WorldWideScience

Sample records for adjoint quasi-geostrophic models

  1. Arctic-Mid-Latitude Linkages in a Nonlinear Quasi-Geostrophic Atmospheric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörthe Handorf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasi-geostrophic three-level T63 model of the wintertime atmospheric circulation of the Northern Hemisphere has been applied to investigate the impact of Arctic amplification (increase in surface air temperatures and loss of Arctic sea ice during the last 15 years on the mid-latitude large-scale atmospheric circulation. The model demonstrates a mid-latitude response to an Arctic diabatic heating anomaly. A clear shift towards a negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO− during low sea-ice-cover conditions occurs, connected with weakening of mid-latitude westerlies over the Atlantic and colder winters over Northern Eurasia. Compared to reanalysis data, there is no clear model response with respect to the Pacific Ocean and North America.

  2. Subcritical thermal convection of liquid metals in a rotating sphere using a quasi-geostrophic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, P.; Guervilly, C.

    2016-12-01

    We study non-linear convection in a rapidly rotating sphere with internal heating for values of the Prandtl number relevant for liquid metals (10-2-1). We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which variations of the axial vorticity along the rotation axis are neglected, whereas the temperature field is fully three-dimensional. We identify two separate branches of convection close to onset: (i) a well-known weak branch for Ekman numbers greater than 10-6, which is continuous at the onset (supercritical bifurcation) and consists of the interaction of thermal Rossby waves, and (ii) a novel strong branch at lower Ekman numbers, which is discontinuous at the onset. The strong branch becomes subcritical for Ekman numbers of the order of 10-8. On the strong branch, the Reynolds number of the flow is greater than 1000, and a strong zonal flow with multiple jets develops, even close to the non-linear onset of convection. We find that the subcriticality is amplified by decreasing the Prandtl number. The two branches can co-exist for intermediate Ekman numbers, leading to hysteresis (E = 10-6, Pr =10-2). Non-linear oscillations are observed near the onset of convection for E = 10-7 and Pr = 10-1.

  3. Subcritical convection of liquid metals in a rotating sphere using a quasi-geostrophic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, Céline; Cardin, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We study nonlinear convection in a rapidly rotating sphere with internal heating for values of the Prandtl number relevant for liquid metals ($Pr\\in[10^{-2},10^{-1}]$). We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which variations of the axial vorticity along the rotation axis are neglected, whereas the temperature field is fully three-dimensional. We identify two separate branches of convection close to onset: (i) a well-known weak branch for Ekman numbers greater than $10^{-6}$, which is continuous at the onset (supercritical bifurcation) and consists of thermal Rossby waves, and (ii) a novel strong branch at lower Ekman numbers, which is discontinuous at the onset. The strong branch becomes subcritical for Ekman numbers of the order of $10^{-8}$. On the strong branch, the Reynolds number of the flow is greater than $10^3$, and a strong zonal flow with multiple jets develops, even close to the nonlinear onset of convection. We find that the subcriticality is amplified by decreasing the Prandtl number. The two branches can co-exist for intermediate Ekman numbers, leading to hysteresis ($Ek=10^{-6}$, $Pr=10^{-2}$). Nonlinear oscillations are observed near the onset of convection for $Ek=10^{-7}$ and $Pr=10^{-1}$.

  4. Convergence of Extreme Value Statistics in a Two-Layer Quasi-Geostrophic Atmospheric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Melinda Gálfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We search for the signature of universal properties of extreme events, theoretically predicted for Axiom A flows, in a chaotic and high-dimensional dynamical system. We study the convergence of GEV (Generalized Extreme Value and GP (Generalized Pareto shape parameter estimates to the theoretical value, which is expressed in terms of the partial information dimensions of the attractor. We consider a two-layer quasi-geostrophic atmospheric model of the mid-latitudes, adopt two levels of forcing, and analyse the extremes of different types of physical observables (local energy, zonally averaged energy, and globally averaged energy. We find good agreement in the shape parameter estimates with the theory only in the case of more intense forcing, corresponding to a strong chaotic behaviour, for some observables (the local energy at every latitude. Due to the limited (though very large data size and to the presence of serial correlations, it is difficult to obtain robust statistics of extremes in the case of the other observables. In the case of weak forcing, which leads to weaker chaotic conditions with regime behaviour, we find, unsurprisingly, worse agreement with the theory developed for Axiom A flows.

  5. Interactive and Mutual Information among low-frequency variability modes of a quasi-geostrophic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carlos; Perdigão, Rui

    2013-04-01

    We assess the Shannon multivariate mutual information (MI) and interaction information (IT), either on a simultaneous or on a time-lagged (up to 3 months) basis, between low-frequency modes of an atmospheric, T63, 3-level, perpetual winter forced, quasi-geostrophic model. For that purpose, Principal Components (PCs) of the spherical-harmonic components of the monthly-mean stream-functions are used. Every single PC time-series (of 1000 years length) is subjected to a prior Gaussian anamorphosis before computing MI and IT. That allows for unambiguously decomposing MI into the positive Gaussian (depending on the Gaussian correlation) and the non-Gaussian MI terms. We use a kernel-based MI estimator. Since marginal Gaussian PDFs are imposed, that makes MI estimation very robust even when using short data. Statistically significant non-Gaussian bivariate MI appears between the variance-dominating PC-pairs of larger space and time-scales with evidence in the bivariate PDF of the mixing of PDFs centered at different weather regimes. The corresponding residual Gaussian MI is due to PCs being uncorrelated and to the weak non-Gaussianity of monthly-based PCs. The Gaussianized PCs in the tail's variance spectrum (of faster variability) do not much differ from Gaussian independent white noises. Trivariate MI I(A,B,C) (also known as total correlation) is computed among simultaneous and time-lagged PCs: A,B,C as well as the interaction information: IT(A,B,C)=I(A,B|C)-I(A,B)=I(A,C|B)-I(A,C)=I(B,C|A)-I(B,C) along with their Gaussian and non-Gaussian counterparts where conditional MI is used. The corresponding non-Gaussian term allows for quantifying nonlinear predictability and causality. For example, we find interactive variable triads of positive non-Gaussian IT where A=X(t+tau), B=Y(t+tau), C=Z(t) where t is time, tau is time-lag and X,Y,Z are arbitrary PCs. Typically it works when X,Y are nearly independent while Z(t) is a mediator variable taking the role of a precursor

  6. Multiple zonal jets and convective heat transport barriers in a quasi-geostrophic model of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection driven by internal heating in a full sphere. We use a numerical model based on the quasi-geostrophic approximation for the velocity field, whereas the temperature field is 3-D. This approximation allows us to perform simulations for Ekman numbers down to 10-8, Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (˜10-1) and Reynolds numbers up to 3 × 104. Persistent zonal flows composed of multiple jets form as a result of the mixing of potential vorticity. For the largest Rayleigh numbers computed, the zonal velocity is larger than the convective velocity despite the presence of boundary friction. The convective structures and the zonal jets widen when the thermal forcing increases. Prograde and retrograde zonal jets are dynamically different: in the prograde jets (which correspond to weak potential vorticity gradients) the convection transports heat efficiently and the mean temperature tends to be homogenized; by contrast, in the cores of the retrograde jets (which correspond to steep gradients of potential vorticity) the dynamics is dominated by the propagation of Rossby waves, resulting in the formation of steep mean temperature gradients and the dominance of conduction in the heat transfer process. Consequently, in quasi-geostrophic systems, the width of the retrograde zonal jets controls the efficiency of the heat transfer.

  7. Large-Scale Flows and Magnetic Fields Produced by Rotating Convection in a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Convection is the main heat transport process in the liquid cores of planets. The convective flows are thought to be turbulent and constrained by rotation (corresponding to high Reynolds numbers Re and low Rossby numbers Ro). Under these conditions, and in the absence of magnetic fields, the convective flows can produce coherent Reynolds stresses that drive persistent large-scale zonal flows. The formation of large-scale flows has crucial implications for the thermal evolution of planets and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. In this work, we explore this problem with numerical simulations using a quasi-geostrophic approximation to model convective and zonal flows at Re 104 and Ro 10-4 for Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (Pr 0.1). The formation of intense multiple zonal jets strongly affects the convective heat transport, leading to the formation of a mean temperature staircase. We also study the generation of magnetic fields by the quasi-geostrophic flows at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

  8. A Two-Layer Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Summer Trough Formation in the Australian Subtropical Easterlies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandry, C. B.; Leslie, L. M.

    1984-03-01

    C.B. FandryCSIRO Division of Oceanography, G.P.O. Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia 7001 L.M. LeslieAustralian Numerical Meteorology Research Centre, G.P.O. Box 5089AA, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 3001A dominant feature of the low-level easterly wind flow in the Australian subtropics during summer is the trough development that occurs on both the western and eastern sides of the continent. This phenomenon is investigated analytically with a two-level model. A generalized solution is derived from the steady-state quasi-geostrophic equations governing uniform flow over arbitrarily shaped orography. The model solutions indicate that orography acting alone is of only marginal importance in producing the western trough. However, the high east coast orography is of significance in the formation of the eastern trough.Land-sea temperature contrast is parameterized in terms of equivalent orography with localized surface heating being mathematically equivalent to an orographic depression. The solutions including orography and surface heating acting together simulate well the lower layer flow over the Australian subtropics.

  9. Quasi-geostrophic dynamo theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael A.

    2018-03-01

    The asymptotic theory of rapidly rotating, convection-driven dynamos in a plane layer is discussed. A key characteristic of these quasi-geostrophic dynamos is that the Lorentz force is comparable in magnitude to the ageostrophic component of the Coriolis force, rather than the leading order component that yields geostrophy. This characteristic is consistent with both observations of planetary dynamos and numerical dynamo investigations, where the traditional Elssasser number, ΛT = O (1) . Thus, while numerical dynamo simulations currently cannot access the strongly turbulent flows that are thought to be characteristic of planetary interiors, it is argued that they are in the appropriate geostrophically balanced regime provided that inertial and viscous forces are both small relative to the leading order Coriolis force. Four distinct quasi-geostrophic dynamo regimes are discussed, with each regime characterized by a unique magnetic to kinetic energy density ratio and differing dynamics. The axial torque due to the Lorentz force is shown to be asymptotically small for such quasi-geostrophic dynamos, suggesting that 'Taylor's constraint' represents an ambiguous measure of the primary force balance in a rapidly rotating dynamo.

  10. Kinematic validation of a quasi-geostrophic model for the fast dynamics in the Earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, S.; Jackson, A.

    2017-09-01

    We derive a quasi-geostrophic (QG) system of equations suitable for the description of the Earth's core dynamics on interannual to decadal timescales. Over these timescales, rotation is assumed to be the dominant force and fluid motions are strongly invariant along the direction parallel to the rotation axis. The diffusion-free, QG system derived here is similar to the one derived in Canet et al. but the projection of the governing equations on the equatorial disc is handled via vertical integration and mass conservation is applied to the velocity field. Here we carefully analyse the properties of the resulting equations and we validate them neglecting the action of the Lorentz force in the momentum equation. We derive a novel analytical solution describing the evolution of the magnetic field under these assumptions in the presence of a purely azimuthal flow and an alternative formulation that allows us to numerically solve the evolution equations with a finite element method. The excellent agreement we found with the analytical solution proves that numerical integration of the QG system is possible and that it preserves important physical properties of the magnetic field. Implementation of magnetic diffusion is also briefly considered.

  11. Variational four-dimensional analysis using quasi-geostrophic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derber, John C.

    1987-01-01

    A variational four-dimensional analysis technique using quasi-geostrophic models as constraints is examined using gridded fields as data. The analysis method uses a standard iterative nonlinear minimization technique to find the solution to the constraining forecast model which best fits the data as measured by a predefined functional. The minimization algorithm uses the derivative of the functional with respect to each of the initial condition values. This derivative vector is found by inserting the weighted differences between the model solution and the inserted data into a backwards integrating adjoint model. The four-dimensional analysis system was examined by applying it to fields created from a primitive equations model forecast and to fields created from satellite retrievals. The results show that the technique has several interesting characteristics not found in more traditional four-dimensional assimilation techniques. These features include a close fit of the model solution to the observations throughout the analysis interval and an insensitivity to the frequency of data insertion or the amount of data. The four-dimensional analysis technique is very versatile and can be extended to more complex problems with little theoretical difficulty.

  12. Quasi-geostrophic dynamics in the presence of moisture gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Joy M.; Sukhatme, Jai

    2016-01-01

    The derivation of a quasi-geostrophic (QG) system from the rotating shallow water equations on a midlatitude beta-plane coupled with moisture is presented. Condensation is prescribed to occur whenever the moisture at a point exceeds a prescribed saturation value. It is seen that a slow condensation time scale is required to obtain a consistent set of equations at leading order. Further, since the advecting wind fields are geostrophic, changes in moisture (and hence, precipitation) occur only ...

  13. Hydromagnetic quasi-geostrophic modes in rapidly rotating planetary cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canet, E.; Finlay, Chris; Fournier, A.

    2014-01-01

    The core of a terrestrial-type planet consists of a spherical shell of rapidly rotating, electrically conducting, fluid. Such a body supports two distinct classes of quasi-geostrophic (QG) eigenmodes: fast, primarily hydrodynamic, inertial modes with period related to the rotation time scale......, or shorter than, their oscillation time scale.Based on our analysis, we expect Mercury to be in a regime where the slow magnetic modes are of quasi-free decay type. Earth and possibly Ganymede, with their larger Elsasser numbers, may possess slow modes that are in the transition regime of weak diffusion...

  14. Adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursky, Paul; Porter, Michael B.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Hodgkiss, W. S.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2004-02-01

    The use of adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion is investigated. An adjoint model is derived from a linearized forward propagation model to propagate data-model misfit at the observation points back through the medium to the medium perturbations not being accounted for in the model. This adjoint model can be used to aid in inverting for these unaccounted medium perturbations. Adjoint methods are being applied to a variety of inversion problems, but have not drawn much attention from the underwater acoustic community. This paper presents an application of adjoint methods to acoustic inversion. Inversions are demonstrated in simulation for both range-independent and range-dependent sound speed profiles using the adjoint of a parabolic equation model. Sensitivity and error analyses are discussed showing how the adjoint model enables calculations to be performed in the space of observations, rather than the often much larger space of model parameters. Using an adjoint model enables directions of steepest descent in the model parameters (what we invert for) to be calculated using far fewer modeling runs than if a forward model only were used.

  15. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  17. A new approach for developing adjoint models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Many data assimilation algorithms rely on the availability of gradients of misfit functionals, which can be efficiently computed with adjoint models. However, the development of an adjoint model for a complex geophysical code is generally very difficult. Algorithmic differentiation (AD, also called automatic differentiation) offers one strategy for simplifying this task: it takes the abstraction that a model is a sequence of primitive instructions, each of which may be differentiated in turn. While extremely successful, this low-level abstraction runs into time-consuming difficulties when applied to the whole codebase of a model, such as differentiating through linear solves, model I/O, calls to external libraries, language features that are unsupported by the AD tool, and the use of multiple programming languages. While these difficulties can be overcome, it requires a large amount of technical expertise and an intimate familiarity with both the AD tool and the model. An alternative to applying the AD tool to the whole codebase is to assemble the discrete adjoint equations and use these to compute the necessary gradients. With this approach, the AD tool must be applied to the nonlinear assembly operators, which are typically small, self-contained units of the codebase. The disadvantage of this approach is that the assembly of the discrete adjoint equations is still very difficult to perform correctly, especially for complex multiphysics models that perform temporal integration; as it stands, this approach is as difficult and time-consuming as applying AD to the whole model. In this work, we have developed a library which greatly simplifies and automates the alternate approach of assembling the discrete adjoint equations. We propose a complementary, higher-level abstraction to that of AD: that a model is a sequence of linear solves. The developer annotates model source code with library calls that build a 'tape' of the operators involved and their dependencies, and

  18. Global Adjoint Tomography: Next-Generation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Orsvuran, Ridvan; Peter, Daniel; Ruan, Youyi; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    The first-generation global adjoint tomography model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al. 2016) is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations based on GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of 3D wave propagation and Fréchet kernels. For simplicity, GLAD-M15 was constructed as an elastic model with transverse isotropy confined to the upper mantle. However, Earth's mantle and crust show significant evidence of anisotropy as a result of its composition and deformation. There may be different sources of seismic anisotropy affecting both body and surface waves. As a first attempt, we initially tackle with surface-wave anisotropy and proceed iterations using the same 253 earthquake data set used in GLAD-M15 with an emphasize on upper-mantle. Furthermore, we explore new misfits, such as double-difference measurements (Yuan et al. 2016), to better deal with the possible artifacts of the uneven distribution of seismic stations globally and minimize source uncertainties in structural inversions. We will present our observations with the initial results of azimuthally anisotropic inversions and also discuss the next generation global models with various parametrizations. Meanwhile our goal is to use all available seismic data in imaging. This however requires a solid framework to perform iterative adjoint tomography workflows with big data on supercomputers. We will talk about developments in adjoint tomography workflow from the need of defining new seismic and computational data formats (e.g., ASDF by Krischer et al. 2016, ADIOS by Liu et al. 2011) to developing new pre- and post-processing tools together with experimenting workflow management tools, such as Pegasus (Deelman et al. 2015). All our simulations are performed on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Our ultimate aim is to get ready to harness ORNL's next-generation supercomputer "Summit", an IBM with Power-9 CPUs and NVIDIA Volta GPU accelerators, to be ready by 2018 which will enable us to

  19. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    KAUST Repository

    Bozdağ, Ebru

    2016-09-23

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named \\'Titan\\', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used \\'crustal corrections\\'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ M ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the

  20. Data adjoint assimilation into the adjoint inverse coastal circulation model that conforms to topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Gaddard, A. J. H.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Piggott, M. D.; Umpleby, A. P.; Copeland, G. J. M.

    2003-04-01

    There are often uncertain factors in ocean numerical models, e.g. the initial and boundary conditions, parameters. With the introduction of advanced observational techniques, more attention has been given to data assimilation to improve the predictive capabilities of ocean models. The question is how and where best to assimilate the observations for reducing the dependence of solutions on the initial and boundary data and getting a better representation of non-stratified water flows around and over coastal topography. In this investigation, we aim to introduce an adjoint model into the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM), which is a 3D nonlinear non-hydrostatic model with mesh adaptivity and optimal Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) parallel solver. By using an unstructured mesh, ICOM can automatically conform to the complicated coastal topography and with mesh adaptivity the resolution can be designed to meet physics demands such as flows in region of high shear and flow separation at coastlines. In the initial stage of this investigation, we discuss various adjoint methods and their consistence. To accelerate the convergence of the gradient calculation and reduce the memory requirement, the numerical techniques: Nonlinear Conjugate Gradient and Check Pointing are introduced. We then apply the adjoint method to 1D nonlinear shallow water and 2D coastal flow past a headland with the inversion of both boundary and initial conditions. We give an initial insight to (1) Effect of data information to be inverted; (2) Role of the nonlinear terms in the inversion; (3) Possibility of adopting non-consistent discretization schemes in the forward and backward adjoint models; (4) Effect of various boundary conditions, e.g. uniform flow and wave/tidal flow.

  1. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  2. Use of the quasi-geostrophic dynamical framework to reconstruct the 3-D ocean state in a high-resolution realistic simulation of North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresnay, Simon; Ponte, Aurélien

    2017-04-01

    The quasi-geostrophic (QG) framework has been, is and will be still for years to come a cornerstone method linking observations with estimates of the ocean circulation and state. We have used here the QG framework to reconstruct dynamical variables of the 3-D ocean in a state-of-the-art high-resolution (1/60 deg, 300 vertical levels) numerical simulation of the North Atlantic (NATL60). The work was carried out in 3 boxes of the simulation: Gulf Stream, Azores and Reykjaness Ridge. In a first part, general diagnostics describing the eddying dynamics have been performed and show that the QG scaling verifies in general, at depths distant from mixed layer and bathymetric gradients. Correlations with surface observables variables (e.g. temperature, sea level) were computed and estimates of quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (QGPV) were reconstructed by the means of regression laws. It is shown that that reconstruction of QGPV exhibits valuable skill for a restricted scale range, mainly using sea level as the variable of regression. Additional discussion is given, based on the flow balanced with QGPV. This work is part of the DIMUP project, aiming to improve our ability to operationnaly estimate the ocean state.

  3. Development and Applications of the FV3 GEOS-5 Adjoint Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kim, Jong G.; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Errico, Ron; Gelaro, Ron; Kent, James; Coy, Larry; Doyle, Jim; Goldstein, Alex

    2017-01-01

    GMAO has developed a highly sophisticated adjoint modeling system based on the most recent version of the finite volume cubed sphere (FV3) dynamical core. This provides a mechanism for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions and examining observation impacts. It also allows for the computation of singular vectors and for the implementation of hybrid 4DVAR. In this work we will present the scientific assessment of the new adjoint system and show results from a number of research application of the adjoint system.

  4. Inverse modeling of methane sources and sinks using the adjoint of a global transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, S; Kaminski, T; Dentener, F; Lelieveld, J; Heimann, M

    1999-01-01

    An inverse modeling method is presented to evaluate the sources and sinks of atmospheric methane. An adjoint version of a global transport model has been used to estimate these fluxes at a relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. Measurements from 34 monitoring stations and 11 locations

  5. Adjoint-based sensitivities and data assimilation with a time-dependent marine ice sheet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Dan; Heimbach, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    To date, assimilation of observational data using large-scale ice models has consisted only of time-dependent inversions of surface velocities for basal traction, bed elevation, or ice stiffness. These inversions are for the most part based on control methods (Macayeal D R, 1992, A tutorial on the use of control methods in ice sheet modeling), which involve generating and solving the adjoint of the ice model. Quite a lot has been learned about the fast-flowing parts of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from such inversions. Still, there are limitations to these "snapshot" inversions. For instance, they cannot capture time-dependent dynamics, such as propagation of perturbations through the ice sheet. They cannot assimilate time-dependent observations, such as surface elevation changes. And they are problematic for initializing time-dependent ice sheet models, as such initializations may contain considerable model drift. We have developed an adjoint for a time-dependent land ice model, with which we will address such issues. The land ice model implements a hybrid shallow shelf-shallow ice stress balance and can represent the floating, fast-sliding, and frozen bed regimes of a marine ice sheet. The adjoint is generated by a combination of analytic methods and the use of automated differentiation (AD) software. Experiments with idealized geometries have been carried out; adjoint sensitivities reveal the "vulnerable" regions of ice shelves, and preliminary inversions of "synthetic" observations (e.g. simultaneous inversion of basal traction and topography) yield encouraging results.

  6. Adjoint sensitivity theory and its application to LEAP Model 22C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barish, J.; Drischler, J.D.; Horwedel, J.E.; Lucius, J.L.; McAdoo, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Adjoint sensitivity theory can be used to determine the sensitivity of results of interest to each of the data elements that enter into the calculations. In this paper adjoint sensitivity theory is discussed, and its applicability to a large energy-economics model is demonstrated by applying it to a specific calculation carried out with the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP). Numerical results for dR/dx, where R is the result of interest and x is any one of the data elements, are presented for all x for which dR/dx is appreciable and for several definitions of R. In a number of cases the accuracy of the dR/dx obtained by adjoint methods has been verified by direct calculations and these comparisons are also presented. The application of the theory as presented requires extensive development work in that a large amount of analytic differentiation must be carried out and a substantial effort is needed to evaluate these derivatives. In the course of the work, a method was developed that would allow all of the required derivatives to be obtained numerically using LEAP and this method is presented and discussed. This numerical method is applicable only to codes with the very special modular structure of LEAP.

  7. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  8. Application of variational principles and adjoint integrating factors for constructing numerical GFD models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The proposed method is considered on an example of hydrothermodynamics and atmospheric chemistry models [1,2]. In the development of the existing methods for constructing numerical schemes possessing the properties of total approximation for operators of multiscale process models, we have developed a new variational technique, which uses the concept of adjoint integrating factors. The technique is as follows. First, a basic functional of the variational principle (the integral identity that unites the model equations, initial and boundary conditions) is transformed using Lagrange's identity and the second Green's formula. As a result, the action of the operators of main problem in the space of state functions is transferred to the adjoint operators defined in the space of sufficiently smooth adjoint functions. By the choice of adjoint functions the order of the derivatives becomes lower by one than those in the original equations. We obtain a set of new balance relationships that take into account the sources and boundary conditions. Next, we introduce the decomposition of the model domain into a set of finite volumes. For multi-dimensional non-stationary problems, this technique is applied in the framework of the variational principle and schemes of decomposition and splitting on the set of physical processes for each coordinate directions successively at each time step. For each direction within the finite volume, the analytical solutions of one-dimensional homogeneous adjoint equations are constructed. In this case, the solutions of adjoint equations serve as integrating factors. The results are the hybrid discrete-analytical schemes. They have the properties of stability, approximation and unconditional monotony for convection-diffusion operators. These schemes are discrete in time and analytic in the spatial variables. They are exact in case of piecewise-constant coefficients within the finite volume and along the coordinate lines of the grid area in each

  9. Efficient Stochastic Inversion Using Adjoint Models and Kernel-PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimmisetty, Charanraj A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Zhao, Wenju [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Scientific Computing; Chen, Xiao [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Tong, Charles H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; White, Joshua A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Atmospheric, Earth and Energy Division

    2017-10-18

    Performing stochastic inversion on a computationally expensive forward simulation model with a high-dimensional uncertain parameter space (e.g. a spatial random field) is computationally prohibitive even when gradient information can be computed efficiently. Moreover, the ‘nonlinear’ mapping from parameters to observables generally gives rise to non-Gaussian posteriors even with Gaussian priors, thus hampering the use of efficient inversion algorithms designed for models with Gaussian assumptions. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian stochastic inversion methodology, which is characterized by a tight coupling between the gradient-based Langevin Markov Chain Monte Carlo (LMCMC) method and a kernel principal component analysis (KPCA). This approach addresses the ‘curse-of-dimensionality’ via KPCA to identify a low-dimensional feature space within the high-dimensional and nonlinearly correlated parameter space. In addition, non-Gaussian posterior distributions are estimated via an efficient LMCMC method on the projected low-dimensional feature space. We will demonstrate this computational framework by integrating and adapting our recent data-driven statistics-on-manifolds constructions and reduction-through-projection techniques to a linear elasticity model.

  10. An inverse problem strategy based on forward model evaluations: Gradient-based optimization without adjoint solves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilo Valentin, Miguel Alejandro [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a new nonlinear programming formulation for the solution of inverse problems. First, a general inverse problem formulation based on the compliance error functional is presented. The proposed error functional enables the computation of the Lagrange multipliers, and thus the first order derivative information, at the expense of just one model evaluation. Therefore, the calculation of the Lagrange multipliers does not require the solution of the computationally intensive adjoint problem. This leads to significant speedups for large-scale, gradient-based inverse problems.

  11. Adjoint-Based Climate Model Tuning: Application to the Planet Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Guokun; Köhl, Armin; Matei, Ion; Stammer, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    The adjoint method is used to calibrate the medium complexity climate model "Planet Simulator" through parameter estimation. Identical twin experiments demonstrate that this method can retrieve default values of the control parameters when using a long assimilation window of the order of 2 months. Chaos synchronization through nudging, required to overcome limits in the temporal assimilation window in the adjoint method, is employed successfully to reach this assimilation window length. When assimilating ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the observations of air temperature and the radiative fluxes are the most important data for adjusting the control parameters. The global mean net longwave fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are significantly improved by tuning two model parameters controlling the absorption of clouds and water vapor. The global mean net shortwave radiation at the surface is improved by optimizing three model parameters controlling cloud optical properties. The optimized parameters improve the free model (without nudging terms) simulation in a way similar to that in the assimilation experiments. Results suggest a promising way for tuning uncertain parameters in nonlinear coupled climate models.

  12. An approach to computing discrete adjoints for MPI-parallelized models applied to Ice Sheet System Model 4.11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Larour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of sea-level rise projections, there is a strong need for hindcast validation of the evolution of polar ice sheets in a way that tightly matches observational records (from radar, gravity, and altimetry observations mainly. However, the computational requirements for making hindcast reconstructions possible are severe and rely mainly on the evaluation of the adjoint state of transient ice-flow models. Here, we look at the computation of adjoints in the context of the NASA/JPL/UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM, written in C++ and designed for parallel execution with MPI. We present the adaptations required in the way the software is designed and written, but also generic adaptations in the tools facilitating the adjoint computations. We concentrate on the use of operator overloading coupled with the AdjoinableMPI library to achieve the adjoint computation of the ISSM. We present a comprehensive approach to (1 carry out type changing through the ISSM, hence facilitating operator overloading, (2 bind to external solvers such as MUMPS and GSL-LU, and (3 handle MPI-based parallelism to scale the capability. We demonstrate the success of the approach by computing sensitivities of hindcast metrics such as the misfit to observed records of surface altimetry on the northeastern Greenland Ice Stream, or the misfit to observed records of surface velocities on Upernavik Glacier, central West Greenland. We also provide metrics for the scalability of the approach, and the expected performance. This approach has the potential to enable a new generation of hindcast-validated projections that make full use of the wealth of datasets currently being collected, or already collected, in Greenland and Antarctica.

  13. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains - I: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D. G.; Cacuci, D. G.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure (ASAP) for generic dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains is presented, together with applications of this procedure to the analysis of several systems of increasing complexity. The general theory is presented in Part I of this work and is accompanied by a paradigm application to the dynamic reliability analysis of a simple binary component, namely a pump functioning on an 'up/down' cycle until it fails irreparably. This paradigm example admits a closed form analytical solution, which permits a clear illustration of the main characteristics of the ASAP for Markov chains. In particular, it is shown that the ASAP for Markov chains presents outstanding computational advantages over other procedures currently in use for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the dynamic reliability of large-scale systems. This conclusion is further underscored by the large-scale applications presented in Part II. (authors)

  14. What can adjoint modelling tell about the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in basal sliding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Jonathan; Rutt, Ian; Murray, Tavi; Utke, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Studying the future behaviour of the Greenland Ice Sheet is important considering the ice sheet has a sea-level equivalent of 7 metres and the rate of mass loss from it is increasing (Velicogna, 2009). Examining the modelled response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in forcing parameters can give insight into how it will behave in the future. The response of the ice sheet to specific changes in forcing parameters is referred to as the sensitivity. Being able to obtain model sensitivities in as little computation time as possible would be useful for examining the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Adjoint models allow sensitivities to be obtained more efficiently than the conventional way, when considering spatially varying parameters. Conventionally, such sensitivities are obtained by perturbing a parameter at every grid point in turn and calculating the sensitivity at every grid point. Adjoint sensitivities, though, are calculated in a single step. This reduces the computational cost when obtaining sensitivities over large model domains. The adjoint method also has the advantage that it gives the exact value of the model sensitivity, rather than a finite difference approximation to it. We present the adjoint of a finite difference, shallow ice, thermomechanical ice sheet model with basal sliding, applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet. This adjoint model is obtained using the OpenAD automatic differentiation tool (Utke, 2006), which is open source. The adjoint model is validated by comparing adjoint and forward model sensitivities over 100 years. This work builds on the work of Heimbach (2009). We use the adjoint model to examine the sensitivity of the model to changes in basal sliding. About half the mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet occurs from surface runoff and half from dynamic mass loss (Broeke, 2009). Melt-water from Greenland Ice Sheet supra-glacial lakes can percolate to the bed through moulins. The melt-water that reaches the bed can then

  15. Construction of the seismic wave-speed model by adjoint tomography beneath the Japanese metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    The Japanese metropolitan area has high risks of earthquakes and volcanoes associated with convergent tectonic plates. It is important to clarify detail three-dimensional structure for understanding tectonics and predicting strong motion. Classical tomographic studies based on ray theory have revealed seismotectonics and volcanic tectonics in the region, however it is unknown whether their models reproduce observed seismograms. In the present study, we construct new seismic wave-speed model by using waveform inversion. Adjoint tomography and the spectral element method (SEM) were used in the inversion (e.g. Tape et al. 2009; Peter et al. 2011). We used broadband seismograms obtained at NIED F-net stations for 140 earthquakes occurred beneath the Kanto district. We selected four frequency bands between 5 and 30 sec and used from the seismograms of longer period bands for the inversion. Tomographic iteration was conducted until obtaining the minimized misfit between data and synthetics. Our SEM model has 16 million grid points that covers the metropolitan area of the Kanto district. The model parameters were the Vp and Vs of the grid points, and density and attenuation were updated to new values depending on new Vs in each iteration. The initial model was assumed the tomographic model (Matsubara and Obara 2011) based on ray theory. The source parameters were basically used from F-net catalog, while the centroid times were inferred from comparison between data and synthetics. We simulated the forward and adjoint wavefields of each event and obtained Vp and Vs misfit kernels from their interaction. Large computation was conducted on K computer, RIKEN. We obtained final model (m16) after 16 iterations in the present study. For the waveform improvement, it is clearly shown that m16 is better than the initial model, and the seismograms especially improved in the frequency bands of longer than 8 sec and changed better for seismograms of the events occurred at deeper than a

  16. Adjoint sensitivity analysis applied on a model of irradiation assisted degradation of metals in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonson, S.A.; Ballinger, R.G.; Christensen, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation of an aqueous environment results, in general, in a steady state concentration of oxidizing chemical species in solution. Although the effect may be beneficial to the metal in contact with the solution in some cases, say by producing a more protective film, it is generally believed to be detrimental. The ability to predict the concentrations of the oxidizing species and from this begin to analyze the detrimental behavior on the metals requires computer codes that model the chemical reactions, production rates, and diffusion characteristics of the species being produced by irradiation. The large number of parameters and the complexity of the interactions involved in the predictions of irradiation effects on metals degradation requires a more sophisticated approach to determining the sensitivities of the final results. Monte Carlo techniques are too computationally intensive for practical use in determining sensitivities. The paper presents an approach, adjoint sensitivity analysis, that is more practical, i.e., three computer runs versus thousands, and also a more accurate measure of the sensitivities of the model

  17. Tracking sensitive source areas of different weather pollution types using GRAPES-CUACE adjoint model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; An, Xingqin; Zhai, Shixian; Hou, Qing; Sun, Zhaobin

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the sustained pollution processes were selected during which daily PM2.5 concentration exceeded 75 μg/m3 for three days continuously based on the hourly data of Beijing observation sites from July 2012 to December 2015. Using the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) MICAPS meteorological processing system, synoptic situation during PM2.5 pollution processes was classified into five weather types: low pressure and weak high pressure alternating control, weak high pressure, low pressure control, high rear, and uniform pressure field. Then, we chose the representative pollution cases corresponding to each type, adopted the GRAPES-CUACE adjoint model tracking the sensitive source areas of the five types, and analyzed the critical discharge periods of Beijing and neighboring provinces as well as their contribution to the PM2.5 peak concentration in Beijing. The results showed that the local source plays the main theme in the 30 h before the objective time, and prior to 72 h before the objective time contribution of local sources for the five pollution types are 37.5%, 25.0%, 39.4%, 31.2%, and 42.4%, respectively; the Hebei source contributes constantly in the 57 h ahead of the objective time with the contribution proportion ranging from 37% to 64%; the contribution period and rate of Tianjin and Shanxi sources are shorter and smaller. Based on the adjoint sensitivity analysis, we further discussed the effect of emission reduction control measures in different types, finding that the effect of local source reduction in the first 20 h of the objective time is better, and if the local source is reduced 50% within 72 h before the objective time, the decline rates of PM2.5 in the five types are 11.6%, 9.4%, 13.8%, 9.9% and 15.2% respectively. And the reduction effect of the neighboring sources is better within the 3-57 h before the objective time.

  18. Aerosol Health Impact Source Attribution Studies with the CMAQ Adjoint Air Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. D.

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an air pollutant consisting of a mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the sources and distributions of PM2.5 is important for many reasons, two of which are that PM2.5 has an adverse effect on human health and also an effect on climate change. Recent studies have suggested that health benefits resulting from a unit decrease in black carbon (BC) are four to nine times larger than benefits resulting from an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. The goal of this thesis is to quantify the role of emissions from different sectors and different locations in governing the total health impacts, risk, and maximum individual risk of exposure to BC both nationally and regionally in the US. We develop and use the CMAQ adjoint model to quantify the role of emissions from all modeled sectors, times, and locations on premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC. From a national analysis, we find that damages resulting from anthropogenic emissions of BC are strongly correlated with population and premature death. However, we find little correlation between damages and emission magnitude, suggesting that controls on the largest emissions may not be the most efficient means of reducing damages resulting from BC emissions. Rather, the best proxy for locations with damaging BC emissions is locations where premature deaths occur. Onroad diesel and nonroad vehicle emissions are the largest contributors to premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC, while onroad gasoline emissions cause the highest deaths per amount emitted. Additionally, emissions in fall and winter contribute to more premature deaths (and more per amount emitted) than emissions in spring and summer. From a regional analysis, we find that emissions from outside each of six urban areas account for 7% to 27% of the premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC within the region. Within the region encompassing New York City and Philadelphia

  19. Comparing Mass Balance and Adjoint-Based 4D-VAR Methods for Inverse Modeling of Nitrogen Dioxide Columns for Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M.; Martin, R.; Henze, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) emission inventories can be improved through top-down constraints provided by inverse modeling of observed nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Here we compare two methods of inverse modeling for emissions of NOx from synthetic NO2 columns generated from known emissions using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint. We treat the adjoint-based 4D-VAR approach for estimating top-down emissions as a benchmark against which to evaluate variations on the mass balance method. We find that the standard mass balance algorithm can be improved by using an iterative process and using finite difference to calculate the local sensitivity of a change in NO2 columns to a change in emissions, resulting in a factor of two reduction in inversion error. In a simplified case study to recover local emission perturbations, horizontal smearing effects due to NOx transport were better resolved by the adjoint-based approach than by mass balance. For more complex emission changes that reflect real world scenarios, the iterative finite difference mass balance and adjoint methods produce similar top-down inventories when inverting hourly synthetic observations, both reducing the a priori error by factors of 3-4. Inversions of data sets that simulate satellite observations from low Earth and geostationary orbits also indicate that both the mass balance and adjoint inversions produce similar results, reducing a priori error by a factor of 3. As the iterative finite difference mass balance method provides similar accuracy as the adjoint-based 4D-VAR method, it offers the ability to efficiently estimate top-down emissions using models that do not have an adjoint.

  20. Spectral-Element Seismic Wave Propagation Codes for both Forward Modeling in Complex Media and Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present both SPECFEM3D_Cartesian and SPECFEM3D_GLOBE open-source codes, representing high-performance numerical wave solvers simulating seismic wave propagation for local-, regional-, and global-scale application. These codes are suitable for both forward propagation in complex media and tomographic imaging. Both solvers compute highly accurate seismic wave fields using the continuous Galerkin spectral-element method on unstructured meshes. Lateral variations in compressional- and shear-wave speeds, density, as well as 3D attenuation Q models, topography and fluid-solid coupling are all readily included in both codes. For global simulations, effects due to rotation, ellipticity, the oceans, 3D crustal models, and self-gravitation are additionally included. Both packages provide forward and adjoint functionality suitable for adjoint tomography on high-performance computing architectures. We highlight the most recent release of the global version which includes improved performance, simultaneous MPI runs, OpenCL and CUDA support via an automatic source-to-source transformation library (BOAST), parallel I/O readers and writers for databases using ADIOS and seismograms using the recently developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) with built-in provenance. This makes our spectral-element solvers current state-of-the-art, open-source community codes for high-performance seismic wave propagation on arbitrarily complex 3D models. Together with these solvers, we provide full-waveform inversion tools to image the Earth's interior at unprecedented resolution.

  1. Bifurcation analysis of 3D ocean flows using a parallel fully-implicit ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thies, J.; Wubs, F.W.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the physics and dynamics of the ocean circulation, techniques of numerical bifurcation theory such as continuation methods have proved to be useful. Up to now these techniques have been applied to models with relatively few degrees of freedom such as multi-layer quasi-geostrophic and

  2. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Müller

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they decrease

  3. Profiling the robustness, efficiency and limits of the forward-adjoint method for 3-D mantle convection modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. G.; Davies, J. H.

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of Earth's past mantle structure is inherently unknown. This lack of knowledge presents problems in many areas of Earth science, including in mantle circulation modelling (MCM). As a mathematical model of mantle convection, MCMs require boundary and initial conditions. While boundary conditions are readily available from sources such as plate reconstructions for the upper surface, and as free slip at the core-mantle boundary, the initial condition is not known. MCMs have historically `created' an initial condition using long `spin up' processes using the oldest available plate reconstruction period available. While these do yield good results when models are run to present day, it is difficult to infer with confidence results from early in a model's history. Techniques to overcome this problem are now being studied in geodynamics, such as by assimilating the known internal structure (e.g. from seismic tomography) of Earth at present day backwards in time. One such method is to use an iterative process known as the forward-adjoint method. While this is an efficient means of solving this inverse problem, it still strains all but the most cutting edge computational systems. In this study we endeavour to profile the effectiveness of this method using synthetic test cases as our known data source. We conclude that savings in terms of computational expense for forward-adjoint models can be achieved by streamlining the time-stepping of the calculation, as well as determining the most efficient method of updating initial conditions in the iterative scheme. Furthermore, we observe that in the models presented, there exists an upper limit on the time interval over which solutions will practically converge, although this limit is likely to be linked to Rayleigh number.

  4. Tracking a Severe Pollution Event in Beijing in December 2016 with the GRAPES-CUACE Adjoint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; An, Xingqin; Zhai, Shixian; Sun, Zhaobin

    2018-02-01

    We traced the adjoint sensitivity of a severe pollution event in December 2016 in Beijing using the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the China Meteorological Administration Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environmental Forecasting System). The key emission sources and periods affecting this severe pollution event are analyzed. For comaprison, we define 2000 Beijing Time 3 December 2016 as the objective time when PM2.5 reached the maximum concentration in Beijing. It is found that the local hourly sensitivity coefficient amounts to a peak of 9.31 μg m-3 just 1 h before the objective time, suggesting that PM2.5 concentration responds rapidly to local emissions. The accumulated sensitivity coefficient in Beijing is large during the 20-h period prior to the objective time, showing that local emissions are the most important in this period. The accumulated contribution rates of emissions from Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, and Shanxi are 34.2%, 3.0%, 49.4%, and 13.4%, respectively, in the 72-h period before the objective time. The evolution of hourly sensitivity coefficient shows that the main contribution from the Tianjin source occurs 1-26 h before the objective time and its peak hourly contribution is 0.59 μg m-3 at 4 h before the objective time. The main contributions of the Hebei and Shanxi emission sources occur 1-54 and 14-53 h, respectively, before the objective time and their hourly sensitivity coefficients both show periodic fluctuations. The Hebei source shows three sensitivity coefficient peaks of 3.45, 4.27, and 0.71 μg m-3 at 4, 16, and 38 h before the objective time, respectively. The sensitivity coefficient of the Shanxi source peaks twice, with values of 1.41 and 0.64 μg m-3 at 24 and 45 h before the objective time, respectively. Overall, the adjoint model is effective in tracking the crucial sources and key periods of emissions for the severe pollution event.

  5. Optimization of Open Boundary Conditions in a 3D Internal Tidal Model with the Adjoint Method around Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhou Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of inverse problem, the optimization of open boundary conditions (OBCs in a 3D internal tidal model is investigated with the adjoint method. Fourier coefficients of M2 internal tide on four open boundaries, which are regarded as OBCs, are inverted simultaneously. During the optimization, the steepest descent method is used to minimize cost function. The reasonability and feasibility of the model are tested by twin experiments (TEs. In TE1, OBCs on four open boundaries are successfully inverted by using independent point (IP strategy, suggesting that IP strategy is useful in parameter estimation. Results of TE2 indicate that the model is effective even by assimilating inaccurate “observations.” Based on conclusions of TEs, the M2 internal tide around Hawaii is simulated by assimilating T/P data in practical experiment. The simulated cochart shows good agreement with that obtained from the Oregon State University tidal model and T/P observations. Careful inspection shows that the major difference between simulated results and OSU model results is short-scale fluctuations superposed on coamplitude lines, which can be treated as the surface manifestation modulated by the internal tide. The computed surface manifestation along T/P tracks is comparable to the estimation in previous work.

  6. Adjoint entropy vs topological entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano Bruno, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Recently the adjoint algebraic entropy of endomorphisms of abelian groups was introduced and studied. We generalize the notion of adjoint entropy to continuous endomorphisms of topological abelian groups. Indeed, the adjoint algebraic entropy is defined using the family of all finite-index subgroups, while we take only the subfamily of all open finite-index subgroups to define the topological adjoint entropy. This allows us to compare the (topological) adjoint entropy with the known topologic...

  7. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains - II: Application to IFMIF reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D. G.; Cacuci, D. G.; Balan, I.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.

    2008-01-01

    In Part II of this work, the adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure developed in Part I is applied to perform sensitivity analysis of several dynamic reliability models of systems of increasing complexity, culminating with the consideration of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) accelerator system. Section II presents the main steps of a procedure for the automated generation of Markov chains for reliability analysis, including the abstraction of the physical system, construction of the Markov chain, and the generation and solution of the ensuing set of differential equations; all of these steps have been implemented in a stand-alone computer code system called QUEFT/MARKOMAG-S/MCADJSEN. This code system has been applied to sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability measures for a paradigm '2-out-of-3' system comprising five components and also to a comprehensive dynamic reliability analysis of the IFMIF accelerator system facilities for the average availability and, respectively, the system's availability at the final mission time. The QUEFT/MARKOMAG-S/MCADJSEN has been used to efficiently compute sensitivities to 186 failure and repair rates characterizing components and subsystems of the first-level fault tree of the IFMIF accelerator system. (authors)

  8. A reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    The adjoint method has been used very often for variational data assimilation. The computational cost to run the adjoint model often exceeds several original model runs and the method needs significant programming efforts to implement the adjoint model code. The work proposed here is variational data assimilation based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) which avoids the implementation of the adjoint of the tangent linear approximation of the original nonlinear model. An ensemble of the forward model simulations is used to determine the approximation of the covariance matrix and only the dominant eigenvectors of this matrix are used to define a model subspace. The adjoint of the tangent linear model is replaced by the reduced adjoint based on this reduced space. Thus the adjoint model is run in reduced space with negligible computational cost. Once the gradient is obtained in reduced space it is projected back in full space and the minimization process is carried in full space. In the paper the reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation is introduced. The characteristics and performance of the method are illustrated with a number of data assimilation experiments in a ground water subsurface contaminant model. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Relating health and climate impacts to grid-scale emissions using adjoint sensitivity modeling for the Climate and Clean Air Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, D. K.; Lacey, F.; Seltzer, M.; Vallack, H.; Kuylenstierna, J.; Bowman, K. W.; Anenberg, S.; Sasser, E.; Lee, C. J.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) was initiated in 2012 to develop, understand and promote measures to reduce short lived climate forcers such as aerosol, ozone and methane. The Coalition now includes over 30 nations, and as a service to these nations is committed to providing a decision support toolkit that allows member nations to explore the benefits of a range of emissions mitigation measures in terms of the combined impacts on air quality and climate and so help in the development of their National Action Plans. Here we will present recent modeling work to support the development of the CCAC National Action Plans toolkit. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is presented as a means of efficiently relating air quality, climate and crop impacts back to changes in emissions from each species, sector and location at the grid-scale resolution of typical global air quality model applications. The GEOS-Chem adjoint model is used to estimate the damages per ton of emissions of PM2.5 related mortality, the impacts of ozone precursors on crops and ozone-related health effects, and the combined impacts of these species on regional surface temperature changes. We show how the benefits-per-emission vary spatially as a function of the surrounding environment, and how this impacts the overall benefit of sector-specific control strategies. We present initial findings for Bangladesh, as well as Mexico, Ghana and Colombia, some of the first countries to join the CCAC, and discuss general issues related to adjoint-based metrics for quantifying air quality and climate co-benefits.

  10. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urichuk, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.urichuk@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Walton, Mark A., E-mail: walton@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  11. Stochastic flow modeling : Quasi-Geostrophy, Taylor state and torsional wave excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    We reconstruct the core flow evolution over the period 1840-2010 under the quasi-geostrophic assumption, from the stochastic magnetic field model COV-OBS and its full model error covariance matrix. We make use of a prior information on the flow temporal power spectrum compatible with that of obse...... variations from 1950 onward. We propose a triggering mechanism for these waves involving non-zonal motions in the framework of Taylor's state....

  12. Generalized Adjoint Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    of the adjoint of a linear transformation in Banach space . Let B = f(Z;B; Y )g be a set of causal input-output systems, where Y is the input space of... Banach spaces . Other spaces and mappings related to (Y; F; U) will be introduced, but U and Y with the qualifying a¢ xes they carry always refer to...functions from < into a Banach space E such that any translate of a function in L is also a function in L. Let N = fkks;t ;1 < s < t əg be a family

  13. NON-SELF-ADJOINT GRAPHS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussein, A.; Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 367, č. 4 (2015), s. 2921-2957 ISSN 0002-9947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Laplacians on metric graphs * non-self-adjoint boundary conditions * similarity transforms to self-adjoint operators * Riesz basis Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.196, year: 2015

  14. Phenomenology of spinless adjoints in two universal extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Kirtiman; Datta, Anindya

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of (1,1)-mode adjoint scalars in the framework of two Universal Extra Dimensions. The Kaluza-Klein (KK) towers of these adjoint scalars arise in the 4-dimensional effective theory from the 6th component of the gauge fields after compactification. Adjoint scalars can have KK-number conserving as well as KK-number violating interactions. We calculate the KK-number violating operators involving these scalars and two Standard Model fields. Decay widths of these scalars into different channels have been estimated. We have also briefly discussed pair-production and single production of such scalars at the Large Hadron Collider

  15. Analysis of Nonlinear Missile Guidance Systems Through Linear Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Gamal Eltohamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a linear simulation algorithm, the adjoint method, is modified and employed as an efficient tool for analyzing the contributions of system parameters to the miss - distance of a nonlinear time-varying missile guidance system model. As an example for the application of the linear adjoint method, the effect of missile flight time on the miss - distance is studied. Since the missile model is highly nonlinear and a time-varying linearized model is required to apply the adjoint method, a new technique that utilizes the time-reversed linearized coefficients of the missile as a replacement for the time-varying describing functions is applied and proven to be successful. It is found that, when compared with Monte Carlo generated results, simulation results of this linear adjoint technique provide acceptable accuracy and can be produced with much less effort.

  16. Surface Pressure Dependencies in the GEOS-Chem-Adjoint System and the Impact of the GEOS-5 Surface Pressure on CO2 Model Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In the GEOS-Chem Adjoint (GCA) system, the total (wet) surface pressure of the GEOS meteorology is employed as dry surface pressure, ignoring the presence of water vapor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) research team has been evaluating the impact of the above discrepancy on the CO2 model forecast and the CO2 flux inversion. The JPL CMS research utilizes a multi-mission assimilation framework developed by the Multi-Mission Observation Operator (M2O2) research team at JPL extending the GCA system. The GCA-M2O2 framework facilitates mission-generic 3D and 4D-variational assimilations streamlining the interfaces to the satellite data products and prior emission inventories. The GCA-M2O2 framework currently integrates the GCA system version 35h and provides a dry surface pressure setup to allow the CO2 model forecast to be performed with the GEOS-5 surface pressure directly or after converting it to dry surface pressure.

  17. Adjoint electron Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo is the most efficient method for accurate analysis of space systems exposed to natural and artificially enhanced electron environments. Recent adjoint calculations for isotropic electron environments include: comparative data for experimental measurements on electronics boxes; benchmark problem solutions for comparing total dose prediction methodologies; preliminary assessment of sectoring methods used during space system design; and total dose predictions on an electronics package. Adjoint Monte Carlo, forward Monte Carlo, and experiment are in excellent agreement for electron sources that simulate space environments. For electron space environments, adjoint Monte Carlo is clearly superior to forward Monte Carlo, requiring one to two orders of magnitude less computer time for relatively simple geometries. The solid-angle sectoring approximations used for routine design calculations can err by more than a factor of 2 on dose in simple shield geometries. For critical space systems exposed to severe electron environments, these potential sectoring errors demand the establishment of large design margins and/or verification of shield design by adjoint Monte Carlo/experiment

  18. Hamiltonian Realizations of Nonlinear Adjoint Operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Gray, W. Steven

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses state-space realizations for nonlinear adjoint operators. In particular the relationship among nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operators, Hamiltonian extensions and port-controlled Hamiltonian systems are clarified. The characterization of controllability, observability and Hankel

  19. Approximation for the adjoint neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suster, Luis Carlos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    The proposal of this work is the determination of an analytical approximation which is capable to reproduce the adjoint neutron flux for the energy range of the narrow resonances (NR). In a previous work we developed a method for the calculation of the adjoint spectrum which was calculated from the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were obtained by the collision probabilities method, this method involved a considerable quantity of numerical calculation. In the analytical method some approximations were done, like the multiplication of the escape probability in the fuel by the adjoint flux in the moderator, and after these approximations, taking into account the case of the narrow resonances, were substituted in the adjoint neutron balance equation for the fuel, resulting in an analytical approximation for the adjoint flux. The results obtained in this work were compared to the results generated with the reference method, which demonstrated a good and precise results for the adjoint neutron flux for the narrow resonances. (author)

  20. Weak self-adjoint differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandarias, M L

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of self-adjoint and quasi self-adjoint equations were introduced by Ibragimov (2006 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 318 742-57; 2007 Arch. ALGA 4 55-60). In Ibragimov (2007 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 333 311-28), a general theorem on conservation laws was proved. In this paper, we generalize the concept of self-adjoint and quasi self-adjoint equations by introducing the definition of weak self-adjoint equations. We find a class of weak self-adjoint quasi-linear parabolic equations. The property of a differential equation to be weak self-adjoint is important for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation. (fast track communication)

  1. Adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  2. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  3. Adjoint-Operator Learning For A Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhen, Jacob; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1993-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to synthesize initially unknown mathematical models of time-dependent phenomena or to learn temporally evolving patterns by use of algorithms based on adjoint operators. Algorithms less complicated, involve less computation and solve learning equations forward in time possibly simultaneously with equations of evolution of neural network, thereby both increasing computational efficiency and making real-time applications possible.

  4. Invariants in electromagnetic and gravitational adjoint fields

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of adjoint fields on the conservation laws in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field, by means of the characteristics of octonions. When the adjoint field can not be neglected, it will cause the predictions to departure slightly from the conservation laws, which include mass continuity equation, charge continuity equation, and conservation of spin. The adjoint field of electromagnetic field has an effect on conservation of mass, and that of gravitatio...

  5. Toward regional-scale adjoint tomography in the deep earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to the development of efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and to the increasing power of computer clusters, it is now possible to obtain regional-scale images of the Earth's interior using adjoint-tomography (e.g. Tape, C., et al., 2009). As for now, these tomographic models are limited to the upper layers of the earth, i.e., they provide us with high-resolution images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. Given the gigantic amount of calculation it represents, obtaing similar models at the global scale (i.e. images of the entire Earth) seems out of reach at the moment. Furthermore, it's likely that the first generation of such global adjoint tomographic models will have a resolution significantly smaller than the current regional models. In order to image regions of interests in the deep Earth, such as plumes, slabs or large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs), while keeping the computation tractable, we are developing new tools that will allow us to perform regional-scale adjoint-tomography at arbitrary depths. In a recent study (Masson et al., 2013), we showed that a numerical equivalent of the time reversal mirrors used in experimental acoustics permits to confine the wave propagation computations (i.e. using SEM simulations) inside the region to be imaged. With this ability to limit wave propagation modeling inside a region of interest, obtaining the adjoint sensitivity kernels needed for tomographic imaging is only two steps further. First, the local wavefield modeling needs to be coupled with field extrapolation techniques in order to obtain synthetic seismograms at the surface of the earth. These seismograms will account for the 3D structure inside the region of interest in a quasi-exact manner. We will present preliminary results where the field-extrapolation is performed using Green's function computed in a 1D Earth model thanks to the Direct Solution Method (DSM). Once synthetic seismograms

  6. Deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems: forward and adjoint methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents a self-contained mathematical formalism for deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems, a detailed application to sensitivity analysis of the homogeneous equilibrium model of two-phase flow, and a representative application to sensitivity analysis of a model (simulating pump-trip-type accidents in BWRs) where a transition between single phase and two phase occurs. The rigor and generality of this sensitivity analysis formalism stem from the use of Gateaux (G-) differentials. This report highlights the major aspects of deterministic (forward and adjoint) sensitivity analysis, including derivation of the forward sensitivity equations, derivation of sensitivity expressions in terms of adjoint functions, explicit construction of the adjoint system satisfied by these adjoint functions, determination of the characteristics of this adjoint system, and demonstration that these characteristics are the same as those of the original quasilinear two-phase flow equations. This proves that whenever the original two-phase flow problem is solvable, the adjoint system is also solvable and, in principle, the same numerical methods can be used to solve both the original and adjoint equations

  7. New Monte Carlo approach to the adjoint Boltzmann equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Matteis, A.; Simonini, R.

    1978-01-01

    A class of stochastic models for the Monte Carlo integration of the adjoint neutron transport equation is described. Some current general methods are brought within this class, thus preparing the ground for subsequent comparisons. Monte Carlo integration of the adjoint Boltzmann equation can be seen as a simulation of the transport of mathematical particles with reaction kernels not normalized to unity. This last feature is a source of difficulty: It can influence the variance of the result negatively and also often leads to preparation of special ''libraries'' consisting of tables of normalization factors as functions of energy, presently used by several methods. These are the two main points that are discussed and that are taken into account to devise a nonmultigroup method of solution for a certain class of problems. Reactions considered in detail are radiative capture, elastic scattering, discrete levels and continuum inelastic scattering, for which the need for tables has been almost completely eliminated. The basic policy pursued to avoid a source of statistical fluctuations is to try to make the statistical weight of the traveling particle dependent only on its starting and current energies, at least in simple cases. The effectiveness of the sampling schemes proposed is supported by numerical comparison with other more general adjoint Monte Carlo methods. Computation of neutron flux at a point by means of an adjoint formulation is the problem taken as a test for numerical experiments. Very good results have been obtained in the difficult case of resonant cross sections

  8. Space-time adaptive solution of inverse problems with the discrete adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexe, Mihai; Sandu, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    This paper develops a framework for the construction and analysis of discrete adjoint sensitivities in the context of time dependent, adaptive grid, adaptive step models. Discrete adjoints are attractive in practice since they can be generated with low effort using automatic differentiation. However, this approach brings several important challenges. The space-time adjoint of the forward numerical scheme may be inconsistent with the continuous adjoint equations. A reduction in accuracy of the discrete adjoint sensitivities may appear due to the inter-grid transfer operators. Moreover, the optimization algorithm may need to accommodate state and gradient vectors whose dimensions change between iterations. This work shows that several of these potential issues can be avoided through a multi-level optimization strategy using discontinuous Galerkin (DG) hp-adaptive discretizations paired with Runge-Kutta (RK) time integration. We extend the concept of dual (adjoint) consistency to space-time RK-DG discretizations, which are then shown to be well suited for the adaptive solution of time-dependent inverse problems. Furthermore, we prove that DG mesh transfer operators on general meshes are also dual consistent. This allows the simultaneous derivation of the discrete adjoint for both the numerical solver and the mesh transfer logic with an automatic code generation mechanism such as algorithmic differentiation (AD), potentially speeding up development of large-scale simulation codes. The theoretical analysis is supported by numerical results reported for a two-dimensional non-stationary inverse problem.

  9. Adjoint sensitivity studies of coastal upwelling at northeast of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Hoteit, I.

    2010-12-01

    The north Pacific western boundary current (Kuroshio) begins to the east of the Philippines, crosses the Luzon strait and flows northward close to the Taiwan coast following the continental shelf. The Kuroshio shows occasional splitting near the shelf northeast of Taiwan where one branch carries Kuroshio waters onto the shelf north of Taiwan while the major part flows along the shelf oriented in the east-west direction. Previous modeling and observational studies of the Kuroshio near the Taiwan coast showed that during summer (May - September) the core of the Kuroshio moves offshore by 100 km, while during winter (October - April) Kuroshio waters flows closer to the Taiwan coast. Another interesting phenomenon is the occurrences of cold waters ”cold-dome” just northeast of Taiwan, which is closely associated with the seasonal migration of Kuroshio waters. Cold water upwells in this area during summer, associated with cyclonic eddies. This patch of cold water can be clearly distinguished from surrounding warm waters in satellite sea-surface temperature (SST) maps. This seasonal upwelling is more pronounced during summer, when the axis of the Kuroshio shifts offshore, and is less persistent during winter when the Kuroshio flows closer to the Taiwan coast. A number of five year forward model simulation have been made using realistic forcings, initial conditions and boundary conditions. The forward model simulations have been tested by comparing with satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and SST. An adjoint-based sensitivity study been performed for the ”cold-dome” upwelling features and northward shelf intrusion of Kuroshio waters at northeast coast of Taiwan. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and its adjoint. The goal is to understand the influences on the cold-dome and the shelf intrusions. The adjoint sensitivities of SST, SSH, velocities, and transport were computed with respect to

  10. SELF-ADJOINT FOURTH ORDER DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Click on the link to view the abstract. Keywords: Fourth order differential equation, eigenvalue dependent boundary conditions, quadratic operator pencil, self-adjoint operator. Quaestiones Mathematicae 34(2011), 393–406 ...

  11. Adjoint-based optimization for flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Wei, Mingjun

    2012-11-01

    Adjoint-based methods show great potential in flow control and optimization of complex problems with high- or infinite-dimensional control space. It is attractive to solve an adjoint problem to understand the complex effects from multiple control parameters to a few performance indicators of the flight of birds or insects. However, the traditional approach to formulate the adjoint problem becomes either impossible or too complex when arbitrary moving boundary (e.g. flapping wings) and its perturbation is considered. Here, we use non-cylindrical calculus to define the perturbation. So that, a simple adjoint system can be derived directly in the inertial coordinate. The approach is first applied to the optimization of cylinder oscillation and later to flapping wings. Supported by AFOSR.

  12. Local fibred right adjoints are polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders; Kock, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense......For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense...

  13. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  14. Generalization of Spectral Green's Function nodal method for slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Silva, Odair P. da; Barros, Ricardo C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Garcia, Carlos R., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    Presented here is the application of the adjoint technique for solving source-detector discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) transport problems by using a spectral nodal method. For slab-geometry adjoint S-N model, the adjoint spectral Green's function method (SGF{sup †}) is extended to multigroup problems considering arbitrary L'th-order of scattering anisotropy, and the possibility of non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward S{sub N} transport problems. The SGF{sup †} method converges numerical solutions that are completely free from spatial truncation errors. In order to generate numerical solutions of the SGF{sup †} equations, we use the partial adjoint one-node block inversion (NBI) iterative scheme. Partial adjoint NBI scheme uses the most recent estimates for the node-edge adjoint angular Fluxes in the outgoing directions of a given discretization node, to solve the resulting adjoint SN problem in that node for all the adjoint angular fluxes in the incoming directions, which constitute the outgoing adjoint angular fluxes for the adjacent node in the sweeping directions. Numerical results are given to illustrate the present spectral nodal method features and some advantages of using the adjoint technique in source-detector problems. author)

  15. Generalization of Spectral Green's Function nodal method for slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in SN formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Silva, Odair P. da; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    Presented here is the application of the adjoint technique for solving source{detector discrete ordinates (S N ) transport problems by using a spectral nodal method. For slab-geometry adjoint S-N model, the adjoint spectral Green's function method (SGF † ) is extended to multigroup problems considering arbitrary L'th-order of scattering anisotropy, and the possibility of non{zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward S N transport problems. The SGF † method converges numerical solutions that are completely free from spatial truncation errors. In order to generate numerical solutions of the SGF † equations, we use the partial adjoint one{node block inversion (NBI) iterative scheme. Partial adjoint NBI scheme uses the most recent estimates for the node-edge adjoint angular Fluxes in the outgoing directions of a given discretization node, to solve the resulting adjoint SN problem in that node for all the adjoint angular fluxes in the incoming directions, which constitute the outgoing adjoint angular fluxes for the adjacent node in the sweeping directions. Numerical results are given to illustrate the present spectral nodal method features and some advantages of using the adjoint technique in source-detector problems. author)

  16. A generalized adjoint framework for sensitivity and global error estimation in time-dependent nuclear reactor simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripling, H.F.; Anitescu, M.; Adams, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We develop an abstract framework for computing the adjoint to the neutron/nuclide burnup equations posed as a system of differential algebraic equations. ► We validate use of the adjoint for computing both sensitivity to uncertain inputs and for estimating global time discretization error. ► Flexibility of the framework is leveraged to add heat transfer physics and compute its adjoint without a reformulation of the adjoint system. ► Such flexibility is crucial for high performance computing applications. -- Abstract: We develop a general framework for computing the adjoint variable to nuclear engineering problems governed by a set of differential–algebraic equations (DAEs). The nuclear engineering community has a rich history of developing and applying adjoints for sensitivity calculations; many such formulations, however, are specific to a certain set of equations, variables, or solution techniques. Any change or addition to the physics model would require a reformulation of the adjoint problem and substantial difficulties in its software implementation. In this work we propose an abstract framework that allows for the modification and expansion of the governing equations, leverages the existing theory of adjoint formulation for DAEs, and results in adjoint equations that can be used to efficiently compute sensitivities for parametric uncertainty quantification. Moreover, as we justify theoretically and demonstrate numerically, the same framework can be used to estimate global time discretization error. We first motivate the framework and show that the coupled Bateman and transport equations, which govern the time-dependent neutronic behavior of a nuclear reactor, may be formulated as a DAE system with a power constraint. We then use a variational approach to develop the parameter-dependent adjoint framework and apply existing theory to give formulations for sensitivity and global time discretization error estimates using the adjoint

  17. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos

    2000-01-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  18. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  19. Mass anomalous dimension of adjoint QCD at large N from twisted volume reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Margarita García [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049-Madrid (Spain); González-Arroyo, Antonio [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Teórica, C-XI, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Keegan, Liam [PH-TH, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Okawa, Masanori [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University,Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Core of Research for the Energetic Universe, Hiroshima University,Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    In this work we consider the SU(N) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation, in the limit of large N. In this limit the infinite-volume physics of this model can be studied by means of the corresponding twisted reduced model defined on a single site lattice. Making use of this strategy we study the reduced model for various values of N up to 289. By analyzing the eigenvalue distribution of the adjoint Dirac operator we test the conformality of the theory and extract the corresponding mass anomalous dimension.

  20. Mass anomalous dimension of Adjoint QCD at large N from twisted volume reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Margarita García; Keegan, Liam; Okawa, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider the $SU(N)$ gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation, in the limit of large $N$. In this limit the infinite-volume physics of this model can be studied by means of the corresponding twisted reduced model defined on a single site lattice. Making use of this strategy we study the reduced model for various values of $N$ up to 289. By analyzing the eigenvalue distribution of the adjoint Dirac operator we test the conformality of the theory and extract the corresponding mass anomalous dimension.

  1. Technical Note: Adjoint formulation of the TOMCAT atmospheric transport scheme in the Eulerian backtracking framework (RETRO-TOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, P. E.; Esler, J. G.; Carver, G. D.

    2014-06-01

    A new methodology for the formulation of an adjoint to the transport component of the chemistry transport model TOMCAT is described and implemented in a new model, RETRO-TOM. The Eulerian backtracking method is used, allowing the forward advection scheme (Prather's second-order moments) to be efficiently exploited in the backward adjoint calculations. Prather's scheme is shown to be time symmetric, suggesting the possibility of high accuracy. To attain this accuracy, however, it is necessary to make a careful treatment of the "density inconsistency" problem inherent to offline transport models. The results are verified using a series of test experiments. These demonstrate the high accuracy of RETRO-TOM when compared with direct forward sensitivity calculations, at least for problems in which flux limiters in the advection scheme are not required. RETRO-TOM therefore combines the flexibility and stability of a "finite difference of adjoint" formulation with the accuracy of an "adjoint of finite difference" formulation.

  2. Double-Difference Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsvuran, R.; Bozdag, E.; Lei, W.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    The adjoint method allows us to incorporate full waveform simulations in inverse problems. Misfit functions play an important role in extracting the relevant information from seismic waveforms. In this study, our goal is to apply the Double-Difference (DD) methodology proposed by Yuan et al. (2016) to global adjoint tomography. Dense seismic networks, such as USArray, lead to higher-resolution seismic images underneath continents. However, the imbalanced distribution of stations and sources poses challenges in global ray coverage. We adapt double-difference multitaper measurements to global adjoint tomography. We normalize each DD measurement by its number of pairs, and if a measurement has no pair, as may frequently happen for data recorded at oceanic stations, classical multitaper measurements are used. As a result, the differential measurements and pair-wise weighting strategy help balance uneven global kernel coverage. Our initial experiments with minor- and major-arc surface waves show promising results, revealing more pronounced structure near dense networks while reducing the prominence of paths towards cluster of stations. We have started using this new measurement in global adjoint inversions, addressing azimuthal anisotropy in upper mantle. Meanwhile, we are working on combining the double-difference approach with instantaneous phase measurements to emphasize contributions of scattered waves in global inversions and extending it to body waves. We will present our results and discuss challenges and future directions in the context of global tomographic inversions.

  3. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound...

  4. Solar wind reconstruction from magnetosheath data using an adjoint approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nabert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to reconstruct solar wind conditions from spacecraft data taken during magnetosheath passages, which can be used to support, e.g., magnetospheric models. The unknown parameters of the solar wind are used as boundary conditions of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics magnetosheath model. The boundary conditions are varied until the spacecraft data matches the model predictions. The matching process is performed using a gradient-based minimization of the misfit between data and model. To achieve this time-consuming procedure, we introduce the adjoint of the magnetosheath model, which allows efficient calculation of the gradients. An automatic differentiation tool is used to generate the adjoint source code of the model. The reconstruction method is applied to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms data to calculate the solar wind conditions during spacecraft magnetosheath transitions. The results are compared to actual solar wind data. This allows validation of our reconstruction method and indicates the limitations of the MHD magnetosheath model used.

  5. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P 1 equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  6. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  7. Interpreting adjoint and ensemble sensitivity toward the development of optimal observation targeting strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancell, B.C.; Hakim, G.J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Two general methods, adjoint or singular vector methods, and ensemble-based methods, have been previously investigated to identify locations where observations would have a significant positive impact on a numerical weather model forecast. In this paper, we perform a basic comparison of targeting regions chosen to reduce the expected variance of a chosen forecast response function within an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) based on both an adjoint method and an ensemble method. Ensemble sensitivity is defined by linear regressions of a chosen forecast response function onto the model initial-time state variables, and is used to calculate variance reduction fields to provide targeting guidance for the ensemble-based method. Adjoint sensitivity is used to provide targeting guidance for the adjoint-based method. 90 ensemble forecasts are considered over a 24-hour forecast period, and the response function is chosen to represent the sea-level pressure at a single point in the Pacific Northwest United States. Targeting by ensemble guidance is shown to be a function of ensemble sensitivity and both the initial-time model state and observation variance. We find that large areas of variance reduction exist away from regions of large ensemble sensitivity, adjoint sensitivity, and the initial-time variance of the model state. For hypothetical aircraft observations, ensemble guidance is superior to adjoint guidance for 850 hPa temperature observations in a single case. This advantage increases as the number of flight tracks increases. In all cases, as more flight tracks are considered, diminishing returns on response function variance reduction are realized. Implications of these results for the development of targeting strategies are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Advances in Global Adjoint Tomography -- Massive Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity are key to understanding a myriad of processes in Earth's interior. Resolving these properties requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3-D Earth models and an iterative inversion strategy. In the wake of successes in regional studies(e.g., Chen et al., 2007; Tape et al., 2009, 2010; Fichtner et al., 2009, 2010; Chen et al.,2010; Zhu et al., 2012, 2013; Chen et al., 2015), we are employing adjoint tomography based on a spectral-element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999, 2002) on a global scale using the supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After 15 iterations, we have obtained a high-resolution transversely isotropic Earth model (M15) using traveltime data from 253 earthquakes. To obtain higher resolution images of the emerging new features and to prepare the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity, we expanded the original dataset with approximately 4,220 additional global earthquakes (Mw5.5-7.0) --occurring between 1995 and 2014-- and downloaded 300-minute-long time series for all available data archived at the IRIS Data Management Center, ORFEUS, and F-net. Ocean Bottom Seismograph data from the last decade are also included to maximize data coverage. In order to handle the huge dataset and solve the I/O bottleneck in global adjoint tomography, we implemented a python-based parallel data processing workflow based on the newly developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). With the help of the data selection tool MUSTANG developed by IRIS, we cleaned our dataset and assembled event-based ASDF files for parallel processing. We have started Centroid Moment Tensors (CMT) inversions for all 4,220 earthquakes with the latest model M15, and selected high-quality data for measurement. We will statistically investigate each channel using synthetic seismograms calculated in M15 for updated CMTs and identify problematic channels. In addition to data screening, we also modified

  9. Global Adjoint Tomography - Hotspots and Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Modrak, R. T.; Smith, J. A.; Orsvuran, R.; Bozdag, E.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Plumes rise from the deep mantle due to thermal or/and chemical buoyancy, forming hotspots at the surface, and oceanic plates subduct underneath continents, piling up at discontinuities or sinking down to the core-mantle boundary. Despite these basic convection mechanisms, many questions remain about the origin of mantle plumes, slab subduction, their interaction with mantle convection, and their relationship with the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. Plume and slab morphology at depth provide further insight into these questions but imaging them in the mid and lower mantle is known to be very challenging due to a lack of data coverage and resolvability limits of conventional body-wave traveltime tomography. The deployment of regional dense arrays (e.g., USArray) and development of full waveform inversion techniques provide opportunities to resolve finer 3D details of mantle plumes and slabs. Harnessing the power of supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we employed a spectral-element method to accurately simulate seismograms in complex 3D Earth models and an adjoint method to obtain model updates. Bozdag et al. (2016) iteratively determined a transversely isotropic earth model (GLAD_M15) using 253 events. To achieve higher resolution and better coverage in the deep mantle, we expanded our database to 1,040 events; a 1/3 of them are deep earthquakes (>500 km). We reinverted source parameters using model GLAD_M15, recalculated synthetic seismograms, selected time windows that show good agreement between data and the synthetics, and made measurements within these windows. From the measurements, we further assess the overall quality of each event and station and exclude bad measurements using very conservative criteria. Thus far, we assimilated more than 10 million windows in three period bands from 17-250 s. As the model improves, we correct the centroid time and scalar moment of each event using its mean

  10. Challenges in adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  11. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: jperez@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint S{sub N} balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the S{sub N} equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint S{sub N} problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  12. Passive control of thermoacoustic oscillations with adjoint methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jose; Juniper, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    Strict pollutant regulations are driving gas turbine manufacturers to develop devices that operate under lean premixed conditions, which produce less NOx but encourage thermoacoustic oscillations. These are a form of unstable combustion that arise due to the coupling between the acoustic field and the fluctuating heat release in a combustion chamber. In such devices, in which safety is paramount, thermoacoustic oscillations must be eliminated passively, rather than through feedback control. The ideal way to eliminate thermoacoustic oscillations is by subtly changing the shape of the device. To achieve this, one must calculate the sensitivity of each unstable thermoacoustic mode to every geometric parameter. This is prohibitively expensive with standard methods, but is relatively cheap with adjoint methods. In this study we first present low-order network models as a tool to model and study the thermoacoustic behaviour of combustion chambers. Then we compute the continuous adjoint equations and the sensitivities to relevant parameters. With this, we run an optimization routine that modifies the parameters in order to stabilize all the resonant modes of a laboratory combustor rig.

  13. Numerical study of dense adjoint matter in two color QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.; Morrison, S.; Scorzato, L.; Oevers, M.

    2000-06-01

    We identify the global symmetries of SU(2) lattice gauge theory with N flavors of staggered fermion in the presence of a quark chemical potential μ, for fermions in both fundamental and adjoint representations, and anticipate likely patterns of symmetry breaking at both low and high densities. Results from numerical simulations of the model with N=1 adjoint flavor on a 4 3 x 8 lattice are presented, using both hybrid Monte Carlo and two-step multi-boson algorithms. It is shown that the sign of the fermion determinant starts to fluctuate once the model enters a phase with non-zero baryon charge density. HMC simulations are not ergodic in this regime, but TSMB simulations retain ergodicity even in the dense phase, and in addition appear to show superior decorrelation. The HMC results for the equation of state and the pion mass show good quantitative agreement with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory, which should hold only for N≥2. The TSMB results incorporating the sign of the determinant support a delayed onset transition, consistent with the pattern of symmetry breaking expected for N=1. (orig.)

  14. A demonstration of adjoint methods for multi-dimensional remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William G. K.; Hasekamp, Otto P.

    2018-01-01

    In previous work, we derived the adjoint method as a computationally efficient path to three-dimensional (3D) retrievals of clouds and aerosols. In this paper we will demonstrate the use of adjoint methods for retrieving two-dimensional (2D) fields of cloud extinction. The demonstration uses a new 2D radiative transfer solver (FSDOM). This radiation code was augmented with adjoint methods to allow efficient derivative calculations needed to retrieve cloud and surface properties from multi-angle reflectance measurements. The code was then used in three synthetic retrieval studies. Our retrieval algorithm adjusts the cloud extinction field and surface albedo to minimize the measurement misfit function with a gradient-based, quasi-Newton approach. At each step we compute the value of the misfit function and its gradient with two calls to the solver FSDOM. First we solve the forward radiative transfer equation to compute the residual misfit with measurements, and second we solve the adjoint radiative transfer equation to compute the gradient of the misfit function with respect to all unknowns. The synthetic retrieval studies verify that adjoint methods are scalable to retrieval problems with many measurements and unknowns. We can retrieve the vertically-integrated optical depth of moderately thick clouds as a function of the horizontal coordinate. It is also possible to retrieve the vertical profile of clouds that are separated by clear regions. The vertical profile retrievals improve for smaller cloud fractions. This leads to the conclusion that cloud edges actually increase the amount of information that is available for retrieving the vertical profile of clouds. However, to exploit this information one must retrieve the horizontally heterogeneous cloud properties with a 2D (or 3D) model. This prototype shows that adjoint methods can efficiently compute the gradient of the misfit function. This work paves the way for the application of similar methods to 3D remote

  15. Unconditional bases of subspaces related to non-self-adjoint perturbations of self-adjoint operators

    OpenAIRE

    Motovilov, A. K.; Shkalikov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Assume that $T$ is a self-adjoint operator on a Hilbert space $\\mathcal{H}$ and that the spectrum of $T$ is confined in the union $\\bigcup_{j\\in J}\\Delta_j$, $J\\subseteq\\mathbb{Z}$, of segments $\\Delta_j=[\\alpha_j, \\beta_j]\\subset\\mathbb{R}$ such that $\\alpha_{j+1}>\\beta_j$ and $$ \\inf_{j} \\left(\\alpha_{j+1}-\\beta_j\\right) = d > 0. $$ If $B$ is a bounded (in general non-self-adjoint) perturbation of $T$ with $\\|B\\|=:b

  16. On the non-uniqueness of the nodal mathematical adjoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluate three CMFD schemes for computing the nodal mathematical adjoint. • The nodal mathematical adjoint is not unique and can be non-positive (nonphysical). • Adjoint and forward eigenmodes are compatible if produced by the same CMFD method. • In nodal applications the excited eigenmodes are purely mathematical entities. - Abstract: Computation of the neutron adjoint flux within the framework of modern nodal diffusion methods is often facilitated by reducing the nodal equation system for the forward flux into a simpler coarse-mesh finite-difference form and then transposing the resultant matrix equations. The solution to the transposed problem is known as the nodal mathematical adjoint. Since the coarse-mesh finite-difference reduction of a given nodal formulation can be obtained in a number of ways, different nodal mathematical adjoint solutions can be computed. This non-uniqueness of the nodal mathematical adjoint challenges the credibility of the reduction strategy and demands a verdict as to its suitability in practical applications. This is the matter under consideration in this paper. A selected number of coarse-mesh finite-difference reduction schemes are described and compared. Numerical calculations are utilised to illustrate the differences in the adjoint solutions as well as to appraise the impact on such common applications as the computation of core point kinetics parameters. Recommendations are made for the proper application of the coarse-mesh finite-difference reduction approach to the nodal mathematical adjoint problem

  17. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the thermomechanical behavior of repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.L.; Thompson, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adjoint sensitivity method is applied to thermomechanical models for the first time. The method provides an efficient and inexpensive answer to the question: how sensitive are thermomechanical predictions to assumed parameters. The answer is exact, in the sense that it yields exact derivatives of response measures to parameters, and approximate, in the sense that projections of the response fo other parameter assumptions are only first order correct. The method is applied to linear finite element models of thermomechanical behavior. Extensions to more complicated models are straight-forward but often laborious. An illustration of the method with a two-dimensional repository corridor model reveals that the chosen stress response measure was most sensitive to Poisson's ratio for the rock matrix

  18. Visualising Earth's Mantle based on Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, E.; Pugmire, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Hill, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Peter, D. B.; Podhorszki, N.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in 3D wave propagation solvers and high-performance computing have enabled regional and global full-waveform inversions. Interpretation of tomographic models is often done on visually. Robust and efficient visualization tools are necessary to thoroughly investigate large model files, particularly at the global scale. In collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have developed effective visualization tools and used for visualization of our first-generation global model, GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al. 2016). VisIt (https://wci.llnl.gov/simulation/computer-codes/visit/) is used for initial exploration of the models and for extraction of seismological features. The broad capability of VisIt, and its demonstrated scalability proved valuable for experimenting with different visualization techniques, and in the creation of timely results. Utilizing VisIt's plugin-architecture, a data reader plugin was developed, which reads the ADIOS (https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/adios/) format of our model files. Blender (https://www.blender.org) is used for the setup of lighting, materials, camera paths and rendering of geometry. Python scripting was used to control the orchestration of different geometries, as well as camera animation for 3D movies. While we continue producing 3D contour plots and movies for various seismic parameters to better visualize plume- and slab-like features as well as anisotropy throughout the mantle, our aim is to make visualization an integral part of our global adjoint tomography workflow to routinely produce various 2D cross-sections to facilitate examination of our models after each iteration. This will ultimately form the basis for use of pattern recognition techniques in our investigations. Simulations for global adjoint tomography are performed on ORNL's Titan system and visualization is done in parallel on ORNL's post-processing cluster Rhea.

  19. Elementary operators on self-adjoint operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Lajos; Semrl, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and let and be standard *-operator algebras on H. Denote by and the set of all self-adjoint operators in and , respectively. Assume that and are surjective maps such that M(AM*(B)A)=M(A)BM(A) and M*(BM(A)B)=M*(B)AM*(B) for every pair , . Then there exist an invertible bounded linear or conjugate-linear operator and a constant c[set membership, variant]{-1,1} such that M(A)=cTAT*, , and M*(B)=cT*BT, .

  20. Using adjoint-based optimization to study wing flexibility in flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    In the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects, it is important to understand the impact of wing flexibility/deformation on aerodynamic performance. However, the large control space from the complexity of wing deformation and kinematics makes usual parametric study very difficult or sometimes impossible. Since the adjoint-based approach for sensitivity study and optimization strategy is a process with its cost independent of the number of input parameters, it becomes an attractive approach in our study. Traditionally, adjoint equation and sensitivity are derived in a fluid domain with fixed solid boundaries. Moving boundary is only allowed when its motion is not part of control effort. Otherwise, the derivation becomes either problematic or too complex to be feasible. Using non-cylindrical calculus to deal with boundary deformation solves this problem in a very simple and still mathematically rigorous manner. Thus, it allows to apply adjoint-based optimization in the study of flapping wing flexibility. We applied the ``improved'' adjoint-based method to study the flexibility of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flapping wings, where the flapping trajectory and deformation are described by either model functions or real data from the flight of dragonflies. Supported by AFOSR.

  1. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malins Alex

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS. An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  2. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandara, Lashi; Milatovic, Ognjen

    2015-01-01

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator

  3. The dynamic adjoint as a Green’s function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pázsit, I.; Dykin, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlight: • The relationship between the direct Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint function is discussed in two-group theory. • It is shown that the elements of the direct Greens’ function matrix are identical to those of the transpose of the adjoint Green’s function matrix, with an interchange of arguments. • It is also remarked how the dynamic adjoint function of van Dam can be given in terms of the direct Green’s function matrix. - Abstract: The concept of the dynamic adjoint was introduced by Hugo van Dam for calculating the in-core neutron noise in boiling water reactors in the mid-70’s. This successful approach found numerous applications for calculating the neutron noise in both PWRs and BWRs since then. Although the advantages and disadvantages of using the direct (forward) or the adjoint (backward) approach for the calculation of the neutron noise were analysed in a number of publications, the direct relationship between the forward Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint has not been discussed. On the other hand, in particle transport theory the relationship between the direct and adjoint Green’s function has been discussed in detail, in which Mike Williams has had many seminal contributions. In this note we analyse the relationship between the direct Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint in the spirit of Mike’s work in neutron transport and radiation damage theory. The paper is closed with some personal remarks and reminiscences.

  4. Improved Adjoint-Operator Learning For A Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of adjoint-operator learning reduces amount of computation and associated computational memory needed to make electronic neural network learn temporally varying pattern (e.g., to recognize moving object in image) in real time. Method extension of method described in "Adjoint-Operator Learning for a Neural Network" (NPO-18352).

  5. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Niita, Koji

    2017-09-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  6. An Adjoint-Based Adaptive Ensemble Kalman Filter

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hajoon

    2013-10-01

    A new hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/four-dimensional variational data assimilation (EnKF/4D-VAR) approach is introduced to mitigate background covariance limitations in the EnKF. The work is based on the adaptive EnKF (AEnKF) method, which bears a strong resemblance to the hybrid EnKF/three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) method. In the AEnKF, the representativeness of the EnKF ensemble is regularly enhanced with new members generated after back projection of the EnKF analysis residuals to state space using a 3D-VAR [or optimal interpolation (OI)] scheme with a preselected background covariance matrix. The idea here is to reformulate the transformation of the residuals as a 4D-VAR problem, constraining the new member with model dynamics and the previous observations. This should provide more information for the estimation of the new member and reduce dependence of the AEnKF on the assumed stationary background covariance matrix. This is done by integrating the analysis residuals backward in time with the adjoint model. Numerical experiments are performed with the Lorenz-96 model under different scenarios to test the new approach and to evaluate its performance with respect to the EnKF and the hybrid EnKF/3D-VAR. The new method leads to the least root-mean-square estimation errors as long as the linear assumption guaranteeing the stability of the adjoint model holds. It is also found to be less sensitive to choices of the assimilation system inputs and parameters.

  7. Comparison of the Adjoint and Adjoint-Free 4dVar Assimilation of the Hydrographic and Velocity Observations in the Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    becauseMnT = (Mn . . .M1)T = MT1. . .MTn . This corresponds to backward -in-time integration of the ad- joint model forced by qn i . The second...still be viewed as satisfactory. Taking advantage of the trend toward massive parallelization in omputer technologies , the adjoint-free variational...N., Cornuelle, B., Kohl, A., Heimbach, P., 2013. A MITgcm/DART ocean prediction and analysis system with application to the Gulf of Mexico . Dyn

  8. Linear and nonlinear aspects of snow albedo feedbacks in atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roads, J. O.

    1981-01-01

    Namias' hypothesis, that anomalous snowcover on the eastern side of the North American continent can generate an anomalous east coast low pressure system and an anomalous inland high pressure system, is consistent with the time-averaged anomalous response from a nonlinear, primitive equation channel model with an idealized, flat land-sea arrangement. An attempt to understand and describe this anomalous response in the nonlinear model as a linear response to anomalous diabatic heating was largely unsuccessful, primarily because the anomalous eddy fluxes were also important. This unsuccessful attempt to describe the nonlinear model's time averages by linear theory then motivated several comparisons between linear and nonlinear severely truncated quasi-geostrophic models. It was also found in these models that the eddy fluxes were extremely important for forcing or dissipating the stationary eddies.

  9. Application of sensitivity analysis to a simplified coupled neutronic thermal-hydraulics transient in a fast reactor using Adjoint techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, L.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a method to perform sensitivity analysis for a simplified multi-physics problem is presented. The method is based on the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure which is used to apply first order perturbation theory to linear and nonlinear problems using adjoint techniques. The multi-physics problem considered includes a neutronic, a thermo-kinetics, and a thermal-hydraulics part and it is used to model the time dependent behavior of a sodium cooled fast reactor. The adjoint procedure is applied to calculate the sensitivity coefficients with respect to the kinetic parameters of the problem for two reference transients using two different model responses, the results obtained are then compared with the values given by a direct sampling of the forward nonlinear problem. Our first results show that, thanks to modern numerical techniques, the procedure is relatively easy to implement and provides good estimation for most perturbations, making the method appealing for more detailed problems. (author)

  10. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  11. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the ;tape;. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  12. Nonlinear self-adjointness of the Krichever-Novikov equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiakberova, L. R.; Ibragimov, N. H.

    2014-02-01

    It is known that the classification of third-order evolutionary equations with the constant separant possessing a nontrivial Lie-Bäcklund algebra (in other words, integrable equations) results in the linear equation, the KdV equation and the Krichever-Novikov equation. The first two of these equations are nonlinearly self-adjoint. This property allows to associate conservation laws of the equations in question with their symmetries. The problem on nonlinear self-adjointness of the Krichever-Novikov equation has not been solved yet. In the present paper we solve this problem and find the explicit form of the differential substitution providing the nonlinear self-adjointness.

  13. First-arrival traveltime tomography for anisotropic media using the adjoint-state method

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2016-05-27

    Traveltime tomography using transmission data has been widely used for static corrections and for obtaining near-surface models for seismic depth imaging. More recently, it is also being used to build initial models for full-waveform inversion. The classic traveltime tomography approach based on ray tracing has difficulties in handling large data sets arising from current seismic acquisition surveys. Some of these difficulties can be addressed using the adjoint-state method, due to its low memory requirement and numerical efficiency. By coupling the gradient computation to nonlinear optimization, it avoids the need for explicit computation of the Fréchet derivative matrix. Furthermore, its cost is equivalent to twice the solution of the forward-modeling problem, irrespective of the size of the input data. The presence of anisotropy in the subsurface has been well established during the past few decades. The improved seismic images obtained by incorporating anisotropy into the seismic processing workflow justify the effort. However, previous literature on the adjoint-state method has only addressed the isotropic approximation of the subsurface. We have extended the adjoint-state technique for first-arrival traveltime tomography to vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Because δ is weakly resolvable from surface seismic alone, we have developed the mathematical framework and procedure to invert for vNMO and η. Our numerical tests on the VTI SEAM model demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to invert for near-surface model parameters and reveal the accuracy achievable by the algorithm.

  14. A new 2D climate model with chemistry and self consistent eddy-parameterization. The impact of airplane NO{sub x} on the chemistry of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gepraegs, R.; Schmitz, G.; Peters, D. [Institut fuer Atmosphaerenphysik, Kuehlungsborn (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A 2D version of the ECHAM T21 climate model has been developed. The new model includes an efficient spectral transport scheme with implicit diffusion. Furthermore, photodissociation and chemistry of the NCAR 2D model have been incorporated. A self consistent parametrization scheme is used for eddy heat- and momentum flux in the troposphere. It is based on the heat flux parametrization of Branscome and mixing-length formulation for quasi-geostrophic vorticity. Above 150 hPa the mixing-coefficient K{sub yy} is prescribed. Some of the model results are discussed, concerning especially the impact of aircraft NO{sub x} emission on the model chemistry. (author) 6 refs.

  15. Intrinsic self adjointness and the calculus of variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, M.W.; Embaby, M.

    1986-07-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made for generalizing the calculus of variations in such a way that the end points are left without being constrained, with the purpose of generating Sturm-Liouville differential operators and the like, that are intrinsically self-adjoint. This approach is not only different from the hermitization prescription, but also more superior in view of the fact that self-adjointness is built in naturally. The proposed generalization of the variational calculus provides an Euler-Lagrange differential equation with a differential boundary term, that is responsible for restoring self-adjointness. In this frame, functionals containing higher order derivatives, and multi-dimensional dependent as well as independent variables which may or may not be subjected to some integral constraints are extremized. As a typical example, the Sturm-Liouville problem is considered, in which intrinsic self adjointness is incorporated. (author)

  16. Adjoint-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Aerospace Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of twenty years of adjoint-based aerodynamic design research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Adjoint-based algorithms provide a powerful tool for efficient sensitivity analysis of complex large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Unlike alternative approaches for which computational expense generally scales with the number of design parameters, adjoint techniques yield sensitivity derivatives of a simulation output with respect to all input parameters at the cost of a single additional simulation. With modern large-scale CFD applications often requiring millions of compute hours for a single analysis, the efficiency afforded by adjoint methods is critical in realizing a computationally tractable design optimization capability for such applications.

  17. Full Waveform Adjoint Seismic Tomography of the Antarctic Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A. J.; Wiens, D.; Zhu, H.; Tromp, J.; Nyblade, A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Winberry, J. P.; Wilson, T. J.; Dalziel, I. W. D.; Hansen, S. E.; Shore, P.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies investigating the response and influence of the solid Earth on the evolution of the cryosphere demonstrate the need to account for 3D rheological structure to better predict ice sheet dynamics, stability, and future sea level impact, as well as to improve glacial isostatic adjustment models and more accurately measure ice mass loss. Critical rheological properties like mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness may be estimated from shear wave velocity models that, for Antarctica, would ideally possess regional-scale resolution extending down to at least the base of the transition zone (i.e. 670 km depth). However, current global- and continental-scale seismic velocity models are unable to obtain both the resolution and spatial coverage necessary, do not take advantage of the full set of available Antarctic data, and, in most instance, employ traditional seismic imaging techniques that utilize limited seismogram information. We utilize 3-component earthquake waveforms from almost 300 Antarctic broadband seismic stations and 26 southern mid-latitude stations from 270 earthquakes (5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0) between 2001-2003 and 2007-2016 to conduct a full-waveform adjoint inversion for Antarctica and surrounding regions of the Antarctic plate. Necessary forward and adjoint wavefield simulations are performed utilizing SPECFEM3D_GLOBE with the aid of the Texas Advanced Computing Center. We utilize phase observations from seismogram segments containing P, S, Rayleigh, and Love waves, including reflections and overtones, which are autonomously identified using FLEXWIN. The FLEXWIN analysis is carried out over a short (15-50 s) and long (initially 50-150 s) period band that target body waves, or body and surface waves, respectively. As our model is iteratively refined, the short-period corner of the long period band is gradually reduced to 25 s as the model converges over 20 linearized inversion iterations. We will briefly present this new high

  18. An Adjoint-based Numerical Method for a class of nonlinear Fokker-Planck Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Festa, Adriano

    2017-03-22

    Here, we introduce a numerical approach for a class of Fokker-Planck (FP) equations. These equations are the adjoint of the linearization of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations. Using this structure, we show how to transfer the properties of schemes for HJ equations to the FP equations. Hence, we get numerical schemes with desirable features such as positivity and mass-preservation. We illustrate this approach in examples that include mean-field games and a crowd motion model.

  19. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Licheng; Zhao, Yuanhong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Xiaoye; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Fu, Tzung-May; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yuxuan

    2015-08-01

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution.

  20. Aerodynamic Optimization Based on Continuous Adjoint Method for a Flexible Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoke Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic optimization based on continuous adjoint method for a flexible wing is developed using FORTRAN 90 in the present work. Aerostructural analysis is performed on the basis of high-fidelity models with Euler equations on the aerodynamic side and a linear quadrilateral shell element model on the structure side. This shell element can deal with both thin and thick shell problems with intersections, so this shell element is suitable for the wing structural model which consists of two spars, 20 ribs, and skin. The continuous adjoint formulations based on Euler equations and unstructured mesh are derived and used in the work. Sequential quadratic programming method is adopted to search for the optimal solution using the gradients from continuous adjoint method. The flow charts of rigid and flexible optimization are presented and compared. The objective is to minimize drag coefficient meanwhile maintaining lift coefficient for a rigid and flexible wing. A comparison between the results from aerostructural analysis of rigid optimization and flexible optimization is shown here to demonstrate that it is necessary to include the effect of aeroelasticity in the optimization design of a wing.

  1. Estimating a planetary magnetic field with time-dependent global MHD simulations using an adjoint approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nabert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with a planetary magnetic field causes electrical currents that modify the magnetic field distribution around the planet. We present an approach to estimating the planetary magnetic field from in situ spacecraft data using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulation approach. The method is developed with respect to the upcoming BepiColombo mission to planet Mercury aimed at determining the planet's magnetic field and its interior electrical conductivity distribution. In contrast to the widely used empirical models, global MHD simulations allow the calculation of the strongly time-dependent interaction process of the solar wind with the planet. As a first approach, we use a simple MHD simulation code that includes time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field parameters. The planetary parameters are estimated by minimizing the misfit of spacecraft data and simulation results with a gradient-based optimization. As the calculation of gradients with respect to many parameters is usually very time-consuming, we investigate the application of an adjoint MHD model. This adjoint MHD model is generated by an automatic differentiation tool to compute the gradients efficiently. The computational cost for determining the gradient with an adjoint approach is nearly independent of the number of parameters. Our method is validated by application to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms magnetosheath data to estimate Earth's dipole moment.

  2. Data-based adjoint and H2 optimal control of the Ginzburg-Landau equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael; Bodony, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Equation-free, reduced-order methods of control are desirable when the governing system of interest is of very high dimension or the control is to be applied to a physical experiment. Two-phase flow optimal control problems, our target application, fit these criteria. Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is a data-driven method for model reduction that can be used to resolve the dynamics of very high dimensional systems and project the dynamics onto a smaller, more manageable basis. We evaluate the effectiveness of DMD-based forward and adjoint operator estimation when applied to H2 optimal control approaches applied to the linear and nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equation. Perspectives on applying the data-driven adjoint to two phase flow control will be given. Office of Naval Research (ONR) as part of the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives (MURI) Program, under Grant Number N00014-16-1-2617.

  3. Forcings and feedbacks on convection in the 2010 Pakistan flood: Modeling extreme precipitation with interactive large-scale ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Ji; Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Sobel, Adam H.

    2016-09-01

    Extratropical extreme precipitation events are usually associated with large-scale flow disturbances, strong ascent, and large latent heat release. The causal relationships between these factors are often not obvious, however, the roles of different physical processes in producing the extreme precipitation event can be difficult to disentangle. Here we examine the large-scale forcings and convective heating feedback in the precipitation events, which caused the 2010 Pakistan flood within the Column Quasi-Geostrophic framework. A cloud-revolving model (CRM) is forced with large-scale forcings (other than large-scale vertical motion) computed from the quasi-geostrophic omega equation using input data from a reanalysis data set, and the large-scale vertical motion is diagnosed interactively with the simulated convection. Numerical results show that the positive feedback of convective heating to large-scale dynamics is essential in amplifying the precipitation intensity to the observed values. Orographic lifting is the most important dynamic forcing in both events, while differential potential vorticity advection also contributes to the triggering of the first event. Horizontal moisture advection modulates the extreme events mainly by setting the environmental humidity, which modulates the amplitude of the convection's response to the dynamic forcings. When the CRM is replaced by either a single-column model (SCM) with parameterized convection or a dry model with a reduced effective static stability, the model results show substantial discrepancies compared with reanalysis data. The reasons for these discrepancies are examined, and the implications for global models and theoretical models are discussed.

  4. Manipulating Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Using Adjoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    It has been observed that initial interfacial perturbations affect the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. However, it remains to be seen to what extent the perturbations alter the RT growth rate. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) provide a powerful means for studying the effects of initial conditions (IC) on the growth rate. However, a brute-force approach for identifying optimal initial perturbations is not practical via DNS. In addition, identifying sensitivity of the RT growth to the large number of parameters used in defining the IC is computationally expensive. A discrete adjoint is formulated to measure sensitivities of multi-mode RT growth to ICs in a high-order finite difference framework. The sensitivity is used as a search direction for adjusting the initial perturbations to both maximize and suppress the RT growth rate during its non-linear regime. The modes that contribute the greatest sensitivity are identified, and optimized perturbation energy spectrum are reported. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  5. Intelligent earthquake data processing for global adjoint tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, J.; Li, T.; Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the increased computational capability afforded by modern and future computing architectures, the seismology community is demanding a more comprehensive understanding of the full waveform information from the recorded earthquake seismograms. Global waveform tomography is a complex workflow that matches observed seismic data with synthesized seismograms by iteratively updating the earth model parameters based on the adjoint state method. This methodology allows us to compute a very accurate model of the earth's interior. The synthetic data is simulated by solving the wave equation in the entire globe using a spectral-element method. In order to ensure the inversion accuracy and stability, both the synthesized and observed seismograms must be carefully pre-processed. Because the scale of the inversion problem is extremely large and there is a very large volume of data to both be read and written, an efficient and reliable pre-processing workflow must be developed. We are investigating intelligent algorithms based on a machine-learning (ML) framework that will automatically tune parameters for the data processing chain. One straightforward application of ML in data processing is to classify all possible misfit calculation windows into usable and unusable ones, based on some intelligent ML models such as neural network, support vector machine or principle component analysis. The intelligent earthquake data processing framework will enable the seismology community to compute the global waveform tomography using seismic data from an arbitrarily large number of earthquake events in the fastest, most efficient way.

  6. Data and Workflow Management Challenges in Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Orsvuran, R.; Krischer, L.; Chen, Y.; Balasubramanian, V.; Hill, J.; Turilli, M.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Jha, S.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    It is crucial to take the complete physics of wave propagation into account in seismic tomography to further improve the resolution of tomographic images. The adjoint method is an efficient way of incorporating 3D wave simulations in seismic tomography. However, global adjoint tomography is computationally expensive, requiring thousands of wavefield simulations and massive data processing. Through our collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) computing group and an allocation on Titan, ORNL's GPU-accelerated supercomputer, we are now performing our global inversions by assimilating waveform data from over 1,000 earthquakes. The first challenge we encountered is dealing with the sheer amount of seismic data. Data processing based on conventional data formats and processing tools (such as SAC), which are not designed for parallel systems, becomes our major bottleneck. To facilitate the data processing procedures, we designed the Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) and developed a set of Python-based processing tools to replace legacy FORTRAN-based software. These tools greatly enhance reproducibility and accountability while taking full advantage of highly parallel system and showing superior scaling on modern computational platforms. The second challenge is that the data processing workflow contains more than 10 sub-procedures, making it delicate to handle and prone to human mistakes. To reduce human intervention as much as possible, we are developing a framework specifically designed for seismic inversion based on the state-of-the art workflow management research, specifically the Ensemble Toolkit (EnTK), in collaboration with the RADICAL team from Rutgers University. Using the initial developments of the EnTK, we are able to utilize the full computing power of the data processing cluster RHEA at ORNL while keeping human interaction to a minimum and greatly reducing the data processing time. Thanks to all the improvements, we are now able to

  7. Big Data Challenges in Global Seismic 'Adjoint Tomography' (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    The challenge of imaging Earth's interior on a global scale is closely linked to the challenge of handling large data sets. The related iterative workflow involves five distinct phases, namely, 1) data gathering and culling, 2) synthetic seismogram calculations, 3) pre-processing (time-series analysis and time-window selection), 4) data assimilation and adjoint calculations, 5) post-processing (pre-conditioning, regularization, model update). In order to implement this workflow on modern high-performance computing systems, a new seismic data format is being developed. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is designed to replace currently used data formats with a more flexible format that allows for fast parallel I/O. The metadata is divided into abstract categories, such as "source" and "receiver", along with provenance information for complete reproducibility. The structure of ASDF is designed keeping in mind three distinct applications: earthquake seismology, seismic interferometry, and exploration seismology. Existing time-series analysis tool kits, such as SAC and ObsPy, can be easily interfaced with ASDF so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages. ASDF accommodates an automated, efficient workflow for global adjoint tomography. Manually managing the large number of simulations associated with the workflow can rapidly become a burden, especially with increasing numbers of earthquakes and stations. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the possibility of automating the entire workflow. Scientific Workflow Management Software (SWfMS) allows users to execute workflows almost routinely. SWfMS provides additional advantages. In particular, it is possible to group independent simulations in a single job to fit the available computational resources. They also give a basic level of fault resilience as the workflow can be resumed at the correct state preceding a failure. Some of the best candidates for our particular workflow

  8. Adjoint current-based approaches to prostate brachytherapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J. A.; Henderson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper builds on previous work done at the Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison to employ the adjoint concept of nuclear reactor physics in the so-called greedy heuristic of brachytherapy optimization. Whereas that previous work focused on the adjoint flux, i.e. the importance, this work has included use of the adjoint current to increase the amount of information available in optimizing. Two current-based approaches were developed for 2-D problems, and each was compared to the most recent form of the flux-based methodology. The first method aimed to take a treatment plan from the flux-based greedy heuristic and adjust via application of the current-displacement, or a vector displacement based on a combination of tissue (adjoint) and seed (forward) currents acting as forces on a seed. This method showed promise in improving key urethral and rectal dosimetric quantities. The second method uses the normed current-displacement as the greedy criterion such that seeds are placed in regions of least force. This method, coupled with the dose-update scheme, generated treatment plans with better target irradiation and sparing of the urethra and normal tissues than the flux-based approach. Tables of these parameters are given for both approaches. In summary, these preliminary results indicate adjoint current methods are useful in optimization and further work in 3-D should be performed. (authors)

  9. On the norm convergence of the self-adjoint Trotter–Kato product ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The norm convergence of the Trotter–Kato product formula with error bound is shown for the semigroup generated by that operator sum of two nonnegative self-adjoint operators and which is self-adjoint.

  10. Normal and adjoint integral and integrodifferential neutron transport equations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.

    1976-01-01

    Using the simplifying hypotheses of the integrodifferential Boltzmann equations of neutron transport, given in JEN 334 report, several integral equations, and theirs adjoint ones, are obtained. Relations between the different normal and adjoint eigenfunctions are established and, in particular, proceeding from the integrodifferential Boltzmann equation it's found out the relation between the solutions of the adjoint equation of its integral one, and the solutions of the integral equation of its adjoint one (author)

  11. Numerical signatures of non-self-adjointness in quantum Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruf, M; Mueller, C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grobe, R, E-mail: matthias.ruf@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: carsten.mueller@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: grobe@phy.ilstu.edu [Intense Laser Physics Theory Unit and Department of Physics, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4560 (United States)

    2011-08-26

    Non-self-adjoint quantum mechanical operators do not necessarily possess eigenvalues. Finite N x N matrix representations of these operators, however, can be hermitian and therefore have a finite set of N real eigenvalues. Using the momentum operator, the kinetic energy operator, and the relativistic Hamiltonian of the Coulomb problem for the Klein-Gordon equation as examples, we examine analytically and also numerically the properties of the spectrum and eigenvectors in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces. We study the limit of N {yields} {infinity} for which some eigenvalues cease to exist as the corresponding operators are not self-adjoint. (paper)

  12. Adjoint sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in Monte Carlo forward calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Chang Hyo

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint-weighted perturbation (AWP) method, in which the required adjoint flux is estimated in the course of Monte Carlo (MC) forward calculations, has recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional MC perturbation techniques, such as the correlated sampling and differential operator sampling (DOS) methods. The equivalence of the first-order AWP method and first-order DOS method with the fission source perturbation taken into account is proven. An algorithm for the AWP calculations is implemented in the Seoul National University MC code McCARD and applied to the sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the Godiva and Bigten criticalities. (author)

  13. 2D Seiberg-like dualities with an adjoint matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoungho; Kim, Hyungchul; Park, Jaemo

    2017-10-01

    We consider the analogue of Kutasov-Schwimmer-Seiberg duality for two-dimensional N=(2,2)U(k) gauge theory with one adjoint X with the superpotential Tr X l+1 and with fundamental and anti-fundamental chiral multiplets. We give the evidences for the proposed dualities by analytically proving that the elliptic genus of dual pair coincides with each other. For some of the dual pairs flowing to the superconformal field theory, we show the nonperturbative truncation of the chiral ring. For the theory with one adjoint and N f > k fundamental fields, we argue the theory exhibits mass gap.

  14. Adjoint sensitivity of global cloud droplet number to aerosol and dynamical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karydis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the adjoint of a comprehensive cloud droplet formation parameterization for use in aerosol-cloud-climate interaction studies. The adjoint efficiently and accurately calculates the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to all parameterization inputs (e.g., updraft velocity, water uptake coefficient, aerosol number and hygroscopicity with a single execution. The adjoint is then integrated within three dimensional (3-D aerosol modeling frameworks to quantify the sensitivity of CDNC formation globally to each parameter. Sensitivities are computed for year-long executions of the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM, using wind fields computed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Global Circulation Model (GCM II', and the GEOS-Chem CTM, driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. We find that over polluted (pristine areas, CDNC is more sensitive to updraft velocity and uptake coefficient (aerosol number and hygroscopicity. Over the oceans of the Northern Hemisphere, addition of anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol is predicted to increase CDNC in contrast to coarse-mode sea salt which tends to decrease CDNC. Over the Southern Oceans, CDNC is most sensitive to sea salt, which is the main aerosol component of the region. Globally, CDNC is predicted to be less sensitive to changes in the hygroscopicity of the aerosols than in their concentration with the exception of dust where CDNC is very sensitive to particle hydrophilicity over arid areas. Regionally, the sensitivities differ considerably between the two frameworks and quantitatively reveal why the models differ considerably in their indirect forcing estimates.

  15. Singular factorizations, self-adjoint extensions and applications to quantum many-body physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langmann, Edwin [Mathematical Physics, KTH Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Laptev, Ari [Department of Mathematics, KTH, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Paufler, Cornelius [Theoretische Elementarteilchen-Physik, Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2006-02-03

    We study self-adjoint operators defined by factorizing second-order differential operators in first-order ones. We discuss examples where such factorizations introduce singular interactions into simple quantum-mechanical models such as the harmonic oscillator or the free particle on the circle. The generalization of these examples to the many-body case yields quantum models of distinguishable and interacting particles in one dimensions which can be solved explicitly and by simple means. Our considerations lead us to a simple method to construct exactly solvable quantum many-body systems of Calogero-Sutherland type.

  16. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  17. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of high frequency structures with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Bakr, Mohamed; Demir, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the theory of adjoint sensitivity analysis and uses the popular FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) method to show how wideband sensitivities can be efficiently estimated for different types of materials and structures. It includes a variety of MATLAB® examples to help readers absorb the content more easily.

  18. Non-self-adjoint hamiltonians defined by Riesz bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagarello, F., E-mail: fabio.bagarello@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell' Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, I-90128 Palermo, Italy and INFN, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Inoue, A., E-mail: a-inoue@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Mathematics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Trapani, C., E-mail: camillo.trapani@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    We discuss some features of non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians with real discrete simple spectrum under the assumption that the eigenvectors form a Riesz basis of Hilbert space. Among other things, we give conditions under which these Hamiltonians can be factorized in terms of generalized lowering and raising operators.

  19. Adjoint analysis of mixed continuous/discrete systems in simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The adjoint simulation method is a well established and efficient tool for gaining insight and understanding of key parameters affecting the behaviour and performance of a guided missile homing system. Traditionally, the method has been employed by various missile companies during the preliminary

  20. An adjoint-based simultaneous estimation method of the asthenosphere's viscosity and afterslip using a fast and scalable finite-element adjoint solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, Ryoichiro; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo

    2018-04-01

    The simultaneous estimation of the asthenosphere's viscosity and coseismic slip/afterslip is expected to improve largely the consistency of the estimation results to observation data of crustal deformation collected in widely spread observation points, compared to estimations of slips only. Such an estimate can be formulated as a non-linear inverse problem of material properties of viscosity and input force that is equivalent to fault slips based on large-scale finite-element (FE) modeling of crustal deformation, in which the degree of freedom is in the order of 109. We formulated and developed a computationally efficient adjoint-based estimation method for this inverse problem, together with a fast and scalable FE solver for the associated forward and adjoint problems. In a numerical experiment that imitates the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, the advantage of the proposed method is confirmed by comparing the estimated results with those obtained using simplified estimation methods. The computational cost required for the optimization shows that the proposed method enabled the targeted estimation to be completed with moderate amount of computational resources.

  1. Approximation for the adjoint neutron spectrum; Aproximacao para o espectro adjunto de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suster, Luis Carlos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The proposal of this work is the determination of an analytical approximation which is capable to reproduce the adjoint neutron flux for the energy range of the narrow resonances (NR). In a previous work we developed a method for the calculation of the adjoint spectrum which was calculated from the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were obtained by the collision probabilities method, this method involved a considerable quantity of numerical calculation. In the analytical method some approximations were done, like the multiplication of the escape probability in the fuel by the adjoint flux in the moderator, and after these approximations, taking into account the case of the narrow resonances, were substituted in the adjoint neutron balance equation for the fuel, resulting in an analytical approximation for the adjoint flux. The results obtained in this work were compared to the results generated with the reference method, which demonstrated a good and precise results for the adjoint neutron flux for the narrow resonances. (author)

  2. Nonlinear self-adjointness and invariant solutions of a 2D Rossby wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpoiasu, Rodica; Constantinescu, Radu

    2014-02-01

    The paper investigates the nonlinear self-adjointness of the nonlinear inviscid barotropic nondivergent vorticity equation in a beta-plane. It is a particular form of Rossby equation which does not possess variational structure and it is studied using a recently method developed by Ibragimov. The conservation laws associated with the infinite-dimensional symmetry Lie algebra models are constructed and analyzed. Based on this Lie algebra, some classes of similarity invariant solutions with nonconstant linear and nonlinear shears are obtained. It is also shown how one of the conservation laws generates a particular wave solution of this equation.

  3. Multi-scale Sensitivity and Predictability of Hurricane Joaquin (2015) Illuminated Through Adjoint Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J. D.; Holdaway, D.; Amerault, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Joaquin (2015) was a strong category 4 hurricane (maximum winds of 135 kts) that developed from an upper-level low over the western Atlantic and was noteworthy because of its large impact in the Bahamas, as well as the sinking of the cargo ship El Farroand loss of her 33 crew members. Joaquin initially moved southwest towards the Bahamas and rapidly intensified before sharply turning northeastward. Nearly all operational model forecasts failed to provide an accurate prediction of the rapid intensification and track, even at short lead times. As a result, the National Hurricane Center forecasted landfall in the mid-Atlantic, while in reality the storm moved well offshore. In this study, we utilize two adjoint modeling systems, the Navy COAMPS and the NASA GEOS-5, to investigate the role of initial condition errors that may have led to the relatively poor track and intensity predictions of Hurricane Joaquin. Adjoint models can provide valuable insight into the practical limitations of our ability to predict the path of tropical cyclones and their strength. An adjoint model can be used for the efficient and rigorous computation of numerical weather forecast sensitivity to changes in the initial state. The adjoint sensitivity diagnostics illustrate complex influences on the evolution of Joaquin that occur over a wide range of spatial scales. The sensitivity results highlight the importance of an upper-level trough to the northeast that provided the steering flow for the poorly-predicted southwesterly movement of the hurricane in its early phase. The steering flow and hurricane track are found to be very sensitive to relatively small changes in the initial state to the east-northeast of the hurricane. Additionally, the intensity prediction of Hurricane Joaquin is found to be very sensitive to the initial state moisture including highly structured regions around the storm and in remote regions as well. Hurricane Joaquin was observed in four NASA WB-57 research

  4. Automation of Global Adjoint Tomography Based on ASDF and Workflow Management Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Krischer, L.; Chen, Y.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Global adjoint tomography is computationally expensive, requiring thousands of wavefield simulations and massive data processing. Though a collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory computing group and an allocation on the `Titan' GPU-accelerated supercomputer, we have begun to assimilate waveform data from more than 4,000 earthquakes, from 1995 to 2015, in our inversions. However, since conventional file formats and signal processing tools were not designed for parallel processing of massive data volumes, use of such tools in high-resolution global inversions leads to major bottlenecks. To overcome such problems and allow for continued scientific progress, we designed the Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) and developed a set of processing tools based on ASDF, covering from signal processing (pytomo3d), time window selection (pyflex) to adjoint source (pyadjoint). These new tools greatly enhance the reproducibility and accountability of our research while taking full advantage of parallel computing, showing superior scaling on modern computational platforms. The entire inversion workflow, intrinsically complex and sensitive to human errors, is carefully handled and automated by modern workflow management tools, preventing data contamination and saving a huge amount of time. Our starting model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al., 2016), an elastic model with transversely isotropic upper mantle, is based on 253 earthquakes and 15 nonlinear conjugate gradient iterations. We have now completed source inversions for more than 1,000 earthquakes and have started structural inversions using a quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. We will discuss the challenges of large-scale workflows on HPC systems, the solutions offered by our new adjoint tomography tools, and the initial tomographic results obtained using the new expanded dataset.

  5. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  6. Mitigation of Engine Inlet Distortion Through Adjoint-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Irian; Rallabhandi, Sriram; Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2017-01-01

    The adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D is extended to allow efficient gradient- based optimization and design of concepts with highly integrated aero-propulsive systems. A circumferential distortion calculation, along with the derivatives needed to perform adjoint-based design, have been implemented in FUN3D. This newly implemented distortion calculation can be used not only for design but also to drive the existing mesh adaptation process and reduce the error associated with the fan distortion calculation. The design capability is demonstrated by the shape optimization of an in-house aircraft concept equipped with an aft fuselage propulsor. The optimization objective is the minimization of flow distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of this aft fuselage propulsor.

  7. Development and validation of continuous energy adjoint-weighted calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truchet, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in nowadays Reactor Physics is to propagate input data uncertainties (e.g. nuclear data, manufacturing tolerances, etc.) to nuclear codes final results (e.g. k(eff), reaction rate, etc.). In order to propagate uncertainties, one typically assumes small variations around a reference and evaluates at first sensitivity profiles. Problem is that nuclear Monte Carlo codes are not - or were not until very recently - able to straightforwardly process such sensitivity profiles, even thought they are considered as reference codes. First goal of this PhD thesis is to implement a method to calculate k(eff)-sensitivity profiles to nuclear data or any perturbations in TRIPOLI-4, the CEA Monte Carlo neutrons transport code. To achieve such a goal, a method has first been developed to calculate the adjoint flux using the Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) principle that states that the adjoint flux at a given phase space point is proportional to the neutron importance in a just critical core after several power iterations. Thanks to our developments, it has been made possible, for the fist time, to calculate the continuous adjoint flux for an actual and complete reactor core configuration. From that new feature, we have elaborated a new method able to forwardly apply the exact perturbation theory in Monte Carlo codes. Exact perturbation theory does not rely on small variations which makes possible to calculate very complex experiments. Finally and after a deep analysis of the IFP method, this PhD thesis also reproduces and improves an already used method to calculate adjoint weighted kinetic parameters as well as reference migrations areas. (author) [fr

  8. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions...... volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields....

  9. Seismic Window Selection and Misfit Measurements for Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Podhorszki, N.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Adjoint Tomography requires fast parallel processing of large datasets. After obtaing the preprocessed observed and synthetic seismograms, we use the open source software packages FLEXWIN (Maggi et al. 2007) to select time windows and MEASURE_ADJ to make measurements. These measurements define adjoint sources for data assimilation. Previous versions of these tools work on a pair of SAC files---observed and synthetic seismic data for the same component and station, and loop over all seismic records associated with one earthquake. Given the large number of stations and earthquakes, the frequent read and write operations create severe I/O bottlenecks on modern computing platforms. We present new versions of these tools utilizing a new seismic data format, namely the Adaptive Seismic Data Format(ASDF). This new format shows superior scalability for applications on high-performance computers and accommodates various types of data, including earthquake, industry and seismic interferometry datasets. ASDF also provides user-friendly APIs, which can be easily integrated into the adjoint tomography workflow and combined with other data processing tools. In addition to solving the I/O bottleneck, we are making several improvements to these tools. For example, FLEXWIN is tuned to select windows for different types of earthquakes. To capture their distinct features, we categorize earthquakes by their depths and frequency bands. Moreover, instead of only picking phases between the first P arrival and the surface-wave arrivals, our aim is to select and assimilate many other later prominent phases in adjoint tomography. For example, in the body-wave band (17 s - 60 s), we include SKS, sSKS and their multiple, while in the surface-wave band (60 s - 120 s) we incorporate major-arc surface waves.

  10. Numerical study of dense adjoint 2-color matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.; Scorzato, L.; Oevers, M.

    2000-11-01

    We study the global symmetries of SU(2) gauge theory with N flavors of staggered fermions in the presence of a chemical potential. We motivate the special interest of the case N=1 (staggered) with fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group. We present results from numerical simulations with both hybrid Monte Carlo and the two-step multi-bosonic algorithm. (orig.)

  11. An adjoint-based framework for maximizing mixing in binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Maximilian; Schmid, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Mixing in the inertial, but laminar parameter regime is a common application in a wide range of industries. Enhancing the efficiency of mixing processes thus has a fundamental effect on product quality, material homogeneity and, last but not least, production costs. In this project, we address mixing efficiency in the above mentioned regime (Reynolds number Re = 1000 , Peclet number Pe = 1000) by developing and demonstrating an algorithm based on nonlinear adjoint looping that minimizes the variance of a passive scalar field which models our binary Newtonian fluids. The numerical method is based on the FLUSI code (Engels et al. 2016), a Fourier pseudo-spectral code, which we modified and augmented by scalar transport and adjoint equations. Mixing is accomplished by moving stirrers which are numerically modeled using a penalization approach. In our two-dimensional simulations we consider rotating circular and elliptic stirrers and extract optimal mixing strategies from the iterative scheme. The case of optimizing shape and rotational speed of the stirrers will be demonstrated.

  12. Estimation of spatial covariance structures by adjoint state maximum likelihood cross-validation: 1. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, F. Javier; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    1989-03-01

    This series of three papers describes a cross-validation method to estimate the spatial covariance structure of intrinsic or nonintrinsic random functions from point or spatially averaged data that may be corrupted by noise. Any number of relevant parameters, including nugget effect, can be estimated. The theory, described in this paper, is based on a maximum likelihood approach which treats the cross-validation errors as Gaussian. Various a posteriori statistical tests are used to verify this hypothesis and to show that in many cases, correlation between these errors is weak. The log likelihood criterion is optimized through a combination of conjugate gradient algorithms. An adjoint state theory is used to efficiently calculate the gradient of the estimation criterion, optimize the step size downgradient, and compute a lower bound for the covariance matrix of the estimation errors. Issues related to the identifiability, stability, and uniqueness of the resulting adjoint state maximum likelihood cross-validation (ASMLCV) method are discussed. This paper also describes the manner in which ASMLCV allows one to use model structure identification criteria to select the best covariance model among a given set of alternatives. Practical aspects of ASMLCV and its application to synthetic data are presented in paper 2 (Samper and Neuman, this issue (a)). Applications to real hydrogeological data (transmissivities and groundwater levels) have been presented elsewhere, while hydrochemical and isotopic data are analyzed by ASMLCV in paper 3 (Samper and Neuman, this issue (b)).

  13. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  14. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis of low-order thermoacoustic networks using a wave-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, José G.; Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2017-07-01

    Strict pollutant emission regulations are pushing gas turbine manufacturers to develop devices that operate in lean conditions, with the downside that combustion instabilities are more likely to occur. Methods to predict and control unstable modes inside combustion chambers have been developed in the last decades but, in some cases, they are computationally expensive. Sensitivity analysis aided by adjoint methods provides valuable sensitivity information at a low computational cost. This paper introduces adjoint methods and their application in wave-based low order network models, which are used as industrial tools, to predict and control thermoacoustic oscillations. Two thermoacoustic models of interest are analyzed. First, in the zero Mach number limit, a nonlinear eigenvalue problem is derived, and continuous and discrete adjoint methods are used to obtain the sensitivities of the system to small modifications. Sensitivities to base-state modification and feedback devices are presented. Second, a more general case with non-zero Mach number, a moving flame front and choked outlet, is presented. The influence of the entropy waves on the computed sensitivities is shown.

  15. The development of the continuous orthonormalization and adjoint methods for solar seismology: Eigenfrequency computation and sensitivity analysis for direct and inverse problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Two new analysis methods for solar seismology are developed. Called the continuous orthonormalization (CON) and adjoint methods, their use enables both solar eigenfrequencies and eigenfrequency sensitivities to be computed more accurately and efficiently than with existing methods. The CON method integrates an eighth-order nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) which defines the linear adiabatic nonradial oscillation modes of the Sun. All normal modes of oscillation are treated identically, regardless of their type or their predominant location inside the Sun. The adjoint method integrates a related eighth-order linear inhomogeneous system of ODEs. From the resultant solution, an eigenfrequency's partial derivatives with respect to an extensive set of solar model parameters may be computed simultaneously. Extensive numerical tests confirm the validity of the two new methods. Eigenfrequencies obtained via the CON method have seven significant digits and match within 1 percent the eigenfrequencies obtained via finite difference or mesh approaches. Eigenfrequency sensitivities obtained via the adjoint method match with 2 percent the results obtained by explicitly perturbing the solar model parameters and recomputing the eigenfrequencies. The usefulness and power of the two new methods are demonstrated by applying them to the solution of an elementary solar inversion problem. A sample solar model's f-mode frequencies are iteratively driven into agreement with an observed set of f-mode frequencies. Adjoint sensitivity results are used to alter solar model parameters within hundreds of radial bins

  16. Application of adjoint sensitivity analysis to nuclear reactor fuel rod performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilderman, S.J.; Was, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    Adjoint sensitivity analysis in nuclear fuel behavior modeling is extended to operate on the entire power history for both Zircaloy and stainless steel cladding via the computer codes FCODE-ALPHA/SS and SCODE/SS. The sensitivities of key variables to input parameters are found to be highly non-intuitive and strongly dependent on the fuel-clad gap status and the history of the fuel during the cycle. The sensitivities of five key variables, clad circumferential stress and strain, fission gas release, fuel centerline temperature and fuel-clad gap, to eleven input parameters are studied. The most important input parameters (yielding significances between 1 and 100) are fabricated clad inner and outer radii and fuel radius. The least important significances (less than 0.01) are the time since reactor start-up and fuel-burnup densification rate. Intermediate to these are fabricated fuel porosity, linear heat generation rate, the power history scale factor, clad outer temperature, fill gas pressure and coolant pressure. Stainless steel and Zircaloy have similar sensitivities at start-up but these diverges a burnup proceeds due to the effect of the higher creep rate of Zircaloy which causes the system to be more responsive to changes in input parameters. The value of adjoint sensitivity analysis lies in its capability of uncovering dependencies of fuel variables on input parameters that cannot be determined by a sequential thought process. (orig.)

  17. Nonself-Adjoint Second-Order Difference Operators in Limit-Circle Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilender P. Allahverdiev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the maximal dissipative second-order difference (or discrete Sturm-Liouville operators acting in the Hilbert space ℓ2(ℤ (ℤ:={0,±1,±2,…}, that is, the extensions of a minimal symmetric operator with defect index (2,2 (in the Weyl-Hamburger limit-circle cases at ±∞. We investigate two classes of maximal dissipative operators with separated boundary conditions, called “dissipative at −∞” and “dissipative at ∞.” In each case, we construct a self-adjoint dilation of the maximal dissipative operator and its incoming and outgoing spectral representations, which make it possible to determine the scattering matrix of the dilation. We also establish a functional model of the maximal dissipative operator and determine its characteristic function through the Titchmarsh-Weyl function of the self-adjoint operator. We prove the completeness of the system of eigenvectors and associated vectors of the maximal dissipative operators.

  18. Domain decomposition method for the Baltic Sea based on theory of adjoint equation and inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezina, Natalya; Agoshkov, Valery

    2017-04-01

    Domain decomposition method (DDM) allows one to present a domain with complex geometry as a set of essentially simpler subdomains. This method is particularly applied for the hydrodynamics of oceans and seas. In each subdomain the system of thermo-hydrodynamic equations in the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations is solved. The problem of obtaining solution in the whole domain is that it is necessary to combine solutions in subdomains. For this purposes iterative algorithm is created and numerical experiments are conducted to investigate an effectiveness of developed algorithm using DDM. For symmetric operators in DDM, Poincare-Steklov's operators [1] are used, but for the problems of the hydrodynamics, it is not suitable. In this case for the problem, adjoint equation method [2] and inverse problem theory are used. In addition, it is possible to create algorithms for the parallel calculations using DDM on multiprocessor computer system. DDM for the model of the Baltic Sea dynamics is numerically studied. The results of numerical experiments using DDM are compared with the solution of the system of hydrodynamic equations in the whole domain. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project 14-11-00609, the formulation of the iterative process and numerical experiments). [1] V.I. Agoshkov, Domain Decompositions Methods in the Mathematical Physics Problem // Numerical processes and systems, No 8, Moscow, 1991 (in Russian). [2] V.I. Agoshkov, Optimal Control Approaches and Adjoint Equations in the Mathematical Physics Problem, Institute of Numerical Mathematics, RAS, Moscow, 2003 (in Russian).

  19. Adjoint tomography of the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Kanto region using broadband seismograms

    KAUST Repository

    Miyoshi, Takayuki

    2017-10-04

    A three-dimensional seismic wave speed model in the Kanto region of Japan was developed using adjoint tomography for application in the effective reproduction of observed waveforms. Starting with a model based on previous travel time tomographic results, we inverted the waveforms obtained at seismic broadband stations from 140 local earthquakes in the Kanto region to obtain the P- and S-wave speeds Vp and Vs. Additionally, all centroid times of the source solutions were determined before the structural inversion. The synthetic displacements were calculated using the spectral-element method (SEM) in which the Kanto region was parameterized using 16 million grid points. The model parameters Vp and Vs were updated iteratively by Newton’s method using the misfit and Hessian kernels until the misfit between the observed and synthetic waveforms was minimized. Computations of the forward and adjoint simulations were conducted on the K computer in Japan. The optimized SEM code required a total of 6720 simulations using approximately 62,000 node hours to obtain the final model after 16 iterations. The proposed model reveals several anomalous areas with extremely low-Vs values in comparison with those of the initial model. These anomalies were found to correspond to geological features, earthquake sources, and volcanic regions with good data coverage and resolution. The synthetic waveforms obtained using the newly proposed model for the selected earthquakes showed better fit than the initial model to the observed waveforms in different period ranges within 5–30 s. This result indicates that the model can accurately predict actual waveforms.

  20. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  1. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2017-12-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here for

  2. The efficiency of geophysical adjoint codes generated by automatic differentiation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasenko, A. V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of numerical models that describe complex physical or chemical processes depends on the choice of model parameters. Estimating an optimal set of parameters by optimization algorithms requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the process of interest to model parameters. Typically the sensitivity computation involves differentiation of the model, which can be performed by applying algorithmic differentiation (AD) tools to the underlying numerical code. However, existing AD tools differ substantially in design, legibility and computational efficiency. In this study we show that, for geophysical data assimilation problems of varying complexity, the performance of adjoint codes generated by the existing AD tools (i) Open_AD, (ii) Tapenade, (iii) NAGWare and (iv) Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) can be vastly different. Based on simple test problems, we evaluate the efficiency of each AD tool with respect to computational speed, accuracy of the adjoint, the efficiency of memory usage, and the capability of each AD tool to handle modern FORTRAN 90-95 elements such as structures and pointers, which are new elements that either combine groups of variables or provide aliases to memory addresses, respectively. We show that, while operator overloading tools are the only ones suitable for modern codes written in object-oriented programming languages, their computational efficiency lags behind source transformation by orders of magnitude, rendering the application of these modern tools to practical assimilation problems prohibitive. In contrast, the application of source transformation tools appears to be the most efficient choice, allowing handling even large geophysical data assimilation problems. However, they can only be applied to numerical models written in earlier generations of programming languages. Our study indicates that applying existing AD tools to realistic geophysical problems faces limitations that urgently need to be solved to allow the

  3. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  4. On the norm convergence of the self-adjoint Trotter–Kato product ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    norm convergence with error bound. In [12] we have shown. Theorem 1.1. If A and B are nonnegative self-adjoint operators in H with domains ..... [20] Rogava Dzh L, Error bounds for Trotter–type formulas for self-adjoint operators, Funct. Anal.

  5. Adjoint-based approach to Enhancing Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed adjoint method for multi-component compressible flow is used to measure sensitivity of the mixing rate to initial perturbations in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT instabilities are performed at moderate Reynolds numbers. The DNS are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint provides a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). In this work, a QoI is defined based on the time-integrated scalar field to quantify the mixing rate. Therefore, the adjoint solution is used to measure sensitivity of this QoI to a set of initial perturbations, and inform a gradient-based line search to optimize mixing. We first demonstrate the adjoint approach in the linear regime and compare the optimized initial conditions to the expected values from linear stability analysis. The adjoint method is then used in the high Reynolds number limit where theory is no longer valid. Finally, chaos is known to contaminate the accuracy of the adjoint gradient in turbulent flows when integrated over long time horizons. We assess the influence of chaos on the accuracy of the adjoint gradient to guide the work of future studies on adjoint-based sensitivity of turbulent mixing. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  6. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation; Sistema de equacoes P1 adjuntas para a moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  7. Lecture 1. Monte Carlo basics. Lecture 2. Adjoint Monte Carlo. Lecture 3. Coupled Forward-Adjoint calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is a statistical method to solve mathematical and physical problems using random numbers. The principle of the methods will be demonstrated for a simple mathematical problem and for neutron transport. Various types of estimators will be discussed, as well as generally applied variance reduction methods like splitting, Russian roulette and importance biasing. The theoretical formulation for solving eigenvalue problems for multiplying systems will be shown. Some reflections will be given about the applicability of the Monte Carlo method, its limitations and its future prospects for reactor physics calculations. Adjoint Monte Carlo is a Monte Carlo game to solve the adjoint neutron (or photon) transport equation. The adjoint transport equation can be interpreted in terms of simulating histories of artificial particles, which show properties of neutrons that move backwards in history. These particles will start their history at the detector from which the response must be estimated and give a contribution to the estimated quantity when they hit or pass through the neutron source. Application to multigroup transport formulation will be demonstrated Possible implementation for the continuous energy case will be outlined. The inherent advantages and disadvantages of the method will be discussed. The Midway Monte Carlo method will be presented for calculating a detector response due to a (neutron or photon) source. A derivation will be given of the basic formula for the Midway Monte Carlo method The black absorber technique, allowing for a cutoff of particle histories when reaching the midway surface in one of the calculations will be derived. An extension of the theory to coupled neutron-photon problems is given. The method will be demonstrated for an oil well logging problem, comprising a neutron source in a borehole and photon detectors to register the photons generated by inelastic neutron scattering. (author)

  8. High Order Adjoint Derivatives using ESDIRK Methods for Oil Reservoir Production Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capolei, Andrea; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    In production optimization, computation of the gradients is the computationally expensive step. We improve the computational efficiency of such algorithms by improving the gradient computation using high-order ESDIRK (Explicit Singly Diagonally Implicit Runge-Kutta) temporal integration methods...... and continuous adjoints . The high order integration scheme allows larger time steps and therefore faster solution times. We compare gradient computation by the continuous adjoint method to the discrete adjoint method and the finite-difference method. The methods are implemented for a two phase flow reservoir...... simulator. Computational experiments demonstrate that the accuracy of the sensitivities obtained by the adjoint methods are comparable to the accuracy obtained by the finite difference method. The continuous adjoint method is able to use a different time grid than the forward integration. Therefore, it can...

  9. FOCUS: a non-multigroup adjoint Monte Carlo code with improved variance reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the selection mechanism in the adjoint Monte Carlo code FOCUS in which the energy is treated as a continuous variable. The method of Kalos who introduced the idea of adjoint cross sections is followed to derive a sampling scheme for the adjoint equation solved in FOCUS which is in most aspects analogous to the normal Monte Carlo game. The disadvantages of the use of these adjoint cross sections are removed to some extent by introduction of a new definition for the adjoint cross sections resulting in appreciable variance reduction. At the cost of introducing a weight factor slightly different from unity, the direction and energy are selected in a simple way without the need of two-dimensional probability tables. Finally the handling of geometry and cross section in FOCUS is briefly discussed. 6 references. (U.S.)

  10. Variation estimation of the averaged cross sections in the direct and adjoint fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    1995-01-01

    There are several applications of the perturbation theory to specifics problems of reactor physics, such as nonuniform fuel burnup, nonuniform poison accumulation and evaluations of Doppler effects on reactivity. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of direct and adjoint diffusion equations, are used in these applications. In the adjoint diffusion equation has been used the group constants averaged in the energy-dependent direct neutron flux, that it is not theoretically consistent. In this paper it is presented a method to calculate the energy-dependent adjoint neutron flux, to obtain the average group-constant that will be used in the adjoint diffusion equation. The method is based on the solution of the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were derived for a two regions cell. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  11. Self-adjoint oscillator operator from a modified factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Marco A. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, H.C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICyT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Gutierrez, M. Ranferi [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2011-05-30

    By using an alternative factorization, we obtain a self-adjoint oscillator operator of the form L{sub δ}=d/(dx) (p{sub δ}(x)d/(dx) )-((x{sup 2})/(p{sub δ}(x)) +p{sub δ}(x)-1), where p{sub δ}(x)=1+δe{sup -x{sup 2}}, with δ element of (-1,∞) an arbitrary real factorization parameter. At positive values of δ, this operator interpolates between the quantum harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian for δ=0 and a scaled Hermite operator at high values of δ. For the negative values of δ, the eigenfunctions look like deformed quantum mechanical Hermite functions. Possible applications are mentioned. -- Highlights: → We present a generalization of the Mielnik factorization. → We study the case of linear relationship between the factorization coefficients. → We introduce a new one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operator. → We show its properties depending on the values of the parameter.

  12. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  13. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down; Solucao das equacoes P1 adjuntas para moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P{sub 1} equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  14. Unsteady adjoint for large eddy simulation of a coupled turbine stator-rotor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Wang, Qiqi; Laskowski, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady fluid flow simulations like large eddy simulation are crucial in capturing key physics in turbomachinery applications like separation and wake formation in flow over a turbine vane with a downstream blade. To determine how sensitive the design objectives of the coupled system are to control parameters, an unsteady adjoint is needed. It enables the computation of the gradient of an objective with respect to a large number of inputs in a computationally efficient manner. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions for a coupled turbine stator-rotor system. As the transonic fluid flows over the stator vane, the boundary layer transitions to turbulence. The turbulent wake then impinges on the rotor blades, causing early separation. This coupled system exhibits chaotic dynamics which causes conventional adjoint solutions to diverge exponentially, resulting in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions for long-time simulations. In this presentation, adjoint solutions for aerothermal objectives are obtained through a localized adjoint viscosity injection method which aims to stabilize the adjoint solution and maintain accurate sensitivities. Preliminary results obtained from the supercomputer Mira will be shown in the presentation.

  15. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  16. Time reversal imaging, Inverse problems and Adjoint Tomography}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C. S.; Capdeville, Y.; Kawakatsu, H.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    With the increasing power of computers and numerical techniques (such as spectral element methods), it is possible to address a new class of seismological problems. The propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media is simulated more and more accurately and new applications developed, in particular time reversal methods and adjoint tomography in the three-dimensional Earth. Since the pioneering work of J. Claerbout, theorized by A. Tarantola, many similarities were found between time-reversal methods, cross-correlations techniques, inverse problems and adjoint tomography. By using normal mode theory, we generalize the scalar approach of Draeger and Fink (1999) and Lobkis and Weaver (2001) to the 3D- elastic Earth, for theoretically understanding time-reversal method on global scale. It is shown how to relate time-reversal methods on one hand, with auto-correlations of seismograms for source imaging and on the other hand, with cross-correlations between receivers for structural imaging and retrieving Green function. Time-reversal methods were successfully applied in the past to acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics, non destructive testing and to seismic waves in seismology for earthquake imaging. In the case of source imaging, time reversal techniques make it possible an automatic location in time and space as well as the retrieval of focal mechanism of earthquakes or unknown environmental sources . We present here some applications at the global scale of these techniques on synthetic tests and on real data, such as Sumatra-Andaman (Dec. 2004), Haiti (Jan. 2010), as well as glacial earthquakes and seismic hum.

  17. Objective-function Hybridization in Adjoint Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y. O.; Bozdag, E.; Simons, F.; Gao, F.

    2016-12-01

    In the realm of seismic tomography, we are at the threshold of a new era of huge seismic datasets. However, how to assimilate as much information as possible from every seismogram is still a challenge. Cross-correlation measurements are generally tailored to some window selection algorithms, such as FLEXWIN (Maggie et al. 2008), to balance amplitude differences between seismic phases. However, these measurements naturally favor maximum picks in selected windows. It is also difficult to select all usable portions of seismograms in an optimum way that lots of information is generally lost, particularly the scattered waves. Instantaneous phase type of misfits extract information from every wiggle without cutting seismograms into small pieces, however, dealing with cycle skips at short periods can be challenging. For this purpose, we introduce a flexible hybrid approach for adjoint seismic tomography, to combine various objective functions. We initially focus on phase measurements and propose using instantaneous phase to take into account relatively small-magnitude scattered waves at long periods while using cross-correlation measurements on FLEXWIN windows to select distinct body-wave arrivals without complicating measurements due to non-linearities at short periods. To better deal with cycle skips and reliably measure instantaneous phases we design a new misfit function that incorporates instantaneous phase information implicitly instead of measuring it explicitly, through using normalized analytic signals. We present in our synthetic experiments how instantaneous phase, cross-correlation and their hybridization affect tomographic results. The combination of two different phase measurements in a hybrid approach constitutes progress towards using "anything and everything" in a data set, addressing data quality and measurement challenges simultaneously. We further extend hybridisation of misfit functions for amplitude measurements such as cross-correlation amplitude

  18. A greedy heuristic using adjoint functions for the optimization of seed and needle configurations in prostate seed implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sua; Kowalok, Michael E; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Henderson, Douglass L

    2007-01-01

    We continue our work on the development of an efficient treatment-planning algorithm for prostate seed implants by incorporation of an automated seed and needle configuration routine. The treatment-planning algorithm is based on region of interest (ROI) adjoint functions and a greedy heuristic. As defined in this work, the adjoint function of an ROI is the sensitivity of the average dose in the ROI to a unit-strength brachytherapy source at any seed position. The greedy heuristic uses a ratio of target and critical structure adjoint functions to rank seed positions according to their ability to irradiate the target ROI while sparing critical structure ROIs. Because seed positions are ranked in advance and because the greedy heuristic does not modify previously selected seed positions, the greedy heuristic constructs a complete seed configuration quickly. Isodose surface constraints determine the search space and the needle constraint limits the number of needles. This study additionally includes a methodology that scans possible combinations of these constraint values automatically. This automated selection scheme saves the user the effort of manually searching constraint values. With this method, clinically acceptable treatment plans are obtained in less than 2 min. For comparison, the branch-and-bound method used to solve a mixed integer-programming model took close to 2.5 h to arrive at a feasible solution. Both methods achieved good treatment plans, but the speedup provided by the greedy heuristic was a factor of approximately 100. This attribute makes this algorithm suitable for intra-operative real-time treatment planning

  19. Application of Adjoint Methodology in Various Aspects of Sonic Boom Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the advances in computational design has been the development of adjoint methods allowing efficient calculation of sensitivities in gradient-based shape optimization. This paper discusses two new applications of adjoint methodology that have been developed to aid in sonic boom mitigation exercises. In the first, equivalent area targets are generated using adjoint sensitivities of selected boom metrics. These targets may then be used to drive the vehicle shape during optimization. The second application is the computation of adjoint sensitivities of boom metrics on the ground with respect to parameters such as flight conditions, propagation sampling rate, and selected inputs to the propagation algorithms. These sensitivities enable the designer to make more informed selections of flight conditions at which the chosen cost functionals are less sensitive.

  20. Adjoint aux conférences et au soutien administratif (h/f) | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L' adjoint aux conférences et au soutien administratif est responsable du suivi et de la mise à jour de l'ensemble de formulaires, contrats et modèles utilisés dans les fonctions de gestion d'événements ainsi que de l'administration du site intranet des Services de conférence. L'adjoint aux conférences et au soutien ...

  1. Spatial discretizations for self-adjoint forms of the radiative transfer equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Jim E.; Adams, B. Todd; Noh, Taewan; McGhee, John M.; Evans, Thomas M.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2006-01-01

    There are three commonly recognized second-order self-adjoint forms of the neutron transport equation: the even-parity equations, the odd-parity equations, and the self-adjoint angular flux equations. Because all of these equations contain second-order spatial derivatives and are self-adjoint for the mono-energetic case, standard continuous finite-element discretization techniques have proved quite effective when applied to the spatial variables. We first derive analogs of these equations for the case of time-dependent radiative transfer. The primary unknowns for these equations are functions of the angular intensity rather than the angular flux, hence the analog of the self-adjoint angular flux equation is referred to as the self-adjoint angular intensity equation. Then we describe a general, arbitrary-order, continuous spatial finite-element approach that is applied to each of the three equations in conjunction with backward-Euler differencing in time. We refer to it as the 'standard' technique. We also introduce an alternative spatial discretization scheme for the self-adjoint angular intensity equation that requires far fewer unknowns than the standard method, but appears to give comparable accuracy. Computational results are given that demonstrate the validity of both of these discretization schemes

  2. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  3. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  4. An adjoint-based scheme for eigenvalue error improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merton, S.R.; Smedley-Stevenson, R.P.; Pain, C.C.; El-Sheikh, A.H.; Buchan, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    A scheme for improving the accuracy and reducing the error in eigenvalue calculations is presented. Using a rst order Taylor series expansion of both the eigenvalue solution and the residual of the governing equation, an approximation to the error in the eigenvalue is derived. This is done using a convolution of the equation residual and adjoint solution, which is calculated in-line with the primal solution. A defect correction on the solution is then performed in which the approximation to the error is used to apply a correction to the eigenvalue. The method is shown to dramatically improve convergence of the eigenvalue. The equation for the eigenvalue is shown to simplify when certain normalizations are applied to the eigenvector. Two such normalizations are considered; the rst of these is a fission-source type of normalisation and the second is an eigenvector normalisation. Results are demonstrated on a number of demanding elliptic problems using continuous Galerkin weighted nite elements. Moreover, the correction scheme may also be applied to hyperbolic problems and arbitrary discretization. This is not limited to spatial corrections and may be used throughout the phase space of the discrete equation. The applied correction not only improves fidelity of the calculation, it allows assessment of the reliability of numerical schemes to be made and could be used to guide mesh adaption algorithms or to automate mesh generation schemes. (author)

  5. Surface spectra of Weyl semimetals through self-adjoint extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seradjeh, Babak; Vennettilli, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We apply the method of self-adjoint extensions of Hermitian operators to the low-energy, continuum Hamiltonians of Weyl semimetals in bounded geometries and derive the spectrum of the surface states on the boundary. This allows for the full characterization of boundary conditions and the surface spectra on surfaces both normal to the Weyl node separation as well as parallel to it. We show that the boundary conditions for quadratic bulk dispersions are, in general, specified by a U (2 ) matrix relating the wave function and its derivatives normal to the surface. We give a general procedure to obtain the surface spectra from these boundary conditions and derive them in specific cases of bulk dispersion. We consider the role of global symmetries in the boundary conditions and their effect on the surface spectrum. We point out several interesting features of the surface spectra for different choices of boundary conditions, such as a Mexican-hat shaped dispersion on the surface normal to Weyl node separation. We find that the existence of bound states, Fermi arcs, and the shape of their dispersion, depend on the choice of boundary conditions. This illustrates the importance of the physics at and near the boundaries in the general statement of bulk-boundary correspondence.

  6. Success of Arnol'd's method in hierarchy of ocean models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripa, P.

    1993-01-01

    The method of Arnol'd is used to derive stability conditions of Hamiltonian systems with singular Poisson brackets; notably, those of fluid mechanics. Let the field(s) var-phi(x,t) represent the state variables, and Hamiltonian H [var-phi] and Poisson bracket (.,.) be such that ∂ t var-phi = (var-phi, H). The bracket must have the usual properties; in addition, it may be singular, i.e. there may exist non-trivial functional(s) of state C(var-phi) - called Casimir(s) - such that (C,F) ≡ 0, for any admissible functional of state F(var-phi). Arnol'd's theorms on stability are applied to put constraints on the solutions var-phi(x,t). This model is then applied to the problem of circulation within ocean models, in particular to two families of classical ocean models, primitive equations (PEN) and quasi-geostrophic (QGM) models. These models are layered vertical structures with top and bottom boundaries which may be either rigid or free

  7. Asynchronous Two-Level Checkpointing Scheme for Large-Scale Adjoints in the Spectral-Element Solver Nek5000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanen, Michel; Marin, Oana; Zhang, Hong; Anitescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Adjoints are an important computational tool for large-scale sensitivity evaluation, uncertainty quantification, and derivative-based optimization. An essential component of their performance is the storage/recomputation balance in which efficient checkpointing methods play a key role. We introduce a novel asynchronous two-level adjoint checkpointing scheme for multistep numerical time discretizations targeted at large-scale numerical simulations. The checkpointing scheme combines bandwidth-limited disk checkpointing and binomial memory checkpointing. Based on assumptions about the target petascale systems, which we later demonstrate to be realistic on the IBM Blue Gene/Q system Mira, we create a model of the expected performance of our checkpointing approach and validate it using the highly scalable Navier-Stokes spectralelement solver Nek5000 on small to moderate subsystems of the Mira supercomputer. In turn, this allows us to predict optimal algorithmic choices when using all of Mira. We also demonstrate that two-level checkpointing is significantly superior to single-level checkpointing when adjoining a large number of time integration steps. To our knowledge, this is the first time two-level checkpointing had been designed, implemented, tuned, and demonstrated on fluid dynamics codes at large scale of 50k+ cores.

  8. A response matrix method for slab-geometry discrete ordinates adjoint calculations in energy-dependent source-detector problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Ralph S.; Moura, Carlos A., E-mail: ralph@ime.uerj.br, E-mail: demoura@ime.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Modelagem Computacional

    2017-07-01

    Presented here is an application of the Response Matrix (RM) method for adjoint discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) problems in slab geometry applied to energy-dependent source-detector problems. The adjoint RM method is free from spatial truncation errors, as it generates numerical results for the adjoint angular fluxes in multilayer slabs that agree with the numerical values obtained from the analytical solution of the energy multigroup adjoint SN equations. Numerical results are given for two typical source-detector problems to illustrate the accuracy and the efficiency of the offered RM computer code. (author)

  9. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1̃2 months.

  10. Covariant Lyapunov Vectors in a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model - Multiscale Effects and Geometric Degeneracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Vannitsem, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    We study a simplified coupled atmosphere-ocean model using the formalism of covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs), which link physically-based directions of perturbations to growth/decay rates. The model is obtained via a severe truncation of quasi-geostrophic equations for the two fluids, and includes a simple yet physically meaningful representation of their dynamical/thermodynamical coupling. The model has 36 degrees of freedom, and the parameters are chosen so that a chaotic behaviour is observed. One finds two positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs), sixteen negative LEs, and eighteen near-zero LEs. The presence of many near-zero LEs results from the vast time-scale separation between the characteristic time scales of the two fluids, and leads to nontrivial error growth properties in the tangent space spanned by the corresponding CLVs, which are geometrically very degenerate. Such CLVs correspond to two different classes of ocean/atmosphere coupled modes. The tangent space spanned by the CLVs corresponding to the positive and negative LEs has, instead, a non-pathological behaviour, and one can construct robust large deviations laws for the finite time LEs, thus providing a universal model for assessing predictability on long to ultra-long scales along such directions. Finally, it is somewhat surprising to find that the tangent space of the unstable manifold has strong projection on both atmospheric and oceanic components, thus giving evidence that coupled modes are responsible for the instability of the flow.

  11. Least-squares reverse time migration in frequency domain using the adjoint-state method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Haoran; Chen, Shengchang; Wang, Huazhong

    2013-01-01

    A new scheme is presented to implement a least-squares frequency domain reverse time migration (LS-FRTM). This scheme expresses the gradient of the misfit function with respect to the model as the product of the conjugated Green's functions and the data residuals in the frequency domain based on the adjoint state method. In the 2D case, for each frequency all the Green's functions from the shots to the reflectors and from the reflectors to the receivers which depend on the background velocity can be calculated once using the lower/upper decomposition. The pseudo-Hessian matrix which is also expressed as a function of the Green's function is used as a substitute for the approximate Hessian to amplitude compensation for the gradient. Since the linearized inversion does not update the background velocity, the Green's function needs to be calculated only once. An iteration based LS-FRTM can be implemented with high efficiency. As examples supporting our assertion, we present the results obtained by applying our method to the 2D Marmousi model. (paper)

  12. Geothermal reservoir monitoring based upon spectral-element and adjoint methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.; Harris, D.; Mellors, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Induced seismicity associated with CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and enhanced geothermal systems is triggered by fracturing during fluid injection. These events range from magnitude -1 (microseismicity) up to 3.5, for induced seismicity on pre-existing faults. In our approach, we are using seismic data collected at the Salton Sea geothermal field, to improve the current structural model (SCEC CVM4.0 including a 10m resolution topography) and to invert for the moment tensor and source location of the microseismic events. The key here is to refine the velocity model to then precisely invert for the location and mechanism (tensile or shear) of fracture openings. This information is crucial for geothermal reservoir assessment, especially in an unconventional setting where hydrofracturing is used to enhance productivity. The location of pre-existing and formed fractures as well as their type of openings are important elements for strategic decisions. Numerical simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, which contrary to finite-element methods (FEM), uses high degree Lagrange polynomials, allowing the technique to not only handle complex geometries, like the FEM, but also to retain the strength of exponential convergence and accuracy due to the use of high degree polynomials. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method.

  13. Large-N reduction in QCD-like theories with massive adjoint fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeyanagi, Tatsuo; /Kyoto U.; Hanada, Masanori; /Weizmann Inst.; Unsal, Mithat; /Weizmann Inst. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yacoby, Ran; /Weizmann Inst.

    2010-08-26

    Large-N QCD with heavy adjoint fermions emulates pure Yang-Mills theory at long distances. We study this theory on a four- and three-torus, and analytically argue the existence of a large-small volume equivalence. For any finite mass, center symmetry unbroken phase exists at sufficiently small volume and this phase can be used to study the large-volume limit through the Eguchi-Kawai equivalence. A finite temperature version of volume independence implies that thermodynamics on R3 x S1 can be studied via a unitary matrix quantum mechanics on S1, by varying the temperature. To confirm this non-perturbatively, we numerically study both zero- and one-dimensional theories by using Monte-Carlo simulation. Order of finite-N corrections turns out to be 1/N. We introduce various twisted versions of the reduced QCD which systematically suppress finite-N corrections. Using a twisted model, we observe the confinement/deconfinement transition on a 1{sup 3} x 2-lattice. The result agrees with large volume simulations of Yang-Mills theory. We also comment that the twisted model can serve as a non-perturbative formulation of the non-commutative Yang-Mills theory.

  14. Sources of springtime surface black carbon in the Arctic: an adjoint analysis for April 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Qi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We quantify source contributions to springtime (April 2008 surface black carbon (BC in the Arctic by interpreting surface observations of BC at five receptor sites (Denali, Barrow, Alert, Zeppelin, and Summit using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem and its adjoint. Contributions to BC at Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelin are dominated by Asian anthropogenic sources (40–43 % before 18 April and by Siberian open biomass burning emissions (29–41 % afterward. In contrast, Summit, a mostly free tropospheric site, has predominantly an Asian anthropogenic source contribution (24–68 %, with an average of 45 %. We compute the adjoint sensitivity of BC concentrations at the five sites during a pollution episode (20–25 April to global emissions from 1 March to 25 April. The associated contributions are the combined results of these sensitivities and BC emissions. Local and regional anthropogenic sources in Alaska are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Denali (63 % of total anthropogenic contributions, and natural gas flaring emissions in the western extreme north of Russia (WENR are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Zeppelin (26 % and Alert (13 %. We find that long-range transport of emissions from Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (also known as Jing–Jin–Ji, the biggest urbanized region in northern China, contribute significantly (∼ 10 % to surface BC across the Arctic. On average, it takes ∼ 12 days for Asian anthropogenic emissions and Siberian biomass burning emissions to reach the Arctic lower troposphere, supporting earlier studies. Natural gas flaring emissions from the WENR reach Zeppelin in about a week. We find that episodic transport events dominate BC at Denali (87 %, a site outside the Arctic front, which is a strong transport barrier. The relative contribution of these events to surface BC within the polar dome is much smaller (∼ 50 % at Barrow and Zeppelin and ∼ 10 % at

  15. Sources of springtime surface black carbon in the Arctic: an adjoint analysis for April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; Henze, Daven K.; Tseng, Hsien-Liang; He, Cenlin

    2017-08-01

    We quantify source contributions to springtime (April 2008) surface black carbon (BC) in the Arctic by interpreting surface observations of BC at five receptor sites (Denali, Barrow, Alert, Zeppelin, and Summit) using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and its adjoint. Contributions to BC at Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelin are dominated by Asian anthropogenic sources (40-43 %) before 18 April and by Siberian open biomass burning emissions (29-41 %) afterward. In contrast, Summit, a mostly free tropospheric site, has predominantly an Asian anthropogenic source contribution (24-68 %, with an average of 45 %). We compute the adjoint sensitivity of BC concentrations at the five sites during a pollution episode (20-25 April) to global emissions from 1 March to 25 April. The associated contributions are the combined results of these sensitivities and BC emissions. Local and regional anthropogenic sources in Alaska are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Denali (63 % of total anthropogenic contributions), and natural gas flaring emissions in the western extreme north of Russia (WENR) are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Zeppelin (26 %) and Alert (13 %). We find that long-range transport of emissions from Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (also known as Jing-Jin-Ji), the biggest urbanized region in northern China, contribute significantly (˜ 10 %) to surface BC across the Arctic. On average, it takes ˜ 12 days for Asian anthropogenic emissions and Siberian biomass burning emissions to reach the Arctic lower troposphere, supporting earlier studies. Natural gas flaring emissions from the WENR reach Zeppelin in about a week. We find that episodic transport events dominate BC at Denali (87 %), a site outside the Arctic front, which is a strong transport barrier. The relative contribution of these events to surface BC within the polar dome is much smaller (˜ 50 % at Barrow and Zeppelin and ˜ 10 % at Alert). The large contributions from Asian anthropogenic

  16. A simplified model of the Martian atmosphere - Part 2: a POD-Galerkin analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Whitehouse

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In Part I of this study Whitehouse et al. (2005 performed a diagnostic analysis of a simplied model of the Martian atmosphere, in which topography was absent and in which heating was modelled as Newtonian relaxation towards a zonally symmetric equilibrium temperature field. There we derived a reduced-order approximation to the vertical and the horizonal structure of the baroclinically unstable Martian atmosphere, retaining only the barotropic mode and the leading order baroclinic modes. Our objectives in Part II of the study are to incorporate these approximations into a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition-Galerkin expansion of the spherical quasi-geostrophic model in order to derive hierarchies of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the time-varying coefficients of the spatial structures. Two different vertical truncations are considered, as well as three different norms and 3 different Galerkin truncations. We investigate each in turn, using tools from bifurcation theory, to determine which of the systems most closely resembles the data for which the original diagnostics were performed.

  17. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  18. Detector placement optimization for cargo containers using deterministic adjoint transport examination for SNM detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, Trevor D.; Sjoden, Glenn E.; Manalo, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    With growing concerns over port security and the potential for illicit trafficking of SNM through portable cargo shipping containers, efforts are ongoing to reduce the threat via container monitoring. This paper focuses on answering an important question of how many detectors are necessary for adequate coverage of a cargo container considering the detection of neutrons and gamma rays. Deterministic adjoint transport calculations are performed with compressed helium- 3 polyethylene moderated neutron detectors and sodium activated cesium-iodide gamma-ray scintillation detectors on partial and full container models. Results indicate that the detector capability is dependent on source strength and potential shielding. Using a surrogate weapons grade plutonium leakage source, it was determined that for a 20 foot ISO container, five neutron detectors and three gamma detectors are necessary for adequate coverage. While a large CsI(Na) gamma detector has the potential to monitor the entire height of the container for SNM, the He-3 neutron detector is limited to roughly 1.25 m in depth. Detector blind spots are unavoidable inside the container volume unless additional measures are taken for adequate coverage. (author)

  19. Adjoint optimization scheme for lower hybrid current rampup and profile control in Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Bizarro, J.P.; Hoang, G.T.; Kupfer, K.; Peysson, Y.; Shkarofsky, I.P.; Bonoli, P.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to take into account and study the effect of the electric field profiles on the Lower Hybrid (LH) current drive efficiency during transient phases such as rampup. As a complement to the full ray-tracing / Fokker Planck studies, and for the purpose of optimization studies, we developed a simplified 1-D model based on the adjoint Karney-Fisch numerical results. This approach allows us to estimate the LH power deposition profile which would be required for ramping the current with prescribed rate, total current density profile (q-profile) and surface loop voltage. For rampup optimization studies, we can therefore scan the whole parameter space and eliminate a posteriori those scenarios which correspond to unrealistic deposition profiles. We thus obtain the time evolution of the LH power, minor radius of the plasma, volt-second consumption and total energy dissipated. Optimization can thus be performed with respect to any of those criteria. This scheme is illustrated by some numerical simulations performed with TORE-SUPRA and NET/ITER parameters. We conclude with a derivation of a simple and general scaling law for the flux consumption during the rampup phase

  20. Adjoint-based global variance reduction approach for reactor analysis problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.

    2011-01-01

    A new variant of a hybrid Monte Carlo-Deterministic approach for simulating particle transport problems is presented and compared to the SCALE FW-CADIS approach. The new approach, denoted by the Subspace approach, optimizes the selection of the weight windows for reactor analysis problems where detailed properties of all fuel assemblies are required everywhere in the reactor core. Like the FW-CADIS approach, the Subspace approach utilizes importance maps obtained from deterministic adjoint models to derive automatic weight-window biasing. In contrast to FW-CADIS, the Subspace approach identifies the correlations between weight window maps to minimize the computational time required for global variance reduction, i.e., when the solution is required everywhere in the phase space. The correlations are employed to reduce the number of maps required to achieve the same level of variance reduction that would be obtained with single-response maps. Numerical experiments, serving as proof of principle, are presented to compare the Subspace and FW-CADIS approaches in terms of the global reduction in standard deviation. (author)

  1. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of thermoacoustic instability in a nonlinear Helmholtz solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper, Matthew; Magri, Luca

    2014-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a persistent problem in aircraft and rocket engines. It occurs when heat release in the combustion chamber synchronizes with acoustic oscillations. It is always noisy and can sometimes result in catastrophic failure of the engine. Typically, the heat release from the flame is assumed to equal the acoustic velocity at a reference point multiplied by a spatially-varying function (the flame envelope) subject to a spatially-varying time delay. This models hydrodynamic perturbations convecting down the flame causing subsequent heat release perturbations. This creates an eigenvalue problem that is linear in the acoustic pressure but nonlinear in the complex frequency, omega. This can be solved as a sequence of linear eigenvalue problems in which the operators are updated with a new value of omega after each iteration. Adjoint methods find the sensitivity of each eigenmode to all the parameters simultaneously and are well suited to thermoacoustic problems because there are a few interesting eigenmodes but many influential parameters. The challenge here is to express the sensitivity of the eigenvalue at the final iteration to an arbitrary change in the parameters of the first iteration. This is a promising new technique for the control of thermoacoustics. European Research Council Grant Number 2590620.

  2. Sources of nonlinear behavior and Predictability in a realistic atmospheric model: a data modeling statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J. M.; Kravtsov, S.

    2011-12-01

    This study quantifies the dependence of nonlinear regimes (manifested in non-gaussian probability distributions) and spreads of ensemble trajectories in a reduced phase space of a realistic three-layer quasi-geostrophic (QG3) atmospheric model on this model's climate state.To elucidate probabilistic properties of the QG3 trajectories, we compute, in phase planes of leading EOFs of the model, the coefficients of the corresponding Fokker-Planck (FP) equations. These coefficients represent drift vectors (computed from one-day phase space tendencies) and diffusion tensors (computed from one-day lagged covariance matrices of model trajectory displacements), and are based on a long QG3 simulation. We also fit two statistical trajectory models to the reduced phase-space time series spanned by the full QG3 model states. One reduced model is a standard Linear Inverse Model (LIM) fitted to a long QG3 time series. The LIM model is forced by state-independent (additive) noise and has a deterministic operator which represents non-divergent velocity field in the reduced phase space considered. The other, more advanced model (NSM), is nonlinear, divergent, and is driven by state-dependent noise. The NSM model mimics well the full QG3 model trajectory behavior in the reduced phase space; its corresponding FP model is nearly identical to that based on the full QG3 simulations. By systematic analysis of the differences between the drift vectors and diffusion tensors of the QG3-based, NSM-based, and LIM-based FP models, as well as the PDF evolution simulated by these FP models, we disentangle the contributions of the multiplicative noise and deterministic dynamics into nonlinear behavior and predictability of the atmospheric states produced by the dynamical QG3 model.

  3. The transversality conditions for infinite-horizon optimal control problem with a free right endpoint and the stability of the adjoint variable (in Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Khlopin, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    An infinite-horizon optimal control problem with a free right endpoint is considered. In this paper we proved that Lyapunov stability of the adjoint variable implying the vanishing of the adjoint variable at infinity along optimal solution.

  4. An Adjoint-Based Approach to Study a Flexible Flapping Wing in Pitching-Rolling Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo

    2017-11-01

    Flapping-wing aerodynamics, with advantages in agility, efficiency, and hovering capability, has been the choice of many flyers in nature. However, the study of bio-inspired flapping-wing propulsion is often hindered by the problem's large control space with different wing kinematics and deformation. The adjoint-based approach reduces largely the computational cost to a feasible level by solving an inverse problem. Facing the complication from moving boundaries, non-cylindrical calculus provides an easy extension of traditional adjoint-based approach to handle the optimization involving moving boundaries. The improved adjoint method with non-cylindrical calculus for boundary treatment is first applied on a rigid pitching-rolling plate, then extended to a flexible one with active deformation to further increase its propulsion efficiency. The comparison of flow dynamics with the initial and optimal kinematics and deformation provides a unique opportunity to understand the flapping-wing mechanism. Supported by AFOSR and ARL.

  5. Formulation of coarse mesh finite difference to calculate mathematical adjoint flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Valmir; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is the obtention of the mathematical adjoint flux, having as its support the nodal expansion method (NEM) for coarse mesh problems. Since there are difficulties to evaluate this flux by using NEM. directly, a coarse mesh finite difference program was developed to obtain this adjoint flux. The coarse mesh finite difference formulation (DFMG) adopted uses results of the direct calculation (node average flux and node face averaged currents) obtained by NEM. These quantities (flux and currents) are used to obtain the correction factors which modify the classical finite differences formulation . Since the DFMG formulation is also capable of calculating the direct flux it was also tested to obtain this flux and it was verified that it was able to reproduce with good accuracy both the flux and the currents obtained via NEM. In this way, only matrix transposition is needed to calculate the mathematical adjoint flux. (author)

  6. Exploring the use of a deterministic adjoint flux calculation in criticality Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinaphanh, A.; Miss, J.; Richet, Y.; Martin, N.; Hebert, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary study on the use of a deterministic adjoint flux calculation to improve source convergence issues by reducing the number of iterations needed to reach the converged distribution in criticality Monte Carlo calculations. Slow source convergence in Monte Carlo eigenvalue calculations may lead to underestimate the effective multiplication factor or reaction rates. The convergence speed depends on the initial distribution and the dominance ratio. We propose using an adjoint flux estimation to modify the transition kernel according to the Importance Sampling technique. This adjoint flux is also used as the initial guess of the first generation distribution for the Monte Carlo simulation. Calculated Variance of a local estimator of current is being checked. (author)

  7. Adjoint Based A Posteriori Analysis of Multiscale Mortar Discretizations with Multinumerics

    KAUST Repository

    Tavener, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we derive a posteriori error estimates for linear functionals of the solution to an elliptic problem discretized using a multiscale nonoverlapping domain decomposition method. The error estimates are based on the solution of an appropriately defined adjoint problem. We present a general framework that allows us to consider both primal and mixed formulations of the forward and adjoint problems within each subdomain. The primal subdomains are discretized using either an interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method or a continuous Galerkin method with weakly imposed Dirichlet conditions. The mixed subdomains are discretized using Raviart- Thomas mixed finite elements. The a posteriori error estimate also accounts for the errors due to adjoint-inconsistent subdomain discretizations. The coupling between the subdomain discretizations is achieved via a mortar space. We show that the numerical discretization error can be broken down into subdomain and mortar components which may be used to drive adaptive refinement.Copyright © by SIAM.

  8. An exact and consistent adjoint method for high-fidelity discretization of the compressible flow equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramanathan Vishnampet Ganapathi

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvement. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs. Such methods have enabled sensitivity analysis and active control of turbulence at engineering flow conditions by providing gradient information at computational cost comparable to that of simulating the flow. They accelerate convergence of numerical design optimization algorithms, though this is predicated on the availability of an accurate gradient of the discretized flow equations. This is challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. We analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space--time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge--Kutta-like scheme

  9. Development of a Matlab/Simulink tool to facilitate system analysis and simulation via the adjoint and covariance methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2007-01-01

    The COVariance and ADjoint Analysis Tool (COVAD) is a specially designed software tool, written for the Matlab/Simulink environment, which allows the user the capability to carry out system analysis and simulation using the adjoint, covariance or Monte Carlo methods. This paper describes phase one

  10. On the use of flux-adjoint condensed nuclear data for 1-group AGR kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutt, P.K.

    1979-03-01

    Following previous work on the differences between one and two neutron group AGR kinetics the possible advantages of flux-adjoint condensed lattice data over the simple flux condensation procedure are investigated. Analytic arguments are given for expecting flux-adjoint condensation to give a better representation of rod worth slopes and flux shape changes associated with partially rodded cores. These areas have previously been found to yield most of the one to two neutron group differences. The validity of these arguments is demonstrated comparing various calculations. (U.K.)

  11. Adjoint shape optimization for fluid-structure interaction of ducted flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heners, J. P.; Radtke, L.; Hinze, M.; Düster, A.

    2018-03-01

    Based on the coupled problem of time-dependent fluid-structure interaction, equations for an appropriate adjoint problem are derived by the consequent use of the formal Lagrange calculus. Solutions of both primal and adjoint equations are computed in a partitioned fashion and enable the formulation of a surface sensitivity. This sensitivity is used in the context of a steepest descent algorithm for the computation of the required gradient of an appropriate cost functional. The efficiency of the developed optimization approach is demonstrated by minimization of the pressure drop in a simple two-dimensional channel flow and in a three-dimensional ducted flow surrounded by a thin-walled structure.

  12. Adjoint shape optimization for fluid-structure interaction of ducted flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heners, J. P.; Radtke, L.; Hinze, M.; Düster, A.

    2017-08-01

    Based on the coupled problem of time-dependent fluid-structure interaction, equations for an appropriate adjoint problem are derived by the consequent use of the formal Lagrange calculus. Solutions of both primal and adjoint equations are computed in a partitioned fashion and enable the formulation of a surface sensitivity. This sensitivity is used in the context of a steepest descent algorithm for the computation of the required gradient of an appropriate cost functional. The efficiency of the developed optimization approach is demonstrated by minimization of the pressure drop in a simple two-dimensional channel flow and in a three-dimensional ducted flow surrounded by a thin-walled structure.

  13. The sensitivity analysis by adjoint method for the uncertainty evaluation of the CATHARE-2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, F.; de Crecy, A.; Perret, C. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Grenoble (France)

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the application of the DASM (Discrete Adjoint Sensitivity Method) to CATHARE 2 thermal-hydraulics code. In a first part, the basis of this method is presented. The mathematical model of the CATHARE 2 code is based on the two fluid six equation model. It is discretized using implicit time discretization and it is relatively easy to implement this method in the code. The DASM is the ASM directly applied to the algebraic system of the discretized code equations which has been demonstrated to be the only solution of the mathematical model. The ASM is an integral part of the new version 1.4 of CATHARE. It acts as a post-processing module. It has been qualified by comparison with the {open_quotes}brute force{close_quotes} technique. In a second part, an application of the DASM in CATHARE 2 is presented. It deals with the determination of the uncertainties of the constitutive relationships, which is a compulsory step for calculating the final uncertainty of a given response. First, the general principles of the method are explained: the constitutive relationship are represented by several parameters and the aim is to calculate the variance-covariance matrix of these parameters. The experimental results of the separate effect tests used to establish the correlation are considered. The variance of the corresponding results calculated by CATHARE are estimated by comparing experiment and calculation. A DASM calculation is carried out to provide the derivatives of the responses. The final covariance matrix is obtained by combination of the variance of the responses and those derivatives. Then, the application of this method to a simple case-the blowdown Canon experiment-is presented. This application has been successfully performed.

  14. Adjoint QCD on ℝ{sup 3}×S{sup 1} with twisted fermionic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misumi, Tatsuhiro [Department of Physics and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University,Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Kanazawa, Takuya [iTHES Research Group and Quantum Hadron Physics Laboratory, RIKEN,Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-06-30

    We investigate QCD with adjoint Dirac fermions on ℝ{sup 3}×S{sup 1} with generic boundary conditions for fermions along S{sup 1}. By means of perturbation theory, semiclassical methods and a chiral effective model, we elucidate a rich phase structure in the space spanned by the S{sup 1} compactification scale L, twisted fermionic boundary condition ϕ and the fermion mass m. We found various phases with or without chiral and center symmetry breaking, separated by first- and second-order phase transitions, which in specific limits (ϕ=0, ϕ=π, L→0 and m→∞) reproduce known results in the literature. In the center-symmetric phase at small L, we show that Ünsal’s bion-induced confinement mechanism is at work but is substantially weakened at ϕ≠0 by a linear potential between monopoles. Through an analytic and numerical study of the PNJL model, we show that the order parameters for center and chiral symmetries (i.e., Polyakov loop and chiral condensate) are strongly intertwined at ϕ≠0. Due to this correlation, a deconfined phase can intervene between a weak-coupling center-symmetric phase at small L and a strong-coupling one at large L. Whether this happens or not depends on the ratio of the dynamical fermion mass to the energy scale of the Yang-Mills theory. Implication of this possibility for resurgence in gauge theories is briefly discussed. In an appendix, we study the index of the adjoint Dirac operator on ℝ{sup 3}×S{sup 1} with twisted boundary conditions, which is important for semiclassical analysis of monopoles.

  15. Self-adjointness and spectral properties of Dirac operators with magnetic links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portmann, Fabian; Sok, Jérémy; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2018-01-01

    We define Dirac operators on $\\mathbb{S}^3$ (and $\\mathbb{R}^3$) with magnetic fields supported on smooth, oriented links and prove self-adjointness of certain (natural) extensions. We then analyze their spectral properties and show, among other things, that these operators have discrete spectrum...

  16. Adjoint Parameter Sensitivity Analysis for the Hydrodynamic Lattice Boltzmann Method with Applications to Design Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    We present an adjoint parameter sensitivity analysis formulation and solution strategy for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The focus is on design optimization applications, in particular topology optimization. The lattice Boltzmann method is briefly described with an in-depth discussion of so...

  17. Spectral analysis of non-self-adjoint Jacobi operator associated with Jacobian elliptic functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siegl, Petr; Štampach, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2017), s. 901-928 ISSN 1846-3886 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-11058S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Non-self-adjoint Jacobi operator * Weyl m-function * Jacobian elliptic functions Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.440, year: 2016

  18. Running coupling in SU(2) gauge theory with two adjoint fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantaharju, Jarno; Rantalaiho, Teemu; Rummukainen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We study SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group on the lattice. Using clover improved Wilson fermion action with hypercubic truncated stout smearing we perform simulations at larger coupling than before. We measure the evolution of the coupling...

  19. Applications of a discrete viscous adjoint method for aerodynamic shape optimisation of 3D configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimisation based on high-fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimisation problems, and the adjoint approach—which allows fast

  20. On the inequivalence of renormalization and self-adjoint extensions for quantum singular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camblong, Horacio E.; Epele, Luis N.; Fanchiotti, Huner; Garcia Canal, Carlos A.; Ordonez, Carlos R.

    2007-01-01

    A unified S-matrix framework of quantum singular interactions is presented for the comparison of self-adjoint extensions and physical renormalization. For the long-range conformal interaction the two methods are not equivalent, with renormalization acting as selector of a preferred extension and regulator of the unbounded Hamiltonian

  1. Adjoint-based control of a surfactant-free drop suspended in an axisymmetric straining flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidadi, Shreyas; Bodony, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Optimal control theory has been remarkably successful in controlling a wide variety of single-phase flows. However, to date there has been no fundamental study on its application to multiphase problems. In this study, the continuous adjoint method is employed for the first time to control a clean, neutrally buoyant droplet of viscosity μI suspended in a low Reynolds number axisymmetric straining flow of viscosity μE. The control variable is the non-dimensional Capillary number C. For the forward problem, each C generates a distinct steady-state droplet. This information is utilized by the inverse problem to compute the adjoint velocities and the corresponding control gradient at the drop interface. The resultant gradient is subsequently used to update C. The algorithm is repeated until the desired shape is realized. To reduce computational cost, both the forward and adjoint velocities are obtained by solving Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The theory is tested for three viscosity ratios; λ =μI /μE = 0.1 , 1 and 10. For all three cases, the cost functional is successfully minimized. The adjoint gradient is shown to be in good agreement with the corresponding finite-difference approximation of it.

  2. Fourth-order stable central difference method for self-adjoint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, fourth order stable central difference method is presented for solving self-adjoint singular perturbation problems for small values of perturbation parameter, ε . First, the given differential equation was reduced to its conventional form and then it was transformed into linear system of algebraic equations in the ...

  3. Double adjoint method for determining the contribution of composition to reactivity at different times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, S.A.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The double adjoint method is described. ► System reloading is determined so the multiplication factor behaviour is repeated. ► Both fast and thermal systems behave as desired. ► Allowance must be made for indirect effects in thermal systems. ► An alternative definition of breeding ratio is derived. -- Abstract: The double adjoint method uses the adjoint reactivity and transmutation problems to describe how the system composition is related to the system reactivity at different points in time. Values of the contribution to the reactivity are determined using the adjoint reactivity problem, and these are then used as the source function for the adjoint transmutation problem. The method is applied to the problem of determining the contribution of the beginning of cycle composition to the end of cycle reactivity. It is tested in both fast and thermal systems by comparing the behaviour of the multiplication factor at the end of cycle in calculations with perturbed initial compositions to that predicted by the double adjoint method. The results from the fast system are good, while those from the thermal system are less favourable. This is believed to be due to the method neglecting the coupling between the composition and the flux, which plays a more significant role in thermal systems than fast ones. The importance of correcting for the effects of the fuel compound is also established. The values found are used in calculations to determine the appropriate fuel reloading of the systems tested, with the aim of duplicating the behaviour of the multiplication factor of the original system. Again the fast system gives good results, while the thermal system is less accurate. The double adjoint method is also used for a definition of breeding ratio, and some of the features of this definition are illustrated by examining the effects of different feed materials and reprocessing schemes. The method is shown to be a useful tool for the comparison of the

  4. Fast parallel algorithms for the x-ray transform and its adjoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao

    2012-11-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods often offer better imaging quality and allow for reconstructions with lower imaging dose than classical methods in computed tomography. However, the computational speed is a major concern for these iterative methods, for which the x-ray transform and its adjoint are two most time-consuming components. The speed issue becomes even notable for the 3D imaging such as cone beam scans or helical scans, since the x-ray transform and its adjoint are frequently computed as there is usually not enough computer memory to save the corresponding system matrix. The purpose of this paper is to optimize the algorithm for computing the x-ray transform and its adjoint, and their parallel computation. The fast and highly parallelizable algorithms for the x-ray transform and its adjoint are proposed for the infinitely narrow beam in both 2D and 3D. The extension of these fast algorithms to the finite-size beam is proposed in 2D and discussed in 3D. The CPU and GPU codes are available at https://sites.google.com/site/fastxraytransform. The proposed algorithm is faster than Siddon's algorithm for computing the x-ray transform. In particular, the improvement for the parallel computation can be an order of magnitude. The authors have proposed fast and highly parallelizable algorithms for the x-ray transform and its adjoint, which are extendable for the finite-size beam. The proposed algorithms are suitable for parallel computing in the sense that the computational cost per parallel thread is O(1).

  5. CMT Source Inversions for Massive Data Assimilation in Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Komatitsch, D.; Song, X.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.; Peter, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a vital tool for probing the Earth's interior and enhancing our knowledge of the underlying dynamical processes [e.g., Liu et al., 2012]. Using the adjoint tomography method, we have successfully obtained a first-generation global FWI model named M15 [Bozdag et al., 2015]. To achieve higher resolution of the emerging new structural features and to accommodate azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity in the next-generation model, we expanded our database from 256 to 4,224 earthquakes. Previous studies have shown that ray-theory-based Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) inversion algorithms can produce systematic biases in earthquake source parameters due to tradeoffs with 3D crustal and mantle heterogeneity [e.g., Hjorleifsdottir et al., 2010]. To reduce these well-known tradeoffs, we performed CMT inversions in our current 3D global model before resuming the structural inversion with the expanded database. Initial source parameters are selected from the global CMT database [Ekstrom et al., 2012], with moment magnitudes ranging from 5.5 to 7.0 and occurring between 1994 and 2015. Data from global and regional networks were retrieved from the IRIS DMC. Synthetic seismograms were generated based on the spectral-element-based seismic wave propagation solver (SPECFEM3D GLOBE) in model M15. We used a source inversion algorithm based on a waveform misfit function while allowing time shifts between data and synthetics to accommodate additional unmodeled 3D heterogeneity [Liu et al., 2004]. To accommodate the large number of earthquakes and time series (more than 10,000,000 records), we implemented a source inversion workflow based on the newly developed Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) [Krischer, Smith, et al., 2015] and ObsPy [Krischer et al., 2015]. In ASDF, each earthquake is associated with a single file, thereby eliminating I/O bottlenecks in the workflow and facilitating fast parallel processing. Our preliminary results indicate that errors

  6. Adjoint-Based a Posteriori Error Estimation for Coupled Time-Dependent Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Asner, Liya

    2012-01-01

    We consider time-dependent parabolic problem s coupled across a common interface which we formulate using a Lagrange multiplier construction and solve by applying a monolithic solution technique. We derive an adjoint-based a posteriori error representation for a quantity of interest given by a linear functional of the solution. We establish the accuracy of our error representation formula through numerical experimentation and investigate the effect of error in the adjoint solution. Crucially, the error representation affords a distinction between temporal and spatial errors and can be used as a basis for a blockwise time-space refinement strategy. Numerical tests illustrate the efficacy of the refinement strategy by capturing the distinctive behavior of a localized traveling wave solution. The saddle point systems considered here are equivalent to those arising in the mortar finite element technique for parabolic problems. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  7. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  8. Periodicity is Optimal for Offline and Online Multi-Stage Adjoint Computations

    OpenAIRE

    Aupy, Guillaume; Herrmann, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We reexamine the work of Aupy et al. on optimal algorithms for multi-stageadjoint computations, where two levels of memories are available. Previousoptimal algorithm had a quadratic execution time. Here, with structuralarguments, namely periodicity, on the optimal solution, we provide an optimalalgorithm in constant time, with appropriate pre-processing. We also provide an asymptotically optimal algorithm for the online problem,when the adjoint graph size is not known before-hand. Again, this...

  9. Adjoint de programme régional (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sous la direction générale des administrateurs de programme désignés du BRAS, l'adjoint de programme régional fournit un grand nombre de services administratifs ... et des documents, en fournissant des renseignements généraux sur les projets, en répondant aux appels téléphoniques et aux courriers électroniques des ...

  10. Adjoint administratif et de conférences (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    adjoint administratif et de conférences est chargé d'aider à l'organisation et à la mise au point des détails administratifs des réunions, conférences et événements spéciaux qui se tiennent dans les installations de conférence situées au 8e étage du ...

  11. Adjoint de direction (h/f) – Gestion du risque et de l'audit interne ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Résumé des fonctions Sous la supervision de la directrice, Gestion du risque et de l'audit interne (GRAI), l'adjoint de direction procure à l'unité de GRAI du soutien ... prépare et met en forme les documents, y compris les présentations PowerPoint; relit et coordonne la traduction, la relecture et la modification des documents; ...

  12. Adjoint Subspaces in Banach Spaces, with Applications to Ordinary Differential Subspaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coddington, Earl A.; Dijksma, Aalt

    1978-01-01

    Given two subspaces A0 ⊂ A1 ⊂ W = X ⊕ Y, where X, Y are Banach spaces, we show how to characterize, in terms of generalized boundary conditions, those adjoint pairs A, A* satisfying A0 ⊂ A ⊂ A1, A1* ⊂ A* ⊂ A0* ⊂ W+ = Y* ⊕ X*, where X*, Y* are the conjugate spaces of X, Y, respectively. The

  13. A journey to 3 d: exact relations for adjoint SQCD from dimensional reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amariti, Antonio; Klare, Claudius

    2015-05-01

    In this note we elaborate on the reduction of four dimensional Seiberg duality with adjoint matter to three dimensions. We use the exact formulation of the superconformal index and of the partition function as instruments to test this reduction. We translate the identity between indices of the dual 4 d theories to 3 d. This produces various new identities between partition functions of 3 d dual phases.

  14. On the discrete spectrum of non-self-adjoint Schroedinger differential equation with an operator coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramoglu, Mehmet; Tasci, Fatih; Zeynalov, Djafar

    2004-01-01

    We study the discrete part of spectrum of a singular non-self-adjoint second-order differential equation on a semiaxis with an operator coefficient. Its boundedness is proved. The result is applied to the Schroedinger boundary value problem -Δu+q(x)u=λ 2 u, u vertical bar ∂D =0, with a complex potential q(x) in an angular domain

  15. Adjoint de direction - Vice-président, Programmes et partenariats (h/f ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'adjoint de direction auprès du vice-président, Programmes et partenariats a pour rôle de fournir, en toute confidentialité, un soutien opérationnel et administratif au vice-président, et de collaborer avec le conseiller principal de programmes pour assurer le bon déroulement de plusieurs aspects du fonctionnement de la ...

  16. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis for Density and Composition: A User’s Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Perkó, Zoltán; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Perfetti, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of uncertainties is essential for criticality safety. Our paper deals with material density and composition uncertainties and provides guidance on how traditional first-order sensitivity methods can be used to predict their effects. Unlike problems that deal with traditional cross-section uncertainty analysis, material density and composition-related problems are often characterized by constraints that do not allow arbitrary and independent variations of the input parameters. Their proper handling requires constrained sensitivities that take into account the interdependence of the inputs. This paper discusses how traditional unconstrained isotopic density sensitivities can be calculated using the adjoint sensitivity capabilities of the popular Monte Carlo codes MCNP6 and SCALE 6.2, and we also present the equations to be used when forward and adjoint flux distributions are available. Subsequently, we show how the constrained sensitivities can be computed using the unconstrained (adjoint-based) sensitivities as well as by applying central differences directly. We present three distinct procedures for enforcing the constraint on the input variables, each leading to different constrained sensitivities. As a guide, the sensitivity and uncertainty formulas for several frequently encountered specific cases involving densities and compositions are given. One analytic k ∞ example highlights the relationship between constrained sensitivity formulas and central differences, and a more realistic numerical problem reveals similarities among the computer codes used and differences among the three methods of enforcing the constraint.

  17. Adjoint-based Sensitivity of Jet Noise to Near-nozzle Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung Whan; Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Past efforts have used optimal control theory, based on the numerical solution of the adjoint flow equations, to perturb turbulent jets in order to reduce their radiated sound. These efforts have been successful in that sound is reduced, with concomitant changes to the large-scale turbulence structures in the flow. However, they have also been inconclusive, in that the ultimate level of reduction seemed to depend upon the accuracy of the adjoint-based gradient rather than a physical limitation of the flow. The chaotic dynamics of the turbulence can degrade the smoothness of cost functional in the control-parameter space, which is necessary for gradient-based optimization. We introduce a route to overcoming this challenge, in part by leveraging the regularity and accuracy with a dual-consistent, discrete-exact adjoint formulation. We confirm its properties and use it to study the sensitivity and controllability of the acoustic radiation from a simulation of a M = 1.3 turbulent jet, whose statistics matches data. The smoothness of the cost functional over time is quantified by a minimum optimization step size beyond which the gradient cannot have a certain degree of accuracy. Based on this, we achieve a moderate level of sound reduction in the first few optimization steps. This material is based [in part] upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002374.

  18. Adjoint-based Mesh Optimization Method: The Development and Application for Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seongmin; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2016-01-01

    In this research, methods for optimizing mesh distribution is proposed. The proposed method uses adjoint base optimization method (adjoint method). The optimized result will be obtained by applying this meshing technique to the existing code input deck and will be compared to the results produced from the uniform meshing method. Numerical solutions are calculated form an in-house 1D Finite Difference Method code while neglecting the axial conduction. The fuel radial node optimization was first performed to match the Fuel Centerline Temperature (FCT) the best. This was followed by optimizing the axial node which the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) is matched the best. After obtaining the optimized radial and axial nodes, the nodalization is implemented into the system analysis code and transient analyses were performed to observe the optimum nodalization performance. The developed adjoint-based mesh optimization method in the study is applied to MARS-KS, which is a nuclear system analysis code. Results show that the newly established method yields better results than that of the uniform meshing method from the numerical point of view. It is again stressed that the optimized mesh for the steady state can also give better numerical results even during a transient analysis

  19. Neutron response of silicon carbide semiconductor detectors from deterministic adjoint transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.; Manalo, K.; Plower, T.; Sjoden, G.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor detectors for use in power monitoring is of significant interest because of their distinct advantages, including small size, small mass, and their inactivity both chemically and neutronically. The main focus of this paper includes evaluating the predicted response of a SiC detector when placed in a 17 x 17 Westinghouse PWR assembly, using the PENTRAN code system for the 3-D deterministic adjoint transport computations. Adjoint transport results indicated maximum adjoint values of 1, 0.507 and 0.308 were obtained for the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron energy groups, respectively. Within a radial distance of 6.08 cm from the SiC detector, local fuel pins contribute 75.33% at this radius within the thermal group response. A total of 35.85% of the response in the epithermal group is accounted for in the same 6.08 cm radius; similarly, 21.58% of the fast group response is accounted for in the same radius. This means that for neutrons, the effective monitoring range of the SiC detectors is on the order of five fuel pins away from the detector; pins outside this range in the fuel lattice are minimally 'seen' by the SiC detector. (authors)

  20. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  1. Sources and Processes Affecting Fine Particulate Matter Pollution over North China: An Adjoint Analysis of the Beijing APEC Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Shao, Jingyuan; Lu, Xiao; Zhao, Yuanhong; Hu, Yongyun; Henze, Daven K; Liao, Hong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-08-16

    The stringent emission controls during the APEC 2014 (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit; November 5-11, 2014) offer a unique opportunity to quantify factors affecting fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution over North China. Here we apply a four-dimensional variational data assimilation system using the adjoint model of GEOS-Chem to address this issue. Hourly surface measurements of PM2.5 and SO2 for October 15-November 14, 2014 are assimilated into the model to optimize daily aerosol primary and precursor emissions over North China. Measured PM2.5 concentrations in Beijing average 50.3 μg m(-3) during APEC, 43% lower than the mean concentration (88.2 μg m(-3)) for the whole period including APEC. Model results attribute about half of the reduction to meteorology due to active cold surge occurrences during APEC. Assimilation of surface measurements largely reduces the model biases and estimates 6%-30% lower aerosol emissions in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region during APEC than in late October. We further demonstrate that high PM2.5 events in Beijing during this period can be occasionally contributed by natural mineral dust, but more events show large sensitivities to inorganic aerosol sources, particularly emissions of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) reflecting strong formation of aerosol nitrate in the fall season.

  2. An Adjoint Sensitivity Method Applied to Time Reverse Imaging of Tsunami Source for the 2009 Samoa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Gusman, Aditya; Satake, Kenji; Cummins, Phil R.

    2018-01-01

    We have previously developed a tsunami source inversion method based on "Time Reverse Imaging" and demonstrated that it is computationally very efficient and has the ability to reproduce the tsunami source model with good accuracy using tsunami data of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami. In this paper, we implemented this approach in the 2009 Samoa earthquake tsunami triggered by a doublet earthquake consisting of both normal and thrust faulting. Our result showed that the method is quite capable of recovering the source model associated with normal and thrust faulting. We found that the inversion result is highly sensitive to some stations that must be removed from the inversion. We applied an adjoint sensitivity method to find the optimal set of stations in order to estimate a realistic source model. We found that the inversion result is improved significantly once the optimal set of stations is used. In addition, from the reconstructed source model we estimated the slip distribution of the fault from which we successfully determined the dipping orientation of the fault plane for the normal fault earthquake. Our result suggests that the fault plane dip toward the northeast.

  3. Forecasting turbulent modes with nonparametric diffusion models: Learning from noisy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tyrus; Harlim, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we apply a recently developed nonparametric modeling approach, the "diffusion forecast", to predict the time-evolution of Fourier modes of turbulent dynamical systems. While the diffusion forecasting method assumes the availability of a noise-free training data set observing the full state space of the dynamics, in real applications we often have only partial observations which are corrupted by noise. To alleviate these practical issues, following the theory of embedology, the diffusion model is built using the delay-embedding coordinates of the data. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most stable component of the dynamics and reduces the influence of independent additive observation noise. The resulting diffusion forecast model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and when the observation noise vanishes. As in any standard forecasting problem, the forecasting skill depends crucially on the accuracy of the initial conditions. We introduce a novel Bayesian method for filtering the discrete-time noisy observations which works with the diffusion forecast to determine the forecast initial densities. Numerically, we compare this nonparametric approach with standard stochastic parametric models on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. We show that when the only available data is the low-dimensional set of noisy modes that are being modeled, the diffusion forecast is indeed competitive to the perfect model.

  4. Data-Driven Modeling of Complex Systems by means of a Dynamical ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, A.; Mukhin, D.; Gavrilov, A.; Loskutov, E.; Feigin, A.

    2017-12-01

    The data-driven methods for modeling and prognosis of complex dynamical systems become more and more popular in various fields due to growth of high-resolution data. We distinguish the two basic steps in such an approach: (i) determining the phase subspace of the system, or embedding, from available time series and (ii) constructing an evolution operator acting in this reduced subspace. In this work we suggest a novel approach combining these two steps by means of construction of an artificial neural network (ANN) with special topology. The proposed ANN-based model, on the one hand, projects the data onto a low-dimensional manifold, and, on the other hand, models a dynamical system on this manifold. Actually, this is a recurrent multilayer ANN which has internal dynamics and capable of generating time series. Very important point of the proposed methodology is the optimization of the model allowing us to avoid overfitting: we use Bayesian criterion to optimize the ANN structure and estimate both the degree of evolution operator nonlinearity and the complexity of nonlinear manifold which the data are projected on. The proposed modeling technique will be applied to the analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems: Lorenz'96 model of atmospheric turbulence, producing high-dimensional space-time chaos, and quasi-geostrophic three-layer model of the Earth's atmosphere with the natural orography, describing the dynamics of synoptical vortexes as well as mesoscale blocking systems. The possibility of application of the proposed methodology to analyze real measured data is also discussed. The study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant #16-12-10198).

  5. Optimal input design for multibody systems by using an extended adjoint approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberpeilsteiner, Stefan; Lauss, Thomas; Nachbagauer, Karin; Steiner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for optimizing inputs of multibody systems for a subsequently performed parameter identification. Herein, optimality with respect to identifiability is attained by maximizing the information content in measurements described by the Fisher information matrix. For solving the resulting optimization problem, the adjoint system of the sensitivity differential equation system is employed. The proposed approach combines these two well-established methods and can be applied to multibody systems in a systematic, automated manner. Furthermore, additional optimization goals can be added and used to find inputs satisfying, for example, end conditions or state constraints.

  6. Confining vs. conformal scenario for SU(2) with 2 adjoint fermions. Gluonic observables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2010-01-01

    Walking technicolor is a mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking without Higgs field. The Higgs mechanism is provided by chiral symmetry breaking in the technicolor theory. An essential ingredient is the vicinity to an IR fixed point, which could reconcile technicolor with the electroweak...... precision tests. SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac adjoint fermions has been proposed as a candidate for walking technicolor. Understanding whether this theory is confining or IR-conformal is a challenging problem, which can be addressed by means of numerical simulations. We have pointed out that a clean...

  7. Diagonalization of a self-adjoint operator acting on a Hilbert module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parfeny P. Saworotnow

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available For each bounded self-adjoint operator T on a Hilbert module H over an H*-algebra A there exists a locally compact space m and a certain A-valued measure μ such that H is isomorphic to L2(μ⊗A and T corresponds to a multiplication with a continuous function. There is a similar result for a commuting family of normal operators. A consequence for this result is a representation theorem for generalized stationary processes.

  8. An alternative factorization of the quantum harmonic oscillator and two-parameter family of self-adjoint operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos-Olalla, Rafael, E-mail: olalla@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Reyes, Marco A., E-mail: marco@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-10-01

    We introduce an alternative factorization of the Hamiltonian of the quantum harmonic oscillator which leads to a two-parameter self-adjoint operator from which the standard harmonic oscillator, the one-parameter oscillators introduced by Mielnik, and the Hermite operator are obtained in certain limits of the parameters. In addition, a single Bernoulli-type parameter factorization, which is different from the one introduced by M.A. Reyes, H.C. Rosu, and M.R. Gutiérrez [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2145], is briefly discussed in the final part of this work. -- Highlights: ► Factorizations with operators which are not mutually adjoint are presented. ► New two-parameter and one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operators are introduced. ► Their eigenfunctions are two- and one-parameter deformed Hermite functions.

  9. AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO WIND FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2016-04-01

    During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  10. Variation estimation of the averaged cross sections in the direct and adjoint fluxes; Estimativa das variacoes das secoes de choque mediadas nos fluxos direto e adjunto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1995-12-31

    There are several applications of the perturbation theory to specifics problems of reactor physics, such as nonuniform fuel burnup, nonuniform poison accumulation and evaluations of Doppler effects on reactivity. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of direct and adjoint diffusion equations, are used in these applications. In the adjoint diffusion equation has been used the group constants averaged in the energy-dependent direct neutron flux, that it is not theoretically consistent. In this paper it is presented a method to calculate the energy-dependent adjoint neutron flux, to obtain the average group-constant that will be used in the adjoint diffusion equation. The method is based on the solution of the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were derived for a two regions cell. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab.

  11. Adjoint-Based Mesh Adaptation for the Sonic Boom Signature Loudness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.; Park, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The mesh adaptation functionality of FUN3D is utilized to obtain a mesh optimized to calculate sonic boom ground signature loudness. During this process, the coupling between the discrete-adjoints of the computational fluid dynamics tool FUN3D and the atmospheric propagation tool sBOOM is exploited to form the error estimate. This new mesh adaptation methodology will allow generation of suitable meshes adapted to reduce the estimated errors in the ground loudness, which is an optimization metric employed in supersonic aircraft design. This new output-based adaptation could allow new insights into meshing for sonic boom analysis and design, and complements existing output-based adaptation techniques such as adaptation to reduce estimated errors in off-body pressure functional. This effort could also have implications for other coupled multidisciplinary adjoint capabilities (e.g., aeroelasticity) as well as inclusion of propagation specific parameters such as prevailing winds or non-standard atmospheric conditions. Results are discussed in the context of existing methods and appropriate conclusions are drawn as to the efficacy and efficiency of the developed capability.

  12. Dirichlet operators on loop spaces: Essential self-adjointness and log-Sobolev inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Moon; Yoo, Hyun Jae

    1997-06-01

    For each γ∈[0,1] and potential function V:Rd→R, we consider the Dirichlet form Eμ(γ) and the associated Dirichlet operator Hμ(γ) for the Gibbs measure μ on the loop space E={ω∈C([0,1];Rd):ω(0)=ω(1)}. The Gibbs measure μ is related to the Gibbs state of the quantum anharmonic oscillator with the potential V via the Feynman-Kac formula. We formulate Dirichlet forms in the framework of rigged Hilbert spaces which are related to the loop space E. We then give an approximate criterion for the essential self-adjointness of Dirichlet operators associated with Dirichlet forms given by probability measures on Hilbert spaces. Under appropriate conditions on the potential, we apply the approximate criterion to show that the Dirichlet operator Hμ(γ) is essentially self-adjoint on the domain of smooth cylinder functions. In addition, if the potential satisfies a uniform convexity condition, we prove that the Dirichlet operator Hμ(γ) has a gap at the lower end of spectrum. We also show that the Gibbs measure μ satisfies the log-Sobolev inequality. We use the approximation method developed by Albeverio, Kondratiev, and Röckner with necessary modifications.

  13. Efficient Adjoint Computation of Hybrid Systems of Differential Algebraic Equations with Applications in Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhyankar, Shrirang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Anitescu, Mihai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Hong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool to describe power system dynamic behavior in response to parameter variations. It is a central component in preventive and corrective control applications. The existing approaches for sensitivity calculations, namely, finite-difference and forward sensitivity analysis, require a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of sensitivity parameters. In this work, we investigate, implement, and test a discrete adjoint sensitivity approach whose computational effort is effectively independent of the number of sensitivity parameters. The proposed approach is highly efficient for calculating trajectory sensitivities of larger systems and is consistent, within machine precision, with the function whose sensitivity we are seeking. This is an essential feature for use in optimization applications. Moreover, our approach includes a consistent treatment of systems with switching, such as DC exciters, by deriving and implementing the adjoint jump conditions that arise from state and time-dependent discontinuities. The accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated in comparison with the forward sensitivity analysis approach.

  14. Radiation source reconstruction with known geometry and materials using the adjoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykes, Joshua M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to estimate an unknown isotropic source distribution, in space and energy, using detector measurements when the geometry and material composition are known. The estimated source distribution minimizes the difference between the measured and computed responses of detectors located at a selected number of points within the domain. In typical methods, a forward flux calculation is performed for each source guess in an iterative process. In contrast, we use the adjoint flux to compute the responses. Potential applications of the proposed method include determining the distribution of radio-contaminants following a nuclear event, monitoring the flow of radioactive fluids in pipes to determine hold-up locations, and retroactive reconstruction of radiation fields using workers' detectors' readings. After presenting the method, we describe a numerical test problem to demonstrate the preliminary viability of the method. As expected, using the adjoint flux reduces the number of transport solves to be proportional to the number of detector measurements, in contrast to methods using the forward flux that require a typically larger number proportional to the number of spatial mesh cells. (author)

  15. Self-adjoint angular flux equation for coupled electron-photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Prinja, A.K.; Morel, J.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere, and, like the even- and odd-parity form, S n source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here, the authors apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross sections from the CEPXS code and S n discretization

  16. Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Morel, J.E.; Prinja, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere and, like the even- and odd- parity form, S n source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here we apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross-sections from the CEPXS code and S n discretization

  17. Mathematical models for quantum point contact spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exner, P.; Seba, P.

    1986-01-01

    Two mathematical models intended to describe the point contact spectroscopical experiments are constructed. It adds a new item to the list of recently discovered applications of the self-adjoint extension theory

  18. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations : Applications towards Complex 3D Configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast

  19. Scaling properties of SU(2) gauge theory with mixed fundamental-adjoint action

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Enrico; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with fundamental-adjoint Wilson plaquette action. We confirm the presence of a first order bulk phase transition and we estimate the location of its end-point in the bare parameter space. If this point is second order, the theory is one of the simplest realizations of a lattice gauge theory admitting a continuum limit at finite bare couplings. All the relevant gauge observables are monitored in the vicinity of the fixed point with very good control over finite-size effects. The scaling properties of the low-lying glueball spectrum are studied while approaching the end-point in a controlled manner.

  20. Slices to sums of adjoint orbits, the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold, and Hilbert schemes of points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawski Roger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the regular Slodowy slice to the sum of two semisimple adjoint orbits of GL(n, ℂ is isomorphic to the deformation of the D2-singularity if n = 2, the Dancer deformation of the double cover of the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold if n = 3, and to the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold itself if n = 4. For higher n, such slices to the sum of two orbits, each having only two distinct eigenvalues, are either empty or biholomorphic to open subsets of the Hilbert scheme of points on one of the above surfaces. In particular, these open subsets of Hilbert schemes of points carry complete hyperkähler metrics. In the case of the double cover of the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold this metric turns out to be the natural L2-metric on a hyperkähler submanifold of the monopole moduli space.

  1. The method of rigged spaces in singular perturbation theory of self-adjoint operators

    CERN Document Server

    Koshmanenko, Volodymyr; Koshmanenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents the newly developed method of rigged Hilbert spaces as a modern approach in singular perturbation theory. A key notion of this approach is the Lax-Berezansky triple of Hilbert spaces embedded one into another, which specifies the well-known Gelfand topological triple. All kinds of singular interactions described by potentials supported on small sets (like the Dirac δ-potentials, fractals, singular measures, high degree super-singular expressions) admit a rigorous treatment only in terms of the equipped spaces and their scales. The main idea of the method is to use singular perturbations to change inner products in the starting rigged space, and the construction of the perturbed operator by the Berezansky canonical isomorphism (which connects the positive and negative spaces from a new rigged triplet). The approach combines three powerful tools of functional analysis based on the Birman-Krein-Vishik theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators, the theory of singular quadra...

  2. One-loop adjoint masses for non-supersymmetric intersecting branes

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasopoulos, P; Benakli, K; Goodsell, M D; Vichi, A

    2011-01-01

    We consider breaking of supersymmetry in intersecting D-brane configurations by slight deviation of the angles from their supersymmetric values. We compute the masses generated by radiative corrections for the adjoint scalars on the brane world-volumes. In the open string channel, the string two-point function receives contributions only from the infrared and the ultraviolet limits. The latter is due to tree-level closed string uncanceled NS-NS tadpoles, which we explicitly reproduce from the effective Born-Infeld action. On the other hand, the infrared region reproduces the one-loop mediation of supersymmetry breaking in the effective gauge theory, via messengers and their Kaluza-Klein excitations. In the toroidal set-up considered here, it receives contributions only from broken N=4 and N=2 supersymmetric configurations, and thus always leads at leading order to a tachyonic direction, in agreement with effective field theory expectations.

  3. Optical properties reconstruction using the adjoint method based on the radiative transfer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addoum, Ahmad; Farges, Olivier; Asllanaj, Fatmir

    2018-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the spatial distribution of optical properties in heterogeneous media like biological tissues. The light transport through such media is accurately described by the radiative transfer equation in the frequency-domain. The adjoint method is used to efficiently compute the objective function gradient with respect to optical parameters. Numerical tests show that the algorithm is accurate and robust to retrieve simultaneously the absorption μa and scattering μs coefficients for lowly and highly absorbing medium. Moreover, the simultaneous reconstruction of μs and the anisotropy factor g of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function is achieved with a reasonable accuracy. The main novelty in this work is the reconstruction of g which might open the possibility to image this parameter in tissues as an additional contrast agent in optical tomography.

  4. Modularity and 4D-2D spectral equivalences for large- N gauge theories with adjoint matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basar, Gökçe; Cherman, Aleksey; Dienes, Keith R.; McGady, David A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent work, we demonstrated that the confined-phase spectrum of non-supersymmetric pure Yang-Mills theory coincides with the spectrum of the chiral sector of a two-dimensional conformal field theory in the large- N limit. This was done within the tractable setting in which the gauge theory is compactified on a three-sphere whose radius is small compared to the strong length scale. In this paper, we generalize these observations by demonstrating that similar results continue to hold even when massless adjoint matter fields are introduced. These results hold for both thermal and (-1) F -twisted partition functions, and collectively suggest that the spectra of large- N confining gauge theories are organized by the symmetries of two-dimensional conformal field theories.

  5. Adjoint method provides phase response functions for delay-induced oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Ikuhiro; Ogawa, Yutaro; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Nakao, Hiroya; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2012-07-27

    Limit-cycle oscillations induced by time delay are widely observed in various systems, but a systematic phase-reduction theory for them has yet to be developed. Here we present a practical theoretical framework to calculate the phase response function Z(θ), a fundamental quantity for the theory, of delay-induced limit cycles with infinite-dimensional phase space. We show that Z(θ) can be obtained as a zero eigenfunction of the adjoint equation associated with an appropriate bilinear form for the delay differential equations. We confirm the validity of the proposed framework for two biological oscillators and demonstrate that the derived phase equation predicts intriguing multimodal locking behavior.

  6. Discrete Adjoint-Based Simultaneous Analysis and Design Approach for Conceptual Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviu SUGAR-GABOR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simultaneous analysis and design method is derived and applied for a non-linear constrained aerodynamic optimization problem. The method is based on the approach of defining a Lagrange functional based on the objective function and the aerodynamic model’s equations, using two sets of multipliers. A fully-coupled, non-linear system of equations is derived by requiring that the Gateaux variation of the Lagrange functional vanishes for arbitrary variations of the aerodynamic model’s dependent variables and design parameters. The optimization problem is approached using a one-shot technique, by solving the non-linear system in which all sensitivities and problem constraints are included. The computational efficiency of the method is compared against a gradient-based optimization algorithm using adjoint-provided gradient. A conceptual-stage aerodynamic optimization problem is solved, based on a non-linear numerical lifting-line method with viscous corrections.

  7. Maps Preserving Peripheral Spectrum of Generalized Jordan Products of Self-Adjoint Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let A1 and A2  be standard real Jordan algebras of self-adjoint operators on complex Hilbert spaces H1  and  H2, respectively. For  k≥2, let  (i1,…,im be a fixed sequence with i1,…,im∈{1,…,k} and assume that at least one of the terms in (i1,…,im appears exactly once. Define the generalized Jordan product  T1∘T2∘⋯∘Tk=Ti1Ti2⋯Tim+Tim⋯Ti2Ti1 on elements in  Ai. Let Φ:A1→A2 be a map with the range containing all rank-one projections and trace zero-rank two self-adjoint operators. We show that Φ satisfies that σπ(Φ(A1∘⋯∘Φ(Ak=σπ(A1∘⋯∘Ak for all A1,…,Ak, where σπ(A stands for the peripheral spectrum of A, if and only if there exist a scalar c∈{-1,1} and a unitary operator U:H1→H2 such that Φ(A=cUAU* for all A∈A1, or Φ(A=cUAtU* for all A∈A1, where At is the transpose of A for an arbitrarily fixed orthonormal basis of H1. Moreover, c=1 whenever m is odd.

  8. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; hide

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  9. Drag reduction of a transport helicopter by application of an adjoint-based fuselage optimization chain and modification of the rotor head

    OpenAIRE

    Wentrup, Marc; Khier, Walid; Zhang, Qinyin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper two approaches are investigated to reduce the parasite drag of a helicopter. The first approach is to optimize the surface of the fuselage back door. This is done by applying an automatic, adjoint-based optimization chain; developed by DLR for these purposes. This optimization chain combines the RANS-solver TAU with a solver for the discrete adjoint equation and a conjugate-gradient based optimization algorithm. The parameterization is done by Free Form Deformation. A descriptio...

  10. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors Using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated by using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multipoint optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  11. Improved forward wave propagation and adjoint-based sensitivity kernel calculations using a numerically stable finite-element PML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Zhinan; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland

    2014-01-01

    the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) form of CFS-UPML, which allows for extension to higher order time schemes and is easier to implement. Secondly, we rigorously derive the CFS-UPML formulation for time-domain adjoint elastic wave problems, which to our knowledge has never been done before. Thirdly...... an efficient infinite-domain truncation method suitable for accurately truncating an infinite domain governed by the second-order elastic wave equation written in displacement and computed based on a finite-element (FE) method. In this paper, we make several steps towards this goal. First, we make the 2-D...... in both formulations, in particular if very small mesh elements are present inside the absorbing layer, but we explain how these instabilities can be delayed as much as needed by using a stretching factor to reach numerical stability in practice for applications. Fourthly, in the case of adjoint problems...

  12. Theory and verification for the GRASP II code for adjoint-sensitivity analysis of steady-state and transient ground-water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RamaRao, B.S.; Reeves, M. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Calibration of a numerical model of the regional ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, has been performed by an interative parameter-fitting procedure. Parameterization has been secured by choosing to assign the transmissivity values at a limited number of selected locations, designated as pilot points. The transmissivity distribution in the model is derived by kriging the combined pool of measured and pilot-plant transmissivities. Iterating on the twin steps of sequentially adding additional pilot point(s) and kriging leads to the model of required accuracy, as judged by a weighted least-square-error objective function. At the end of calibration, it must be ensured that the correlation structure of the measured transmissivities is broadly preserved by the pilot-plant transmissivities. Adjoint-sensitivity analysis of the model has been coupled with kriging to provide objectively the optimal location of the pilot points during an iteration. The pilot-point transmissivities have been adjusted by modeler's judgement incorporating information, where available, on local geologic conditions and large-scale hydraulic interference tests, in order to minimize the objective function. 43 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Adjoint au site Web et aux médias sociaux (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'adjoint coordonne également l'établissement de la collection de livres en ligne du CRDI, ce qui comprend une collaboration étroite avec la maison d'édition du ... il résout les erreurs dans les processus et les systèmes de contrôle de la qualité, et travaille avec la Division de la gestion de l'information et de la technologie ...

  14. Fully automatic time-window selection using machine learning for global adjoint tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, J.; Lei, W.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Bozdag, E.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Selecting time windows from seismograms such that the synthetic measurements (from simulations) and measured observations are sufficiently close is indispensable in a global adjoint tomography framework. The increasing amount of seismic data collected everyday around the world demands "intelligent" algorithms for seismic window selection. While the traditional FLEXWIN algorithm can be "automatic" to some extent, it still requires both human input and human knowledge or experience, and thus is not deemed to be fully automatic. The goal of intelligent window selection is to automatically select windows based on a learnt engine that is built upon a huge number of existing windows generated through the adjoint tomography project. We have formulated the automatic window selection problem as a classification problem. All possible misfit calculation windows are classified as either usable or unusable. Given a large number of windows with a known selection mode (select or not select), we train a neural network to predict the selection mode of an arbitrary input window. Currently, the five features we extract from the windows are its cross-correlation value, cross-correlation time lag, amplitude ratio between observed and synthetic data, window length, and minimum STA/LTA value. More features can be included in the future. We use these features to characterize each window for training a multilayer perceptron neural network (MPNN). Training the MPNN is equivalent to solve a non-linear optimization problem. We use backward propagation to derive the gradient of the loss function with respect to the weighting matrices and bias vectors and use the mini-batch stochastic gradient method to iteratively optimize the MPNN. Numerical tests show that with a careful selection of the training data and a sufficient amount of training data, we are able to train a robust neural network that is capable of detecting the waveforms in an arbitrary earthquake data with negligible detection error

  15. Adjoint-based optimization of mechanical performance in polycrystalline materials and structures through texture control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Grace [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bishop, Joseph E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The texture of a polycrystalline material refers to the preferred orientation of the grains within the material. In metallic materials, texture can significantly affect the mechanical properties such as elastic moduli, yield stress, strain hardening, and fracture toughness. Recent advances in additive manufacturing of metallic materials offer the possibility in the not too distant future of controlling the spatial variation of texture. In this work, we investigate the advantages, in terms of mechanical performance, of allowing the texture to vary spatially. We use an adjoint-based gradient optimization algorithm within a finite element solver (COMSOL) to optimize several engineering quantities of interest in a simple structure (hole in a plate) and loading (uniaxial tension) condition. As a first step to general texture optimization, we consider the idealized case of a pure fiber texture in which the homogenized properties are transversely isotropic. In this special case, the only spatially varying design variables are the three Euler angles that prescribe the orientation of the homogenized material at each point within the structure. This work paves a new way to design metallic materials for tunable mechanical properties at the microstructure level.

  16. Accurately bi-orthogonal direct and adjoint lambda modes via two-sided Eigen-solvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, J.E.; Vidal, V.; Verdu, G.

    2005-01-01

    This work is concerned with the accurate computation of the dominant l-modes (Lambda mode) of the reactor core in order to approximate the solution of the neutron diffusion equation in different situations such as the transient modal analysis. In a previous work, the problem was already addressed by implementing a parallel program based on SLEPc (Scalable Library for Eigenvalue Problem Computations), a public domain software for the solution of eigenvalue problems. Now, the proposed solution is extended by incorporating also the computation of the adjoint l-modes in such a way that the bi-orthogonality condition is enforced very accurately. This feature is very desirable in some types of analyses, and in the proposed scheme it is achieved by making use of two-sided eigenvalue solving software. Current implementations of some of these software, while still susceptible of improvement, show that they can be competitive in terms of response time and accuracy with respect to other types of eigenvalue solving software. The code developed by the authors has parallel capabilities in order to be able to analyze reactors with a great level of detail in a short time. (authors)

  17. Phases of circle-compactified QCD with adjoint fermions at finite density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Takuya; Ünsal, Mithat; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    We study chemical-potential dependence of confinement and mass gap in QCD with adjoint fermions in spacetime with one spatial compact direction. By calculating the one-loop effective potential for the Wilson line in the presence of a chemical potential, we show that a center-symmetric phase and a center-broken phase alternate when the chemical potential in units of the compactification scale is increased. In the center-symmetric phase we use semiclassical methods to show that photons in the magnetic bion plasma acquire a mass gap that grows with the chemical potential as a result of anisotropic interactions between monopole-instantons. For the neutral fermionic sector which remains gapless perturbatively, there are two possibilities at a nonperturbative level: either to remain gapless (unbroken global symmetry) or to undergo a novel superfluid transition through a four-fermion interaction (broken global symmetry). If the latter is the case, this leads to an energy gap of quarks proportional to a new nonperturbative scale L-1exp [-1 /(g4μ L )] , where L denotes the circumference of S1, the low-energy physics is described by a Nambu-Goldstone mode associated with the baryon number, and there exists a new type of BEC-BCS crossover of the diquark pairing as a function of the compactification scale at a small chemical potential.

  18. Discrete SLn-connections and self-adjoint difference operators on 2-dimensional manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinevich, P. G.; Novikov, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    The programme of discretization of famous completely integrable systems and associated linear operators was launched in the 1990s. In particular, the properties of second-order difference operators on triangulated manifolds and equilateral triangular lattices have been studied by Novikov and Dynnikov since 1996. This study included Laplace transformations, new discretizations of complex analysis, and new discretizations of GLn-connections on triangulated n-dimensional manifolds. A general theory of discrete GLn-connections 'of rank one' has been developed (see the Introduction for definitions). The problem of distinguishing the subclass of SLn-connections (and unimodular SLn+/- -connections, which satisfy detA = +/-1) has not been solved. In the present paper it is shown that these connections play an important role (which is similar to the role of magnetic fields in the continuous case) in the theory of self-adjoint Schrödinger difference operators on equilateral triangular lattices in ℝ2. In Appendix 1 a complete characterization is given of unimodular SLn+/- -connections of rank 1 for all n > 1, thus correcting a mistake (it was wrongly claimed that they reduce to a canonical connection for n > 2). With the help of a communication from Korepanov, a complete clarification is provided of how the classical theory of electrical circuits and star-triangle transformations is connected with the discrete Laplace transformations on triangular lattices. Bibliography: 29 titles.

  19. An adjoint method of sensitivity analysis for residual vibrations of structures subject to impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Cheng, Gengdong

    2018-03-01

    For structures subject to impact loads, the residual vibration reduction is more and more important as the machines become faster and lighter. An efficient sensitivity analysis of residual vibration with respect to structural or operational parameters is indispensable for using a gradient based optimization algorithm, which reduces the residual vibration in either active or passive way. In this paper, an integrated quadratic performance index is used as the measure of the residual vibration, since it globally measures the residual vibration response and its calculation can be simplified greatly with Lyapunov equation. Several sensitivity analysis approaches for performance index were developed based on the assumption that the initial excitations of residual vibration were given and independent of structural design. Since the resulting excitations by the impact load often depend on structural design, this paper aims to propose a new efficient sensitivity analysis method for residual vibration of structures subject to impacts to consider the dependence. The new method is developed by combining two existing methods and using adjoint variable approach. Three numerical examples are carried out and demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method. The numerical results show that the dependence of initial excitations on structural design variables may strongly affects the accuracy of sensitivities.

  20. Accurately bi-orthogonal direct and adjoint lambda modes via two-sided Eigen-solvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, J.E.; Vidal, V. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, D. Sistemas Informaticos y Computacion (Spain); Verdu, G. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, D. Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    This work is concerned with the accurate computation of the dominant l-modes (Lambda mode) of the reactor core in order to approximate the solution of the neutron diffusion equation in different situations such as the transient modal analysis. In a previous work, the problem was already addressed by implementing a parallel program based on SLEPc (Scalable Library for Eigenvalue Problem Computations), a public domain software for the solution of eigenvalue problems. Now, the proposed solution is extended by incorporating also the computation of the adjoint l-modes in such a way that the bi-orthogonality condition is enforced very accurately. This feature is very desirable in some types of analyses, and in the proposed scheme it is achieved by making use of two-sided eigenvalue solving software. Current implementations of some of these software, while still susceptible of improvement, show that they can be competitive in terms of response time and accuracy with respect to other types of eigenvalue solving software. The code developed by the authors has parallel capabilities in order to be able to analyze reactors with a great level of detail in a short time. (authors)

  1. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-06-13

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  2. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W.

    1994-06-01

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation

  3. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    multiple experiments or numerical simulations. Alternatively an inverse design method can be used. An adjoint optimization method can be used to achieve the optimum blowing rate. It is shown that the method works for both geometry optimization and active control of the flow in order to deflect the flow in desirable ways. An adjoint optimization method is described. It is used to determine the blowing distribution in the diverging section of a convergent-divergent nozzle that gives a desired pressure distribution in the nozzle. Both the direct and adjoint problems and their associated boundary conditions are developed. The adjoint method is used to determine the blowing distribution required to minimize the shock strength in the nozzle to achieve a known target pressure and to achieve close to an ideally expanded flow pressure. A multi-block structured solver is developed to calculate the flow solution and associated adjoint variables. Two and three-dimensional calculations are performed for internal and external of the nozzle domains. A two step MacCormack scheme based on predictor- corrector technique is was used for some calculations. The four and five stage Runge-Kutta schemes are also used to artificially march in time. A modified Runge-Kutta scheme is used to accelerate the convergence to a steady state. Second order artificial dissipation has been added to stabilize the calculations. The steepest decent method has been used for the optimization of the blowing velocity after the gradients of the cost function with respect to the blowing velocity are calculated using adjoint method. Several examples are given of the optimization of blowing using the adjoint method.

  4. Adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure of Markov chains with applications on reliability of IFMIF accelerator-system facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, I.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents the implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for the Continuous Time, Discrete Space Markov chains (CTMC), as an alternative to the other computational expensive methods. In order to develop this procedure as an end product in reliability studies, the reliability of the physical systems is analyzed using a coupled Fault-Tree - Markov chain technique, i.e. the abstraction of the physical system is performed using as the high level interface the Fault-Tree and afterwards this one is automatically converted into a Markov chain. The resulting differential equations based on the Markov chain model are solved in order to evaluate the system reliability. Further sensitivity analyses using ASAP applied to CTMC equations are performed to study the influence of uncertainties in input data to the reliability measures and to get the confidence in the final reliability results. The methods to generate the Markov chain and the ASAP for the Markov chain equations have been implemented into the new computer code system QUEFT/MARKOMAGS/MCADJSEN for reliability and sensitivity analysis of physical systems. The validation of this code system has been carried out by using simple problems for which analytical solutions can be obtained. Typical sensitivity results show that the numerical solution using ASAP is robust, stable and accurate. The method and the code system developed during this work can be used further as an efficient and flexible tool to evaluate the sensitivities of reliability measures for any physical system analyzed using the Markov chain. Reliability and sensitivity analyses using these methods have been performed during this work for the IFMIF Accelerator System Facilities. The reliability studies using Markov chain have been concentrated around the availability of the main subsystems of this complex physical system for a typical mission time. The sensitivity studies for two typical responses using ASAP have been

  5. Adjoint-Free Variational Data Assimilation into a Regional Wave Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    velocities depending on the ambient current and constrained by the disper- sion relationship for linear surface waves: s25 gjkj tanhjkjh , (11) where s...is the wave angular frequency and h(x) is the water depth. Given the appropriate initial/boundary conditions, ambient current, and wind forcing, (10...doi:10.1007/s10236-014-0700-2. Ren, L., Z. Mao , H. Huang, and F. Gong, 2010: Satellite-based RAR performance simulation for measuring ocean wave

  6. History matching of transient pressure build-up in a simulation model using adjoint method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajala, I.; Haekal, Rachmat; Ganzer, L. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Almuallim, H. [Firmsoft Technologies, Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Schulze-Riegert, R. [SPT Group GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work is the efficient and computer-assisted history-matching of pressure build-up and pressure derivatives by small modification to reservoir rock properties on a grid by grid level. (orig.)

  7. An optimal control method for fluid structure interaction systems via adjoint boundary pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirco, L.; Da Vià, R.; Manservisi, S.

    2017-11-01

    In recent year, in spite of the computational complexity, Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems have been widely studied due to their applicability in science and engineering. Fluid-structure interaction systems consist of one or more solid structures that deform by interacting with a surrounding fluid flow. FSI simulations evaluate the tensional state of the mechanical component and take into account the effects of the solid deformations on the motion of the interior fluids. The inverse FSI problem can be described as the achievement of a certain objective by changing some design parameters such as forces, boundary conditions and geometrical domain shapes. In this paper we would like to study the inverse FSI problem by using an optimal control approach. In particular we propose a pressure boundary optimal control method based on Lagrangian multipliers and adjoint variables. The objective is the minimization of a solid domain displacement matching functional obtained by finding the optimal pressure on the inlet boundary. The optimality system is derived from the first order necessary conditions by taking the Fréchet derivatives of the Lagrangian with respect to all the variables involved. The optimal solution is then obtained through a standard steepest descent algorithm applied to the optimality system. The approach presented in this work is general and could be used to assess other objective functionals and controls. In order to support the proposed approach we perform a few numerical tests where the fluid pressure on the domain inlet controls the displacement that occurs in a well defined region of the solid domain.

  8. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocities and source parameters have been a long standing challenge in seismology since the first attempts to mitigate trade-off between very different parameters influencing travel-times (Spencer and Gubbins 1980, Pavlis and Booker 1980) since the early development in the 1970s (Aki et al 1976, Aki and Lee 1976, Crosson 1976). There is a strong trade-off between earthquake source positions, initial times and velocities during the tomographic inversion: mitigating these trade-offs is usually carried empirically (Lemeur et al 1997). This procedure is not optimal and may lead to errors in the velocity reconstruction as well as in the source localization. For a better simultaneous estimation of such multi-parametric reconstruction problem, one may take benefit of improved local optimization such as full Newton method where the Hessian influence helps balancing between different physical parameter quantities and improving the coverage at the point of reconstruction. Unfortunately, the computation of the full Hessian operator is not easily computed in large models and with large datasets. Truncated Newton (TCN) is an alternative optimization approach (Métivier et al. 2012) that allows resolution of the normal equation H Δm = - g using a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. It only requires to be able to compute the gradient of the misfit function and Hessian-vector products. Traveltime maps can be computed in the whole domain by numerical modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). The gradient and the Hessian-vector products for velocities can be computed without ray-tracing using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state methods for the cost of 1 and 2 additional modeling step (Plessix 2006, Métivier et al. 2012). Reciprocity allows to compute accurately the gradient and the full Hessian for each coordinates of the sources and for their initial times. Then the resolution of the problem is done through two nested loops. The model update Δm is

  9. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  10. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. (ed.)

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  11. Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element discretization of the self-adjoint angular flux form of the transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Rabiti, Cristian; Wang, Yaqi

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element (CFE) discretization of the transport equation requires a modification of the transport solution in order to achieve local conservation, a condition used in nonlinear acceleration to define the stopping criterion. In this work we implement a coarse-mesh finite difference acceleration for a CFE discretization of the second-order self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the transport equation and use a postprocessing to enforce local conservation. Numerical results are given for one-group source calculations of one-dimensional slabs. We also give a novel formal derivation of the boundary conditions for the SAAF. (authors)

  12. Formulation of coarse mesh finite difference to calculate mathematical adjoint flux; Formulacao de diferencas finitas de malha grossa para calculo do fluxo adjunto matematico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Valmir; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this work is the obtention of the mathematical adjoint flux, having as its support the nodal expansion method (NEM) for coarse mesh problems. Since there are difficulties to evaluate this flux by using NEM. directly, a coarse mesh finite difference program was developed to obtain this adjoint flux. The coarse mesh finite difference formulation (DFMG) adopted uses results of the direct calculation (node average flux and node face averaged currents) obtained by NEM. These quantities (flux and currents) are used to obtain the correction factors which modify the classical finite differences formulation . Since the DFMG formulation is also capable of calculating the direct flux it was also tested to obtain this flux and it was verified that it was able to reproduce with good accuracy both the flux and the currents obtained via NEM. In this way, only matrix transposition is needed to calculate the mathematical adjoint flux. (author)

  13. Sampling strategies based on singular vectors for assimilated models in ocean forecasting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Maria; Brandini, Carlo; Ortolani, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Meteorological and oceanographic models do need observations, not only as a ground truth element to verify the quality of the models, but also to keep model forecast error acceptable: through data assimilation techniques which merge measured and modelled data, natural divergence of numerical solutions from reality can be reduced / controlled and a more reliable solution - called analysis - is computed. Although this concept is valid in general, its application, especially in oceanography, raises many problems due to three main reasons: the difficulties that have ocean models in reaching an acceptable state of equilibrium, the high measurements cost and the difficulties in realizing them. The performances of the data assimilation procedures depend on the particular observation networks in use, well beyond the background quality and the used assimilation method. In this study we will present some results concerning the great impact of the dataset configuration, in particular measurements position, on the evaluation of the overall forecasting reliability of an ocean model. The aim consists in identifying operational criteria to support the design of marine observation networks at regional scale. In order to identify the observation network able to minimize the forecast error, a methodology based on Singular Vectors Decomposition of the tangent linear model is proposed. Such a method can give strong indications on the local error dynamics. In addition, for the purpose of avoiding redundancy of information contained in the data, a minimal distance among data positions has been chosen on the base of a spatial correlation analysis of the hydrodynamic fields under investigation. This methodology has been applied for the choice of data positions starting from simplified models, like an ideal double-gyre model and a quasi-geostrophic one. Model configurations and data assimilation are based on available ROMS routines, where a variational assimilation algorithm (4D-var) is

  14. Toward the Development of a Coupled COAMPS-ROMS Ensemble Kalman Filter and Adjoint with a focus on the Indian Ocean and the Intraseasonal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Toward the Development of a Coupled COAMPS-ROMS Ensemble Kalman Filter and Adjoint...system at NCAR. (2) Compare the performance of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) and 4

  15. On the Incompleteness of Ibragimov’s Conservation Law Theorem and Its Equivalence to a Standard Formula Using Symmetries and Adjoint-Symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C. Anco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A conservation law theorem stated by N. Ibragimov along with its subsequent extensions are shown to be a special case of a standard formula that uses a pair consisting of a symmetry and an adjoint-symmetry to produce a conservation law through a well-known Fréchet derivative identity. Furthermore, the connection of this formula (and of Ibragimov’s theorem to the standard action of symmetries on conservation laws is explained, which accounts for a number of major drawbacks that have appeared in recent work using the formula to generate conservation laws. In particular, the formula can generate trivial conservation laws and does not always yield all non-trivial conservation laws unless the symmetry action on the set of these conservation laws is transitive. It is emphasized that all local conservation laws for any given system of differential equations can be found instead by a general method using adjoint-symmetries. This general method is a kind of adjoint version of the standard Lie method to find all local symmetries and is completely algorithmic. The relationship between this method, Noether’s theorem and the symmetry/adjoint-symmetry formula is discussed.

  16. Continuous-energy adjoint flux and perturbation calculation using the iterated fission probability method in Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4 and underlying applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to present an exact method able to precisely evaluate very small reactivity effects with a Monte Carlo code (<10 pcm). it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4 and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4 is described. To illustrate the efficiency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the 'direct' estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the 'direct' method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high precision. It offers the possibility to split reactivity contributions on both isotopes and reactions. Other applications of this perturbation method are presented and tested like the calculation of exact kinetic parameters (βeff, Λeff) or sensitivity parameters

  17. Least-Squares PN Formulation of the Transport Equation Using Self-Adjoint-Angular-Flux Consistent Boundary Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent M. Laboure; Yaqi Wang; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the Least-Squares (LS) PN form of the transport equation compatible with voids in the context of Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM).We first deriveweakly imposed boundary conditions which make the LS weak formulation equivalent to the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) variational formulation with a void treatment, in the particular case of constant cross-sections and a uniform mesh. We then implement this method in Rattlesnake with the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework using a spherical harmonics (PN) expansion to discretize in angle. We test our implementation using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) and find the expected convergence behavior both in angle and space. Lastly, we investigate the impact of the global non-conservation of LS by comparing the method with SAAF on a heterogeneous test problem.

  18. Least-Squares PN Formulation of the Transport Equation Using Self-Adjoint-Angular-Flux Consistent Boundary Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laboure, Vincent M.; Wang, Yaqi; DeHart, Mark D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the Least-Squares (LS) PN form of the transport equation compatible with voids [1] in the context of Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM).We first deriveweakly imposed boundary conditions which make the LS weak formulation equivalent to the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) variational formulation with a void treatment [2], in the particular case of constant cross-sections and a uniform mesh. We then implement this method in Rattlesnake with the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework [3] using a spherical harmonics (PN) expansion to discretize in angle. We test our implementation using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) and find the expected convergence behavior both in angle and space. Lastly, we investigate the impact of the global non-conservation of LS by comparing the method with SAAF on a heterogeneous test problem.

  19. Convergence of a semi-discretization scheme for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation: A new approach with the adjoint method

    KAUST Repository

    Cagnetti, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a numerical scheme for the one dimensional time dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the periodic setting. This scheme consists in a semi-discretization using monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian in the spacial variable. From classical viscosity solution theory, these schemes are known to converge. In this paper we present a new approach to the study of the rate of convergence of the approximations based on the nonlinear adjoint method recently introduced by L.C. Evans. We estimate the rate of convergence for convex Hamiltonians and recover the O(h) convergence rate in terms of the L∞ norm and O(h) in terms of the L1 norm, where h is the size of the spacial grid. We discuss also possible generalizations to higher dimensional problems and present several other additional estimates. The special case of quadratic Hamiltonians is considered in detail in the end of the paper. © 2013 IMACS.

  20. Nonlinear self-adjointness, conservation laws, and the construction of solutions of partial differential equations using conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimov, N Kh; Avdonina, E D

    2013-01-01

    The method of nonlinear self-adjointness, which was recently developed by the first author, gives a generalization of Noether's theorem. This new method significantly extends approaches to constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries, since it does not require the existence of a Lagrangian. In particular, it can be applied to any linear equations and any nonlinear equations that possess at least one local conservation law. The present paper provides a brief survey of results on conservation laws which have been obtained by this method and published mostly in recent preprints of the authors, along with a method for constructing exact solutions of systems of partial differential equations with the use of conservation laws. In most cases the solutions obtained by the method of conservation laws cannot be found as invariant or partially invariant solutions. Bibliography: 23 titles

  1. Accounting for model error in air quality forecasts: an application of 4DEnVar to the assimilation of atmospheric composition using QG-Chem 1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Emili

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Model errors play a significant role in air quality forecasts. Accounting for them in the data assimilation (DA procedures is decisive to obtain improved forecasts. We address this issue using a reduced-order coupled chemistry–meteorology model based on quasi-geostrophic dynamics and a detailed tropospheric chemistry mechanism, which we name QG-Chem. This model has been coupled to the software library for the data assimilation Object Oriented Prediction System (OOPS and used to assess the potential of the 4DEnVar algorithm for air quality analyses and forecasts. The assets of 4DEnVar include the possibility to deal with multivariate aspects of atmospheric chemistry and to account for model errors of a generic type. A simple diagnostic procedure for detecting model errors is proposed, based on the 4DEnVar analysis and one additional model forecast. A large number of idealized data assimilation experiments are shown for several chemical species of relevance for air quality forecasts (O3, NOx, CO and CO2 with very different atmospheric lifetimes and chemical couplings. Experiments are done both under a perfect model hypothesis and including model error through perturbation of surface chemical emissions. Some key elements of the 4DEnVar algorithm such as the ensemble size and localization are also discussed. A comparison with results of 3D-Var, widely used in operational centers, shows that, for some species, analysis and next-day forecast errors can be halved when model error is taken into account. This result was obtained using a small ensemble size, which remains affordable for most operational centers. We conclude that 4DEnVar has a promising potential for operational air quality models. We finally highlight areas that deserve further research for applying 4DEnVar to large-scale chemistry models, i.e., localization techniques, propagation of analysis covariance between DA cycles and treatment for chemical nonlinearities. QG-Chem can provide a

  2. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  3. Anisotropic models are unitary: A rejuvenation of standard quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sridip; Banerjee, Narayan

    2016-12-01

    The present work proves that the folklore of the pathology of non-conservation of probability in quantum anisotropic models is wrong. It is shown in full generality that all operator ordering can lead to a Hamiltonian with a self-adjoint extension as long as it is constructed as a symmetric operator. It is indicated that the self-adjoint extension, however, is not unique and this non-uniqueness is suspected not to be a feature of anisotropic models only, in the sense that there exists operator orderings such that Hamiltonian for an isotropic homogeneous cosmological model does not have unique self-adjoint extension. For isotropic model, there is a special unique extension associated with quadratic form of Hamiltonian, i.e., a Friedrich's extension. Details of calculations are carried out for a Bianchi III model as an example.

  4. Automated differentiation of computer models for sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis of reactor physics computer models is an established discipline after more than twenty years of active development of generalized perturbations theory based on direct and adjoint methods. Many reactor physics models have been enhanced to solve for sensitivities of model results to model data. The calculated sensitivities are usually normalized first derivatives, although some codes are capable of solving for higher-order sensitivities. The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and application of the GRESS system for automating the implementation of the direct and adjoint techniques into existing FORTRAN computer codes. The GRESS system was developed at ORNL to eliminate the costly man-power intensive effort required to implement the direct and adjoint techniques into already-existing FORTRAN codes. GRESS has been successfully tested for a number of codes over a wide range of applications and presently operates on VAX machines under both VMS and UNIX operating systems. (author). 9 refs, 1 tab

  5. Self-adjointness of the two-dimensional massless Dirac Hamiltonian and vacuum energy density in the background of a singular magnetic vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, Yu. A.

    2000-01-01

    A massless spinor field is quantized in the background of a singular static magnetic vortex in 2+1-dimensional space-time. The method of self-adjoint extensions is employed to define the most general set of physically acceptable boundary conditions at the location of the vortex. Under these conditions, the vacuum energy density and effective potential in the vortex background are determined

  6. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, John M., E-mail: finn@lanl.gov [T-5, Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  7. [Purifying process of gynostemma pentaphyllum saponins based on "adjoint marker" online control technology and identification of their compositions by UPLC-QTOF-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dong-Dong; Kuang, Yan-Hui; Dong, Li-Hua; Ye, Xiao; Chen, Liang-Mian; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Zhen-Shan; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, De-Qin; Li, Chu-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    To optimize the purification process of gynostemma pentaphyllum saponins (GPS) based on "adjoint marker" online control technology with GPS as the testing index. UPLC-QTOF-MS technology was used for qualitative analysis. "Adjoint marker" online control results showed that the end point of load sample was that the UV absorbance of effluent liquid was equal to half of that of load sample solution, and the absorbance was basically stable when the end point was stable. In UPLC-QTOF-MS qualitative analysis, 16 saponins were identified from GPS, including 13 known gynostemma saponins and 3 new saponins. This optimized method was proved to be simple, scientific, reasonable, easy for online determination, real-time record, and can be better applied to the mass production and automation of production. The results of qualitative analysis indicated that the "adjoint marker" online control technology can well retain main efficacy components of medicinal materials, and provide analysis tools for the process control and quality traceability. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Integrable lattices and their sublattices: From the discrete Moutard (discrete Cauchy-Riemann) 4-point equation to the self-adjoint 5-point scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doliwa, A.; Grinevich, P.; Nieszporski, M.; Santini, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the sublattice approach, a procedure to generate, from a given integrable lattice, a sublattice which inherits its integrability features. We consider, as illustrative example of this approach, the discrete Moutard 4-point equation and its sublattice, the self-adjoint 5-point scheme on the star of the square lattice, which are relevant in the theory of the integrable discrete geometries and in the theory of discrete holomorphic and harmonic functions (in this last context, the discrete Moutard equation is called discrete Cauchy-Riemann equation). Therefore an integrable, at one energy, discretization of elliptic two-dimensional operators is considered. We use the sublattice point of view to derive, from the Darboux transformations and superposition formulas of the discrete Moutard equation, the Darboux transformations and superposition formulas of the self-adjoint 5-point scheme. We also construct, from algebro-geometric solutions of the discrete Moutard equation, algebro-geometric solutions of the self-adjoint 5-point scheme. In particular, we show that the corresponding restrictions on the finite-gap data are of the same type as those for the fixed energy problem for the two-dimensional Schroedinger operator. We finally use these solutions to construct explicit examples of discrete holomorphic and harmonic functions, as well as examples of quadrilateral surfaces in R 3

  9. Utilization of satellite cloud information to diagnose the energy state and transformations in extratropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An important component of the research was a continuing investigation of the impact of latent release on extratropical cyclone development. Previous efforts to accomplish this task have focused on the energy balance and the vertical motion field of an intense winter extratropical cyclone over the United States. During this fiscal year researchers turned their attention to a more fundamental diagnostic variable, the height tendency. Central to this effort is the use of a modified form of the quasi-geostrophic height tendency equation, in which geostrophic wind components have been replaced by observed winds and a latent heat release term has been added. This methodology was adopted to produce a simple diagnostic model which retains the essential mechanisms of quasi-geostrophic theory but more faithfully describes observed wave development when the Rossby Number approaches and exceeds 0.5. Results to date indicate that the new model yields height tendencies that are superior to those obtained from the quasi-geostrophic formulation and are sufficiently close to the observed tendencies to be a useful tool for diagnosing the principle large-scale forcing mechanisms in th e700-300 mb layer. Of the three forcing terms included in the new model, vortity advection is in general dominant. The most persistent challenge to this dominance is made by the thermal advection. On the whole, latent heat release plays a secondary role. Finally, during the rapid intensification observed for this cyclone, all three processes complement each other in forcing height falls.

  10. Approximation of eigenvalues of some unbounded self-adjoint discrete Jacobi matrices by eigenvalues of finite submatrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Malejki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the problem of approximation of eigenvalues of some self-adjoint operator in the Hilbert space \\(l^2(\\mathbb{N}\\ by eigenvalues of suitably chosen principal finite submatrices of an infinite Jacobi matrix that defines the operator considered. We assume the Jacobi operator is bounded from below with compact resolvent. In our research we estimate the asymptotics (with \\(n\\to \\infty\\ of the joint error of approximation for the first \\(n\\ eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the operator by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the finite submatrix of order \\(n \\times n\\. The method applied in our research is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method and Volkmer's results included in [H. Volkmer, Error Estimates for Rayleigh-Ritz Approximations of Eigenvalues and Eigenfunctions of the Mathieu and Spheroidal Wave Equation, Constr. Approx. 20 (2004, 39-54]. We extend the method to cover a class of infinite symmetric Jacobi matrices with three diagonals satisfying some polynomial growth estimates.

  11. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.; Yoo, S.; Kowalok, M.; Mackie, T.R.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-meter from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum

  12. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  13. Adjoint-Baed Optimal Control on the Pitch Angle of a Single-Bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Chen; Colonius, Tim

    2017-11-01

    Optimal control on the pitch angle of a NACA0018 single-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) is numerically investigated at a low Reynolds number of 1500. With fixed tip-speed ratio, the input power is minimized and mean tangential force is maximized over a specific time horizon. The immersed boundary method is used to simulate the two-dimensional, incompressible flow around a horizontal cross section of the VAWT. The problem is formulated as a PDE constrained optimization problem and an iterative solution is obtained using adjoint-based conjugate gradient methods. By the end of the longest control horizon examined, two controls end up with time-invariant pitch angles of about the same magnitude but with the opposite signs. The results show that both cases lead to a reduction in the input power but not necessarily an enhancement in the mean tangential force. These reductions in input power are due to the removal of a power-damaging phenomenon that occurs when a vortex pair is captured by the blade in the upwind-half region of a cycle. This project was supported by Caltech FLOWE center/Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  14. GRASP [GRound-Water Adjunct Sensitivity Program]: A computer code to perform post-SWENT [simulator for water, energy, and nuclide transport] adjoint sensitivity analysis of steady-state ground-water flow: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.L.; RamaRao, B.S.; McNeish, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    GRASP (GRound-Water Adjunct Senstivity Program) computes measures of the behavior of a ground-water system and the system's performance for waste isolation, and estimates the sensitivities of these measures to system parameters. The computed measures are referred to as ''performance measures'' and include weighted squared deviations of computed and observed pressures or heads, local Darcy velocity components and magnitudes, boundary fluxes, and travel distance and time along travel paths. The sensitivities are computed by the adjoint method and are exact derivatives of the performance measures with respect to the parameters for the modeled system, taken about the assumed parameter values. GRASP presumes steady-state, saturated grondwater flow, and post-processes the results of a multidimensional (1-D, 2-D, 3-D) finite-difference flow code. This document describes the mathematical basis for the model, the algorithms and solution techniques used, and the computer code design. The implementation of GRASP is verified with simple one- and two-dimensional flow problems, for which analytical expressions of performance measures and sensitivities are derived. The linkage between GRASP and multidimensional finite-difference flow codes is described. This document also contains a detailed user's manual. The use of GRASP to evaluate nuclear waste disposal issues has been emphasized throughout the report. The performance measures and their sensitivities can be employed to assist in directing data collection programs, expedite model calibration, and objectively determine the sensitivity of projected system performance to parameters

  15. Vortex Stability In Two -layer Rotating Shallow-water Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Xavier; Baey, Jean-Michel

    The stability of circular vortices subject to an initial normal-mode perturbation is studied in a two-layer shallow-water fluid with rigid lid, flat bottom and constant background rotation. Considerable similarity with quasi-geostrophic dynamics is found for linear (barotropic or baroclinic) instability, except in the frontal and nonlinear barotropic limits. This discrepancy is explained by asymptotic models. In many cases, the elliptical mode of deformation is the most unstable one. The ability of these perturbed circular vortices to stabilize nonlinearly as long-lived multipoles is then investigated. For elliptical perturbations, steady tripoles form from moderately unstable vortices as in the quasi-geostrophic limit. These tripoles, which exhibit various 3D structures, are robust when perturbed by non coherent disturbances. More unstable circular vortices break as two dipoles, propagating in opposite directions. Triangular perturbations can also lead to stationary quadrupoles or to dipolar breaking. The similarity with quasi-geostrophic dynamics, which ext ends to these nonlinear regimes, is related to the weakness of the divergent circulation, as shown by the analysis of the Lighthill equation. J.M. Baey &X. Carton, 2001: "Piecewise-constant vortices in a two-layer shallow - water flow". Advances in mathematical modelling of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, Kluwer Acad. Publ., 61, p.87-92. J.M. Baey &X. Carton, 2002: "Vortex multipoles in two-layer rotating shallow -water flows". To appear in J. Fluid Mech.

  16. Single Shooting and ESDIRK Methods for adjoint-based optimization of an oil reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capolei, Andrea; Völcker, Carsten; Frydendall, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Conventional recovery techniques enable recovery of 10-50% of the oil in an oil eld. Advances in smart well technology and enhanced oil recovery techniques enable signicant larger recovery. To realize this potential, feedback model-based optimal control technologies are needed to manipulate...

  17. The Adjoint Method for Gradient-based Dynamic Optimization of UV Flash Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias Kasper Skovborg; Capolei, Andrea; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel single-shooting algorithm for gradient-based solution of optimal control problems with vapor-liquid equilibrium constraints. Dynamic optimization of UV flash processes is relevant in nonlinear model predictive control of distillation columns, certain two-phase flow......-component flash process which demonstrate the importance of the optimization solver, the compiler, and the linear algebra software for the efficiency of dynamic optimization of UV flash processes....

  18. On the Similarity of Sturm-Liouville Operators with Non-Hermitian Boundary Conditions to Self-Adjoint and Normal Operators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, Petr; Železný, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 255-281 ISSN 1661-8254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002; GA MŠk LC527; GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD202/08/H072 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Sturm-Liouville operators * non-symmetric Robin boundary conditions * similarity to normal or self-adjoint operators * discrete spectral operator * complex symmetric operator * PT-symmetry * metric operator * C operator * Hilbert-Schmidt operators Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.545, year: 2014

  19. A simple model of big-crunch/big-bang transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Piechocki, Wlodzimierz [Department of Theoretical Physics, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-05-07

    We present classical and quantum dynamics of a test particle in the compactified Milne space. Background spacetime includes one compact space dimension undergoing contraction to a point followed by expansion. Quantization consists in finding a self-adjoint representation of the algebra of particle observables. Our model offers some insight into the nature of the cosmic singularity.

  20. Adjoint based optimal control of partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media with applications to CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Simon, Moritz

    2014-11-14

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. With the target of optimizing CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. Our objective is to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, while time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system, formulate the optimal control problem and derive the continuous adjoint equations. For the discretization we apply a variant of the so-called BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method that we further stabilize by a periodic averaging feature to reduce oscillations. The timestep-wise Lagrange function of the control problem is implemented as a variational form in Sundance, a toolbox for rapid development of parallel FE simulations, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. We discuss the BOX method and our implementation in Sundance. The MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT, using limited-memory BFGS updates for approximating second derivatives. Finally, we present and discuss different types of optimal control results.

  1. Testbed model and data assimilation for ARM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are to further develop and test the ALFA (AER Local Forecast and Assimilation) model originally designed at AER for local weather prediction and apply it to three distinct but related purposes in connection with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program: (a) to provide a testbed that simulates a global climate model in order to facilitate the development and testing of new cloud parametrizations and radiation models; (b) to assimilate the ARM data continuously at the scale of a climate model, using the adjoint method, thus providing the initial conditions and verification data for testing parameumtions; (c) to study the sensitivity of a radiation scheme to cloud parameters, again using the adjoint method, thus demonstrating the usefulness of the testbed model. The data assimilation will use a variational technique that minimizes the difference between the model results and the observation during the analysis period. The adjoint model is used to compute the gradient of a measure of the model errors with respect to nudging terms that are added to the equations to force the model output closer to the data. The radiation scheme that will be included in the basic ALFA model makes use of a gen two-stream approximation, and is designed for vertically inhonogeneous, multiple-scattering atmospheres. The sensitivity of this model to the definition of cloud parameters will be studied. The adjoint technique will also be used to compute the sensitivities. This project is designed to provide the Science Team members with the appropriate tools and modeling environment for proper testing and tuning of new radiation models and cloud parametrization schemes

  2. Efficient transfer of sensitivity information in multi-component models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Rabiti, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    In support of adjoint-based sensitivity analysis, this manuscript presents a new method to efficiently transfer adjoint information between components in a multi-component model, whereas the output of one component is passed as input to the next component. Often, one is interested in evaluating the sensitivities of the responses calculated by the last component to the inputs of the first component in the overall model. The presented method has two advantages over existing methods which may be classified into two broad categories: brute force-type methods and amalgamated-type methods. First, the presented method determines the minimum number of adjoint evaluations for each component as opposed to the brute force-type methods which require full evaluation of all sensitivities for all responses calculated by each component in the overall model, which proves computationally prohibitive for realistic problems. Second, the new method treats each component as a black-box as opposed to amalgamated-type methods which requires explicit knowledge of the system of equations associated with each component in order to reach the minimum number of adjoint evaluations. (author)

  3. Model Calibration in Option Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Loerx

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider calibration problems for models of pricing derivatives which occur in mathematical finance. We discuss various approaches such as using stochastic differential equations or partial differential equations for the modeling process. We discuss the development in the past literature and give an outlook into modern approaches of modelling. Furthermore, we address important numerical issues in the valuation of options and likewise the calibration of these models. This leads to interesting problems in optimization, where, e.g., the use of adjoint equations or the choice of the parametrization for the model parameters play an important role.

  4. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    OpenAIRE

    Buongiorno Nardelli, B.; Guinehut, S.; Pascual, A.; Drillet, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Mulet, S.

    2012-01-01

    The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data) was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estim...

  5. Dirichlet Forms and Dirichlet Operators for Gibbs Measures of Quantum Unbounded Spin Systems: Essential Self-Adjointness and Log-Sobolev Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hye Young; Park, Yong Moon; Yoo, Hyun Jae

    1998-02-01

    For each γ ∈ [0, 1] we consider the Dirichlet form ℰ_μ ^γ and the associated Dirichlet operator H_μ ^γ for the Gibbs measure μ of quantum unbounded spin systems interacting via superstable and regular potential. The Gibbs measure μ is related to the Gibbs state of the system via a (functional) Euclidean integral procedure. The configuration space for the spin systems is given by Ω : = E^{{Z}^v } , E: = \\{ {ω in C( {[ {0,1} ];{R}^d } ):ω ( 0 ) = ω ( 1 )} \\}. We formulate Dirichlet forms in the framework of rigged Hilbert spaces which are related to the space Ω. Under appropriate conditions on the potential, we show that the Dirichlet operator H_μ ^{( γ )} is essentially self-adjoint on the domain of smooth cylinder functions. We give sufficient conditions on the potential so that the corresponding Gibbs measure is uniformly log-concave (ULC). This property gives the spectral gap of the Dirichlet operator H_μ ^{( γ )} at the lower end of the spectrum. Furthermore, we prove that under the conditions of (ULC), the unique Gibbs measure μ satisfies the log-Sobolev inequality (LS). We use an approximate argument used in the study of the same subjects for loop spaces, which in turn is a modification of the method originally developed by S. Albeverio, Yu. G. Kondratiev, and M. Röckner.

  6. A family of integrable differential–difference equations, its bi-Hamiltonian structure and binary nonlinearization of the Lax pairs and adjoint Lax pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xixiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We deduce a family of integrable differential–difference equations. ► We present a discrete Hamiltonian operator involving two arbitrary real parameters. ► We establish the bi-Hamiltonian structure for obtained integrable family. ► Liouvolle integrability of the obtained family is demonstrated. ► Every equation in obtained family is factored through the binary nonlinearization. - Abstract: A family of integrable differential–difference equations is derived by the method of Lax pairs. A discrete Hamiltonian operator involving two arbitrary real parameters is introduced. When the parameters are suitably selected, a pair of discrete Hamiltonian operators is presented. Bi-Hamiltonian structure of obtained family is established by discrete trace identity. Then, Liouville integrability for the obtained family is proved. Ultimately, through the binary nonlinearization of the Lax pairs and adjoint Lax pairs, every differential–difference equation in obtained family is factored by an integrable symplectic map and a finite-dimensional integrable system in Liouville sense.

  7. Extreme weather: Subtropical floods and tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.

    Extreme weather events have a large effect on society. As such, it is important to understand these events and to project how they may change in a future, warmer climate. The aim of this thesis is to develop a deeper understanding of two types of extreme weather events: subtropical floods and tropical cyclones (TCs). In the subtropics, the latitude is high enough that quasi-geostrophic dynamics are at least qualitatively relevant, while low enough that moisture may be abundant and convection strong. Extratropical extreme precipitation events are usually associated with large-scale flow disturbances, strong ascent, and large latent heat release. In the first part of this thesis, I examine the possible triggering of convection by the large-scale dynamics and investigate the coupling between the two. Specifically two examples of extreme precipitation events in the subtropics are analyzed, the 2010 and 2014 floods of India and Pakistan and the 2015 flood of Texas and Oklahoma. I invert the quasi-geostrophic omega equation to decompose the large-scale vertical motion profile to components due to synoptic forcing and diabatic heating. Additionally, I present model results from within the Column Quasi-Geostrophic framework. A single column model and cloud-revolving model are forced with the large-scale forcings (other than large-scale vertical motion) computed from the quasi-geostrophic omega equation with input data from a reanalysis data set, and the large-scale vertical motion is diagnosed interactively with the simulated convection. It is found that convection was triggered primarily by mechanically forced orographic ascent over the Himalayas during the India/Pakistan flood and by upper-level Potential Vorticity disturbances during the Texas/Oklahoma flood. Furthermore, a climate attribution analysis was conducted for the Texas/Oklahoma flood and it is found that anthropogenic climate change was responsible for a small amount of rainfall during the event but the

  8. Error estimation and adaptive chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Braack

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical method to use several chemical transport models of increasing accuracy and complexity in an adaptive way. In largest parts of the domain, a simplified chemical model may be used, whereas in certain regions a more complex model is needed for accuracy reasons. A mathematically derived error estimator measures the modeling error and provides information where to use more accurate models. The error is measured in terms of output functionals. Therefore, one has to consider adjoint problems which carry sensitivity information. This concept is demonstrated by means of ozone formation and pollution emission.

  9. Propagation of bottom-trapped waves over variable topography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    on a topographic slope, as they propagate towards a deeper region of constant depth, is examined using a quasi-geostrophic model. It is seen that there can be no free transmitted wave to the region of constant depth. The bottom-trapped energy is thus... currents farther away. 1. INTRODUCTION Rhines (1970) showed that a stratified rotating fluid over sloping bottom topography can support free waves that are bottom-intensified. The in- crease in the kinetic energy of the currents with depth...

  10. A conformal invariant model of localized spinning test particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, C.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 13 - Marseille; Fliche, H.H.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 13 - Marseille

    1977-02-01

    A purely classical model of massless test particle with spin s is introduced as the dynamical system defined by the 10 dimensional 0(4,2) co-adjoint orbit with Casimir numbers (s 2 ,0,0). The Mathisson Papapetrou et al. equations of motion in a gravitational field are recovered, and moreover the particle appears to travel on null geodesics. Several implications are discussed

  11. A light neutralino in hybrid models of supersymmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; Parmentier, Jeanne; 10.1016

    2008-01-01

    We show that in gauge mediation models where heavy messenger masses are provided by the adjoint Higgs field of an underlying SU(5) theory, a generalized gauge mediation spectrum arises with the characteristic feature of having a neutralino much lighter than in the standard gauge or gravity mediation schemes. This naturally fits in a hybrid scenario where gravity mediation, while subdominant with respect to gauge mediation, provides mu and B mu parameters in the TeV range.

  12. Inverse Modeling of Emissions and their Time Profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Resler, Jaroslav; Eben, Kryštof; Juruš, Pavel; Liczki, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 4 (2010), s. 288-295 ISSN 1309-1042 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1A4/107/07 Grant - others:COST(XE) ES0602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : 4DVar * inverse modeling * diurnal time profile of emission * CMAQ adjoint * satellite observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  13. Zonally averaged model of dynamics, chemistry and radiation for the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, K. K.

    1985-01-01

    A nongeostrophic theory of zonally averaged circulation is formulated using the nonlinear primitive equations on a sphere, taking advantage of the more direct relationship between the mean meridional circulation and diabatic heating rate which is available in isentropic coordinates. Possible differences between results of nongeostrophic theory and the commonly used geostrophic formulation are discussed concerning: (1) the role of eddy forcing of the diabatic circulation, and (2) the nonlinear nearly inviscid limit vs the geostrophic limit. Problems associated with the traditional Rossby number scaling in quasi-geostrophic formulations are pointed out and an alternate, more general scaling based on the smallness of mean meridional to zonal velocities for a rotating planet is suggested. Such a scaling recovers the geostrophic balanced wind relationship for the mean zonal flow but reveals that the mean meridional velocity is in general ageostrophic.

  14. Improved Satellite Microwave Retrievals and Their Incorporation into a Simplified 4D-Var Vortex Initialization Using Adjoint Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxu

    Microwave instruments provide unique radiance measurements for observing surface properties and vertical atmosphere profiles in almost all weather conditions except for heavy precipitation. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) observes radiation emitted by Earth at window channels, which helps to retrieve surface and column integrated geophysical variables. However, observations at some X- and K-band channels are susceptible to interference by television signals transmitted from geostationary satellites when AMSR2 is scanning regions including the U.S. and Europe, which is referred to as Television Frequency Interference (TFI). It is found that high reflectivity over the ocean surface is favorable for the television signals to be reflected back to space. When the angle between the Earth scene vector and the reflected signal vector is small enough, the reflected TV signals will enter AMSR2's antenna. As a consequence, TFI will introduce erroneous information to retrieved geophysical products if not detected. This study proposes a TFI correction algorithm for observations over ocean. Microwave imagers are mostly for observing surface or column-integrated properties. In order to have vertical temperature profiles of the atmosphere, a study focusing on the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is included. A traditional AMSU-A temperature retrieval algorithm is modified to remove the scan biases in the temperature retrieval and to include only those ATMS sounding channels that are correlated with the atmospheric temperatures on the pressure level of the retrieval. The warm core structures derived for Hurricane Sandy when it moved from the tropics to the mid-latitudes are examined. Significant improvements have been obtained for the forecasts of hurricane track, but not intensity, especially during the first 6-12 hours. In this study, a simplified four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) vortex initialization model is developed to assimilate the

  15. A reduced-dynamics variational approach for the assimilation of altimeter data into eddy-resolving ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Morey, Steven L.; O'Brien, James J.

    A new method of assimilating sea surface height (SSH) data into ocean models is introduced and tested. Many features observable by satellite altimetry are approximated by the first baroclinic mode over much of the ocean, especially in the lower (but non-equatorial) and mid latitude regions. Based on this dynamical trait, a reduced-dynamics adjoint technique is developed and implemented with a three-dimensional model using vertical normal mode decomposition. To reduce the complexity of the variational data assimilation problem, the adjoint equations are based on a one-active-layer reduced-gravity model, which approximates the first baroclinic mode, as opposed to the full three-dimensional model equations. The reduced dimensionality of the adjoint model leads to lower computational cost than a traditional variational data assimilation algorithm. The technique is applicable to regions of the ocean where the SSH variability is dominated by the first baroclinic mode. The adjustment of the first baroclinic mode model fields dynamically transfers the SSH information to the deep ocean layers. The technique is developed in a modular fashion that can be readily implemented with many three-dimensional ocean models. For this study, the method is tested with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) configured to simulate the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Quillen equivalences between the model categories of smooth spaces, simplicial sets, and arc-gengerated spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In the preceding paper, we have constructed a compactly generated model structure on the category $\\dcal$ of diffeological spaces together with the adjoint pairs $|\\ |_\\dcal : \\scal \\rightleftarrows \\dcal : S^\\dcal$ and $\\tilde{\\cdot} : \\dcal \\rightleftarrows \\ccal^0 : R$, where $\\scal$ and $\\ccal^0$ denote the category of simplicial sets and that of arc-generated spaces, respectively. In this paper, we show that $(|\\ |_\\dcal, S^\\dcal)$ and $(\\tilde{\\cdot}, R)$ are pairs of Quillen equivalenc...

  17. The exhibition"La France au CERN" was inaugurated by Danièle Hulin, Directrice adjointe Secteur Physique, Chimie, Sciences pour l'Ingénieur (PCSI), Ministère délégué à l'Enseignement supérieur et à la recherche.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    The exhibition"La France au CERN" was inaugurated by Danièle Hulin, Directrice adjointe Secteur Physique, Chimie, Sciences pour l'Ingénieur (PCSI), Ministère délégué à l'Enseignement supérieur et à la recherche.

  18. Fully three dimensional simulations of rotating convection at low Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, E.; Schaeffer, N.; Cardin, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rotating thermal convection in spheres or spherical shells has been extensively studied for Prandtl number unity.However, planetary cores are made of liquid metals which have low Prandtl numbers Pr ≤ 0.1. Recently, using a quasi-geostrophic approximation, Guervilly & Cardin (2016) have studied nonlinear convection in rotating full sphere with internal heating at low Prandtl (0.01 ≤ Pr ≤ 0.1) and Ekman (10-8 ≤ Ek ≤ 10-5 ) numbers. They have found a bifurcation between a weak branch characterized by thermal Rossby waves and a strong branch characterized by a strong zonal flow with multiple jets. In these quasi-geostrophic simulations, where vorticity is defined to be constant along the axis of rotation, these bifurcations could be super- or sub-critical or exhibit hysteresis depending on the Ek and Prnumbers of the simulations. Here we present fully three dimensional simulations carried out over a portion of the parameter space (down to Ek = 10-6, Pr = 0.01) that confirm the scaling and bifurcations of the weak and strong branches found in the QG models. Additionally, by modeling the full flow we get information about the full meridional circulation of the convective fluid. The vigorous flows of the sub-critical strong branch may help to generate powerful dynamos before an inner-core has been formed, with a heat flux extracted from the mantle very close to the adiabatic flux.

  19. Assessing the Tangent Linear Behaviour of Common Tracer Transport Schemes and Their Use in a Linearised Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kent, James

    2015-01-01

    The linearity of a selection of common advection schemes is tested and examined with a view to their use in the tangent linear and adjoint versions of an atmospheric general circulation model. The schemes are tested within a simple offline one-dimensional periodic domain as well as using a simplified and complete configuration of the linearised version of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5). All schemes which prevent the development of negative values and preserve the shape of the solution are confirmed to have nonlinear behaviour. The piecewise parabolic method (PPM) with certain flux limiters, including that used by default in GEOS-5, is found to support linear growth near the shocks. This property can cause the rapid development of unrealistically large perturbations within the tangent linear and adjoint models. It is shown that these schemes with flux limiters should not be used within the linearised version of a transport scheme. The results from tests using GEOS-5 show that the current default scheme (a version of PPM) is not suitable for the tangent linear and adjoint model, and that using a linear third-order scheme for the linearised model produces better behaviour. Using the third-order scheme for the linearised model improves the correlations between the linear and non-linear perturbation trajectories for cloud liquid water and cloud liquid ice in GEOS-5.

  20. Forward and Inverse Analysis of Chemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    Assessing the discrepancy between modeled and observed distributions of aerosols is a persistent problem on many scales. Tools for analyzing the evolution of aerosol size distributions using the adjoint method are presented in idealized box model calculations. The ability to recover information about aerosol growth rates and initial size distributions is assessed given a range of simulated observations of evolving systems. While such tools alone could facilitate analysis of chamber measurements, improving estimates of aerosol sources on regional and global scales requires explicit consideration of many additional chemical and physical processes that govern secondary formation of atmospheric aerosols from emissions of gas-phase precursors. The adjoint of the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem is derived, affording detailed analysis of the relationship between gas-phase aerosol precursor emissions (SOx, NOx and NH 3) and the subsequent distributions of sulfate - ammonium - nitrate aerosol. Assimilation of surface measurements of sulfate and nitrate aerosol is shown to provide valuable constraints on emissions of ammonia. Adjoint sensitivities are used to propose strategies for air quality control, suggesting, for example, that reduction of SOx emissions in the summer and NH3 emissions in the winter would most effectively reduce non-attainment of aerosol air quality standards. The ability of this model to estimate global distributions of carbonaceous aerosol is also addressed. Based on new yield data from environmental chamber studies, mechanisms for incorporating the dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on NOx concentrations are developed for use in global models. When NOx levels are appropriately accounted for, it is demonstrated that sources such as isoprene and aromatics, previously neglected as sources of aerosol in global models, significantly contribute to predicted SOA burdens downwind of polluted areas (owing to benzene and toluene

  1. Surrogate based approaches to parameter inference in ocean models

    KAUST Repository

    Knio, Omar

    2016-01-06

    This talk discusses the inference of physical parameters using model surrogates. Attention is focused on the use of sampling schemes to build suitable representations of the dependence of the model response on uncertain input data. Non-intrusive spectral projections and regularized regressions are used for this purpose. A Bayesian inference formalism is then applied to update the uncertain inputs based on available measurements or observations. To perform the update, we consider two alternative approaches, based on the application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods or of adjoint-based optimization techniques. We outline the implementation of these techniques to infer dependence of wind drag, bottom drag, and internal mixing coefficients.

  2. Seismic Full Waveform Modeling & Imaging in Attenuating Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng

    the attenuating wavefield, and introduce unwanted phase shift. Numerical examples show that there are phase (depth) shifts in the Q-compensated RTM images from the GSLS equation. An adjoint-based least-squares reverse-time migration is proposed for viscoelastic media (Q-LSRTM), to compensate the attenuation losses in P and S images. The viscoelastic adjoint operator, and the P and S modulus perturbation imaging conditions are derived using the adjoint-state method and an augmented Lagrangian functional. Q-LSRTM solves the viscoelastic linearized modeling operator for synthetic data, and the adjoint operator is used for back propagating the data residual. Q-LSRTM is capable of iteratively updating the P and S modulus perturbations,in the direction of minimizing data residuals, and attenuation loss is iteratively compensated. A novel Q compensation approach is developed for adjoint seismic imaging by pseudodifferential scaling. With a correct Q model included in the migration algorithm, propagation effects, including the Q effects, can be compensated with the application of the inverse Hessian to the RTM image. Pseudodifferential scaling is used to efficiently approximate the action of the inverse Hessian. Numerical examples indicate that the adjoint RTM images with pseudodifferential scaling approximate the true model perturbation, and can be used as well-conditioned gradients for least-squares imaging.

  3. Flavor structure of E6 GUT models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Hidetoshi; Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2010-01-01

    In E 6 grand unified theory with SU(2) H family symmetry, the spontaneous CP violation can solve the supersymmetric CP problem. The scenario predicts V ub -O(λ 4 ) instead of O(λ 3 ), which is the naively expected value, because of cancellation at the leading order. Since the experimental value of V ub is O(λ 4 ), it is important to consider the reason and the conditions for the cancellation. In this paper, we provide a simple reason for the cancellation and show that in some E 6 models, such cancellation requires that the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the adjoint Higgs does not break U(1) B-L . Note that the direction of the VEV plays an important role in solving the doublet-triplet splitting problem by the Dimopoulos-Wilczek mechanism. In this E 6 model, the direction of the adjoint Higgs VEV can be measured experimentally by measuring the size of V ub -O(λ 4 ). (author)

  4. A geometrical representation of the interacting-boson model of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiron, M.W.

    1982-03-01

    The representation of the interacting-boson-model Hamiltonian as a second-order differential operator in geometrical variables is studied in detail. It is shown that, with appropriate boundary conditions and biorthogonal weight functions, it reproduces exactly both the spectrum and matrix elements of operators of the algebraic boson model. It can be written in self-adjoint form and expanded in a symmetrized moment expansion, allowing the identification of collective mass parameters and energy surfaces, but differs in detail from conventional geometrical collective model. (author)

  5. Real-time economic optimization for a fermentation process using Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Norbert; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2014-01-01

    and demonstrate its usefulness in economic optimization. The model is formulated as an index-1 differential algebraic equation (DAE), which guarantees conservation of mass and energy in discrete form. The optimization is based on recent advances within Economic Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (E......-NMPC), and also utilizes the index-1 DAE model. The E-NMPC uses the single-shooting method and the adjoint method for computation of the optimization gradients. The process constraints are relaxed to soft-constraints on the outputs. Finally we derive the analytical solution to the economic optimization problem...

  6. Analysis of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) patent tomograms: Stereology and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, V.; Wing, G.M.; Winter, L.; Zahrt, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is an insidious disease of young women which attacks the lungs and if untreated results in death. Treatment is radical. Currently a woman diagnosed as having LAM (usually by computed tomography (CT) of the lung) is run through an exhausting set of tests and exercises to determine the extent of the disease. Image processing techniques have been able to quantify the tomograms by providing a histogram of the number of cyst intercepts of a given area. The images are digital, so the data are discrete, and the areas are in terms of square pixels. It is hoped that by analyzing the data and by recovering the probability density of the cysts themselves one can provide a set of parameters that will aid in the early diagnosis of the disease and that will correlate well with the physiology. The desire to invert the data, that is to determine the probability density of the cysts from the probability density of the circular intersections of the cysts with the tomographic plane, led to a re-examination of the Wicksell equation. In Section 2, the authors transform Wicksell's equation in diameter (a generalized Abel equation) into an equation in areas (the original Abel equation). In Section 3 they present the adjoint equation in several equivalent forms. Analytic solutions of the adjoint equation necessary for later use are developed in Section 4. Outside of the framework of integral equations they have done some modeling of the data. They find that, to a very high degree of reliability, the data follows a simple power law. The distribution of spheres likewise follows a simple power law. These considerations are given in Section 5. Then in Section 6 they explore the exponential model as an alternative. Section 7 solves the Wicksell equation and uses the Golberg device, via the adjoint, to solve a related problem. They finally get to the number of cysts and their average size in Section 8. Their conclusions are in Section 9

  7. Optimization of Regional Geodynamic Models for Mantle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepley, M.; Isaac, T.; Jadamec, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The SubductionGenerator program is used to construct high resolution, 3D regional thermal structures for mantle convection simulations using a variety of data sources, including sea floor ages and geographically referenced 3D slab locations based on seismic observations. The initial bulk temperature field is constructed using a half-space cooling model or plate cooling model, and related smoothing functions based on a diffusion length-scale analysis. In this work, we seek to improve the 3D thermal model and test different model geometries and dynamically driven flow fields using constraints from observed seismic velocities and plate motions. Through a formal adjoint analysis, we construct the primal-dual version of the multi-objective PDE-constrained optimization problem for the plate motions and seismic misfit. We have efficient, scalable preconditioners for both the forward and adjoint problems based upon a block preconditioning strategy, and a simple gradient update is used to improve the control residual. The full optimal control problem is formulated on a nested hierarchy of grids, allowing a nonlinear multigrid method to accelerate the solution.

  8. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for distributed hydrological modeling: potential of variational methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Castaings

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Variational methods are widely used for the analysis and control of computationally intensive spatially distributed systems. In particular, the adjoint state method enables a very efficient calculation of the derivatives of an objective function (response function to be analysed or cost function to be optimised with respect to model inputs.

    In this contribution, it is shown that the potential of variational methods for distributed catchment scale hydrology should be considered. A distributed flash flood model, coupling kinematic wave overland flow and Green Ampt infiltration, is applied to a small catchment of the Thoré basin and used as a relatively simple (synthetic observations but didactic application case.

    It is shown that forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis provide a local but extensive insight on the relation between the assigned model parameters and the simulated hydrological response. Spatially distributed parameter sensitivities can be obtained for a very modest calculation effort (~6 times the computing time of a single model run and the singular value decomposition (SVD of the Jacobian matrix provides an interesting perspective for the analysis of the rainfall-runoff relation.

    For the estimation of model parameters, adjoint-based derivatives were found exceedingly efficient in driving a bound-constrained quasi-Newton algorithm. The reference parameter set is retrieved independently from the optimization initial condition when the very common dimension reduction strategy (i.e. scalar multipliers is adopted.

    Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis results suggest that most of the variability in this high-dimensional parameter space can be captured with a few orthogonal directions. A parametrization based on the SVD leading singular vectors was found very promising but should be combined with another regularization strategy in order to prevent overfitting.

  9. The Forward and Adjoint Monte Carlo Estimation of the Kill Probability of a Critical Component Inside an Armored Vehicle by a Burst of Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    ZfminSrie U.S. Dopeituemt of Comoro, Springfield. Virginis 22151. The findings in this an~i -#t tS be doui it u official anputiat of 00 Ae potim , ae...3) to analyze and develop into a spall-burst model . Their primary conclusion 4 was that the available data were so sparse and possessed such huge...scatter that the final development of a predictive model was impossible at that time. However, they did conclude that the distribution of fragments

  10. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buongiorno Nardelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estimated through the Q vector formulation of the omega equation. The project focused on a test case, covering the region where the Gulf Stream separates from the US East Coast. This work demonstrated that innovative methods for the high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations can be used to build the next generations of operational observation-based products.

  11. Photochemistry and dynamics of the ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, R. G.; Alyea, F. N.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a broad review of the photochemical and dynamic theories of the ozone layer. The two theories are combined into the MIT three-dimensional dynamic-chemical quasi-geostrophic model with 26 levels in the vertical spaced in logarithmic pressure coordinates between the ground and 72-km altitude. The chemical scheme incorporates the important odd nitrogen, odd hydrogen, and odd oxygen chemistry, but is simplified in the sense that it requires specification of the distributions of NO2, OH and HO2. The prognostic equations are the vorticity equation, the perturbation thermodynamic equation, and the global mean and perturbation continuity equations for ozone; diagnostic equations include the hydrostatic equation, the balance condition, and the mass continuity equation. The model is applied to the investigation of the impact of supersonic aircraft on the ozone layer.

  12. Scaling of saturation amplitudes in baroclinic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    By using finite-amplitude conservation laws for pseudomomentum and pseudoenergy, rigorous upper bounds have been derived on the saturation amplitudes in baroclinic instability for layered and continuously-stratified quasi-geostrophic models. Bounds have been obtained for both the eddy energy and the eddy potential enstrophy. The bounds apply to conservative (inviscid, unforced) flow, as well as to forced-dissipative flow when the dissipation is proportional to the potential vorticity. This approach provides an efficient way of extracting an analytical estimate of the dynamical scalings of the saturation amplitudes in terms of crucial non-dimensional parameters. A possible use is in constructing eddy parameterization schemes for zonally-averaged climate models. The scaling dependences are summarized, and compared with those derived from weakly-nonlinear theory and from baroclinic-adjustment estimates

  13. Element-by-element parallel spectral-element methods for 3-D teleseismic wave modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shaolin

    2017-09-28

    The development of an efficient algorithm for teleseismic wave field modeling is valuable for calculating the gradients of the misfit function (termed misfit gradients) or Fréchet derivatives when the teleseismic waveform is used for adjoint tomography. Here, we introduce an element-by-element parallel spectral-element method (EBE-SEM) for the efficient modeling of teleseismic wave field propagation in a reduced geology model. Under the plane-wave assumption, the frequency-wavenumber (FK) technique is implemented to compute the boundary wave field used to construct the boundary condition of the teleseismic wave incidence. To reduce the memory required for the storage of the boundary wave field for the incidence boundary condition, a strategy is introduced to efficiently store the boundary wave field on the model boundary. The perfectly matched layers absorbing boundary condition (PML ABC) is formulated using the EBE-SEM to absorb the scattered wave field from the model interior. The misfit gradient can easily be constructed in each time step during the calculation of the adjoint wave field. Three synthetic examples demonstrate the validity of the EBE-SEM for use in teleseismic wave field modeling and the misfit gradient calculation.

  14. A Class of Inert N-tuplet Models with Radiative Neutrino Mass and Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Law, Sandy S. C.; McDonald, Kristian L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a class of models with radiative neutrino mass and stable dark-matter candidates. Neutrino mass is generated by a one-loop diagram with the same topography as Ma's 2006 proposal (which used an inert scalar-doublet and singlet fermion). We generalize this approach and determine all variants with new fields no larger than the adjoint representation. When the neutrino mass diagram contains a Majorana mass insertion there are two possibilities, both of which are known. If the mass inse...

  15. Generation of zonal flows in rotating fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    contribution the generation of zonal flows will be illustrated in a simple fluid experiment performed in a rotating container with radial symmetric bottom topography. An effective mixing that homogenizes the potential vorticity in the fluid layer will lead to the replacement of the high-potential vorticity......The spontaneous generation of large-scale flows by the rectification of small-scale turbulent fluctuations is of great importance both in geophysical flows and in magnetically confined plasmas. These flows regulate the turbulence and may set up effective transport barriers. In the present...... near the centre with low potential vorticity from the outside, which will imply the formation of a large-scale flow. The experimental results are supported by direct numerical solutions of the quasi-geostrophic vorticity equation in the beta-plane approximation modelling the experimental situation...

  16. Planetary gyre, time-dependent eddies, torsional waves, and equatorial jets at the Earth's core surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We report a calculation of time-dependent quasi-geostrophic core flows for 1940–2010. Inverting recursively for an ensemble of solutions, we evaluate the main source of uncertainties, namely, the model errors arising from interactions between unresolved core surface motions and magnetic fields...... between the magnetic field and subdecadal nonzonal motions within the fluid outer core. Both the zonal and the more energetic nonzonal interannual motions were particularly intense close to the equator (below 10∘ latitude) between 1995 and 2010. We revise down the amplitude of the decade fluctuations...... of the planetary-scale circulation and find that electromagnetic core-mantle coupling is not the main mechanism for angular momentum exchanges on decadal time scales if mantle conductance is 3 × 108 S or lower....

  17. The structure of singularities in nonlocal transport equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoz, F de la [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad del PaIs Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Escuela Universitaria de IngenierIa Tecnica Industrial, Plaza de la Casilla 3, 48012 Bilbao (Spain); Fontelos, M A [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, C/Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-05-09

    We describe the structure of solutions developing singularities in the form of cusps in finite time in nonlocal transport equations of the family: {theta}{sub t}-{delta}({theta}H({theta})){sub x}-(1-{delta})H({theta}){theta}{sub x}=0, 0<={delta}<=1, where H represents the Hilbert transform. Equations of this type appear in various contexts: evolution of vortex sheets, models for quasi-geostrophic equation and evolution equations for order parameters. Equation (1) was studied, and the existence of singularities developing in finite time was proved. The structure of such singularities was, nevertheless, not described. In this paper, we will describe the geometry of the solution in the neighborhood of the singularity once it develops and the (self-similar) way in which it is approached as t {yields} t{sub 0}, where t{sub 0} is the singular time.

  18. Solitonlike solutions in loop current eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Shoichiro

    1989-01-01

    The application of the nonlinear quasi-geostrophic equations to an isolated eddy in the western continental slope region in the Gulf of Mexico is examined for a two-layer ocean model with bottom topography. In the linear limit, solutions are topographic nondispersive waves. Form-preserving solutions, or solitons, have been found. The solution is shown to be a limiting form for a nonlinear dispersive system propagating northward along the topographic waveguide in the western continental slope region in the Gulf of Mexico. Using satellite-tracked drifter data, a linear relationship is found between the amplitude of the deduced stream function of the eddy and its observed translational velocity over the continental slope, which supports the hypothesis that some mesoscale eddies interacting with the continental slope behave as solitons.

  19. A class of inert N-tuplet models with radiative neutrino mass and dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sandy S. C.; McDonald, Kristian L.

    2013-09-01

    We present a class of models with radiative neutrino mass and stable dark-matter candidates. Neutrino mass is generated by a one-loop diagram with the same topography as Ma's 2006 proposal (which used an inert scalar-doublet and singlet fermion). We generalize this approach and determine all variants with new fields no larger than the adjoint representation. When the neutrino mass diagram contains a Majorana mass insertion there are two possibilities, both of which are known. If the mass insertion is of the Dirac type there are seven additional models, two of which are excluded by direct-detection experiments. The other five models are also constrained, such that only scalar dark-matter is viable. There are cases with an inert singlet, an inert doublet, and an inert triplet, providing a natural setting for inert N -tuplet models of dark matter, with the additional feature of achieving radiative neutrino mass. We show that some of the models admit a simple explanation for the (requisite) discrete symmetry, and briefly discuss cases with representations larger than the adjoint, which can admit a connection to the astrophysical gamma-ray signal.

  20. Simultaneous model spin-up and parameter identification with the one-shot method in a climate model example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Kratzenstein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the Oneshot Optimization strategy introduced by Hamdi and Griewank for the applicability and efficiency to identify parameters in models of the earth's climate system. Parameters of a box model of the North Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation are optimized with respect to the fit of model output to data given by another model of intermediate complexity. Since the model is run into a steady state by a pseudo time-stepping, efficient techniques are necessary to avoid extensive recomputations or storing when using gradient-based local optimization algorithms. The Oneshot approach simultaneously updates state, adjoint and parameter values. For the required partial derivatives, the algorithmic/automatic differentiation tool TAF was used. Numerical results are compared to results obtained by the BFGS-quasi-Newton method.

  1. Modeling of finite aspect ratio effects on current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.

    1996-01-01

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by a full wave code. This eliminates the need to use the approximation inherent in the parameterization. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code. The accuracy of the parameterization of the current drive efficiency, η, is judged by a comparison with a direct calculation: where χ is the adjoint function, ε is the kinetic energy, and rvec Γ is the quasilinear flux. It is shown that for large aspect ratio devices (ε → 0), the parameterization is nearly identical to the direct calculation. As the aspect ratio approaches unity, visible differences between the two calculations appear

  2. Modeling of finite aspect ratio effects on current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by a full wave code. This eliminates the need to use the approximation inherent in the parameterization. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code. The accuracy of the parameterization of the current drive efficiency, {eta}, is judged by a comparison with a direct calculation: where {chi} is the adjoint function, {epsilon} is the kinetic energy, and {rvec {Gamma}} is the quasilinear flux. It is shown that for large aspect ratio devices ({epsilon} {r_arrow} 0), the parameterization is nearly identical to the direct calculation. As the aspect ratio approaches unity, visible differences between the two calculations appear.

  3. M-theoretic matrix models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Alba; Mariño, Marcos

    2015-02-01

    Some matrix models admit, on top of the usual 't Hooft expansion, an M-theory-like expansion, i.e. an expansion at large N but where the rest of the parameters are fixed, instead of scaling with N . These models, which we call M-theoretic matrix models, appear in the localization of Chern-Simons-matter theories, and also in two-dimensional statistical physics. Generically, their partition function receives non-perturbative corrections which are not captured by the 't Hooft expansion. In this paper, we discuss general aspects of these type of matrix integrals and we analyze in detail two different examples. The first one is the matrix model computing the partition function of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in three dimensions with one adjoint hypermultiplet and N f fundamentals, which has a conjectured M-theory dual, and which we call the N f matrix model. The second one, which we call the polymer matrix model, computes form factors of the 2d Ising model and is related to the physics of 2d polymers. In both cases we determine their exact planar limit. In the N f matrix model, the planar free energy reproduces the expected behavior of the M-theory dual. We also study their M-theory expansion by using Fermi gas techniques, and we find non-perturbative corrections to the 't Hooft expansion.

  4. Dirac - Kaehler formalism and the Yang-Mills model with Supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.

    1985-01-01

    It is used the differential Dirac-Kahler's formalism for transposing supersymmetric models for the lattice. Such a formalism has shown itself extremely useful for these purposes because there exists a complete mathematical duality in its versions in the continuum and in the lattice. This work treats specifically the Yang-Mills, model with extended supersymmetry N = 2 in the adjoint representation; the procedure which is adopted here consists in to rewrite the essential of the model in question in the new language, first in the continuum, getting it adequate for the lattice, because it is from the property of the supercharges Q 2 = H that the lattice supersymmetric Hamiltonian will be obtained. By the way, it was constructed a lattice gauge theory within the formalism of Dirac-Kahler, it is almost a natural consequence of the adopted definitions for the lattice gauge transformations of the fields in the adjoint representation and of the two types of covariant derivatives which are necessary in the lattice. In order to carry out some calculations, it was put emphasis on the matrix representation of the Dirac-Kahler's formalism, it was also extended to a lattice. (author) [pt

  5. A variational data assimilation system for soil–atmosphere flux estimates for the Community Land Model (CLM3.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hoppe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and implementation of a spatio-temporal variational data assimilation system (4D-var for the soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer model "Community Land Model" (CLM3.5, along with the development of the adjoint code for the core soil–atmosphere transfer scheme of energy and soil moisture. The purpose of this work is to obtain an improved estimation technique for the energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. Optimal assessments of these fluxes are neither available from model simulations nor measurements alone, while a 4D-var data assimilation has the potential to combine both information sources by a Best Linear Unbiased Estimate (BLUE. The 4D-var method requires the development of the adjoint model of the CLM which is established in this work. The new data assimilation algorithm is able to assimilate soil temperature and soil moisture measurements for one-dimensional columns of the model grid. Numerical experiments were first used to test the algorithm under idealised conditions. It was found that the analysis delivers improved results whenever there is a dependence between the initial values and the assimilated quantity. Furthermore, soil temperature and soil moisture from in situ field measurements were assimilated. These calculations demonstrate the improved performance of flux estimates, whenever soil property parameters are available of sufficient quality. Misspecifications could also be identified by the performance of the variational scheme.

  6. Adaptive Surrogate Modeling for Response Surface Approximations with Application to Bayesian Inference

    KAUST Repository

    Prudhomme, Serge

    2015-01-07

    The need for surrogate models and adaptive methods can be best appreciated if one is interested in parameter estimation using a Bayesian calibration procedure for validation purposes. We extend here our latest work on error decomposition and adaptive refinement for response surfaces to the development of surrogate models that can be substituted for the full models to estimate the parameters of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. The error estimates and adaptive schemes are driven here by a quantity of interest and are thus based on the approximation of an adjoint problem. We will focus in particular to the accurate estimation of evidences to facilitate model selection. The methodology will be illustrated on the Spalart-Allmaras RANS model for turbulence simulation.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification for Large-Scale Ice Sheet Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghattas, Omar [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This report summarizes our work to develop advanced forward and inverse solvers and uncertainty quantification capabilities for a nonlinear 3D full Stokes continental-scale ice sheet flow model. The components include: (1) forward solver: a new state-of-the-art parallel adaptive scalable high-order-accurate mass-conservative Newton-based 3D nonlinear full Stokes ice sheet flow simulator; (2) inverse solver: a new adjoint-based inexact Newton method for solution of deterministic inverse problems governed by the above 3D nonlinear full Stokes ice flow model; and (3) uncertainty quantification: a novel Hessian-based Bayesian method for quantifying uncertainties in the inverse ice sheet flow solution and propagating them forward into predictions of quantities of interest such as ice mass flux to the ocean.

  8. Effects of Induced Stress on Seismic Forward Modelling and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Jeroen; Trampert, Jeannot

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate how effects of induced stress may be incorporated in seismic modelling and inversion. Our approach is motivated by the accommodation of prestress in global seismology. Induced stress modifies both the equation of motion and the constitutive relationship. The theory predicts that induced pressure linearly affects the unstressed isotropic moduli with a slope determined by their adiabatic pressure derivatives. The induced deviatoric stress produces anisotropic compressional and shear wavespeeds; the latter result in shear-wave splitting. For forward modelling purposes, we determine the weak form of the equation of motion under induced stress. In the context of the inverse problem, we determine induced stress sensitivity kernels, which may be used for adjoint tomography. The theory is illustrated by considering 2D propagation of SH waves and related Fréchet derivatives based on a spectral-element method.

  9. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.; Wheeler, Mary F.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems

  10. 3rd International Workshop on Advances in Simulation-Driven Optimization and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Leifsson, Leifur; Yang, Xin-She

    2016-01-01

    This edited volume is devoted to the now-ubiquitous use of computational models across most disciplines of engineering and science, led by a trio of world-renowned researchers in the field. Focused on recent advances of modeling and optimization techniques aimed at handling computationally-expensive engineering problems involving simulation models, this book will be an invaluable resource for specialists (engineers, researchers, graduate students) working in areas as diverse as electrical engineering, mechanical and structural engineering, civil engineering, industrial engineering, hydrodynamics, aerospace engineering, microwave and antenna engineering, ocean science and climate modeling, and the automotive industry, where design processes are heavily based on CPU-heavy computer simulations. Various techniques, such as knowledge-based optimization, adjoint sensitivity techniques, and fast replacement models (to name just a few) are explored in-depth along with an array of the latest techniques to optimize the...

  11. Modelling atmospheric dispersion of mercury, lead and cadmium at european scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roustan, Yelva

    2005-01-01

    Lead, mercury and cadmium are identified as the most worrying heavy metals within the framework of the long range air pollution. Understanding and modeling their transport and fate allow for making effective decisions in order to reduce their impact on people and their environment. The first two parts of this thesis relate to the modeling of these trace pollutants for the impact study at the European scale. While mercury is mainly present under gaseous form and likely to chemically react, the other heavy metals are primarily carried by the fine particles and considered as inert. The third part of this thesis presents a methodological development based on an adjoint approach. It has been used to perform a sensitivity analysis of the model and to carry out inverse modeling to improve boundary conditions which are crucial with a restricted area model. (author) [fr

  12. Importance estimation in Monte Carlo modelling of neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickael, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The estimation of neutron and photon importance in a three-dimensional geometry is achieved using a coupled Monte Carlo and diffusion theory calculation. The parameters required for the solution of the multigroup adjoint diffusion equation are estimated from an analog Monte Carlo simulation of the system under investigation. The solution of the adjoint diffusion equation is then used as an estimate of the particle importance in the actual simulation. This approach provides an automated and efficient variance reduction method for Monte Carlo simulations. The technique has been successfully applied to Monte Carlo simulation of neutron and coupled neutron-photon transport in the nuclear well-logging field. The results show that the importance maps obtained in a few minutes of computer time using this technique are in good agreement with Monte Carlo generated importance maps that require prohibitive computing times. The application of this method to Monte Carlo modelling of the response of neutron porosity and pulsed neutron instruments has resulted in major reductions in computation time. (Author)

  13. Quantitative use of Palaeo-Proxy Data in Global Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, M.

    2003-04-01

    It is arguably one of the ultimate aims of palaeo-modelling science to somehow "get the palaeo-proxy data into the model" i.e. to constrain the climate of the model the trajectory of the real climate recorded in the palaeo data. The traditional way of interfacing data with models is to use data assimilation. This presents a number of problems in the palaeo context as the data are more often representative of seasonal to annual or decadal climate and models have time steps of order minutes, hence the model increments are likely to be vanishingly small. Also, variational data assimilation schemes would require the adjoint of the coupled ocean-atmosphere model and the adjoint of the functions which translate model variables such as temperature and precipitation into the palaeo-proxies, both of which are hard to determine because of the high degree of non-linearity in the system and the wide range of space and time scales. An alternative is to add forward models of proxies to the model and run "many years" of simulation until an analog state is found which matches the palaeo data for each season, year, decade etc. Clearly "many years" might range from a few thousand years to almost infinity and depends on the number of degrees of freedom in the climate system and on the error characteristics of the palaeo data. The length of simulation required is probably beyond the supercomputer capacity of a single institution and hence an alternative is to use idle capacity of home and business personal computers - the climateprediction.net project.

  14. Searching for beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the laboratory and in the sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Min

    2010-09-15

    We study the collider signals as well as Dark Matter candidates in supersymmetric models. We show that the collider signatures from a supersymmetric Grand Unification model based on the SO(10) gauge group can be distinguishable from those from the (constrained) minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, even though they share some common features. The N=2 supersymmetry has the characteristically distinct phenomenology, due to the Dirac nature of gauginos, as well as the extra adjoint scalars. We compute the cold Dark Matter relic density including a class of one-loop corrections. Finally, we discuss the detectability of neutralino Dark Matter candidate of the SO(10) model by the direct and indirect Dark Matter search experiments. (orig.)

  15. Development of new techniques for assimilating satellite altimetry data into ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng

    State of the art fully three-dimensional ocean models are very computationally expensive and their adjoints are even more resource intensive. However, many features of interest are approximated by the first baroclinic mode over much of the ocean, especially in the lower and mid latitude regions. Based on this dynamical feature, a new type of data assimilation scheme to assimilate sea surface height (SSH) data, a reduced-space adjoint technique, is developed and implemented with a three-dimensional model using vertical normal mode decomposition. The technique is tested with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) configured to simulate the Gulf of Mexico. The assimilation procedure works by minimizing the cost function, which generalizes the misfit between the observations and their counterpart model variables. The "forward" model is integrated for the period during which the data are assimilated. Vertical normal mode decomposition retrieves the first baroclinic mode, and the data misfit between the model outputs and observations is calculated. Adjoint equations based on a one-active-layer reduced gravity model, which approximates the first baroclinic mode, are integrated backward in time to get the gradient of the cost function with respect to the control variables (velocity and SSH of the first baroclinic mode). The gradient is input to an optimization algorithm (the limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method is used for the cases presented here) to determine the new first baroclinic mode velocity and SSH fields, which are used to update the forward model variables at the initial time. Two main issues in the area of ocean data assimilation are addressed: (1) How can information provided only at the sea surface be transferred dynamically into deep layers? (2) How can information provided only locally, in limited oceanic regions, be horizontally transferred to ocean areas far away from the data-dense regions, but dynamically connected to it? The first

  16. Application to supersymmetric models of Dirac-kaehler formalism on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimerman, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Using Dirac-Kaehler techniques we formulate some supersymmetric models on the lattice. Specifically we consider the Wess-Zumino model with N=2 in two dimensions which is formulated on a space lattice in its Hamiltonian version (continuous time) as well as on the space-time lattice in its Lagrangean version (euclidean space). On the space lattice (Hamiltonian formulation) we study also the supersymmetric Yanh-Mills model with N=4 in four dimensions. After the introduction of lattice covariant derivatives for fields in the adjoint representation of a compact group we write down some new relations which we have obtained and which constitute generalizations on the lattice of those which are known in the continuous case. (author) [pt

  17. The importance of variables and parameters in radiolytic chemical kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepho, M.G.; Turner, P.J.; Reimus, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the pertinent radiochemical reactions are not completely understood, and most of the associated rate constants are poorly characterized. To help identify the important radiochemical reactions, rate constants, species, and environmental conditions, an importance theory code, SWATS (Sensitivitiy With Adjoint Theory-Sparse version)-LOOPCHEM, has been developed for the radiolytic chemical kinetics model in the radiolysis code LOOPCHEM. The LOOPCHEM code calculates the concentrations of various species in a radiolytic field over time. The SWATS-LOOPCHEM code efficiently calculates: the importance (relative to a defined response of interest) of each species concentration over time, the sensitivity of each parameter of interest, and the importance of each equation in the radiolysis model. The calculated results will be used to guide future experimental and modeling work for determining the importance of radiolysis on waste package performance. A demonstration (the importance of selected concentrations and the sensitivities of selected parameters) of the SWATS-LOOPCHEM code is provided for illustrative purposes

  18. Testing variational estimation of process parameters and initial conditions of an earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Blessing

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a variational assimilation system around a coarse resolution Earth System Model (ESM and apply it for estimating initial conditions and parameters of the model. The system is based on derivative information that is efficiently provided by the ESM's adjoint, which has been generated through automatic differentiation of the model's source code. In our variational approach, the length of the feasible assimilation window is limited by the size of the domain in control space over which the approximation by the derivative is valid. This validity domain is reduced by non-smooth process representations. We show that in this respect the ocean component is less critical than the atmospheric component. We demonstrate how the feasible assimilation window can be extended to several weeks by modifying the implementation of specific process representations and by switching off processes such as precipitation.

  19. Economic Optimization of Spray Dryer Operation using Nonlinear Model Predictive Control with State Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Norbert; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Rawlings, James B.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an economically optimizing Nonlinear Model Predictive Controller (E-NMPC) for a complete spray drying plant with multiple stages. In the E-NMPC the initial state is estimated by an extended Kalman Filter (EKF) with noise covariances estimated by an autocovariance least...... squares method (ALS). We present a model for the spray drying plant and use this model for simulation as well as for prediction in the E-NMPC. The open-loop optimal control problem in the E-NMPC is solved using the single-shooting method combined with a quasi-Newton Sequential Quadratic programming (SQP......) algorithm and the adjoint method for computation of gradients. We evaluate the economic performance when unmeasured disturbances are present. By simulation, we demonstrate that the E-NMPC improves the profit of spray drying by 17% compared to conventional PI control....

  20. Model Predictive Optimal Control of a Time-Delay Distributed-Parameter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal control method for a class of distributed-parameter systems governed by first order, quasilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations that arise in many physical systems. Such systems are characterized by time delays since information is transported from one state to another by wave propagation. A general closed-loop hyperbolic transport model is controlled by a boundary control embedded in a periodic boundary condition. The boundary control is subject to a nonlinear differential equation constraint that models actuator dynamics of the system. The hyperbolic equation is thus coupled with the ordinary differential equation via the boundary condition. Optimality of this coupled system is investigated using variational principles to seek an adjoint formulation of the optimal control problem. The results are then applied to implement a model predictive control design for a wind tunnel to eliminate a transport delay effect that causes a poor Mach number regulation.

  1. Wave Propagation Analysis and Inverse Modeling to Identify Fluid-Solid Interfaces and Moving-Source Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Stephen F.

    The purpose of this research is to test the effectiveness of forward and inverse modeling approaches in wave propagation analysis problems with complex settings and scenarios that include fluid-solid interfaces, non-stationary sources, and non-point sources not previously investigated. The research is made up of three components. First, finite element method modeling and a genetic algorithm are employed to assess the feasibility of using inverse modeling to determine the thickness of the surface ice on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons, and the depth of a possible subsurface ocean. The feasibility study presented in this dissertation considers the specific case in which inverse modeling might be used to determine the depths of ice and ocean layers on Europa for a possible space mission in which the effects of a spacecraft-released impactor on Europa's surface are measured. Second, reconstructing dynamic distributed loads, such as truck loads on highways, require inverting for large numbers of parameters. To address solving for the large number of unknowns in such problems, an adjoint-method-based acoustic-source inversion procedure for reconstructing multiple moving, non-point acoustic sources is developed and tested with numerical experiments. Third, forward modeling of moving sources in three-dimensional (3D) settings is tested with numerical experiments using SPECFEM3D, an open source spectral element method program. Researching forward modeling for complicated scenarios such as moving acoustic sources in fluid-solid coupled systems in 3D is an important step toward using SPECFEM3D for moving-source inversion problems in 3D. The conclusions of the research presented are as follows: It is feasible to estimate the thickness of the ice layer on the surface of Europa and the depth of a subsurface ocean with inverse modeling based on measured wave motions in the ice caused by a planned impact. The adjoint method is effective in reconstructing large numbers of acoustic

  2. Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Spädtke, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  3. First status report on regional ground-water flow modeling for the Paradox Basin, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    Regional ground-water flow within the principal hydrogeologic units of the Paradox Basin is evaluated by developing a conceptual model of the flow regime in the shallow aquifers and the deep-basin brine aquifers and testing these models using a three-dimensional, finite-difference flow code. Semiquantitative sensitivity analysis (a limited parametric study) is conducted to define the system response to changes in hydrologic properties or boundary conditions. A direct method for sensitivity analysis using an adjoint form of the flow equation is applied to the conceptualized flow regime in the Leadville limestone aquifer. All steps leading to the final results and conclusions are incorporated in this report. The available data utilized in this study is summarized. The specific conceptual models, defining the areal and vertical averaging of litho-logic units, aquifer properties, fluid properties, and hydrologic boundary conditions, are described in detail. Two models were evaluated in this study: a regional model encompassing the hydrogeologic units above and below the Paradox Formation/Hermosa Group and a refined scale model which incorporated only the post Paradox strata. The results are delineated by the simulated potentiometric surfaces and tables summarizing areal and vertical boundary fluxes, Darcy velocities at specific points, and ground-water travel paths. Results from the adjoint sensitivity analysis include importance functions and sensitivity coefficients, using heads or the average Darcy velocities to represent system response. The reported work is the first stage of an ongoing evaluation of the Gibson Dome area within the Paradox Basin as a potential repository for high-level radioactive wastes

  4. Time Domain Waveform Inversion for the Q Model Based on the First-Order Viscoacoustic Wave Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagating seismic waves are dispersed and attenuated in the subsurface due to the conversion of elastic energy into heat. The absorptive property of a medium can be described by the quality factor Q. In this study, the first-order pressure-velocity viscoacoustic wave equations based on the standard linear solid model are used to incorporate the effect of Q. For the Q model inversion, an iterative procedure is then proposed by minimizing an objective function that measures the misfit energy between the observed data and the modeled data. The adjoint method is applied to derive the gradients of the objective function with respect to the model parameters, that is, bulk modulus, density, and Q-related parameter τ. Numerical tests on the crosswell recording geometry indicate the feasibility of the proposed approach for the Q anomaly estimation.

  5. New models for energy beam machining enable accurate generation of free forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinte, Dragos; Billingham, John; Bilbao Guillerna, Aitor

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate that, despite differences in their nature, many energy beam controlled-depth machining processes (for example, waterjet, pulsed laser, focused ion beam) can be modeled using the same mathematical framework-a partial differential evolution equation that requires only simple calibrations to capture the physics of each process. The inverse problem can be solved efficiently through the numerical solution of the adjoint problem and leads to beam paths that generate prescribed three-dimensional features with minimal error. The viability of this modeling approach has been demonstrated by generating accurate free-form surfaces using three processes that operate at very different length scales and with different physical principles for material removal: waterjet, pulsed laser, and focused ion beam machining. Our approach can be used to accurately machine materials that are hard to process by other means for scalable applications in a wide variety of industries.

  6. Assessing the Impact of Surface and Upper-Air Observations on the Forecast Skill of the ACCESS Numerical Weather Prediction Model over Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Soldatenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s in situ observations (land and sea surface observations, upper air observations by radiosondes, pilot balloons, wind profilers, and aircraft observations on the short-term forecast skill provided by the ACCESS (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator global numerical weather prediction (NWP system is evaluated using an adjoint-based method. This technique makes use of the adjoint perturbation forecast model utilized within the 4D-Var assimilation system, and is able to calculate the individual impact of each assimilated observation in a cycling NWP system. The results obtained show that synoptic observations account for about 60% of the 24-h forecast error reduction, with the remainder accounted for by aircraft (12.8%, radiosondes (10.5%, wind profilers (3.9%, pilot balloons (2.8%, buoys (1.7% and ships (1.2%. In contrast, the largest impact per observation is from buoys and aircraft. Overall, all observation types have a positive impact on the 24-h forecast skill. Such results help to support the decision-making process regarding the evolution of the observing network, particularly at the national level. Consequently, this 4D-Var-based approach has great potential as a tool to assist the design and running of an efficient and effective observing network.

  7. SEAPODYM-LTL: a parsimonious zooplankton dynamic biomass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchon, Anna; Lehodey, Patrick; Gehlen, Marion; Titaud, Olivier; Senina, Inna; Séférian, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Mesozooplankton organisms are of critical importance for the understanding of early life history of most fish stocks, as well as the nutrient cycles in the ocean. Ongoing climate change and the need for improved approaches to the management of living marine resources has driven recent advances in zooplankton modelling. The classical modeling approach tends to describe the whole biogeochemical and plankton cycle with increasing complexity. We propose here a different and parsimonious zooplankton dynamic biomass model (SEAPODYM-LTL) that is cost efficient and can be advantageously coupled with primary production estimated either from satellite derived ocean color data or biogeochemical models. In addition, the adjoint code of the model is developed allowing a robust optimization approach for estimating the few parameters of the model. In this study, we run the first optimization experiments using a global database of climatological zooplankton biomass data and we make a comparative analysis to assess the importance of resolution and primary production inputs on model fit to observations. We also compare SEAPODYM-LTL outputs to those produced by a more complex biogeochemical model (PISCES) but sharing the same physical forcings.

  8. Z/sub N/ topology and charge confinement in SU(N) Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezawa, Z.F.; Iwazaki, A.

    1981-01-01

    We analyze topological effects in frozen SU(N) Higgs models in continuous space-time, where topological excitations are Z/sub N/ vortices together with associated Z/sub N/ monopoles. The space dimension is either two or three. We show that vortex condensation generates magnetic gauge symmetry and that monopole condensation leads to a spontaneous breakdown of this symmetry. By summing up all possible excitation modes of Z/sub N/ vortices and Z/sub N/ monopoles, we derive an effective Lagrangian in the strong-coupling regime. We obtain the following conclusions: (i) if external charges are introduced in the fundamental representation, they are confined by electric vortex strings, and (ii) if external charges are introduced in the adjoint representation, they are screened completely

  9. Aerostructural Level Set Topology Optimization for a Common Research Model Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Peter D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use level set topology optimization to improve the design of a representative wing box structure for the NASA common research model. The objective is to minimize the total compliance of the structure under aerodynamic and body force loading, where the aerodynamic loading is coupled to the structural deformation. A taxi bump case was also considered, where only body force loads were applied. The trim condition that aerodynamic lift must balance the total weight of the aircraft is enforced by allowing the root angle of attack to change. The level set optimization method is implemented on an unstructured three-dimensional grid, so that the method can optimize a wing box with arbitrary geometry. Fast matching and upwind schemes are developed for an unstructured grid, which make the level set method robust and efficient. The adjoint method is used to obtain the coupled shape sensitivities required to perform aerostructural optimization of the wing box structure.

  10. On new traveling wave solutions and conserved densities for the 2D Ricci flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpoiasu, Rodica

    2018-01-01

    In this paper some travelling wave solutions and conservation laws for the 2D Ricci flow model in conformal gauge are investigated. A guideline able to classify the types of solutions according to the values of some parameters is provided by making use of two versions of the auxiliary equation method. The key feature of these approaches is to take a second order linear ordinary differential equation (ODE), respectively a first order nonlinear ODE with at most an eighth-degree nonlinear term as auxiliary equations. Conserved forms of the travelling wave equation for the Ricci flow are derived through three specific approaches, namely the variational approach, the Ibragimov method for nonlinear self-adjoint differential equations and the one based upon a relationship between conserved forms and their associated symmetries. The former two methods generated similar results, while the latter one has revealed new conserved densities.

  11. Using dynamical interpolation to map high-resolution altimeter data in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roge, M.; Morrow, R.; Gerald, D.

    2016-12-01

    The main oceanographic objective of the future SWOT mission is to characterize the ocean mesoscale and submesoscale circulation by observing the fine range of ocean dynamics (from 15-300 km). However it will not capture the time evolution of short mesoscale signals. Despite the very high spatial resolution of the future satellite, the temporal resolution is not sufficient to track the evolution of the small, rapid features (exact repeat cycle of 21 days, with near repeats around 5-10 days, depending on the latitude). High resolution SWOT sea surface height snapshots alone will not allow us to follow the dynamics of ocean variability at these scales, such as the formation and evolution of small eddies. Here, we investigate a means to reconstruct the missing SSH signal in time between two satellite revisits. We use a shallow water quasi-geostrophic model developed by Ubelmann et al (2015). Based on potential vorticity conservation, it dynamically advects the SSH field, assuming that the quasi-geostrophic dynamics are principally captured by the first baroclinic mode. This model has been tested in energetic open ocean regions such as the Gulf Stream and the Californian Current, and has given improved results. Here we test this model in the Western Mediterranean Sea, where the first radius of deformation of Rossby is small (5-15 km), where the dynamics have a strong topographic control and strong spatial and seasonal variability. In this region, the technique provides a small improvement over linear interpolation in the coastal boundary current systems. The simple dynamical model is missing some physical mechanisms, needed to correctly represent the mesoscale circulation in this region, including a significant barotropic mode. We investigate modifications to the 1.5 layer model in this regional study, to include a topographic-beta effect and small-scale dissipation and an extension to a two-layer model. The results show an improved performance compared to simple linear

  12. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  13. Matrix models, geometric engineering and elliptic genera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollowood, Timothy; Iqbal, Amer; Vafa, Cumrun

    2008-01-01

    We compute the prepotential of N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories in four dimensions obtained by toroidal compactifications of gauge theories from 6 dimensions, as a function of Kaehler and complex moduli of T 2 . We use three different methods to obtain this: matrix models, geometric engineering and instanton calculus. Matrix model approach involves summing up planar diagrams of an associated gauge theory on T 2 . Geometric engineering involves considering F-theory on elliptic threefolds, and using topological vertex to sum up worldsheet instantons. Instanton calculus involves computation of elliptic genera of instanton moduli spaces on R 4 . We study the compactifications of N = 2* theory in detail and establish equivalence of all these three approaches in this case. As a byproduct we geometrically engineer theories with massive adjoint fields. As one application, we show that the moduli space of mass deformed M5-branes wrapped on T 2 combines the Kaehler and complex moduli of T 2 and the mass parameter into the period matrix of a genus 2 curve

  14. The predictability of large-scale wind-driven flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mahadevan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The singular values associated with optimally growing perturbations to stationary and time-dependent solutions for the general circulation in an ocean basin provide a measure of the rate at which solutions with nearby initial conditions begin to diverge, and hence, a measure of the predictability of the flow. In this paper, the singular vectors and singular values of stationary and evolving examples of wind-driven, double-gyre circulations in different flow regimes are explored. By changing the Reynolds number in simple quasi-geostrophic models of the wind-driven circulation, steady, weakly aperiodic and chaotic states may be examined. The singular vectors of the steady state reveal some of the physical mechanisms responsible for optimally growing perturbations. In time-dependent cases, the dominant singular values show significant variability in time, indicating strong variations in the predictability of the flow. When the underlying flow is weakly aperiodic, the dominant singular values co-vary with integral measures of the large-scale flow, such as the basin-integrated upper ocean kinetic energy and the transport in the western boundary current extension. Furthermore, in a reduced gravity quasi-geostrophic model of a weakly aperiodic, double-gyre flow, the behaviour of the dominant singular values may be used to predict a change in the large-scale flow, a feature not shared by an analogous two-layer model. When the circulation is in a strongly aperiodic state, the dominant singular values no longer vary coherently with integral measures of the flow. Instead, they fluctuate in a very aperiodic fashion on mesoscale time scales. The dominant singular vectors then depend strongly on the arrangement of mesoscale features in the flow and the evolved forms of the associated singular vectors have relatively short spatial scales. These results have several implications. In weakly aperiodic, periodic, and stationary regimes, the mesoscale energy

  15. 15 janvier 2014 - A. Manoha, Présidente du Tribunal de Grande Instance de Bourg-en-Bresse en France, visite le tunnel du LHC au Point 5 avec R. Garoby, Chef adjoint du département Faisceaux; visite la caverne de l'expérience CMS avec D. Contardo, Chef du projet CMS Upgrade et signe le livre d'or avec R. Garoby. F. Eder, Délégué aux relations avec les Etats-hôtes du CERN présent.

    CERN Document Server

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    15 janvier 2014 - A. Manoha, Présidente du Tribunal de Grande Instance de Bourg-en-Bresse en France, visite le tunnel du LHC au Point 5 avec R. Garoby, Chef adjoint du département Faisceaux; visite la caverne de l'expérience CMS avec D. Contardo, Chef du projet CMS Upgrade et signe le livre d'or avec R. Garoby. F. Eder, Délégué aux relations avec les Etats-hôtes du CERN présent.

  16. On SLE Martingales in Boundary WZW Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Anton; Bytsko, Andrei; Izyurov, Konstantin

    2011-09-01

    Following Bettelheim et al. (Phys Rev Lett 95:251601, 2005), we consider the boundary WZW model on a half-plane with a cut growing according to the Schramm-Loewner stochastic evolution and the boundary fields inserted at the tip of the cut and at infinity. We study necessary and sufficient conditions for boundary correlation functions to be SLE martingales. Necessary conditions come from the requirement for the boundary field at the tip of the cut to have a depth two null vector. Sufficient conditions are established using Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations for boundary correlators. Combining these two approaches, we show that in the case of G = SU(2) the boundary correlator is an SLE martingale if and only if the boundary field carries spin 1/2. In the case of G = SU( n) and the level k = 1, there are several situations when boundary one-point correlators are SLE κ -martingales. If the boundary field is labelled by the defining n-dimensional representation of SU( n), we obtain {\\varkappa=2} . For n even, by choosing the boundary field labelled by the (unique) self-adjoint fundamental representation, we get {\\varkappa=8/(n {+} 2)} . We also study the situation when the distance between the two boundary fields is finite, and we show that in this case the {SLE_\\varkappa} evolution is replaced by {SLE_{\\varkappa,ρ}} with {ρ=\\varkappa -6}.

  17. Assimilation of SWARM and CHAMP data under realistic spatial and temporal core flow constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrois, Olivier; Finlay, Christopher; Gillet, Nicolas; Hammer, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    We assimilate geomagnetic data from both ground-based and virtual observatories (from CHAMP and SWARM satellite records) to simultaneously build models of the magnetic field and of fluid motions at the core surface. We consider data cleaned from external magnetic field contributions, equally distributed in space and time. We use spatial constraints from geodynamo simulations and dense observation error covariance matrices. We use an augmented state ensemble Kalman filter that allows to estimate uncertainties on core motions and the magnetic model as a function of length and time-scales. The model is time-stepped using stochastic equations coherent with the occurrence of geomagnetic jerks. The algorithm is applied to observations over the period 2000-2017. It gives reasonable solutions in terms of misfit to the data. The geomagnetic model obtained is in agreement with alternative models such as CHAOS or COV-OBS. We retrieve the eccentric westward gyre, and core motions are essentially in agreement with the quasi-geostrophic approximation - with local violation under Indonesia. The method is able to provide probability densities for core flows, magnetic field and secular variation forecasts both at the core surface and at observatory locations.

  18. Numerical simulation study of polar low in Kara sea: developing mechanisms evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verezemskaya, Polina; Stepanenko, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The study focuses on investigating the mechanisms of interaction between potential vorticity's anomalies and latent heat release as polar low development factors. The polar low observed in Kara sea 29th -30th September 2008 is analyzed using numerical modeling (WRF ARW model) and observational data (IR cloudiness and microwave water vapor and surface wind speeds from MODIS (Aqua)). Two numerical experiments with 5 km spatial resolution were conducted with microphisical scheme turned on and off to assess the role of latent heat on vortex intensification. The quality of modelling was estimated by comparing WRF output and the satellite data. Based on reference experiment (with microphysical parameterization turned on) and observational data PL developed in vertically stable, non-baroclinic atmosphere and characterized by very low surface heat fluxes. «Dry» experiment results suggests that without latent heat source in the middle troposphere polar low intensifies slower, than in reality. In order to divide low- and upper-level forcing within PL dynamics we used attribution concept based on the quasi-geostrophic omega-equation. To ensure that QG theory is applicable for this PL case, we estimate correlation between the modeled and QG vertical speed field obtained from omega-equation using finite-differences method.

  19. Fermion Masses and Mixing in SUSY Grand Unified Gauge Models with Extended Gut Gauge Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chih-Lung

    2005-04-05

    The authors discuss a class of supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified gauge (GUT) models based on the GUT symmetry G x G or G x G x G, where G denotes the GUT group that has the Standard Model symmetry (SU(3){sub c} x SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}) embedded as a subgroup. As motivated from string theory, these models are constructed without introducing any Higgs field of rani two or higher. Thus all the Higgs fields are in the fundamental representations of the extended GUT symmetry or, when G = SO(10), in the spinorial representation. These Higgs fields, when acquiring their vacuum expectation values, would break the extended GUT symmetry down to the Standard Model symmetry. In this dissertation, they argue that the features required of unified models, such as the Higgs doublet-triplet splitting, proton stability, and the hierarchy of fermion masses and mixing angles, could have natural explanations in the framework of the extended SUSY GUTs. Furthermore, they argue that the frameworks used previously to construct SO(10) GUT models using adjoint Higgs fields can naturally arise from the SO(10) x SO(10) and SO(10) x SO(10) x SO(10) models by integrating out heavy fermions. This observation thus suggests that the traditional SUSY GUT SO(10) theories can be viewed as the low energy effective theories generated by breaking the extended GUT symmetry down to the SO(10) symmetry.

  20. Reliable finite element methods for self-adjoint singular perturbation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that the standard finite element method based on the space Vh of continuous piecewise linear functions is not reliable in solving singular perturbation problems. It is also known that the solution of a two-point boundaryvalue singular perturbation problem admits a decomposition into a regular part and a finite ...

  1. Hypercyclicity of the adjoint of weighted composition operators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. A bounded linear operator T on a Banach space X is said to be hypercyclic if there exists a vector x ∈ X for which the orbit. Orb(T,x) = {T nx: n ∈ N} is dense in X and in this case we refer to x as a hypercyclic vector for T . The hypercyclicity of composition operators on the Hardy space H2 have been considered ...

  2. Hypercyclicity of the adjoint of weighted composition operators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ac.ir; ... The holomorphic self-maps of the open unit disk U are divided into classes of elliptic and non-elliptic. The elliptic type is an automorphism and has a fixed point in U. It is well-known that this map is conjugate to a rotation z → λz for some ...

  3. Similarity-Based Unification: A Multi-Adjoint Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medina, J.; Ojeda-Aciego, M.; Vojtáš, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 1 (2004), s. 43-62 ISSN 0165-0114 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : similarity * fuzzy unification Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.734, year: 2004

  4. On a non-self adjoint eigenfunction expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Naylor

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a formula of inversion for an integral transform similar to that associated with the names of Kontorovich and Lebedev. The kernel involves the Hankel function Hu(1(kr, in which r varies over a truncated infinite interval a≤r0 and the parameter k is complex. This kind of transform is useful in the investigation of functions that satisfy the Helmholtz equation and the condition of radiation.

  5. Adjoint Optimisation of the Turbulent Flow in an Annular Diffuser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Erik; Agular Knudsen, Christian; Kunoy, Jens Dahl

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a numerical optimisation of guide vanes in an annular diffuser, is performed. The optimisation is preformed for the purpose of improving the following two parameters simultaneously; the first parameter is the uniformity perpen-dicular to the flow direction, a 1/3 diameter do...

  6. Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, 6th, Universite de Toulouse III, France, Sept. 7-9, 1987, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This symposium includes topics on wall flows, unsteady flows, scalar and buoyant transport, instrumentation and techniques, combustion, aerodynamic flows, free flows, geophysical flows, complex flows, separated flows, coherent structures, closures, numerical simulation, and two-phase flows. Papers are presented on the effect of favorable pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layers, the models of hydrodynamic resonances in separated shear flows, the transport of passive scalars in a turbulent channel flow, a pulsed hot-wire probe for near-wall measurements, and vortex dynamics in diffusion flames. Consideration is also given to time-dependent structure in wing-body junction flows, bifurcating air jets at high subsonic speeds, the wake of an axisymmetric body with or without tail separation, coherent structures in quasi-geostrophic jets, and separated flow predictions using a new turbulence model. Additional papers are on stochastic estimation of organized structures in turbulent channel flow, a comparative study of eleven models of turbulence, and a numerical study of a stably stratified mixing layer

  7. Multiscale numerical simulations of magnetoconvection at low magnetic Prandtl and Rossby numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, S.; Calkins, M. A.; Julien, K. A.; Marti, P.

    2017-12-01

    The dynamics of the Earth's outer core is characterized by low values of the Rossby (Ro), Ekman and magnetic Prandtl numbers. These values indicate the large spectra of temporal and spatial scales that need to be accounted for in realistic numerical simulations of the system. Current direct numerical simulation are not capable of reaching this extreme regime, suggesting that a new class of models is required to account for the rich dynamics expected in the natural system. Here we present results from a quasi-geostrophic, multiscale model based on the scale separation implied by the low Ro typical of rapidly rotating systems. We investigate a plane layer geometry where convection is driven by an imposed temperature gradient and the hydrodynamic equations are modified by a large scale magnetic field. Analytical investigation shows that at values of thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals, the energetic requirements for the onset of convection is not significantly altered even in the presence of strong magnetic fields. Results from strongly forced nonlinear numerical simulations show the presence of an inverse cascade, typical of 2-D turbulence, when no or weak magnetic field is applied. For higher values of the magnetic field the inverse cascade is quenched.

  8. Distributed allocation of mobile sensing swarms in gyre flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mallory

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We address the synthesis of distributed control policies to enable a swarm of homogeneous mobile sensors to maintain a desired spatial distribution in a geophysical flow environment, or workspace. In this article, we assume the mobile sensors (or robots have a "map" of the environment denoting the locations of the Lagrangian coherent structures or LCS boundaries. Using this information, we design agent-level hybrid control policies that leverage the surrounding fluid dynamics and inherent environmental noise to enable the team to maintain a desired distribution in the workspace. We discuss the stability properties of the ensemble dynamics of the distributed control policies. Since realistic quasi-geostrophic ocean models predict double-gyre flow solutions, we use a wind-driven multi-gyre flow model to verify the feasibility of the proposed distributed control strategy and compare the proposed control strategy with a baseline deterministic allocation strategy. Lastly, we validate the control strategy using actual flow data obtained by our coherent structure experimental testbed.

  9. Distributed allocation of mobile sensing swarms in gyre flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, K.; Hsieh, M. A.; Forgoston, E.; Schwartz, I. B.

    2013-09-01

    We address the synthesis of distributed control policies to enable a swarm of homogeneous mobile sensors to maintain a desired spatial distribution in a geophysical flow environment, or workspace. In this article, we assume the mobile sensors (or robots) have a "map" of the environment denoting the locations of the Lagrangian coherent structures or LCS boundaries. Using this information, we design agent-level hybrid control policies that leverage the surrounding fluid dynamics and inherent environmental noise to enable the team to maintain a desired distribution in the workspace. We discuss the stability properties of the ensemble dynamics of the distributed control policies. Since realistic quasi-geostrophic ocean models predict double-gyre flow solutions, we use a wind-driven multi-gyre flow model to verify the feasibility of the proposed distributed control strategy and compare the proposed control strategy with a baseline deterministic allocation strategy. Lastly, we validate the control strategy using actual flow data obtained by our coherent structure experimental testbed.

  10. Effect of potential vorticity flux on the circulation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaohua; Sun, Junchuan; Wang, Yonggang; Wei, Zexun; Yang, Dezhou; Qu, Tangdong

    2017-08-01

    This study analyzes temperature and salinity products from the U.S. Navy Generalized Digital Environment Model. To avoid the fictitious assumption of no-motion reference level, a P-vector inverse method is employed to derive geostrophic velocity. Line integral of geostrophic velocity shows evidence for the existence of a sandwiched circulation in the South China Sea (SCS), i.e., cyclonic circulation in the subsurface and deep layers and anticyclonic in the intermediate layer. To reveal the factors responsible for the sandwiched circulation, we derive the potential vorticity equation based on a four-and-a-half-layer quasi-geostrophic model and apply theoretical potential vorticity constraint to density layers. The result shows that the sandwiched circulation is largely induced by planetary potential vorticity flux through lateral boundaries, mainly the Luzon Strait. This dynamical mechanism lies in the fact that the net potential vorticity inflow in the subsurface and deep layers leads to a positive layer-average vorticity in the SCS basin, yielding vortex stretching and a cyclonic basin-wide circulation. On the contrary, the net potential vorticity outflow in the intermediate layer induces a negative layer-average vorticity, generating an anticyclonic basin-wide circulation in the SCS. Furthermore, by illustrating different consequence from depth/density layers, we clarify that density layers are essential for applying theoretical potential vorticity constraint to the isolated deep SCS basin.

  11. Perturbation analysis for Monte Carlo continuous cross section models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Chris B.; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis, including both its forward and adjoint applications, collectively referred to hereinafter as Perturbation Analysis (PA), is an essential tool to complete Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Data Assimilation (DA). PA-assisted UQ and DA have traditionally been carried out for reactor analysis problems using deterministic as opposed to stochastic models for radiation transport. This is because PA requires many model executions to quantify how variations in input data, primarily cross sections, affect variations in model's responses, e.g. detectors readings, flux distribution, multiplication factor, etc. Although stochastic models are often sought for their higher accuracy, their repeated execution is at best computationally expensive and in reality intractable for typical reactor analysis problems involving many input data and output responses. Deterministic methods however achieve computational efficiency needed to carry out the PA analysis by reducing problem dimensionality via various spatial and energy homogenization assumptions. This however introduces modeling error components into the PA results which propagate to the following UQ and DA analyses. The introduced errors are problem specific and therefore are expected to limit the applicability of UQ and DA analyses to reactor systems that satisfy the introduced assumptions. This manuscript introduces a new method to complete PA employing a continuous cross section stochastic model and performed in a computationally efficient manner. If successful, the modeling error components introduced by deterministic methods could be eliminated, thereby allowing for wider applicability of DA and UQ results. Two MCNP models demonstrate the application of the new method - a Critical Pu Sphere (Jezebel), a Pu Fast Metal Array (Russian BR-1). The PA is completed for reaction rate densities, reaction rate ratios, and the multiplication factor. (author)

  12. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.

    2014-02-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Numerical Predictions of Sonic Boom Signatures for a Straight Line Segmented Leading Edge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Wilcox, Floyd J.; Cliff, Susan; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A sonic boom wind tunnel test was conducted on a straight-line segmented leading edge (SLSLE) model in the NASA Langley 4- by 4- Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The purpose of the test was to determine whether accurate sonic boom measurements could be obtained while continuously moving the SLSLE model past a conical pressure probe. Sonic boom signatures were also obtained using the conventional move-pause data acquisition method for comparison. The continuous data acquisition approach allows for accurate signatures approximately 15 times faster than a move-pause technique. These successful results provide an incentive for future testing with greatly increased efficiency using the continuous model translation technique with the single probe to measure sonic boom signatures. Two widely used NASA codes, USM3D (Navier-Stokes) and CART3D-AERO (Euler, adjoint-based adaptive mesh), were used to compute off-body sonic boom pressure signatures of the SLSLE model at several different altitudes below the model at Mach 2.0. The computed pressure signatures compared well with wind tunnel data. The effect of the different altitude for signature extraction was evaluated by extrapolating the near field signatures to the ground and comparing pressure signatures and sonic boom loudness levels.

  14. Predictive Understanding of the Oceans' Wind-Driven Circulation on Interdecadal Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghil, Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and IGPP; Temam, Roger [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Feliks, Y. [IIBR (France); Simonnet, E. [INLN (France); Tachim-Medjo, T. [Florida International Univ. (FIU), Miami, FL (United States)

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to obtain a predictive understanding of a major component of the climate system's interdecadal variability: the oceans' wind-driven circulation. To do so, we developed and applied advanced computational and statistical methods to the problem of climate variability and climate change. The methodology was developed first for models of intermediate complexity, such as the quasi-geostrophic and the primitive equations, which describe the wind-driven, near-surface flow in mid-latitude ocean basins. Our computational work consisted in developing efficient multi-level methods to simulate this flow and study its dependence on physically relevant parameters. Our oceanographic and climate work consisted in applying these methods to study the bifurcations in the wind-driven circulation and their relevance to the flows observed at present and those that might occur in a warmer climate. Both aspects of the work are crucial for the efficient treatment of large-scale, eddy-resolving numerical simulations of the oceans and an increased understanding and better prediction of climate change. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding ocean-atmosphere interaction in the mid-latitudes. An important by-product of this research is a novel approach to explaining the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  15. The dynamics of magnetic Rossby waves in spherical dynamo simulations: A signature of strong-field dynamos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, K.; Teed, R. J.; Jones, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate slow magnetic Rossby waves in convection-driven dynamos in rotating spherical shells. Quasi-geostrophic waves riding on a mean zonal flow may account for some of the geomagnetic westward drifts and have the potential to allow the toroidal field strength within the planetary fluid core to be estimated. We extend the work of Hori et al. (2015) to include a wider range of models, and perform a detailed analysis of the results. We find that a predicted dispersion relation matches well with the longitudinal drifts observed in our strong-field dynamos. We discuss the validity of our linear theory, since we also find that the nonlinear Lorentz terms influence the observed waveforms. These wave motions are excited by convective instability, which determines the preferred azimuthal wavenumbers. Studies of linear rotating magnetoconvection have suggested that slow magnetic Rossby modes emerge in the magnetostrophic regime, in which the Lorentz and Coriolis forces are in balance in the vorticity equation. We confirm this to be predominant balance for the slow waves we have detected in nonlinear dynamo systems. We also show that a completely different wave regime emerges if the magnetic field is not present. Finally we report the corresponding radial magnetic field variations observed at the surface of the shell in our simulations and discuss the detectability of these waves in the geomagnetic secular variation.

  16. The effect of topography on the evolution of unstable disturbances in a baroclinic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. H. E.

    1985-01-01

    A two layer spectral quasi-geostrophic model is used to simulate the effects of topography on the equilibria, their stability, and the long term evolution of incipient unstable waves. The flow is forced by latitudinally dependent radiative heating. Dissipation is in the form of Rayleigh friction. An analytical solution is found for the propagating finite amplitude waves which result from baroclinic instability of the zonal winds when topography is absent. The appearance of this solution for wavelengths just longer than the Rossby radius of deformation and disappearance of ultra-long wavelengths is interpreted in terms of the Hopf bifurcation theory. Simple dynamic and thermodynamic criteria for the existence of periodic Rossby solutions are presented. A Floquet stability analysis shows that the waves are neutral. The nature of the form drag instability of high index equilibria is investigated. The proximity of the equilibrium shear to a resonant value is essential for the instability, provided the equilibrium occurs at a slightly stronger shear than resonance.

  17. Parameterized Radiation Transport Model for Neutron Detection in Complex Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Bisson, D.; Gilligan, J.; Fisher, B. M.; Mayo, R. M.

    2013-04-01

    There is interest in developing the ability to rapidly compute the energy dependent neutron flux within a complex geometry for a variety of applications. Coupled with sensor response function information, this capability would allow direct estimation of sensor behavior in multitude of operational scenarios. In situations where detailed simulation is not warranted or affordable, it is desirable to possess reliable estimates of the neutron field in practical scenarios which do not require intense computation. A tool set of this kind would provide quantitative means to address the development of operational concepts, inform asset allocation decisions, and exercise planning. Monte Carlo and/or deterministic methods provide a high degree of precision and fidelity consistent with the accuracy with which the scene is rendered. However, these methods are often too computationally expensive to support the real-time evolution of a virtual operational scenario. High fidelity neutron transport simulations are also time consuming from the standpoint of user setup and post-simulation analysis. We pre-compute adjoint solutions using MCNP to generate a coarse spatial and energy grid of the neutron flux over various surfaces as an alternative to full Monte Carlo modeling. We attempt to capture the characteristics of the neutron transport solution. We report on the results of brief verification and validation measurements which test the predictive capability of this approach over soil and asphalt concrete surfaces. We highlight the sensitivity of the simulated and experimental results to the material composition of the environment.

  18. Nonlinear unitary quantum collapse model with self-generated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geszti, Tamás

    2018-04-01

    Collapse models including some external noise of unknown origin are routinely used to describe phenomena on the quantum-classical border; in particular, quantum measurement. Although containing nonlinear dynamics and thereby exposed to the possibility of superluminal signaling in individual events, such models are widely accepted on the basis of fully reproducing the non-signaling statistical predictions of quantum mechanics. Here we present a deterministic nonlinear model without any external noise, in which randomness—instead of being universally present—emerges in the measurement process, from deterministic irregular dynamics of the detectors. The treatment is based on a minimally nonlinear von Neumann equation for a Stern–Gerlach or Bell-type measuring setup, containing coordinate and momentum operators in a self-adjoint skew-symmetric, split scalar product structure over the configuration space. The microscopic states of the detectors act as a nonlocal set of hidden parameters, controlling individual outcomes. The model is shown to display pumping of weights between setup-defined basis states, with a single winner randomly selected and the rest collapsing to zero. Environmental decoherence has no role in the scenario. Through stochastic modelling, based on Pearle’s ‘gambler’s ruin’ scheme, outcome probabilities are shown to obey Born’s rule under a no-drift or ‘fair-game’ condition. This fully reproduces quantum statistical predictions, implying that the proposed non-linear deterministic model satisfies the non-signaling requirement. Our treatment is still vulnerable to hidden signaling in individual events, which remains to be handled by future research.

  19. On fermionic models of a closed ecosystem with application to bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Di Salvo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of operatorial techniques of quantum physics to a theoretical model of closed ecosystems. The model is built by using fermionic operators whose evolution is ruled by a self--adjoint Hamiltonian operator. Adopting Heisenberg--like dynamics, we consider either linear or nonlinear models with the aim of describing the long-term survival of bacterial populations; the introduction of effective dissipative mechanisms is also considered. Moreover, a variant of linear models through the introduction of additional rules acting periodically on the system is proposed. Specifically, the evolution in a time interval is obtained by gluing the evolutions in a finite set of adjacent subintervals. In each subinterval the Hamiltonian is time independent, but the values of the parameters entering the Hamiltonian may be changed by the rules at the end of a subinterval on the basis of the actual state of the system. Within this context, a new approach is provided in order to obtain reliable results, without increasing the computational cost of the numerical integration of the differential equations involved.

  20. BEATBOX v1.0: Background Error Analysis Testbed with Box Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Knote

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Background Error Analysis Testbed (BEATBOX is a new data assimilation framework for box models. Based on the BOX Model eXtension (BOXMOX to the Kinetic Pre-Processor (KPP, this framework allows users to conduct performance evaluations of data assimilation experiments, sensitivity analyses, and detailed chemical scheme diagnostics from an observation simulation system experiment (OSSE point of view. The BEATBOX framework incorporates an observation simulator and a data assimilation system with the possibility of choosing ensemble, adjoint, or combined sensitivities. A user-friendly, Python-based interface allows for the tuning of many parameters for atmospheric chemistry and data assimilation research as well as for educational purposes, for example observation error, model covariances, ensemble size, perturbation distribution in the initial conditions, and so on. In this work, the testbed is described and two case studies are presented to illustrate the design of a typical OSSE experiment, data assimilation experiments, a sensitivity analysis, and a method for diagnosing model errors. BEATBOX is released as an open source tool for the atmospheric chemistry and data assimilation communities.

  1. Oregon Washington Coastal Ocean Forecast System: Real-time Modeling and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeeva, S.; Kurapov, A. L.; Pasmans, I.

    2016-02-01

    Three-day forecasts of ocean currents, temperature and salinity along the Oregon and Washington coasts are produced daily by a numerical ROMS-based ocean circulation model. NAM is used to derive atmospheric forcing for the model. Fresh water discharge from Columbia River, Fraser River, and small rivers in Puget Sound are included. The forecast is constrained by open boundary conditions derived from the global Navy HYCOM model and once in 3 days assimilation of recent data, including HF radar surface currents, sea surface temperature from the GOES satellite, and SSH from several satellite altimetry missions. 4-dimensional variational data assimilation is implemented in 3-day time windows using the tangent linear and adjoint codes developed at OSU. The system is semi-autonomous - all the data, including NAM and HYCOM fields are automatically updated, and daily operational forecast is automatically initiated. The pre-assimilation data quality control and post-assimilation forecast quality control require the operator's involvement. The daily forecast and 60 days of hindcast fields are available for public on opendap. As part of the system model validation plots to various satellites and SEAGLIDER are also automatically updated and available on the web (http://ingria.coas.oregonstate.edu/rtdavow/). Lessons learned in this pilot real-time coastal ocean forecasting project help develop and test metrics for forecast skill assessment for the West Coast Operational Forecast System (WCOFS), currently at testing and development phase at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  2. Model for ICRF fast wave current drive in self-consistent MHD equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Englade, R.C.; Porkolab, M.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a model for fast wave current drive in the ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) range was incorporated into the current drive and MHD equilibrium code ACCOME. The ACCOME model combines a free boundary solution of the Grad Shafranov equation with the calculation of driven currents due to neutral beam injection, lower hybrid (LH) waves, bootstrap effects, and ICRF fast waves. The equilibrium and current drive packages iterate between each other to obtain an MHD equilibrium which is consistent with the profiles of driven current density. The ICRF current drive package combines a toroidal full-wave code (FISIC) with a parameterization of the current drive efficiency obtained from an adjoint solution of the Fokker Planck equation. The electron absorption calculation in the full-wave code properly accounts for the combined effects of electron Landau damping (ELD) and transit time magnetic pumping (TTMP), assuming a Maxwellian (or bi-Maxwellian) electron distribution function. Furthermore, the current drive efficiency includes the effects of particle trapping, momentum conserving corrections to the background Fokker Planck collision operator, and toroidally induced variations in the parallel wavenumbers of the injected ICRF waves. This model has been used to carry out detailed studies of advanced physics scenarios in the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Results are shown, for example, which demonstrate the possibility of achieving stable equilibria at high beta and high bootstrap current fraction in TPX. Model results are also shown for the proposed ITER device

  3. BEATBOX v1.0: Background Error Analysis Testbed with Box Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knote, Christoph; Barré, Jérôme; Eckl, Max

    2018-02-01

    The Background Error Analysis Testbed (BEATBOX) is a new data assimilation framework for box models. Based on the BOX Model eXtension (BOXMOX) to the Kinetic Pre-Processor (KPP), this framework allows users to conduct performance evaluations of data assimilation experiments, sensitivity analyses, and detailed chemical scheme diagnostics from an observation simulation system experiment (OSSE) point of view. The BEATBOX framework incorporates an observation simulator and a data assimilation system with the possibility of choosing ensemble, adjoint, or combined sensitivities. A user-friendly, Python-based interface allows for the tuning of many parameters for atmospheric chemistry and data assimilation research as well as for educational purposes, for example observation error, model covariances, ensemble size, perturbation distribution in the initial conditions, and so on. In this work, the testbed is described and two case studies are presented to illustrate the design of a typical OSSE experiment, data assimilation experiments, a sensitivity analysis, and a method for diagnosing model errors. BEATBOX is released as an open source tool for the atmospheric chemistry and data assimilation communities.

  4. Data inversion in coupled subsurface flow and geomechanics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Marco A; McLaughlin, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    We present an inverse modeling approach to estimate petrophysical and elastic properties of the subsurface. The aim is to use the fully coupled geomechanics-flow model of Girault et al (2011 Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci. 21 169–213) to jointly invert surface deformation and pressure data from wells. We use a functional-analytic framework to construct a forward operator (parameter-to-output map) that arises from the geomechanics-flow model of Girault et al. Then, we follow a deterministic approach to pose the inverse problem of finding parameter estimates from measurements of the output of the forward operator. We prove that this inverse problem is ill-posed in the sense of stability. The inverse problem is then regularized with the implementation of the Newton-conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm of Hanke (1997 Numer. Funct. Anal. Optim. 18 18–971). For a consistent application of the Newton-CG scheme, we establish the differentiability of the forward map and characterize the adjoint of its linearization. We provide assumptions under which the theory of Hanke ensures convergence and regularizing properties of the Newton-CG scheme. These properties are verified in our numerical experiments. In addition, our synthetic experiments display the capabilities of the proposed inverse approach to estimate parameters of the subsurface by means of data inversion. In particular, the added value of measurements of surface deformation in the estimation of absolute permeability is quantified with respect to the standard history matching approach of inverting production data with flow models. The proposed methodology can be potentially used to invert satellite geodetic data (e.g. InSAR and GPS) in combination with production data for optimal monitoring and characterization of the subsurface. (paper)

  5. Reconfigurable Model Execution in the OpenMDAO Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, John T.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's OpenMDAO framework facilitates constructing complex models and computing their derivatives for multidisciplinary design optimization. Decomposing a model into components that follow a prescribed interface enables OpenMDAO to assemble multidisciplinary derivatives from the component derivatives using what amounts to the adjoint method, direct method, chain rule, global sensitivity equations, or any combination thereof, using the MAUD architecture. OpenMDAO also handles the distribution of processors among the disciplines by hierarchically grouping the components, and it automates the data transfer between components that are on different processors. These features have made OpenMDAO useful for applications in aircraft design, satellite design, wind turbine design, and aircraft engine design, among others. This paper presents new algorithms for OpenMDAO that enable reconfigurable model execution. This concept refers to dynamically changing, during execution, one or more of: the variable sizes, solution algorithm, parallel load balancing, or set of variables-i.e., adding and removing components, perhaps to switch to a higher-fidelity sub-model. Any component can reconfigure at any point, even when running in parallel with other components, and the reconfiguration algorithm presented here performs the synchronized updates to all other components that are affected. A reconfigurable software framework for multidisciplinary design optimization enables new adaptive solvers, adaptive parallelization, and new applications such as gradient-based optimization with overset flow solvers and adaptive mesh refinement. Benchmarking results demonstrate the time savings for reconfiguration compared to setting up the model again from scratch, which can be significant in large-scale problems. Additionally, the new reconfigurability feature is applied to a mission profile optimization problem for commercial aircraft where both the parametrization of the mission profile and the

  6. Topological Symmetry, Spin Liquids and CFT Duals of Polyakov Model with Massless Fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsal, Mithat

    2008-04-30

    We prove the absence of a mass gap and confinement in the Polyakov model with massless complex fermions in any representation of the gauge group. A U(1){sub *} topological shift symmetry protects the masslessness of one dual photon. This symmetry emerges in the IR as a consequence of the Callias index theorem and abelian duality. For matter in the fundamental representation, the infrared limits of this class of theories interpolate between weakly and strongly coupled conformal field theory (CFT) depending on the number of flavors, and provide an infinite class of CFTs in d = 3 dimensions. The long distance physics of the model is same as certain stable spin liquids. Altering the topology of the adjoint Higgs field by turning it into a compact scalar does not change the long distance dynamics in perturbation theory, however, non-perturbative effects lead to a mass gap for the gauge fluctuations. This provides conceptual clarity to many subtle issues about compact QED{sub 3} discussed in the context of quantum magnets, spin liquids and phase fluctuation models in cuprate superconductors. These constructions also provide new insights into zero temperature gauge theory dynamics on R{sup 2,1} and R{sup 2,1} x S{sup 1}. The confined versus deconfined long distance dynamics is characterized by a discrete versus continuous topological symmetry.

  7. The importance of variables and parameters in radiolytic chemical kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepho, M.G.; Turner, P.J.; Reimus, P.W.

    1988-07-01

    Many pertinent radiochemical reactions are not completely understood, and most of the associated rate constants are poorly characterized. To help identify the important radiochemical reactions, rate constants, species, and environmental conditions, an importance theory code, SWATS (Sensitivity With Adjoint Theory-Sparse version)-LOOPCHEM, has been developed for the radiolytic chemical kinetics model in the radiolysis code LOOPCHEM. The LOOPCHEM code calculates the concentrations of various species in a radiolytic field over time. The SWATS-LOOPCHEM code efficiently calculates: (1) the importance (relative to a defined response of interest) of each species concentration over time, (2) the sensitivity of each parameter of interest, and (3) the importance of each equation in the radiolysis model. The calculated results will be used to guide future experimental and modeling work for determining the importance of radiolysis on waste package performance. A demonstration (the importance of selected concentrations and the sensitivities of selected parameters) of the SWATS-LOOPCHEM code is provided for illustrative purposes, and no attempt is made at this time to interpret the results for waste package performance assessment purposes. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. 2d Affine XY-Spin Model/4d Gauge Theory Duality and Deconfinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /San Francisco State U.

    2012-08-16

    We introduce a duality between two-dimensional XY-spin models with symmetry-breaking perturbations and certain four-dimensional SU(2) and SU(2) = Z{sub 2} gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle R{sup 1,2} x S{sup 1}, and considered at temperatures near the deconfinement transition. In a Euclidean set up, the theory is defined on R{sup 2} x T{sup 2}. Similarly, thermal gauge theories of higher rank are dual to new families of 'affine' XY-spin models with perturbations. For rank two, these are related to models used to describe the melting of a 2d crystal with a triangular lattice. The connection is made through a multi-component electric-magnetic Coulomb gas representation for both systems. Perturbations in the spin system map to topological defects in the gauge theory, such as monopole-instantons or magnetic bions, and the vortices in the spin system map to the electrically charged W-bosons in field theory (or vice versa, depending on the duality frame). The duality permits one to use the two-dimensional technology of spin systems to study the thermal deconfinement and discrete chiral transitions in four-dimensional SU(N{sub c}) gauge theories with n{sub f} {ge} 1 adjoint Weyl fermions.

  9. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tladi, Maleafisha Joseph Pekwa Stephen. Vol 40, No 6 (2017) - Articles On the qualitative theory of the rotating boussinesq and quasi-geostrophic equations. Abstract. ISSN: 1727-933X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  10. Quaestiones Mathematicae - Vol 40, No 6 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the qualitative theory of the rotating boussinesq and quasi-geostrophic equations · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Maleafisha Joseph Pekwa Stephen Tladi, 705-737. Global optimization of cyclic Kannan nonexpansive mappings in nonreflexive Banach ...

  11. SWANEA (Southwest Asia-Northeast Africa) A Climatological Study. Volume 4. The Mediterranean Coast and Northeast Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    University of loannina (Greece), Rivista De Meteorologia Aeronautica, Vol XL, No. 2/3, 1980. SBI3-4 Lahcy, J.F., et al., Atlas of 300mb Wind Characteristics...22, NSF GA 29147, 1974. McGinley, J.A., "Dynamics of Alpine Lee Cyclogenesis from a Quasi-Geostrophic View," Rivista Di Meteorologia Aeronautica, Vol

  12. Mathematics of tsunami: modelling and identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivorotko, Olga; Kabanikhin, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami (long waves in the deep water) motion caused by underwater earthquakes is described by shallow water equations ( { ηtt = div (gH (x,y)-gradη), (x,y) ∈ Ω, t ∈ (0,T ); η|t=0 = q(x,y), ηt|t=0 = 0, (x,y) ∈ Ω. ( (1) Bottom relief H(x,y) characteristics and the initial perturbation data (a tsunami source q(x,y)) are required for the direct simulation of tsunamis. The main difficulty problem of tsunami modelling is a very big size of the computational domain (Ω = 500 × 1000 kilometres in space and about one hour computational time T for one meter of initial perturbation amplitude max|q|). The calculation of the function η(x,y,t) of three variables in Ω × (0,T) requires large computing resources. We construct a new algorithm to solve numerically the problem of determining the moving tsunami wave height S(x,y) which is based on kinematic-type approach and analytical representation of fundamental solution. Proposed algorithm of determining the function of two variables S(x,y) reduces the number of operations in 1.5 times than solving problem (1). If all functions does not depend on the variable y (one dimensional case), then the moving tsunami wave height satisfies of the well-known Airy-Green formula: S(x) = S(0)° --- 4H (0)/H (x). The problem of identification parameters of a tsunami source using additional measurements of a passing wave is called inverse tsunami problem. We investigate two different inverse problems of determining a tsunami source q(x,y) using two different additional data: Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) measurements and satellite altimeters wave-form images. These problems are severely ill-posed. The main idea consists of combination of two measured data to reconstruct the source parameters. We apply regularization techniques to control the degree of ill-posedness such as Fourier expansion, truncated singular value decomposition, numerical regularization. The algorithm of selecting the truncated number of

  13. Source-receptor matrix calculation for deposited mass with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDM) are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere LPDMs typically consider only linear processes, i.e., processes that do not depend on the concentration of the simulated tracer such as non-linear chemical reactions. This linearity means that they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. The only difference between such simulations is the sign of the wind components used for transporting the particles. In the case where the number of (potential) source elements is larger than the number of receptors, running the model backward from the receptors is computationally more efficient than running it forward from the sources (if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources). To interpret the wet deposition of acidifying compounds or the contamination of snow by the albedo reducing BC, the s-r relationship of the deposited material would be very important to understand. To date, backward calculations for deposition quantities have not been possible. We present an extension of the LPDM FLEXPART that allows such calculations and test its performance for both dry and wet deposition. We show a comparison between model results in forward and backward mode as well as modeled vs. measured concentration of black carbon at high latitudes. Both analysis prove that the model approach is working well in backward mode and also gives a very good agreement with deposition measurements.

  14. Three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the Bohemian Massif from Bayesian ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentová, Lubica; Gallovič, František; Maierová, Petra

    2017-10-01

    We perform two-step surface wave tomography of phase-velocity dispersion curves obtained by ambient noise cross-correlations in the Bohemian Massif. In the first step, the inter-station dispersion curves were inverted for each period (ranging between 4 and 20 s) separately into phase-velocity maps using 2D adjoint method. In the second step, we perform Bayesian inversion of the set of the phase-velocity maps into an S-wave velocity model. To sample the posterior probability density function, the parallel tempering algorithm is employed providing over 1 million models. From the model samples, not only mean model but also its uncertainty is determined to appraise the reliable features. The model is correlated with known main geologic structures of the Bohemian Massif. The uppermost low-velocity anomalies are in agreement with thick sedimentary basins. In deeper parts (4-20 km), the S-wave velocity anomalies correspond, in general, to main tectonic domains of the Bohemian Massif. The exception is a stable low-velocity body in the middle of the high-velocity Moldanubian domain and high-velocity body resembling a promontory of the Moldanubian into the Teplá-Barrandian domain. The most pronounced (high-velocity) anomaly is located beneath the Eger Rift that is a part of a Tertiary rift system across Europe.

  15. Bottom friction optimization for a better barotropic tide modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Martial; Lathuilière, Cyril; Son Hoang, Hong; Baraille, Rémy

    2015-04-01

    At a regional scale, barotropic tides are the dominant source of variability of currents and water heights. A precise representation of these processes is essential because of their great impacts on human activities (submersion risks, marine renewable energies, ...). Identified sources of error for tide modelling at a regional scale are the followings: bathymetry, boundary forcing and dissipation due to bottom friction. Nevertheless, bathymetric databases are nowadays known with a good accuracy, especially over shelves, and global tide models performances are better than ever. The most promising improvement is thus the bottom friction representation. The method used to estimate bottom friction is the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) which consists in the approximation of the gradient based on a fixed number of cost function measurements, regardless of the dimension of the vector to be estimated. Indeed, each cost function measurement is obtained by randomly perturbing every component of the parameter vector. An important feature of SPSA is its relative ease of implementation. In particular, the method does not require the development of tangent linear and adjoint version of the circulation model. Experiments are carried out to estimate bottom friction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) in barotropic mode (one isopycnal layer). The study area is the Northeastern Atlantic margin which is characterized by strong currents and an intense dissipation. Bottom friction is parameterized with a quadratic term and friction coefficient is computed with the water height and the bottom roughness. The latter parameter is the one to be estimated. Assimilated data are the available tide gauge observations. First, the bottom roughness is estimated taking into account bottom sediment natures and bathymetric ranges. Then, it is estimated with geographical degrees of freedom. Finally, the impact of the estimation of a mixed quadratic/linear friction

  16. Probing emergent geometry through phase transitions in free vector and matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, Irene; Sundborg, Bo [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Wintergerst, Nico [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-02-01

    Boundary correlation functions provide insight into the emergence of an effective geometry in higher spin gravity duals of O(N) or U(N) symmetric field theories. On a compact manifold, the singlet constraint leads to nontrivial dynamics at finite temperature and large N phase transitions even at vanishing ’t Hooft coupling. At low temperature, the leading behavior of boundary two-point functions is consistent with propagation through a bulk thermal anti de Sitter space. Above the phase transition, the two-point function shows significant departure from thermal AdS space and the emergence of localized black hole like objects in the bulk. In adjoint models, these objects appear at length scales of order of the AdS radius, consistent with a Hawking-Page transition, but in vector models they are parametrically larger than the AdS scale. In low dimensions, we find another crossover at large distances beyond which the correlation function again takes a thermal AdS form, albeit with a temperature dependent normalization factor.

  17. ESTIMATING THE DEEP SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION USING MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS AND A DYNAMO MODEL: A VARIATIONAL APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Ching Pui; Jouve, Laurène; Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU Université Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Fournier, Alexandre [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot UMR 7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Talagrand, Olivier [Laboratoire de météorologie dynamique, UMR 8539, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2015-12-01

    We show how magnetic observations of the Sun can be used in conjunction with an axisymmetric flux-transport solar dynamo model in order to estimate the large-scale meridional circulation throughout the convection zone. Our innovative approach rests on variational data assimilation, whereby the distance between predictions and observations (measured by an objective function) is iteratively minimized by means of an optimization algorithm seeking the meridional flow that best accounts for the data. The minimization is performed using a quasi-Newton technique, which requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the objective function to the meridional flow. That sensitivity is efficiently computed via the integration of the adjoint flux-transport dynamo model. Closed-loop (also known as twin) experiments using synthetic data demonstrate the validity and accuracy of this technique for a variety of meridional flow configurations, ranging from unicellular and equatorially symmetric to multicellular and equatorially asymmetric. In this well-controlled synthetic context, we perform a systematic study of the behavior of our variational approach under different observational configurations by varying their spatial density, temporal density, and noise level, as well as the width of the assimilation window. We find that the method is remarkably robust, leading in most cases to a recovery of the true meridional flow to within better than 1%. These encouraging results are a first step toward using this technique to (i) better constrain the physical processes occurring inside the Sun and (ii) better predict solar activity on decadal timescales.

  18. Null-polygonal minimal surfaces in AdS{sub 4} from perturbed W minimal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ito, Katsushi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Satoh, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics

    2012-11-15

    We study the null-polygonal minimal surfaces in AdS{sub 4}, which correspond to the gluon scattering amplitudes/Wilson loops in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. The area of the minimal surfaces with n cusps is characterized by the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA) integral equations or the Y-system of the homogeneous sine-Gordon model, which is regarded as the SU(n-4){sub 4}/U(1){sup n-5} generalized parafermion theory perturbed by the weight-zero adjoint operators. Based on the relation to the TBA systems of the perturbed W minimal models, we solve the TBA equations by using the conformal perturbation theory, and obtain the analytic expansion of the remainder function around the UV/regular-polygonal limit for n = 6 and 7. We compare the rescaled remainder function for n=6 with the two-loop one, to observe that they are close to each other similarly to the AdS{sub 3} case.

  19. An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.; Wheeler, Mary F.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) as a general method for parameter estimation based on stochastic estimation of gradients using an ensemble of directional derivatives. ISEM eliminates the need for adjoint coding and deals with the numerical simulator as a blackbox. The proposed method employs directional derivatives within a Gauss–Newton iteration. The update equation in ISEM resembles the update step in ensemble Kalman filter, however the inverse of the output covariance matrix in ISEM is regularized using standard truncated singular value decomposition or Tikhonov regularization. We also investigate the performance of a set of shrinkage based covariance estimators within ISEM. The proposed method is successfully applied on several nonlinear parameter estimation problems for subsurface flow models. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by the small size of utilized ensembles and in terms of error convergence rates

  20. An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.

    2013-06-01

    Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) as a general method for parameter estimation based on stochastic estimation of gradients using an ensemble of directional derivatives. ISEM eliminates the need for adjoint coding and deals with the numerical simulator as a blackbox. The proposed method employs directional derivatives within a Gauss-Newton iteration. The update equation in ISEM resembles the update step in ensemble Kalman filter, however the inverse of the output covariance matrix in ISEM is regularized using standard truncated singular value decomposition or Tikhonov regularization. We also investigate the performance of a set of shrinkage based covariance estimators within ISEM. The proposed method is successfully applied on several nonlinear parameter estimation problems for subsurface flow models. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by the small size of utilized ensembles and in terms of error convergence rates. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  1. The Oceanographic Multipurpose Software Environment (OMUSE v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pelupessy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the Oceanographic Multipurpose Software Environment (OMUSE. OMUSE aims to provide a homogeneous environment for existing or newly developed numerical ocean simulation codes, simplifying their use and deployment. In this way, numerical experiments that combine ocean models representing different physics or spanning different ranges of physical scales can be easily designed. Rapid development of simulation models is made possible through the creation of simple high-level scripts. The low-level core of the abstraction in OMUSE is designed to deploy these simulations efficiently on heterogeneous high-performance computing resources. Cross-verification of simulation models with different codes and numerical methods is facilitated by the unified interface that OMUSE provides. Reproducibility in numerical experiments is fostered by allowing complex numerical experiments to be expressed in portable scripts that conform to a common OMUSE interface. Here, we present the design of OMUSE as well as the modules and model components currently included, which range from a simple conceptual quasi-geostrophic solver to the global circulation model POP (Parallel Ocean Program. The uniform access to the codes' simulation state and the extensive automation of data transfer and conversion operations aids the implementation of model couplings. We discuss the types of couplings that can be implemented using OMUSE. We also present example applications that demonstrate the straightforward model initialization and the concurrent use of data analysis tools on a running model. We give examples of multiscale and multiphysics simulations by embedding a regional ocean model into a global ocean model and by coupling a surface wave propagation model with a coastal circulation model.

  2. The Oceanographic Multipurpose Software Environment (OMUSE v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelupessy, Inti; van Werkhoven, Ben; van Elteren, Arjen; Viebahn, Jan; Candy, Adam; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Dijkstra, Henk

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we present the Oceanographic Multipurpose Software Environment (OMUSE). OMUSE aims to provide a homogeneous environment for existing or newly developed numerical ocean simulation codes, simplifying their use and deployment. In this way, numerical experiments that combine ocean models representing different physics or spanning different ranges of physical scales can be easily designed. Rapid development of simulation models is made possible through the creation of simple high-level scripts. The low-level core of the abstraction in OMUSE is designed to deploy these simulations efficiently on heterogeneous high-performance computing resources. Cross-verification of simulation models with different codes and numerical methods is facilitated by the unified interface that OMUSE provides. Reproducibility in numerical experiments is fostered by allowing complex numerical experiments to be expressed in portable scripts that conform to a common OMUSE interface. Here, we present the design of OMUSE as well as the modules and model components currently included, which range from a simple conceptual quasi-geostrophic solver to the global circulation model POP (Parallel Ocean Program). The uniform access to the codes' simulation state and the extensive automation of data transfer and conversion operations aids the implementation of model couplings. We discuss the types of couplings that can be implemented using OMUSE. We also present example applications that demonstrate the straightforward model initialization and the concurrent use of data analysis tools on a running model. We give examples of multiscale and multiphysics simulations by embedding a regional ocean model into a global ocean model and by coupling a surface wave propagation model with a coastal circulation model.

  3. Asymptotic structure of low frequency supersonic heated jet noise using LES data to re-construct a turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed; Sescu, Adrian; Sassanis, Vasileios; Bres, Guillaume; Towne, Aaron; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The Goldstein-Sescu-Afsar asymptotic theory postulated that the appropriate distinguished limit in which non-parallel mean flow effects introduces a leading order change in the 'propagator' (which is related adjoint linearized Euler Green's function) within Goldstein's acoustic analogy must be when the jet spread rate is the same order as Strouhal number. We analyze the low frequency structure of the acoustic spectrum using Large-eddy simulations of two axi-symmetric jets (heated & unheated) at constant supersonic jet Mach number to obtain the mean flow for the asymptotic theory. This approach provides excellent quantitative agreement for the peak jet noise when the coefficients of the turbulence model are tuned for good agreement with the far-field acoustic data. Our aim in this talk, however, is to show the predictive capability of the asymptotics when the turbulence model in the acoustic analogy is 'exactly' re-constructed by numerically matching the length scale coefficients of an algebraic-exponential model for the 1212-component of the Reynolds stress auto-covariance tensor (1 is streamwise & 2 is radial direction) with LES data at any spatial location and temporal frequency. In this way, all information is obtained from local unsteady flow. We thank Professor Parviz Moin for supporting this work as part of the Center for Turbulence Research Summer Program 2016.

  4. Estimating Jupiter’s Gravity Field Using Juno Measurements, Trajectory Estimation Analysis, and a Flow Model Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Durante, Daniele; Finocchiaro, Stefano; Iess, Luciano, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    The upcoming Juno spacecraft measurements have the potential of improving our knowledge of Jupiter’s gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spatial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially regarding the Jovian flow structure and its depth, which can influence the measured gravity field. In this study we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using a simulated Juno trajectory, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint-based inverse model for the flow dynamics. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that this method can fit some of the gravitational harmonics better to the “measured” harmonics, mainly because of the added information from the dynamical model, which includes the flow structure. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity harmonics estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  5. Optimization-based control of constrained nonlinear systems with continuous-time models: Adaptive time-grid refinement algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Fernando A. C. C.; Paiva, Luís T.

    2016-10-01

    We address optimal control problems for nonlinear systems with pathwise state-constraints. These are challenging non-linear problems for which the number of discretization points is a major factor determining the computational time. Also, the location of these points has a major impact in the accuracy of the solutions. We propose an algorithm that iteratively finds an adequate time-grid to satisfy some predefined error estimate on the obtained trajectories, which is guided by information on the adjoint multipliers. The obtained results show a highly favorable comparison against the traditional equidistant-spaced time-grid methods, including the ones using discrete-time models. This way, continuous-time plant models can be directly used. The discretization procedure can be automated and there is no need to select a priori the adequate time step. Even if the optimization procedure is forced to stop in an early stage, as might be the case in real-time problems, we can still obtain a meaningful solution, although it might be a less accurate one. The extension of the procedure to a Model Predictive Control (MPC) context is proposed here. By defining a time-dependent accuracy threshold, we can generate solutions that are more accurate in the initial parts of the receding horizon, which are the most relevant for MPC.

  6. Minimal models for N-K-functions(infinity)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksma, Aad; Luger, Annemarie; Shondin, Yuri; Langer, M; Luger, A; Woracek, H

    2006-01-01

    We present explicit realizations in terms of self-adjoint operators and linear relations for a non-zero scalar generalized Nevanlinna function N(z) and the function (N) over cap (z) = -1/N(z) under the assumption that N(z) has exactly one generalized pole which is not of positive type namely at z =

  7. Design strategies for human & earth systems modeling to meet emerging multi-scale decision support needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spak, S.; Pooley, M.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of coupled human and earth systems models promises immense potential and grand challenges as they transition toward new roles as core tools for defining and living within planetary boundaries. New frontiers in community model development include not only computational, organizational, and geophysical process questions, but also the twin objectives of more meaningfully integrating the human dimension and extending applicability to informing policy decisions on a range of new and interconnected issues. We approach these challenges by posing key policy questions that require more comprehensive coupled human and geophysical models, identify necessary model and organizational processes and outputs, and work backwards to determine design criteria in response to these needs. We find that modular community earth system model design must: * seamlessly scale in space (global to urban) and time (nowcasting to paleo-studies) and fully coupled on all component systems * automatically differentiate to provide complete coupled forward and adjoint models for sensitivity studies, optimization applications, and 4DVAR assimilation across Earth and human observing systems * incorporate diagnostic tools to quantify uncertainty in couplings, and in how human activity affects them * integrate accessible community development and application with JIT-compilation, cloud computing, game-oriented interfaces, and crowd-sourced problem-solving We outline accessible near-term objectives toward these goals, and describe attempts to incorporate these design objectives in recent pilot activities using atmosphere-land-ocean-biosphere-human models (WRF-Chem, IBIS, UrbanSim) at urban and regional scales for policy applications in climate, energy, and air quality.

  8. Method of intermediate problems in the Fröhlich polaron model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Soldatov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Method of intermediate problems in the theory of linear semi-bounded self-adjoint operators on rigged Hilbert space was applied to the investigation of the ground state energy of the Fröhlich polaron model. It was shown that various infinite sequences of non-decreasing improvable lower bound estimates for the polaron ground state energy can be derived for arbitrary values of the electron-phonon interaction constant. The proposed approach allows for explicit numerical evaluation of the thus obtained lower bound estimates at all orders and can be straightforwardly generalized for investigation of the low-lying branch of the slow-moving polaron excitation energy spectral curve adjacent to the ground state energy of the polaron at rest. In conjunction with numerous, already derived by multitudinous methods, well-known upper bound estimates for the energy spectral curve of the Fröhlich polaron as a function of the electron-phonon interaction constant and the polaron total momentum, the aforesaid improvable lower bound estimates might provide one with virtually precise magnitude for the energy of the slow-moving polaron.

  9. Inverse models of plate coupling and mantle rheology: Towards a direct link between large-scale mantle flow and mega thrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnis, M.; Ratnaswamy, V.; Stadler, G.; Rudi, J.; Liu, X.; Ghattas, O.

    2017-12-01

    We are developing high-resolution inverse models for plate motions and mantle flow to recover the degree of mechanical coupling between plates and the non-linear and plastic parameters governing viscous flow within the lithosphere and mantle. We have developed adjoint versions of the Stokes equations with fully non-linear viscosity with a cost function that measures the fit with plate motions and with regional constrains on effective upper mantle viscosity (from post-glacial rebound and post seismic relaxation). In our earlier work, we demonstrate that when the temperature field is known, the strength of plate boundaries, the yield stress and strain rate exponent in the upper mantle are recoverable. As the plate boundary coupling drops below a threshold, the uncertainty of the inferred parameters increases due to insensitivity of plate motion to plate coupling. Comparing the trade-offs between inferred rheological parameters found from a Gaussian approximation of the parameter distribution and from MCMC sampling, we found that the Gaussian approximation—which is significantly cheaper to compute—is often a good approximation. We have extended our earlier method such that we can recover normal and shear stresses within the zones determining the interface between subducting and over-riding plates determined through seismic constraints (using the Slab1.0 model). We find that those subduction zones with low seismic coupling correspond with low inferred values of mechanical coupling. By fitting plate motion data in the optimization scheme, we find that Tonga and the Marianas have the lowest values of mechanical coupling while Chile and Sumatra the highest, among the subduction zones we have studies. Moreover, because of the nature of the high-resolution adjoint models, the subduction zones with the lowest coupling have back-arc extension. Globally we find that the non-linear stress-strain exponent, n, is about 3.0 +/- 0.25 (in the upper mantle and lithosphere) and a

  10. A mechanistic modelling and data assimilation approach to estimate the carbon/chlorophyll and carbon/nitrogen ratios in a coupled hydrodynamical-biological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Faugeras

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of hydrodynamical-biological models is to provide estimates of the main carbon fluxes such as total and export oceanic production. These models are nitrogen based, that is to say that the variables are expressed in terms of their nitrogen content. Moreover models are calibrated using chlorophyll data sets. Therefore carbon to chlorophyll (C:Chl and carbon to nitrogen (C:N ratios have to be assumed. This paper addresses the problem of the representation of these ratios. In a 1D framework at the DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean Sea we propose a model which enables the estimation of the basic biogeochemical fluxes and in which the spatio-temporal variability of the C:Chl and C:N ratios is fully represented in a mechanical way. This is achieved through the introduction of new state variables coming from the embedding of a phytoplankton growth model in a more classical Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model (in which the C:N ratio is assumed to be a constant. Following this modelling step, the parameters of the model are estimated using the adjoint data assimilation method which enables the assimilation of chlorophyll and nitrate data sets collected at DYFAMED in 1997.Comparing the predictions of the new Mechanistic model with those of the classical Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model which was calibrated with the same data sets, we find that both models reproduce the reference data in a comparable manner. Both fluxes and stocks can be equally well predicted by either model. However if the models are coinciding on an average basis, they are diverging from a variability prediction point of view. In the Mechanistic model biology adapts much faster to its environment giving rise to higher short term variations. Moreover the seasonal variability in total production differs from the Redfieldian NNPZD-DOM model to the Mechanistic model. In summer the Mechanistic model predicts higher production values in carbon unit than the Redfieldian NNPZD

  11. The Impact of Incorporating Chemistry to Numerical Weather Prediction Models: An Ensemble-Based Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P. A.; Arellano, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    Data assimilation has emerged as an integral part of numerical weather prediction (NWP). More recently, atmospheric chemistry processes have been incorporated into NWP models to provide forecasts and guidance on air quality. There is, however, a unique opportunity within this coupled system to investigate the additional benefit of constraining model dynamics and physics due to chemistry. Several studies have reported the strong interaction between chemistry and meteorology through radiation, transport, emission, and cloud processes. To examine its importance to NWP, we conduct an ensemble-based sensitivity analysis of meteorological fields to the chemical and aerosol fields within the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) framework. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of the forecasts of surface temperature and related dynamical fields to the initial conditions of dust and aerosol concentrations in the model over the continental United States within the summer 2008 time period. We use an ensemble of meteorological and chemical/aerosol predictions within WRF-Chem/DART to calculate the sensitivities. This approach is similar to recent ensemble-based sensitivity studies in NWP. The use of an ensemble prediction is appealing because the analysis does not require the adjoint of the model, which to a certain extent becomes a limitation due to the rapidly evolving models and the increasing number of different observations. Here, we introduce this approach as applied to atmospheric chemistry. We also show our initial results of the calculated sensitivities from joint assimilation experiments using a combination of conventional meteorological observations from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, retrievals of aerosol optical depth from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and retrievals of carbon monoxide from NASA's Measurements of Pollution in the

  12. Modelling of deposited black carbon with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART in backward mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Cassiani, Massimo; Sollum, Espen; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models are popular tools to simulate the dispersion of trace gases, aerosols or radionuclides in the atmosphere. If they consider only linear processes, they are self-adjoint, i.e., they can be run forward and backward in time without changes to the source code. Backward simulations are very efficient if the number of receptors is smaller than the number of sources, and they are well suited to establish source-receptor (s-r) relationships for measurements of various trace substances in air. However, not only the air concentrations are of interest, but also the s-r relationships for deposition are important for interpreting measurement data. E.g., deposition of dust is measured regularly in ice cores, partly also as a proxy to understand changes in aridity in dust source regions. Contamination of snow by black carbon (BC) aerosols has recently become a hot topic because of the potential impact of BC on the snow albedo. To interpret such deposition measurements and study the sources of the deposited substance, it would be convenient to have a model that is capable of efficient s-r relationship calculations for such types of measurements. We present here the implementation of such an algorithm into the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, and test the new scheme by comparisons with results from forward simulations as well as comparisons with measurements. As an application, we analyse source regions for elemental carbon (EC) measured in snow over the years 2014-2016 in the Russian Arctic. Simulations using an annual constant black carbon inventory based on ECLIPSE V5 and GFED (Global Fire Emission Database), have been performed. The meteorological data used in the simulation are 3 hourly operational data from the European Centre of Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) on a 1 degree grid resolution and 138 vertical levels. The model is able to capture very well the measured concentrations. Gas flaring and residential

  13. Bounds on the number of bound states in the transfer matrix spectrum for some weakly correlated lattice models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Carroll, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We consider the interaction of particles in weakly correlated lattice quantum field theories. In the imaginary time functional integral formulation of these theories there is a relative coordinate lattice Schroedinger operator H which approximately describes the interaction of these particles. Scalar and vector spin, QCD and Gross-Neveu models are included in these theories. In the weakly correlated regime H=H o +W where H o =−γΔ l , 0 l is the d-dimensional lattice Laplacian: γ=β, the inverse temperature for spin systems and γ=κ 3 where κ is the hopping parameter for QCD. W is a self-adjoint potential operator which may have non-local contributions but obeys the bound ‖W(x, y)‖⩽cexp ( −a(‖x‖+‖y‖)), a large: exp−a=β/β o (1/2) (κ/κ o ) for spin (QCD) models. H o , W, and H act in l 2 (Z d ), d⩾ 1. The spectrum of H below zero is known to be discrete and we obtain bounds on the number of states below zero. This number depends on the short range properties of W, i.e., the long range tail does not increase the number of states.

  14. Characterizing Volumetric Strain at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada, USA Using Geodetic Data, Numerical Models, and Prior Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, E. C.; Feigl, K. L.; Cardiff, M. A.; Morency, C.; Kreemer, C.; Akerley, J.

    2017-12-01

    Time-dependent deformation has been observed at Brady Hot Springs using data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) [e.g., Ali et al. 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geothermics.2016.01.008]. We seek to determine the geophysical process governing the observed subsidence. As two end-member hypotheses, we consider thermal contraction and a decrease in pore fluid pressure. A decrease in temperature would cause contraction in the subsurface and subsidence at the surface. A decrease in pore fluid pressure would allow the volume of pores to shrink and also produce subsidence. To simulate these processes, we use a dislocation model that assumes uniform elastic properties in a half space [Okada, 1985]. The parameterization consists of many cubic volume elements (voxels), each of which contracts by closing its three mutually orthogonal bisecting square surfaces. Then we use linear inversion to solve for volumetric strain in each voxel given a measurement of range change. To differentiate between the two possible hypotheses, we use a Bayesian framework with geostatistical prior information. We perform inversion using each prior to decide if one leads to a more geophysically reasonable interpretation than the other. This work is part of a project entitled "Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology" and is supported by the Geothermal Technology Office of the U.S. Department of Energy [DE-EE0006760].

  15. Statistical and dynamical properties of covariant lyapunov vectors in a coupled atmosphere-ocean model—multiscale effects, geometric degeneracy, and error dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    We study a simplified coupled atmosphere-ocean model using the formalism of covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs), which link physically-based directions of perturbations to growth/decay rates. The model is obtained via a severe truncation of quasi-geostrophic equations for the two fluids, and includes a simple yet physically meaningful representation of their dynamical/thermodynamical coupling. The model has 36 degrees of freedom, and the parameters are chosen so that a chaotic behaviour is observed. There are two positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs), sixteen negative LEs, and eighteen near-zero LEs. The presence of many near-zero LEs results from the vast time-scale separation between the characteristic time scales of the two fluids, and leads to nontrivial error growth properties in the tangent space spanned by the corresponding CLVs, which are geometrically very degenerate. Such CLVs correspond to two different classes of ocean/atmosphere coupled modes. The tangent space spanned by the CLVs corresponding to the positive and negative LEs has, instead, a non-pathological behaviour, and one can construct robust large deviations laws for the finite time LEs, thus providing a universal model for assessing predictability on long to ultra-long scales along such directions. Interestingly, the tangent space of the unstable manifold has substantial projection on both atmospheric and oceanic components. The results show the difficulties in using hyperbolicity as a conceptual framework for multiscale chaotic dynamical systems, whereas the framework of partial hyperbolicity seems better suited, possibly indicating an alternative definition for the chaotic hypothesis. They also suggest the need for an accurate analysis of error dynamics on different time scales and domains and for a careful set-up of assimilation schemes when looking at coupled atmosphere-ocean models.

  16. Using a dynamical advection to reconstruct a part of the SSH evolution in the context of SWOT, application to the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogé, Marine; Morrow, Rosemary; Ubelmann, Clément; Dibarboure, Gérald

    2017-08-01

    The main oceanographic objective of the future SWOT mission is to better characterize the ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale circulation, by observing a finer range of ocean topography dynamics down to 20 km wavelength. Despite the very high spatial resolution of the future satellite, it will not capture the time evolution of the shorter mesoscale signals, such as the formation and evolution of small eddies. SWOT will have an exact repeat cycle of 21 days, with near repeats around 5-10 days, depending on the latitude. Here, we investigate a technique to reconstruct the missing 2D SSH signal in the time between two satellite revisits. We use the dynamical interpolation (DI) technique developed by Ubelmann et al. (2015). Based on potential vorticity (hereafter PV) conservation using a one and a half layer quasi-geostrophic model, it features an active advection of the SSH field. This model has been tested in energetic open ocean regions such as the Gulf Stream and the Californian Current, and has given promising results. Here, we test this model in the Western Mediterranean Sea, a lower energy region with complex small scale physics, and compare the SSH reconstruction with the high-resolution Symphonie model. We investigate an extension of the simple dynamical model including a separated mean circulation. We find that the DI gives a 16-18% improvement in the reconstruction of the surface height and eddy kinetic energy fields, compared with a simple linear interpolation, and a 37% improvement in the Northern Current subregion. Reconstruction errors are higher during winter and autumn but statistically, the improvement from the DI is also better for these seasons.

  17. A level set-based topology optimization method for simultaneous design of elastic structure and coupled acoustic cavity using a two-phase material model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamada, Takayuki; Izui, Kazuhiro; Nishiwaki, Shinji

    2017-09-01

    This papers proposes a level set-based topology optimization method for the simultaneous design of acoustic and structural material distributions. In this study, we develop a two-phase material model that is a mixture of an elastic material and acoustic medium, to represent an elastic structure and an acoustic cavity by controlling a volume fraction parameter. In the proposed model, boundary conditions at the two-phase material boundaries are satisfied naturally, avoiding the need to express these boundaries explicitly. We formulate a topology optimization problem to minimize the sound pressure level using this two-phase material model and a level set-based method that obtains topologies free from grayscales. The topological derivative of the objective functional is approximately derived using a variational approach and the adjoint variable method and is utilized to update the level set function via a time evolutionary reaction-diffusion equation. Several numerical examples present optimal acoustic and structural topologies that minimize the sound pressure generated from a vibrating elastic structure.

  18. Fire emissions constrained by the synergistic use of formaldehyde and glyoxal SCIAMACHY columns in a two-compound inverse modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J.; de Smedt, I.; van Roozendael, M.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J.

    2008-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) are carbonyls formed in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, anthropogenic activities, and biomass burning. They are also directly emitted by fires. Although this primary production represents only a small part of the global source for both species, yet it can be locally important during intense fire events. Simultaneous observations of formaldehyde and glyoxal retrieved from the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument in 2005 and provided by the BIRA/IASB and the Bremen group, respectively, are compared with the corresponding columns simulated with the IMAGESv2 global CTM. The chemical mechanism has been optimized with respect to HCHO and CHOCHO production from pyrogenically emitted NMVOCs, based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) and on an explicit profile for biomass burning emissions. Gas-to-particle conversion of glyoxal in clouds and in aqueous aerosols is considered in the model. In this study we provide top-down estimates for fire emissions of HCHO and CHOCHO precursors by performing a two- compound inversion of emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model. The pyrogenic fluxes are optimized at the model resolution. The two-compound inversion offers the advantage that the information gained from measurements of one species constrains the sources of both compounds, due to the existence of common precursors. In a first inversion, only the burnt biomass amounts are optimized. In subsequent simulations, the emission factors for key individual NMVOC compounds are also varied.

  19. Multigroup cross section collapsing optimization of a He-3 detector assembly model using deterministic transport techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Mi; Yi, Ce; Manalo, Kevin L.; Sjoden, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    Multigroup optimization is performed on a neutron detector assembly to examine the validity of transport response in forward and adjoint modes. For SN transport simulations, we discuss the multigroup collapse of an 80 group library to 40, 30, and 16 groups, constructed from using the 3-D parallel PENTRAN and macroscopic cross section collapsing with YGROUP contribution weighting. The difference in using P 1 and P 3 Legendre order in scattering cross sections is investigated; also, associated forward and adjoint transport responses are calculated. We conclude that for the block analyzed, a 30 group cross section optimizes both computation time and accuracy relative to the 80 group transport calculations. (author)

  20. Direct and inverse modelling for environmental risk assessment and emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, V.; Baklanov, A.; Tsvetova, E.; Mahura, A.

    2009-04-01

    A concept of environmental modelling and its applications for Siberian regions are presented. The regions are considered both as sources and receptors of pollution as elements of the global climatic system. A methodology has been developed to build the combined methods of forward and inverse modelling for the problems of the air quality, environmental risk assessment and control. It is based on variational principles and methods of adjoint sensitivity theory. This allows obtaining the optimal numerical schemes and universal algorithm of the forward-inverse modelling. Following the concept, the functionals (describing the generalised characteristics of the processes, data, and models) are considered together with the basic model components. To combine all these elements in the frames of forward and inverse relations, we suppose that each of them may contain uncertainty. In this case, it is naturally to formulate a weak-constraint variational principle for the augmented functional which contains the model description in the form of integral identity and the cost functional including the total measure of all uncertainties. The stationary conditions for the augmented functional with respect to the variations its functional arguments define the mutually agreed structure of numerical schemes for forward and adjoint problems, and sensitivity relations. For quantitative risk assessment the following characteristics are useful: (i) values of goal functionals and their variations in a form of sensitivity relations; (ii) risk and sensitivity functions to the variations of the sources. It is convenient to take the risk function multiplied by the source function as a distributed risk measure. The variational technique provides the backward propagation of information, contained in the target functionals, to parameters and sources of the models through the sensitivity and uncertainty functions. This gives a base for realisation of the feedback algorithms and methods of control

  1. First status report on regional and local ground-water flow modeling for Richton Dome, Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.W.; Metcalfe, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Regional and local ground-water flow within the principal hydrogeologic units in the vicinity of Richton Dome is evaluated by developing conceptual models of the flow regime within these units at three different scales and testing these models using a three-dimensional, finite-difference flow code. Semiquantitative sensitivity analysis is conducted to define the system response to changes in the conceptual model, particularly the hydrologic properties. The effects of salinity on the flow field are evaluated at the refined and local scales. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is applied to the conceptualized flow regime in the Wilcox aquifer. All steps leading to the final results and conclusions are incorporated in this report. The available data utilized in this study is summarized. The specific conceptual models, defining the areal and vertical averaging of lithologic units, aquifer properties, fluid properties, and hydrologic boundary conditions, are described in detail. The results are delineated by the simulated potentiometric surfaces and tables summarizing areal and vertical boundary fluxes, Darcy velocities at specific points, and ground-water travel paths. These results are presented at regional, refined, and local (near-dome) scales. The reported work is the first stage of an ongoing evaluation of the Richton Dome as a potential repository for high-level radioactive wastes. The results and conclusions should thus be considered preliminary and subject to modification with the collection of additional data. However, this report does provide a useful basis for describing the sensitivity and, to a lesser extent, the uncertainty of the present conceptualization of ground-water flow in the vicinity of Richton Dome. 25 references, 69 figures, 15 tables

  2. Use of the breeding technique to estimate the structure of the analysis 'errors of the day'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Corazza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D-variational data assimilation scheme for a quasi-geostrophic channel model (Morss, 1998 is used to study the structure of the background error and its relationship to the corresponding bred vectors. The "true" evolution of the model atmosphere is defined by an integration of the model and "rawinsonde observations" are simulated by randomly perturbing the true state at fixed locations. Case studies using different observational densities are considered to compare the evolution of the Bred Vectors to the spatial structure of the background error. In addition, the bred vector dimension (BV-dimension, defined by Patil et al. (2001 is applied to the bred vectors. It is found that after 3-5 days the bred vectors develop well organized structures which are very similar for the two different norms (enstrophy and streamfunction considered in this paper. When 10 surrogate bred vectors (corresponding to different days from that of the background error are used to describe the local patterns of the background error, the explained variance is quite high, about 85-88%, indicating that the statistical average properties of the bred vectors represent well those of the background error. However, a subspace of 10 bred vectors corresponding to the time of the background error increased the percentage of explained variance to 96-98%, with the largest percentage when the background errors are large. These results suggest that a statistical basis of bred vectors collected over time can be used to create an effective constant background error covariance for data assimilation with 3D-Var. Including the "errors of the day" through the use of bred vectors corresponding to the background forecast time can bring an additional significant improvement.

  3. Convectively driven decadal zonal accelerations in Earth's fluid core

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Colin; Dumberry, Mathieu

    2018-04-01

    Azimuthal accelerations of cylindrical surfaces co-axial with the rotation axis have been inferred to exist in Earth's fluid core on the basis of magnetic field observations and changes in the length-of-day. These accelerations have a typical timescale of decades. However, the physical mechanism causing the accelerations is not well understood. Scaling arguments suggest that the leading order torque averaged over cylindrical surfaces should arise from the Lorentz force. Decadal fluctuations in the magnetic field inside the core, driven by convective flows, could then force decadal changes in the Lorentz torque and generate zonal accelerations. We test this hypothesis by constructing a quasi-geostrophic model of magnetoconvection, with thermally driven flows perturbing a steady, imposed background magnetic field. We show that when the Alfvén number in our model is similar to that in Earth's fluid core, temporal fluctuations in the torque balance are dominated by the Lorentz torque, with the latter generating mean zonal accelerations. Our model reproduces both fast, free Alfvén waves and slow, forced accelerations, with ratios of relative strength and relative timescale similar to those inferred for the Earth's core. The temporal changes in the magnetic field which drive the time-varying Lorentz torque are produced by the underlying convective flows, shearing and advecting the magnetic field on a timescale associated with convective eddies. Our results support the hypothesis that temporal changes in the magnetic field deep inside Earth's fluid core drive the observed decadal zonal accelerations of cylindrical surfaces through the Lorentz torque.

  4. Vertex operator representation of the soliton tau functions in the An(1) Toda models by dressing transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belich, H.; Cuba, G.; Paunov, R.

    1997-12-01

    Affine Toda theories based on simple Lie algebras G are known to posses soliton solutions. Toda solitons has been found by Olive, Turok and Underwood within the group-theoretical approach to the integrable field equations. Single solitons are created by exponentials of special elements of the underlying affine Lie algebra which diagonalize the adjoint action of the principal Heisenberg subalgebra. When G is simply laced and level one representations are considered, the generators of the affine Lie algebra are expressed in terms of the principal Heisenberg oscillators. This representation is known as vertex operator construction. It plays a crucial role in the string theory as well as in the conformal field theory. Alternatively, solitons can be generated from the vacuum by dressing transformations. The problem to relate dressing symmetry to the vertex operator representation of the tau functions for the sine-Gordon model was previously considered by Babelon and Bernard. In the present paper, we extend this relation for arbitrary A (1) n Toda field theory. (author)

  5. Parameter estimation for a cohesive sediment transport model by assimilating satellite observations in the Hangzhou Bay: Temporal variations and spatial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daosheng; Zhang, Jicai; He, Xianqiang; Chu, Dongdong; Lv, Xianqing; Wang, Ya Ping; Yang, Yang; Fan, Daidu; Gao, Shu

    2018-01-01

    Model parameters in the suspended cohesive sediment transport models are critical for the accurate simulation of suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs). Difficulties in estimating the model parameters still prevent numerical modeling of the sediment transport from achieving a high level of predictability. Based on a three-dimensional cohesive sediment transport model and its adjoint model, the satellite remote sensing data of SSCs during both spring tide and neap tide, retrieved from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), are assimilated to synchronously estimate four spatially and temporally varying parameters in the Hangzhou Bay in China, including settling velocity, resuspension rate, inflow open boundary conditions and initial conditions. After data assimilation, the model performance is significantly improved. Through several sensitivity experiments, the spatial and temporal variation tendencies of the estimated model parameters are verified to be robust and not affected by model settings. The pattern for the variations of the estimated parameters is analyzed and summarized. The temporal variations and spatial distributions of the estimated settling velocity are negatively correlated with current speed, which can be explained using the combination of flocculation process and Stokes' law. The temporal variations and spatial distributions of the estimated resuspension rate are also negatively correlated with current speed, which are related to the grain size of the seabed sediments under different current velocities. Besides, the estimated inflow open boundary conditions reach the local maximum values near the low water slack conditions and the estimated initial conditions are negatively correlated with water depth, which is consistent with the general understanding. The relationships between the estimated parameters and the hydrodynamic fields can be suggestive for improving the parameterization in cohesive sediment transport models.

  6. On inverse methods for combining chemical and physical oceanographic data: A steady-state analysis of the Atlantic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, Bert; Bjoerkstroem, Anders; Holmen, Kim; Moore, Berrien

    1987-08-01

    An attempt has been made to increase the spatial resolution in the vise of inverse methods to deduce rates of water circulation and detritus formation by the simultaneous use of tracer data and the condition of quasi-geostrophic flow. It is shown that an overdetermined system of equations is desirable to permit analysis of the sensitivity of a solution to errors in the data fields. The method has been tested for the Atlantic Ocean, in which case we employ an 84-box model (eight layers in the vertical and 12 regions in the horizontal define the box configuration). As quasi-steady tracers we consider dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), radiocarbon, alkalinity, phosphorus, oxygen, salinity and enthalpy. The condition of quasi-geostrophic flow is employed for flow across all vertical surfaces between regions except close to the equator. Water continuity is required to be exactly satisfied by the use of a set of closed loops to describe the advective flow. The method of least squares is used to derive a solution and in . . so doing we also require, that turbulence only transfers matter down tracer gradients (i.e. eddy diffusivity is nonnegative) and that detritus is formed only in surface boxes and is destroyed in the water column below. It is shown how appropriate weighting of the equations in the set is decisive for the solutions that we derive and that great care must be taken to ascertain that the interior tracer distributions and the boundary conditions in terms of exchange of tracer material with the exterior are compatible. The enthalpy equations turn out not to fulfil such a demand and have not been used in deriving the solutions presented in the paper. A basic solution with an ageostrophic flow component of about 15% is derived and compared with current knowledge about the general circulation of the Atlantic Ocean and the rates of detritus formation and destruction. The sensitivity of the solution to uncertainties in the data field is presented. It is shown that

  7. The Interaction of Two Surface Vortices Near a Topographic Slope in a Stratified Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charly de Marez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the influence of bottom topography on the interaction of two identical vortices in a two-layer, quasi-geostrophic model. The two vortices have piecewise-uniform potential vorticity and are lying in the upper layer of the model. The topography is a smooth bottom slope. For two cyclones, topography modifies the merger critical distance and the merger efficiency: the topographic wave and vortices can advect the two cyclones along the shelf when they are initially far from it or towards the shelf when they are initially closer to it. They can also advect the two cyclones towards each other and thus favour merger. The cyclones deform, and the potential vorticity field undergoes filamentation. Regimes of partial vortex merger or of vortex splitting are then observed. The interaction of the vorticity poles in the two layers are analysed to explain the evolution of the two upper layer cyclones. For taller topography, two new regimes appear: vortex drift and splitting; and filamentation and asymmetric merger. They are due to the hetonic coupling of lower layer vorticity with the upper layer vortices (a heton is a baroclinic vortex dipole, carrying heat and momentum and propagating horizontally in the fluid, or to the strong shear that the former exerts on the latter. The interaction of two anticyclones shows regimes of co-rotation or merger, but specifically, it leads to the drift of the two vortices away from the slope, via a hetonic coupling with oppositely-signed vorticity in the lower layer. This vorticity originates in the breaking of the topographic wave. The analysis of passive tracer evolution confirms the inshore or offshore drift of the fluid, the formation of tracer fronts along filaments and its stirring in regions of vortex merger. The trajectories of particles indicate how the fluid initially in the vortices is finally partitioned.

  8. Uptake by the Atlantic Ocean of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide and radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, B.; Bjorkstrom, A.

    1989-01-01

    Inverse methods have been used to deduce water circulation, spatial patterns of turbulent exchange and biological activity in the Atlantic Ocean, by using a set of stationary tracers and a condition of quasi-geostrophic flow. The solution yields a direct meridional circulation cell with descending motion in the northern Atlantic with an intensity of 20-25 Sverdrup, a reasonable distribution of vertical turbulent transfer in the uppermost ocean layers and comparatively large rates of detritus formation, about 4.5 Pg C yr -1 . The solution is used to compute the invasion of tritium 1955-1983, and the uptake of excess radiocarbon and carbon dioxide during the period 1760-1983. A fair agreement between computed and observed changes of tritium and 14 C is obtained, but the period of observations is too short to serve as a conclusive test model. The uptake of carbon dioxide during the 220 years period into the Atlantic Ocean is 33 ± 5 Pg and it is further found that significant variations of the uptake fraction of the CO 2 emissions may have occurred due to varying rates of emissions in gorce of time. The conclusion is drawn that the ocean and its carbonate system may not have been the only sink for anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Means for how to further improve the model and its capability to reproduce the ocean behaviour are discussed. Burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and changing land use have changed the global carbon cycle very significant during the last two centuries

  9. Toronto area ozone: Long-term measurements and modeled sources of poor air quality events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, C. H.; Strong, K.; Jones, D. B. A.; Walker, T. W.; Jiang, Z.; Henze, D. K.; Cooke, M. A.; McLinden, C. A.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Pommier, M.; Fogal, P. F.

    2015-11-01

    The University of Toronto Atmospheric Observatory and Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments each has over a decade of ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements in southern Ontario. We present the Toronto area FTIR time series from 2002 to 2013 of two tropospheric trace gases—ozone and carbon monoxide—along with surface in situ measurements taken by government monitoring programs. We interpret their variability with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and determine the atmospheric conditions that cause pollution events in the time series. Our analysis includes a regionally tagged O3 model of the 2004-2007 time period, which quantifies the geographical contributions to Toronto area O3. The important emission types for 15 pollution events are then determined with a high-resolution adjoint model. Toronto O3, during pollution events, is most sensitive to southern Ontario and U.S. fossil fuel NOx emissions and natural isoprene emissions. The sources of Toronto pollution events are found to be highly variable, and this is demonstrated in four case studies representing local, short-, middle-, and long-range transport scenarios. This suggests that continental-scale emission reductions could improve air quality in the Toronto region. We also find that abnormally high temperatures and high-pressure systems are common to all pollution events studied, suggesting that climate change may impact Toronto O3. Finally, we quantitatively compare the sensitivity of the surface and column measurements to anthropogenic NOx emissions and show that they are remarkably similar. This work thus demonstrates the usefulness of FTIR measurements in an urban area to assess air quality.

  10. Meddy Interaction With A Deep Cyclone In The Gulf of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Xavier; Cherubin, Laurent

    Hydrological measurements made in July 1999 in the Gulf of Cadiz reveal the presence of two meddies, one south of Cape Saint Vincent, the other one near the Moroccan shelf and their interaction with a deep cyclone. The thermohaline anomalies of the meddies reach 60-70 km diameter, and are concentrated between 750 and 1500m depths; they reach 2C and 0.5 in salinity. The cyclone is shallower (between 600 and 1300m) with a weaker signature of Mediterranean water (12C at 800m, 36.2 in salinity between 800 and 1200m). This cyclone is coupled with one of the meddies as a baroclinic dipole. This dipole tears a long warm and salty filament away from the other meddy at 1200m. The long term evolution of these eddies is described by means of deep-drogued drifting buoy trajectories: the isolated meddy drifts southwestward, the dipole remains coherent while moving along the continental shelf until it reaches Cape Saint Vincent where it splits. A three-layer quasi-geostrophic model is used to evaluate the possible origin of the meddy and cyclone near the Portuguese coast, and to assess if their interactions, both mutual, with the domain boundaries, and with bottom topography, can account for their motion and deformation. L. Cherubin, X. Carton, J. Paillet, Y. Morel, A. Serpette, 2000: "Instability of the Mediterranean water undercurrents southwest of Portugal: effects of baroclinicity and of topography", Oceanologica Acta, 23, 551-573. X. Carton, L. Cherubin, J. Paillet, Y. Morel, A. Serpette, B. Le Cann, 2002: "Meddy coupling with a deep cyclone in the Gulf of Cadiz ". To appear in J. Mar. Syst.

  11. On the Initiation of an Isolated Convective Storm Near the Central Urban Area of Beijing Metropolitan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, H.; Cui, X.; Zhang, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    An isolated heavy-rain-producing convective storm was unexpectedly initiated in the early afternoon of 9 August 2011 near the central urban area of Beijing metropolitan region (BMR), which occurred at some distance from BMR's northwestern mountains and two pre-existing mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) to the north and west, respectively. An observational analysis shows the presence of large-scale quasi-geostrophic conditions but a favorable regional environment for the convective initiation (CI) of storms, including conditional instability, a low-level southerly flow and high-θe (equivalent potential temperature) area. A nested-grid (4/1.333 km) cloud-resolving model simulation of the case is performed to examine the CI of the storm. Results reveal that the growth of the mixed boundary layer, enhanced by the urban heat island (UHI) effects, accounts for the formation of a thin layer of clouds at the boundary-layer top at the CI site. However, this storm may not take place without sustained low-level convergence of high-θe air between a southerly flow and a northerly flow ahead of a cold outflow boundary associated with the northern MCS. The latter is driven by the latent heating of the shallow layer of clouds during the earlier CI stage and then a cold mesohigh associated with the northern MCS. The results indicate the important roles of the urban effects, mountain morphology, and convectively generated pressure perturbations in determining the CI location and timing of isolated convective storms over the BMR during the summer months.

  12. Statistical mechanics of two-dimensional and geophysical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Venaille, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical study of the self-organization of two-dimensional and geophysical turbulent flows is addressed based on statistical mechanics methods. This review is a self-contained presentation of classical and recent works on this subject; from the statistical mechanics basis of the theory up to applications to Jupiter’s troposphere and ocean vortices and jets. Emphasize has been placed on examples with available analytical treatment in order to favor better understanding of the physics and dynamics. After a brief presentation of the 2D Euler and quasi-geostrophic equations, the specificity of two-dimensional and geophysical turbulence is emphasized. The equilibrium microcanonical measure is built from the Liouville theorem. Important statistical mechanics concepts (large deviations and mean field approach) and thermodynamic concepts (ensemble inequivalence and negative heat capacity) are briefly explained and described. On this theoretical basis, we predict the output of the long time evolution of complex turbulent flows as statistical equilibria. This is applied to make quantitative models of two-dimensional turbulence, the Great Red Spot and other Jovian vortices, ocean jets like the Gulf-Stream, and ocean vortices. A detailed comparison between these statistical equilibria and real flow observations is provided. We also present recent results for non-equilibrium situations, for the studies of either the relaxation towards equilibrium or non-equilibrium steady states. In this last case, forces and dissipation are in a statistical balance; fluxes of conserved quantity characterize the system and microcanonical or other equilibrium measures no longer describe the system.

  13. The Effects of Great Plains Irrigation on the Surface Energy Balance, Regional Circulation, and Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Huber

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation provides a needed source of water in regions of low precipitation. Adding water to a region that would otherwise see little natural precipitation alters the partitioning of surface energy fluxes, the evolution of the planetary boundary layer, and the atmospheric transport of water vapor. The effects of irrigation are investigated in this paper through the employment of the Advanced Research (ARW Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF using a pair of simulations representing the extremes of an irrigated and non-irrigated U.S. Great Plains region. In common with previous studies, irrigation in the Great Plains alters the radiation budget by increasing latent heat flux and cooling the surface temperatures. These effects increase the net radiation at the surface, channeling that energy into additional latent heat flux, which increases convective available potential energy and provides downstream convective systems with additional energy and moisture. Most noteworthy in this study is the substantial influence of irrigation on the structure of the Great Plains Low-level Jet (GPLLJ. The simulation employing irrigation is characterized by a positive 850-mb geopotential height anomaly, a result interpreted by quasi-geostrophic theory to be a response to low-level irrigation-induced cooling. The modulation of the regional-scale height pattern associated with the GPLLJ results in weaker flow southeast of the 850-mb anomaly and stronger flow to the northwest. Increased latent heat flux in the irrigated simulation is greater than the decrease in regional transport, resulting in a net increase in atmospheric moisture and a nearly 50% increase in July precipitation downstream of irrigated regions without any change to the number of precipitation events.

  14. Ensemble singular vectors and their use as additive inflation in EnKF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chih Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Given an ensemble of forecasts, it is possible to determine the leading ensemble singular vector (ESV, that is, the linear combination of the forecasts that, given the choice of the perturbation norm and forecast interval, will maximise the growth of the perturbations. Because the ESV indicates the directions of the fastest growing forecast errors, we explore the potential of applying the leading ESVs in ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF for correcting fast-growing errors. The ESVs are derived based on a quasi-geostrophic multi-level channel model, and data assimilation experiments are carried out under framework of the local ensemble transform Kalman filter. We confirm that even during the early spin-up starting with random initial conditions, the final ESVs of the first analysis with a 12-h window are strongly related to the background errors. Since initial ensemble singular vectors (IESVs grow much faster than Lyapunov Vectors (LVs, and the final ensemble singular vectors (FESVs are close to convergence to leading LVs, perturbations based on leading IESVs grow faster than those based on FESVs, and are therefore preferable as additive inflation. The IESVs are applied in the EnKF framework for constructing flow-dependent additive perturbations to inflate the analysis ensemble. Compared with using random perturbations as additive inflation, a positive impact from using ESVs is found especially in areas with large growing errors. When an EnKF is ‘cold-started’ from random perturbations and poor initial condition, results indicate that using the ESVs as additive inflation has the advantage of correcting large errors so that the spin-up of the EnKF can be accelerated.

  15. ALBOREX: an intensive multi-platform and multidisciplinary experiment in the Alboran Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Allen, John; Olita, Antonio; Tovar, Antonio; Oguz, Temel; Mahadevan, Amala; Poulain, Pierre; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    An intensive multi-platform and multidisciplinary experiment was completed in May 2014 as part of PERSEUS EU Project. 25 drifters, 2 gliders, 3 Argo floats and one ship were dedicated to sample an area of about 50x50 km in the eastern Alboran Sea during one week. The experiment, which also includes 66 CTD stations and 500 water samples (salinity, chlorophyll and nutrients), was designed to capture the intense but transient vertical exchanges associated with mesoscale and submesoscale features. The vertical motion associated with mesoscale and submesoscale features such as ocean eddies, filaments and fronts plays a major role in determining ocean productivity, due to the exchange of properties between the surface and the ocean interior. Understanding the relationship between these physical and biological processes is crucial for predicting the marine ecosystems response to changes in the climate system and to sustainable marine resource management. However, to understand the links between mesoscale and submesoscale features and ecosystem responses, it is necessary to collect data at a range of temporal and spatial scales, and then combine these data with coupled physical and biochemical models. Data from thermosalinograph revealed a sharp surface salinity front with values ranging from 36.6 (Atlantic Waters) to 38.2 (Mediterranean Waters) in conjunction with a filament in temperature. Drifters followed a massive anticyclonic gyre. Near real time data from ADCP showed coherent patterns with currents up to 1m/s. Gliders detected a subduction of chlorophyll located in areas adjacent to the front. We also present results on the horizontal strain rate, relative vorticity and quasi-geostrophic vertical motion to understand the dynamics of this intense ocean front.

  16. Guidelines for effective radiation transport for cable SGEMP modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, Clifton Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fan, Wesley C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, C. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report describes experiences gained in performing radiation transport computations with the SCEPTRE radiation transport code for System Generated ElectroMagnetic Pulse (SGEMP) applications. SCEPTRE is a complex code requiring a fairly sophisticated user to run the code effectively, so this report provides guidance for analysts interested in performing these types of calculations. One challenge in modeling coupled photon/electron transport for SGEMP is to provide a spatial mesh that is sufficiently resolved to accurately model surface charge emission and charge deposition near material interfaces. The method that has been most commonly used to date to compute cable SGEMP typically requires a sub-micron mesh size near material interfaces, which may be difficult for meshing software to provide for complex geometries. We present here an alternative method for computing cable SGEMP that appears to substantially relax this requirement. The report also investigates the effect of refining the energy mesh and increasing the order of the angular approximation to provide some guidance on determining reasonable parameters for the energy/angular approximation needed for x-ray environments. Conclusions for γ-ray environments may be quite different and will be treated in a subsequent report. In the course of the energy-mesh refinement studies, a bug in the cross-section generation software was discovered that may cause underprediction of the result by as much as an order of magnitude for the test problem studied here, when the electron energy group widths are much smaller than those for the photons. Results will be presented and compared using cross sections generated before and after the fix. We also describe adjoint modeling, which provides sensitivity of the total charge drive to the source energy and angle of incidence, which is quite useful for comparing the effect of changing the source environment and for determining most stressing angle of incidence and source

  17. Adjoint(e) de direction à la Vice-présidente, Stratégie générale et ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tenir à jour les pages intranet SGC, c'est-à-dire veiller à ce que l'information soit affichée rapidement, se trouve facilement, et soit à jour et complète. Revoir et réviser les textes et les présentations pour assurer que le contenu et le format sont conformes aux procédures et aux lignes directrices établies. Superviser le ...

  18. Near-horizon states of black holes and Calogero models -2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dynamics of particles or fields in the near-horizon region of black holes [1,2] ... 1. We are interested in finding normalizable solutions of the eigenvalue problem Η = Ε in a situation where the system ad- mits self-adjoint extensions. .... This may seem surprising with the presence of SU(1,1) as the spectrum. 692. Pramana ...

  19. Discrete skew selfadjoint canonical systems and the isotropic Heisenberg magnet model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaashoek, M.A.; Sakhnovich, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    A discrete analog of a skew self-adjoint canonical (Zakharov-Shabat or AKNS) system with a pseudo-exponential potential is introduced. For the corresponding Weyl function the direct and inverse problem are solved explicitly in terms of three parameter matrices. As an application explicit solutions

  20. Optimal distributed control of a diffuse interface model of tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Pierluigi; Gilardi, Gianni; Rocca, Elisabetta; Sprekels, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a distributed optimal control problem is studied for a diffuse interface model of tumor growth which was proposed by Hawkins-Daruud et al in Hawkins-Daruud et al (2011 Int. J. Numer. Math. Biomed. Eng. 28 3-24). The model consists of a Cahn-Hilliard equation for the tumor cell fraction φ coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a function σ representing the nutrient-rich extracellular water volume fraction. The distributed control u monitors as a right-hand side of the equation for σ and can be interpreted as a nutrient supply or a medication, while the cost function, which is of standard tracking type, is meant to keep the tumor cell fraction under control during the evolution. We show that the control-to-state operator is Fréchet differentiable between appropriate Banach spaces and derive the first-order necessary optimality conditions in terms of a variational inequality involving the adjoint state variables. The financial support of the FP7-IDEAS-ERC-StG #256872 (EntroPhase) and of the project Fondazione Cariplo-Regione Lombardia MEGAsTAR ‘Matematica d’Eccellenza in biologia ed ingegneria come accelleratore di una nuona strateGia per l’ATtRattività dell’ateneo pavese’ is gratefully acknowledged. The paper also benefited from the support of the MIUR-PRIN Grant 2015PA5MP7 ‘Calculus of Variations’ for PC and GG, and the GNAMPA (Gruppo Nazionale per l’Analisi Matematica, la Probabilità e le loro Applicazioni) of INdAM (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica) for PC, GG and ER.

  1. Characterization of Material Properties at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada by Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Feigl, K. L.; Patterson, J.; Parker, L.; Reinisch, E. C.; Zeng, X.; Cardiff, M. A.; Fratta, D.; Lord, N. E.; Thurber, C. H.; Robertson, M.; Miller, D. E.; Akerley, J.; Kreemer, C.; Morency, C.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2017-12-01

    The PoroTomo project consists of poroelastic tomography by adjoint inverse modeling of data from seismology, geodesy, and hydrology. The goal of the PoroTomo project is to assess an integrated technology for characterizing and monitoring changes in the rock mechanical properties of an enhanced geothermal system in 3 dimensions with a spatial resolution better than 50 meters. In March 2016, we deployed the integrated technology in a 1500-by-500-by-400-meter volume at Brady. The 15-day deployment included 4 distinct time intervals with intentional manipulations of the pumping rates in injection and production wells. The data set includes: active seismic sources, fiber-optic cables for Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) and Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) arranged vertically in a borehole to 400 m depth and horizontally in a trench 8700 m in length and 0.5 m in depth; 244 seismometers on the surface, 3 pressure sensors in observation wells, continuous geodetic measurements at 3 GPS stations, and 7 InSAR acquisitions. To account for the mechanical behavior of both the rock and the fluids, we are developing numerical models for the 3-D distribution of the material properties. We present an overview of results, including:Tomographic images of P-wave velocity estimated from seismic body waves [Thurber et al., this meeting].Tomographic images of phase velocity estimated from ambient noise correlation functions [Zeng et al., this meeting].Models of volumetric contraction to account for subsidence observed by InSAR and GPS [Reinisch et al., this meeting].Interpretation of pressure and temperature data [Patterson et al., this meeting].Taken together, these results support a conceptual model of highly permeable conduits along faults channeling fluids from shallow aquifers to the deep geothermal reservoir tapped by the production wells. The PoroTomo project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. On the sensitivity of teleseismic full-waveform inversion to earth parametrization, initial model and acquisition design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Combe, L.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.

    2018-02-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is not yet a mature imaging technology for lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data. Therefore, its promise and pitfalls need to be assessed more accurately according to the specifications of teleseismic experiments. Three important issues are related to (1) the choice of the lithospheric parametrization for optimization and visualization, (2) the initial model and (3) the acquisition design, in particular in terms of receiver spread and sampling. These three issues are investigated with a realistic synthetic example inspired by the CIFALPS experiment in the Western Alps. Isotropic elastic FWI is implemented with an adjoint-state formalism and aims to update three parameter classes by minimization of a classical least-squares difference-based misfit function. Three different subsurface parametrizations, combining density (ρ) with P and S wave speeds (Vp and Vs) , P and S impedances (Ip and Is), or elastic moduli (λ and μ) are first discussed based on their radiation patterns before their assessment by FWI. We conclude that the (ρ, λ, μ) parametrization provides the FWI models that best correlate with the true ones after recombining a posteriori the (ρ, λ, μ) optimization parameters into Ip and Is. Owing to the low frequency content of teleseismic data, 1-D reference global models as PREM provide sufficiently accurate initial models for FWI after smoothing that is necessary to remove the imprint of the layering. Two kinds of station deployments are assessed: coarse areal geometry versus dense linear one. We unambiguously conclude that a coarse areal geometry should be favoured as it dramatically increases the penetration in depth of the imaging as well as the horizontal resolution. This results because the areal geometry significantly increases local wavenumber coverage, through a broader sampling of the scattering and dip angles, compared to a linear deployment.

  3. Analysis of flash flood processes dynamics in a Mediterranean catchment using a distributed hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, H.; Maubourguet, M.-M.; Castaings, W.; Dartus, D.

    2009-09-01

    The present study aims at analyzing the hydrological processes involved in flash flood generation. It focuses on small catchments located in the Mediterranean region (Southern France) and often affected by extreme events (Gaume et al., 2009; Ruin et al., 2008). The model used in this study is a spatially distributed rainfall-runoff model dedicated to extreme event simulation and developed on the basis of physical process representation. It is structured into three modules, which represent the soil component, the overland flow component and flow through the drainage network. Infiltration is described using the Green and Ampt model and the soils are assumed vertically homogeneous. Lateral subsurface flow is based on the Darcy's law for a confined aquifer. Surface runoff calculation is divided into two parts: overland flow and flow along the drainage network. Both are simulated using the 1D kinematic wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations with the Manning friction law. In the drainage network, the friction difference between main channel and floodplain is taken into account. Determination of model parameters requires terrain measurement data, usually issued from DEM, soil survey and vegetation or land-use. Four parameters are calibrated for the entire catchment using discharge measurements. Model sensitivity to individual parameters is assessed using Monte-Carlo simulations, the model is then calibrated using these results to estimate the parameters with a data assimilation process called the adjoint state method (Bessière et al., 2008; Castaings et al., 2009). Flood events with different hydrometeorological characteristics are studied to compare the location of saturated areas, infiltration and runoff dynamics as well as importance of the subsurface flow. A better understanding of these processes is indeed necessary especially to improve the model efficiency when the simulation parameters cannot be calibrated and must therefore be transposed from gauged

  4. Effect of scalar nonlinearity on the dipole vortex solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, X; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J.; Pavlenko, V.P.

    1988-07-01

    The dipole vortex solutions of the Hasegawa-Mima drift wave or equivalently, the quasi-geostrophic Rossby wave equation are shown to be split up into long-lived monopole vortices (cyclones and anticyclones) in the presence of a small scalar, i.e. KdV type, nonlinearity. The lifetime of the dipole vortex varies inversely with the strength of the scalar nonlinearity. 12 refs., 4 figs

  5. The relationship between sea surface temperature anomalies and atmospheric circulation in general circulation model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharin, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Several multi-year integrations of the Hamburg version of the ECMWF/T21 general circulation model driven by the sea surface temperature (SST) observed in the period 1970-1988 were examined to study the extratropical response of the atmospheric circulation to SST anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere in winter. In the first 19-years run SST anomalies were prescribed globally (GAGO run), and in two others SST variability was limited to extratropical regions (MOGA run) and to tropics (TOGA run), respectively. A canonical correlation analysis was applied to the monthly means to find the best correlated patterns of SST anomalies in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric flow. Contrary to expectation, the extratropical response in the GAGO run is not equal to the linear combination of the responses in the MOGA and TOGA runs. In the GAGO integration with globally prescribed SST the best correlated atmospheric pattern is global and is characterized by dipole structures of the same polarity in the North Atlantic and the North Pacific sectors. In the MOGA and TOGA experiments the atmospheric response is more local with main centers in the North Atlantic and North Pacific, respectively. The atmospheric modes found by the CCA were compared with the normal modes of the barotropic vorticity equation linearized about the 500 mb winter climate of the control integration driven by the climatological SST. The normal modes with smallest eigenvalues are similar to the canonical patterns of 500 mb geopotential height. The corresponding eigenvectors of the adjoint operator, which represent an external forcing optimal for exciting normal modes, have a longitudinal structure with maxima in regions characterized by enhanced high frequency baroclinic activity over both oceans. It was suggested that variability of storm tracks could play an important role in variability of the barotropic normal modes. (orig.)

  6. Model(ing) Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kerstin

    The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was the first and most celebrated of a wave of international criminal tribunals (ICTs) built in the 1990s designed to advance liberalism through international criminal law. Model(ing) Justice examines the case law of the ICTY...

  7. Models and role models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing experimental models to understand dental caries has been the theme in our research group. Our first, the pH-cycling model, was developed to investigate the chemical reactions in enamel or dentine, which lead to dental caries. It aimed to leverage our understanding of the fluoride mode of

  8. Reflector modelization in neutronic and optimization methods applied to fuel loading pattern; Modelisation du reflecteur en neutronique et methodes d`optimisation appliquees aux plans de rechargement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    I Physical description of P.W.R nuclear core can be handled by multigroup neutronic diffusion model. We are interested in two problems, using the same approach for the optimization aspect. To deal with some differences between calculations and measurements, the question of their reduction is then introduced. A reflector parameters identification from core measurements is then purposed, the reflector being at the present time the less known part of core diffusion model. This approach conducts to study the reflector model, in particular by an analysis of its transport origin. It leads finally to a new model of reflector described by boundary operators using an integral formulation on the core/reflector interface. That is on this new model that a parameter identification formulation of calculations-measurements differences reduction is given, using an adjoint state formulation to minimize errors by a gradient method. Furthermore, nuclear fuel reload of P.W.R core needs an optimal distribution of fuel assemblies, namely a loading pattern. This combinatorial optimization problem is then expressed as a cost function minimization, the cost function describing the power spatial distribution. Various methods (linear programming, simulated annealing,...), used to solve this problem, are detailed, given in particular a practical search example. A new approach is then proposed, using the gradient of the cost function to direct the search in the patterns discrete space. Final results of complete patterns search trials are presented, and compared to those obtained by other methods. In particular the results are obtained very quickly. (author). 81 refs., 55 figs., 5 appends.

  9. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali [Laboratoire des Signaux et Systèmes 3, Rue Joliot-Curie 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2015-01-13

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512{sup 3} to 8192{sup 3} voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H{sup t} (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  10. Bounds on the number of bound states in the transfer matrix spectrum for some weakly correlated lattice models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Carroll, Michael [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada e Estatistica, ICMC-USP, C.P. 668,13560-970 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    We consider the interaction of particles in weakly correlated lattice quantum field theories. In the imaginary time functional integral formulation of these theories there is a relative coordinate lattice Schroedinger operator H which approximately describes the interaction of these particles. Scalar and vector spin, QCD and Gross-Neveu models are included in these theories. In the weakly correlated regime H=H{sub o}+W where H{sub o}=-{gamma}{Delta}{sub l}, 0 < {gamma} Much-Less-Than 1 and {Delta}{sub l} is the d-dimensional lattice Laplacian: {gamma}={beta}, the inverse temperature for spin systems and {gamma}={kappa}{sup 3} where {kappa} is the hopping parameter for QCD. W is a self-adjoint potential operator which may have non-local contributions but obeys the bound Double-Vertical-Line W(x, y) Double-Vertical-Line Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To cexp ( -a( Double-Vertical-Line x Double-Vertical-Line + Double-Vertical-Line y Double-Vertical-Line )), a large: exp-a={beta}/{beta}{sub o}{sup (1/2)}({kappa}/{kappa}{sub o}) for spin (QCD) models. H{sub o}, W, and H act in l{sub 2}(Z{sup d}), d Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1. The spectrum of H below zero is known to be discrete and we obtain bounds on the number of states below zero. This number depends on the short range properties of W, i.e., the long range tail does not increase the number of states.

  11. An eigenvalue approach for the automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based reconstructions: Application to real-time phase-contrast flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengguo; Hohage, Thorsten; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Joseph, Arun A; Wang, Xiaoqing; Voit, Dirk; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automatic method for the scaling of unknowns in model-based nonlinear inverse reconstructions and to evaluate its application to real-time phase-contrast (RT-PC) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Model-based MRI reconstructions of parametric maps which describe a physical or physiological function require the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, because the list of unknowns in the extended MRI signal equation comprises multiple functional parameters and all coil sensitivity profiles. Iterative solutions therefore rely on an appropriate scaling of unknowns to numerically balance partial derivatives and regularization terms. The scaling of unknowns emerges as a self-adjoint and positive-definite matrix which is expressible by its maximal eigenvalue and solved by power iterations. The proposed method is applied to RT-PC flow MRI based on highly undersampled acquisitions. Experimental validations include numerical phantoms providing ground truth and a wide range of human studies in the ascending aorta, carotid arteries, deep veins during muscular exercise and cerebrospinal fluid during deep respiration. For RT-PC flow MRI, model-based reconstructions with automatic scaling not only offer velocity maps with high spatiotemporal acuity and much reduced phase noise, but also ensure fast convergence as well as accurate and precise velocities for all conditions tested, i.e. for different velocity ranges, vessel sizes and the simultaneous presence of signals with velocity aliasing. In summary, the proposed automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based MRI reconstructions yields quantitatively reliable velocities for RT-PC flow MRI in various experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Cognitive modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zandbelt, Bram

    2017-01-01

    Introductory presentation on cognitive modeling for the course ‘Cognitive control’ of the MSc program Cognitive Neuroscience at Radboud University. It addresses basic questions, such as 'What is a model?', 'Why use models?', and 'How to use models?'

  13. Modelling the models

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the production of mesons in the forward region of LHC proton-proton collisions, the LHCf collaboration has provided key information needed to calibrate extremely high-energy cosmic ray models.   Average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of rapidity loss ∆y. Black dots represent LHCf data and the red diamonds represent SPS experiment UA7 results. The predictions of hadronic interaction models are shown by open boxes (sibyll 2.1), open circles (qgsjet II-03) and open triangles (epos 1.99). Among these models, epos 1.99 shows the best overall agreement with the LHCf data. LHCf is dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted at extremely small angles in the very forward region of LHC collisions. Two imaging calorimeters – Arm1 and Arm2 – take data 140 m either side of the ATLAS interaction point. “The physics goal of this type of analysis is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models – the well-known &...

  14. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  15. Adjoint de programme (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Crystal Reports, IDRIS, contenus Web, NavigatER);; Maintenir les contacts avec les membres de l'équipe à l'aide de CardScan;; Contribuer au classement électronique des documents de l'équipe à l'aide de LiveLinks;; Coordonner la traduction, la lecture d'épreuves et la mise en forme de documents, suivant les besoins; ...

  16. Coupled adjoint aerostructural wing optimization using quasi-three-dimensional aerodynamic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elham, A.; van Tooren, M.J.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for wing aerostructural analysis and optimization, which needs much lower computational costs, while computes the wing drag and structural deformation with a level of accuracy comparable to the higher fidelity CFD and FEM tools. A quasi-threedimensional aerodynamic

  17. Adjoint de direction, Économies inclusives (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Résumé des fonctions Sous la responsabilité du directeur de domaine de programme ou de la division et en qualité de membre de l'équipe de gestion de la ... les interventions et les décisions administratives aux dossiers gérés par le directeur, classer des documents sur papier et (ou) sur support électronique et tenir un ...

  18. Adjoint-based shape optimisation of inkjet printhead with compliant boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungurtsev, Petr; Juniper, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    A drop-on-demand inkjet printhead is a narrow, ink-filled, channel with a piezoelement on the upper boundary and a nozzle on the opposite side. A high-frequency electric pulse is applied to deform the piezoelement, pushing a small amount of fluid through the nozzle to create a droplet. After the pulse ends, acoustic waves continue to propagate inside the channel. The printing speed depends on the rate at which droplets are expelled and therefore on the frequency of the applied pulse. As the pulse frequency increases and approaches the first natural mode, the amplitude of the acoustic wave increases rapidly. This leads to an unpredictable oscillatory behaviour inside the channel as the acoustic waves have not decayed before the start of the next pulse, and the print quality reduces. We demonstrate how to adjust the printhead geometry to increase the decay rate of acoustic oscillations, which should maintain print quality for higher frequencies. We have derived the decay rate sensitivity to the shape changes in Hadamard form, and modified the channel`s geometry to increase the decay rate of acoustic fluctuations. Also, the presence of the domain boundaries compliance is taken into account to consider their deformation under the influence of the oscillations propagating inside. Marie Curie ITN.

  19. Physics-based Morphology Analysis and Adjoint Optimization of Flexible Flapping Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    THIS PAGE 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 434-243-4098 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Adobe Professional...maneuvering flight. The aerodynamic performance is then studied using an in- house immersed boundary method (IBM) based computational fluid dynamics (CFD...both near and far field. Our results on the maneuvering hummingbird kinematics suggest that hummingbird sustained yaw turns by tiling up the outer

  20. Multiscale Capability in Rattlesnake using Contiguous Discontinuous Discretization of Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Weixiong [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, Mark D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    In this report, we present a new upwinding scheme for the multiscale capability in Rattlesnake, the MOOSE based radiation transport application. Comparing with the initial implementation of multiscale utilizing Lagrange multipliers to impose strong continuity of angular flux on interface of in-between subdomains, this scheme does not require the particular domain partitioning. This upwinding scheme introduces discontinuity of angular flux and resembles the classic upwinding technique developed for solving first order transport equation using discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) on the subdomain interfaces. Because this scheme restores the causality of radiation streaming on the interfaces, significant accuracy improvement can be observed with moderate increase of the degrees of freedom comparing with the continuous method over the entire solution domain. Hybrid SN-PN is implemented and tested with this upwinding scheme. Numerical results show that the angular smoothing required by Lagrange multiplier method is not necessary for the upwinding scheme.