Ota, Yosuke; Tsujino, Kayoko; Soejima, Toshinori; Kato, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  1. The effect of anesthesia on body temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Rainer

    2010-06-01

    The human thermoregulatory system usually maintains core body temperature near 37 degrees C. This homeostasis is accomplished by thermoregulatory defense mechanisms such as vasoconstriction and shivering or sweating and vasodilatation. Thermoregulation is impaired during general anesthesia. Suppression of thermoregulatory defense mechanisms during general anesthesia is dose dependant and mostly results in perioperative hypothermia. Several adverse effects of hypothermia have been identified, including an increase in postoperative wound infection, perioperative coagulopathy and an increase of postoperative morbid cardiac events. Perioperative hypothermia can be avoided by warming patients actively during general anesthesia. Fever is a controlled increase of core body temperature. Various causes of perioperative fever are given. Fever is usually attenuated by general anesthesia. Typically, patients develop a fever of greater magnitude in the postoperative phase. Postoperative fever is fairly common. The incidence of fever varies with type and duration of surgery, patient's age, surgical site and preoperative inflammation.

  2. [A case of conversion disorder (hysteria) after spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Makino, Shiho; Doi, Yumiko; Nishimura, Mitsuo; Baba, Miwa; Mizukawa, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Yoji

    2009-02-01

    We report a case of conversion disorder after spinal anesthesia. A 16-year-old healthy woman underwent arthroscopic surgery under spinal anesthesia. She showed tremor all over and it did not stop. We sedated her with propofol during the operation. After the operation, her involuntary tremble continued. We consulted with a pediatrician who diagnosed her as conversion disorder. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were performed to rule out some pathological changes and abnormality in her head. As a result, Rathke cleft cyst was suspected but it could not explain this episode. We consider that her stress for the operation under spinal anesthesia caused this episode. In a case of a younger patient, it is necessary to consider mental support. And we need to suspect conversion disorder when we see tremor during operation under regional anesthesia.

  3. [Development and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-yi; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Sheng-mei

    2010-09-21

    To study the design, implementation and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system. To record, process and store peri-operative patient data automatically, all kinds of bedside monitoring equipments are connected into the system based on information integrating technology; after a statistical analysis of those patient data by data mining technology, patient status can be evaluated automatically based on risk prediction standard and decision support system, and then anesthetist could perform reasonable and safe clinical processes; with clinical processes electronically recorded, standard record tables could be generated, and clinical workflow is optimized, as well. With the system, kinds of patient data could be collected, stored, analyzed and archived, kinds of anesthesia documents could be generated, and patient status could be evaluated to support clinic decision. The anesthesia information management system is useful for improving anesthesia quality, decreasing risk of patient and clinician, and aiding to provide clinical proof.

  4. PERIPHERAL BLOCK ANESTHESIA OF UPPER EXTREMITY AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tapar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful peripheral blocks and selection of appropriate technique according to surgery is possible with a good knowledge of anatomy. Regional peripheral block anesthesia of upper extremity which applied by single injection to plexus brachialis is the most recommended method of anesthesia in daily surgical procedures. The most important advantages of peripheral nerve blocks which are type of regional anesthesia according to general anesthesia and central blocks are less effect to respiration and hemodynamics and shortness of recovery time. If a plexus brachialis catheter is placed, control of pain is provided without using systemic narcotic analgesic. With these advantages; rare life threatening potential complications can be seen which are pneumothorax, hematoma, neuritis, allergy, systemic and neurologic complications. In this compilation we aimed to review again the complications of upper extremity nerve blocks according to block type. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(3.000: 195-200

  5. Recurrent sterile abscesses following aluminium adjuvant-containing vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nicola P; Edwards, Kathryn M; Sparks, Robert C; Dekker, Cornelia L

    2009-01-01

    Abscess formation following immunisation is a previously reported complication, generally associated with microbial contamination of the vaccine. Less commonly, such abscesses have been sterile. Here we describe two children evaluated in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) network who developed recurrent sterile abscesses after administration of vaccines containing aluminium adjuvant, either individually or in combination. Although the abscesses healed without sequelae, these occurrences support an association between receipt of aluminium adjuvant and sterile abscesses in susceptible patients. For patients with similar symptoms, clinicians may wish to choose a vaccine formulation containing the least amount of aluminium adjuvant.

  6. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers

  7. Rational use of oxygen in medical disease and anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Staehr, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2012-01-01

    Supplemental oxygen is often administered during anesthesia and in critical illness to treat hypoxia, but high oxygen concentrations are also given for a number of other reasons such as prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). The decision to use supplemental oxygen is, however, controversial......, because of large heterogeneity in the reported results and emerging reports of side-effects. The aim of this article is to review the recent findings regarding benefits and harms of oxygen therapy in anesthesia and acute medical conditions....

  8. Cholecystectomy with local anesthesia as a resource in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Campo Abad, Roberto; Noel Mederos Curbelo, Orestes

    2011-01-01

    In the case of a patient presenting with acute cholescystectomy ideally is to remove the gallbladder. Sometimes there are special situations in malnourished elderlies with deterioration of its general status in whom a lengthy anesthesia intervention, even using not much invasive means as the videosurgery, put at risk the life of patient. In such cases the cholescystectomy with local anesthesia is an alternative that must to be taken into account. (author)

  9. Anesthesia and Pain Relief in the History of Islamic Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since diseases and surgeries could be very painful, the annihilation of pain has been the most important goal of physicians. The history of Iranian-Islamic medicine includes distinguished physicians that attempted to find different methods of anesthesia. This research aims at reviewing approaches for anesthesia throughout the history of the Iranian-Islamic medicine, in order to identify a variety of drugs used during that period. Methods: In this research, the information was main...

  10. [General anesthesia for a patient with post-polio syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonobe, Shota; Imashuku, Yasuhiko; Inamori, Masayuki; Yabuta, Koichi; Hashimura, Toshiya; Kura, Masahiro; Otada, Hideki

    2013-08-01

    We gave anesthesia for a patient with post-polio syndrome undergoing laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy. She is a 68-year-old woman and had been diagnosed as post-polio syndrome since she was 55 years of age. Before the operation, paralysis was observed in her right leg. After inducing anesthesia using propofol, muscle relaxation was obtained by rocuronium bromide for intubation. Remifentanil was used during the operation, and good pain relief was obtained by iv-PCA (fentanyl) after operation.

  11. Subconjunctival hemorrhage and vision loss after regional ocular anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Umesh Chandra; Panda, Lapam; Gupta, Sumi; Modi, Rohit Ramesh

    2017-04-22

    To report two cases of retinal vascular occlusion and associated subconjunctival hemorrhage in needle optic nerve injury during local bulbar anesthesia. Surgical records of these two subjects who presented with acute vision loss after cataract extraction were studied, and systemic workup and ocular imaging were carried out to establish the cause. Computerized tomography showed evidence of optic nerve injury. Subconjunctival hemorrhage could be an associated clinical finding in hypodermic needle injury-related retinal vascular occlusion during ocular anesthesia.

  12. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  13. Surgery plus anesthesia induces loss of attention in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan eRen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop animal models to study postoperative delirium. Inattention is one of the symptoms of delirium. Increases in the levels of α-synuclein and S100β have been reported to be associated with delirium. Therefore, we set out to determine the effects of surgery plus general anesthesia on the behavioral changes (including loss of attention in mice and on the levels of α-synuclein and S100β in the brain tissues of these mice. C57BL/6J mice (2- to 8-months-old had a simple laparotomy plus isoflurane anesthesia. The behavioral changes, including attention level and the speed of movements, were determined 12, 24 and 48 hours after the surgery plus anesthesia in the mice. The levels of α-synuclein and S100β in the cortex of these mice following the surgery plus anesthesia were determined by Western blot analysis.We found that there was a loss of attention at 24, but not 12 or 48, hours following the surgery plus anesthesia (49%+5 versus 33%+2.9, P=0.011, N=12 in the mice without significantly affecting the speed of their movements. There were increases in the levels of total α-synuclein (139%+33.5 versus 100%+13.7, P=0.037, N=6 and S100β (142%+7.7 versus 100%+6, P=0.002, N=6 in the cortex of the mice 12 hours following the surgery plus anesthesia.These findings suggested that the surgery plus isoflurane anesthesia might induce behavioral and biochemical/biochemical/cellular changes associated with delirium. We could use the surgery plus anesthesia in mice to develop an animal model to study postoperative delirium.

  14. CpG ODN and ISCOMATRIX Adjuvant: A Synergistic Adjuvant Combination Inducing Strong T-Cell IFN-γ Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. McCluskie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For the induction of robust humoral and cellular immune responses, a strong rationale exists to use vaccine-adjuvant combinations possessing both immune modulatory and enhanced delivery capabilities. Herein, we evaluated the combination of 2 different adjuvants, a TLR9 agonist, composed of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG, and ISCOMATRIX adjuvant (ISCOMATRIX, composed of saponin, phospholipid, and cholesterol, which possesses both immunostimulatory and delivery properties. While both individual adjuvants have been shown effective in numerous preclinical and clinical studies, it is likely that for optimal adjuvant activity a combined adjuvant approach will be necessary. Herein, using three different antigens, namely, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, ovalbumin (OVA, and influenza A haemagglutinin antigen (HA, we show in mice that some adjuvant effects of CpG and ISCOMATRIX are further enhanced if they are used in combination. In particular, with all three antigens, IFN-γ levels were greatly increased with the CpG/ISCOMATRIX combination. The ability of the CpG/ISCOMATRIX combination to induce antitumor responses when administered with OVA following administration to mice of a highly metastatic OVA-secreting tumor cell line (B16-OVA melanoma was also demonstrated. Thus the CpG/ISCOMATRIX combination may prove to be a valuable tool in the development of novel or improved vaccines.

  15. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Towe, Christopher; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  16. Gamma knife radiosurgery under general anesthesia in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Serizawa, Toru; Nagano, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) is an important treatment option for pediatric intracranial diseases, such as arteriovenous malformations and brain tumors. To perform GKS in children, general anesthesia is required for placing a stereotactic frame around the head of the patient, who must remain supine for the entire procedure. This report describes the anesthetic management of children who have undergone GKS at our institution. Fifty-one GKS procedures were performed in 43 patients (age range, 2-15 years). Twenty-one patients had arteriovenous malformations, and 14 patients had brain tumors. Twenty-nine patients (67.4%) received general anesthesia. All children 10 years or younger were treated under general anesthesia. General anesthesia for GKS is performed outside of the operating room and involves unique conditions. First, the patients must be transported to multiple sites in the hospital (the neuroangiography suite, the department of radiology for magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and the gamma knife unit). Second, general anesthesia must be maintained in a high magnetic field. Third, medical staff, including anesthesiologists, must remain outside the room during irradiation. Safe and efficient general anesthesia is essential for performing GKS in children. (author)

  17. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  18. SODIUM THIOPANTAL AND MIDAZOLAM USE IN NEUROLEPTIC ANESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAJEDI

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study amnesic and anesthetic effects of Midazolam used to reduce awarness and recall of neurolept Anesthesia. Methods: The study was clinical trial with simple random sampling. Patients were studied in four groups of 30 numbers. Each preparation and induction of anesthesia was identical in all groups. Bolous Thiopental (BT group received 0.3mg/kg NaThiopental during induction of Anesthesia. Infusion thiopental group (IT 0.3mg/kg Na thiopental was given during induction plus 100mg/kg/min for Maintaince of anesthesia. Bolous Midazolam (BM group recieved 0.1 mg/kg Midazolam during induction and Infusion Midazolam (lM groug 0.1 mg/kg during Induction plus 0.1mg/kg/h for maintainance of Anesthesia. All groups were observed for signs of awareness and recall. Also hemodynamic variables and duration of recovery were measured and compared between groups with analysis of variance and Chi square tests. Result: Signs of Awareness (tachycardia and Lacrimation in IM group was significantly less than other groups. (P<0.05 Percent of patients reported recall were significantly lower in IM group. (P<0.05 Discussion: Infusion of Midazolam can reduce signs of awareness and recall during neurolept anesthesia without increase in complications or duration of recovery period

  19. Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert; Cremata, Edward; Hawk, Cheryl

    2014-02-03

    There are currently no widely accepted guidelines on standards for the practice of chiropractic or manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia, and the evidence base for this practice is composed primarily of lower-level evidence. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-informed and consensus-based guidelines on spinal manipulation under anesthesia to address the gaps in the literature with respect to patient selection and treatment protocols. An expert consensus process was conducted from August-October 2013 using the Delphi method. Panelists were first provided with background literature, consisting of three review articles on manipulation under anesthesia. The Delphi rounds were conducted using the widely-used and well-established RAND-UCLA consensus process methodology to rate seed statements for their appropriateness. Consensus was determined to be reached if 80% of the 15 panelists rated a statement as appropriate. Consensus was reached on all 43 statements in two Delphi rounds. The Delphi process was conducted from August-October 2013. Consensus was reached on recommendations related to all aspects of manipulation under anesthesia, including patient selection; diagnosis and establishing medical necessity; treatment and follow-up procedures; evaluation of response to treatment; safety practices; appropriate compensation considerations; and facilities, anesthesia and nursing standards. A high level of agreement was achieved in developing evidence-informed recommendations about the practice of chiropractic/manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia.

  20. Smart marketing may improve public understanding of the anesthesia profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barak; Ogorek, Daniel; Oifa, Stanislav; Cattan, Anat; Matot, Idit

    2015-01-01

    A 2005 survey led by the Israeli Society of Anesthesiologists (ISA) found that large parts of the Israeli public are not familiar with the profession of anesthesia. The ISA has subsequently been conducting a public campaign for several years with the aim to enhance community knowledge regarding the anesthesiologists' training and their critical role in the perioperative period. The present study sought to evaluate the value of a campaign aiming to enhance public understanding of the importance of a medical profession; more specifically, a campaign to promote awareness of the community regarding the anesthesia profession. If proved to be successful, public campaigns may be considered in other countries and for other medical professions with similar difficulties. In 2013, five hundred participants from the general community were asked to answer a questionnaire focusing on the profession of anesthesia. Public knowledge has improved following the campaign. Specifically, improvement was demonstrated regarding the qualification of the anesthesiologist as an MD (92% vs. 64% in 2013 and 2005, respectively), and enhanced awareness of the anesthesia team's critical role in the operating room (OR) (48% vs. 30% in 2013 and 2005, respectively). The Israeli community is attentive to public campaigns that address the roles of a medical profession. Enhanced public knowledge regarding the importance of the anesthesia profession may have a significant impact on both the payment policy for anesthesiologists and on the recruitment of more physicians to the field of anesthesia. Public campaigns may be considered for other medical professions with similar difficulties.

  1. A technical description of a novel pharmacological anesthesia robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mohamad; Arbeid, Erik; Cyr, Shantale; Mathieu, Pierre A; Taddei, Riccardo; Morse, Joshua; Hemmerling, Thomas M

    2014-02-01

    To control the three components of general anesthesia (hypnosis, analgesia, and neuromuscular blockade), an automated closed-loop, anesthesia-drug delivery system (McSleepy) was developed. Bispectral index was used as the control variable for hypnosis, the analgoscore for analgesia, and phonomyography for neuromuscular blockade. McSleepy can be used to control the induction, maintenance and emergence from general anesthesia. To do so, a large touch screen is used to provide a user friendly interface, permitting bidirectional communication: the user giving information about the different stages of anesthesia, and the system prompting the anesthesiologist to perform certain actions such as mask ventilation, intubation or waking-up the patient using audio clips with voice commands. Several safety features were implemented to provide a secure and reliable anesthesia. Preliminary results of 15 patients are presented in this paper. Evaluation of McSleepy was done through an assessment of its clinical performance and using Varvel's performance indices. The system was found to be clinically useful by providing good precision in drug administration and reliable results for the duration of a general anesthesia.

  2. Penetrating keratoplasty for perforated corneal ulcers under topical anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Rashim; Sharma, Namrata; Pruthi, Archna; Maharana, Prafulla K; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the structural and functional outcomes of eyes with perforated corneal ulcers undergoing penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) under topical anesthesia. A prospective analysis of 17 consecutive cases that underwent PKP under topical anesthesia, where infiltrative anesthesia was contraindicated or general anesthesia could not be given for medical reasons or was not available for logistical reasons. Seventeen eyes of 15 patients with a mean age of 47.3 ± 16.2 years underwent a PKP for treating perforated corneal ulcers under topical anesthesia. Perforation involved the pupillary zone in 13 (76.5%) cases. Preoperatively, 8 patients (47.1%) were phakic, 8 (47.1%) were pseudophakic, and 1 (5.9%) was aphakic. The PKP was completed successfully in all the eyes. An anterior capsular tear occurred in 3 eyes (17.6%). A posterior chamber intraocular implant was put in 1 eye, and 2 eyes were found to be aphakic. The patients reported mild to moderate discomfort and tolerated the procedure well. At the final follow-up, 10 patients had clear grafts (58.8%), and 7 patients (41.2%) had partially clear grafts. The best-corrected visual acuity was better than 6/18 in 10 eyes and between 6/60 and 6/24 in 7 eyes. PKP can be performed successfully under topical anesthesia in cooperative patients who have perforated corneal ulcers.

  3. Activity of glycated chitosan and other adjuvants to PDT vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Čiplys, Evaldas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Glycated chitosan (GC), a water soluble galactose-conjugated natural polysaccharide, has proven to be an effective immunoadjuvant for treatment of tumors based on laser thermal therapy. It was also shown to act as adjuvant for tumor therapy with high-intensity ultrasound and in situ photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, GC was examined as potential adjuvant to PDT-generated cancer vaccine. Two other agents, pure calreticulin protein and acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521, were also tested as prospective adjuvants for use in conjunction with PDT vaccines. Single treatment with GC, included with PDT vaccine cells suspension, improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to vaccine alone. This attractive prospect of GC application remains to be carefully optimized and mechanistically elucidated. Both calreticulin and LCL521 proved also effective adjuvants when combined with PDT vaccine tumor treatment.

  4. Mx bio adjuvant for enhancing immune responses against influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Soleimani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: These data revealed that Mx1 as biological adjuvant was able to increase antibody titer and induction memory immune responses against influenza immunization without causing any side effects.

  5. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants After General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study-A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Mary Ellen; Withington, D E; Arnup, S J; Davidson, A J; Disma, N; Frawley, G; Morton, N S; Bell, G; Hunt, R W; Bellinger, D C; Polaner, D M; Leo, A; Absalom, A R; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Izzo, F; Szmuk, P; Young, V; Soriano, S G; de Graaff, J C

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  6. Reactive Software Agent Anesthesia Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant H. Kruger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information overload of the anesthesiologist through technological advances have threatened the safety of patients under anesthesia in the operating room (OR. Traditional monitoring and alarm systems provide independent, spatially distributed indices of patient physiological state. This creates the potential to distract caregivers from direct patient care tasks. To address this situation, a novel reactive agent decision support system with graphical human machine interface was developed. The system integrates the disparate data sources available in the operating room, passes the data though a decision matrix comprising a deterministic physiologic rule base established through medical research. Patient care is improved by effecting change to the care environment by displaying risk factors and alerts as an intuitive color coded animation. The system presents a unified, contextually appropriate snapshot of the patient state including current and potential risk factors, and alerts of critical patient events to the operating room team without requiring any user intervention. To validate the efficacy of the system, a retrospective analysis focusing on the hypotension rules were performed. Results show that even with vigilant and highly trained clinicians, deviations from ideal patient care exist and it is here that the proposed system may allow more standardized and improved patient care and potentially outcomes.

  7. Ambulatory anesthesia for cosmetic surgery in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Diego Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Outpatient plastic surgery is growing around the world. This industry faces unique challenges in terms of patient selection and standards of practice to ensure safety and cost-effectiveness. This review will highlight information about anesthesia practice for outpatient cosmetic surgery in Brazil, especially regarding regulation, legislation, and medical tourism. Medical tourism is growing worldwide, with a flow of patients traveling from developed to developing countries where procedures can be done at a fraction of the cost as in the patient's home country. Though generally well tolerated, there are concerns about incomplete data on outcomes of office-based surgeries and lack of safety standards. Brazil is one of the world's leaders in cosmetic surgery. Strong legislation governing outpatient facilities and continued development of accrediting standards for healthcare facilities are indications of a commitment to patient safety and high quality of care. Although the market for medical tourism in this country is high, there are still barriers to overcome before Brazil reaches its full potential in this industry.

  8. Ignoring Adjuvant Toxicity Falsifies the Safety Profile of Commercial Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mesnage

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial formulations of pesticides are invariably not single ingredients. Instead they are cocktails of chemicals, composed of a designated pesticidal “active principle” and “other ingredients,” with the latter collectively also known as “adjuvants.” These include surfactants, antifoaming agents, dyes, etc. Some adjuvants are added to influence the absorption and stability of the active principle and thus promote its pesticidal action. Currently, the health risk assessment of pesticides in the European Union and in the United States focuses almost exclusively on the stated active principle. Nonetheless, adjuvants can also be toxic in their own right with numerous negative health effects having been reported in humans and on the environment. Despite the known toxicity of adjuvants, they are regulated differently from active principles, with their toxic effects being generally ignored. Adjuvants are not subject to an acceptable daily intake, and they are not included in the health risk assessment of dietary exposures to pesticide residues. Here, we illustrate this gap in risk assessment by reference to glyphosate, the most used pesticide active ingredient. We also investigate the case of neonicotinoid insecticides, which are strongly suspected to be involved in bee and bumblebee colony collapse disorder. Authors of studies sometimes use the name of the active principle (for example glyphosate when they are testing a commercial formulation containing multiple (active principle plus adjuvant ingredients. This results in confusion in the scientific literature and within regulatory circles and leads to a misrepresentation of the safety profile of commercial pesticides. Urgent action is needed to lift the veil on the presence of adjuvants in food and human bodily fluids, as well as in the environment (such as in air, water, and soil and to characterize their toxicological properties. This must be accompanied by regulatory precautionary

  9. Engineering of an Inhalable DDA/TDB Liposomal Adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Yang, Mingshi; Mulvad, Helle

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and optimize spray drying parameters of importance for the design of an inhalable powder formulation of a cationic liposomal adjuvant composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB).......The purpose of this study was to identify and optimize spray drying parameters of importance for the design of an inhalable powder formulation of a cationic liposomal adjuvant composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose-6,6'-dibehenate (TDB)....

  10. Learning impairment in honey bees caused by agricultural spray adjuvants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Ciarlo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spray adjuvants are often applied to crops in conjunction with agricultural pesticides in order to boost the efficacy of the active ingredient(s. The adjuvants themselves are largely assumed to be biologically inert and are therefore subject to minimal scrutiny and toxicological testing by regulatory agencies. Honey bees are exposed to a wide array of pesticides as they conduct normal foraging operations, meaning that they are likely exposed to spray adjuvants as well. It was previously unknown whether these agrochemicals have any deleterious effects on honey bee behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An improved, automated version of the proboscis extension reflex (PER assay with a high degree of trial-to-trial reproducibility was used to measure the olfactory learning ability of honey bees treated orally with sublethal doses of the most widely used spray adjuvants on almonds in the Central Valley of California. Three different adjuvant classes (nonionic surfactants, crop oil concentrates, and organosilicone surfactants were investigated in this study. Learning was impaired after ingestion of 20 µg organosilicone surfactant, indicating harmful effects on honey bees caused by agrochemicals previously believed to be innocuous. Organosilicones were more active than the nonionic adjuvants, while the crop oil concentrates were inactive. Ingestion was required for the tested adjuvant to have an effect on learning, as exposure via antennal contact only induced no level of impairment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A decrease in percent conditioned response after ingestion of organosilicone surfactants has been demonstrated here for the first time. Olfactory learning is important for foraging honey bees because it allows them to exploit the most productive floral resources in an area at any given time. Impairment of this learning ability may have serious implications for foraging efficiency at the colony level, as well as potentially many

  11. Ignoring Adjuvant Toxicity Falsifies the Safety Profile of Commercial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnage, Robin; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2018-01-01

    Commercial formulations of pesticides are invariably not single ingredients. Instead they are cocktails of chemicals, composed of a designated pesticidal “active principle” and “other ingredients,” with the latter collectively also known as “adjuvants.” These include surfactants, antifoaming agents, dyes, etc. Some adjuvants are added to influence the absorption and stability of the active principle and thus promote its pesticidal action. Currently, the health risk assessment of pesticides in the European Union and in the United States focuses almost exclusively on the stated active principle. Nonetheless, adjuvants can also be toxic in their own right with numerous negative health effects having been reported in humans and on the environment. Despite the known toxicity of adjuvants, they are regulated differently from active principles, with their toxic effects being generally ignored. Adjuvants are not subject to an acceptable daily intake, and they are not included in the health risk assessment of dietary exposures to pesticide residues. Here, we illustrate this gap in risk assessment by reference to glyphosate, the most used pesticide active ingredient. We also investigate the case of neonicotinoid insecticides, which are strongly suspected to be involved in bee and bumblebee colony collapse disorder. Authors of studies sometimes use the name of the active principle (for example glyphosate) when they are testing a commercial formulation containing multiple (active principle plus adjuvant) ingredients. This results in confusion in the scientific literature and within regulatory circles and leads to a misrepresentation of the safety profile of commercial pesticides. Urgent action is needed to lift the veil on the presence of adjuvants in food and human bodily fluids, as well as in the environment (such as in air, water, and soil) and to characterize their toxicological properties. This must be accompanied by regulatory precautionary measures to

  12. Learning impairment in honey bees caused by agricultural spray adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlo, Timothy J; Mullin, Christopher A; Frazier, James L; Schmehl, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Spray adjuvants are often applied to crops in conjunction with agricultural pesticides in order to boost the efficacy of the active ingredient(s). The adjuvants themselves are largely assumed to be biologically inert and are therefore subject to minimal scrutiny and toxicological testing by regulatory agencies. Honey bees are exposed to a wide array of pesticides as they conduct normal foraging operations, meaning that they are likely exposed to spray adjuvants as well. It was previously unknown whether these agrochemicals have any deleterious effects on honey bee behavior. An improved, automated version of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) assay with a high degree of trial-to-trial reproducibility was used to measure the olfactory learning ability of honey bees treated orally with sublethal doses of the most widely used spray adjuvants on almonds in the Central Valley of California. Three different adjuvant classes (nonionic surfactants, crop oil concentrates, and organosilicone surfactants) were investigated in this study. Learning was impaired after ingestion of 20 µg organosilicone surfactant, indicating harmful effects on honey bees caused by agrochemicals previously believed to be innocuous. Organosilicones were more active than the nonionic adjuvants, while the crop oil concentrates were inactive. Ingestion was required for the tested adjuvant to have an effect on learning, as exposure via antennal contact only induced no level of impairment. A decrease in percent conditioned response after ingestion of organosilicone surfactants has been demonstrated here for the first time. Olfactory learning is important for foraging honey bees because it allows them to exploit the most productive floral resources in an area at any given time. Impairment of this learning ability may have serious implications for foraging efficiency at the colony level, as well as potentially many social interactions. Organosilicone spray adjuvants may therefore contribute to the

  13. Adjuvant therapy for ampullary carcinomas: The Mayo Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Sumita; Miller, Robert C.; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 125 patients who underwent definitive surgery for carcinomas involving the ampulla of Vater between April 1977 and February 2005 and who survived more than 50 days after surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients also received adjuvant radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Adverse prognostic factors were investigated, and overall survival (OS) and local and distant failure were estimated. Results: Adverse prognostic factors for decreased OS by univariate analysis included lymph node (LN) involvement, locally advanced tumors (T3/T4), and poor histologic grade. By multivariate analysis, positive LN status (p = 0.02) alone was associated with decreased OS. The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy improved OS for patients with positive LN (p = 0.01). Median survival for positive LN patients receiving adjuvant therapy was 3.4 years, vs. 1.6 years for those with surgery alone. Conclusions: The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy may improve OS in patients with LN involvement. The effect of adjuvant therapy on outcomes for patients with poor histologic grade or T3/T4 tumors without LN involvement could not be assessed

  14. Use of adjuvants to minimize leaching of herbicides in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Ashok K.; Singh, Megh

    1991-03-01

    Excessive leaching of herbicides affects their efficacy against target weeds and results in contamination of groundwater. Use of adjuvants that can weakly bind herbicides and in turn release them slowly is a valuable technique to prolong the efficacy of herbicides and to minimize their leaching into groundwater. Effects of activated charcoal, three humic substances (Enersol SP 85%, Enersol 12%, and Agroliz), or a synthetic polymer (Hydrosorb) on the leaching of bromacil, dicamba, and simazine were investigated in leaching columns using a Candler fine sand (Typic Quartzipsamment). The addition of adjuvants had no harmful effects on physical properties of the soil as evident from lack of its affects on water percolation. When no adjuvants were used, 69%, 37%, and 4% of applied dicamba, bromacil, and simazine, respectively, were leached in the first pore volume of leachate (⋍3.2 cm rainfall). With five pore volumes of leachate (⋍16 cm rainfall), bromacil and dicamba were leached completely and only 80% of simazine was leached. Using Enersol 12% adjuvant resulted in a 13%-18% reduction in leaching of dicamba and bromacil in five pore volumes of leachate. The leaching of simazine was significantly decreased when any of the five adjuvants mentioned above were used. However, the decrease in leaching was significantly greater when using Enersol SP 85% or Enersol 12% (24%-28%) than when using the other adjuvants (12%-16%).

  15. [Novel Adjuvant Therapy for Ocular Melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Jacobus J; Heindl, Ludwig M

    2017-05-01

    Background Malignant melanoma is the most common cancer of the eye in adults that originates either in the intra-ocular uveal tract or extra-ocular conjunctiva. Although the primary tumor can be treated successfully, no effective therapy for both metastatic conjunctival and uveal melanoma currently exits. Tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis and immune cell infiltration play a pivotal role in the development and therapeutic targeting of metastases. Project description Here, we provide an overview of current translational research on lymphangiogenesis and its therapeutic inhibition as well as modulation of immune cell infiltration by passive and active immunotherapy in melanoma of the eye. Specifically, our previous and ongoing work on lymphangiogenesis and immune cells in ocular melanoma within the clinical research unit FOR 2240 "(Lymph)Angiogenesis and Cellular Immunity in Inflammatory Diseases of the Eye" is summarized. Conclusions Translational research on the modulation of tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis and immune cell infiltration could provide novel targets for adjuvant therapy in melanoma of the eye. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Effect of method of anesthesia on the reproductive and obstetric outcomes of heterotopic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Liu, Y F; Liu, J; Huang, Y; Xu, G F; Cai, J; Chen, Y; Wu, Y Q; Ying, Y Y; Zhang, R J; Zhang, D

    2017-12-07

    Anesthesia is commonly used for surgical termination of the extrauterine component of heterotopic pregnancy. We sought to evaluate the effects of general and regional anesthesia during salpingectomy on reproductive and obstetric outcomes of heterotopic pregnancies. A two-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted, and 49 heterotopic pregnancies were included. Baseline characteristics, reproductive and obstetric outcomes were compared between the general anesthesia and regional anesthesia groups. Baseline characteristics were comparable for age, weeks of gestation at diagnosis, and duration of anesthesia. No significant difference was found in pregnancy outcome, perinatal outcome or neonatal weight (P >0.05). The rate of miscarriage in the general anesthesia group was 23.5% versus the regional anesthesia group 15.6% (P >0.05). With respect to reproductive and obstetric outcomes, this retrospective study found no difference between general anesthesia and regional anesthesia used for early heterotopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute effects of general anesthesia with propofol, pentobarbital or isoflurane plus propofol on plasma metabolites and hormones in adult pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daş, G; Vernunft, A; Görs, S; Kanitz, E; Weitzel, J M; Brüssow, K-P; Metges, C C

    2016-12-01

    experimental factors of interest. Although Prop + Isof anesthesia did not differ from the controls, providing a physiologically-friendly GA, both single and the isoflurane-combined treatment of Prop induced hypertriglyceridemia due to the lipid adjuvant of the Prop drugs. It is concluded that readouts obtained under GA may be influenced both by physiological adulterations as response to anesthesia as well as by artifacts due to accompanying ingredients of the drug formulations.

  18. A unique anesthesia approach for carotid endarterectomy: Combination of general and regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhen Samanta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid endarterectomy (CEA, a preventable surgery, reduces the future risks of cerebrovascular stroWke in patients with marked carotid stenosis. Peri-operative management of such patients is challenging due to associated major co-morbidities and high incidence of peri-operative stroke and myocardial infarction. Both general anesthesia (GA and local regional anesthesia (LRA can be used with their pros and cons. Most developing countries as well as some developed countries usually perform CEA under GA because of technical easiness. LRA usually comprises superficial, intermediate, deep cervical plexus block or a combination of these techniques. Deep block, particularly, is technically difficult and more complicated, whereas intermediate plexus block is technically easy and equally effective. We did CEA under a combination of GA and LRA using ropivacaine 0.375% with 1 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine (DEX infiltration. In LRA, we gave combined superficial and intermediate cervical plexus block with infiltration at the incision site and along the lower border of mandible. We observed better hemodynamics in intraoperative as well as postoperative periods and an improved postoperative outcome of the patient. So, we concluded that combination of GA and LRA is a good anesthetic technique for CEA. Larger randomized prospective trials are needed to support our conclusion.

  19. Pre-use anesthesia machine check; certified anesthesia technician based quality improvement audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Suhaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Al Dosary, Saad; Al Barmawi, Hanan; Pogoku, Mahdhav

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of providing a work ready machine in multiple theatre operating rooms in a tertiary modern medical center in Riyadh. The aim of the following study is to keep high quality environment for workers and patients in surgical operating rooms. Technicians based audit by using key performance indicators to assure inspection, passing test of machine worthiness for use daily and in between cases and in case of unexpected failure to provide quick replacement by ready to use another anesthetic machine. The anesthetic machines in all operating rooms are daily and continuously inspected and passed as ready by technicians and verified by anesthesiologist consultant or assistant consultant. The daily records of each machines were collected then inspected for data analysis by quality improvement committee department for descriptive analysis and report the degree of staff compliance to daily inspection as "met" items. Replaced machine during use and overall compliance. Distractive statistic using Microsoft Excel 2003 tables and graphs of sums and percentages of item studied in this audit. Audit obtained highest compliance percentage and low rate of replacement of machine which indicate unexpected machine state of use and quick machine switch. The authors are able to conclude that following regular inspection and running self-check recommended by the manufacturers can contribute to abort any possibility of hazard of anesthesia machine failure during operation. Furthermore in case of unexpected reason to replace the anesthesia machine in quick maneuver contributes to high assured operative utilization of man machine inter-phase in modern surgical operating rooms.

  20. Anesthesia and Pain Relief in the History of Islamic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Since diseases and surgeries could be very painful, the annihilation of pain has been the most important goal of physicians. The history of Iranian-Islamic medicine includes distinguished physicians that attempted to find different methods of anesthesia. This research aims at reviewing approaches for anesthesia throughout the history of the Iranian-Islamic medicine, in order to identify a variety of drugs used during that period. In this research, the information was mainly collected from medical history, traditional literature and various search engines (e.g. Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Scopus, SIDS and NoorMags). The search keywords were Anesthetic, Tbnj (sedation), Tnvym (sedative), and Hypnotic. Finally, a detailed analytical study was performed on all notes and the results were presented. Mohammad Ibn-Zakaria Al-Razi (known to the Western world as Razes) in the 10th century was the first physician who used general inhalation for anesthesia in surgeries. Drugs used to relieve pain and anesthesia can be divided into two categories: (i) single drug and (ii) compound drugs. Usually, these are consumed by eating, drinking, inhalation, or as topical. Drugs such as Hemlock, Mandrake, Henbane, Hyocyamus, Mandragora, Loiseuria, Opium Poppy, and Black Nightshade were used. Beyond these herbs, Aghili (18 th century) in his book "Makhzan al-adviyah" also explained the topical application of ice for pain management. The choice for the type of medication and its form of consumption is commensurate to pain and the speed by which the drug has an effect. Anesthesia was usually done in two ways: (i) using a substance called "Mokhader" which was consumed via the mouth or nose, and (ii) "Tnvym" which means putting a patient to sleep to block the sensation of pain. Typically, anesthesia methods and drug recipes were kept as secret to prevent misuse and abuse by unauthorized people. Based on our study, Islamic physicians proposed inspiring methods in using drugs for anesthesia

  1. Brief anesthesia, but not voluntary locomotion, significantly alters cortical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Michael J.; Kudlik, D'Anne E.; Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E.; Drew, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in brain temperature can alter electrical properties of neurons and cause changes in behavior. However, it is not well understood how behaviors, like locomotion, or experimental manipulations, like anesthesia, alter brain temperature. We implanted thermocouples in sensorimotor cortex of mice to understand how cortical temperature was affected by locomotion, as well as by brief and prolonged anesthesia. Voluntary locomotion induced small (∼0.1°C) but reliable increases in cortical temperature that could be described using a linear convolution model. In contrast, brief (90-s) exposure to isoflurane anesthesia depressed cortical temperature by ∼2°C, which lasted for up to 30 min after the cessation of anesthesia. Cortical temperature decreases were not accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the γ-band local field potential power, multiunit firing rate, or locomotion behavior, which all returned to baseline within a few minutes after the cessation of anesthesia. In anesthetized animals where core body temperature was kept constant, cortical temperature was still >1°C lower than in the awake animal. Thermocouples implanted in the subcortex showed similar temperature changes under anesthesia, suggesting these responses occur throughout the brain. Two-photon microscopy of individual blood vessel dynamics following brief isoflurane exposure revealed a large increase in vessel diameter that ceased before the brain temperature significantly decreased, indicating cerebral heat loss was not due to increased cerebral blood vessel dilation. These data should be considered in experimental designs recording in anesthetized preparations, computational models relating temperature and neural activity, and awake-behaving methods that require brief anesthesia before experimental procedures. PMID:25972579

  2. The Effect of Low Flow Inhalation Anesthesia on Operative Hemodynamic Condition in Comparison with High Flow Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eidi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Low flow anesthesia technique in which the flow fresh gas is lower than minute volume of the patient results in improvement in the patient’s care such as reduction of operative hypothermia, reduction of postoperative shivering and leads to an increase in economical and enviornmental interests. The goal of the study was to investigate the patients’ operative hemodynamic variations using the high and low flow anesthesia techniques. Materials & Methods: This prospective, clincal and single blind study was carried out in Tbriz Emam Khomeini Hospital in 1384. In this study 97 patients in ASA class I or II after routine induction of G.A, during maintenance of anesthesia were randomly divided in two groups group I (high flow anesthesia and group II (low flow anesthesia. For all patients ECG, HR, SPO2, BP, B.T, ETCO2 and inspiratory, expiratory percentage of O2, N2O, halothane, postoprative shievring and duration of oprations were recorded. 46 patients underwent high flow anesthesia and 51 patients underwent low flow anesthesia. Results: The average blood pressure in group I was as follow: preoperative, systol=13820 mmHg and diastol=7815 mmHg, intraoperative, systol=10531 mmHg and diastol=6410 mmHg and in recovery systol=11615 mmHg and diastol=7013 mmHg. In group II who had low flow anesthesia the blood pressure was found to be systol=13922 mmHg and diastol=7922 mmHg preoperative, systol=12221 mmHg and diastol=7517 mmHg intraoperative and systol=11815 mmHg and diastol=7717 mmHg in recovery. The differences in blood pressure in both group were statiscally significant (p=0.01. The average heart rate in group I was 9018 beat/min preoperative, 7014 intraoperative and 126 in recovery. The avrage heart rate in group II was 87.921 preoperative, 8616 intraoperative and 10417 in recovery. The differences were statiscally significant but there was no significant difference between

  3. Occupational stress of anesthesia: Effects on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanaty, Ola M; El Metainy, Shahira; Abdelmaksoud, Rania; Demerdash, Hala; Aliaa, Doaa Abo; El Wafa, Heba Abo

    2017-06-01

    Anesthesiology has been identified as a stressful specialty. Chronic psychological stress may lead to biological aging and skin aging. The primary outcome was to measure physical health and emotional well-being. Secondary outcomes include skin aging analysis, telomere shortening in anesthetists. This is a prospective observational study. University of Alexandria. Study was carried out on 366 ASA I-II physicians 30-50yr. Physicians were categorized into two equal groups, Group A (183) were anesthesia physicians and Group B (183) were physicians in less stressful specialties (laboratory specialties). Subgroup analysis was performed comparing 10years' intervals from (30-40) and from (40-50). Physical health and emotional well-being were evaluated. All physicians were exposed to validated assessment scales for the upper face and the lower face for skin aging analysis. Blood sampling were drowned from all physicians during their working hours for analysis of telomere length, markers of oxidative stress. The two studied groups showed comparable demographic data and years of work. Physical health score and emotional health score showed higher values in Group A than Group B. Upper and lower face aesthetic unit summary score showed higher values in Group A than Group B. Telomere (TTAGGG) repeats for terminal restriction fragments (TRF) of Group A individuals revealed a significant decrease of TRF compared to Group B (p=0.001*). Biological and skin aging is evident in anesthetists who are chronically exposed to occupational stress, with obvious shorter telomere length, higher lower and upper face scores, and free radicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Undivided attention improves postoperative anesthesia handover recall

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    Arenas A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Arenas,1 Burton J Tabaac,1 Galina Fastovets,2 Vinod Patil3 1Department of Clinical Sciences, American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Cupecoy, Sint Maarten; 2Department of Surgery, Broomfield Hospital, National Health Service, Chelmsford, UK; 3Department of Anesthesia, Queens Hospital, National Health Service, Romford, UK Background: For years, undivided attention during the presurgical “timeout” has been utilized as a precaution to ensure patient safety. The information relayed during the timeout is presented in a confirmatory nature rather than a delegation of new information. However, it is a standard of practice in which all members of the operating theater provide their full and undivided attention. Standards of patient care should be contiguous throughout the preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative stages of surgery. In this manner, it is expected that the same undivided attention afforded during the timeout should be maintained when transferring the patient to the postanesthesia care unit. Methods: In this study, information was collected regarding handover of information during the transfer status postsurgical procedures. Data were collected via observing interactions between the anesthesiologist and the nurse during verbal patient transfers. Results: This study demonstrated that the presence of undivided attention during the handover of a surgical patient in the postanesthesia care unit has a direct correlation with improved recall of the information discussed during handover. Conclusion: Focus is on the quantity of information that can be recalled by the transferring nurse, and whether or not undivided attention affects the outcome. Analysis focuses on suggestions to better improve patient safety and recovery when being transferred in an anesthetic setting. The practice of patient handover should be standardized to better improve the safety and quality of medical care. Keywords: communication

  5. Medication errors in anesthesia: unacceptable or unavoidable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Dhawan

    Full Text Available Abstract Medication errors are the common causes of patient morbidity and mortality. It adds financial burden to the institution as well. Though the impact varies from no harm to serious adverse effects including death, it needs attention on priority basis since medication errors' are preventable. In today's world where people are aware and medical claims are on the hike, it is of utmost priority that we curb this issue. Individual effort to decrease medication error alone might not be successful until a change in the existing protocols and system is incorporated. Often drug errors that occur cannot be reversed. The best way to ‘treat' drug errors is to prevent them. Wrong medication (due to syringe swap, overdose (due to misunderstanding or preconception of the dose, pump misuse and dilution error, incorrect administration route, under dosing and omission are common causes of medication error that occur perioperatively. Drug omission and calculation mistakes occur commonly in ICU. Medication errors can occur perioperatively either during preparation, administration or record keeping. Numerous human and system errors can be blamed for occurrence of medication errors. The need of the hour is to stop the blame - game, accept mistakes and develop a safe and ‘just' culture in order to prevent medication errors. The newly devised systems like VEINROM, a fluid delivery system is a novel approach in preventing drug errors due to most commonly used medications in anesthesia. Similar developments along with vigilant doctors, safe workplace culture and organizational support all together can help prevent these errors.

  6. [Insulinoma and pregnancy: anesthesia and perioperative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Angélica de Fátima de Assunção; Braga, Franklin Sarmento da Silva; Junior, José Hélio Zen; Brandão, Maria José Nascimento; Marcondes, Giancarlo Antonio; Barbosa, Thales Daniel Alves

    Insulinoma is a functional neuroendocrine tumor derived from beta cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, usually solitary, benign, and curable with surgery (enucleation). It rarely occurs during pregnancy and is clinically manifested by hypoglycemia, particularly in the first trimester of pregnancy. During pregnancy, both conservative therapeutic measures (medication) and surgical treatment are challenging regarding the impossibility of studies on drug teratogenicity as well as the maternal-fetal repercussions during surgery, such as hypoglycemia and changes due to stress. A 33-year primiparous woman, 86kg, 1.62m, BMI 32.7kg.m -2 , at 15 weeks of gestation, physical status ASA III, investigated for a reduced level of consciousness. Laboratory tests showed: hypoglycemia (45mg.dL -1 ) associated with hyperinsulinemia (24 nUI.mL -1 ), glycosylated hemoglobin (4.1%); other laboratory findings and physical examination were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.1cm nodule in the pancreatic tail with suspected insulinoma. Due to the difficult glycemic control with bolus and continuous infusion of glucose, laparotomy was performed for tumor enucleation under total intravenous anesthesia combined with epidural block. Monitoring, central and peripheral venous access, radial artery catheterization, diuresis, and glucosimetry were recorded every 15minutes. Intraoperatively, there was severe hypoglycemia while handling the tumor and shortly before its enucleation, which was controlled through continuous infusion of 10% glucose balanced crystalloid solution (100-230ml.h -1 ). The patient's postoperative evolution was uneventful, with resolution of hypoglycemia and total withdrawal of glucose intravenous infusion. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of anesthesia on the response to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Aaron B; Faraguna, Ugo; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2010-12-01

    Slow wave activity (SWA) during NREM sleep is the best characterized marker of sleep homeostasis, and the occurrence of sleep slow waves is necessary to reduce sleep need. Recent evidence suggests that sleep slow waves may mediate several beneficial effects of sleep on performance, from the prevention of cognitive impairments to memory consolidation. However, slow waves are also triggered by low doses of many anesthetics, but very few reports have examined whether anesthesia-mediated slow waves affect the homeostatic regulation of sleep. Moreover, no study has examined how sleep is affected by higher doses of anesthetics, which lead to a predominantly "isoelectric" EEG tracing without slow waves. We studied in rats whether 1 hour of a dose of isoflurane or desflurane able to induce almost continuous slow waves (ISO-sw, DES-sw), and of a dose of desflurane resulting in a predominantly isoelectric EEG (DES-iso) reduces the sleep pressure caused by 4 h of sleep deprivation. Anesthesia was compared to a mock condition in which rats were only anesthetized for 2-3 min. Basic sleep research laboratory. Male WKY rats (n=31). Total sleep deprivation by exposure to novel objects starting at light onset, followed by one hour of anesthesia or mock anesthesia. One hour of anesthesia (sw or iso) did not affect either sleep duration or the overall sleep pattern. Anesthesia with ISO-sw or DES-sw, both associated with the occurrence of almost continuous slow waves, reduced the SWA rebound expected following 4 h of sleep deprivation. One hour of anesthesia with DES-iso, associated with isoelectric EEG and few slow waves, also reduced the SWA rebound after sleep deprivation, and did so to an extent similar to that observed after DES-sw. However, in contrast to DES-sw, SWA after DES-iso remained chronically lower than in baseline, resulting in reduced slow wave energy (SWE, SWA × time) for at least 2 days. The blunted SWA rebound after ISO-sw and DES-sw suggests that anesthesia slow

  8. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jin Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia.Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods havebeen introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. Inparticular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI system maintains a relatively accurate level ofplasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conductedthis study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol andremifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation.Methods This study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgeryfrom February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mLpropofol and 50 μg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modulesof a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at2 μg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinicaleffect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status werecontinuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals.Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered duringsurgery, memory about surgery, and side effects.Results Intraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in threecases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratorydifficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotrachealintubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on theday of surgery and able to ambulate normally.Conclusions Our results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol andremifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breastaugmentation surgery.

  9. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Jin Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPatients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol and remifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation.MethodsThis study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mL propofol and 50 µg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modules of a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at 2 µg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinical effect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status were continuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals. Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered during surgery, memory about surgery, and side effects.ResultsIntraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in three cases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratory difficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotracheal intubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on the day of surgery and able to ambulate normally.ConclusionsOur results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol and remifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breast

  10. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu-Jin; Cha, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Yong-Ha; Kim, Tae-Gon; Kim, Il-Guk

    2012-09-01

    Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI) system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anesthesia using the TCI system with propofol and remifentanil would be an effective method of anesthesia in breast augmentation. This study recruited 100 patients who underwent breast augmentation surgery from February to August 2011. Intravenous anesthesia was performed with 10 mg/mL propofol and 50 µg/mL remifentanil simultaneously administered using two separate modules of a continuous computer-assisted TCI system. The average target concentration was set at 2 µg/mL and 2 ng/mL for propofol and remifentanil, respectively, and titrated against clinical effect and vital signs. Oxygen saturation, electrocardiography, and respiratory status were continuously measured during surgery. Blood pressure was measured at 5-minute intervals. Information collected includes total duration of surgery, dose of drugs administered during surgery, memory about surgery, and side effects. Intraoperatively, there was transient hypotension in two cases and hypoxia in three cases. However, there were no serious complications due to anesthesia such as respiratory difficulty, deep vein thrombosis, or malignant hypertension, for which an endotracheal intubation or reversal agent would have been needed. All the patients were discharged on the day of surgery and able to ambulate normally. Our results indicate that anesthetic methods, where the TCI of propofol and remifentanil is used, might replace general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in breast augmentation surgery.

  11. Outpatient hysteroscopy with combined local intracervical and intrauterine anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdi, Mohammed; Tulandi, Togas

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of pain during and after office hysteroscopy with combined intracervical and intrauterine anesthesia compared to intracervical anesthesia only. We evaluated the amount of pain experienced during office hysteroscopy using combined local intracervical and intrauterine anesthesia, 10, 30, and 60 min after, and during endometrial biopsy prospectively in 37 infertile women (study group). We used a visual analog scale ranging from 0 to 10. Seventy-six women who received only intracervical anesthesia served as historical controls. The mean ages of patients in the control and study groups were comparable. Patients' perception of pain was significantly higher during endometrial biopsy than during or after hysteroscopy in the study patients (p < 0.01, 95% CI 0-3). The mean pain score in the control group was significantly higher than that in the study group during hysteroscopy (3.3 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.3; p < 0.05, 95% CI 0-2). However, there was no significant difference in the pain scores between the control and study groups during endometrial biopsy and 10, 30, and 60 min after the procedure. Endometrial biopsy is associated with more pain than office hysteroscopy. Additional intrauterine anesthesia with 1% lidocaine significantly reduces pain sensation during office hysteroscopy. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Non-invasive anesthesia for children undergoing proton radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal; Grosshans, David; Arunkumar, Radha; Rebello, Elizabeth; Popovich, Shannon; Zavala, Acsa; Williams, Cynthia; Ruiz, Javier; Hernandez, Mike; Mahajan, Anita; Porche, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy is a newer modality of radiotherapy during which anesthesiologists face specific challenges related to the setup and duration of treatment sessions. Purpose: Describe our anesthesia practice for children treated in a standalone proton therapy center, and report on complications encountered during anesthesia. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of anesthetic records for patients ⩽18 years of age treated with proton therapy at our institution between January 2006 and April 2013 was performed. Results: A total of 9328 anesthetics were administered to 340 children with a median age of 3.6 years (range, 0.4–14.2). The median daily anesthesia time was 47 min (range, 15–79). The average time between start of anesthesia to the start of radiotherapy was 7.2 min (range, 1–83 min). All patients received Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with spontaneous ventilation, with 96.7% receiving supplemental oxygen by non-invasive methods. None required daily endotracheal intubation. Two episodes of bradycardia, and one episode each of; seizure, laryngospasm and bronchospasm were identified for a cumulative incidence of 0.05%. Conclusions: In this large series of children undergoing proton therapy at a freestanding center, TIVA without daily endotracheal intubation provided a safe, efficient, and less invasive option of anesthetic care

  13. Possibilities of creating meaningful encounters in anesthesia nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Karin

    Anesthesia nursing is performed in a highly technological environment with restricted time for interaction with patients. Patients are in a vulnerable position, which can be characterized by anxiety regarding the anesthetic and surgical procedure. The bedrock of effective nursing care is to facil......Anesthesia nursing is performed in a highly technological environment with restricted time for interaction with patients. Patients are in a vulnerable position, which can be characterized by anxiety regarding the anesthetic and surgical procedure. The bedrock of effective nursing care...... of nursing. In this dissertation, focused ethnography is used to explore the interactions between patients and nurse anesthetists before general anesthesia. Moreover, it will explore the professional identity of nurse anesthetists, in relation to the situation of preparing patients for general anesthesia....... A micro-substantive theory is developed regarding the opportunities for creating meaningful encounters between patients and nurse anesthetists. The theory is based on three dominant motivations for interaction in anesthesia nursing. The context of care is not committed and responsive to the core elements...

  14. A History of Intravenous Anesthesia in War (1656-1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Matthew; Jagdish, S

    2016-01-01

    The practice of anesthesia in war places significant restraints on the choice of anesthetic technique used; these include, but are not limited to, safety, simplicity, and portability. Ever since intravenous anesthesia became a practical alternative, there have been military doctors who felt that this technique was particularly suited to this environment. The challenge, as in civilian practice, has been to find the appropriate drugs as well as simple and safe delivery systems. The urgency of war has always stimulated innovation in medicine to counteract the ongoing development of weapons of war and their effects on the human body and to achieve improved survival as public expectations rise. This article traces the development of and the use of intravenous anesthesia by military physicians for battle casualties. The story starts long before the era of modern anesthesia, and the discussion concludes in the dog days of the cold war. The rapidly increasing interest in intravenous anesthesia in both civilian and military practice since the early 1990s is left for other authors to examine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia in achondroplastic dwarf for femur surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochana Girish Bakhshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia is the commonest form of short-limbed dwarfism and occurs in 1:26,000- 40,000 live births. This is an autosomal dominant disorder with abnormal endochondral ossification whereas periosteal and intramembranous ossification are normal. The basic abnormality is a disturbance of cartilage formation mainly at the epiphyseal growth plates and at the base of the skull. The anesthetic management of achondroplastic dwarfs is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Both regional as well as general anesthesia have their individual risks and consequences. We report a case of an achondroplastic dwarf in whom combined spinal epidural anesthesia was used for fixation of a fractured femur. The patient had undergone previous femur surgery under general anesthesia since he had been informed that spinal anesthesia could be very problematic. There was no technical difficulty encountered during the procedure and an adequate level was achieved with low-dose local anesthetics without any problem. Postoperative pain relief was offered for three consecutive postoperative days using epidural tramadol. We discuss the anesthetic issues and highlight the role of combined spinal epidural anesthesia with low-dose local anesthetics in this patient. This approach also helped in early ambulation and postoperative pain relief.

  16. Implementation of an Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, James R; Ritter, Melody J

    2011-01-01

    During the administration of anesthesia, the anesthesia provider has historically created a paper record, charted manually, that included extensive patient care-related data (vital signs, other parameters, etc) and commentaries. DocuSys, a proprietary anesthesia information management system (AIMS), creates an electronic version of the anesthesia record and provides additional information. It electronically captures data from clinical monitors and other sources, including scheduling applications and laboratory computers. The AIMS facilitates chart entries such as drug doses and case narratives. Benefits of an AIMS include improved legibility of the anesthesia record and greater efficiency in documentation efforts. Use of the AIMS assists the practitioner with decision support logic, such as the timing of antibiotic administration and the inclusion of legally required documentation. Upon case completion, the AIMS data are immediately available to other information systems, such as billing and medical records. Data can be made available from a single case or, more important, from thousands of cases to analyze variables such as efficiency of services, adherence to best practices, patient outcomes, and clinical research. The AIMS was deployed at the main campus of the Ochsner Health System on March 26, 2009. In this article, we discuss the issues involved in the AIMS implementation process: the successes, surprises, and continued challenges.

  17. Evaluation of anesthesia applications in interventional neuroradiology cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziya Kaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we aimed to evaluate anesthesiaapplications of the patients underwent invasive interventionalneuroradiology applications.Materials and methods: Between June 2004 and October2004, 152 emergency or elective adult patients whowere undergone general anesthesia were evaluated retrospectively.Information about the patients was taken fromradiology, anesthesia notes and university’s informationsystem. Patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender,American Society of Anesthesiologists score, indicationof application, the existence of concomitant diseases, anesthesiatechnique, anesthetic medications and the possibilityof whether patient were in intensive care unit.Results: Of all, 55.3% of the patients (n=84 were femaleand 44,7% (n=68 were male. General anesthesia wasapplied in all cases and propofol was preferred mostly ininduction and sevoflurane was preferred in maintenance.Surgically, 81,6% of the patients was elective and 18,4%was emergency patients. Diagnoses of patients were asfollow: Cerebral aneurysm 63,8%, arteriovenous malformation19,7%, thrombolytic therapy 8%, tumor embolization5,3% and carotid stenting 3,2%. Totally 58 patientswere taken into intensive care unit and 6 of these died.Conclusions: In order to provide a safe and efficient patientcare, we think that permanent anesthesia equipmentis necessary together with good physical conditions of theoperation room, proficiency of neuroradiologist, the closerelationship between the patient and anesthetist and agood knowledge of underlying neuropathology. J Clin ExpInvest 2012; 3(4: 493-499Key words: Interventional radiology, general anesthesia,cerebral aneurysm, arterio-venous malformations.

  18. Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng MR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R Eng,1 Paul F White1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2White Mountain Institute, The Sea Ranch, CA, USA Summary statement: Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia has become important for the anesthesiologist as the key perioperative physician in outpatient surgery. Key techniques and choices of anesthetics are important in accomplishing fast track goals of ambulatory surgery. Purpose of review: The anesthesiologist in the outpatient environment must focus on improving perioperative efficiency and reducing recovery times while accounting for patients' well-being and safety. This review article focuses on recent intravenous anesthetic techniques to accomplish these goals. Recent findings: This review is an overview of techniques in intravenous anesthesia for ambulatory anesthesia. Intravenous techniques may be tailored to accomplish outpatient surgery goals for the type of surgical procedure and individual patient needs. Careful anesthetic planning and the application of the plans are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Conclusion: Careful planning and application of intravenous techniques are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Keywords: intravenous anesthesia, outpatient anesthesia, fast-track surgery

  19. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  20. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants: The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study--Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Morton, Neil S; Arnup, Sarah J; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-07-01

    Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Infants aged 60 weeks or younger, postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorrhaphy, were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born less than 26 weeks gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 h postoperatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Three hundred sixty-three patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall, the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 h) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms; odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.31 to 1.30, P = 0.2133); however, the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 min) was lower in the RA arm (1 vs. 3%; OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.91; P = 0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 min to 12 h) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.41 to 3.33; P = 0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR, 21.87; 95% CI, 4.38 to 109.24), and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy reduces apnea in the early postoperative period. Cardiorespiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants.

  1. Preformulation studies on Freund's incomplete adjuvant emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R O; Mahaguna, V

    1998-02-01

    Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant (FIA), which is used in vaccine therapy, is a water-in-oil emulsion delivery system consisting of an aqueous internal phase containing an antigenic protein dispersed in an external phase containing a mixture of mannide monooleate and light mineral oil. Preformulation studies are reported in this investigation for FIA emulsion. The preformulation studies included the determination of the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the formulations investigated, the surface activity of mannide monooleate at the interface between the oil phase and the aqueous phase containing ovalbumin as the model antigenic protein, and the effect of ovalbumin on the surface activity at the interface. The influence of the concentration of mannide monooleate and/or ovalbumin on the interfacial tension between light mineral oil and either purified water or 0.9% w/v normal saline solution was measured by the DuNouy Ring Method at 25 degrees C. The CMC was determined experimentally from the relationship between the concentration of the surface active agent in each formulation and the interfacial tension. The number of moles of the surface active agent per unit area at the interface (surface excess concentration) was calculated from the Gibbs' Adsorption equation. The results indicated that mannide monooleate was an effective surface active agent since the formulation containing only mannide monooleate provided the lowest magnitude of CMC. The presence of the surface active agent, mannide monooleate and/or ovalbumin, in the formulations studied reduced the interfacial tension between the two phases. The surface activity was influenced by the presence of an electrolyte (sodium chloride), a protein (ovalbumin), or mannide monooleate in the formulation. The presence of antigenic proteins in the aqueous phase of a waterin-oil emulsion influenced the effectiveness of a surface active agent in the formulation.

  2. Frequency of anesthesia-related complications in children with Down syndrome under general anesthesia for noncardiac procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Lawrence M; Colligan, Jacqueline; Brandom, Barbara W

    2004-09-01

    Craniofacial and cardiac anomalies of Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) would seem to place these patients at higher risk of anesthesia-related complications (ARCs), but to date no comprehensive large-scale study has quantified this risk. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients with DS undergoing anesthesia between April 1, 1988, and May 31, 1995, at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. In addition, the Anesthesiology Department Quality Assurance (QA) System database of concurrently collected anesthesia information on all patients undergoing anesthesia at the hospital since 1985 was analyzed. Of the total 74,021 anesthetic encounters during the study period, 930 anesthetic encounters in 488 patients with DS undergoing noncardiac procedures were analyzed. The most frequent ARCs were bradycardia (severe) (3.66%), natural airway obstruction (1.83%), difficult intubation (0.54%), postintubation croup (1.83%), and bronchospasm (0.43%). Comprehensive reporting is needed to capture all significant adverse events. The incidences of bradycardia on induction, natural airway obstruction, and postintubation (or instrumentation) croup were significantly higher in the DS noncardiac group compared with the remaining population. Current anesthesia techniques and agents must be compared using quantitative QA data to ensure use of the safest options for each patient.

  3. Extrapedicular Infiltration Anesthesia as an Improved Method of Local Anesthesia for Unipedicular Percutaneous Vertebroplasty or Percutaneous Kyphoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liehua Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This report introduces extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia as an improved method of local anesthesia for unipedicular percutaneous vertebroplasty or percutaneous kyphoplasty. Method. From March 2015 to March 2016, 44 patients (11 males and 33 females with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with a mean age of 71.4±8.8 years (range: 60 to 89 received percutaneous vertebroplasty or percutaneous kyphoplasty. 24 patients were managed with conventional local infiltration anesthesia (CLIA and 20 patients with both CLIA and extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia (EPIA. Patients evaluated intraoperative pain by means of the visual analogue score and were monitored during the procedure for additional sedative analgesia needs and for adverse nerve root effects. Results. VAS of CLIA + EPIA and CLIA group was 2.5±0.7 and 4.3±1.0, respectively, and there was significant difference (P=0.001. In CLIA group, 1 patient required additional sedative analgesia, but in CLIA + EPIA group, no patients required that. In the two groups, no adverse nerve root effects were noted. Summary. Extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia provided good local anesthetic effects without significant complications. This method deserves further consideration for use in unipedicular percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty.

  4. Comparison of minute distribution frequency for anesthesia start and end times from an anesthesia information management system and paper records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Michael; Latif, Asad; Thomsen, Robert; Slodzinski, Martin; Raghavan, Rahul; Paul, Sharon Leigh; Stonemetz, Jerry

    2017-08-01

    Use of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) has been reported to improve accuracy of recorded information. We tested the hypothesis that analyzing the distribution of times charted on paper and computerized records could reveal possible rounding errors, and that this effect could be modulated by differences in the user interface for documenting certain event times with an AIMS. We compared the frequency distribution of start and end times for anesthesia cases completed with paper records and an AIMS. Paper anesthesia records had significantly more times ending with "0" and "5" compared to those from the AIMS (p < 0.001). For case start times, AIMS still exhibited end-digit preference, with times whose last digits had significantly higher frequencies of "0" and "5" than other integers. This effect, however, was attenuated compared to that for paper anesthesia records. For case end times, the distribution of minutes recorded with AIMS was almost evenly distributed, unlike those from paper records that still showed significant end-digit preference. The accuracy of anesthesia case start times and case end times, as inferred by statistical analysis of the distribution of the times, is enhanced with the use of an AIMS. Furthermore, the differences in AIMS user interface for documenting case start and case end times likely affects the degree of end-digit preference, and likely accuracy, of those times.

  5. Safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Kara-Junior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized comparative study of 60 eyes of 60 patients treated with or without concurrent oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, referred for cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. The sample included a treatment (n=30 and a control (n=30 group. Results: There were no records of intraoperative or postoperative intracameral bleeding complications in both the groups. At 1-month postoperative follow-up, 90.0% of patients presented spectacle-corrected visual acuity of at least 20/40. Conclusion: Cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with topical anesthesia can be successfully conducted without discontinuing warfarin.

  6. P. Prithvi Raj, MD, FFARCS: regional anesthesia pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Lakshmi; Giesecke, Adolph

    2010-04-01

    At a time when regional anesthesia was a curious alternative, Dr. Raj developed techniques to improve the success of the blocks and make regional analgesia more acceptable to the average anesthesiologist. His abundant research and numerous articles, books, lectures and demonstrations on regional anesthesia and pain management have established him as a world leader in the field. He has described new blocks and new techniques of doing old blocks. He has described the mechanism of action of intravenous regional analgesia. He has improved education and training by opening pain centers across the country, each of which has offered pain fellowship opportunities. He has founded societies dedicated to research and education in regional analgesia and pain management. Regional anesthesia and pain management will forever be linked with the name of Dr. Prithvi Raj. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center is proud to have been a part of his early development.

  7. Acupuncture Mechanisms: Anesthesia, Analgesia and Protection on Organ Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture, as a healing art in traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used to treat various diseases. In the history of acupuncture anesthesia, in the past decades, mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia has been widely investigated, and in recent years, acupuncture protection on organ functions has attracted great interest. This review summarized the research progress on mechanisms of acupuncture for analgesia and its protection against organ function injury in anesthesia, and its perspective of analgesia, immunomodulation, neuroendocrine regulation and multiple organ protection. The current evidence supports that acupuncture analgesia and its organ protection in anesthesia is associated with the integration of neuroendocrine-immune networks in the level of neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones, neuronal ensembles, lymphocytes, and endocrine cells. Although the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and its organ protection are still not completely understood, basic as well as clinic researches on the mechanisms and applications of acupuncture and related techniques are being carried out.

  8. [Physiology in Relation to Anesthesia Practice: Preface and Comments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2016-05-01

    It has been long recognized that anesthesia practice is profoundly based in physiology. With the advance of the technology of imaging, measurement and information, a serious gap has emerged between anesthesia mainly handling gross systemic parameters and molecular physiology. One of the main reasons is the lack of establishment of integration approach. This special series of reviews deals with systems physiology covering respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. It also includes metabolism, and fluid, acid-base, and electrolyte balance. Each review focuses on several physiological concepts in each area, explaining current understanding and limits of the concepts based on the new findings. They reaffirm the importance of applying physiological inference in anesthesia practice and underscore the needs of advancement of systems physiology.

  9. [Methods of anesthesia during surgical treatment for scoliosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aĭzenberg, V L; Ukolov, K Iu; Diordiev, A V

    2010-01-01

    Various anesthetic methods during surgical simultaneous double-stage correction of scoliotic deformity in the spine were analyzed in 73 children. Analgesic quality was assessed from central hemodynamics and some biochemical parameters of stress, the volume of blood loss, and the number of complications. Forty children were operated on under general sevofluorane + fentanyl anesthesia and artificial ventilation. In 33 children, this general anesthesia mode was added by epidural analgesia with 1% morphine solution in 10-12 ml of a solvent. Epidural morphine analgesia used in the complex of general anesthesia upgraded the quality of nociceptive defense, substantially decreased the consumption of systemic narcotic analgesics, an anesthetic, and relaxants, lowered blood loss by 10%, and reduced the number of postoperative complications by 20%.

  10. [Electroencephalographic monitoring during sevofluorane and halothane anesthesia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, Iu I; Babaev, B D; Ostreĭkov, I F; Shishkov, M V; Povarnin, O Ia

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two children aged 5 to 15 years were examined. Ten children underwent fluorothane; 12 received a combination of sevofluorane and isofluorane. EEG was continuously recorded by a 9-channel computer-assisted encephalograph via bilateral electrode placement and BIS values were simultaneously measured. In the fluorothane group, EEG displayed a gradual reduction in basic rhythm, an increase in slow activity with the rhythm being recovered on emergence. The BIS index changed from 95-98 to 40-45 with a spike up to 78-84 on emergence. In the sevofluorane group, EEG recorded a pointed alpha rhythm, increased amplitude, and rhythm synchronization. The isofluorane anesthesia stage changed EEC patterns towards a reduction in cortical rhythm with slow fluctuations. The BIS value changed from 96-99 to 19-25 with 35-40 on anesthesia maintenance and up to 82-87 on emergence. The BIS data agree with EEG readings at all anesthesia stages.

  11. [Patient suitability for cataract surgery under local anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlajković, Gordana; Sindelić, Radomir; Marjanović, Ivan; Knezević, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    In the past two decades local anesthesia has emerged as a reliable, safe and cost-effective first choice for cataract surgery in adults. However, the technique is not totally devoid of inherent risks, and requires not only an experienced and well-trained surgeon but also a cooperative patient. Thus, only the patient who is able to communicate, lie still in the supine position, and tolerate their face being covered by a drape is a suitable candidate for local anesthesia. In addition, the preoperative assessment should include particular features of the globe and orbit which may affect the operation as well as a history of allergy to local anesthetics. Finally, it is important to respond to patient preferences and wishes. A careful, patient selection for local anesthesia reduces the risk of surgical cancellation or delay and is essential for patient satisfaction and a successful visual outcome following cataract surgery.

  12. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Taguchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP, neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth.

  13. Anesthesia for day-care surgeries: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Day-care surgery has become a popular modality of surgical intervention throughout the globe. Numerous factors including the economic and financial issues are driving this therapeutic modality to a widespread acceptance among surgeons and anesthesiologists. Advancements in anesthesia and surgical techniques as well as availability of newer drugs are largely responsible for the progress of day-care surgeries. Numerous challenges are still faced by anesthesiologists and surgeons in carrying out day-care surgeries, especially in spite of these advancements, at resource-limited setups. The first right step in successfully delivering the day-care surgical services includes proper selection of the patients. The preanesthetic evaluation is highly essential in determining the suitability of the patient for day-care anesthesia and surgery as well as the formulation of various anesthetic plans and strategies. The current review is intended to highlight inherent challenges and probable solutions to them for this rapidly progressing anesthesia.

  14. Construction and validation of a nursing care protocol in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cassiane de Santana; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito; Peniche, Aparecida de Cassia Giane

    2017-12-11

    To construct and validate a nursing care protocol in anesthesia. methodological study of face and content validation, judging clarity, relevance, pertinence and comprehensiveness of a care protocol, elaborated from the integrative review of previous literature and based on the conceptual model of assistance perioperative nursing of Castellanos and Jouclas. The protocol was evaluated by five anesthesiologists and nurses from the surgical center. The results were analyzed through the content validity index. among the 119 items assessed by experts, 11 (9.2%) instrument items presented content validity index of <80% and were changed. The items with disagreement were related to the selection and availability of materials and equipment, especially before anesthetic induction. The content validity index, obtained for the different items, proposed after the amendments mentioned, ranged from 80 to 100%, in the three periods of anesthesia, indicating the proper validity of the proposed content. the nursing care protocol in anesthesia was considered valid.

  15. Awake Craniotomy Anesthesia: A Comparison of the Monitored Anesthesia Care and Asleep-Awake-Asleep Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; ReFaey, Karim; Garcia, Oscar; John, Amballur; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Tripathi, Punita

    2017-08-01

    Commonly used sedation techniques for an awake craniotomy include monitored anesthesia care (MAC), using an unprotected airway, and the asleep-awake-asleep (AAA) technique, using a partially or totally protected airway. We present a comparative analysis of the MAC and AAA techniques, evaluating anesthetic management, perioperative outcomes, and complications in a consecutive series of patients undergoing the removal of an eloquent brain lesion. Eighty-one patients underwent awake craniotomy for an intracranial lesion over a 9-year period performed by a single-surgeon and a team of anesthesiologists. Fifty patients were treated using the MAC technique, and 31 were treated using the AAA technique. A retrospective analysis evaluated anesthetic management, intraoperative complications, postoperative outcomes, pain management, and complications. The MAC and AAA groups had similar preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Mean operative time was shorter in the MAC group (283.5 minutes vs. 313.3 minutes; P = 0.038). Hypertension was the most common intraoperative complication seen (8% in the MAC group vs. 9.7% in the AAA group; P = 0.794). Intraoperative seizure occurred at a rate of 4% in the MAC group and 3.2% in the AAA group (P = 0.858). Awake cases were converted to general anesthesia in no patients in the MAC group and in 1 patient (3.2%) in the AAA group (P = 0.201). No cases were aborted in either group. The mean hospital length of stay was 3.98 days in the MAC group and 3.84 days in the AAA group (P = 0.833). Both the MAC and AAA sedation techniques provide an efficacious and safe method for managing awake craniotomy cases and produce similar perioperative outcomes, with the MAC technique associated with shorter operative time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental adjuvants, apoptosis and the censorship over autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manfredi, Angelo A; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia

    2005-11-01

    Alterations during apoptosis lead to the activation of autoreactive T cells and the production of autoantibodies. This article discusses the pathogenic potential of cells dying in vivo, dissecting the role of signals that favor immune responses (adjuvants) and the influence of genetic backgrounds. Diverse factors determine whether apoptosis leads or not to a self-sustaining, clinically apparent autoimmune disease. The in vivo accumulation of uncleared dying cells per se is not sufficient to cause disease. However, dying cells are antigenic and their complementation with immune adjuvants causes lethal diseases in predisposed lupus-prone animals. At least some adjuvant signals directly target the function and the activation state of antigen presenting cells. Several laboratories are aggressively pursuing the molecular identification of endogenous adjuvants. Sodium monourate and the high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) are, among those identified so far, well known to rheumatologists. However, even the complementation of apoptotic cells with potent adjuvant signals fail to cause clinical autoimmunity in most strains: autoantibodies generated are transient, do not undergo to epitope/spreading and do not cause disease. Novel tools for drug development will derive from the molecular identification of the constraints that prevent autoimmunity in normal subjects.

  17. Adjuvant synergy in the response to hepatitis B vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su; Liu, Xu; Caulfield, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    The adjuvant properties of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and a phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (S-ODN) hexamer consisting of the sequence, 5'-GACGTT-3', were evaluated in mice using hepatitis B (HBs) protein and DNA vaccines. GACGTT was an effective adjuvant when co-injected with HBs protein intramuscularly or when injected at the same anatomic site within 1 day before or 1 day after injection of the protein. Surprisingly, IL-12 had a negligible adjuvant effect when co-injected with HBsAg; however, when bound to "alum", IL-12 stimulated a dramatic increase in anti-HBs titers and a switch from a TH2 to a TH1 response profile as evidenced by an increase in IgG2a subclass anti-HBs antibodies and the ability to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) upon in vitro stimulation with an HBs peptide. Interestingly, aluminum phosphate was a far better co-adjuvant (with IL-12) than was aluminum hydroxide even though both "alums" bound >99% of the IL-12. Finally, the combination of IL-12, GACGTT, and aluminum phosphate was found to elicit a markedly polarized TH1 response. The results indicate that aluminum phosphate is highly effective at delivering an antigen (HBsAg) together with TH1 adjuvants such as IL-12 and GACGTT resulting in a shift from a TH2 to a TH1 response.

  18. Adjuvants for Clostridium tetani and Clostridium diphtheriae vaccines updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshanqiti, Fatimah M; Al-Masaudi, Saad B; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2017-01-01

    It's known that diphtheria and tetanus are a contagious lethal diseases over the years, they caused by pathogenic microbes corynebacterium diphtheria and Clostridium tetani, respectively. The diseases result from the production of bacterial toxin. Vaccination with bacterial toxoid vaccines adsorbed on particulates adjuvants still are the best way to prevent this epidemic diseases from spread. The particulate vaccines have been shown to be more efficient than soluble one for the induction of the immune responses. Nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance the immune responses. As well known the immune response to inactivate killed and subunit vaccine enhances by alum adjuvants. The adjuvants examined and tested after reducing its size to particle size, thus mimic size of viruses which is considered smallest units can derive the immune system. The major issue is minimizing the adjuvant particles, to gain insight of resulting immunity types and impact on immune response. The adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles appears to largely be a consequence of their uptake into antigen presenting cells.

  19. Contact topical anesthesia for strabismus surgery in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés-Torres, J; García-Martín, E; Peña-Calvo, P; Sanjuan-Villarreal, A; Gil-Arribas, L M; Fernández-Tirado, F J

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the effectiveness and usefulness of contact topical anesthesia in strabismus surgery in adult patients. A prospective study was conducted on 20 patients undergoing strabismus surgery using contact topical anesthesia and sedation with remifentanil. The intensity of pain was recorded using a numeric pain rating scale at the time of anesthesia implementation, during the surgical procedure, 30 min afterwards, and during the first postoperative day. The incidence of oculocardiac reflex, postoperative nausea and vomiting, corneal ulcers, patient satisfaction (numerically from 0 to 10) and the degree of residual ocular deviation were also assessed. The operation was performed successfully in all patients. Average pain intensity was 1.40 ± 1.73 during anesthesia implementation, 4.20 ± 2.57 during the surgical procedure, 2.50 ± 2.54 30 min after surgery, and 3.55 ± 2.89 during the first postoperative day. Oculocardiac reflex was observed in 7 patients (35%), postoperative nausea and vomiting in 4 (20%), and corneal ulcer in 4 (20%). The patient satisfaction was 9.53 ± 2.51. More than two-thirds (70%) of patients had a residual ocular deviation less than 10 prism diopters. Contact topical anesthesia is a safe and effective alternative for strabismus surgery in adult patients. Contact topical anesthesia provides adequate pain control, lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and oculocardiac reflex, and optimal setting of ocular alignment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of Opioid-free Anesthesia in Reducing Postoperative Respiratory Depression in Children Undergoing Tonsillectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Anesthesia; General Anesthesia; Analgesics, Opioid; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes; Physiologic Effects of Drugs; Narcotics; Analgesics; Sleep Disordered Breathing; Obstructive Sleep Apnea of Child; Tonsillectomy; Respiratory Depression; Dexmedetomidine; Ketamine; Lidocaine; Gabapentin; Pulse Oximetry

  1. Cleft-lift operation for pilonidal sinuses under tumescent local anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders

    2011-01-01

    The use of tumescent local anesthesia in the Bascom cleft-lift procedure has not been described before.......The use of tumescent local anesthesia in the Bascom cleft-lift procedure has not been described before....

  2. The Relationship Between Air Force Anesthesia Provider's Job Satisfaction and Anticipated Turnover

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stamps, David

    1997-01-01

    .... Job satisfaction of anesthesia providers has been shown to impact turnover rates (Cowan, 1995). The research instrument was a 57 item questionnaire utilized by Cowan and was sent to all AF anesthesia providers on active duty, N...

  3. General anesthesia with sevoflurane decreases myocardial blood volume and hyperemic blood flow in healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, C.S.E.; Slikkerveer, J.; Kamp, O.; Heijmans, M.W.; Loer, S.A.; de Marchi, S.F.; Vogel, R.; Boer, C.; Bouwman, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preservation of myocardial perfusion during general anesthesia is likely important in patients at risk for perioperative cardiac complications. Data related to the influence of general anesthesia on the normal myocardial circulation are limited. In this study, we investigated myocardial

  4. General Versus Spinal Anesthesia: Which is a Risk Factor for Octogenarian Hip Fracture Repair Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Shih

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: General anesthesia increased the risk of postoperative morbidity in octogenarian patients after hip fracture repair, and patients with preexisting respiratory diseases were especially vulnerable. Spinal anesthesia is strongly recommended in such individuals.

  5. Descriptive Study: Anesthesia for Awake Craniotomy in Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saipin Muangman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of awake craniotomy is to test neurological functions to ensure accurate lesion surgery and lessen postoperative neurological complications. There are several methods to provide anesthesia during awake craniotomy including local anesthesia infiltration, local anesthesia plus conscious sedation, general anesthesia and wake-up during surgery and sleep again (asleep-awake-asleep or AAA. Each method has its pro and con with different complications. In Siriraj Hospital, there was no prior study of anesthetic techniques and complications of awake craniotomy. Methods: The retrospective descriptive study of awake craniotomy was carried out with 60 patients in Siriraj Hospital 2007-2011. Results: There were 35 males (58.3% with average age 40.7±12.6 years and weight 64.2±12 kilograms undergoing awake craniotomy. Twenty patients (33.3% presented with seizure before surgery. Most diagnosis was oligodendroglioma in 25 patients (41.7%, mostly at the frontal lobe (44 patients or 73.3%. The most common position was supine(46patientsor76.7%. ICU lengthof stay was1.4±0.9(0,6days. Hospital stay was11.1±9 (4,55days. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA was mostlyused(52patientsor90% while18patients (30% received scalp block. Most patients (85% did not require nasal airways while 8 patients (13.3% did, and only 1 patient (1.7% required laryngeal mask airway (LMA to help open up air passage. The drugs used during asleep1 and asleep2 were propofol together with dexmedetomidine and fentanyl in 34 patients (56.7% and 23 patients (38.3%, respectively. Whilebeingawake (15patientsor20%,dexmedetomidine and/or fentanyl were administered. Complications during anesthesia were hypertension (33.3%, hypotension (26.7%, upper airway obstruction(23.3%, bradycardia (15%, tachycardia (10%, seizure (1.7% andnausea (1.7%. Conclusion: The most common anesthesia method inSiriraj Hospital for awake craniotomy was TIVA (90%, using propofol together with

  6. Anesthesia for plastic reconstruction surgery of radiation injury of neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yafen; Zhang Junmin; Huang Zhiqin

    1993-01-01

    The management of anesthesia used in the plastic reconstruction of 18 cases of radiation injury of neck is reported. 17 cases were malignant tumor patients. After radiotherapy, their general condition was weak. The injury of neck skin and surrounding tissues was severe. Most operations were excision of the focus and repairing the wound using adjacent flap. The choice of anesthesia depended on the general condition, degree of injury and the procedure. Good pre-operative preparation, close monitoring and satisfactory airway control during operation are very important

  7. [Anesthesia for a pediatric patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakami, Gotaro; Tazuke-Nishimura, Misako; Hirakata, Hideo; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with Coffin-Siris syndrome was scheduled to undergo diagnostic laparoscopy, inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiopexy at an ambulatory setting and same-day admission. Following anesthesia induction with inhalational sevoflurane, upper airway obstruction and hypoxemia developed. Hypoxemia was resolved immediately by manual positive pressure ventilation, although the stomach became bulged. Operation was finished uneventfully. However, he had massive bronchial secretion during anesthesia. He was admitted as planned and discharged on postoperative day 2. Since patients with Coffin-Siris syndrome have potential airway and pulmonary dysfunctions, careful perianesthesia airway and respiratory managements are essential.

  8. Cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions during anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Shiogai

    Full Text Available General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX and pentobarbital (PB. We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used.

  9. Stress and Anxiety in Children After the Use of Computerized Dental Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Alexandra M.; Carvalho, Ariany B.; Censi, Laís L.; Cardoso, Carmen L.; Leite-Panissi, Christie R.; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra da; Carvalho, Fabricio Kitazono de; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra da

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the transitory stress levels and the anxiety state in children submitted to conventional and computerized dental anesthesia. Twenty children (7 to 12 years) were randomly assigned to receive conventional and computerized dental anesthesia. To investigate the hypothesis that transitory stress could be lower after using computerized anesthesia compared to conventional anesthesia, cortisol levels in saliva were measured before and after each technique. Anxie...

  10. Interest in Anesthesia as Reflected by Keyword Searches using Common Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renyu; García, Paul S; Fleisher, Lee A

    2012-01-23

    Since current general interest in anesthesia is unknown, we analyzed internet keyword searches to gauge general interest in anesthesia in comparison with surgery and pain. The trend of keyword searches from 2004 to 2010 related to anesthesia and anaesthesia was investigated using Google Insights for Search. The trend of number of peer reviewed articles on anesthesia cited on PubMed and Medline from 2004 to 2010 was investigated. The average cost on advertising on anesthesia, surgery and pain was estimated using Google AdWords. Searching results in other common search engines were also analyzed. Correlation between year and relative number of searches was determined with pSearches for the keyword "anesthesia" or "anaesthesia" diminished since 2004 reflected by Google Insights for Search (psearch for "anesthesia side effects" is trending up over the same time period while the search for "anesthesia and safety" is trending down. The search phrase "before anesthesia" is searched more frequently than "preanesthesia" and the search for "before anesthesia" is trending up. Using "pain" as a keyword is steadily increasing over the years indicated. While different search engines may provide different total number of searching results (available posts), the ratios of searching results between some common keywords related to perioperative care are comparable, indicating similar trend. The peer reviewed manuscripts on "anesthesia" and the proportion of papers on "anesthesia and outcome" are trending up. Estimates for spending of advertising dollars are less for anesthesia-related terms when compared to that for pain or surgery due to relative smaller number of searching traffic. General interest in anesthesia (anaesthesia) as measured by internet searches appears to be decreasing. Pain, preanesthesia evaluation, anesthesia and outcome and side effects of anesthesia are the critical areas that anesthesiologists should focus on to address the increasing concerns.

  11. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under continuous spinal anesthesia in a patient with Steinert's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Mariana; Santos, Angela dos; Lages, Neusa; Correia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Steinert's disease is an intrinsic disorder of the muscle with multisystem manifestations. Myotonia may affect any muscle group, is elicited by several factors and drugs used in general anesthesia like hypnotics, sedatives and opioids. Although some authors recommend the use of regional anesthesia or combined anesthesia with low doses of opioids, the safest anesthetic technique still has to be established. We performed a continuous spinal anesthesia in a patient with Steinert's disea...

  12. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky

    2012-01-01

    in Dukes´ C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive...... preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes´ C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma......Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment...

  13. Cognitive function after adjuvant treatment for early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Riis, Jens Østergaard; Engebjerg, Malene Cramer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cognitive function in patients with early breast cancer before and after adjuvant chemotherapy or 6 months of tamoxifen. We performed a population-based study in the county of North Jutland, Denmark, including 120 women aged ... chemotherapy with seven cycles of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and fluoruracil or adjuvant tamoxifen for 6 months for early breast cancer from 2004 to 2006. They were compared with an aged-matched group of 208 women without previous cancer selected randomly from the same population. Data were collected before...... themselves as impaired at 6 months. Our results do not support that adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with cognitive side effects in breast cancer patients....

  14. Production, purification and immunogenicity of recombinant Ebola virus proteins - A comparison of Freund's adjuvant and adjuvant system 03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melén, Krister; Kakkola, Laura; He, Felix; Airenne, Kari; Vapalahti, Olli; Karlberg, Helen; Mirazimi, Ali; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2017-04-01

    There is an urgent need for Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins, EBOV-specific antibodies and recombinant antigens to be used in diagnostics and as potential vaccine candidates. Our objective was to produce and purify recombinant proteins for immunological assays and for the production of polyclonal EBOV specific antibodies. In addition, a limited comparison of the adjuvant effects of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and adjuvant system 03 (AS03) was carried out. Recombinant EBOV GST-VP24, -VP30, -VP35, -VP40 and -NP were produced in E. coli and purified with affinity chromatography followed by preparative gel electrophoresis. Recombinant EBOV GP-His was produced in Sf9 insect cells and purified by preparative gel electrophoresis. To compare the adjuvant effect of FCA and AS03, 12 rabbits were immunized four times with one of the six recombinant EBOV proteins using FCA or AS03. In addition, three guinea pigs were immunized with EBOV VP24 using FCA. With the exception of sera from two rabbits immunized with GST-VP24, the antisera against all other EBOV proteins showed very high and specific antibody responses after three to four immunizations. The adjuvant effect of AS03 was comparable to that of FCA. The produced antibodies recognized the corresponding EBOV proteins in wild type EBOV-infected cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of side effects induced by injection of different adjuvant/antigen combinations in rabbits and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, P.P.A.M.; Koedam, M.A.; Wester, P.W.; Baumans, V.; Claassen, E.; Hendriksen, C.F.M.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the side effects induced by injection of Freund's adjuvant (FA) and alternative adjuvants combined with different antigens. Rabbits and mice were injected subcutaneously, intramuscularly (rabbits) and intraperitoneally (mice) with different adjuvants (FA, Specol, RIBI, TiterMax,

  16. Scratching the surface: Exploratory analysis of key opinion leaders on rate limiting factors in novel adjuvanted-vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronker, E.S.; Claassen, E.; Weenen, T; Commandeur, H; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative article analyzes the potentially rate-limiting factors affecting value chain dynamics during adjuvanted-vaccine development. Adjuvants are considered immunostimulating substances that can be added to a vaccine. Although adjuvants have the potential to elicit adverse

  17. 42 CFR 414.61 - Payment for anesthesia services furnished by a teaching CRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for anesthesia services furnished by a... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.61 Payment for anesthesia services furnished by a teaching CRNA. (a) Basis for payment. Beginning January 1, 2010, anesthesia services furnished by a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  19. THE HAZARD OF INDUCING FENERAL ANESTHESIA BEFORE CORRECTION OF AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZEINALABEDIN JAVADZADEH

    1987-05-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative diagnosis of an airway obstruction should alert anesthetist to a potentially life threatening situation. Intubation of the trachea while the patient is awa- ke or tra~heostomy under local anesthesia is a most useful technique and safty method in induction of anesthesia where problems are anticipated during the induction or g e ne r a l anesthesia.

  20. Anesthesia-Related Maternal Mortality in the United States : 1979-2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkins, Joy L.; Chang, Jeani; Palmer, Susan K.; Gibbs, Charles P.; Callaghan, William M.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine 12 years of anesthesia-related maternal deaths from 1991 to 2002 and compare them with data from 1979 to 1990, to estimate trends in anesthesia-related maternal mortality over time, and to compare the risks of general and regional anesthesia during cesarean delivery. METHODS:

  1. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  2. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTRATHECAL DEXMEDETOMIDINE AND FENTANYL AS ADJUVANTS TO BUPIVACAINE FOR LOWER ABDOMINAL SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Various adjuvants have been used with local anesthetics in spinal anesthesia to improve the quality of block and to provide prolonged postoperative analgesia. Dexmedetomidine, the new highly selective α2 - agonist drug, is now being used as a neuraxial adju vant. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the onset and duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic effect, postoperative analgesia, and adverse effects of dexmedetomidine or fentanyl given intrathecally with hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine. METHOD OLOGY: Fifty patients classified in American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II scheduled for lower abdominal surgeries were included in this prospective cohort study at Amala Institute of Medical Sciences. Patients received either 15 mg hyperba ric bupivacaine plus 25 μg fentanyl (group 1, n = 25 or 15 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 5 μg dexmedetomidine (group 2, n = 25 intrathecally . RESULTS : Patients in dexmedetomidine group (2 had a significantly longer duration of motor and sensory block t han patients in fentanyl group . (1 The mean time regression of motor block to reach Bromage 0 was 17 6 . 2± 5.71 min in d exmeditomid ine group and 16 6 . 36 ± 5.97 min in fentanyl group (P<0.05. Duration of analgesia was 2 39.52 ± 9.05 min in D exmed i tomidine gro up and 189.96 ± 5.35 min in fentanyl group ( p< 0.05. A significant decrease in heart rate was noted in dexmedetomidine group. CONCLUSION : Intrathecal dexmedetomidine is associated with prolonged duration of analgesia and motor block along with significant dec rease in heart rate.

  3. Dexmedetomidine for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhanettin Usta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on shivering during spinal anesthesia. METHODS: Sixty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged 18-50 years, scheduled for elective minor surgical operations under spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine, were enrolled. They were administered saline (group C, n = 30 or dexmedetomidine (group D, n = 30. Motor block was assessed using a Modified Bromage Scale. The presence of shivering was assessed by a blinded observer after the completion of subarachnoid drug injection. RESULTS: Hypothermia was observed in 21 patients (70% in group D and in 20 patients (66.7% in group C (p = 0.781. Three patients (10% in group D and 17 patients (56.7% in group C experienced shivering (p = 0.001. The intensity of shivering was lower in group D than in group C (p = 0.001. Time from baseline to onset of shivering was 10 (5-15 min in group D and 15 (5-45 min in group C (p = 0.207. CONCLUSION: Dexmedetomidine infusion in the perioperative period significantly reduced shivering associated with spinal anesthesia during minor surgical procedures without any major adverse effect during the perioperative period. Therefore, we conclude that dexmedetomidine infusion is an effective drug for preventing shivering and providing sedation in patients during spinal anesthesia.

  4. Effects of combined general anesthesia and thoracic epidural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-02

    endocrine systems. Many factors such as .... operating room. A 20 G of epidural catheter was inserted under local analgesia (2 ml of 2% lidocaine) at T9–10, immediately before the induction of general anesthesia. The position of ...

  5. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness. Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind study conducted in the operating theatre of visceral surgery at Sahloul Teaching Hospital over a period of 4 months. Patients ...

  6. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using [3- 3 H] glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-[1- 3 H] deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain

  7. Anesthesia Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamings, Patricia A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe development of a collaborative graduate concentration in anesthesia nursing involving North Carolina Baptist Hospital and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Project components included (1) developing a cohesive faculty work group, (2) developing the curriculum, and (3) combining resources through an administrative…

  8. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-07

    Mar 7, 2013 ... Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased ...

  9. Pediatric ophthalmic indications for examination under anesthesia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the ophthalmic indications and challenges for pediatric ocular examination under anesthesia (EUA). Methods: The surgical register and patients' records of children who underwent EUA between 1990 and 2007 were examined to document patients' bio data, diagnoses and details of procedures and ...

  10. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased remarkably.

  11. The Efficacy of Intracorpus Spongiosum Anesthesia in Internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To critically evaluate the effectiveness of glans and intracorpus spongiosum anesthesia in performing internal urethrotomy for anterior urethral strictures. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study, 43 patients with anterior urethral strictures underwent visual internal urethrotomy under intracorpus spongiosum ...

  12. Loss of Smell and Taste After General Anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason Joe; Öberg, Stina; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a patient, who lost the ability to smell and taste after receiving a propofol-based general anesthesia for a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Immediately after the procedure, the patient had anosmia (loss of smell), ageusia (loss of taste), and light dysphagia...

  13. Brainstem Anesthesia after Retrobulbar Block: A Case Report and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Retro-bulbar anesthesia is one of the most common regional blocks used for intraocular surgeries. Complications associated with regional blocks may be limited to the eye or may be systemic. CASE REPORT: After a retro-bulbar block for glaucoma surgery, a 60-year-old man developed loss of ...

  14. Critical Thinking in Nurse Anesthesia Education: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari; Mendel, Shaun; Fisher, Rodney; Cooper, Kimball; Fisher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking is pivotal for student success in health professions education. Knowing the critical thinking ability of the learner helps educators tailor curriculum to enhance critical thinking. A quantitative comparative pilot study assessed critical thinking ability for students at two distinct points in a nurse anesthesia program…

  15. Survey of comprehensive restorative treatment for children under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yai-Tin Lin

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Although general anesthesia provides an optimal condition for treating children with high caries risk, high failure rates of composite restorations were noted. Indirect pulp capping and ferric sulfate pulpotomy followed by stainless steel crown restorations are successful techniques and can be used to treat deep carious lesions.

  16. Effect of a training model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Maas, N.E.; Bachet, I.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preclinical use of a training model in local anesthesia teaching on the subsequent clinical administration of a local anesthetic. Sixty-five dental students gave their first injection to a fellow dental student: twenty-two students after previous experience

  17. Testing of Anesthesia Machines and Defibrillators in Healthcare Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbeta, Lejla; Dzemic, Zijad; Bego, Tamer; Sejdic, Ervin; Badnjevic, Almir

    2017-09-01

    To improve the quality of patient treatment by improving the functionality of medical devices in healthcare institutions. To present the results of the safety and performance inspection of patient-relevant output parameters of anesthesia machines and defibrillators defined by legal metrology. This study covered 130 anesthesia machines and 161 defibrillators used in public and private healthcare institutions, during a period of two years. Testing procedures were carried out according to international standards and legal metrology legislative procedures in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The results show that in 13.84% of tested anesthesia machine and 14.91% of defibrillators device performance is not in accordance with requirements and should either have its results be verified, or the device removed from use or scheduled for corrective maintenance. Research emphasizes importance of independent safety and performance inspections, and gives recommendations for the frequency of inspection based on measurements. Results offer implications for adequacy of preventive and corrective maintenance performed in healthcare institutions. Based on collected data, the first digital electronical database of anesthesia machines and defibrillators used in healthcare institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina is created. This database is a useful tool for tracking each device's performance over time.

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis after spinal anesthesia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare but serious complication after spinal anesthesia. It is often related to the presence of predisposing factors, such as pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive use, and malignancies. Headache is the most common symptom. We describe a case of a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia and had postoperative headache complicated with CVT. Case report Male patient, 30 years old, ASA 1, who underwent uneventful arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anesthesia. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, the patient showed frontal, orthostatic headache that improved when positioned supine. Diagnosis of sinusitis was made in the general emergency room, and he received symptomatic medication. In subsequent days, the headache worsened with holocranial location and with little improvement in the supine position. The patient presented with left hemiplegia followed by tonic-clonic seizures. He underwent magnetic resonance venography; diagnosed with CVT. Analysis of procoagulant factors identified the presence of lupus anticoagulant antibody. The patient received anticonvulsants and anticoagulants and was discharged on the eighth day without sequelae. Discussion Any patient presenting with postural headache after spinal anesthesia, which intensifies after a plateau, loses its orthostatic characteristic or become too long, should undergo imaging tests to rule out more serious complications, such as CVT. The loss of cerebrospinal fluid leads to dilation and venous stasis that, coupled with the traction caused by the upright position, can lead to CVT in some patients with prothrombotic conditions.

  19. Neurophysiological monitoring simulation using flash animation for anesthesia resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebel, Annette; Hatton, Kevin W; Sloan, Paul A; Hayes, Christopher T; Sardam, Sean C; Dority, Jeremy; Hassan, Zaki-Udin

    2011-02-01

    Surgery of the spine is associated with the possible complication of permanent nerve injury. Neurophysiological monitoring is widely used during spine surgery to decrease the incidence and severity of neurologic injury. A profound understanding of physiological and pharmacological factors influencing evoked potentials is expected from the anesthesia provider. Because demonstration and teaching of all somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) changes is difficult in the clinical environment, we developed human patient simulator scenarios to facilitate the anesthesia resident training in neurophysiological monitoring. A SSEP simulation for resident training was created using flash animation in a patient simulation program and is the focus of this report. Feedback from participants (anesthesia residents) was obtained by a postscenario survey. This report provides a detailed description of the scenario and computer program. The survey findings indicated that the simulation session is an effective teaching method of SSEP monitoring. Flash animation integration into a patient simulation program for SSEP monitoring appears to be an effective method for anesthesia resident education in neurophysiological monitoring. Copyright © 2011 Society for Simulation in Healthcare

  20. [Perspectives of an electronic data processing-controlled anesthesia protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, G; Naujoks, B

    1987-10-01

    There are two ways to introduce electronic data processing in anesthesia recording, which should be combined in the future: (1) computer-aided data collection (during anesthesia) and (2) data analysis. Both procedures have their own advantages and disadvantages. The first step in data collection is a system whereby the on-line registered data are automatically plotted and the discrete data are noted by hand (semi-automatic recording). The second step is to keep the minutes on a display screen instead of on paper, thus producing a protocol in digital form (automatic recording). We discuss the problems of these computer-aided recording systems and future trends, in particular the problems caused by the "human-computer interface" and by uncertainty with respect to the validity of the stored data. For computer-aided data analysis of anesthesia records, one has to select appropriate data in order to build up data bases. This selection is necessary whether the protocol is in analogical or in digital form, and we attempt to develop some general rules, the concrete selection depends, of course, on the aim of the evaluation. As an example we discuss evaluations for administrative purposes. Evaluations for scientific questions are even more affected by the quality of data definitions, and the efforts involved in data management are considerably higher. At the end of this paper we sketch a hybrid information system for computer-aided anesthesia recording that combines data collection and data analysis.

  1. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using (3-/sup 3/H) glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-(1-/sup 3/H) deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain.

  2. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facque AR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an outpatient basis continues to grow, the surgeon and anesthesiologist alike must be prepared to offer safe and reliable anesthesia and analgesia in the ambulatory setting. Surgeons must be aware of the possible techniques that will be employed in their surgeries in order to anticipate and prepare patients for possible postoperative side effects, and anesthesiologists must be prepared to offer such techniques in order to ensure a relatively rapid return to normal activity despite potentially having undergone major surgery. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients with comments on recent developments in the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, cosmetic anesthesia, outpatient, ambulatory anesthesia

  3. Creation of an integrated outcome database for pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravero, Joseph P; Sriswasdi, Patcharee; Lekowski, Rebecca; Carpino, Elizabeth; Blum, Richard; Askins, Nissa; Zurakowski, David; Sinnott, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Outcome analysis is essential to health care quality improvement efforts. Pediatric anesthesia faces unique challenges in analyzing outcomes. Anesthesia most often involves a one-time point of care interaction where work flow precludes detailed feedback to care givers. In addition, pediatric outcome evaluations must take into account patients' age, development, and underlying illnesses when attempting to establish benchmarks. The deployment of electronic medical records, including preoperative, operative, and postoperative data, offers an opportunity for creating datasets large and inclusive enough to overcome these potential confounders. At our institution, perioperative data exist in five distinct environments. In this study, we describe a method to integrate these datasets into a single web-based relational database that provides researchers and clinicians with regular anesthesia outcome data that can be reviewed on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Because of its complexity, the project also entailed the creation of a 'dashboard,' allowing tracking of data trends and rapid feedback of measured metrics to promote and sustain improvements. We present the first use of such a database and dashboard for pediatric anesthesia professionals as well as successfully demonstrating its capabilities to perform as described above. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Xenon Anesthesia Improves Respiratory Gas Exchanges in Morbidly Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Abramo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xenon-in-oxygen is a high density gas mixture and may improve PaO2/FiO2 ratio in morbidly obese patients uniforming distribution of ventilation during anesthesia. Methods. We compared xenon versus sevoflurane anesthesia in twenty adult morbidly obese patients (BMI>35 candidate for roux-en-Y laparoscopic gastric bypass and assessed PaO2/FiO2 ratio at baseline, at 15 min from induction of anaesthesia and every 60 min during surgery. Differences in intraoperative and postoperative data including heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, oxygen saturation, plateau pressure, eyes opening and extubation time, Aldrete score on arrival to the PACU were compared by the Mann-Whitney test and were considered as secondary aims. Moreover the occurrence of side effects and postoperative analgesic demand were assessed. Results. In xenon group PaO2-FiO2 ratio was significantly higher after 60 min and 120 min from induction of anesthesia; heart rate and overall remifentanil consumption were lower; the eyes opening time and the extubation time were shorter; morphine consumption at 72 hours was lower; postoperative nausea was more common. Conclusions. Xenon anesthesia improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and maintained its distinctive rapid recovery times and cardiovascular stability. A reduction of opioid consumption during and after surgery and an increased incidence of PONV were also observed in xenon group.

  5. Anesthesia practices in intracranial mass surgery: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Ozmete

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Several anesthetic techniques may be used successfully to provide anesthesia for resection of intracranial mass surgery. To reduced morbidity and mortality, the possible complications must be recognized and treated early with invasive monitoring, strict hemodynamics and blood gas monitoring. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 86-91

  6. Appropriate practice of anesthesia: A plea for better training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O P Adudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of the anesthesiologist is often unknown among patients. But, the situation where the anesthesiologist is uncertain of his/her function gives more cause for concern. Methods: A questionnaire survey on the appraisal of anesthetic practices was carried out over 5 months using the style of clinical practice. Results: One-third of the anesthesiologists who responded to the survey attached little importance to the work they did by not communicating the same to their patients while 45.2% did not discuss the intraoperative findings with the surgeons. Although 57 (59.4% of the respondents usually visit their patients on the ward preoperatively, only 16 (21.6% discussed the proposed anesthetic procedure with the patients. Thirty-nine (40.2% respondents claimed that they do not wear ward coats to the ward at the preoperative visit. Less than 20% consistently conducted a postoperative visit. The majority of the respondents would treat all patients as important, irrespective of social status, while 74.5% of them considered obtaining informed consent for anesthesia from patients as significantly important. Conclusion: The current practice of anesthesia has been found wanting in several aspects. Knowledgeable discussion by anesthesiologists with surgeons as well as enlightenment of patients and their relatives about their work will improve the quality of anesthesia care remarkably. Changes in the anesthesia training curriculum to reflect these deficiencies would be helpful.

  7. Pediatric ophthalmic indications for examination under anesthesia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The surgical register and patients' records of children who underwent EUA between 1990 and 2007 were examined to document ... Keywords: Congenital eye diseases, examination under anesthesia, pediatric anesthesiasis. Résumé. Objectif: ... of blindness is lower in children than in adults, [3] children have a ...

  8. Dexmedetomidine for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Burhanettin; Gozdemir, Muhammet; Demircioglu, Ruveyda Irem; Muslu, Bunyamin; Sert, Huseyin; Yaldiz, Adnan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on shivering during spinal anesthesia. Sixty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged 18-50 years), scheduled for elective minor surgical operations under spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine, were enrolled. They were administered saline (group C, n = 30) or dexmedetomidine (group D, n = 30). Motor block was assessed using a Modified Bromage Scale. The presence of shivering was assessed by a blinded observer after the completion of subarachnoid drug injection. Hypothermia was observed in 21 patients (70%) in group D and in 20 patients (66.7%) in group C (p = 0.781). Three patients (10%) in group D and 17 patients (56.7%) in group C experienced shivering (p = 0.001). The intensity of shivering was lower in group D than in group C (p = 0.001). Time from baseline to onset of shivering was 10 (5-15) min in group D and 15 (5-45) min in group C (p = 0.207). Dexmedetomidine infusion in the perioperative period significantly reduced shivering associated with spinal anesthesia during minor surgical procedures without any major adverse effect during the perioperative period. Therefore, we conclude that dexmedetomidine infusion is an effective drug for preventing shivering and providing sedation in patients during spinal anesthesia.

  9. Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine Alleviates Shivering during Cesarean Delivery under Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liang; Xu, Jun-Mei; Liu, Su-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Li, Xin; Zhu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Shivering associated with spinal anesthesia during Cesarean delivery is an uncomfortable experience for the parturient, which may also cause adverse effects. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we sought to evaluate the effect of intrathecal dexmedetomidine, administered as an adjunct to hyperbaric bupivacaine for Cesarean delivery, on the incidence and severity of shivering associated with spinal anesthesia. Patients undergoing Cesarean delivery were randomly allocated to three groups of 30 patients each. Experimental treatments were added to hyperbaric bupivacaine as follows: Patients in group I (control) were administered isotonic saline. Patients in groups II and III received dexmedetomidine (2.5, 5 µg, respectively), mixed with isotonic saline. Shivering was observed in 11, 10 and 2 patients in groups I, II and III, respectively. The incidence of shivering in group III was significantly lower than that in groups I (p=0.005) and II (p=0.01). The severity of shivering was significantly different between the three groups (p=0.01). There were no significant inter-group differences with respect to mean arterial pressure and heart rate at any time point after administration of intrathecal local anesthesia (p>0.05). Intrathecal dexmedetomidine (5 µg) administered as an adjunct to hyperbaric bupivacaine during Cesarean delivery significantly reduced the incidence and intensity of shivering associated with spinal anesthesia.

  10. Ondansetron and meperidine prevent postoperative shivering after general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asl, Masoud Entezari; Isazadefar, Khatereh; Mohammadian, Ali; Khoshbaten, Manouchehr

    2011-02-01

    Postoperative shivering is one of the common problems following general anesthesia and may lead to multiple complications. The aim of this study was to examine the preventive effects of Ondansetron and Meperidine on postoperative shivering. This randomized placebo-controlled double blind clinical trial included 90 patients scheduled for elective gynecologic operations, randomly divided to three groups. Ondansetron (4 mg), Meperidine (0.4 mg/kg) and 2 cc normal saline (as a control group) were administered immediately before the induction of anesthesia. Anesthesia induced equivalently for all. Patients were observed in terms of vital signs, side effects and shivering. Postoperative shivering was observed in 13.3% of patients in Ondansetron group and 20% of Meperidine group, significantly lower than the controls (50%). The reduction of core and dermal temperature during the anesthesia and recovery, changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were similar in all three groups. The incidence of nausea was similar among the three groups of study while vomiting occurred in 6.7% of the Meperidine group and 3.3% of the controls but none in the patients receiving Ondansetron. Ondansetron can effectively reduce post operative shivering.

  11. Analgesia and anesthesia for neonates : Study design and ethical issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, KJS; Aranda, JV; Berde, CB; Buckman, S; Capparelli, EV; Carlo, WA; Hummel, P; Lantos, P; Johnston, CC; Lehr, VT; Lynn, AM; Oberlander, TF; Raju, TNK; Soriano, SG; Taddio, A; Walco, GA; Maxwell, L.G.

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to summarize the clinical, methodologic, and ethical considerations for researchers interested in designing future trials in neonatal analgesia and anesthesia, hopefully stimulating additional research in this field. Methods: The MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and

  12. Case Report: Management of Anesthesia in a Pregnant Patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) affect approximately 0.8% of all the newborns with malformed structured heart or large vessels. Nowadays, due to the progress in medical methods and management, most women with CHD are expected to reach childbearing age. Noticeable improvement in anesthesia management is ...

  13. Propofol drip infusion anesthesia for MRI scanning: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasao-Takano, Mami; Misumi, Kan; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kamiya, Yoko; Noguchi, Izumi; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) room is a special environment. The required intense magnetic fields create unique problems with the use of standard anesthesia machines, syringe pumps, and physiologic monitors. We have recently experienced 2 oral maxillofacial surgery cases requiring MRI: a 15-year-old boy with developmental disability and a healthy 5-year-old boy. The patients required complete immobilization during the scanning for obtaining high-quality images for the best diagnosis. Anesthesia was started in the MRI scanning room. An endotracheal intubation was performed after induction with intravenous administration of muscle relaxant. Total intravenous anesthesia via propofol drip infusion (4-7 mg/kg/h) was used during the scanning. Standard physiologic monitors were used during scan pauses, but special monitors were used during scanning. In MRI scanning for oral maxillofacial surgery, general anesthesia, with the added advantage of having a secured airway, is recommended as a safe alternative to sedation especially in cases of patients with disability and precooperative chidren.

  14. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  15. Review of knee arthroscopy performed under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Billy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Local anesthesia for knee arthroscopy is a well documented procedure with diagnostic and therapeutic role. Numerous therapeutic procedures including partial menisectomy, meniscus repair, abrasion chondroplasy, synovectomy, loose body removal can be performed safely and comfortably. Appropriate case selection, anesthetic strategy and technical expertise are the key to smooth and successful surgery.

  16. Inverse zombies, anesthesia awareness, and the hard problem of unconsciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashour, George A; LaRock, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Philosophical (p-) zombies are constructs that possess all of the behavioral features and responses of a sentient human being, yet are not conscious. P-zombies are intimately linked to the hard problem of consciousness and have been invoked as arguments against physicalist approaches. But what if we were to invert the characteristics of p-zombies? Such an inverse (i-) zombie would possess all of the behavioral features and responses of an insensate being, yet would nonetheless be conscious. While p-zombies are logically possible but naturally improbable, an approximation of i-zombies actually exists: individuals experiencing what is referred to as "anesthesia awareness." Patients under general anesthesia may be intubated (preventing speech), paralyzed (preventing movement), and narcotized (minimizing response to nociceptive stimuli). Thus, they appear--and typically are--unconscious. In 1-2 cases/1000, however, patients may be aware of intraoperative events, sometimes without any objective indices. Furthermore, a much higher percentage of patients (22% in a recent study) may have the subjective experience of dreaming during general anesthesia. P-zombies confront us with the hard problem of consciousness--how do we explain the presence of qualia? I-zombies present a more practical problem--how do we detect the presence of qualia? The current investigation compares p-zombies to i-zombies and explores the "hard problem" of unconsciousness with a focus on anesthesia awareness.

  17. [Cerebral venous thrombosis after spinal anesthesia: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisinotto, Flora Margarida Barra; Dezena, Roberto Alexandre; Abud, Tania Mara Vilela; Martins, Laura Bisinotto

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare, but serious complication after spinal anesthesia. It is often related to the presence of predisposing factors, such as pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive use, and malignancies. Headache is the most common symptom. We describe a case of a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia who had postoperative headache complicated with CVT. Male patient, 30 years old, ASA 1, who underwent uneventful arthroscopic knee surgery under spinal anesthesia. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, the patient showed frontal, orthostatic headache that improved when positioned supine. Diagnosis of sinusitis was made in the general emergency room, and he received symptomatic medication. In subsequent days, the headache worsened with holocranial location and with little improvement in the supine position. The patient presented with left hemiplegia followed by tonic-clonic seizures. He underwent magnetic resonance venography; diagnosed with CVT. Analysis of procoagulant factors identified the presence of lupus anticoagulant antibody. The patient received anticonvulsants and anticoagulants and was discharged eight days without sequelae. Any patient presenting with postural headache after spinal anesthesia, which intensifies after a plateau, loses its orthostatic characteristic or become too long, should undergo imaging tests to rule out more serious complications, such as CVT. The loss of cerebrospinal fluid leads to dilation and venous stasis that, coupled with the traction caused by the upright position, can lead to TVC in some patients with prothrombotic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... Background: Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness.

  19. Memory during general anesthesia : Practical and methodological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonebakker, AE; Jelicic, M; Passchier, J; Bonke, B

    1996-01-01

    Evidence coming from several studies into memory and awareness during general anesthesia suggests that in surgical patients who seem to be adequately anesthetized (i.e., unaware of what happens in the operating theater), some form of cognitive functioning is preserved. This finding has important

  20. Anesthesia and analgesia for caesaren section in dog

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    Vasiljević Maja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a case of a pregnant female dog, of English bulldog breed, three years old, which was brought to Belgrade Faculty of Veterinary Medicine because of inability for normal parturition. Cesarean section is an urgent intervention both in human and in veterinary medicine. Anesthesia of a pregnant dog should be carried out very carefully, because of all the physiological changes that appear during pregnancy, as well as the impact of anesthetics on embryos themselves. Anesthetics, analgesics and sedatives pass through blood brain barrier, but also their transport goes through placenta to embryo, so for that reason it is not possible to anesthetize only mother and to avoid anesthesia effects on the embryo. Therefore, anesthetics with short time of action which metabolize quickly and have minimal negative effect on embryos are recommended. When choosing the right analgesics and anesthetics, there should be known that female dogs in which it is necessary to do Cesarean section belong to the group of high risk patients. Pregnant female dogs are exposed to hypoventilation, hypoxia, hypercapnia, intense heart work, vomiting and regurgitation as well. Reversible anesthetics are recommended to provide shorter duration time of anesthesia, and in accordance, inhalation anesthetics doses are minimal. Application of α2- agonist in premedication, propophol in induction, as well as maintaining general inhalation anesthesia with sevofluran, along with local analgesia, proved to be the ideal combination in this case of cesarean section.

  1. Nerve identification and prevention of intraneural injection in regional anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayeri, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313998264

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with techniques to more reliably identify nervous structures and subsequently prevent intraneural injection in the practice of regional anesthesia. To identify nerves of the brachial plexus and sciatic nerve, both conventional techniques such as nerve stimulation, as well as

  2. Dexmedetomidine: An Adjuvant Making Large Inroads into Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introduction of newer more selective α-2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine has made a revolution in the field of anesthesia owing to its varied application. The aim of the current review is to highlight the various clinical and pharmacological aspects of dexmedetomidine in daily routine practice of anesthesiology and ...

  3. A randomised controlled trial comparing the effect of adjuvant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    29. Tucker AP, Lai C, Nadeson R, Goodschild CS. Intra- thecal midazolam I: a cohort study investigating safety. Anesth Analg. 2004;98(6):1512-20. 30. Safari F, Dabbagh A, Sharifnia M. The effect of ad- juvant midazolam compared with fentanyl on the dura- tion of spinal anesthesia with 0.5% bupivacaine in opium abusers.

  4. Combined spinal and general anesthesia is better than general anesthesia alone for laparoscopic hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam S Ghodki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Spinal anesthesia (SA was combined with general anesthesia (GA for achieving hemodynamic stability in laparoscopic hysterectomy. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of SA combined with GA in maintaining hemodynamic stability in laparoscopic hysterectomy. The secondary outcomes studied were requirement of inhaled anesthetics, vasodilators, and recovery profile. Settings and Design: We conducted a prospective, randomized study in ASAI/II patients posted for laparoscopic hysterectomy, who were willing to participate in the study. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to receive SA with GA (group SGA or plain GA (group GA. Group SGA received 10 mg bupivacaine (heavy for SA. GA was administered using conventional balanced technique. Maintenance was carried out with nitrous oxide, oxygen, and isoflurane. Comparison of hemodynamic parameters was carried out during creation of pneumoperitoneum and thereafter. Total isoflurane requirement, need of vasodilators, recovery profile, and regression of SA were studied. Statistical analysis used: Descriptive statistics in the form of mean, standard deviation, frequency, and percentages were calculated for interval and categorical variables, respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied for noting significant difference between the two groups, with chi-square tests for categorical variables and post-hoc Bonferroni test for interval variables. Comparison of heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, SPO2, and etCO2 was done with Student′s t-test or Mann-Whitney test, wherever applicable. Results: Patients in group SGA maintained stable and acceptable MAP values throughout pneumoperitoneum. The difference as compared to group GA was statistically significant (P < 0.01. Group GA showed additional requirement of metoprolol (53.33% and higher concentration of isoflurane (P < 0.001 to combat the increased MAP. Recovery was early and quick in group SGA as

  5. The analgesic effect of nitroglycerin added to lidocaine on quality of intravenous regional anesthesia in patients undergoing elective forearm and hand surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Kimiaei Asadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of nitroglycerine (NTG on sensory and motor block onset and recovery time as well as the quality of tourniquet pain relief, when added to lidocaine (LID for intravenous regional anesthesia in elective forearm and hand surgery. METHODS: A randomized double-blinded clinical trial was performed on 40 patients that were randomly allocated into two groups received lidocaine 3 mg/kg with NTG 200 µg or received only lidocaine 3 mg/kg as the control. RESULTS: There was no difference between the two study groups in hemodynamic parameters before tourniquet inflation, at any time after inflation and after its deflation. There was no difference in the mean of pain score over time between the two groups. The onset time of sensory and motor blockades was shorter in the group received both LID and NTG. The mean recovery time of sensory blockade was longer in the former group. The frequency of opioid injections was significantly lower in those who administered LID and NTG. CONCLUSION: The adjuvant drug of NTG when added to LID is effective in improving the overall quality of anesthesia, shortening onset time of both sensory and motor blockades, and stabling homodynamic parameters in hand and forearm surgery.

  6. Electroencephalographic Variation during End Maintenance and Emergence from Surgical Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacColl, Jono N.; Illing, Sam; Sleigh, Jamie W.

    2014-01-01

    The re-establishment of conscious awareness after discontinuing general anesthesia has often been assumed to be the inverse of loss of consciousness. This is despite the obvious asymmetry in the initiation and termination of natural sleep. In order to characterize the restoration of consciousness after surgery, we recorded frontal electroencephalograph (EEG) from 100 patients in the operating room during maintenance and emergence from general anesthesia. We have defined, for the first time, 4 steady-state patterns of anesthetic maintenance based on the relative EEG power in the slow-wave (anesthesia. Unlike single-drug experiments performed in healthy volunteers, we found that surgical patients exhibited greater electroencephalographic heterogeneity while re-establishing conscious awareness after drug discontinuation. Moreover, these emergence patterns could be broadly grouped according to the duration and rapidity of transitions amongst these slow-wave dominated brain states that precede awakening. Most patients progressed gradually from a pattern characterized by strong peaks of delta (0.5–4 Hz) and alpha/spindle (8–14 Hz) power (‘Slow-Wave Anesthesia’) to a state marked by low delta-spindle power (‘Non Slow-Wave Anesthesia’) before awakening. However, 31% of patients transitioned abruptly from Slow-Wave Anesthesia to waking; they were also more likely to express pain in the post-operative period. Our results, based on sleep-staging classification, provide the first systematized nomenclature for tracking brain states under general anesthesia from maintenance to emergence, and suggest that these transitions may correlate with post-operative outcomes such as pain. PMID:25264892

  7. Active Emergence from Propofol General Anesthesia is Induced by Methylphenidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemali, Jessica J.; Van Dort, Christa J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Isoflurane and propofol are general anesthetics that may have distinct molecular mechanisms of action. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylphenidate actively induces emergence from propofol general anesthesia. METHODS Using adult rats, the effect of methylphenidate on time to emergence after a single bolus of propofol was determined. The ability of methylphenidate to restore righting during a continuous target controlled infusion of propofol was also tested. In a separate group of rats, a target controlled infusion of propofol was established and spectral analysis was performed on electroencephalogram recordings taken before and after methylphenidate administration. RESULTS Methylphenidate decreased median time to emergence after a single dose of propofol from 735 seconds (95% CI: 598 to 897 seconds, n=6) to 448 seconds (95% CI: 371 to 495 seconds, n=6). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0051). During continuous propofol anesthesia with a median final target plasma concentration of 4.0 μg/ml (95%CI: 3.2 to 4.6, n=6), none of the rats exhibited purposeful movements after injection of normal saline. After methylphenidate, however, all 6 rats promptly exhibited arousal and had restoration of righting with a median time of 82 seconds (95% CI: 30 to 166 seconds). Spectral analysis of electroencephalogram data demonstrated a shift in peak power from delta (anesthesia in rats. Further study is warranted to test the hypothesis that methylphenidate induces emergence from propofol general anesthesia in humans. PMID:22446983

  8. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  9. Spatial memory is intact in aged rats after propofol anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Ho; Culley, Deborah J; Baxter, Mark G; Xie, Zhongcong; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Crosby, Gregory

    2008-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that aged rats have persistent impairment of spatial memory after sedation with nitrous oxide or general anesthesia with isoflurane-nitrous oxide. Propofol has different receptor mechanisms of action and a favorable short-term recovery profile, and it has been proposed that propofol is devoid of enduring effects on cognitive performance. No studies have investigated this question in aged subjects, however, so we designed an experiment to examine the long-term effects of propofol anesthesia on spatial working memory. Eighteen-mo-old rats were randomized to 2 h of 100% oxygen-propofol anesthesia (n=11) or to a control group that breathed 100% oxygen (n=10). Propofol was administered by continuous infusion via a tail vein catheter. Rats breathed spontaneously and rectal temperature was maintained. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured noninvasively and a venous blood gas was obtained just before discontinuation of propofol. After a 2-day recovery, spatial working memory was assessed for 14 days using a 12-arm radial maze. The number of total errors, number of correct choices to first error, and time to complete the maze was recorded and analyzed using a repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), with Pmemory in aged rats. In aged rats, propofol anesthesia is devoid of the persistent memory effects observed with other general anesthetics in this model. Thus, while it appears that the state of general anesthesia is neither necessary nor sufficient for development of postanesthetic memory impairment, the choice of anesthetics may play a role in late cognitive outcome in the aged.

  10. Is Lumbosacral Plexus Block an Effective and Safe Alternative as Surgical Anesthesia for Total Hip Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    BACKGROUND An increasing number of patients for total hip replacement presents with cardiovascular comorbidities, that render them fragile to traditional methods of anesthesia. The aim of this intended study is to compare lumbosacral plexus blockade with continuous spinal anesthesia for surgical...... anesthesia in total hip replacement. We hypothesize that lumbosacral plexus blockade induces less hemodynamic impact compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. METHODS Thirty patients (ASA I-III, age ≥ 50 years) will be included for elective hip replacement after informed consent. Hemodynamics...... compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. This might favor the future use of lumbosacral plexus blockade for patients with severe cardiovascular comorbidities....

  11. Is lumbosacral plexus block an effective and safe alternative as surgical anesthesia for total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    BACKGROUND An increasing number of patients for total hip replacement presents with cardiovascular comorbidities, that render them fragile to traditional methods of anesthesia. The aim of this intended study is to compare lumbosacral plexus blockade with continuous spinal anesthesia for surgical...... anesthesia in total hip replacement. We hypothesize that lumbosacral plexus blockade induces less hemodynamic impact compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. METHODS Thirty patients (ASA I-III, age ≥ 50 years) will be included for elective hip replacement after informed consent. Hemodynamics...... compared to continuous spinal anesthesia. This might favor the future use of lumbosacral plexus blockade for patients with severe cardiovascular comorbidities....

  12. Integration of the enterprise electronic health record and anesthesia information management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springman, Scott R

    2011-09-01

    Fewer than 5% of anesthesia departments use an electronic medical record (EMR) that is anesthesia specific. Many anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been developed with a focus only on the unique needs of anesthesia providers, without being fully integrated into other electronic health record components of the entire enterprise medical system. To understand why anesthesia providers should embrace health information technology (HIT) on a health system-wide basis, this article reviews recent HIT history and reviews HIT concepts. The author explores current developments in efforts to expand enterprise HIT, and the pros and cons of full enterprise integration with an AIMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adjuvants and delivery systems in veterinary vaccinology: current state and future developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Dedieu, Laurence; Johnson, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Modern adjuvants should induce strong and balanced immune responses, and it is often desirable to induce specific types of immunity. As an example, efficient Th1-immunity-inducing adjuvants are highly in demand. Such adjuvants promote good cell-mediated immunity against subunit vaccines that have...

  14. External Validation of Adjuvant! Online Breast Cancer Prognosis Tool Prioritising Recommendations for Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajage, D.; de Rycke, Y.; Bollet, M.; Savignoni, A.; Caly, M.; Pierga, J.Y.; Horlings, H.M.; van de Vijver, M.J.; Vincent-Salomon, A.; Sigal-Zafrani, B.; Senechal, C.; Asselain, B.; Sastre, X.; Reyal, F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adjuvant! Online is a web-based application designed to provide 10 years survival probability of patients with breast cancer. Several predictors have not been assessed in the original Adjuvant! Online study. We provide the validation of Adjuvant! Online algorithm on two breast cancer

  15. External validation of Adjuvant! Online breast cancer prognosis tool. Prioritising recommendations for improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajage, David; de Rycke, Yann; Bollet, Marc; Savignoni, Alexia; Caly, Martial; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Horlings, Hugo M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Senechal, Claire; Asselain, Bernard; Sastre, Xavier; Reyal, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant! Online is a web-based application designed to provide 10 years survival probability of patients with breast cancer. Several predictors have not been assessed in the original Adjuvant! Online study. We provide the validation of Adjuvant! Online algorithm on two breast cancer datasets, and

  16. Advax, a Delta Inulin Microparticle, Potentiates In-built Adjuvant Property of Co-administered Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hayashi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Advax, a delta inulin-derived microparticle, has been developed as an adjuvant for several vaccines. However, its immunological characteristics and potential mechanism of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Advax behaves as a type-2 adjuvant when combined with influenza split vaccine, a T helper (Th2-type antigen, but behaves as a type-1 adjuvant when combined with influenza inactivated whole virion (WV, a Th1-type antigen. In addition, an adjuvant effect was not observed when Advax-adjuvanted WV vaccine was used to immunize toll-like receptor (TLR 7 knockout mice which are unable to respond to RNA contained in WV antigen. Similarly, no adjuvant effect was seen when Advax was combined with endotoxin-free ovalbumin, a neutral Th0-type antigen. An adjuvant effect was also not seen in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α knockout mice, and the adjuvant effect required the presences of dendritic cells (DCs and phagocytic macrophages. Therefore, unlike other adjuvants, Advax potentiates the intrinsic or in-built adjuvant property of co-administered antigens. Hence, Advax is a unique class of adjuvant which can potentiate the intrinsic adjuvant feature of the vaccine antigens through a yet to be determined mechanism.

  17. Advax, a Delta Inulin Microparticle, Potentiates In-built Adjuvant Property of Co-administered Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Haseda, Yasunari; Kobiyama, Kouji; Wijaya, Edward; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Standley, Daron M; Yamada, Hiroshi; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Hara, Hiromitsu; Saito, Takashi; Takai, Toshiyuki; Coban, Cevayir; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Ishii, Ken J

    2017-02-01

    Advax, a delta inulin-derived microparticle, has been developed as an adjuvant for several vaccines. However, its immunological characteristics and potential mechanism of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that Advax behaves as a type-2 adjuvant when combined with influenza split vaccine, a T helper (Th)2-type antigen, but behaves as a type-1 adjuvant when combined with influenza inactivated whole virion (WV), a Th1-type antigen. In addition, an adjuvant effect was not observed when Advax-adjuvanted WV vaccine was used to immunize toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 knockout mice which are unable to respond to RNA contained in WV antigen. Similarly, no adjuvant effect was seen when Advax was combined with endotoxin-free ovalbumin, a neutral Th0-type antigen. An adjuvant effect was also not seen in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α knockout mice, and the adjuvant effect required the presences of dendritic cells (DCs) and phagocytic macrophages. Therefore, unlike other adjuvants, Advax potentiates the intrinsic or in-built adjuvant property of co-administered antigens. Hence, Advax is a unique class of adjuvant which can potentiate the intrinsic adjuvant feature of the vaccine antigens through a yet to be determined mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Is there any benefit in associating neuraxial anesthesia to general anesthesia for coronary artery bypass graft surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; de Sousa Rodrigues, Célio Fernando; Castro, Aldemar Araújo; da Cunha, Rafael Martins; Barbosa, Tatiana Roa Bezerra Wanderley

    2016-01-01

    The use of neuraxial anesthesia in cardiac surgery is recent, but the hemodynamic effects of local anesthetics and anticoagulation can result in risk to patients. To review the benefits of neuraxial anesthesia in cardiac surgery for CABG through a systematic review of systematic reviews. The search was performed in Pubmed (January 1966 to December 2012), Embase (1974 to December 2012), The Cochrane Library (volume 10, 2012) and Lilacs (1982 to December 2012) databases, in search of articles of systematic reviews. The following variables: mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, in-hospital length of stay, arrhythmias and epidural hematoma were analyzed. The use of neuraxial anesthesia in cardiac surgery remains controversial. The greatest benefit found by this review was the possibility of reducing postoperative arrhythmias, but this result was contradictory among the identified findings. The results of findings regarding mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke and in-hospital length of stay did not show greater efficacy of neuraxial anesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Anesthesia 2.0: internet-based information resources and Web 2.0 applications in anesthesia education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Young, Chelsea; Zamora, Abby; Kurup, Viji; Macario, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Informatics is a broad field encompassing artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science, information science, and social science. The goal of this review is to illustrate how Web 2.0 information technologies could be used to improve anesthesia education. Educators in all specialties of medicine are increasingly studying Web 2.0 technologies to maximize postgraduate medical education of housestaff. These technologies include microblogging, blogs, really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, podcasts, wikis, and social bookmarking and networking. 'Anesthesia 2.0' reflects our expectation that these technologies will foster innovation and interactivity in anesthesia-related web resources which embraces the principles of openness, sharing, and interconnectedness that represent the Web 2.0 movement. Although several recent studies have shown benefits of implementing these systems into medical education, much more investigation is needed. Although direct practice and observation in the operating room are essential, Web 2.0 technologies hold great promise to innovate anesthesia education and clinical practice such that the resident learner need not be in a classroom for a didactic talk, or even in the operating room to see how an arterial line is properly placed. Thoughtful research to maximize implementation of these technologies should be a priority for development by academic anesthesiology departments. Web 2.0 and advanced informatics resources will be part of physician lifelong learning and clinical practice.

  20. General Anesthesia versus Local Anesthesia in StereotaXY (GALAXY) for Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, R. A.; Verbaan, D.; de Bie, R. M. A.; Schuurman, P. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study is to investigate if deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for Parkinson's disease (PD) under general anesthesia further improves outcome by lessening postoperative cognitive, mood, and behavioral adverse effects; shorten surgical time and