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Sample records for adjoint flux

  1. Variation estimation of the averaged cross sections in the direct and adjoint fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    1995-01-01

    There are several applications of the perturbation theory to specifics problems of reactor physics, such as nonuniform fuel burnup, nonuniform poison accumulation and evaluations of Doppler effects on reactivity. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of direct and adjoint diffusion equations, are used in these applications. In the adjoint diffusion equation has been used the group constants averaged in the energy-dependent direct neutron flux, that it is not theoretically consistent. In this paper it is presented a method to calculate the energy-dependent adjoint neutron flux, to obtain the average group-constant that will be used in the adjoint diffusion equation. The method is based on the solution of the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were derived for a two regions cell. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  2. Formulation of coarse mesh finite difference to calculate mathematical adjoint flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Valmir; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is the obtention of the mathematical adjoint flux, having as its support the nodal expansion method (NEM) for coarse mesh problems. Since there are difficulties to evaluate this flux by using NEM. directly, a coarse mesh finite difference program was developed to obtain this adjoint flux. The coarse mesh finite difference formulation (DFMG) adopted uses results of the direct calculation (node average flux and node face averaged currents) obtained by NEM. These quantities (flux and currents) are used to obtain the correction factors which modify the classical finite differences formulation . Since the DFMG formulation is also capable of calculating the direct flux it was also tested to obtain this flux and it was verified that it was able to reproduce with good accuracy both the flux and the currents obtained via NEM. In this way, only matrix transposition is needed to calculate the mathematical adjoint flux. (author)

  3. On the use of flux-adjoint condensed nuclear data for 1-group AGR kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutt, P.K.

    1979-03-01

    Following previous work on the differences between one and two neutron group AGR kinetics the possible advantages of flux-adjoint condensed lattice data over the simple flux condensation procedure are investigated. Analytic arguments are given for expecting flux-adjoint condensation to give a better representation of rod worth slopes and flux shape changes associated with partially rodded cores. These areas have previously been found to yield most of the one to two neutron group differences. The validity of these arguments is demonstrated comparing various calculations. (U.K.)

  4. Exploring the use of a deterministic adjoint flux calculation in criticality Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinaphanh, A.; Miss, J.; Richet, Y.; Martin, N.; Hebert, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary study on the use of a deterministic adjoint flux calculation to improve source convergence issues by reducing the number of iterations needed to reach the converged distribution in criticality Monte Carlo calculations. Slow source convergence in Monte Carlo eigenvalue calculations may lead to underestimate the effective multiplication factor or reaction rates. The convergence speed depends on the initial distribution and the dominance ratio. We propose using an adjoint flux estimation to modify the transition kernel according to the Importance Sampling technique. This adjoint flux is also used as the initial guess of the first generation distribution for the Monte Carlo simulation. Calculated Variance of a local estimator of current is being checked. (author)

  5. Self-adjoint angular flux equation for coupled electron-photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Prinja, A.K.; Morel, J.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere, and, like the even- and odd-parity form, S n source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here, the authors apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross sections from the CEPXS code and S n discretization

  6. Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Morel, J.E.; Prinja, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere and, like the even- and odd- parity form, S n source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here we apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross-sections from the CEPXS code and S n discretization

  7. Variation estimation of the averaged cross sections in the direct and adjoint fluxes; Estimativa das variacoes das secoes de choque mediadas nos fluxos direto e adjunto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1995-12-31

    There are several applications of the perturbation theory to specifics problems of reactor physics, such as nonuniform fuel burnup, nonuniform poison accumulation and evaluations of Doppler effects on reactivity. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of direct and adjoint diffusion equations, are used in these applications. In the adjoint diffusion equation has been used the group constants averaged in the energy-dependent direct neutron flux, that it is not theoretically consistent. In this paper it is presented a method to calculate the energy-dependent adjoint neutron flux, to obtain the average group-constant that will be used in the adjoint diffusion equation. The method is based on the solution of the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were derived for a two regions cell. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab.

  8. Formulation of coarse mesh finite difference to calculate mathematical adjoint flux; Formulacao de diferencas finitas de malha grossa para calculo do fluxo adjunto matematico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Valmir; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this work is the obtention of the mathematical adjoint flux, having as its support the nodal expansion method (NEM) for coarse mesh problems. Since there are difficulties to evaluate this flux by using NEM. directly, a coarse mesh finite difference program was developed to obtain this adjoint flux. The coarse mesh finite difference formulation (DFMG) adopted uses results of the direct calculation (node average flux and node face averaged currents) obtained by NEM. These quantities (flux and currents) are used to obtain the correction factors which modify the classical finite differences formulation . Since the DFMG formulation is also capable of calculating the direct flux it was also tested to obtain this flux and it was verified that it was able to reproduce with good accuracy both the flux and the currents obtained via NEM. In this way, only matrix transposition is needed to calculate the mathematical adjoint flux. (author)

  9. Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element discretization of the self-adjoint angular flux form of the transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Rabiti, Cristian; Wang, Yaqi

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear acceleration of a continuous finite element (CFE) discretization of the transport equation requires a modification of the transport solution in order to achieve local conservation, a condition used in nonlinear acceleration to define the stopping criterion. In this work we implement a coarse-mesh finite difference acceleration for a CFE discretization of the second-order self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the transport equation and use a postprocessing to enforce local conservation. Numerical results are given for one-group source calculations of one-dimensional slabs. We also give a novel formal derivation of the boundary conditions for the SAAF. (authors)

  10. Least-Squares PN Formulation of the Transport Equation Using Self-Adjoint-Angular-Flux Consistent Boundary Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent M. Laboure; Yaqi Wang; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the Least-Squares (LS) PN form of the transport equation compatible with voids in the context of Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM).We first deriveweakly imposed boundary conditions which make the LS weak formulation equivalent to the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) variational formulation with a void treatment, in the particular case of constant cross-sections and a uniform mesh. We then implement this method in Rattlesnake with the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework using a spherical harmonics (PN) expansion to discretize in angle. We test our implementation using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) and find the expected convergence behavior both in angle and space. Lastly, we investigate the impact of the global non-conservation of LS by comparing the method with SAAF on a heterogeneous test problem.

  11. Least-Squares PN Formulation of the Transport Equation Using Self-Adjoint-Angular-Flux Consistent Boundary Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laboure, Vincent M.; Wang, Yaqi; DeHart, Mark D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the Least-Squares (LS) PN form of the transport equation compatible with voids [1] in the context of Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM).We first deriveweakly imposed boundary conditions which make the LS weak formulation equivalent to the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) variational formulation with a void treatment [2], in the particular case of constant cross-sections and a uniform mesh. We then implement this method in Rattlesnake with the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework [3] using a spherical harmonics (PN) expansion to discretize in angle. We test our implementation using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) and find the expected convergence behavior both in angle and space. Lastly, we investigate the impact of the global non-conservation of LS by comparing the method with SAAF on a heterogeneous test problem.

  12. Continuous-energy adjoint flux and perturbation calculation using the iterated fission probability method in Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4 and underlying applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to present an exact method able to precisely evaluate very small reactivity effects with a Monte Carlo code (<10 pcm). it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4 and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4 is described. To illustrate the efficiency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the 'direct' estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the 'direct' method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high precision. It offers the possibility to split reactivity contributions on both isotopes and reactions. Other applications of this perturbation method are presented and tested like the calculation of exact kinetic parameters (βeff, Λeff) or sensitivity parameters

  13. Multiscale Capability in Rattlesnake using Contiguous Discontinuous Discretization of Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Weixiong [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, Mark D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    In this report, we present a new upwinding scheme for the multiscale capability in Rattlesnake, the MOOSE based radiation transport application. Comparing with the initial implementation of multiscale utilizing Lagrange multipliers to impose strong continuity of angular flux on interface of in-between subdomains, this scheme does not require the particular domain partitioning. This upwinding scheme introduces discontinuity of angular flux and resembles the classic upwinding technique developed for solving first order transport equation using discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) on the subdomain interfaces. Because this scheme restores the causality of radiation streaming on the interfaces, significant accuracy improvement can be observed with moderate increase of the degrees of freedom comparing with the continuous method over the entire solution domain. Hybrid SN-PN is implemented and tested with this upwinding scheme. Numerical results show that the angular smoothing required by Lagrange multiplier method is not necessary for the upwinding scheme.

  14. Approximation for the adjoint neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suster, Luis Carlos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    The proposal of this work is the determination of an analytical approximation which is capable to reproduce the adjoint neutron flux for the energy range of the narrow resonances (NR). In a previous work we developed a method for the calculation of the adjoint spectrum which was calculated from the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were obtained by the collision probabilities method, this method involved a considerable quantity of numerical calculation. In the analytical method some approximations were done, like the multiplication of the escape probability in the fuel by the adjoint flux in the moderator, and after these approximations, taking into account the case of the narrow resonances, were substituted in the adjoint neutron balance equation for the fuel, resulting in an analytical approximation for the adjoint flux. The results obtained in this work were compared to the results generated with the reference method, which demonstrated a good and precise results for the adjoint neutron flux for the narrow resonances. (author)

  15. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos

    2000-01-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  16. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P 1 equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  17. Approximation for the adjoint neutron spectrum; Aproximacao para o espectro adjunto de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suster, Luis Carlos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The proposal of this work is the determination of an analytical approximation which is capable to reproduce the adjoint neutron flux for the energy range of the narrow resonances (NR). In a previous work we developed a method for the calculation of the adjoint spectrum which was calculated from the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were obtained by the collision probabilities method, this method involved a considerable quantity of numerical calculation. In the analytical method some approximations were done, like the multiplication of the escape probability in the fuel by the adjoint flux in the moderator, and after these approximations, taking into account the case of the narrow resonances, were substituted in the adjoint neutron balance equation for the fuel, resulting in an analytical approximation for the adjoint flux. The results obtained in this work were compared to the results generated with the reference method, which demonstrated a good and precise results for the adjoint neutron flux for the narrow resonances. (author)

  18. On the non-uniqueness of the nodal mathematical adjoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluate three CMFD schemes for computing the nodal mathematical adjoint. • The nodal mathematical adjoint is not unique and can be non-positive (nonphysical). • Adjoint and forward eigenmodes are compatible if produced by the same CMFD method. • In nodal applications the excited eigenmodes are purely mathematical entities. - Abstract: Computation of the neutron adjoint flux within the framework of modern nodal diffusion methods is often facilitated by reducing the nodal equation system for the forward flux into a simpler coarse-mesh finite-difference form and then transposing the resultant matrix equations. The solution to the transposed problem is known as the nodal mathematical adjoint. Since the coarse-mesh finite-difference reduction of a given nodal formulation can be obtained in a number of ways, different nodal mathematical adjoint solutions can be computed. This non-uniqueness of the nodal mathematical adjoint challenges the credibility of the reduction strategy and demands a verdict as to its suitability in practical applications. This is the matter under consideration in this paper. A selected number of coarse-mesh finite-difference reduction schemes are described and compared. Numerical calculations are utilised to illustrate the differences in the adjoint solutions as well as to appraise the impact on such common applications as the computation of core point kinetics parameters. Recommendations are made for the proper application of the coarse-mesh finite-difference reduction approach to the nodal mathematical adjoint problem

  19. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation; Sistema de equacoes P1 adjuntas para a moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  20. Adjoint entropy vs topological entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano Bruno, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Recently the adjoint algebraic entropy of endomorphisms of abelian groups was introduced and studied. We generalize the notion of adjoint entropy to continuous endomorphisms of topological abelian groups. Indeed, the adjoint algebraic entropy is defined using the family of all finite-index subgroups, while we take only the subfamily of all open finite-index subgroups to define the topological adjoint entropy. This allows us to compare the (topological) adjoint entropy with the known topologic...

  1. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down; Solucao das equacoes P1 adjuntas para moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P{sub 1} equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  2. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malins Alex

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS. An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  3. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Niita, Koji

    2017-09-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  4. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urichuk, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.urichuk@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Walton, Mark A., E-mail: walton@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  5. Adjoint current-based approaches to prostate brachytherapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J. A.; Henderson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper builds on previous work done at the Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison to employ the adjoint concept of nuclear reactor physics in the so-called greedy heuristic of brachytherapy optimization. Whereas that previous work focused on the adjoint flux, i.e. the importance, this work has included use of the adjoint current to increase the amount of information available in optimizing. Two current-based approaches were developed for 2-D problems, and each was compared to the most recent form of the flux-based methodology. The first method aimed to take a treatment plan from the flux-based greedy heuristic and adjust via application of the current-displacement, or a vector displacement based on a combination of tissue (adjoint) and seed (forward) currents acting as forces on a seed. This method showed promise in improving key urethral and rectal dosimetric quantities. The second method uses the normed current-displacement as the greedy criterion such that seeds are placed in regions of least force. This method, coupled with the dose-update scheme, generated treatment plans with better target irradiation and sparing of the urethra and normal tissues than the flux-based approach. Tables of these parameters are given for both approaches. In summary, these preliminary results indicate adjoint current methods are useful in optimization and further work in 3-D should be performed. (authors)

  6. Generalized Adjoint Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    of the adjoint of a linear transformation in Banach space . Let B = f(Z;B; Y )g be a set of causal input-output systems, where Y is the input space of... Banach spaces . Other spaces and mappings related to (Y; F; U) will be introduced, but U and Y with the qualifying a¢ xes they carry always refer to...functions from < into a Banach space E such that any translate of a function in L is also a function in L. Let N = fkks;t ;1 < s < t əg be a family

  7. Adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursky, Paul; Porter, Michael B.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Hodgkiss, W. S.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2004-02-01

    The use of adjoint modeling for acoustic inversion is investigated. An adjoint model is derived from a linearized forward propagation model to propagate data-model misfit at the observation points back through the medium to the medium perturbations not being accounted for in the model. This adjoint model can be used to aid in inverting for these unaccounted medium perturbations. Adjoint methods are being applied to a variety of inversion problems, but have not drawn much attention from the underwater acoustic community. This paper presents an application of adjoint methods to acoustic inversion. Inversions are demonstrated in simulation for both range-independent and range-dependent sound speed profiles using the adjoint of a parabolic equation model. Sensitivity and error analyses are discussed showing how the adjoint model enables calculations to be performed in the space of observations, rather than the often much larger space of model parameters. Using an adjoint model enables directions of steepest descent in the model parameters (what we invert for) to be calculated using far fewer modeling runs than if a forward model only were used.

  8. NON-SELF-ADJOINT GRAPHS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussein, A.; Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 367, č. 4 (2015), s. 2921-2957 ISSN 0002-9947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Laplacians on metric graphs * non-self-adjoint boundary conditions * similarity transforms to self-adjoint operators * Riesz basis Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.196, year: 2015

  9. Adjoint sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in Monte Carlo forward calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Chang Hyo

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint-weighted perturbation (AWP) method, in which the required adjoint flux is estimated in the course of Monte Carlo (MC) forward calculations, has recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional MC perturbation techniques, such as the correlated sampling and differential operator sampling (DOS) methods. The equivalence of the first-order AWP method and first-order DOS method with the fission source perturbation taken into account is proven. An algorithm for the AWP calculations is implemented in the Seoul National University MC code McCARD and applied to the sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the Godiva and Bigten criticalities. (author)

  10. A response matrix method for slab-geometry discrete ordinates adjoint calculations in energy-dependent source-detector problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Ralph S.; Moura, Carlos A., E-mail: ralph@ime.uerj.br, E-mail: demoura@ime.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Modelagem Computacional

    2017-07-01

    Presented here is an application of the Response Matrix (RM) method for adjoint discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) problems in slab geometry applied to energy-dependent source-detector problems. The adjoint RM method is free from spatial truncation errors, as it generates numerical results for the adjoint angular fluxes in multilayer slabs that agree with the numerical values obtained from the analytical solution of the energy multigroup adjoint SN equations. Numerical results are given for two typical source-detector problems to illustrate the accuracy and the efficiency of the offered RM computer code. (author)

  11. Adjoint electron Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo is the most efficient method for accurate analysis of space systems exposed to natural and artificially enhanced electron environments. Recent adjoint calculations for isotropic electron environments include: comparative data for experimental measurements on electronics boxes; benchmark problem solutions for comparing total dose prediction methodologies; preliminary assessment of sectoring methods used during space system design; and total dose predictions on an electronics package. Adjoint Monte Carlo, forward Monte Carlo, and experiment are in excellent agreement for electron sources that simulate space environments. For electron space environments, adjoint Monte Carlo is clearly superior to forward Monte Carlo, requiring one to two orders of magnitude less computer time for relatively simple geometries. The solid-angle sectoring approximations used for routine design calculations can err by more than a factor of 2 on dose in simple shield geometries. For critical space systems exposed to severe electron environments, these potential sectoring errors demand the establishment of large design margins and/or verification of shield design by adjoint Monte Carlo/experiment

  12. Hamiltonian Realizations of Nonlinear Adjoint Operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Gray, W. Steven

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses state-space realizations for nonlinear adjoint operators. In particular the relationship among nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operators, Hamiltonian extensions and port-controlled Hamiltonian systems are clarified. The characterization of controllability, observability and Hankel

  13. Generalization of Spectral Green's Function nodal method for slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Silva, Odair P. da; Barros, Ricardo C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Garcia, Carlos R., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    Presented here is the application of the adjoint technique for solving source-detector discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) transport problems by using a spectral nodal method. For slab-geometry adjoint S-N model, the adjoint spectral Green's function method (SGF{sup †}) is extended to multigroup problems considering arbitrary L'th-order of scattering anisotropy, and the possibility of non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward S{sub N} transport problems. The SGF{sup †} method converges numerical solutions that are completely free from spatial truncation errors. In order to generate numerical solutions of the SGF{sup †} equations, we use the partial adjoint one-node block inversion (NBI) iterative scheme. Partial adjoint NBI scheme uses the most recent estimates for the node-edge adjoint angular Fluxes in the outgoing directions of a given discretization node, to solve the resulting adjoint SN problem in that node for all the adjoint angular fluxes in the incoming directions, which constitute the outgoing adjoint angular fluxes for the adjacent node in the sweeping directions. Numerical results are given to illustrate the present spectral nodal method features and some advantages of using the adjoint technique in source-detector problems. author)

  14. Generalization of Spectral Green's Function nodal method for slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in SN formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Silva, Odair P. da; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    Presented here is the application of the adjoint technique for solving source{detector discrete ordinates (S N ) transport problems by using a spectral nodal method. For slab-geometry adjoint S-N model, the adjoint spectral Green's function method (SGF † ) is extended to multigroup problems considering arbitrary L'th-order of scattering anisotropy, and the possibility of non{zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward S N transport problems. The SGF † method converges numerical solutions that are completely free from spatial truncation errors. In order to generate numerical solutions of the SGF † equations, we use the partial adjoint one{node block inversion (NBI) iterative scheme. Partial adjoint NBI scheme uses the most recent estimates for the node-edge adjoint angular Fluxes in the outgoing directions of a given discretization node, to solve the resulting adjoint SN problem in that node for all the adjoint angular fluxes in the incoming directions, which constitute the outgoing adjoint angular fluxes for the adjacent node in the sweeping directions. Numerical results are given to illustrate the present spectral nodal method features and some advantages of using the adjoint technique in source-detector problems. author)

  15. Spatial discretizations for self-adjoint forms of the radiative transfer equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Jim E.; Adams, B. Todd; Noh, Taewan; McGhee, John M.; Evans, Thomas M.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2006-01-01

    There are three commonly recognized second-order self-adjoint forms of the neutron transport equation: the even-parity equations, the odd-parity equations, and the self-adjoint angular flux equations. Because all of these equations contain second-order spatial derivatives and are self-adjoint for the mono-energetic case, standard continuous finite-element discretization techniques have proved quite effective when applied to the spatial variables. We first derive analogs of these equations for the case of time-dependent radiative transfer. The primary unknowns for these equations are functions of the angular intensity rather than the angular flux, hence the analog of the self-adjoint angular flux equation is referred to as the self-adjoint angular intensity equation. Then we describe a general, arbitrary-order, continuous spatial finite-element approach that is applied to each of the three equations in conjunction with backward-Euler differencing in time. We refer to it as the 'standard' technique. We also introduce an alternative spatial discretization scheme for the self-adjoint angular intensity equation that requires far fewer unknowns than the standard method, but appears to give comparable accuracy. Computational results are given that demonstrate the validity of both of these discretization schemes

  16. New Monte Carlo approach to the adjoint Boltzmann equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Matteis, A.; Simonini, R.

    1978-01-01

    A class of stochastic models for the Monte Carlo integration of the adjoint neutron transport equation is described. Some current general methods are brought within this class, thus preparing the ground for subsequent comparisons. Monte Carlo integration of the adjoint Boltzmann equation can be seen as a simulation of the transport of mathematical particles with reaction kernels not normalized to unity. This last feature is a source of difficulty: It can influence the variance of the result negatively and also often leads to preparation of special ''libraries'' consisting of tables of normalization factors as functions of energy, presently used by several methods. These are the two main points that are discussed and that are taken into account to devise a nonmultigroup method of solution for a certain class of problems. Reactions considered in detail are radiative capture, elastic scattering, discrete levels and continuum inelastic scattering, for which the need for tables has been almost completely eliminated. The basic policy pursued to avoid a source of statistical fluctuations is to try to make the statistical weight of the traveling particle dependent only on its starting and current energies, at least in simple cases. The effectiveness of the sampling schemes proposed is supported by numerical comparison with other more general adjoint Monte Carlo methods. Computation of neutron flux at a point by means of an adjoint formulation is the problem taken as a test for numerical experiments. Very good results have been obtained in the difficult case of resonant cross sections

  17. Weak self-adjoint differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandarias, M L

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of self-adjoint and quasi self-adjoint equations were introduced by Ibragimov (2006 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 318 742-57; 2007 Arch. ALGA 4 55-60). In Ibragimov (2007 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 333 311-28), a general theorem on conservation laws was proved. In this paper, we generalize the concept of self-adjoint and quasi self-adjoint equations by introducing the definition of weak self-adjoint equations. We find a class of weak self-adjoint quasi-linear parabolic equations. The property of a differential equation to be weak self-adjoint is important for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation. (fast track communication)

  18. Development and validation of continuous energy adjoint-weighted calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truchet, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in nowadays Reactor Physics is to propagate input data uncertainties (e.g. nuclear data, manufacturing tolerances, etc.) to nuclear codes final results (e.g. k(eff), reaction rate, etc.). In order to propagate uncertainties, one typically assumes small variations around a reference and evaluates at first sensitivity profiles. Problem is that nuclear Monte Carlo codes are not - or were not until very recently - able to straightforwardly process such sensitivity profiles, even thought they are considered as reference codes. First goal of this PhD thesis is to implement a method to calculate k(eff)-sensitivity profiles to nuclear data or any perturbations in TRIPOLI-4, the CEA Monte Carlo neutrons transport code. To achieve such a goal, a method has first been developed to calculate the adjoint flux using the Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) principle that states that the adjoint flux at a given phase space point is proportional to the neutron importance in a just critical core after several power iterations. Thanks to our developments, it has been made possible, for the fist time, to calculate the continuous adjoint flux for an actual and complete reactor core configuration. From that new feature, we have elaborated a new method able to forwardly apply the exact perturbation theory in Monte Carlo codes. Exact perturbation theory does not rely on small variations which makes possible to calculate very complex experiments. Finally and after a deep analysis of the IFP method, this PhD thesis also reproduces and improves an already used method to calculate adjoint weighted kinetic parameters as well as reference migrations areas. (author) [fr

  19. Invariants in electromagnetic and gravitational adjoint fields

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the impact of adjoint fields on the conservation laws in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field, by means of the characteristics of octonions. When the adjoint field can not be neglected, it will cause the predictions to departure slightly from the conservation laws, which include mass continuity equation, charge continuity equation, and conservation of spin. The adjoint field of electromagnetic field has an effect on conservation of mass, and that of gravitatio...

  20. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: jperez@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint S{sub N} balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the S{sub N} equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint S{sub N} problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  1. Inverse modeling of methane sources and sinks using the adjoint of a global transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, S; Kaminski, T; Dentener, F; Lelieveld, J; Heimann, M

    1999-01-01

    An inverse modeling method is presented to evaluate the sources and sinks of atmospheric methane. An adjoint version of a global transport model has been used to estimate these fluxes at a relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. Measurements from 34 monitoring stations and 11 locations

  2. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  3. SELF-ADJOINT FOURTH ORDER DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Click on the link to view the abstract. Keywords: Fourth order differential equation, eigenvalue dependent boundary conditions, quadratic operator pencil, self-adjoint operator. Quaestiones Mathematicae 34(2011), 393–406 ...

  4. Adjoint-based optimization for flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Wei, Mingjun

    2012-11-01

    Adjoint-based methods show great potential in flow control and optimization of complex problems with high- or infinite-dimensional control space. It is attractive to solve an adjoint problem to understand the complex effects from multiple control parameters to a few performance indicators of the flight of birds or insects. However, the traditional approach to formulate the adjoint problem becomes either impossible or too complex when arbitrary moving boundary (e.g. flapping wings) and its perturbation is considered. Here, we use non-cylindrical calculus to define the perturbation. So that, a simple adjoint system can be derived directly in the inertial coordinate. The approach is first applied to the optimization of cylinder oscillation and later to flapping wings. Supported by AFOSR.

  5. Local fibred right adjoints are polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders; Kock, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense......For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense...

  6. Technical Note: Adjoint formulation of the TOMCAT atmospheric transport scheme in the Eulerian backtracking framework (RETRO-TOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, P. E.; Esler, J. G.; Carver, G. D.

    2014-06-01

    A new methodology for the formulation of an adjoint to the transport component of the chemistry transport model TOMCAT is described and implemented in a new model, RETRO-TOM. The Eulerian backtracking method is used, allowing the forward advection scheme (Prather's second-order moments) to be efficiently exploited in the backward adjoint calculations. Prather's scheme is shown to be time symmetric, suggesting the possibility of high accuracy. To attain this accuracy, however, it is necessary to make a careful treatment of the "density inconsistency" problem inherent to offline transport models. The results are verified using a series of test experiments. These demonstrate the high accuracy of RETRO-TOM when compared with direct forward sensitivity calculations, at least for problems in which flux limiters in the advection scheme are not required. RETRO-TOM therefore combines the flexibility and stability of a "finite difference of adjoint" formulation with the accuracy of an "adjoint of finite difference" formulation.

  7. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  9. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  10. Double-Difference Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsvuran, R.; Bozdag, E.; Lei, W.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    The adjoint method allows us to incorporate full waveform simulations in inverse problems. Misfit functions play an important role in extracting the relevant information from seismic waveforms. In this study, our goal is to apply the Double-Difference (DD) methodology proposed by Yuan et al. (2016) to global adjoint tomography. Dense seismic networks, such as USArray, lead to higher-resolution seismic images underneath continents. However, the imbalanced distribution of stations and sources poses challenges in global ray coverage. We adapt double-difference multitaper measurements to global adjoint tomography. We normalize each DD measurement by its number of pairs, and if a measurement has no pair, as may frequently happen for data recorded at oceanic stations, classical multitaper measurements are used. As a result, the differential measurements and pair-wise weighting strategy help balance uneven global kernel coverage. Our initial experiments with minor- and major-arc surface waves show promising results, revealing more pronounced structure near dense networks while reducing the prominence of paths towards cluster of stations. We have started using this new measurement in global adjoint inversions, addressing azimuthal anisotropy in upper mantle. Meanwhile, we are working on combining the double-difference approach with instantaneous phase measurements to emphasize contributions of scattered waves in global inversions and extending it to body waves. We will present our results and discuss challenges and future directions in the context of global tomographic inversions.

  11. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound...

  12. A new approach for developing adjoint models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Many data assimilation algorithms rely on the availability of gradients of misfit functionals, which can be efficiently computed with adjoint models. However, the development of an adjoint model for a complex geophysical code is generally very difficult. Algorithmic differentiation (AD, also called automatic differentiation) offers one strategy for simplifying this task: it takes the abstraction that a model is a sequence of primitive instructions, each of which may be differentiated in turn. While extremely successful, this low-level abstraction runs into time-consuming difficulties when applied to the whole codebase of a model, such as differentiating through linear solves, model I/O, calls to external libraries, language features that are unsupported by the AD tool, and the use of multiple programming languages. While these difficulties can be overcome, it requires a large amount of technical expertise and an intimate familiarity with both the AD tool and the model. An alternative to applying the AD tool to the whole codebase is to assemble the discrete adjoint equations and use these to compute the necessary gradients. With this approach, the AD tool must be applied to the nonlinear assembly operators, which are typically small, self-contained units of the codebase. The disadvantage of this approach is that the assembly of the discrete adjoint equations is still very difficult to perform correctly, especially for complex multiphysics models that perform temporal integration; as it stands, this approach is as difficult and time-consuming as applying AD to the whole model. In this work, we have developed a library which greatly simplifies and automates the alternate approach of assembling the discrete adjoint equations. We propose a complementary, higher-level abstraction to that of AD: that a model is a sequence of linear solves. The developer annotates model source code with library calls that build a 'tape' of the operators involved and their dependencies, and

  13. Double adjoint method for determining the contribution of composition to reactivity at different times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, S.A.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The double adjoint method is described. ► System reloading is determined so the multiplication factor behaviour is repeated. ► Both fast and thermal systems behave as desired. ► Allowance must be made for indirect effects in thermal systems. ► An alternative definition of breeding ratio is derived. -- Abstract: The double adjoint method uses the adjoint reactivity and transmutation problems to describe how the system composition is related to the system reactivity at different points in time. Values of the contribution to the reactivity are determined using the adjoint reactivity problem, and these are then used as the source function for the adjoint transmutation problem. The method is applied to the problem of determining the contribution of the beginning of cycle composition to the end of cycle reactivity. It is tested in both fast and thermal systems by comparing the behaviour of the multiplication factor at the end of cycle in calculations with perturbed initial compositions to that predicted by the double adjoint method. The results from the fast system are good, while those from the thermal system are less favourable. This is believed to be due to the method neglecting the coupling between the composition and the flux, which plays a more significant role in thermal systems than fast ones. The importance of correcting for the effects of the fuel compound is also established. The values found are used in calculations to determine the appropriate fuel reloading of the systems tested, with the aim of duplicating the behaviour of the multiplication factor of the original system. Again the fast system gives good results, while the thermal system is less accurate. The double adjoint method is also used for a definition of breeding ratio, and some of the features of this definition are illustrated by examining the effects of different feed materials and reprocessing schemes. The method is shown to be a useful tool for the comparison of the

  14. Unconditional bases of subspaces related to non-self-adjoint perturbations of self-adjoint operators

    OpenAIRE

    Motovilov, A. K.; Shkalikov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Assume that $T$ is a self-adjoint operator on a Hilbert space $\\mathcal{H}$ and that the spectrum of $T$ is confined in the union $\\bigcup_{j\\in J}\\Delta_j$, $J\\subseteq\\mathbb{Z}$, of segments $\\Delta_j=[\\alpha_j, \\beta_j]\\subset\\mathbb{R}$ such that $\\alpha_{j+1}>\\beta_j$ and $$ \\inf_{j} \\left(\\alpha_{j+1}-\\beta_j\\right) = d > 0. $$ If $B$ is a bounded (in general non-self-adjoint) perturbation of $T$ with $\\|B\\|=:b

  15. Elementary operators on self-adjoint operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Lajos; Semrl, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and let and be standard *-operator algebras on H. Denote by and the set of all self-adjoint operators in and , respectively. Assume that and are surjective maps such that M(AM*(B)A)=M(A)BM(A) and M*(BM(A)B)=M*(B)AM*(B) for every pair , . Then there exist an invertible bounded linear or conjugate-linear operator and a constant c[set membership, variant]{-1,1} such that M(A)=cTAT*, , and M*(B)=cT*BT, .

  16. Radiation source reconstruction with known geometry and materials using the adjoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hykes, Joshua M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to estimate an unknown isotropic source distribution, in space and energy, using detector measurements when the geometry and material composition are known. The estimated source distribution minimizes the difference between the measured and computed responses of detectors located at a selected number of points within the domain. In typical methods, a forward flux calculation is performed for each source guess in an iterative process. In contrast, we use the adjoint flux to compute the responses. Potential applications of the proposed method include determining the distribution of radio-contaminants following a nuclear event, monitoring the flow of radioactive fluids in pipes to determine hold-up locations, and retroactive reconstruction of radiation fields using workers' detectors' readings. After presenting the method, we describe a numerical test problem to demonstrate the preliminary viability of the method. As expected, using the adjoint flux reduces the number of transport solves to be proportional to the number of detector measurements, in contrast to methods using the forward flux that require a typically larger number proportional to the number of spatial mesh cells. (author)

  17. A reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    The adjoint method has been used very often for variational data assimilation. The computational cost to run the adjoint model often exceeds several original model runs and the method needs significant programming efforts to implement the adjoint model code. The work proposed here is variational data assimilation based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) which avoids the implementation of the adjoint of the tangent linear approximation of the original nonlinear model. An ensemble of the forward model simulations is used to determine the approximation of the covariance matrix and only the dominant eigenvectors of this matrix are used to define a model subspace. The adjoint of the tangent linear model is replaced by the reduced adjoint based on this reduced space. Thus the adjoint model is run in reduced space with negligible computational cost. Once the gradient is obtained in reduced space it is projected back in full space and the minimization process is carried in full space. In the paper the reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation is introduced. The characteristics and performance of the method are illustrated with a number of data assimilation experiments in a ground water subsurface contaminant model. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandara, Lashi; Milatovic, Ognjen

    2015-01-01

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator

  19. The dynamic adjoint as a Green’s function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pázsit, I.; Dykin, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlight: • The relationship between the direct Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint function is discussed in two-group theory. • It is shown that the elements of the direct Greens’ function matrix are identical to those of the transpose of the adjoint Green’s function matrix, with an interchange of arguments. • It is also remarked how the dynamic adjoint function of van Dam can be given in terms of the direct Green’s function matrix. - Abstract: The concept of the dynamic adjoint was introduced by Hugo van Dam for calculating the in-core neutron noise in boiling water reactors in the mid-70’s. This successful approach found numerous applications for calculating the neutron noise in both PWRs and BWRs since then. Although the advantages and disadvantages of using the direct (forward) or the adjoint (backward) approach for the calculation of the neutron noise were analysed in a number of publications, the direct relationship between the forward Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint has not been discussed. On the other hand, in particle transport theory the relationship between the direct and adjoint Green’s function has been discussed in detail, in which Mike Williams has had many seminal contributions. In this note we analyse the relationship between the direct Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint in the spirit of Mike’s work in neutron transport and radiation damage theory. The paper is closed with some personal remarks and reminiscences.

  20. Improved Adjoint-Operator Learning For A Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of adjoint-operator learning reduces amount of computation and associated computational memory needed to make electronic neural network learn temporally varying pattern (e.g., to recognize moving object in image) in real time. Method extension of method described in "Adjoint-Operator Learning for a Neural Network" (NPO-18352).

  1. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis for Density and Composition: A User’s Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.; Perkó, Zoltán; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Perfetti, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of uncertainties is essential for criticality safety. Our paper deals with material density and composition uncertainties and provides guidance on how traditional first-order sensitivity methods can be used to predict their effects. Unlike problems that deal with traditional cross-section uncertainty analysis, material density and composition-related problems are often characterized by constraints that do not allow arbitrary and independent variations of the input parameters. Their proper handling requires constrained sensitivities that take into account the interdependence of the inputs. This paper discusses how traditional unconstrained isotopic density sensitivities can be calculated using the adjoint sensitivity capabilities of the popular Monte Carlo codes MCNP6 and SCALE 6.2, and we also present the equations to be used when forward and adjoint flux distributions are available. Subsequently, we show how the constrained sensitivities can be computed using the unconstrained (adjoint-based) sensitivities as well as by applying central differences directly. We present three distinct procedures for enforcing the constraint on the input variables, each leading to different constrained sensitivities. As a guide, the sensitivity and uncertainty formulas for several frequently encountered specific cases involving densities and compositions are given. One analytic k ∞ example highlights the relationship between constrained sensitivity formulas and central differences, and a more realistic numerical problem reveals similarities among the computer codes used and differences among the three methods of enforcing the constraint.

  2. Global Adjoint Tomography: Next-Generation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Orsvuran, Ridvan; Peter, Daniel; Ruan, Youyi; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    The first-generation global adjoint tomography model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al. 2016) is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations based on GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of 3D wave propagation and Fréchet kernels. For simplicity, GLAD-M15 was constructed as an elastic model with transverse isotropy confined to the upper mantle. However, Earth's mantle and crust show significant evidence of anisotropy as a result of its composition and deformation. There may be different sources of seismic anisotropy affecting both body and surface waves. As a first attempt, we initially tackle with surface-wave anisotropy and proceed iterations using the same 253 earthquake data set used in GLAD-M15 with an emphasize on upper-mantle. Furthermore, we explore new misfits, such as double-difference measurements (Yuan et al. 2016), to better deal with the possible artifacts of the uneven distribution of seismic stations globally and minimize source uncertainties in structural inversions. We will present our observations with the initial results of azimuthally anisotropic inversions and also discuss the next generation global models with various parametrizations. Meanwhile our goal is to use all available seismic data in imaging. This however requires a solid framework to perform iterative adjoint tomography workflows with big data on supercomputers. We will talk about developments in adjoint tomography workflow from the need of defining new seismic and computational data formats (e.g., ASDF by Krischer et al. 2016, ADIOS by Liu et al. 2011) to developing new pre- and post-processing tools together with experimenting workflow management tools, such as Pegasus (Deelman et al. 2015). All our simulations are performed on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Our ultimate aim is to get ready to harness ORNL's next-generation supercomputer "Summit", an IBM with Power-9 CPUs and NVIDIA Volta GPU accelerators, to be ready by 2018 which will enable us to

  3. Data adjoint assimilation into the adjoint inverse coastal circulation model that conforms to topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Gaddard, A. J. H.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Piggott, M. D.; Umpleby, A. P.; Copeland, G. J. M.

    2003-04-01

    There are often uncertain factors in ocean numerical models, e.g. the initial and boundary conditions, parameters. With the introduction of advanced observational techniques, more attention has been given to data assimilation to improve the predictive capabilities of ocean models. The question is how and where best to assimilate the observations for reducing the dependence of solutions on the initial and boundary data and getting a better representation of non-stratified water flows around and over coastal topography. In this investigation, we aim to introduce an adjoint model into the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM), which is a 3D nonlinear non-hydrostatic model with mesh adaptivity and optimal Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) parallel solver. By using an unstructured mesh, ICOM can automatically conform to the complicated coastal topography and with mesh adaptivity the resolution can be designed to meet physics demands such as flows in region of high shear and flow separation at coastlines. In the initial stage of this investigation, we discuss various adjoint methods and their consistence. To accelerate the convergence of the gradient calculation and reduce the memory requirement, the numerical techniques: Nonlinear Conjugate Gradient and Check Pointing are introduced. We then apply the adjoint method to 1D nonlinear shallow water and 2D coastal flow past a headland with the inversion of both boundary and initial conditions. We give an initial insight to (1) Effect of data information to be inverted; (2) Role of the nonlinear terms in the inversion; (3) Possibility of adopting non-consistent discretization schemes in the forward and backward adjoint models; (4) Effect of various boundary conditions, e.g. uniform flow and wave/tidal flow.

  4. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  5. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the ;tape;. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  6. Nonlinear self-adjointness of the Krichever-Novikov equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiakberova, L. R.; Ibragimov, N. H.

    2014-02-01

    It is known that the classification of third-order evolutionary equations with the constant separant possessing a nontrivial Lie-Bäcklund algebra (in other words, integrable equations) results in the linear equation, the KdV equation and the Krichever-Novikov equation. The first two of these equations are nonlinearly self-adjoint. This property allows to associate conservation laws of the equations in question with their symmetries. The problem on nonlinear self-adjointness of the Krichever-Novikov equation has not been solved yet. In the present paper we solve this problem and find the explicit form of the differential substitution providing the nonlinear self-adjointness.

  7. Phenomenology of spinless adjoints in two universal extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Kirtiman; Datta, Anindya

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of (1,1)-mode adjoint scalars in the framework of two Universal Extra Dimensions. The Kaluza-Klein (KK) towers of these adjoint scalars arise in the 4-dimensional effective theory from the 6th component of the gauge fields after compactification. Adjoint scalars can have KK-number conserving as well as KK-number violating interactions. We calculate the KK-number violating operators involving these scalars and two Standard Model fields. Decay widths of these scalars into different channels have been estimated. We have also briefly discussed pair-production and single production of such scalars at the Large Hadron Collider

  8. Intrinsic self adjointness and the calculus of variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, M.W.; Embaby, M.

    1986-07-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made for generalizing the calculus of variations in such a way that the end points are left without being constrained, with the purpose of generating Sturm-Liouville differential operators and the like, that are intrinsically self-adjoint. This approach is not only different from the hermitization prescription, but also more superior in view of the fact that self-adjointness is built in naturally. The proposed generalization of the variational calculus provides an Euler-Lagrange differential equation with a differential boundary term, that is responsible for restoring self-adjointness. In this frame, functionals containing higher order derivatives, and multi-dimensional dependent as well as independent variables which may or may not be subjected to some integral constraints are extremized. As a typical example, the Sturm-Liouville problem is considered, in which intrinsic self adjointness is incorporated. (author)

  9. Analysis of Nonlinear Missile Guidance Systems Through Linear Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Gamal Eltohamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a linear simulation algorithm, the adjoint method, is modified and employed as an efficient tool for analyzing the contributions of system parameters to the miss - distance of a nonlinear time-varying missile guidance system model. As an example for the application of the linear adjoint method, the effect of missile flight time on the miss - distance is studied. Since the missile model is highly nonlinear and a time-varying linearized model is required to apply the adjoint method, a new technique that utilizes the time-reversed linearized coefficients of the missile as a replacement for the time-varying describing functions is applied and proven to be successful. It is found that, when compared with Monte Carlo generated results, simulation results of this linear adjoint technique provide acceptable accuracy and can be produced with much less effort.

  10. Adjoint-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Aerospace Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of twenty years of adjoint-based aerodynamic design research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Adjoint-based algorithms provide a powerful tool for efficient sensitivity analysis of complex large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Unlike alternative approaches for which computational expense generally scales with the number of design parameters, adjoint techniques yield sensitivity derivatives of a simulation output with respect to all input parameters at the cost of a single additional simulation. With modern large-scale CFD applications often requiring millions of compute hours for a single analysis, the efficiency afforded by adjoint methods is critical in realizing a computationally tractable design optimization capability for such applications.

  11. Adjoint-Based Climate Model Tuning: Application to the Planet Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Guokun; Köhl, Armin; Matei, Ion; Stammer, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    The adjoint method is used to calibrate the medium complexity climate model "Planet Simulator" through parameter estimation. Identical twin experiments demonstrate that this method can retrieve default values of the control parameters when using a long assimilation window of the order of 2 months. Chaos synchronization through nudging, required to overcome limits in the temporal assimilation window in the adjoint method, is employed successfully to reach this assimilation window length. When assimilating ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the observations of air temperature and the radiative fluxes are the most important data for adjusting the control parameters. The global mean net longwave fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are significantly improved by tuning two model parameters controlling the absorption of clouds and water vapor. The global mean net shortwave radiation at the surface is improved by optimizing three model parameters controlling cloud optical properties. The optimized parameters improve the free model (without nudging terms) simulation in a way similar to that in the assimilation experiments. Results suggest a promising way for tuning uncertain parameters in nonlinear coupled climate models.

  12. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    KAUST Repository

    Bozdağ, Ebru

    2016-09-23

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named \\'Titan\\', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used \\'crustal corrections\\'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ M ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the

  13. Manipulating Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Using Adjoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    It has been observed that initial interfacial perturbations affect the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. However, it remains to be seen to what extent the perturbations alter the RT growth rate. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) provide a powerful means for studying the effects of initial conditions (IC) on the growth rate. However, a brute-force approach for identifying optimal initial perturbations is not practical via DNS. In addition, identifying sensitivity of the RT growth to the large number of parameters used in defining the IC is computationally expensive. A discrete adjoint is formulated to measure sensitivities of multi-mode RT growth to ICs in a high-order finite difference framework. The sensitivity is used as a search direction for adjusting the initial perturbations to both maximize and suppress the RT growth rate during its non-linear regime. The modes that contribute the greatest sensitivity are identified, and optimized perturbation energy spectrum are reported. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  14. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  15. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  16. On the norm convergence of the self-adjoint Trotter–Kato product ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The norm convergence of the Trotter–Kato product formula with error bound is shown for the semigroup generated by that operator sum of two nonnegative self-adjoint operators and which is self-adjoint.

  17. Normal and adjoint integral and integrodifferential neutron transport equations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.

    1976-01-01

    Using the simplifying hypotheses of the integrodifferential Boltzmann equations of neutron transport, given in JEN 334 report, several integral equations, and theirs adjoint ones, are obtained. Relations between the different normal and adjoint eigenfunctions are established and, in particular, proceeding from the integrodifferential Boltzmann equation it's found out the relation between the solutions of the adjoint equation of its integral one, and the solutions of the integral equation of its adjoint one (author)

  18. Numerical signatures of non-self-adjointness in quantum Hamiltonians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruf, M; Mueller, C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grobe, R, E-mail: matthias.ruf@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: carsten.mueller@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: grobe@phy.ilstu.edu [Intense Laser Physics Theory Unit and Department of Physics, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4560 (United States)

    2011-08-26

    Non-self-adjoint quantum mechanical operators do not necessarily possess eigenvalues. Finite N x N matrix representations of these operators, however, can be hermitian and therefore have a finite set of N real eigenvalues. Using the momentum operator, the kinetic energy operator, and the relativistic Hamiltonian of the Coulomb problem for the Klein-Gordon equation as examples, we examine analytically and also numerically the properties of the spectrum and eigenvectors in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces. We study the limit of N {yields} {infinity} for which some eigenvalues cease to exist as the corresponding operators are not self-adjoint. (paper)

  19. 2D Seiberg-like dualities with an adjoint matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoungho; Kim, Hyungchul; Park, Jaemo

    2017-10-01

    We consider the analogue of Kutasov-Schwimmer-Seiberg duality for two-dimensional N=(2,2)U(k) gauge theory with one adjoint X with the superpotential Tr X l+1 and with fundamental and anti-fundamental chiral multiplets. We give the evidences for the proposed dualities by analytically proving that the elliptic genus of dual pair coincides with each other. For some of the dual pairs flowing to the superconformal field theory, we show the nonperturbative truncation of the chiral ring. For the theory with one adjoint and N f > k fundamental fields, we argue the theory exhibits mass gap.

  20. Global Adjoint Tomography - Hotspots and Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Modrak, R. T.; Smith, J. A.; Orsvuran, R.; Bozdag, E.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Plumes rise from the deep mantle due to thermal or/and chemical buoyancy, forming hotspots at the surface, and oceanic plates subduct underneath continents, piling up at discontinuities or sinking down to the core-mantle boundary. Despite these basic convection mechanisms, many questions remain about the origin of mantle plumes, slab subduction, their interaction with mantle convection, and their relationship with the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. Plume and slab morphology at depth provide further insight into these questions but imaging them in the mid and lower mantle is known to be very challenging due to a lack of data coverage and resolvability limits of conventional body-wave traveltime tomography. The deployment of regional dense arrays (e.g., USArray) and development of full waveform inversion techniques provide opportunities to resolve finer 3D details of mantle plumes and slabs. Harnessing the power of supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we employed a spectral-element method to accurately simulate seismograms in complex 3D Earth models and an adjoint method to obtain model updates. Bozdag et al. (2016) iteratively determined a transversely isotropic earth model (GLAD_M15) using 253 events. To achieve higher resolution and better coverage in the deep mantle, we expanded our database to 1,040 events; a 1/3 of them are deep earthquakes (>500 km). We reinverted source parameters using model GLAD_M15, recalculated synthetic seismograms, selected time windows that show good agreement between data and the synthetics, and made measurements within these windows. From the measurements, we further assess the overall quality of each event and station and exclude bad measurements using very conservative criteria. Thus far, we assimilated more than 10 million windows in three period bands from 17-250 s. As the model improves, we correct the centroid time and scalar moment of each event using its mean

  1. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  2. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  3. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of high frequency structures with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Bakr, Mohamed; Demir, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the theory of adjoint sensitivity analysis and uses the popular FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) method to show how wideband sensitivities can be efficiently estimated for different types of materials and structures. It includes a variety of MATLAB® examples to help readers absorb the content more easily.

  4. Adjoint-Operator Learning For A Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhen, Jacob; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1993-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to synthesize initially unknown mathematical models of time-dependent phenomena or to learn temporally evolving patterns by use of algorithms based on adjoint operators. Algorithms less complicated, involve less computation and solve learning equations forward in time possibly simultaneously with equations of evolution of neural network, thereby both increasing computational efficiency and making real-time applications possible.

  5. Non-self-adjoint hamiltonians defined by Riesz bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagarello, F., E-mail: fabio.bagarello@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell' Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, I-90128 Palermo, Italy and INFN, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Inoue, A., E-mail: a-inoue@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Mathematics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Trapani, C., E-mail: camillo.trapani@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    We discuss some features of non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians with real discrete simple spectrum under the assumption that the eigenvectors form a Riesz basis of Hilbert space. Among other things, we give conditions under which these Hamiltonians can be factorized in terms of generalized lowering and raising operators.

  6. Adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  7. Adjoint analysis of mixed continuous/discrete systems in simulink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The adjoint simulation method is a well established and efficient tool for gaining insight and understanding of key parameters affecting the behaviour and performance of a guided missile homing system. Traditionally, the method has been employed by various missile companies during the preliminary

  8. Toward regional-scale adjoint tomography in the deep earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to the development of efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and to the increasing power of computer clusters, it is now possible to obtain regional-scale images of the Earth's interior using adjoint-tomography (e.g. Tape, C., et al., 2009). As for now, these tomographic models are limited to the upper layers of the earth, i.e., they provide us with high-resolution images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. Given the gigantic amount of calculation it represents, obtaing similar models at the global scale (i.e. images of the entire Earth) seems out of reach at the moment. Furthermore, it's likely that the first generation of such global adjoint tomographic models will have a resolution significantly smaller than the current regional models. In order to image regions of interests in the deep Earth, such as plumes, slabs or large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs), while keeping the computation tractable, we are developing new tools that will allow us to perform regional-scale adjoint-tomography at arbitrary depths. In a recent study (Masson et al., 2013), we showed that a numerical equivalent of the time reversal mirrors used in experimental acoustics permits to confine the wave propagation computations (i.e. using SEM simulations) inside the region to be imaged. With this ability to limit wave propagation modeling inside a region of interest, obtaining the adjoint sensitivity kernels needed for tomographic imaging is only two steps further. First, the local wavefield modeling needs to be coupled with field extrapolation techniques in order to obtain synthetic seismograms at the surface of the earth. These seismograms will account for the 3D structure inside the region of interest in a quasi-exact manner. We will present preliminary results where the field-extrapolation is performed using Green's function computed in a 1D Earth model thanks to the Direct Solution Method (DSM). Once synthetic seismograms

  9. Adjoint sensitivity studies of coastal upwelling at northeast of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Hoteit, I.

    2010-12-01

    The north Pacific western boundary current (Kuroshio) begins to the east of the Philippines, crosses the Luzon strait and flows northward close to the Taiwan coast following the continental shelf. The Kuroshio shows occasional splitting near the shelf northeast of Taiwan where one branch carries Kuroshio waters onto the shelf north of Taiwan while the major part flows along the shelf oriented in the east-west direction. Previous modeling and observational studies of the Kuroshio near the Taiwan coast showed that during summer (May - September) the core of the Kuroshio moves offshore by 100 km, while during winter (October - April) Kuroshio waters flows closer to the Taiwan coast. Another interesting phenomenon is the occurrences of cold waters ”cold-dome” just northeast of Taiwan, which is closely associated with the seasonal migration of Kuroshio waters. Cold water upwells in this area during summer, associated with cyclonic eddies. This patch of cold water can be clearly distinguished from surrounding warm waters in satellite sea-surface temperature (SST) maps. This seasonal upwelling is more pronounced during summer, when the axis of the Kuroshio shifts offshore, and is less persistent during winter when the Kuroshio flows closer to the Taiwan coast. A number of five year forward model simulation have been made using realistic forcings, initial conditions and boundary conditions. The forward model simulations have been tested by comparing with satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and SST. An adjoint-based sensitivity study been performed for the ”cold-dome” upwelling features and northward shelf intrusion of Kuroshio waters at northeast coast of Taiwan. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and its adjoint. The goal is to understand the influences on the cold-dome and the shelf intrusions. The adjoint sensitivities of SST, SSH, velocities, and transport were computed with respect to

  10. Mitigation of Engine Inlet Distortion Through Adjoint-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Irian; Rallabhandi, Sriram; Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2017-01-01

    The adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D is extended to allow efficient gradient- based optimization and design of concepts with highly integrated aero-propulsive systems. A circumferential distortion calculation, along with the derivatives needed to perform adjoint-based design, have been implemented in FUN3D. This newly implemented distortion calculation can be used not only for design but also to drive the existing mesh adaptation process and reduce the error associated with the fan distortion calculation. The design capability is demonstrated by the shape optimization of an in-house aircraft concept equipped with an aft fuselage propulsor. The optimization objective is the minimization of flow distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of this aft fuselage propulsor.

  11. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions...... volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields....

  12. Seismic Window Selection and Misfit Measurements for Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Podhorszki, N.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Adjoint Tomography requires fast parallel processing of large datasets. After obtaing the preprocessed observed and synthetic seismograms, we use the open source software packages FLEXWIN (Maggi et al. 2007) to select time windows and MEASURE_ADJ to make measurements. These measurements define adjoint sources for data assimilation. Previous versions of these tools work on a pair of SAC files---observed and synthetic seismic data for the same component and station, and loop over all seismic records associated with one earthquake. Given the large number of stations and earthquakes, the frequent read and write operations create severe I/O bottlenecks on modern computing platforms. We present new versions of these tools utilizing a new seismic data format, namely the Adaptive Seismic Data Format(ASDF). This new format shows superior scalability for applications on high-performance computers and accommodates various types of data, including earthquake, industry and seismic interferometry datasets. ASDF also provides user-friendly APIs, which can be easily integrated into the adjoint tomography workflow and combined with other data processing tools. In addition to solving the I/O bottleneck, we are making several improvements to these tools. For example, FLEXWIN is tuned to select windows for different types of earthquakes. To capture their distinct features, we categorize earthquakes by their depths and frequency bands. Moreover, instead of only picking phases between the first P arrival and the surface-wave arrivals, our aim is to select and assimilate many other later prominent phases in adjoint tomography. For example, in the body-wave band (17 s - 60 s), we include SKS, sSKS and their multiple, while in the surface-wave band (60 s - 120 s) we incorporate major-arc surface waves.

  13. Numerical study of dense adjoint 2-color matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.; Scorzato, L.; Oevers, M.

    2000-11-01

    We study the global symmetries of SU(2) gauge theory with N flavors of staggered fermions in the presence of a chemical potential. We motivate the special interest of the case N=1 (staggered) with fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group. We present results from numerical simulations with both hybrid Monte Carlo and the two-step multi-bosonic algorithm. (orig.)

  14. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  15. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  16. Development and Applications of the FV3 GEOS-5 Adjoint Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kim, Jong G.; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Errico, Ron; Gelaro, Ron; Kent, James; Coy, Larry; Doyle, Jim; Goldstein, Alex

    2017-01-01

    GMAO has developed a highly sophisticated adjoint modeling system based on the most recent version of the finite volume cubed sphere (FV3) dynamical core. This provides a mechanism for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions and examining observation impacts. It also allows for the computation of singular vectors and for the implementation of hybrid 4DVAR. In this work we will present the scientific assessment of the new adjoint system and show results from a number of research application of the adjoint system.

  17. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2017-12-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here for

  18. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  19. Advances in Global Adjoint Tomography -- Massive Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity are key to understanding a myriad of processes in Earth's interior. Resolving these properties requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3-D Earth models and an iterative inversion strategy. In the wake of successes in regional studies(e.g., Chen et al., 2007; Tape et al., 2009, 2010; Fichtner et al., 2009, 2010; Chen et al.,2010; Zhu et al., 2012, 2013; Chen et al., 2015), we are employing adjoint tomography based on a spectral-element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999, 2002) on a global scale using the supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After 15 iterations, we have obtained a high-resolution transversely isotropic Earth model (M15) using traveltime data from 253 earthquakes. To obtain higher resolution images of the emerging new features and to prepare the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity, we expanded the original dataset with approximately 4,220 additional global earthquakes (Mw5.5-7.0) --occurring between 1995 and 2014-- and downloaded 300-minute-long time series for all available data archived at the IRIS Data Management Center, ORFEUS, and F-net. Ocean Bottom Seismograph data from the last decade are also included to maximize data coverage. In order to handle the huge dataset and solve the I/O bottleneck in global adjoint tomography, we implemented a python-based parallel data processing workflow based on the newly developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). With the help of the data selection tool MUSTANG developed by IRIS, we cleaned our dataset and assembled event-based ASDF files for parallel processing. We have started Centroid Moment Tensors (CMT) inversions for all 4,220 earthquakes with the latest model M15, and selected high-quality data for measurement. We will statistically investigate each channel using synthetic seismograms calculated in M15 for updated CMTs and identify problematic channels. In addition to data screening, we also modified

  20. On the norm convergence of the self-adjoint Trotter–Kato product ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    norm convergence with error bound. In [12] we have shown. Theorem 1.1. If A and B are nonnegative self-adjoint operators in H with domains ..... [20] Rogava Dzh L, Error bounds for Trotter–type formulas for self-adjoint operators, Funct. Anal.

  1. Adjoint-based approach to Enhancing Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed adjoint method for multi-component compressible flow is used to measure sensitivity of the mixing rate to initial perturbations in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT instabilities are performed at moderate Reynolds numbers. The DNS are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint provides a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). In this work, a QoI is defined based on the time-integrated scalar field to quantify the mixing rate. Therefore, the adjoint solution is used to measure sensitivity of this QoI to a set of initial perturbations, and inform a gradient-based line search to optimize mixing. We first demonstrate the adjoint approach in the linear regime and compare the optimized initial conditions to the expected values from linear stability analysis. The adjoint method is then used in the high Reynolds number limit where theory is no longer valid. Finally, chaos is known to contaminate the accuracy of the adjoint gradient in turbulent flows when integrated over long time horizons. We assess the influence of chaos on the accuracy of the adjoint gradient to guide the work of future studies on adjoint-based sensitivity of turbulent mixing. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  2. Lecture 1. Monte Carlo basics. Lecture 2. Adjoint Monte Carlo. Lecture 3. Coupled Forward-Adjoint calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is a statistical method to solve mathematical and physical problems using random numbers. The principle of the methods will be demonstrated for a simple mathematical problem and for neutron transport. Various types of estimators will be discussed, as well as generally applied variance reduction methods like splitting, Russian roulette and importance biasing. The theoretical formulation for solving eigenvalue problems for multiplying systems will be shown. Some reflections will be given about the applicability of the Monte Carlo method, its limitations and its future prospects for reactor physics calculations. Adjoint Monte Carlo is a Monte Carlo game to solve the adjoint neutron (or photon) transport equation. The adjoint transport equation can be interpreted in terms of simulating histories of artificial particles, which show properties of neutrons that move backwards in history. These particles will start their history at the detector from which the response must be estimated and give a contribution to the estimated quantity when they hit or pass through the neutron source. Application to multigroup transport formulation will be demonstrated Possible implementation for the continuous energy case will be outlined. The inherent advantages and disadvantages of the method will be discussed. The Midway Monte Carlo method will be presented for calculating a detector response due to a (neutron or photon) source. A derivation will be given of the basic formula for the Midway Monte Carlo method The black absorber technique, allowing for a cutoff of particle histories when reaching the midway surface in one of the calculations will be derived. An extension of the theory to coupled neutron-photon problems is given. The method will be demonstrated for an oil well logging problem, comprising a neutron source in a borehole and photon detectors to register the photons generated by inelastic neutron scattering. (author)

  3. High Order Adjoint Derivatives using ESDIRK Methods for Oil Reservoir Production Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capolei, Andrea; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2012-01-01

    In production optimization, computation of the gradients is the computationally expensive step. We improve the computational efficiency of such algorithms by improving the gradient computation using high-order ESDIRK (Explicit Singly Diagonally Implicit Runge-Kutta) temporal integration methods...... and continuous adjoints . The high order integration scheme allows larger time steps and therefore faster solution times. We compare gradient computation by the continuous adjoint method to the discrete adjoint method and the finite-difference method. The methods are implemented for a two phase flow reservoir...... simulator. Computational experiments demonstrate that the accuracy of the sensitivities obtained by the adjoint methods are comparable to the accuracy obtained by the finite difference method. The continuous adjoint method is able to use a different time grid than the forward integration. Therefore, it can...

  4. FOCUS: a non-multigroup adjoint Monte Carlo code with improved variance reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the selection mechanism in the adjoint Monte Carlo code FOCUS in which the energy is treated as a continuous variable. The method of Kalos who introduced the idea of adjoint cross sections is followed to derive a sampling scheme for the adjoint equation solved in FOCUS which is in most aspects analogous to the normal Monte Carlo game. The disadvantages of the use of these adjoint cross sections are removed to some extent by introduction of a new definition for the adjoint cross sections resulting in appreciable variance reduction. At the cost of introducing a weight factor slightly different from unity, the direction and energy are selected in a simple way without the need of two-dimensional probability tables. Finally the handling of geometry and cross section in FOCUS is briefly discussed. 6 references. (U.S.)

  5. Solar wind reconstruction from magnetosheath data using an adjoint approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nabert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to reconstruct solar wind conditions from spacecraft data taken during magnetosheath passages, which can be used to support, e.g., magnetospheric models. The unknown parameters of the solar wind are used as boundary conditions of an MHD (magnetohydrodynamics magnetosheath model. The boundary conditions are varied until the spacecraft data matches the model predictions. The matching process is performed using a gradient-based minimization of the misfit between data and model. To achieve this time-consuming procedure, we introduce the adjoint of the magnetosheath model, which allows efficient calculation of the gradients. An automatic differentiation tool is used to generate the adjoint source code of the model. The reconstruction method is applied to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms data to calculate the solar wind conditions during spacecraft magnetosheath transitions. The results are compared to actual solar wind data. This allows validation of our reconstruction method and indicates the limitations of the MHD magnetosheath model used.

  6. Passive control of thermoacoustic oscillations with adjoint methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jose; Juniper, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    Strict pollutant regulations are driving gas turbine manufacturers to develop devices that operate under lean premixed conditions, which produce less NOx but encourage thermoacoustic oscillations. These are a form of unstable combustion that arise due to the coupling between the acoustic field and the fluctuating heat release in a combustion chamber. In such devices, in which safety is paramount, thermoacoustic oscillations must be eliminated passively, rather than through feedback control. The ideal way to eliminate thermoacoustic oscillations is by subtly changing the shape of the device. To achieve this, one must calculate the sensitivity of each unstable thermoacoustic mode to every geometric parameter. This is prohibitively expensive with standard methods, but is relatively cheap with adjoint methods. In this study we first present low-order network models as a tool to model and study the thermoacoustic behaviour of combustion chambers. Then we compute the continuous adjoint equations and the sensitivities to relevant parameters. With this, we run an optimization routine that modifies the parameters in order to stabilize all the resonant modes of a laboratory combustor rig.

  7. Self-adjoint oscillator operator from a modified factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Marco A. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, H.C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICyT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Gutierrez, M. Ranferi [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2011-05-30

    By using an alternative factorization, we obtain a self-adjoint oscillator operator of the form L{sub δ}=d/(dx) (p{sub δ}(x)d/(dx) )-((x{sup 2})/(p{sub δ}(x)) +p{sub δ}(x)-1), where p{sub δ}(x)=1+δe{sup -x{sup 2}}, with δ element of (-1,∞) an arbitrary real factorization parameter. At positive values of δ, this operator interpolates between the quantum harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian for δ=0 and a scaled Hermite operator at high values of δ. For the negative values of δ, the eigenfunctions look like deformed quantum mechanical Hermite functions. Possible applications are mentioned. -- Highlights: → We present a generalization of the Mielnik factorization. → We study the case of linear relationship between the factorization coefficients. → We introduce a new one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operator. → We show its properties depending on the values of the parameter.

  8. Numerical study of dense adjoint matter in two color QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.; Morrison, S.; Scorzato, L.; Oevers, M.

    2000-06-01

    We identify the global symmetries of SU(2) lattice gauge theory with N flavors of staggered fermion in the presence of a quark chemical potential μ, for fermions in both fundamental and adjoint representations, and anticipate likely patterns of symmetry breaking at both low and high densities. Results from numerical simulations of the model with N=1 adjoint flavor on a 4 3 x 8 lattice are presented, using both hybrid Monte Carlo and two-step multi-boson algorithms. It is shown that the sign of the fermion determinant starts to fluctuate once the model enters a phase with non-zero baryon charge density. HMC simulations are not ergodic in this regime, but TSMB simulations retain ergodicity even in the dense phase, and in addition appear to show superior decorrelation. The HMC results for the equation of state and the pion mass show good quantitative agreement with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory, which should hold only for N≥2. The TSMB results incorporating the sign of the determinant support a delayed onset transition, consistent with the pattern of symmetry breaking expected for N=1. (orig.)

  9. Adjoint optimization scheme for lower hybrid current rampup and profile control in Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Bizarro, J.P.; Hoang, G.T.; Kupfer, K.; Peysson, Y.; Shkarofsky, I.P.; Bonoli, P.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to take into account and study the effect of the electric field profiles on the Lower Hybrid (LH) current drive efficiency during transient phases such as rampup. As a complement to the full ray-tracing / Fokker Planck studies, and for the purpose of optimization studies, we developed a simplified 1-D model based on the adjoint Karney-Fisch numerical results. This approach allows us to estimate the LH power deposition profile which would be required for ramping the current with prescribed rate, total current density profile (q-profile) and surface loop voltage. For rampup optimization studies, we can therefore scan the whole parameter space and eliminate a posteriori those scenarios which correspond to unrealistic deposition profiles. We thus obtain the time evolution of the LH power, minor radius of the plasma, volt-second consumption and total energy dissipated. Optimization can thus be performed with respect to any of those criteria. This scheme is illustrated by some numerical simulations performed with TORE-SUPRA and NET/ITER parameters. We conclude with a derivation of a simple and general scaling law for the flux consumption during the rampup phase

  10. Deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems: forward and adjoint methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents a self-contained mathematical formalism for deterministic sensitivity analysis of two-phase flow systems, a detailed application to sensitivity analysis of the homogeneous equilibrium model of two-phase flow, and a representative application to sensitivity analysis of a model (simulating pump-trip-type accidents in BWRs) where a transition between single phase and two phase occurs. The rigor and generality of this sensitivity analysis formalism stem from the use of Gateaux (G-) differentials. This report highlights the major aspects of deterministic (forward and adjoint) sensitivity analysis, including derivation of the forward sensitivity equations, derivation of sensitivity expressions in terms of adjoint functions, explicit construction of the adjoint system satisfied by these adjoint functions, determination of the characteristics of this adjoint system, and demonstration that these characteristics are the same as those of the original quasilinear two-phase flow equations. This proves that whenever the original two-phase flow problem is solvable, the adjoint system is also solvable and, in principle, the same numerical methods can be used to solve both the original and adjoint equations

  11. Unsteady adjoint for large eddy simulation of a coupled turbine stator-rotor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Wang, Qiqi; Laskowski, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady fluid flow simulations like large eddy simulation are crucial in capturing key physics in turbomachinery applications like separation and wake formation in flow over a turbine vane with a downstream blade. To determine how sensitive the design objectives of the coupled system are to control parameters, an unsteady adjoint is needed. It enables the computation of the gradient of an objective with respect to a large number of inputs in a computationally efficient manner. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions for a coupled turbine stator-rotor system. As the transonic fluid flows over the stator vane, the boundary layer transitions to turbulence. The turbulent wake then impinges on the rotor blades, causing early separation. This coupled system exhibits chaotic dynamics which causes conventional adjoint solutions to diverge exponentially, resulting in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions for long-time simulations. In this presentation, adjoint solutions for aerothermal objectives are obtained through a localized adjoint viscosity injection method which aims to stabilize the adjoint solution and maintain accurate sensitivities. Preliminary results obtained from the supercomputer Mira will be shown in the presentation.

  12. Space-time adaptive solution of inverse problems with the discrete adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexe, Mihai; Sandu, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    This paper develops a framework for the construction and analysis of discrete adjoint sensitivities in the context of time dependent, adaptive grid, adaptive step models. Discrete adjoints are attractive in practice since they can be generated with low effort using automatic differentiation. However, this approach brings several important challenges. The space-time adjoint of the forward numerical scheme may be inconsistent with the continuous adjoint equations. A reduction in accuracy of the discrete adjoint sensitivities may appear due to the inter-grid transfer operators. Moreover, the optimization algorithm may need to accommodate state and gradient vectors whose dimensions change between iterations. This work shows that several of these potential issues can be avoided through a multi-level optimization strategy using discontinuous Galerkin (DG) hp-adaptive discretizations paired with Runge-Kutta (RK) time integration. We extend the concept of dual (adjoint) consistency to space-time RK-DG discretizations, which are then shown to be well suited for the adaptive solution of time-dependent inverse problems. Furthermore, we prove that DG mesh transfer operators on general meshes are also dual consistent. This allows the simultaneous derivation of the discrete adjoint for both the numerical solver and the mesh transfer logic with an automatic code generation mechanism such as algorithmic differentiation (AD), potentially speeding up development of large-scale simulation codes. The theoretical analysis is supported by numerical results reported for a two-dimensional non-stationary inverse problem.

  13. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  14. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the thermomechanical behavior of repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.L.; Thompson, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adjoint sensitivity method is applied to thermomechanical models for the first time. The method provides an efficient and inexpensive answer to the question: how sensitive are thermomechanical predictions to assumed parameters. The answer is exact, in the sense that it yields exact derivatives of response measures to parameters, and approximate, in the sense that projections of the response fo other parameter assumptions are only first order correct. The method is applied to linear finite element models of thermomechanical behavior. Extensions to more complicated models are straight-forward but often laborious. An illustration of the method with a two-dimensional repository corridor model reveals that the chosen stress response measure was most sensitive to Poisson's ratio for the rock matrix

  15. Time reversal imaging, Inverse problems and Adjoint Tomography}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C. S.; Capdeville, Y.; Kawakatsu, H.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    With the increasing power of computers and numerical techniques (such as spectral element methods), it is possible to address a new class of seismological problems. The propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media is simulated more and more accurately and new applications developed, in particular time reversal methods and adjoint tomography in the three-dimensional Earth. Since the pioneering work of J. Claerbout, theorized by A. Tarantola, many similarities were found between time-reversal methods, cross-correlations techniques, inverse problems and adjoint tomography. By using normal mode theory, we generalize the scalar approach of Draeger and Fink (1999) and Lobkis and Weaver (2001) to the 3D- elastic Earth, for theoretically understanding time-reversal method on global scale. It is shown how to relate time-reversal methods on one hand, with auto-correlations of seismograms for source imaging and on the other hand, with cross-correlations between receivers for structural imaging and retrieving Green function. Time-reversal methods were successfully applied in the past to acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics, non destructive testing and to seismic waves in seismology for earthquake imaging. In the case of source imaging, time reversal techniques make it possible an automatic location in time and space as well as the retrieval of focal mechanism of earthquakes or unknown environmental sources . We present here some applications at the global scale of these techniques on synthetic tests and on real data, such as Sumatra-Andaman (Dec. 2004), Haiti (Jan. 2010), as well as glacial earthquakes and seismic hum.

  16. Objective-function Hybridization in Adjoint Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y. O.; Bozdag, E.; Simons, F.; Gao, F.

    2016-12-01

    In the realm of seismic tomography, we are at the threshold of a new era of huge seismic datasets. However, how to assimilate as much information as possible from every seismogram is still a challenge. Cross-correlation measurements are generally tailored to some window selection algorithms, such as FLEXWIN (Maggie et al. 2008), to balance amplitude differences between seismic phases. However, these measurements naturally favor maximum picks in selected windows. It is also difficult to select all usable portions of seismograms in an optimum way that lots of information is generally lost, particularly the scattered waves. Instantaneous phase type of misfits extract information from every wiggle without cutting seismograms into small pieces, however, dealing with cycle skips at short periods can be challenging. For this purpose, we introduce a flexible hybrid approach for adjoint seismic tomography, to combine various objective functions. We initially focus on phase measurements and propose using instantaneous phase to take into account relatively small-magnitude scattered waves at long periods while using cross-correlation measurements on FLEXWIN windows to select distinct body-wave arrivals without complicating measurements due to non-linearities at short periods. To better deal with cycle skips and reliably measure instantaneous phases we design a new misfit function that incorporates instantaneous phase information implicitly instead of measuring it explicitly, through using normalized analytic signals. We present in our synthetic experiments how instantaneous phase, cross-correlation and their hybridization affect tomographic results. The combination of two different phase measurements in a hybrid approach constitutes progress towards using "anything and everything" in a data set, addressing data quality and measurement challenges simultaneously. We further extend hybridisation of misfit functions for amplitude measurements such as cross-correlation amplitude

  17. An Adjoint-Based Adaptive Ensemble Kalman Filter

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hajoon

    2013-10-01

    A new hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/four-dimensional variational data assimilation (EnKF/4D-VAR) approach is introduced to mitigate background covariance limitations in the EnKF. The work is based on the adaptive EnKF (AEnKF) method, which bears a strong resemblance to the hybrid EnKF/three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) method. In the AEnKF, the representativeness of the EnKF ensemble is regularly enhanced with new members generated after back projection of the EnKF analysis residuals to state space using a 3D-VAR [or optimal interpolation (OI)] scheme with a preselected background covariance matrix. The idea here is to reformulate the transformation of the residuals as a 4D-VAR problem, constraining the new member with model dynamics and the previous observations. This should provide more information for the estimation of the new member and reduce dependence of the AEnKF on the assumed stationary background covariance matrix. This is done by integrating the analysis residuals backward in time with the adjoint model. Numerical experiments are performed with the Lorenz-96 model under different scenarios to test the new approach and to evaluate its performance with respect to the EnKF and the hybrid EnKF/3D-VAR. The new method leads to the least root-mean-square estimation errors as long as the linear assumption guaranteeing the stability of the adjoint model holds. It is also found to be less sensitive to choices of the assimilation system inputs and parameters.

  18. Visualising Earth's Mantle based on Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, E.; Pugmire, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Hill, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Peter, D. B.; Podhorszki, N.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in 3D wave propagation solvers and high-performance computing have enabled regional and global full-waveform inversions. Interpretation of tomographic models is often done on visually. Robust and efficient visualization tools are necessary to thoroughly investigate large model files, particularly at the global scale. In collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have developed effective visualization tools and used for visualization of our first-generation global model, GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al. 2016). VisIt (https://wci.llnl.gov/simulation/computer-codes/visit/) is used for initial exploration of the models and for extraction of seismological features. The broad capability of VisIt, and its demonstrated scalability proved valuable for experimenting with different visualization techniques, and in the creation of timely results. Utilizing VisIt's plugin-architecture, a data reader plugin was developed, which reads the ADIOS (https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/adios/) format of our model files. Blender (https://www.blender.org) is used for the setup of lighting, materials, camera paths and rendering of geometry. Python scripting was used to control the orchestration of different geometries, as well as camera animation for 3D movies. While we continue producing 3D contour plots and movies for various seismic parameters to better visualize plume- and slab-like features as well as anisotropy throughout the mantle, our aim is to make visualization an integral part of our global adjoint tomography workflow to routinely produce various 2D cross-sections to facilitate examination of our models after each iteration. This will ultimately form the basis for use of pattern recognition techniques in our investigations. Simulations for global adjoint tomography are performed on ORNL's Titan system and visualization is done in parallel on ORNL's post-processing cluster Rhea.

  19. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  20. Application of Adjoint Methodology in Various Aspects of Sonic Boom Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the advances in computational design has been the development of adjoint methods allowing efficient calculation of sensitivities in gradient-based shape optimization. This paper discusses two new applications of adjoint methodology that have been developed to aid in sonic boom mitigation exercises. In the first, equivalent area targets are generated using adjoint sensitivities of selected boom metrics. These targets may then be used to drive the vehicle shape during optimization. The second application is the computation of adjoint sensitivities of boom metrics on the ground with respect to parameters such as flight conditions, propagation sampling rate, and selected inputs to the propagation algorithms. These sensitivities enable the designer to make more informed selections of flight conditions at which the chosen cost functionals are less sensitive.

  1. Adjoint aux conférences et au soutien administratif (h/f) | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L' adjoint aux conférences et au soutien administratif est responsable du suivi et de la mise à jour de l'ensemble de formulaires, contrats et modèles utilisés dans les fonctions de gestion d'événements ainsi que de l'administration du site intranet des Services de conférence. L'adjoint aux conférences et au soutien ...

  2. Data and Workflow Management Challenges in Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Orsvuran, R.; Krischer, L.; Chen, Y.; Balasubramanian, V.; Hill, J.; Turilli, M.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Jha, S.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    It is crucial to take the complete physics of wave propagation into account in seismic tomography to further improve the resolution of tomographic images. The adjoint method is an efficient way of incorporating 3D wave simulations in seismic tomography. However, global adjoint tomography is computationally expensive, requiring thousands of wavefield simulations and massive data processing. Through our collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) computing group and an allocation on Titan, ORNL's GPU-accelerated supercomputer, we are now performing our global inversions by assimilating waveform data from over 1,000 earthquakes. The first challenge we encountered is dealing with the sheer amount of seismic data. Data processing based on conventional data formats and processing tools (such as SAC), which are not designed for parallel systems, becomes our major bottleneck. To facilitate the data processing procedures, we designed the Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) and developed a set of Python-based processing tools to replace legacy FORTRAN-based software. These tools greatly enhance reproducibility and accountability while taking full advantage of highly parallel system and showing superior scaling on modern computational platforms. The second challenge is that the data processing workflow contains more than 10 sub-procedures, making it delicate to handle and prone to human mistakes. To reduce human intervention as much as possible, we are developing a framework specifically designed for seismic inversion based on the state-of-the art workflow management research, specifically the Ensemble Toolkit (EnTK), in collaboration with the RADICAL team from Rutgers University. Using the initial developments of the EnTK, we are able to utilize the full computing power of the data processing cluster RHEA at ORNL while keeping human interaction to a minimum and greatly reducing the data processing time. Thanks to all the improvements, we are now able to

  3. Full Waveform Adjoint Seismic Tomography of the Antarctic Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A. J.; Wiens, D.; Zhu, H.; Tromp, J.; Nyblade, A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Winberry, J. P.; Wilson, T. J.; Dalziel, I. W. D.; Hansen, S. E.; Shore, P.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies investigating the response and influence of the solid Earth on the evolution of the cryosphere demonstrate the need to account for 3D rheological structure to better predict ice sheet dynamics, stability, and future sea level impact, as well as to improve glacial isostatic adjustment models and more accurately measure ice mass loss. Critical rheological properties like mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness may be estimated from shear wave velocity models that, for Antarctica, would ideally possess regional-scale resolution extending down to at least the base of the transition zone (i.e. 670 km depth). However, current global- and continental-scale seismic velocity models are unable to obtain both the resolution and spatial coverage necessary, do not take advantage of the full set of available Antarctic data, and, in most instance, employ traditional seismic imaging techniques that utilize limited seismogram information. We utilize 3-component earthquake waveforms from almost 300 Antarctic broadband seismic stations and 26 southern mid-latitude stations from 270 earthquakes (5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0) between 2001-2003 and 2007-2016 to conduct a full-waveform adjoint inversion for Antarctica and surrounding regions of the Antarctic plate. Necessary forward and adjoint wavefield simulations are performed utilizing SPECFEM3D_GLOBE with the aid of the Texas Advanced Computing Center. We utilize phase observations from seismogram segments containing P, S, Rayleigh, and Love waves, including reflections and overtones, which are autonomously identified using FLEXWIN. The FLEXWIN analysis is carried out over a short (15-50 s) and long (initially 50-150 s) period band that target body waves, or body and surface waves, respectively. As our model is iteratively refined, the short-period corner of the long period band is gradually reduced to 25 s as the model converges over 20 linearized inversion iterations. We will briefly present this new high

  4. Big Data Challenges in Global Seismic 'Adjoint Tomography' (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    The challenge of imaging Earth's interior on a global scale is closely linked to the challenge of handling large data sets. The related iterative workflow involves five distinct phases, namely, 1) data gathering and culling, 2) synthetic seismogram calculations, 3) pre-processing (time-series analysis and time-window selection), 4) data assimilation and adjoint calculations, 5) post-processing (pre-conditioning, regularization, model update). In order to implement this workflow on modern high-performance computing systems, a new seismic data format is being developed. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is designed to replace currently used data formats with a more flexible format that allows for fast parallel I/O. The metadata is divided into abstract categories, such as "source" and "receiver", along with provenance information for complete reproducibility. The structure of ASDF is designed keeping in mind three distinct applications: earthquake seismology, seismic interferometry, and exploration seismology. Existing time-series analysis tool kits, such as SAC and ObsPy, can be easily interfaced with ASDF so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages. ASDF accommodates an automated, efficient workflow for global adjoint tomography. Manually managing the large number of simulations associated with the workflow can rapidly become a burden, especially with increasing numbers of earthquakes and stations. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the possibility of automating the entire workflow. Scientific Workflow Management Software (SWfMS) allows users to execute workflows almost routinely. SWfMS provides additional advantages. In particular, it is possible to group independent simulations in a single job to fit the available computational resources. They also give a basic level of fault resilience as the workflow can be resumed at the correct state preceding a failure. Some of the best candidates for our particular workflow

  5. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1̃2 months.

  6. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  7. An adjoint-based scheme for eigenvalue error improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merton, S.R.; Smedley-Stevenson, R.P.; Pain, C.C.; El-Sheikh, A.H.; Buchan, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    A scheme for improving the accuracy and reducing the error in eigenvalue calculations is presented. Using a rst order Taylor series expansion of both the eigenvalue solution and the residual of the governing equation, an approximation to the error in the eigenvalue is derived. This is done using a convolution of the equation residual and adjoint solution, which is calculated in-line with the primal solution. A defect correction on the solution is then performed in which the approximation to the error is used to apply a correction to the eigenvalue. The method is shown to dramatically improve convergence of the eigenvalue. The equation for the eigenvalue is shown to simplify when certain normalizations are applied to the eigenvector. Two such normalizations are considered; the rst of these is a fission-source type of normalisation and the second is an eigenvector normalisation. Results are demonstrated on a number of demanding elliptic problems using continuous Galerkin weighted nite elements. Moreover, the correction scheme may also be applied to hyperbolic problems and arbitrary discretization. This is not limited to spatial corrections and may be used throughout the phase space of the discrete equation. The applied correction not only improves fidelity of the calculation, it allows assessment of the reliability of numerical schemes to be made and could be used to guide mesh adaption algorithms or to automate mesh generation schemes. (author)

  8. Intelligent earthquake data processing for global adjoint tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, J.; Li, T.; Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the increased computational capability afforded by modern and future computing architectures, the seismology community is demanding a more comprehensive understanding of the full waveform information from the recorded earthquake seismograms. Global waveform tomography is a complex workflow that matches observed seismic data with synthesized seismograms by iteratively updating the earth model parameters based on the adjoint state method. This methodology allows us to compute a very accurate model of the earth's interior. The synthetic data is simulated by solving the wave equation in the entire globe using a spectral-element method. In order to ensure the inversion accuracy and stability, both the synthesized and observed seismograms must be carefully pre-processed. Because the scale of the inversion problem is extremely large and there is a very large volume of data to both be read and written, an efficient and reliable pre-processing workflow must be developed. We are investigating intelligent algorithms based on a machine-learning (ML) framework that will automatically tune parameters for the data processing chain. One straightforward application of ML in data processing is to classify all possible misfit calculation windows into usable and unusable ones, based on some intelligent ML models such as neural network, support vector machine or principle component analysis. The intelligent earthquake data processing framework will enable the seismology community to compute the global waveform tomography using seismic data from an arbitrarily large number of earthquake events in the fastest, most efficient way.

  9. Surface spectra of Weyl semimetals through self-adjoint extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seradjeh, Babak; Vennettilli, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We apply the method of self-adjoint extensions of Hermitian operators to the low-energy, continuum Hamiltonians of Weyl semimetals in bounded geometries and derive the spectrum of the surface states on the boundary. This allows for the full characterization of boundary conditions and the surface spectra on surfaces both normal to the Weyl node separation as well as parallel to it. We show that the boundary conditions for quadratic bulk dispersions are, in general, specified by a U (2 ) matrix relating the wave function and its derivatives normal to the surface. We give a general procedure to obtain the surface spectra from these boundary conditions and derive them in specific cases of bulk dispersion. We consider the role of global symmetries in the boundary conditions and their effect on the surface spectrum. We point out several interesting features of the surface spectra for different choices of boundary conditions, such as a Mexican-hat shaped dispersion on the surface normal to Weyl node separation. We find that the existence of bound states, Fermi arcs, and the shape of their dispersion, depend on the choice of boundary conditions. This illustrates the importance of the physics at and near the boundaries in the general statement of bulk-boundary correspondence.

  10. Estimation of boundary heat flux using experimental temperature data in turbulent forced convection flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Ajit K.; Talukdar, Prabal; Subbarao, P. M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Heat flux at the boundary of a duct is estimated using the inverse technique based on conjugate gradient method (CGM) with an adjoint equation. A two-dimensional inverse forced convection hydrodynamically fully developed turbulent flow is considered. The simulations are performed with temperature data measured in the experimental test performed on a wind tunnel. The results show that the present numerical model with CGM is robust and accurate enough to estimate the strength and position of boundary heat flux.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  12. The transversality conditions for infinite-horizon optimal control problem with a free right endpoint and the stability of the adjoint variable (in Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Khlopin, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    An infinite-horizon optimal control problem with a free right endpoint is considered. In this paper we proved that Lyapunov stability of the adjoint variable implying the vanishing of the adjoint variable at infinity along optimal solution.

  13. An Adjoint-Based Approach to Study a Flexible Flapping Wing in Pitching-Rolling Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo

    2017-11-01

    Flapping-wing aerodynamics, with advantages in agility, efficiency, and hovering capability, has been the choice of many flyers in nature. However, the study of bio-inspired flapping-wing propulsion is often hindered by the problem's large control space with different wing kinematics and deformation. The adjoint-based approach reduces largely the computational cost to a feasible level by solving an inverse problem. Facing the complication from moving boundaries, non-cylindrical calculus provides an easy extension of traditional adjoint-based approach to handle the optimization involving moving boundaries. The improved adjoint method with non-cylindrical calculus for boundary treatment is first applied on a rigid pitching-rolling plate, then extended to a flexible one with active deformation to further increase its propulsion efficiency. The comparison of flow dynamics with the initial and optimal kinematics and deformation provides a unique opportunity to understand the flapping-wing mechanism. Supported by AFOSR and ARL.

  14. Adjoint Based A Posteriori Analysis of Multiscale Mortar Discretizations with Multinumerics

    KAUST Repository

    Tavener, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we derive a posteriori error estimates for linear functionals of the solution to an elliptic problem discretized using a multiscale nonoverlapping domain decomposition method. The error estimates are based on the solution of an appropriately defined adjoint problem. We present a general framework that allows us to consider both primal and mixed formulations of the forward and adjoint problems within each subdomain. The primal subdomains are discretized using either an interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method or a continuous Galerkin method with weakly imposed Dirichlet conditions. The mixed subdomains are discretized using Raviart- Thomas mixed finite elements. The a posteriori error estimate also accounts for the errors due to adjoint-inconsistent subdomain discretizations. The coupling between the subdomain discretizations is achieved via a mortar space. We show that the numerical discretization error can be broken down into subdomain and mortar components which may be used to drive adaptive refinement.Copyright © by SIAM.

  15. An exact and consistent adjoint method for high-fidelity discretization of the compressible flow equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Ramanathan Vishnampet Ganapathi

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvement. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs. Such methods have enabled sensitivity analysis and active control of turbulence at engineering flow conditions by providing gradient information at computational cost comparable to that of simulating the flow. They accelerate convergence of numerical design optimization algorithms, though this is predicated on the availability of an accurate gradient of the discretized flow equations. This is challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. We analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space--time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge--Kutta-like scheme

  16. Development of a Matlab/Simulink tool to facilitate system analysis and simulation via the adjoint and covariance methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2007-01-01

    The COVariance and ADjoint Analysis Tool (COVAD) is a specially designed software tool, written for the Matlab/Simulink environment, which allows the user the capability to carry out system analysis and simulation using the adjoint, covariance or Monte Carlo methods. This paper describes phase one

  17. A demonstration of adjoint methods for multi-dimensional remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William G. K.; Hasekamp, Otto P.

    2018-01-01

    In previous work, we derived the adjoint method as a computationally efficient path to three-dimensional (3D) retrievals of clouds and aerosols. In this paper we will demonstrate the use of adjoint methods for retrieving two-dimensional (2D) fields of cloud extinction. The demonstration uses a new 2D radiative transfer solver (FSDOM). This radiation code was augmented with adjoint methods to allow efficient derivative calculations needed to retrieve cloud and surface properties from multi-angle reflectance measurements. The code was then used in three synthetic retrieval studies. Our retrieval algorithm adjusts the cloud extinction field and surface albedo to minimize the measurement misfit function with a gradient-based, quasi-Newton approach. At each step we compute the value of the misfit function and its gradient with two calls to the solver FSDOM. First we solve the forward radiative transfer equation to compute the residual misfit with measurements, and second we solve the adjoint radiative transfer equation to compute the gradient of the misfit function with respect to all unknowns. The synthetic retrieval studies verify that adjoint methods are scalable to retrieval problems with many measurements and unknowns. We can retrieve the vertically-integrated optical depth of moderately thick clouds as a function of the horizontal coordinate. It is also possible to retrieve the vertical profile of clouds that are separated by clear regions. The vertical profile retrievals improve for smaller cloud fractions. This leads to the conclusion that cloud edges actually increase the amount of information that is available for retrieving the vertical profile of clouds. However, to exploit this information one must retrieve the horizontally heterogeneous cloud properties with a 2D (or 3D) model. This prototype shows that adjoint methods can efficiently compute the gradient of the misfit function. This work paves the way for the application of similar methods to 3D remote

  18. Interpreting adjoint and ensemble sensitivity toward the development of optimal observation targeting strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancell, B.C.; Hakim, G.J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Two general methods, adjoint or singular vector methods, and ensemble-based methods, have been previously investigated to identify locations where observations would have a significant positive impact on a numerical weather model forecast. In this paper, we perform a basic comparison of targeting regions chosen to reduce the expected variance of a chosen forecast response function within an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) based on both an adjoint method and an ensemble method. Ensemble sensitivity is defined by linear regressions of a chosen forecast response function onto the model initial-time state variables, and is used to calculate variance reduction fields to provide targeting guidance for the ensemble-based method. Adjoint sensitivity is used to provide targeting guidance for the adjoint-based method. 90 ensemble forecasts are considered over a 24-hour forecast period, and the response function is chosen to represent the sea-level pressure at a single point in the Pacific Northwest United States. Targeting by ensemble guidance is shown to be a function of ensemble sensitivity and both the initial-time model state and observation variance. We find that large areas of variance reduction exist away from regions of large ensemble sensitivity, adjoint sensitivity, and the initial-time variance of the model state. For hypothetical aircraft observations, ensemble guidance is superior to adjoint guidance for 850 hPa temperature observations in a single case. This advantage increases as the number of flight tracks increases. In all cases, as more flight tracks are considered, diminishing returns on response function variance reduction are realized. Implications of these results for the development of targeting strategies are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Mass anomalous dimension of adjoint QCD at large N from twisted volume reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Margarita García [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049-Madrid (Spain); González-Arroyo, Antonio [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Teórica, C-XI, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Keegan, Liam [PH-TH, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Okawa, Masanori [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University,Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Core of Research for the Energetic Universe, Hiroshima University,Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    In this work we consider the SU(N) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation, in the limit of large N. In this limit the infinite-volume physics of this model can be studied by means of the corresponding twisted reduced model defined on a single site lattice. Making use of this strategy we study the reduced model for various values of N up to 289. By analyzing the eigenvalue distribution of the adjoint Dirac operator we test the conformality of the theory and extract the corresponding mass anomalous dimension.

  20. Adjoint shape optimization for fluid-structure interaction of ducted flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heners, J. P.; Radtke, L.; Hinze, M.; Düster, A.

    2018-03-01

    Based on the coupled problem of time-dependent fluid-structure interaction, equations for an appropriate adjoint problem are derived by the consequent use of the formal Lagrange calculus. Solutions of both primal and adjoint equations are computed in a partitioned fashion and enable the formulation of a surface sensitivity. This sensitivity is used in the context of a steepest descent algorithm for the computation of the required gradient of an appropriate cost functional. The efficiency of the developed optimization approach is demonstrated by minimization of the pressure drop in a simple two-dimensional channel flow and in a three-dimensional ducted flow surrounded by a thin-walled structure.

  1. Mass anomalous dimension of Adjoint QCD at large N from twisted volume reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Margarita García; Keegan, Liam; Okawa, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider the $SU(N)$ gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation, in the limit of large $N$. In this limit the infinite-volume physics of this model can be studied by means of the corresponding twisted reduced model defined on a single site lattice. Making use of this strategy we study the reduced model for various values of $N$ up to 289. By analyzing the eigenvalue distribution of the adjoint Dirac operator we test the conformality of the theory and extract the corresponding mass anomalous dimension.

  2. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  3. Adjoint shape optimization for fluid-structure interaction of ducted flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heners, J. P.; Radtke, L.; Hinze, M.; Düster, A.

    2017-08-01

    Based on the coupled problem of time-dependent fluid-structure interaction, equations for an appropriate adjoint problem are derived by the consequent use of the formal Lagrange calculus. Solutions of both primal and adjoint equations are computed in a partitioned fashion and enable the formulation of a surface sensitivity. This sensitivity is used in the context of a steepest descent algorithm for the computation of the required gradient of an appropriate cost functional. The efficiency of the developed optimization approach is demonstrated by minimization of the pressure drop in a simple two-dimensional channel flow and in a three-dimensional ducted flow surrounded by a thin-walled structure.

  4. Comparison of the Adjoint and Adjoint-Free 4dVar Assimilation of the Hydrographic and Velocity Observations in the Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    becauseMnT = (Mn . . .M1)T = MT1. . .MTn . This corresponds to backward -in-time integration of the ad- joint model forced by qn i . The second...still be viewed as satisfactory. Taking advantage of the trend toward massive parallelization in omputer technologies , the adjoint-free variational...N., Cornuelle, B., Kohl, A., Heimbach, P., 2013. A MITgcm/DART ocean prediction and analysis system with application to the Gulf of Mexico . Dyn

  5. A generalized adjoint framework for sensitivity and global error estimation in time-dependent nuclear reactor simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripling, H.F.; Anitescu, M.; Adams, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We develop an abstract framework for computing the adjoint to the neutron/nuclide burnup equations posed as a system of differential algebraic equations. ► We validate use of the adjoint for computing both sensitivity to uncertain inputs and for estimating global time discretization error. ► Flexibility of the framework is leveraged to add heat transfer physics and compute its adjoint without a reformulation of the adjoint system. ► Such flexibility is crucial for high performance computing applications. -- Abstract: We develop a general framework for computing the adjoint variable to nuclear engineering problems governed by a set of differential–algebraic equations (DAEs). The nuclear engineering community has a rich history of developing and applying adjoints for sensitivity calculations; many such formulations, however, are specific to a certain set of equations, variables, or solution techniques. Any change or addition to the physics model would require a reformulation of the adjoint problem and substantial difficulties in its software implementation. In this work we propose an abstract framework that allows for the modification and expansion of the governing equations, leverages the existing theory of adjoint formulation for DAEs, and results in adjoint equations that can be used to efficiently compute sensitivities for parametric uncertainty quantification. Moreover, as we justify theoretically and demonstrate numerically, the same framework can be used to estimate global time discretization error. We first motivate the framework and show that the coupled Bateman and transport equations, which govern the time-dependent neutronic behavior of a nuclear reactor, may be formulated as a DAE system with a power constraint. We then use a variational approach to develop the parameter-dependent adjoint framework and apply existing theory to give formulations for sensitivity and global time discretization error estimates using the adjoint

  6. Self-adjointness and spectral properties of Dirac operators with magnetic links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portmann, Fabian; Sok, Jérémy; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2018-01-01

    We define Dirac operators on $\\mathbb{S}^3$ (and $\\mathbb{R}^3$) with magnetic fields supported on smooth, oriented links and prove self-adjointness of certain (natural) extensions. We then analyze their spectral properties and show, among other things, that these operators have discrete spectrum...

  7. Adjoint-based sensitivities and data assimilation with a time-dependent marine ice sheet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Dan; Heimbach, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    To date, assimilation of observational data using large-scale ice models has consisted only of time-dependent inversions of surface velocities for basal traction, bed elevation, or ice stiffness. These inversions are for the most part based on control methods (Macayeal D R, 1992, A tutorial on the use of control methods in ice sheet modeling), which involve generating and solving the adjoint of the ice model. Quite a lot has been learned about the fast-flowing parts of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from such inversions. Still, there are limitations to these "snapshot" inversions. For instance, they cannot capture time-dependent dynamics, such as propagation of perturbations through the ice sheet. They cannot assimilate time-dependent observations, such as surface elevation changes. And they are problematic for initializing time-dependent ice sheet models, as such initializations may contain considerable model drift. We have developed an adjoint for a time-dependent land ice model, with which we will address such issues. The land ice model implements a hybrid shallow shelf-shallow ice stress balance and can represent the floating, fast-sliding, and frozen bed regimes of a marine ice sheet. The adjoint is generated by a combination of analytic methods and the use of automated differentiation (AD) software. Experiments with idealized geometries have been carried out; adjoint sensitivities reveal the "vulnerable" regions of ice shelves, and preliminary inversions of "synthetic" observations (e.g. simultaneous inversion of basal traction and topography) yield encouraging results.

  8. Adjoint Parameter Sensitivity Analysis for the Hydrodynamic Lattice Boltzmann Method with Applications to Design Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    We present an adjoint parameter sensitivity analysis formulation and solution strategy for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The focus is on design optimization applications, in particular topology optimization. The lattice Boltzmann method is briefly described with an in-depth discussion of so...

  9. Using adjoint-based optimization to study wing flexibility in flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    In the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects, it is important to understand the impact of wing flexibility/deformation on aerodynamic performance. However, the large control space from the complexity of wing deformation and kinematics makes usual parametric study very difficult or sometimes impossible. Since the adjoint-based approach for sensitivity study and optimization strategy is a process with its cost independent of the number of input parameters, it becomes an attractive approach in our study. Traditionally, adjoint equation and sensitivity are derived in a fluid domain with fixed solid boundaries. Moving boundary is only allowed when its motion is not part of control effort. Otherwise, the derivation becomes either problematic or too complex to be feasible. Using non-cylindrical calculus to deal with boundary deformation solves this problem in a very simple and still mathematically rigorous manner. Thus, it allows to apply adjoint-based optimization in the study of flapping wing flexibility. We applied the ``improved'' adjoint-based method to study the flexibility of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flapping wings, where the flapping trajectory and deformation are described by either model functions or real data from the flight of dragonflies. Supported by AFOSR.

  10. Spectral analysis of non-self-adjoint Jacobi operator associated with Jacobian elliptic functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siegl, Petr; Štampach, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2017), s. 901-928 ISSN 1846-3886 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-11058S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Non-self-adjoint Jacobi operator * Weyl m-function * Jacobian elliptic functions Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.440, year: 2016

  11. Running coupling in SU(2) gauge theory with two adjoint fermions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantaharju, Jarno; Rantalaiho, Teemu; Rummukainen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We study SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation of the gauge group on the lattice. Using clover improved Wilson fermion action with hypercubic truncated stout smearing we perform simulations at larger coupling than before. We measure the evolution of the coupling...

  12. Applications of a discrete viscous adjoint method for aerodynamic shape optimisation of 3D configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimisation based on high-fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimisation problems, and the adjoint approach—which allows fast

  13. On the inequivalence of renormalization and self-adjoint extensions for quantum singular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camblong, Horacio E.; Epele, Luis N.; Fanchiotti, Huner; Garcia Canal, Carlos A.; Ordonez, Carlos R.

    2007-01-01

    A unified S-matrix framework of quantum singular interactions is presented for the comparison of self-adjoint extensions and physical renormalization. For the long-range conformal interaction the two methods are not equivalent, with renormalization acting as selector of a preferred extension and regulator of the unbounded Hamiltonian

  14. Adjoint-based control of a surfactant-free drop suspended in an axisymmetric straining flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidadi, Shreyas; Bodony, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Optimal control theory has been remarkably successful in controlling a wide variety of single-phase flows. However, to date there has been no fundamental study on its application to multiphase problems. In this study, the continuous adjoint method is employed for the first time to control a clean, neutrally buoyant droplet of viscosity μI suspended in a low Reynolds number axisymmetric straining flow of viscosity μE. The control variable is the non-dimensional Capillary number C. For the forward problem, each C generates a distinct steady-state droplet. This information is utilized by the inverse problem to compute the adjoint velocities and the corresponding control gradient at the drop interface. The resultant gradient is subsequently used to update C. The algorithm is repeated until the desired shape is realized. To reduce computational cost, both the forward and adjoint velocities are obtained by solving Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The theory is tested for three viscosity ratios; λ =μI /μE = 0.1 , 1 and 10. For all three cases, the cost functional is successfully minimized. The adjoint gradient is shown to be in good agreement with the corresponding finite-difference approximation of it.

  15. Challenges in adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  16. Fourth-order stable central difference method for self-adjoint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, fourth order stable central difference method is presented for solving self-adjoint singular perturbation problems for small values of perturbation parameter, ε . First, the given differential equation was reduced to its conventional form and then it was transformed into linear system of algebraic equations in the ...

  17. Fast parallel algorithms for the x-ray transform and its adjoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao

    2012-11-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods often offer better imaging quality and allow for reconstructions with lower imaging dose than classical methods in computed tomography. However, the computational speed is a major concern for these iterative methods, for which the x-ray transform and its adjoint are two most time-consuming components. The speed issue becomes even notable for the 3D imaging such as cone beam scans or helical scans, since the x-ray transform and its adjoint are frequently computed as there is usually not enough computer memory to save the corresponding system matrix. The purpose of this paper is to optimize the algorithm for computing the x-ray transform and its adjoint, and their parallel computation. The fast and highly parallelizable algorithms for the x-ray transform and its adjoint are proposed for the infinitely narrow beam in both 2D and 3D. The extension of these fast algorithms to the finite-size beam is proposed in 2D and discussed in 3D. The CPU and GPU codes are available at https://sites.google.com/site/fastxraytransform. The proposed algorithm is faster than Siddon's algorithm for computing the x-ray transform. In particular, the improvement for the parallel computation can be an order of magnitude. The authors have proposed fast and highly parallelizable algorithms for the x-ray transform and its adjoint, which are extendable for the finite-size beam. The proposed algorithms are suitable for parallel computing in the sense that the computational cost per parallel thread is O(1).

  18. Inversion of CO and NOx emissions using the adjoint of the IMAGES model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Müller

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use ground-based observations of CO mixing ratios and vertical column abundances together with tropospheric NO2 columns from the GOME satellite instrument as constraints for improving the global annual emission estimates of CO and NOx for the year 1997. The agreement between concentrations calculated by the global 3-dimensional CTM IMAGES and the observations is optimized using the adjoint modelling technique, which allows to invert for CO and NOx fluxes simultaneously, taking their chemical interactions into account. Our analysis quantifies a total of 39 flux parameters, comprising anthropogenic and biomass burning sources over large continental regions, soil and lightning emissions of NOx, biogenic emissions of CO and non-methane hydrocarbons, as well as the deposition velocities of both CO and NOx. Comparison between observed, prior and optimized CO mixing ratios at NOAA/CMDL sites shows that the inversion performs well at the northern mid- and high latitudes, and that it is less efficient in the Southern Hemisphere, as expected due to the scarsity of measurements over this part of the globe. The inversion, moreover, brings the model much closer to the measured NO2 columns over all regions. Sensitivity tests show that anthropogenic sources exhibit weak sensitivity to changes of the a priori errors associated to the bottom-up inventory, whereas biomass burning sources are subject to a strong variability. Our best estimate for the 1997 global top-down CO source amounts to 2760 Tg CO. Anthropogenic emissions increase by 28%, in agreement with previous inverse modelling studies, suggesting that the present bottom-up inventories underestimate the anthropogenic CO emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The magnitude of the optimized NOx global source decreases by 14% with respect to the prior, and amounts to 42.1 Tg N, out of which 22.8 Tg N are due to anthropogenic sources. The NOx emissions increase over Tropical regions, whereas they decrease

  19. Data-based adjoint and H2 optimal control of the Ginzburg-Landau equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael; Bodony, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Equation-free, reduced-order methods of control are desirable when the governing system of interest is of very high dimension or the control is to be applied to a physical experiment. Two-phase flow optimal control problems, our target application, fit these criteria. Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) is a data-driven method for model reduction that can be used to resolve the dynamics of very high dimensional systems and project the dynamics onto a smaller, more manageable basis. We evaluate the effectiveness of DMD-based forward and adjoint operator estimation when applied to H2 optimal control approaches applied to the linear and nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equation. Perspectives on applying the data-driven adjoint to two phase flow control will be given. Office of Naval Research (ONR) as part of the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives (MURI) Program, under Grant Number N00014-16-1-2617.

  20. Adjoint-Based a Posteriori Error Estimation for Coupled Time-Dependent Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Asner, Liya

    2012-01-01

    We consider time-dependent parabolic problem s coupled across a common interface which we formulate using a Lagrange multiplier construction and solve by applying a monolithic solution technique. We derive an adjoint-based a posteriori error representation for a quantity of interest given by a linear functional of the solution. We establish the accuracy of our error representation formula through numerical experimentation and investigate the effect of error in the adjoint solution. Crucially, the error representation affords a distinction between temporal and spatial errors and can be used as a basis for a blockwise time-space refinement strategy. Numerical tests illustrate the efficacy of the refinement strategy by capturing the distinctive behavior of a localized traveling wave solution. The saddle point systems considered here are equivalent to those arising in the mortar finite element technique for parabolic problems. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. Periodicity is Optimal for Offline and Online Multi-Stage Adjoint Computations

    OpenAIRE

    Aupy, Guillaume; Herrmann, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We reexamine the work of Aupy et al. on optimal algorithms for multi-stageadjoint computations, where two levels of memories are available. Previousoptimal algorithm had a quadratic execution time. Here, with structuralarguments, namely periodicity, on the optimal solution, we provide an optimalalgorithm in constant time, with appropriate pre-processing. We also provide an asymptotically optimal algorithm for the online problem,when the adjoint graph size is not known before-hand. Again, this...

  2. Adjoint de programme régional (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sous la direction générale des administrateurs de programme désignés du BRAS, l'adjoint de programme régional fournit un grand nombre de services administratifs ... et des documents, en fournissant des renseignements généraux sur les projets, en répondant aux appels téléphoniques et aux courriers électroniques des ...

  3. An Adjoint-based Numerical Method for a class of nonlinear Fokker-Planck Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Festa, Adriano

    2017-03-22

    Here, we introduce a numerical approach for a class of Fokker-Planck (FP) equations. These equations are the adjoint of the linearization of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations. Using this structure, we show how to transfer the properties of schemes for HJ equations to the FP equations. Hence, we get numerical schemes with desirable features such as positivity and mass-preservation. We illustrate this approach in examples that include mean-field games and a crowd motion model.

  4. Adjoint administratif et de conférences (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    adjoint administratif et de conférences est chargé d'aider à l'organisation et à la mise au point des détails administratifs des réunions, conférences et événements spéciaux qui se tiennent dans les installations de conférence situées au 8e étage du ...

  5. Adjoint de direction (h/f) – Gestion du risque et de l'audit interne ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Résumé des fonctions Sous la supervision de la directrice, Gestion du risque et de l'audit interne (GRAI), l'adjoint de direction procure à l'unité de GRAI du soutien ... prépare et met en forme les documents, y compris les présentations PowerPoint; relit et coordonne la traduction, la relecture et la modification des documents; ...

  6. Adjoint Subspaces in Banach Spaces, with Applications to Ordinary Differential Subspaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coddington, Earl A.; Dijksma, Aalt

    1978-01-01

    Given two subspaces A0 ⊂ A1 ⊂ W = X ⊕ Y, where X, Y are Banach spaces, we show how to characterize, in terms of generalized boundary conditions, those adjoint pairs A, A* satisfying A0 ⊂ A ⊂ A1, A1* ⊂ A* ⊂ A0* ⊂ W+ = Y* ⊕ X*, where X*, Y* are the conjugate spaces of X, Y, respectively. The

  7. A journey to 3 d: exact relations for adjoint SQCD from dimensional reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amariti, Antonio; Klare, Claudius

    2015-05-01

    In this note we elaborate on the reduction of four dimensional Seiberg duality with adjoint matter to three dimensions. We use the exact formulation of the superconformal index and of the partition function as instruments to test this reduction. We translate the identity between indices of the dual 4 d theories to 3 d. This produces various new identities between partition functions of 3 d dual phases.

  8. On the discrete spectrum of non-self-adjoint Schroedinger differential equation with an operator coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramoglu, Mehmet; Tasci, Fatih; Zeynalov, Djafar

    2004-01-01

    We study the discrete part of spectrum of a singular non-self-adjoint second-order differential equation on a semiaxis with an operator coefficient. Its boundedness is proved. The result is applied to the Schroedinger boundary value problem -Δu+q(x)u=λ 2 u, u vertical bar ∂D =0, with a complex potential q(x) in an angular domain

  9. Adjoint de direction - Vice-président, Programmes et partenariats (h/f ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'adjoint de direction auprès du vice-président, Programmes et partenariats a pour rôle de fournir, en toute confidentialité, un soutien opérationnel et administratif au vice-président, et de collaborer avec le conseiller principal de programmes pour assurer le bon déroulement de plusieurs aspects du fonctionnement de la ...

  10. An adjoint-based simultaneous estimation method of the asthenosphere's viscosity and afterslip using a fast and scalable finite-element adjoint solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, Ryoichiro; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo

    2018-04-01

    The simultaneous estimation of the asthenosphere's viscosity and coseismic slip/afterslip is expected to improve largely the consistency of the estimation results to observation data of crustal deformation collected in widely spread observation points, compared to estimations of slips only. Such an estimate can be formulated as a non-linear inverse problem of material properties of viscosity and input force that is equivalent to fault slips based on large-scale finite-element (FE) modeling of crustal deformation, in which the degree of freedom is in the order of 109. We formulated and developed a computationally efficient adjoint-based estimation method for this inverse problem, together with a fast and scalable FE solver for the associated forward and adjoint problems. In a numerical experiment that imitates the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, the advantage of the proposed method is confirmed by comparing the estimated results with those obtained using simplified estimation methods. The computational cost required for the optimization shows that the proposed method enabled the targeted estimation to be completed with moderate amount of computational resources.

  11. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Licheng; Zhao, Yuanhong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Xiaoye; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Fu, Tzung-May; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yuxuan

    2015-08-01

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution.

  12. Adjoint sensitivity theory and its application to LEAP Model 22C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barish, J.; Drischler, J.D.; Horwedel, J.E.; Lucius, J.L.; McAdoo, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Adjoint sensitivity theory can be used to determine the sensitivity of results of interest to each of the data elements that enter into the calculations. In this paper adjoint sensitivity theory is discussed, and its applicability to a large energy-economics model is demonstrated by applying it to a specific calculation carried out with the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP). Numerical results for dR/dx, where R is the result of interest and x is any one of the data elements, are presented for all x for which dR/dx is appreciable and for several definitions of R. In a number of cases the accuracy of the dR/dx obtained by adjoint methods has been verified by direct calculations and these comparisons are also presented. The application of the theory as presented requires extensive development work in that a large amount of analytic differentiation must be carried out and a substantial effort is needed to evaluate these derivatives. In the course of the work, a method was developed that would allow all of the required derivatives to be obtained numerically using LEAP and this method is presented and discussed. This numerical method is applicable only to codes with the very special modular structure of LEAP.

  13. Adjoint-based Sensitivity of Jet Noise to Near-nozzle Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung Whan; Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Past efforts have used optimal control theory, based on the numerical solution of the adjoint flow equations, to perturb turbulent jets in order to reduce their radiated sound. These efforts have been successful in that sound is reduced, with concomitant changes to the large-scale turbulence structures in the flow. However, they have also been inconclusive, in that the ultimate level of reduction seemed to depend upon the accuracy of the adjoint-based gradient rather than a physical limitation of the flow. The chaotic dynamics of the turbulence can degrade the smoothness of cost functional in the control-parameter space, which is necessary for gradient-based optimization. We introduce a route to overcoming this challenge, in part by leveraging the regularity and accuracy with a dual-consistent, discrete-exact adjoint formulation. We confirm its properties and use it to study the sensitivity and controllability of the acoustic radiation from a simulation of a M = 1.3 turbulent jet, whose statistics matches data. The smoothness of the cost functional over time is quantified by a minimum optimization step size beyond which the gradient cannot have a certain degree of accuracy. Based on this, we achieve a moderate level of sound reduction in the first few optimization steps. This material is based [in part] upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002374.

  14. Adjoint-based Mesh Optimization Method: The Development and Application for Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seongmin; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2016-01-01

    In this research, methods for optimizing mesh distribution is proposed. The proposed method uses adjoint base optimization method (adjoint method). The optimized result will be obtained by applying this meshing technique to the existing code input deck and will be compared to the results produced from the uniform meshing method. Numerical solutions are calculated form an in-house 1D Finite Difference Method code while neglecting the axial conduction. The fuel radial node optimization was first performed to match the Fuel Centerline Temperature (FCT) the best. This was followed by optimizing the axial node which the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) is matched the best. After obtaining the optimized radial and axial nodes, the nodalization is implemented into the system analysis code and transient analyses were performed to observe the optimum nodalization performance. The developed adjoint-based mesh optimization method in the study is applied to MARS-KS, which is a nuclear system analysis code. Results show that the newly established method yields better results than that of the uniform meshing method from the numerical point of view. It is again stressed that the optimized mesh for the steady state can also give better numerical results even during a transient analysis

  15. Neutron response of silicon carbide semiconductor detectors from deterministic adjoint transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.; Manalo, K.; Plower, T.; Sjoden, G.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor detectors for use in power monitoring is of significant interest because of their distinct advantages, including small size, small mass, and their inactivity both chemically and neutronically. The main focus of this paper includes evaluating the predicted response of a SiC detector when placed in a 17 x 17 Westinghouse PWR assembly, using the PENTRAN code system for the 3-D deterministic adjoint transport computations. Adjoint transport results indicated maximum adjoint values of 1, 0.507 and 0.308 were obtained for the thermal, epithermal and fast neutron energy groups, respectively. Within a radial distance of 6.08 cm from the SiC detector, local fuel pins contribute 75.33% at this radius within the thermal group response. A total of 35.85% of the response in the epithermal group is accounted for in the same 6.08 cm radius; similarly, 21.58% of the fast group response is accounted for in the same radius. This means that for neutrons, the effective monitoring range of the SiC detectors is on the order of five fuel pins away from the detector; pins outside this range in the fuel lattice are minimally 'seen' by the SiC detector. (authors)

  16. First-arrival traveltime tomography for anisotropic media using the adjoint-state method

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2016-05-27

    Traveltime tomography using transmission data has been widely used for static corrections and for obtaining near-surface models for seismic depth imaging. More recently, it is also being used to build initial models for full-waveform inversion. The classic traveltime tomography approach based on ray tracing has difficulties in handling large data sets arising from current seismic acquisition surveys. Some of these difficulties can be addressed using the adjoint-state method, due to its low memory requirement and numerical efficiency. By coupling the gradient computation to nonlinear optimization, it avoids the need for explicit computation of the Fréchet derivative matrix. Furthermore, its cost is equivalent to twice the solution of the forward-modeling problem, irrespective of the size of the input data. The presence of anisotropy in the subsurface has been well established during the past few decades. The improved seismic images obtained by incorporating anisotropy into the seismic processing workflow justify the effort. However, previous literature on the adjoint-state method has only addressed the isotropic approximation of the subsurface. We have extended the adjoint-state technique for first-arrival traveltime tomography to vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Because δ is weakly resolvable from surface seismic alone, we have developed the mathematical framework and procedure to invert for vNMO and η. Our numerical tests on the VTI SEAM model demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to invert for near-surface model parameters and reveal the accuracy achievable by the algorithm.

  17. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  18. Aerodynamic Optimization Based on Continuous Adjoint Method for a Flexible Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoke Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic optimization based on continuous adjoint method for a flexible wing is developed using FORTRAN 90 in the present work. Aerostructural analysis is performed on the basis of high-fidelity models with Euler equations on the aerodynamic side and a linear quadrilateral shell element model on the structure side. This shell element can deal with both thin and thick shell problems with intersections, so this shell element is suitable for the wing structural model which consists of two spars, 20 ribs, and skin. The continuous adjoint formulations based on Euler equations and unstructured mesh are derived and used in the work. Sequential quadratic programming method is adopted to search for the optimal solution using the gradients from continuous adjoint method. The flow charts of rigid and flexible optimization are presented and compared. The objective is to minimize drag coefficient meanwhile maintaining lift coefficient for a rigid and flexible wing. A comparison between the results from aerostructural analysis of rigid optimization and flexible optimization is shown here to demonstrate that it is necessary to include the effect of aeroelasticity in the optimization design of a wing.

  19. Estimating a planetary magnetic field with time-dependent global MHD simulations using an adjoint approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nabert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with a planetary magnetic field causes electrical currents that modify the magnetic field distribution around the planet. We present an approach to estimating the planetary magnetic field from in situ spacecraft data using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulation approach. The method is developed with respect to the upcoming BepiColombo mission to planet Mercury aimed at determining the planet's magnetic field and its interior electrical conductivity distribution. In contrast to the widely used empirical models, global MHD simulations allow the calculation of the strongly time-dependent interaction process of the solar wind with the planet. As a first approach, we use a simple MHD simulation code that includes time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field parameters. The planetary parameters are estimated by minimizing the misfit of spacecraft data and simulation results with a gradient-based optimization. As the calculation of gradients with respect to many parameters is usually very time-consuming, we investigate the application of an adjoint MHD model. This adjoint MHD model is generated by an automatic differentiation tool to compute the gradients efficiently. The computational cost for determining the gradient with an adjoint approach is nearly independent of the number of parameters. Our method is validated by application to THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms magnetosheath data to estimate Earth's dipole moment.

  20. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  1. Application of variational principles and adjoint integrating factors for constructing numerical GFD models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The proposed method is considered on an example of hydrothermodynamics and atmospheric chemistry models [1,2]. In the development of the existing methods for constructing numerical schemes possessing the properties of total approximation for operators of multiscale process models, we have developed a new variational technique, which uses the concept of adjoint integrating factors. The technique is as follows. First, a basic functional of the variational principle (the integral identity that unites the model equations, initial and boundary conditions) is transformed using Lagrange's identity and the second Green's formula. As a result, the action of the operators of main problem in the space of state functions is transferred to the adjoint operators defined in the space of sufficiently smooth adjoint functions. By the choice of adjoint functions the order of the derivatives becomes lower by one than those in the original equations. We obtain a set of new balance relationships that take into account the sources and boundary conditions. Next, we introduce the decomposition of the model domain into a set of finite volumes. For multi-dimensional non-stationary problems, this technique is applied in the framework of the variational principle and schemes of decomposition and splitting on the set of physical processes for each coordinate directions successively at each time step. For each direction within the finite volume, the analytical solutions of one-dimensional homogeneous adjoint equations are constructed. In this case, the solutions of adjoint equations serve as integrating factors. The results are the hybrid discrete-analytical schemes. They have the properties of stability, approximation and unconditional monotony for convection-diffusion operators. These schemes are discrete in time and analytic in the spatial variables. They are exact in case of piecewise-constant coefficients within the finite volume and along the coordinate lines of the grid area in each

  2. Automation of Global Adjoint Tomography Based on ASDF and Workflow Management Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Krischer, L.; Chen, Y.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Global adjoint tomography is computationally expensive, requiring thousands of wavefield simulations and massive data processing. Though a collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory computing group and an allocation on the `Titan' GPU-accelerated supercomputer, we have begun to assimilate waveform data from more than 4,000 earthquakes, from 1995 to 2015, in our inversions. However, since conventional file formats and signal processing tools were not designed for parallel processing of massive data volumes, use of such tools in high-resolution global inversions leads to major bottlenecks. To overcome such problems and allow for continued scientific progress, we designed the Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) and developed a set of processing tools based on ASDF, covering from signal processing (pytomo3d), time window selection (pyflex) to adjoint source (pyadjoint). These new tools greatly enhance the reproducibility and accountability of our research while taking full advantage of parallel computing, showing superior scaling on modern computational platforms. The entire inversion workflow, intrinsically complex and sensitive to human errors, is carefully handled and automated by modern workflow management tools, preventing data contamination and saving a huge amount of time. Our starting model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al., 2016), an elastic model with transversely isotropic upper mantle, is based on 253 earthquakes and 15 nonlinear conjugate gradient iterations. We have now completed source inversions for more than 1,000 earthquakes and have started structural inversions using a quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. We will discuss the challenges of large-scale workflows on HPC systems, the solutions offered by our new adjoint tomography tools, and the initial tomographic results obtained using the new expanded dataset.

  3. Adjoint sensitivity of global cloud droplet number to aerosol and dynamical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karydis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the adjoint of a comprehensive cloud droplet formation parameterization for use in aerosol-cloud-climate interaction studies. The adjoint efficiently and accurately calculates the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to all parameterization inputs (e.g., updraft velocity, water uptake coefficient, aerosol number and hygroscopicity with a single execution. The adjoint is then integrated within three dimensional (3-D aerosol modeling frameworks to quantify the sensitivity of CDNC formation globally to each parameter. Sensitivities are computed for year-long executions of the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM, using wind fields computed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Global Circulation Model (GCM II', and the GEOS-Chem CTM, driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. We find that over polluted (pristine areas, CDNC is more sensitive to updraft velocity and uptake coefficient (aerosol number and hygroscopicity. Over the oceans of the Northern Hemisphere, addition of anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol is predicted to increase CDNC in contrast to coarse-mode sea salt which tends to decrease CDNC. Over the Southern Oceans, CDNC is most sensitive to sea salt, which is the main aerosol component of the region. Globally, CDNC is predicted to be less sensitive to changes in the hygroscopicity of the aerosols than in their concentration with the exception of dust where CDNC is very sensitive to particle hydrophilicity over arid areas. Regionally, the sensitivities differ considerably between the two frameworks and quantitatively reveal why the models differ considerably in their indirect forcing estimates.

  4. Optimal input design for multibody systems by using an extended adjoint approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberpeilsteiner, Stefan; Lauss, Thomas; Nachbagauer, Karin; Steiner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for optimizing inputs of multibody systems for a subsequently performed parameter identification. Herein, optimality with respect to identifiability is attained by maximizing the information content in measurements described by the Fisher information matrix. For solving the resulting optimization problem, the adjoint system of the sensitivity differential equation system is employed. The proposed approach combines these two well-established methods and can be applied to multibody systems in a systematic, automated manner. Furthermore, additional optimization goals can be added and used to find inputs satisfying, for example, end conditions or state constraints.

  5. Nonlinear self-adjointness and invariant solutions of a 2D Rossby wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpoiasu, Rodica; Constantinescu, Radu

    2014-02-01

    The paper investigates the nonlinear self-adjointness of the nonlinear inviscid barotropic nondivergent vorticity equation in a beta-plane. It is a particular form of Rossby equation which does not possess variational structure and it is studied using a recently method developed by Ibragimov. The conservation laws associated with the infinite-dimensional symmetry Lie algebra models are constructed and analyzed. Based on this Lie algebra, some classes of similarity invariant solutions with nonconstant linear and nonlinear shears are obtained. It is also shown how one of the conservation laws generates a particular wave solution of this equation.

  6. Confining vs. conformal scenario for SU(2) with 2 adjoint fermions. Gluonic observables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2010-01-01

    Walking technicolor is a mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking without Higgs field. The Higgs mechanism is provided by chiral symmetry breaking in the technicolor theory. An essential ingredient is the vicinity to an IR fixed point, which could reconcile technicolor with the electroweak...... precision tests. SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac adjoint fermions has been proposed as a candidate for walking technicolor. Understanding whether this theory is confining or IR-conformal is a challenging problem, which can be addressed by means of numerical simulations. We have pointed out that a clean...

  7. Diagonalization of a self-adjoint operator acting on a Hilbert module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parfeny P. Saworotnow

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available For each bounded self-adjoint operator T on a Hilbert module H over an H*-algebra A there exists a locally compact space m and a certain A-valued measure μ such that H is isomorphic to L2(μ⊗A and T corresponds to a multiplication with a continuous function. There is a similar result for a commuting family of normal operators. A consequence for this result is a representation theorem for generalized stationary processes.

  8. An inverse problem strategy based on forward model evaluations: Gradient-based optimization without adjoint solves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilo Valentin, Miguel Alejandro [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a new nonlinear programming formulation for the solution of inverse problems. First, a general inverse problem formulation based on the compliance error functional is presented. The proposed error functional enables the computation of the Lagrange multipliers, and thus the first order derivative information, at the expense of just one model evaluation. Therefore, the calculation of the Lagrange multipliers does not require the solution of the computationally intensive adjoint problem. This leads to significant speedups for large-scale, gradient-based inverse problems.

  9. Multi-scale Sensitivity and Predictability of Hurricane Joaquin (2015) Illuminated Through Adjoint Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J. D.; Holdaway, D.; Amerault, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Joaquin (2015) was a strong category 4 hurricane (maximum winds of 135 kts) that developed from an upper-level low over the western Atlantic and was noteworthy because of its large impact in the Bahamas, as well as the sinking of the cargo ship El Farroand loss of her 33 crew members. Joaquin initially moved southwest towards the Bahamas and rapidly intensified before sharply turning northeastward. Nearly all operational model forecasts failed to provide an accurate prediction of the rapid intensification and track, even at short lead times. As a result, the National Hurricane Center forecasted landfall in the mid-Atlantic, while in reality the storm moved well offshore. In this study, we utilize two adjoint modeling systems, the Navy COAMPS and the NASA GEOS-5, to investigate the role of initial condition errors that may have led to the relatively poor track and intensity predictions of Hurricane Joaquin. Adjoint models can provide valuable insight into the practical limitations of our ability to predict the path of tropical cyclones and their strength. An adjoint model can be used for the efficient and rigorous computation of numerical weather forecast sensitivity to changes in the initial state. The adjoint sensitivity diagnostics illustrate complex influences on the evolution of Joaquin that occur over a wide range of spatial scales. The sensitivity results highlight the importance of an upper-level trough to the northeast that provided the steering flow for the poorly-predicted southwesterly movement of the hurricane in its early phase. The steering flow and hurricane track are found to be very sensitive to relatively small changes in the initial state to the east-northeast of the hurricane. Additionally, the intensity prediction of Hurricane Joaquin is found to be very sensitive to the initial state moisture including highly structured regions around the storm and in remote regions as well. Hurricane Joaquin was observed in four NASA WB-57 research

  10. Singular factorizations, self-adjoint extensions and applications to quantum many-body physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langmann, Edwin [Mathematical Physics, KTH Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Laptev, Ari [Department of Mathematics, KTH, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Paufler, Cornelius [Theoretische Elementarteilchen-Physik, Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2006-02-03

    We study self-adjoint operators defined by factorizing second-order differential operators in first-order ones. We discuss examples where such factorizations introduce singular interactions into simple quantum-mechanical models such as the harmonic oscillator or the free particle on the circle. The generalization of these examples to the many-body case yields quantum models of distinguishable and interacting particles in one dimensions which can be solved explicitly and by simple means. Our considerations lead us to a simple method to construct exactly solvable quantum many-body systems of Calogero-Sutherland type.

  11. An alternative factorization of the quantum harmonic oscillator and two-parameter family of self-adjoint operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos-Olalla, Rafael, E-mail: olalla@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Reyes, Marco A., E-mail: marco@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-10-01

    We introduce an alternative factorization of the Hamiltonian of the quantum harmonic oscillator which leads to a two-parameter self-adjoint operator from which the standard harmonic oscillator, the one-parameter oscillators introduced by Mielnik, and the Hermite operator are obtained in certain limits of the parameters. In addition, a single Bernoulli-type parameter factorization, which is different from the one introduced by M.A. Reyes, H.C. Rosu, and M.R. Gutiérrez [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2145], is briefly discussed in the final part of this work. -- Highlights: ► Factorizations with operators which are not mutually adjoint are presented. ► New two-parameter and one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operators are introduced. ► Their eigenfunctions are two- and one-parameter deformed Hermite functions.

  12. Application of sensitivity analysis to a simplified coupled neutronic thermal-hydraulics transient in a fast reactor using Adjoint techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, L.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a method to perform sensitivity analysis for a simplified multi-physics problem is presented. The method is based on the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure which is used to apply first order perturbation theory to linear and nonlinear problems using adjoint techniques. The multi-physics problem considered includes a neutronic, a thermo-kinetics, and a thermal-hydraulics part and it is used to model the time dependent behavior of a sodium cooled fast reactor. The adjoint procedure is applied to calculate the sensitivity coefficients with respect to the kinetic parameters of the problem for two reference transients using two different model responses, the results obtained are then compared with the values given by a direct sampling of the forward nonlinear problem. Our first results show that, thanks to modern numerical techniques, the procedure is relatively easy to implement and provides good estimation for most perturbations, making the method appealing for more detailed problems. (author)

  13. Adjoint-Based Mesh Adaptation for the Sonic Boom Signature Loudness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.; Park, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The mesh adaptation functionality of FUN3D is utilized to obtain a mesh optimized to calculate sonic boom ground signature loudness. During this process, the coupling between the discrete-adjoints of the computational fluid dynamics tool FUN3D and the atmospheric propagation tool sBOOM is exploited to form the error estimate. This new mesh adaptation methodology will allow generation of suitable meshes adapted to reduce the estimated errors in the ground loudness, which is an optimization metric employed in supersonic aircraft design. This new output-based adaptation could allow new insights into meshing for sonic boom analysis and design, and complements existing output-based adaptation techniques such as adaptation to reduce estimated errors in off-body pressure functional. This effort could also have implications for other coupled multidisciplinary adjoint capabilities (e.g., aeroelasticity) as well as inclusion of propagation specific parameters such as prevailing winds or non-standard atmospheric conditions. Results are discussed in the context of existing methods and appropriate conclusions are drawn as to the efficacy and efficiency of the developed capability.

  14. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  15. Dirichlet operators on loop spaces: Essential self-adjointness and log-Sobolev inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Moon; Yoo, Hyun Jae

    1997-06-01

    For each γ∈[0,1] and potential function V:Rd→R, we consider the Dirichlet form Eμ(γ) and the associated Dirichlet operator Hμ(γ) for the Gibbs measure μ on the loop space E={ω∈C([0,1];Rd):ω(0)=ω(1)}. The Gibbs measure μ is related to the Gibbs state of the quantum anharmonic oscillator with the potential V via the Feynman-Kac formula. We formulate Dirichlet forms in the framework of rigged Hilbert spaces which are related to the loop space E. We then give an approximate criterion for the essential self-adjointness of Dirichlet operators associated with Dirichlet forms given by probability measures on Hilbert spaces. Under appropriate conditions on the potential, we apply the approximate criterion to show that the Dirichlet operator Hμ(γ) is essentially self-adjoint on the domain of smooth cylinder functions. In addition, if the potential satisfies a uniform convexity condition, we prove that the Dirichlet operator Hμ(γ) has a gap at the lower end of spectrum. We also show that the Gibbs measure μ satisfies the log-Sobolev inequality. We use the approximation method developed by Albeverio, Kondratiev, and Röckner with necessary modifications.

  16. Efficient Adjoint Computation of Hybrid Systems of Differential Algebraic Equations with Applications in Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhyankar, Shrirang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Anitescu, Mihai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Hong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool to describe power system dynamic behavior in response to parameter variations. It is a central component in preventive and corrective control applications. The existing approaches for sensitivity calculations, namely, finite-difference and forward sensitivity analysis, require a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of sensitivity parameters. In this work, we investigate, implement, and test a discrete adjoint sensitivity approach whose computational effort is effectively independent of the number of sensitivity parameters. The proposed approach is highly efficient for calculating trajectory sensitivities of larger systems and is consistent, within machine precision, with the function whose sensitivity we are seeking. This is an essential feature for use in optimization applications. Moreover, our approach includes a consistent treatment of systems with switching, such as DC exciters, by deriving and implementing the adjoint jump conditions that arise from state and time-dependent discontinuities. The accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated in comparison with the forward sensitivity analysis approach.

  17. Application of adjoint sensitivity analysis to nuclear reactor fuel rod performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilderman, S.J.; Was, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    Adjoint sensitivity analysis in nuclear fuel behavior modeling is extended to operate on the entire power history for both Zircaloy and stainless steel cladding via the computer codes FCODE-ALPHA/SS and SCODE/SS. The sensitivities of key variables to input parameters are found to be highly non-intuitive and strongly dependent on the fuel-clad gap status and the history of the fuel during the cycle. The sensitivities of five key variables, clad circumferential stress and strain, fission gas release, fuel centerline temperature and fuel-clad gap, to eleven input parameters are studied. The most important input parameters (yielding significances between 1 and 100) are fabricated clad inner and outer radii and fuel radius. The least important significances (less than 0.01) are the time since reactor start-up and fuel-burnup densification rate. Intermediate to these are fabricated fuel porosity, linear heat generation rate, the power history scale factor, clad outer temperature, fill gas pressure and coolant pressure. Stainless steel and Zircaloy have similar sensitivities at start-up but these diverges a burnup proceeds due to the effect of the higher creep rate of Zircaloy which causes the system to be more responsive to changes in input parameters. The value of adjoint sensitivity analysis lies in its capability of uncovering dependencies of fuel variables on input parameters that cannot be determined by a sequential thought process. (orig.)

  18. An adjoint-based framework for maximizing mixing in binary fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Maximilian; Schmid, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Mixing in the inertial, but laminar parameter regime is a common application in a wide range of industries. Enhancing the efficiency of mixing processes thus has a fundamental effect on product quality, material homogeneity and, last but not least, production costs. In this project, we address mixing efficiency in the above mentioned regime (Reynolds number Re = 1000 , Peclet number Pe = 1000) by developing and demonstrating an algorithm based on nonlinear adjoint looping that minimizes the variance of a passive scalar field which models our binary Newtonian fluids. The numerical method is based on the FLUSI code (Engels et al. 2016), a Fourier pseudo-spectral code, which we modified and augmented by scalar transport and adjoint equations. Mixing is accomplished by moving stirrers which are numerically modeled using a penalization approach. In our two-dimensional simulations we consider rotating circular and elliptic stirrers and extract optimal mixing strategies from the iterative scheme. The case of optimizing shape and rotational speed of the stirrers will be demonstrated.

  19. Nonself-Adjoint Second-Order Difference Operators in Limit-Circle Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilender P. Allahverdiev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the maximal dissipative second-order difference (or discrete Sturm-Liouville operators acting in the Hilbert space ℓ2(ℤ (ℤ:={0,±1,±2,…}, that is, the extensions of a minimal symmetric operator with defect index (2,2 (in the Weyl-Hamburger limit-circle cases at ±∞. We investigate two classes of maximal dissipative operators with separated boundary conditions, called “dissipative at −∞” and “dissipative at ∞.” In each case, we construct a self-adjoint dilation of the maximal dissipative operator and its incoming and outgoing spectral representations, which make it possible to determine the scattering matrix of the dilation. We also establish a functional model of the maximal dissipative operator and determine its characteristic function through the Titchmarsh-Weyl function of the self-adjoint operator. We prove the completeness of the system of eigenvectors and associated vectors of the maximal dissipative operators.

  20. Domain decomposition method for the Baltic Sea based on theory of adjoint equation and inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezina, Natalya; Agoshkov, Valery

    2017-04-01

    Domain decomposition method (DDM) allows one to present a domain with complex geometry as a set of essentially simpler subdomains. This method is particularly applied for the hydrodynamics of oceans and seas. In each subdomain the system of thermo-hydrodynamic equations in the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations is solved. The problem of obtaining solution in the whole domain is that it is necessary to combine solutions in subdomains. For this purposes iterative algorithm is created and numerical experiments are conducted to investigate an effectiveness of developed algorithm using DDM. For symmetric operators in DDM, Poincare-Steklov's operators [1] are used, but for the problems of the hydrodynamics, it is not suitable. In this case for the problem, adjoint equation method [2] and inverse problem theory are used. In addition, it is possible to create algorithms for the parallel calculations using DDM on multiprocessor computer system. DDM for the model of the Baltic Sea dynamics is numerically studied. The results of numerical experiments using DDM are compared with the solution of the system of hydrodynamic equations in the whole domain. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project 14-11-00609, the formulation of the iterative process and numerical experiments). [1] V.I. Agoshkov, Domain Decompositions Methods in the Mathematical Physics Problem // Numerical processes and systems, No 8, Moscow, 1991 (in Russian). [2] V.I. Agoshkov, Optimal Control Approaches and Adjoint Equations in the Mathematical Physics Problem, Institute of Numerical Mathematics, RAS, Moscow, 2003 (in Russian).

  1. Estimation of spatial covariance structures by adjoint state maximum likelihood cross-validation: 1. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, F. Javier; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    1989-03-01

    This series of three papers describes a cross-validation method to estimate the spatial covariance structure of intrinsic or nonintrinsic random functions from point or spatially averaged data that may be corrupted by noise. Any number of relevant parameters, including nugget effect, can be estimated. The theory, described in this paper, is based on a maximum likelihood approach which treats the cross-validation errors as Gaussian. Various a posteriori statistical tests are used to verify this hypothesis and to show that in many cases, correlation between these errors is weak. The log likelihood criterion is optimized through a combination of conjugate gradient algorithms. An adjoint state theory is used to efficiently calculate the gradient of the estimation criterion, optimize the step size downgradient, and compute a lower bound for the covariance matrix of the estimation errors. Issues related to the identifiability, stability, and uniqueness of the resulting adjoint state maximum likelihood cross-validation (ASMLCV) method are discussed. This paper also describes the manner in which ASMLCV allows one to use model structure identification criteria to select the best covariance model among a given set of alternatives. Practical aspects of ASMLCV and its application to synthetic data are presented in paper 2 (Samper and Neuman, this issue (a)). Applications to real hydrogeological data (transmissivities and groundwater levels) have been presented elsewhere, while hydrochemical and isotopic data are analyzed by ASMLCV in paper 3 (Samper and Neuman, this issue (b)).

  2. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  3. Surface Pressure Dependencies in the GEOS-Chem-Adjoint System and the Impact of the GEOS-5 Surface Pressure on CO2 Model Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In the GEOS-Chem Adjoint (GCA) system, the total (wet) surface pressure of the GEOS meteorology is employed as dry surface pressure, ignoring the presence of water vapor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) research team has been evaluating the impact of the above discrepancy on the CO2 model forecast and the CO2 flux inversion. The JPL CMS research utilizes a multi-mission assimilation framework developed by the Multi-Mission Observation Operator (M2O2) research team at JPL extending the GCA system. The GCA-M2O2 framework facilitates mission-generic 3D and 4D-variational assimilations streamlining the interfaces to the satellite data products and prior emission inventories. The GCA-M2O2 framework currently integrates the GCA system version 35h and provides a dry surface pressure setup to allow the CO2 model forecast to be performed with the GEOS-5 surface pressure directly or after converting it to dry surface pressure.

  4. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations : Applications towards Complex 3D Configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast

  5. Scaling properties of SU(2) gauge theory with mixed fundamental-adjoint action

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Enrico; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with fundamental-adjoint Wilson plaquette action. We confirm the presence of a first order bulk phase transition and we estimate the location of its end-point in the bare parameter space. If this point is second order, the theory is one of the simplest realizations of a lattice gauge theory admitting a continuum limit at finite bare couplings. All the relevant gauge observables are monitored in the vicinity of the fixed point with very good control over finite-size effects. The scaling properties of the low-lying glueball spectrum are studied while approaching the end-point in a controlled manner.

  6. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  7. Slices to sums of adjoint orbits, the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold, and Hilbert schemes of points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawski Roger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the regular Slodowy slice to the sum of two semisimple adjoint orbits of GL(n, ℂ is isomorphic to the deformation of the D2-singularity if n = 2, the Dancer deformation of the double cover of the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold if n = 3, and to the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold itself if n = 4. For higher n, such slices to the sum of two orbits, each having only two distinct eigenvalues, are either empty or biholomorphic to open subsets of the Hilbert scheme of points on one of the above surfaces. In particular, these open subsets of Hilbert schemes of points carry complete hyperkähler metrics. In the case of the double cover of the Atiyah-Hitchin manifold this metric turns out to be the natural L2-metric on a hyperkähler submanifold of the monopole moduli space.

  8. The method of rigged spaces in singular perturbation theory of self-adjoint operators

    CERN Document Server

    Koshmanenko, Volodymyr; Koshmanenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents the newly developed method of rigged Hilbert spaces as a modern approach in singular perturbation theory. A key notion of this approach is the Lax-Berezansky triple of Hilbert spaces embedded one into another, which specifies the well-known Gelfand topological triple. All kinds of singular interactions described by potentials supported on small sets (like the Dirac δ-potentials, fractals, singular measures, high degree super-singular expressions) admit a rigorous treatment only in terms of the equipped spaces and their scales. The main idea of the method is to use singular perturbations to change inner products in the starting rigged space, and the construction of the perturbed operator by the Berezansky canonical isomorphism (which connects the positive and negative spaces from a new rigged triplet). The approach combines three powerful tools of functional analysis based on the Birman-Krein-Vishik theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators, the theory of singular quadra...

  9. One-loop adjoint masses for non-supersymmetric intersecting branes

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasopoulos, P; Benakli, K; Goodsell, M D; Vichi, A

    2011-01-01

    We consider breaking of supersymmetry in intersecting D-brane configurations by slight deviation of the angles from their supersymmetric values. We compute the masses generated by radiative corrections for the adjoint scalars on the brane world-volumes. In the open string channel, the string two-point function receives contributions only from the infrared and the ultraviolet limits. The latter is due to tree-level closed string uncanceled NS-NS tadpoles, which we explicitly reproduce from the effective Born-Infeld action. On the other hand, the infrared region reproduces the one-loop mediation of supersymmetry breaking in the effective gauge theory, via messengers and their Kaluza-Klein excitations. In the toroidal set-up considered here, it receives contributions only from broken N=4 and N=2 supersymmetric configurations, and thus always leads at leading order to a tachyonic direction, in agreement with effective field theory expectations.

  10. Optical properties reconstruction using the adjoint method based on the radiative transfer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addoum, Ahmad; Farges, Olivier; Asllanaj, Fatmir

    2018-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the spatial distribution of optical properties in heterogeneous media like biological tissues. The light transport through such media is accurately described by the radiative transfer equation in the frequency-domain. The adjoint method is used to efficiently compute the objective function gradient with respect to optical parameters. Numerical tests show that the algorithm is accurate and robust to retrieve simultaneously the absorption μa and scattering μs coefficients for lowly and highly absorbing medium. Moreover, the simultaneous reconstruction of μs and the anisotropy factor g of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function is achieved with a reasonable accuracy. The main novelty in this work is the reconstruction of g which might open the possibility to image this parameter in tissues as an additional contrast agent in optical tomography.

  11. Modularity and 4D-2D spectral equivalences for large- N gauge theories with adjoint matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basar, Gökçe; Cherman, Aleksey; Dienes, Keith R.; McGady, David A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent work, we demonstrated that the confined-phase spectrum of non-supersymmetric pure Yang-Mills theory coincides with the spectrum of the chiral sector of a two-dimensional conformal field theory in the large- N limit. This was done within the tractable setting in which the gauge theory is compactified on a three-sphere whose radius is small compared to the strong length scale. In this paper, we generalize these observations by demonstrating that similar results continue to hold even when massless adjoint matter fields are introduced. These results hold for both thermal and (-1) F -twisted partition functions, and collectively suggest that the spectra of large- N confining gauge theories are organized by the symmetries of two-dimensional conformal field theories.

  12. Adjoint method provides phase response functions for delay-induced oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Ikuhiro; Ogawa, Yutaro; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Nakao, Hiroya; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2012-07-27

    Limit-cycle oscillations induced by time delay are widely observed in various systems, but a systematic phase-reduction theory for them has yet to be developed. Here we present a practical theoretical framework to calculate the phase response function Z(θ), a fundamental quantity for the theory, of delay-induced limit cycles with infinite-dimensional phase space. We show that Z(θ) can be obtained as a zero eigenfunction of the adjoint equation associated with an appropriate bilinear form for the delay differential equations. We confirm the validity of the proposed framework for two biological oscillators and demonstrate that the derived phase equation predicts intriguing multimodal locking behavior.

  13. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains - I: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D. G.; Cacuci, D. G.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure (ASAP) for generic dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains is presented, together with applications of this procedure to the analysis of several systems of increasing complexity. The general theory is presented in Part I of this work and is accompanied by a paradigm application to the dynamic reliability analysis of a simple binary component, namely a pump functioning on an 'up/down' cycle until it fails irreparably. This paradigm example admits a closed form analytical solution, which permits a clear illustration of the main characteristics of the ASAP for Markov chains. In particular, it is shown that the ASAP for Markov chains presents outstanding computational advantages over other procedures currently in use for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the dynamic reliability of large-scale systems. This conclusion is further underscored by the large-scale applications presented in Part II. (authors)

  14. Discrete Adjoint-Based Simultaneous Analysis and Design Approach for Conceptual Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviu SUGAR-GABOR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simultaneous analysis and design method is derived and applied for a non-linear constrained aerodynamic optimization problem. The method is based on the approach of defining a Lagrange functional based on the objective function and the aerodynamic model’s equations, using two sets of multipliers. A fully-coupled, non-linear system of equations is derived by requiring that the Gateaux variation of the Lagrange functional vanishes for arbitrary variations of the aerodynamic model’s dependent variables and design parameters. The optimization problem is approached using a one-shot technique, by solving the non-linear system in which all sensitivities and problem constraints are included. The computational efficiency of the method is compared against a gradient-based optimization algorithm using adjoint-provided gradient. A conceptual-stage aerodynamic optimization problem is solved, based on a non-linear numerical lifting-line method with viscous corrections.

  15. Maps Preserving Peripheral Spectrum of Generalized Jordan Products of Self-Adjoint Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let A1 and A2  be standard real Jordan algebras of self-adjoint operators on complex Hilbert spaces H1  and  H2, respectively. For  k≥2, let  (i1,…,im be a fixed sequence with i1,…,im∈{1,…,k} and assume that at least one of the terms in (i1,…,im appears exactly once. Define the generalized Jordan product  T1∘T2∘⋯∘Tk=Ti1Ti2⋯Tim+Tim⋯Ti2Ti1 on elements in  Ai. Let Φ:A1→A2 be a map with the range containing all rank-one projections and trace zero-rank two self-adjoint operators. We show that Φ satisfies that σπ(Φ(A1∘⋯∘Φ(Ak=σπ(A1∘⋯∘Ak for all A1,…,Ak, where σπ(A stands for the peripheral spectrum of A, if and only if there exist a scalar c∈{-1,1} and a unitary operator U:H1→H2 such that Φ(A=cUAU* for all A∈A1, or Φ(A=cUAtU* for all A∈A1, where At is the transpose of A for an arbitrarily fixed orthonormal basis of H1. Moreover, c=1 whenever m is odd.

  16. The efficiency of geophysical adjoint codes generated by automatic differentiation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasenko, A. V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of numerical models that describe complex physical or chemical processes depends on the choice of model parameters. Estimating an optimal set of parameters by optimization algorithms requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the process of interest to model parameters. Typically the sensitivity computation involves differentiation of the model, which can be performed by applying algorithmic differentiation (AD) tools to the underlying numerical code. However, existing AD tools differ substantially in design, legibility and computational efficiency. In this study we show that, for geophysical data assimilation problems of varying complexity, the performance of adjoint codes generated by the existing AD tools (i) Open_AD, (ii) Tapenade, (iii) NAGWare and (iv) Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) can be vastly different. Based on simple test problems, we evaluate the efficiency of each AD tool with respect to computational speed, accuracy of the adjoint, the efficiency of memory usage, and the capability of each AD tool to handle modern FORTRAN 90-95 elements such as structures and pointers, which are new elements that either combine groups of variables or provide aliases to memory addresses, respectively. We show that, while operator overloading tools are the only ones suitable for modern codes written in object-oriented programming languages, their computational efficiency lags behind source transformation by orders of magnitude, rendering the application of these modern tools to practical assimilation problems prohibitive. In contrast, the application of source transformation tools appears to be the most efficient choice, allowing handling even large geophysical data assimilation problems. However, they can only be applied to numerical models written in earlier generations of programming languages. Our study indicates that applying existing AD tools to realistic geophysical problems faces limitations that urgently need to be solved to allow the

  17. Adjoint tomography of the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Kanto region using broadband seismograms

    KAUST Repository

    Miyoshi, Takayuki

    2017-10-04

    A three-dimensional seismic wave speed model in the Kanto region of Japan was developed using adjoint tomography for application in the effective reproduction of observed waveforms. Starting with a model based on previous travel time tomographic results, we inverted the waveforms obtained at seismic broadband stations from 140 local earthquakes in the Kanto region to obtain the P- and S-wave speeds Vp and Vs. Additionally, all centroid times of the source solutions were determined before the structural inversion. The synthetic displacements were calculated using the spectral-element method (SEM) in which the Kanto region was parameterized using 16 million grid points. The model parameters Vp and Vs were updated iteratively by Newton’s method using the misfit and Hessian kernels until the misfit between the observed and synthetic waveforms was minimized. Computations of the forward and adjoint simulations were conducted on the K computer in Japan. The optimized SEM code required a total of 6720 simulations using approximately 62,000 node hours to obtain the final model after 16 iterations. The proposed model reveals several anomalous areas with extremely low-Vs values in comparison with those of the initial model. These anomalies were found to correspond to geological features, earthquake sources, and volcanic regions with good data coverage and resolution. The synthetic waveforms obtained using the newly proposed model for the selected earthquakes showed better fit than the initial model to the observed waveforms in different period ranges within 5–30 s. This result indicates that the model can accurately predict actual waveforms.

  18. What can adjoint modelling tell about the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in basal sliding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Jonathan; Rutt, Ian; Murray, Tavi; Utke, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Studying the future behaviour of the Greenland Ice Sheet is important considering the ice sheet has a sea-level equivalent of 7 metres and the rate of mass loss from it is increasing (Velicogna, 2009). Examining the modelled response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in forcing parameters can give insight into how it will behave in the future. The response of the ice sheet to specific changes in forcing parameters is referred to as the sensitivity. Being able to obtain model sensitivities in as little computation time as possible would be useful for examining the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Adjoint models allow sensitivities to be obtained more efficiently than the conventional way, when considering spatially varying parameters. Conventionally, such sensitivities are obtained by perturbing a parameter at every grid point in turn and calculating the sensitivity at every grid point. Adjoint sensitivities, though, are calculated in a single step. This reduces the computational cost when obtaining sensitivities over large model domains. The adjoint method also has the advantage that it gives the exact value of the model sensitivity, rather than a finite difference approximation to it. We present the adjoint of a finite difference, shallow ice, thermomechanical ice sheet model with basal sliding, applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet. This adjoint model is obtained using the OpenAD automatic differentiation tool (Utke, 2006), which is open source. The adjoint model is validated by comparing adjoint and forward model sensitivities over 100 years. This work builds on the work of Heimbach (2009). We use the adjoint model to examine the sensitivity of the model to changes in basal sliding. About half the mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet occurs from surface runoff and half from dynamic mass loss (Broeke, 2009). Melt-water from Greenland Ice Sheet supra-glacial lakes can percolate to the bed through moulins. The melt-water that reaches the bed can then

  19. Drag reduction of a transport helicopter by application of an adjoint-based fuselage optimization chain and modification of the rotor head

    OpenAIRE

    Wentrup, Marc; Khier, Walid; Zhang, Qinyin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper two approaches are investigated to reduce the parasite drag of a helicopter. The first approach is to optimize the surface of the fuselage back door. This is done by applying an automatic, adjoint-based optimization chain; developed by DLR for these purposes. This optimization chain combines the RANS-solver TAU with a solver for the discrete adjoint equation and a conjugate-gradient based optimization algorithm. The parameterization is done by Free Form Deformation. A descriptio...

  20. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors Using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated by using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multipoint optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  1. Improved forward wave propagation and adjoint-based sensitivity kernel calculations using a numerically stable finite-element PML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Zhinan; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland

    2014-01-01

    the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) form of CFS-UPML, which allows for extension to higher order time schemes and is easier to implement. Secondly, we rigorously derive the CFS-UPML formulation for time-domain adjoint elastic wave problems, which to our knowledge has never been done before. Thirdly...... an efficient infinite-domain truncation method suitable for accurately truncating an infinite domain governed by the second-order elastic wave equation written in displacement and computed based on a finite-element (FE) method. In this paper, we make several steps towards this goal. First, we make the 2-D...... in both formulations, in particular if very small mesh elements are present inside the absorbing layer, but we explain how these instabilities can be delayed as much as needed by using a stretching factor to reach numerical stability in practice for applications. Fourthly, in the case of adjoint problems...

  2. An approach to computing discrete adjoints for MPI-parallelized models applied to Ice Sheet System Model 4.11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Larour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of sea-level rise projections, there is a strong need for hindcast validation of the evolution of polar ice sheets in a way that tightly matches observational records (from radar, gravity, and altimetry observations mainly. However, the computational requirements for making hindcast reconstructions possible are severe and rely mainly on the evaluation of the adjoint state of transient ice-flow models. Here, we look at the computation of adjoints in the context of the NASA/JPL/UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM, written in C++ and designed for parallel execution with MPI. We present the adaptations required in the way the software is designed and written, but also generic adaptations in the tools facilitating the adjoint computations. We concentrate on the use of operator overloading coupled with the AdjoinableMPI library to achieve the adjoint computation of the ISSM. We present a comprehensive approach to (1 carry out type changing through the ISSM, hence facilitating operator overloading, (2 bind to external solvers such as MUMPS and GSL-LU, and (3 handle MPI-based parallelism to scale the capability. We demonstrate the success of the approach by computing sensitivities of hindcast metrics such as the misfit to observed records of surface altimetry on the northeastern Greenland Ice Stream, or the misfit to observed records of surface velocities on Upernavik Glacier, central West Greenland. We also provide metrics for the scalability of the approach, and the expected performance. This approach has the potential to enable a new generation of hindcast-validated projections that make full use of the wealth of datasets currently being collected, or already collected, in Greenland and Antarctica.

  3. Adjoint au site Web et aux médias sociaux (h/f) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'adjoint coordonne également l'établissement de la collection de livres en ligne du CRDI, ce qui comprend une collaboration étroite avec la maison d'édition du ... il résout les erreurs dans les processus et les systèmes de contrôle de la qualité, et travaille avec la Division de la gestion de l'information et de la technologie ...

  4. Fully automatic time-window selection using machine learning for global adjoint tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hill, J.; Lei, W.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Bozdag, E.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Selecting time windows from seismograms such that the synthetic measurements (from simulations) and measured observations are sufficiently close is indispensable in a global adjoint tomography framework. The increasing amount of seismic data collected everyday around the world demands "intelligent" algorithms for seismic window selection. While the traditional FLEXWIN algorithm can be "automatic" to some extent, it still requires both human input and human knowledge or experience, and thus is not deemed to be fully automatic. The goal of intelligent window selection is to automatically select windows based on a learnt engine that is built upon a huge number of existing windows generated through the adjoint tomography project. We have formulated the automatic window selection problem as a classification problem. All possible misfit calculation windows are classified as either usable or unusable. Given a large number of windows with a known selection mode (select or not select), we train a neural network to predict the selection mode of an arbitrary input window. Currently, the five features we extract from the windows are its cross-correlation value, cross-correlation time lag, amplitude ratio between observed and synthetic data, window length, and minimum STA/LTA value. More features can be included in the future. We use these features to characterize each window for training a multilayer perceptron neural network (MPNN). Training the MPNN is equivalent to solve a non-linear optimization problem. We use backward propagation to derive the gradient of the loss function with respect to the weighting matrices and bias vectors and use the mini-batch stochastic gradient method to iteratively optimize the MPNN. Numerical tests show that with a careful selection of the training data and a sufficient amount of training data, we are able to train a robust neural network that is capable of detecting the waveforms in an arbitrary earthquake data with negligible detection error

  5. Sources of springtime surface black carbon in the Arctic: an adjoint analysis for April 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Qi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We quantify source contributions to springtime (April 2008 surface black carbon (BC in the Arctic by interpreting surface observations of BC at five receptor sites (Denali, Barrow, Alert, Zeppelin, and Summit using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem and its adjoint. Contributions to BC at Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelin are dominated by Asian anthropogenic sources (40–43 % before 18 April and by Siberian open biomass burning emissions (29–41 % afterward. In contrast, Summit, a mostly free tropospheric site, has predominantly an Asian anthropogenic source contribution (24–68 %, with an average of 45 %. We compute the adjoint sensitivity of BC concentrations at the five sites during a pollution episode (20–25 April to global emissions from 1 March to 25 April. The associated contributions are the combined results of these sensitivities and BC emissions. Local and regional anthropogenic sources in Alaska are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Denali (63 % of total anthropogenic contributions, and natural gas flaring emissions in the western extreme north of Russia (WENR are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Zeppelin (26 % and Alert (13 %. We find that long-range transport of emissions from Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (also known as Jing–Jin–Ji, the biggest urbanized region in northern China, contribute significantly (∼ 10 % to surface BC across the Arctic. On average, it takes ∼ 12 days for Asian anthropogenic emissions and Siberian biomass burning emissions to reach the Arctic lower troposphere, supporting earlier studies. Natural gas flaring emissions from the WENR reach Zeppelin in about a week. We find that episodic transport events dominate BC at Denali (87 %, a site outside the Arctic front, which is a strong transport barrier. The relative contribution of these events to surface BC within the polar dome is much smaller (∼ 50 % at Barrow and Zeppelin and ∼ 10 % at

  6. Tracking sensitive source areas of different weather pollution types using GRAPES-CUACE adjoint model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; An, Xingqin; Zhai, Shixian; Hou, Qing; Sun, Zhaobin

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the sustained pollution processes were selected during which daily PM2.5 concentration exceeded 75 μg/m3 for three days continuously based on the hourly data of Beijing observation sites from July 2012 to December 2015. Using the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) MICAPS meteorological processing system, synoptic situation during PM2.5 pollution processes was classified into five weather types: low pressure and weak high pressure alternating control, weak high pressure, low pressure control, high rear, and uniform pressure field. Then, we chose the representative pollution cases corresponding to each type, adopted the GRAPES-CUACE adjoint model tracking the sensitive source areas of the five types, and analyzed the critical discharge periods of Beijing and neighboring provinces as well as their contribution to the PM2.5 peak concentration in Beijing. The results showed that the local source plays the main theme in the 30 h before the objective time, and prior to 72 h before the objective time contribution of local sources for the five pollution types are 37.5%, 25.0%, 39.4%, 31.2%, and 42.4%, respectively; the Hebei source contributes constantly in the 57 h ahead of the objective time with the contribution proportion ranging from 37% to 64%; the contribution period and rate of Tianjin and Shanxi sources are shorter and smaller. Based on the adjoint sensitivity analysis, we further discussed the effect of emission reduction control measures in different types, finding that the effect of local source reduction in the first 20 h of the objective time is better, and if the local source is reduced 50% within 72 h before the objective time, the decline rates of PM2.5 in the five types are 11.6%, 9.4%, 13.8%, 9.9% and 15.2% respectively. And the reduction effect of the neighboring sources is better within the 3-57 h before the objective time.

  7. Construction of the seismic wave-speed model by adjoint tomography beneath the Japanese metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    The Japanese metropolitan area has high risks of earthquakes and volcanoes associated with convergent tectonic plates. It is important to clarify detail three-dimensional structure for understanding tectonics and predicting strong motion. Classical tomographic studies based on ray theory have revealed seismotectonics and volcanic tectonics in the region, however it is unknown whether their models reproduce observed seismograms. In the present study, we construct new seismic wave-speed model by using waveform inversion. Adjoint tomography and the spectral element method (SEM) were used in the inversion (e.g. Tape et al. 2009; Peter et al. 2011). We used broadband seismograms obtained at NIED F-net stations for 140 earthquakes occurred beneath the Kanto district. We selected four frequency bands between 5 and 30 sec and used from the seismograms of longer period bands for the inversion. Tomographic iteration was conducted until obtaining the minimized misfit between data and synthetics. Our SEM model has 16 million grid points that covers the metropolitan area of the Kanto district. The model parameters were the Vp and Vs of the grid points, and density and attenuation were updated to new values depending on new Vs in each iteration. The initial model was assumed the tomographic model (Matsubara and Obara 2011) based on ray theory. The source parameters were basically used from F-net catalog, while the centroid times were inferred from comparison between data and synthetics. We simulated the forward and adjoint wavefields of each event and obtained Vp and Vs misfit kernels from their interaction. Large computation was conducted on K computer, RIKEN. We obtained final model (m16) after 16 iterations in the present study. For the waveform improvement, it is clearly shown that m16 is better than the initial model, and the seismograms especially improved in the frequency bands of longer than 8 sec and changed better for seismograms of the events occurred at deeper than a

  8. Sources of springtime surface black carbon in the Arctic: an adjoint analysis for April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; Henze, Daven K.; Tseng, Hsien-Liang; He, Cenlin

    2017-08-01

    We quantify source contributions to springtime (April 2008) surface black carbon (BC) in the Arctic by interpreting surface observations of BC at five receptor sites (Denali, Barrow, Alert, Zeppelin, and Summit) using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and its adjoint. Contributions to BC at Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelin are dominated by Asian anthropogenic sources (40-43 %) before 18 April and by Siberian open biomass burning emissions (29-41 %) afterward. In contrast, Summit, a mostly free tropospheric site, has predominantly an Asian anthropogenic source contribution (24-68 %, with an average of 45 %). We compute the adjoint sensitivity of BC concentrations at the five sites during a pollution episode (20-25 April) to global emissions from 1 March to 25 April. The associated contributions are the combined results of these sensitivities and BC emissions. Local and regional anthropogenic sources in Alaska are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Denali (63 % of total anthropogenic contributions), and natural gas flaring emissions in the western extreme north of Russia (WENR) are the largest anthropogenic sources of BC at Zeppelin (26 %) and Alert (13 %). We find that long-range transport of emissions from Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (also known as Jing-Jin-Ji), the biggest urbanized region in northern China, contribute significantly (˜ 10 %) to surface BC across the Arctic. On average, it takes ˜ 12 days for Asian anthropogenic emissions and Siberian biomass burning emissions to reach the Arctic lower troposphere, supporting earlier studies. Natural gas flaring emissions from the WENR reach Zeppelin in about a week. We find that episodic transport events dominate BC at Denali (87 %), a site outside the Arctic front, which is a strong transport barrier. The relative contribution of these events to surface BC within the polar dome is much smaller (˜ 50 % at Barrow and Zeppelin and ˜ 10 % at Alert). The large contributions from Asian anthropogenic

  9. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis of low-order thermoacoustic networks using a wave-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, José G.; Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew P.

    2017-07-01

    Strict pollutant emission regulations are pushing gas turbine manufacturers to develop devices that operate in lean conditions, with the downside that combustion instabilities are more likely to occur. Methods to predict and control unstable modes inside combustion chambers have been developed in the last decades but, in some cases, they are computationally expensive. Sensitivity analysis aided by adjoint methods provides valuable sensitivity information at a low computational cost. This paper introduces adjoint methods and their application in wave-based low order network models, which are used as industrial tools, to predict and control thermoacoustic oscillations. Two thermoacoustic models of interest are analyzed. First, in the zero Mach number limit, a nonlinear eigenvalue problem is derived, and continuous and discrete adjoint methods are used to obtain the sensitivities of the system to small modifications. Sensitivities to base-state modification and feedback devices are presented. Second, a more general case with non-zero Mach number, a moving flame front and choked outlet, is presented. The influence of the entropy waves on the computed sensitivities is shown.

  10. Adjoint-based optimization of mechanical performance in polycrystalline materials and structures through texture control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Grace [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bishop, Joseph E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The texture of a polycrystalline material refers to the preferred orientation of the grains within the material. In metallic materials, texture can significantly affect the mechanical properties such as elastic moduli, yield stress, strain hardening, and fracture toughness. Recent advances in additive manufacturing of metallic materials offer the possibility in the not too distant future of controlling the spatial variation of texture. In this work, we investigate the advantages, in terms of mechanical performance, of allowing the texture to vary spatially. We use an adjoint-based gradient optimization algorithm within a finite element solver (COMSOL) to optimize several engineering quantities of interest in a simple structure (hole in a plate) and loading (uniaxial tension) condition. As a first step to general texture optimization, we consider the idealized case of a pure fiber texture in which the homogenized properties are transversely isotropic. In this special case, the only spatially varying design variables are the three Euler angles that prescribe the orientation of the homogenized material at each point within the structure. This work paves a new way to design metallic materials for tunable mechanical properties at the microstructure level.

  11. Least-squares reverse time migration in frequency domain using the adjoint-state method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Haoran; Chen, Shengchang; Wang, Huazhong

    2013-01-01

    A new scheme is presented to implement a least-squares frequency domain reverse time migration (LS-FRTM). This scheme expresses the gradient of the misfit function with respect to the model as the product of the conjugated Green's functions and the data residuals in the frequency domain based on the adjoint state method. In the 2D case, for each frequency all the Green's functions from the shots to the reflectors and from the reflectors to the receivers which depend on the background velocity can be calculated once using the lower/upper decomposition. The pseudo-Hessian matrix which is also expressed as a function of the Green's function is used as a substitute for the approximate Hessian to amplitude compensation for the gradient. Since the linearized inversion does not update the background velocity, the Green's function needs to be calculated only once. An iteration based LS-FRTM can be implemented with high efficiency. As examples supporting our assertion, we present the results obtained by applying our method to the 2D Marmousi model. (paper)

  12. Accurately bi-orthogonal direct and adjoint lambda modes via two-sided Eigen-solvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, J.E.; Vidal, V.; Verdu, G.

    2005-01-01

    This work is concerned with the accurate computation of the dominant l-modes (Lambda mode) of the reactor core in order to approximate the solution of the neutron diffusion equation in different situations such as the transient modal analysis. In a previous work, the problem was already addressed by implementing a parallel program based on SLEPc (Scalable Library for Eigenvalue Problem Computations), a public domain software for the solution of eigenvalue problems. Now, the proposed solution is extended by incorporating also the computation of the adjoint l-modes in such a way that the bi-orthogonality condition is enforced very accurately. This feature is very desirable in some types of analyses, and in the proposed scheme it is achieved by making use of two-sided eigenvalue solving software. Current implementations of some of these software, while still susceptible of improvement, show that they can be competitive in terms of response time and accuracy with respect to other types of eigenvalue solving software. The code developed by the authors has parallel capabilities in order to be able to analyze reactors with a great level of detail in a short time. (authors)

  13. Phases of circle-compactified QCD with adjoint fermions at finite density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Takuya; Ünsal, Mithat; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    We study chemical-potential dependence of confinement and mass gap in QCD with adjoint fermions in spacetime with one spatial compact direction. By calculating the one-loop effective potential for the Wilson line in the presence of a chemical potential, we show that a center-symmetric phase and a center-broken phase alternate when the chemical potential in units of the compactification scale is increased. In the center-symmetric phase we use semiclassical methods to show that photons in the magnetic bion plasma acquire a mass gap that grows with the chemical potential as a result of anisotropic interactions between monopole-instantons. For the neutral fermionic sector which remains gapless perturbatively, there are two possibilities at a nonperturbative level: either to remain gapless (unbroken global symmetry) or to undergo a novel superfluid transition through a four-fermion interaction (broken global symmetry). If the latter is the case, this leads to an energy gap of quarks proportional to a new nonperturbative scale L-1exp [-1 /(g4μ L )] , where L denotes the circumference of S1, the low-energy physics is described by a Nambu-Goldstone mode associated with the baryon number, and there exists a new type of BEC-BCS crossover of the diquark pairing as a function of the compactification scale at a small chemical potential.

  14. Adjoint sensitivity analysis applied on a model of irradiation assisted degradation of metals in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonson, S.A.; Ballinger, R.G.; Christensen, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation of an aqueous environment results, in general, in a steady state concentration of oxidizing chemical species in solution. Although the effect may be beneficial to the metal in contact with the solution in some cases, say by producing a more protective film, it is generally believed to be detrimental. The ability to predict the concentrations of the oxidizing species and from this begin to analyze the detrimental behavior on the metals requires computer codes that model the chemical reactions, production rates, and diffusion characteristics of the species being produced by irradiation. The large number of parameters and the complexity of the interactions involved in the predictions of irradiation effects on metals degradation requires a more sophisticated approach to determining the sensitivities of the final results. Monte Carlo techniques are too computationally intensive for practical use in determining sensitivities. The paper presents an approach, adjoint sensitivity analysis, that is more practical, i.e., three computer runs versus thousands, and also a more accurate measure of the sensitivities of the model

  15. Discrete SLn-connections and self-adjoint difference operators on 2-dimensional manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinevich, P. G.; Novikov, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    The programme of discretization of famous completely integrable systems and associated linear operators was launched in the 1990s. In particular, the properties of second-order difference operators on triangulated manifolds and equilateral triangular lattices have been studied by Novikov and Dynnikov since 1996. This study included Laplace transformations, new discretizations of complex analysis, and new discretizations of GLn-connections on triangulated n-dimensional manifolds. A general theory of discrete GLn-connections 'of rank one' has been developed (see the Introduction for definitions). The problem of distinguishing the subclass of SLn-connections (and unimodular SLn+/- -connections, which satisfy detA = +/-1) has not been solved. In the present paper it is shown that these connections play an important role (which is similar to the role of magnetic fields in the continuous case) in the theory of self-adjoint Schrödinger difference operators on equilateral triangular lattices in ℝ2. In Appendix 1 a complete characterization is given of unimodular SLn+/- -connections of rank 1 for all n > 1, thus correcting a mistake (it was wrongly claimed that they reduce to a canonical connection for n > 2). With the help of a communication from Korepanov, a complete clarification is provided of how the classical theory of electrical circuits and star-triangle transformations is connected with the discrete Laplace transformations on triangular lattices. Bibliography: 29 titles.

  16. Detector placement optimization for cargo containers using deterministic adjoint transport examination for SNM detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, Trevor D.; Sjoden, Glenn E.; Manalo, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    With growing concerns over port security and the potential for illicit trafficking of SNM through portable cargo shipping containers, efforts are ongoing to reduce the threat via container monitoring. This paper focuses on answering an important question of how many detectors are necessary for adequate coverage of a cargo container considering the detection of neutrons and gamma rays. Deterministic adjoint transport calculations are performed with compressed helium- 3 polyethylene moderated neutron detectors and sodium activated cesium-iodide gamma-ray scintillation detectors on partial and full container models. Results indicate that the detector capability is dependent on source strength and potential shielding. Using a surrogate weapons grade plutonium leakage source, it was determined that for a 20 foot ISO container, five neutron detectors and three gamma detectors are necessary for adequate coverage. While a large CsI(Na) gamma detector has the potential to monitor the entire height of the container for SNM, the He-3 neutron detector is limited to roughly 1.25 m in depth. Detector blind spots are unavoidable inside the container volume unless additional measures are taken for adequate coverage. (author)

  17. Geothermal reservoir monitoring based upon spectral-element and adjoint methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.; Harris, D.; Mellors, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Induced seismicity associated with CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and enhanced geothermal systems is triggered by fracturing during fluid injection. These events range from magnitude -1 (microseismicity) up to 3.5, for induced seismicity on pre-existing faults. In our approach, we are using seismic data collected at the Salton Sea geothermal field, to improve the current structural model (SCEC CVM4.0 including a 10m resolution topography) and to invert for the moment tensor and source location of the microseismic events. The key here is to refine the velocity model to then precisely invert for the location and mechanism (tensile or shear) of fracture openings. This information is crucial for geothermal reservoir assessment, especially in an unconventional setting where hydrofracturing is used to enhance productivity. The location of pre-existing and formed fractures as well as their type of openings are important elements for strategic decisions. Numerical simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, which contrary to finite-element methods (FEM), uses high degree Lagrange polynomials, allowing the technique to not only handle complex geometries, like the FEM, but also to retain the strength of exponential convergence and accuracy due to the use of high degree polynomials. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method.

  18. An adjoint method of sensitivity analysis for residual vibrations of structures subject to impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Cheng, Gengdong

    2018-03-01

    For structures subject to impact loads, the residual vibration reduction is more and more important as the machines become faster and lighter. An efficient sensitivity analysis of residual vibration with respect to structural or operational parameters is indispensable for using a gradient based optimization algorithm, which reduces the residual vibration in either active or passive way. In this paper, an integrated quadratic performance index is used as the measure of the residual vibration, since it globally measures the residual vibration response and its calculation can be simplified greatly with Lyapunov equation. Several sensitivity analysis approaches for performance index were developed based on the assumption that the initial excitations of residual vibration were given and independent of structural design. Since the resulting excitations by the impact load often depend on structural design, this paper aims to propose a new efficient sensitivity analysis method for residual vibration of structures subject to impacts to consider the dependence. The new method is developed by combining two existing methods and using adjoint variable approach. Three numerical examples are carried out and demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method. The numerical results show that the dependence of initial excitations on structural design variables may strongly affects the accuracy of sensitivities.

  19. Large-N reduction in QCD-like theories with massive adjoint fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeyanagi, Tatsuo; /Kyoto U.; Hanada, Masanori; /Weizmann Inst.; Unsal, Mithat; /Weizmann Inst. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yacoby, Ran; /Weizmann Inst.

    2010-08-26

    Large-N QCD with heavy adjoint fermions emulates pure Yang-Mills theory at long distances. We study this theory on a four- and three-torus, and analytically argue the existence of a large-small volume equivalence. For any finite mass, center symmetry unbroken phase exists at sufficiently small volume and this phase can be used to study the large-volume limit through the Eguchi-Kawai equivalence. A finite temperature version of volume independence implies that thermodynamics on R3 x S1 can be studied via a unitary matrix quantum mechanics on S1, by varying the temperature. To confirm this non-perturbatively, we numerically study both zero- and one-dimensional theories by using Monte-Carlo simulation. Order of finite-N corrections turns out to be 1/N. We introduce various twisted versions of the reduced QCD which systematically suppress finite-N corrections. Using a twisted model, we observe the confinement/deconfinement transition on a 1{sup 3} x 2-lattice. The result agrees with large volume simulations of Yang-Mills theory. We also comment that the twisted model can serve as a non-perturbative formulation of the non-commutative Yang-Mills theory.

  20. Accurately bi-orthogonal direct and adjoint lambda modes via two-sided Eigen-solvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, J.E.; Vidal, V. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, D. Sistemas Informaticos y Computacion (Spain); Verdu, G. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, D. Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    This work is concerned with the accurate computation of the dominant l-modes (Lambda mode) of the reactor core in order to approximate the solution of the neutron diffusion equation in different situations such as the transient modal analysis. In a previous work, the problem was already addressed by implementing a parallel program based on SLEPc (Scalable Library for Eigenvalue Problem Computations), a public domain software for the solution of eigenvalue problems. Now, the proposed solution is extended by incorporating also the computation of the adjoint l-modes in such a way that the bi-orthogonality condition is enforced very accurately. This feature is very desirable in some types of analyses, and in the proposed scheme it is achieved by making use of two-sided eigenvalue solving software. Current implementations of some of these software, while still susceptible of improvement, show that they can be competitive in terms of response time and accuracy with respect to other types of eigenvalue solving software. The code developed by the authors has parallel capabilities in order to be able to analyze reactors with a great level of detail in a short time. (authors)

  1. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-06-13

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  2. Adjoint-based global variance reduction approach for reactor analysis problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.

    2011-01-01

    A new variant of a hybrid Monte Carlo-Deterministic approach for simulating particle transport problems is presented and compared to the SCALE FW-CADIS approach. The new approach, denoted by the Subspace approach, optimizes the selection of the weight windows for reactor analysis problems where detailed properties of all fuel assemblies are required everywhere in the reactor core. Like the FW-CADIS approach, the Subspace approach utilizes importance maps obtained from deterministic adjoint models to derive automatic weight-window biasing. In contrast to FW-CADIS, the Subspace approach identifies the correlations between weight window maps to minimize the computational time required for global variance reduction, i.e., when the solution is required everywhere in the phase space. The correlations are employed to reduce the number of maps required to achieve the same level of variance reduction that would be obtained with single-response maps. Numerical experiments, serving as proof of principle, are presented to compare the Subspace and FW-CADIS approaches in terms of the global reduction in standard deviation. (author)

  3. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of thermoacoustic instability in a nonlinear Helmholtz solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper, Matthew; Magri, Luca

    2014-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a persistent problem in aircraft and rocket engines. It occurs when heat release in the combustion chamber synchronizes with acoustic oscillations. It is always noisy and can sometimes result in catastrophic failure of the engine. Typically, the heat release from the flame is assumed to equal the acoustic velocity at a reference point multiplied by a spatially-varying function (the flame envelope) subject to a spatially-varying time delay. This models hydrodynamic perturbations convecting down the flame causing subsequent heat release perturbations. This creates an eigenvalue problem that is linear in the acoustic pressure but nonlinear in the complex frequency, omega. This can be solved as a sequence of linear eigenvalue problems in which the operators are updated with a new value of omega after each iteration. Adjoint methods find the sensitivity of each eigenmode to all the parameters simultaneously and are well suited to thermoacoustic problems because there are a few interesting eigenmodes but many influential parameters. The challenge here is to express the sensitivity of the eigenvalue at the final iteration to an arbitrary change in the parameters of the first iteration. This is a promising new technique for the control of thermoacoustics. European Research Council Grant Number 2590620.

  4. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  5. A variational data assimilation system for soil–atmosphere flux estimates for the Community Land Model (CLM3.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hoppe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and implementation of a spatio-temporal variational data assimilation system (4D-var for the soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer model "Community Land Model" (CLM3.5, along with the development of the adjoint code for the core soil–atmosphere transfer scheme of energy and soil moisture. The purpose of this work is to obtain an improved estimation technique for the energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. Optimal assessments of these fluxes are neither available from model simulations nor measurements alone, while a 4D-var data assimilation has the potential to combine both information sources by a Best Linear Unbiased Estimate (BLUE. The 4D-var method requires the development of the adjoint model of the CLM which is established in this work. The new data assimilation algorithm is able to assimilate soil temperature and soil moisture measurements for one-dimensional columns of the model grid. Numerical experiments were first used to test the algorithm under idealised conditions. It was found that the analysis delivers improved results whenever there is a dependence between the initial values and the assimilated quantity. Furthermore, soil temperature and soil moisture from in situ field measurements were assimilated. These calculations demonstrate the improved performance of flux estimates, whenever soil property parameters are available of sufficient quality. Misspecifications could also be identified by the performance of the variational scheme.

  6. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    multiple experiments or numerical simulations. Alternatively an inverse design method can be used. An adjoint optimization method can be used to achieve the optimum blowing rate. It is shown that the method works for both geometry optimization and active control of the flow in order to deflect the flow in desirable ways. An adjoint optimization method is described. It is used to determine the blowing distribution in the diverging section of a convergent-divergent nozzle that gives a desired pressure distribution in the nozzle. Both the direct and adjoint problems and their associated boundary conditions are developed. The adjoint method is used to determine the blowing distribution required to minimize the shock strength in the nozzle to achieve a known target pressure and to achieve close to an ideally expanded flow pressure. A multi-block structured solver is developed to calculate the flow solution and associated adjoint variables. Two and three-dimensional calculations are performed for internal and external of the nozzle domains. A two step MacCormack scheme based on predictor- corrector technique is was used for some calculations. The four and five stage Runge-Kutta schemes are also used to artificially march in time. A modified Runge-Kutta scheme is used to accelerate the convergence to a steady state. Second order artificial dissipation has been added to stabilize the calculations. The steepest decent method has been used for the optimization of the blowing velocity after the gradients of the cost function with respect to the blowing velocity are calculated using adjoint method. Several examples are given of the optimization of blowing using the adjoint method.

  7. Comparing Mass Balance and Adjoint-Based 4D-VAR Methods for Inverse Modeling of Nitrogen Dioxide Columns for Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M.; Martin, R.; Henze, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) emission inventories can be improved through top-down constraints provided by inverse modeling of observed nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Here we compare two methods of inverse modeling for emissions of NOx from synthetic NO2 columns generated from known emissions using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint. We treat the adjoint-based 4D-VAR approach for estimating top-down emissions as a benchmark against which to evaluate variations on the mass balance method. We find that the standard mass balance algorithm can be improved by using an iterative process and using finite difference to calculate the local sensitivity of a change in NO2 columns to a change in emissions, resulting in a factor of two reduction in inversion error. In a simplified case study to recover local emission perturbations, horizontal smearing effects due to NOx transport were better resolved by the adjoint-based approach than by mass balance. For more complex emission changes that reflect real world scenarios, the iterative finite difference mass balance and adjoint methods produce similar top-down inventories when inverting hourly synthetic observations, both reducing the a priori error by factors of 3-4. Inversions of data sets that simulate satellite observations from low Earth and geostationary orbits also indicate that both the mass balance and adjoint inversions produce similar results, reducing a priori error by a factor of 3. As the iterative finite difference mass balance method provides similar accuracy as the adjoint-based 4D-VAR method, it offers the ability to efficiently estimate top-down emissions using models that do not have an adjoint.

  8. Aerosol Health Impact Source Attribution Studies with the CMAQ Adjoint Air Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. D.

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an air pollutant consisting of a mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the sources and distributions of PM2.5 is important for many reasons, two of which are that PM2.5 has an adverse effect on human health and also an effect on climate change. Recent studies have suggested that health benefits resulting from a unit decrease in black carbon (BC) are four to nine times larger than benefits resulting from an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. The goal of this thesis is to quantify the role of emissions from different sectors and different locations in governing the total health impacts, risk, and maximum individual risk of exposure to BC both nationally and regionally in the US. We develop and use the CMAQ adjoint model to quantify the role of emissions from all modeled sectors, times, and locations on premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC. From a national analysis, we find that damages resulting from anthropogenic emissions of BC are strongly correlated with population and premature death. However, we find little correlation between damages and emission magnitude, suggesting that controls on the largest emissions may not be the most efficient means of reducing damages resulting from BC emissions. Rather, the best proxy for locations with damaging BC emissions is locations where premature deaths occur. Onroad diesel and nonroad vehicle emissions are the largest contributors to premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC, while onroad gasoline emissions cause the highest deaths per amount emitted. Additionally, emissions in fall and winter contribute to more premature deaths (and more per amount emitted) than emissions in spring and summer. From a regional analysis, we find that emissions from outside each of six urban areas account for 7% to 27% of the premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC within the region. Within the region encompassing New York City and Philadelphia

  9. An optimal control method for fluid structure interaction systems via adjoint boundary pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirco, L.; Da Vià, R.; Manservisi, S.

    2017-11-01

    In recent year, in spite of the computational complexity, Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems have been widely studied due to their applicability in science and engineering. Fluid-structure interaction systems consist of one or more solid structures that deform by interacting with a surrounding fluid flow. FSI simulations evaluate the tensional state of the mechanical component and take into account the effects of the solid deformations on the motion of the interior fluids. The inverse FSI problem can be described as the achievement of a certain objective by changing some design parameters such as forces, boundary conditions and geometrical domain shapes. In this paper we would like to study the inverse FSI problem by using an optimal control approach. In particular we propose a pressure boundary optimal control method based on Lagrangian multipliers and adjoint variables. The objective is the minimization of a solid domain displacement matching functional obtained by finding the optimal pressure on the inlet boundary. The optimality system is derived from the first order necessary conditions by taking the Fréchet derivatives of the Lagrangian with respect to all the variables involved. The optimal solution is then obtained through a standard steepest descent algorithm applied to the optimality system. The approach presented in this work is general and could be used to assess other objective functionals and controls. In order to support the proposed approach we perform a few numerical tests where the fluid pressure on the domain inlet controls the displacement that occurs in a well defined region of the solid domain.

  10. The sensitivity analysis by adjoint method for the uncertainty evaluation of the CATHARE-2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, F.; de Crecy, A.; Perret, C. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Grenoble (France)

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents the application of the DASM (Discrete Adjoint Sensitivity Method) to CATHARE 2 thermal-hydraulics code. In a first part, the basis of this method is presented. The mathematical model of the CATHARE 2 code is based on the two fluid six equation model. It is discretized using implicit time discretization and it is relatively easy to implement this method in the code. The DASM is the ASM directly applied to the algebraic system of the discretized code equations which has been demonstrated to be the only solution of the mathematical model. The ASM is an integral part of the new version 1.4 of CATHARE. It acts as a post-processing module. It has been qualified by comparison with the {open_quotes}brute force{close_quotes} technique. In a second part, an application of the DASM in CATHARE 2 is presented. It deals with the determination of the uncertainties of the constitutive relationships, which is a compulsory step for calculating the final uncertainty of a given response. First, the general principles of the method are explained: the constitutive relationship are represented by several parameters and the aim is to calculate the variance-covariance matrix of these parameters. The experimental results of the separate effect tests used to establish the correlation are considered. The variance of the corresponding results calculated by CATHARE are estimated by comparing experiment and calculation. A DASM calculation is carried out to provide the derivatives of the responses. The final covariance matrix is obtained by combination of the variance of the responses and those derivatives. Then, the application of this method to a simple case-the blowdown Canon experiment-is presented. This application has been successfully performed.

  11. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  12. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  13. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.O. (ed.)

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  14. A greedy heuristic using adjoint functions for the optimization of seed and needle configurations in prostate seed implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sua; Kowalok, Michael E; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Henderson, Douglass L

    2007-01-01

    We continue our work on the development of an efficient treatment-planning algorithm for prostate seed implants by incorporation of an automated seed and needle configuration routine. The treatment-planning algorithm is based on region of interest (ROI) adjoint functions and a greedy heuristic. As defined in this work, the adjoint function of an ROI is the sensitivity of the average dose in the ROI to a unit-strength brachytherapy source at any seed position. The greedy heuristic uses a ratio of target and critical structure adjoint functions to rank seed positions according to their ability to irradiate the target ROI while sparing critical structure ROIs. Because seed positions are ranked in advance and because the greedy heuristic does not modify previously selected seed positions, the greedy heuristic constructs a complete seed configuration quickly. Isodose surface constraints determine the search space and the needle constraint limits the number of needles. This study additionally includes a methodology that scans possible combinations of these constraint values automatically. This automated selection scheme saves the user the effort of manually searching constraint values. With this method, clinically acceptable treatment plans are obtained in less than 2 min. For comparison, the branch-and-bound method used to solve a mixed integer-programming model took close to 2.5 h to arrive at a feasible solution. Both methods achieved good treatment plans, but the speedup provided by the greedy heuristic was a factor of approximately 100. This attribute makes this algorithm suitable for intra-operative real-time treatment planning

  15. CMT Source Inversions for Massive Data Assimilation in Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Komatitsch, D.; Song, X.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.; Peter, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a vital tool for probing the Earth's interior and enhancing our knowledge of the underlying dynamical processes [e.g., Liu et al., 2012]. Using the adjoint tomography method, we have successfully obtained a first-generation global FWI model named M15 [Bozdag et al., 2015]. To achieve higher resolution of the emerging new structural features and to accommodate azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity in the next-generation model, we expanded our database from 256 to 4,224 earthquakes. Previous studies have shown that ray-theory-based Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) inversion algorithms can produce systematic biases in earthquake source parameters due to tradeoffs with 3D crustal and mantle heterogeneity [e.g., Hjorleifsdottir et al., 2010]. To reduce these well-known tradeoffs, we performed CMT inversions in our current 3D global model before resuming the structural inversion with the expanded database. Initial source parameters are selected from the global CMT database [Ekstrom et al., 2012], with moment magnitudes ranging from 5.5 to 7.0 and occurring between 1994 and 2015. Data from global and regional networks were retrieved from the IRIS DMC. Synthetic seismograms were generated based on the spectral-element-based seismic wave propagation solver (SPECFEM3D GLOBE) in model M15. We used a source inversion algorithm based on a waveform misfit function while allowing time shifts between data and synthetics to accommodate additional unmodeled 3D heterogeneity [Liu et al., 2004]. To accommodate the large number of earthquakes and time series (more than 10,000,000 records), we implemented a source inversion workflow based on the newly developed Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) [Krischer, Smith, et al., 2015] and ObsPy [Krischer et al., 2015]. In ASDF, each earthquake is associated with a single file, thereby eliminating I/O bottlenecks in the workflow and facilitating fast parallel processing. Our preliminary results indicate that errors

  16. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  17. Spectral-Element Seismic Wave Propagation Codes for both Forward Modeling in Complex Media and Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present both SPECFEM3D_Cartesian and SPECFEM3D_GLOBE open-source codes, representing high-performance numerical wave solvers simulating seismic wave propagation for local-, regional-, and global-scale application. These codes are suitable for both forward propagation in complex media and tomographic imaging. Both solvers compute highly accurate seismic wave fields using the continuous Galerkin spectral-element method on unstructured meshes. Lateral variations in compressional- and shear-wave speeds, density, as well as 3D attenuation Q models, topography and fluid-solid coupling are all readily included in both codes. For global simulations, effects due to rotation, ellipticity, the oceans, 3D crustal models, and self-gravitation are additionally included. Both packages provide forward and adjoint functionality suitable for adjoint tomography on high-performance computing architectures. We highlight the most recent release of the global version which includes improved performance, simultaneous MPI runs, OpenCL and CUDA support via an automatic source-to-source transformation library (BOAST), parallel I/O readers and writers for databases using ADIOS and seismograms using the recently developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) with built-in provenance. This makes our spectral-element solvers current state-of-the-art, open-source community codes for high-performance seismic wave propagation on arbitrarily complex 3D models. Together with these solvers, we provide full-waveform inversion tools to image the Earth's interior at unprecedented resolution.

  18. Asynchronous Two-Level Checkpointing Scheme for Large-Scale Adjoints in the Spectral-Element Solver Nek5000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanen, Michel; Marin, Oana; Zhang, Hong; Anitescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Adjoints are an important computational tool for large-scale sensitivity evaluation, uncertainty quantification, and derivative-based optimization. An essential component of their performance is the storage/recomputation balance in which efficient checkpointing methods play a key role. We introduce a novel asynchronous two-level adjoint checkpointing scheme for multistep numerical time discretizations targeted at large-scale numerical simulations. The checkpointing scheme combines bandwidth-limited disk checkpointing and binomial memory checkpointing. Based on assumptions about the target petascale systems, which we later demonstrate to be realistic on the IBM Blue Gene/Q system Mira, we create a model of the expected performance of our checkpointing approach and validate it using the highly scalable Navier-Stokes spectralelement solver Nek5000 on small to moderate subsystems of the Mira supercomputer. In turn, this allows us to predict optimal algorithmic choices when using all of Mira. We also demonstrate that two-level checkpointing is significantly superior to single-level checkpointing when adjoining a large number of time integration steps. To our knowledge, this is the first time two-level checkpointing had been designed, implemented, tuned, and demonstrated on fluid dynamics codes at large scale of 50k+ cores.

  19. GRASP [GRound-Water Adjunct Sensitivity Program]: A computer code to perform post-SWENT [simulator for water, energy, and nuclide transport] adjoint sensitivity analysis of steady-state ground-water flow: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.L.; RamaRao, B.S.; McNeish, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    GRASP (GRound-Water Adjunct Senstivity Program) computes measures of the behavior of a ground-water system and the system's performance for waste isolation, and estimates the sensitivities of these measures to system parameters. The computed measures are referred to as ''performance measures'' and include weighted squared deviations of computed and observed pressures or heads, local Darcy velocity components and magnitudes, boundary fluxes, and travel distance and time along travel paths. The sensitivities are computed by the adjoint method and are exact derivatives of the performance measures with respect to the parameters for the modeled system, taken about the assumed parameter values. GRASP presumes steady-state, saturated grondwater flow, and post-processes the results of a multidimensional (1-D, 2-D, 3-D) finite-difference flow code. This document describes the mathematical basis for the model, the algorithms and solution techniques used, and the computer code design. The implementation of GRASP is verified with simple one- and two-dimensional flow problems, for which analytical expressions of performance measures and sensitivities are derived. The linkage between GRASP and multidimensional finite-difference flow codes is described. This document also contains a detailed user's manual. The use of GRASP to evaluate nuclear waste disposal issues has been emphasized throughout the report. The performance measures and their sensitivities can be employed to assist in directing data collection programs, expedite model calibration, and objectively determine the sensitivity of projected system performance to parameters

  20. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  1. Toward the Development of a Coupled COAMPS-ROMS Ensemble Kalman Filter and Adjoint with a focus on the Indian Ocean and the Intraseasonal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Toward the Development of a Coupled COAMPS-ROMS Ensemble Kalman Filter and Adjoint...system at NCAR. (2) Compare the performance of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) using the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) and 4

  2. The development of the continuous orthonormalization and adjoint methods for solar seismology: Eigenfrequency computation and sensitivity analysis for direct and inverse problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Two new analysis methods for solar seismology are developed. Called the continuous orthonormalization (CON) and adjoint methods, their use enables both solar eigenfrequencies and eigenfrequency sensitivities to be computed more accurately and efficiently than with existing methods. The CON method integrates an eighth-order nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) which defines the linear adiabatic nonradial oscillation modes of the Sun. All normal modes of oscillation are treated identically, regardless of their type or their predominant location inside the Sun. The adjoint method integrates a related eighth-order linear inhomogeneous system of ODEs. From the resultant solution, an eigenfrequency's partial derivatives with respect to an extensive set of solar model parameters may be computed simultaneously. Extensive numerical tests confirm the validity of the two new methods. Eigenfrequencies obtained via the CON method have seven significant digits and match within 1 percent the eigenfrequencies obtained via finite difference or mesh approaches. Eigenfrequency sensitivities obtained via the adjoint method match with 2 percent the results obtained by explicitly perturbing the solar model parameters and recomputing the eigenfrequencies. The usefulness and power of the two new methods are demonstrated by applying them to the solution of an elementary solar inversion problem. A sample solar model's f-mode frequencies are iteratively driven into agreement with an observed set of f-mode frequencies. Adjoint sensitivity results are used to alter solar model parameters within hundreds of radial bins

  3. On the Incompleteness of Ibragimov’s Conservation Law Theorem and Its Equivalence to a Standard Formula Using Symmetries and Adjoint-Symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C. Anco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A conservation law theorem stated by N. Ibragimov along with its subsequent extensions are shown to be a special case of a standard formula that uses a pair consisting of a symmetry and an adjoint-symmetry to produce a conservation law through a well-known Fréchet derivative identity. Furthermore, the connection of this formula (and of Ibragimov’s theorem to the standard action of symmetries on conservation laws is explained, which accounts for a number of major drawbacks that have appeared in recent work using the formula to generate conservation laws. In particular, the formula can generate trivial conservation laws and does not always yield all non-trivial conservation laws unless the symmetry action on the set of these conservation laws is transitive. It is emphasized that all local conservation laws for any given system of differential equations can be found instead by a general method using adjoint-symmetries. This general method is a kind of adjoint version of the standard Lie method to find all local symmetries and is completely algorithmic. The relationship between this method, Noether’s theorem and the symmetry/adjoint-symmetry formula is discussed.

  4. Tracking a Severe Pollution Event in Beijing in December 2016 with the GRAPES-CUACE Adjoint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; An, Xingqin; Zhai, Shixian; Sun, Zhaobin

    2018-02-01

    We traced the adjoint sensitivity of a severe pollution event in December 2016 in Beijing using the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the China Meteorological Administration Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environmental Forecasting System). The key emission sources and periods affecting this severe pollution event are analyzed. For comaprison, we define 2000 Beijing Time 3 December 2016 as the objective time when PM2.5 reached the maximum concentration in Beijing. It is found that the local hourly sensitivity coefficient amounts to a peak of 9.31 μg m-3 just 1 h before the objective time, suggesting that PM2.5 concentration responds rapidly to local emissions. The accumulated sensitivity coefficient in Beijing is large during the 20-h period prior to the objective time, showing that local emissions are the most important in this period. The accumulated contribution rates of emissions from Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, and Shanxi are 34.2%, 3.0%, 49.4%, and 13.4%, respectively, in the 72-h period before the objective time. The evolution of hourly sensitivity coefficient shows that the main contribution from the Tianjin source occurs 1-26 h before the objective time and its peak hourly contribution is 0.59 μg m-3 at 4 h before the objective time. The main contributions of the Hebei and Shanxi emission sources occur 1-54 and 14-53 h, respectively, before the objective time and their hourly sensitivity coefficients both show periodic fluctuations. The Hebei source shows three sensitivity coefficient peaks of 3.45, 4.27, and 0.71 μg m-3 at 4, 16, and 38 h before the objective time, respectively. The sensitivity coefficient of the Shanxi source peaks twice, with values of 1.41 and 0.64 μg m-3 at 24 and 45 h before the objective time, respectively. Overall, the adjoint model is effective in tracking the crucial sources and key periods of emissions for the severe pollution event.

  5. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  6. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with ...

  7. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  8. Convergence of a semi-discretization scheme for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation: A new approach with the adjoint method

    KAUST Repository

    Cagnetti, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a numerical scheme for the one dimensional time dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the periodic setting. This scheme consists in a semi-discretization using monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian in the spacial variable. From classical viscosity solution theory, these schemes are known to converge. In this paper we present a new approach to the study of the rate of convergence of the approximations based on the nonlinear adjoint method recently introduced by L.C. Evans. We estimate the rate of convergence for convex Hamiltonians and recover the O(h) convergence rate in terms of the L∞ norm and O(h) in terms of the L1 norm, where h is the size of the spacial grid. We discuss also possible generalizations to higher dimensional problems and present several other additional estimates. The special case of quadratic Hamiltonians is considered in detail in the end of the paper. © 2013 IMACS.

  9. Nonlinear self-adjointness, conservation laws, and the construction of solutions of partial differential equations using conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimov, N Kh; Avdonina, E D

    2013-01-01

    The method of nonlinear self-adjointness, which was recently developed by the first author, gives a generalization of Noether's theorem. This new method significantly extends approaches to constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries, since it does not require the existence of a Lagrangian. In particular, it can be applied to any linear equations and any nonlinear equations that possess at least one local conservation law. The present paper provides a brief survey of results on conservation laws which have been obtained by this method and published mostly in recent preprints of the authors, along with a method for constructing exact solutions of systems of partial differential equations with the use of conservation laws. In most cases the solutions obtained by the method of conservation laws cannot be found as invariant or partially invariant solutions. Bibliography: 23 titles

  10. Adjoint QCD on ℝ{sup 3}×S{sup 1} with twisted fermionic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misumi, Tatsuhiro [Department of Physics and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University,Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Kanazawa, Takuya [iTHES Research Group and Quantum Hadron Physics Laboratory, RIKEN,Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-06-30

    We investigate QCD with adjoint Dirac fermions on ℝ{sup 3}×S{sup 1} with generic boundary conditions for fermions along S{sup 1}. By means of perturbation theory, semiclassical methods and a chiral effective model, we elucidate a rich phase structure in the space spanned by the S{sup 1} compactification scale L, twisted fermionic boundary condition ϕ and the fermion mass m. We found various phases with or without chiral and center symmetry breaking, separated by first- and second-order phase transitions, which in specific limits (ϕ=0, ϕ=π, L→0 and m→∞) reproduce known results in the literature. In the center-symmetric phase at small L, we show that Ünsal’s bion-induced confinement mechanism is at work but is substantially weakened at ϕ≠0 by a linear potential between monopoles. Through an analytic and numerical study of the PNJL model, we show that the order parameters for center and chiral symmetries (i.e., Polyakov loop and chiral condensate) are strongly intertwined at ϕ≠0. Due to this correlation, a deconfined phase can intervene between a weak-coupling center-symmetric phase at small L and a strong-coupling one at large L. Whether this happens or not depends on the ratio of the dynamical fermion mass to the energy scale of the Yang-Mills theory. Implication of this possibility for resurgence in gauge theories is briefly discussed. In an appendix, we study the index of the adjoint Dirac operator on ℝ{sup 3}×S{sup 1} with twisted boundary conditions, which is important for semiclassical analysis of monopoles.

  11. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  12. Profiling the robustness, efficiency and limits of the forward-adjoint method for 3-D mantle convection modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. G.; Davies, J. H.

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of Earth's past mantle structure is inherently unknown. This lack of knowledge presents problems in many areas of Earth science, including in mantle circulation modelling (MCM). As a mathematical model of mantle convection, MCMs require boundary and initial conditions. While boundary conditions are readily available from sources such as plate reconstructions for the upper surface, and as free slip at the core-mantle boundary, the initial condition is not known. MCMs have historically `created' an initial condition using long `spin up' processes using the oldest available plate reconstruction period available. While these do yield good results when models are run to present day, it is difficult to infer with confidence results from early in a model's history. Techniques to overcome this problem are now being studied in geodynamics, such as by assimilating the known internal structure (e.g. from seismic tomography) of Earth at present day backwards in time. One such method is to use an iterative process known as the forward-adjoint method. While this is an efficient means of solving this inverse problem, it still strains all but the most cutting edge computational systems. In this study we endeavour to profile the effectiveness of this method using synthetic test cases as our known data source. We conclude that savings in terms of computational expense for forward-adjoint models can be achieved by streamlining the time-stepping of the calculation, as well as determining the most efficient method of updating initial conditions in the iterative scheme. Furthermore, we observe that in the models presented, there exists an upper limit on the time interval over which solutions will practically converge, although this limit is likely to be linked to Rayleigh number.

  13. Directed flux motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  14. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  15. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  16. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understa...

  17. Theoretical magnetic flux emergence

    OpenAIRE

    MacTaggart, David

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence is the subject of how magnetic fields from the solar interior can rise and expand into the atmosphere to produce active regions. It is the link that joins dynamics in the convection zone with dynamics in the atmosphere. In this thesis, we study many aspects of magnetic flux emergence through mathematical modelling and computer simulations. Our primary aim is to understand the key physical processes that lie behind emergence. The first chapter intro...

  18. Flux Emergence (Theory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field) in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  19. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  20. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  1. The Open Flux Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; Liu, Y.; Derosa, M. L.; Yeates, A.; Owens, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  2. Self-adjointness of the two-dimensional massless Dirac Hamiltonian and vacuum energy density in the background of a singular magnetic vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, Yu. A.

    2000-01-01

    A massless spinor field is quantized in the background of a singular static magnetic vortex in 2+1-dimensional space-time. The method of self-adjoint extensions is employed to define the most general set of physically acceptable boundary conditions at the location of the vortex. Under these conditions, the vacuum energy density and effective potential in the vortex background are determined

  3. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, John M., E-mail: finn@lanl.gov [T-5, Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  4. [Purifying process of gynostemma pentaphyllum saponins based on "adjoint marker" online control technology and identification of their compositions by UPLC-QTOF-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dong-Dong; Kuang, Yan-Hui; Dong, Li-Hua; Ye, Xiao; Chen, Liang-Mian; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Zhen-Shan; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, De-Qin; Li, Chu-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    To optimize the purification process of gynostemma pentaphyllum saponins (GPS) based on "adjoint marker" online control technology with GPS as the testing index. UPLC-QTOF-MS technology was used for qualitative analysis. "Adjoint marker" online control results showed that the end point of load sample was that the UV absorbance of effluent liquid was equal to half of that of load sample solution, and the absorbance was basically stable when the end point was stable. In UPLC-QTOF-MS qualitative analysis, 16 saponins were identified from GPS, including 13 known gynostemma saponins and 3 new saponins. This optimized method was proved to be simple, scientific, reasonable, easy for online determination, real-time record, and can be better applied to the mass production and automation of production. The results of qualitative analysis indicated that the "adjoint marker" online control technology can well retain main efficacy components of medicinal materials, and provide analysis tools for the process control and quality traceability. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Integrable lattices and their sublattices: From the discrete Moutard (discrete Cauchy-Riemann) 4-point equation to the self-adjoint 5-point scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doliwa, A.; Grinevich, P.; Nieszporski, M.; Santini, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the sublattice approach, a procedure to generate, from a given integrable lattice, a sublattice which inherits its integrability features. We consider, as illustrative example of this approach, the discrete Moutard 4-point equation and its sublattice, the self-adjoint 5-point scheme on the star of the square lattice, which are relevant in the theory of the integrable discrete geometries and in the theory of discrete holomorphic and harmonic functions (in this last context, the discrete Moutard equation is called discrete Cauchy-Riemann equation). Therefore an integrable, at one energy, discretization of elliptic two-dimensional operators is considered. We use the sublattice point of view to derive, from the Darboux transformations and superposition formulas of the discrete Moutard equation, the Darboux transformations and superposition formulas of the self-adjoint 5-point scheme. We also construct, from algebro-geometric solutions of the discrete Moutard equation, algebro-geometric solutions of the self-adjoint 5-point scheme. In particular, we show that the corresponding restrictions on the finite-gap data are of the same type as those for the fixed energy problem for the two-dimensional Schroedinger operator. We finally use these solutions to construct explicit examples of discrete holomorphic and harmonic functions, as well as examples of quadrilateral surfaces in R 3

  6. Approximation of eigenvalues of some unbounded self-adjoint discrete Jacobi matrices by eigenvalues of finite submatrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Malejki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the problem of approximation of eigenvalues of some self-adjoint operator in the Hilbert space \\(l^2(\\mathbb{N}\\ by eigenvalues of suitably chosen principal finite submatrices of an infinite Jacobi matrix that defines the operator considered. We assume the Jacobi operator is bounded from below with compact resolvent. In our research we estimate the asymptotics (with \\(n\\to \\infty\\ of the joint error of approximation for the first \\(n\\ eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the operator by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the finite submatrix of order \\(n \\times n\\. The method applied in our research is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method and Volkmer's results included in [H. Volkmer, Error Estimates for Rayleigh-Ritz Approximations of Eigenvalues and Eigenfunctions of the Mathieu and Spheroidal Wave Equation, Constr. Approx. 20 (2004, 39-54]. We extend the method to cover a class of infinite symmetric Jacobi matrices with three diagonals satisfying some polynomial growth estimates.

  7. Sources and Processes Affecting Fine Particulate Matter Pollution over North China: An Adjoint Analysis of the Beijing APEC Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Shao, Jingyuan; Lu, Xiao; Zhao, Yuanhong; Hu, Yongyun; Henze, Daven K; Liao, Hong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-08-16

    The stringent emission controls during the APEC 2014 (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit; November 5-11, 2014) offer a unique opportunity to quantify factors affecting fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution over North China. Here we apply a four-dimensional variational data assimilation system using the adjoint model of GEOS-Chem to address this issue. Hourly surface measurements of PM2.5 and SO2 for October 15-November 14, 2014 are assimilated into the model to optimize daily aerosol primary and precursor emissions over North China. Measured PM2.5 concentrations in Beijing average 50.3 μg m(-3) during APEC, 43% lower than the mean concentration (88.2 μg m(-3)) for the whole period including APEC. Model results attribute about half of the reduction to meteorology due to active cold surge occurrences during APEC. Assimilation of surface measurements largely reduces the model biases and estimates 6%-30% lower aerosol emissions in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region during APEC than in late October. We further demonstrate that high PM2.5 events in Beijing during this period can be occasionally contributed by natural mineral dust, but more events show large sensitivities to inorganic aerosol sources, particularly emissions of ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) reflecting strong formation of aerosol nitrate in the fall season.

  8. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.; Yoo, S.; Kowalok, M.; Mackie, T.R.; Thomadsen, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-meter from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum

  9. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  10. Optimization of Open Boundary Conditions in a 3D Internal Tidal Model with the Adjoint Method around Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhou Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of inverse problem, the optimization of open boundary conditions (OBCs in a 3D internal tidal model is investigated with the adjoint method. Fourier coefficients of M2 internal tide on four open boundaries, which are regarded as OBCs, are inverted simultaneously. During the optimization, the steepest descent method is used to minimize cost function. The reasonability and feasibility of the model are tested by twin experiments (TEs. In TE1, OBCs on four open boundaries are successfully inverted by using independent point (IP strategy, suggesting that IP strategy is useful in parameter estimation. Results of TE2 indicate that the model is effective even by assimilating inaccurate “observations.” Based on conclusions of TEs, the M2 internal tide around Hawaii is simulated by assimilating T/P data in practical experiment. The simulated cochart shows good agreement with that obtained from the Oregon State University tidal model and T/P observations. Careful inspection shows that the major difference between simulated results and OSU model results is short-scale fluctuations superposed on coamplitude lines, which can be treated as the surface manifestation modulated by the internal tide. The computed surface manifestation along T/P tracks is comparable to the estimation in previous work.

  11. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability models based on Markov chains - II: Application to IFMIF reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D. G.; Cacuci, D. G.; Balan, I.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.

    2008-01-01

    In Part II of this work, the adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure developed in Part I is applied to perform sensitivity analysis of several dynamic reliability models of systems of increasing complexity, culminating with the consideration of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) accelerator system. Section II presents the main steps of a procedure for the automated generation of Markov chains for reliability analysis, including the abstraction of the physical system, construction of the Markov chain, and the generation and solution of the ensuing set of differential equations; all of these steps have been implemented in a stand-alone computer code system called QUEFT/MARKOMAG-S/MCADJSEN. This code system has been applied to sensitivity analysis of dynamic reliability measures for a paradigm '2-out-of-3' system comprising five components and also to a comprehensive dynamic reliability analysis of the IFMIF accelerator system facilities for the average availability and, respectively, the system's availability at the final mission time. The QUEFT/MARKOMAG-S/MCADJSEN has been used to efficiently compute sensitivities to 186 failure and repair rates characterizing components and subsystems of the first-level fault tree of the IFMIF accelerator system. (authors)

  12. Adjoint-Baed Optimal Control on the Pitch Angle of a Single-Bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Chen; Colonius, Tim

    2017-11-01

    Optimal control on the pitch angle of a NACA0018 single-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) is numerically investigated at a low Reynolds number of 1500. With fixed tip-speed ratio, the input power is minimized and mean tangential force is maximized over a specific time horizon. The immersed boundary method is used to simulate the two-dimensional, incompressible flow around a horizontal cross section of the VAWT. The problem is formulated as a PDE constrained optimization problem and an iterative solution is obtained using adjoint-based conjugate gradient methods. By the end of the longest control horizon examined, two controls end up with time-invariant pitch angles of about the same magnitude but with the opposite signs. The results show that both cases lead to a reduction in the input power but not necessarily an enhancement in the mean tangential force. These reductions in input power are due to the removal of a power-damaging phenomenon that occurs when a vortex pair is captured by the blade in the upwind-half region of a cycle. This project was supported by Caltech FLOWE center/Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  13. An Adjoint Sensitivity Method Applied to Time Reverse Imaging of Tsunami Source for the 2009 Samoa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Gusman, Aditya; Satake, Kenji; Cummins, Phil R.

    2018-01-01

    We have previously developed a tsunami source inversion method based on "Time Reverse Imaging" and demonstrated that it is computationally very efficient and has the ability to reproduce the tsunami source model with good accuracy using tsunami data of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami. In this paper, we implemented this approach in the 2009 Samoa earthquake tsunami triggered by a doublet earthquake consisting of both normal and thrust faulting. Our result showed that the method is quite capable of recovering the source model associated with normal and thrust faulting. We found that the inversion result is highly sensitive to some stations that must be removed from the inversion. We applied an adjoint sensitivity method to find the optimal set of stations in order to estimate a realistic source model. We found that the inversion result is improved significantly once the optimal set of stations is used. In addition, from the reconstructed source model we estimated the slip distribution of the fault from which we successfully determined the dipping orientation of the fault plane for the normal fault earthquake. Our result suggests that the fault plane dip toward the northeast.

  14. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  15. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corte, E.; Maitra, P.

    1977-01-01

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  16. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  17. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime. With the Nusselt number and the mixing length scales, we get the Nusselt number and Reynolds number (w'd/ν) scalings: and or. and. scaling expected to occur at extremely high Ra Rayleigh-Benard convection. Get the ultimate regime ...

  18. ULY JUP COSPIN HIGH FLUX TELESCOPE HIGH RES. ION FLUX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains ion flux data recorded by the COSPIN High Flux Telescope (HFT) during the Ulysses Jupiter encounter 1992-Jan-25 to 1992-Feb-18.

  19. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  20. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  1. Physics of magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Priest, E. R.; Lee, L. C.

    The present work encompasses papers on the structure, waves, and instabilities of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), photospheric flux tubes (PFTs), the structure and heating of coronal loops, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections and magnetic clouds, flux ropes in planetary ionospheres, the magnetopause, magnetospheric field-aligned currents and flux tubes, and the magnetotail. Attention is given to the equilibrium of MFRs, resistive instability, magnetic reconnection and turbulence in current sheets, dynamical effects and energy transport in intense flux tubes, waves in solar PFTs, twisted flux ropes in the solar corona, an electrodynamical model of solar flares, filament cooling and condensation in a sheared magnetic field, the magnetopause, the generation of twisted MFRs during magnetic reconnection, ionospheric flux ropes above the South Pole, substorms and MFR structures, evidence for flux ropes in the earth magnetotail, and MFRs in 3D MHD simulations.

  2. AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO WIND FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2016-04-01

    During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  3. Relating health and climate impacts to grid-scale emissions using adjoint sensitivity modeling for the Climate and Clean Air Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, D. K.; Lacey, F.; Seltzer, M.; Vallack, H.; Kuylenstierna, J.; Bowman, K. W.; Anenberg, S.; Sasser, E.; Lee, C. J.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) was initiated in 2012 to develop, understand and promote measures to reduce short lived climate forcers such as aerosol, ozone and methane. The Coalition now includes over 30 nations, and as a service to these nations is committed to providing a decision support toolkit that allows member nations to explore the benefits of a range of emissions mitigation measures in terms of the combined impacts on air quality and climate and so help in the development of their National Action Plans. Here we will present recent modeling work to support the development of the CCAC National Action Plans toolkit. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is presented as a means of efficiently relating air quality, climate and crop impacts back to changes in emissions from each species, sector and location at the grid-scale resolution of typical global air quality model applications. The GEOS-Chem adjoint model is used to estimate the damages per ton of emissions of PM2.5 related mortality, the impacts of ozone precursors on crops and ozone-related health effects, and the combined impacts of these species on regional surface temperature changes. We show how the benefits-per-emission vary spatially as a function of the surrounding environment, and how this impacts the overall benefit of sector-specific control strategies. We present initial findings for Bangladesh, as well as Mexico, Ghana and Colombia, some of the first countries to join the CCAC, and discuss general issues related to adjoint-based metrics for quantifying air quality and climate co-benefits.

  4. On the Similarity of Sturm-Liouville Operators with Non-Hermitian Boundary Conditions to Self-Adjoint and Normal Operators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčiřík, David; Siegl, Petr; Železný, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 255-281 ISSN 1661-8254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002; GA MŠk LC527; GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD202/08/H072 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Sturm-Liouville operators * non-symmetric Robin boundary conditions * similarity to normal or self-adjoint operators * discrete spectral operator * complex symmetric operator * PT-symmetry * metric operator * C operator * Hilbert-Schmidt operators Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.545, year: 2014

  5. Reactor flux calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lhuillier, D. [Commissariat à l' Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives, Centre de Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-02-15

    The status of the prediction of reactor anti-neutrino spectra is presented. The most accurate method is still the conversion of total β spectra of fissionning isotopes as measured at research reactors. Recent re-evaluations of the conversion process led to an increased predicted flux by few percent and were at the origin of the so-called reactor anomaly. The up to date predictions are presented with their main sources of error. Perspectives are given on the complementary ab-initio predictions and upcoming experimental cross-checks of the predicted spectrum shape.

  6. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  7. [The flux of historiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, R G

    2001-01-01

    The author places Grmek's editorial within the flux of the historiographical debate which, since the middle of the 1970s, has concentrated on two major crises due to the end of social science-oriented 'scientific history' and to the 'linguistic turn'. He also argues that Grmek's historiographical work of the 1980s and 1990s was to some extent an alternative to certain observed changes in historical fashion and has achieved greater intelligibility because of its commitment to a rational vision of science and historiography.

  8. Adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure of Markov chains with applications on reliability of IFMIF accelerator-system facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, I.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents the implementation of the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure (ASAP) for the Continuous Time, Discrete Space Markov chains (CTMC), as an alternative to the other computational expensive methods. In order to develop this procedure as an end product in reliability studies, the reliability of the physical systems is analyzed using a coupled Fault-Tree - Markov chain technique, i.e. the abstraction of the physical system is performed using as the high level interface the Fault-Tree and afterwards this one is automatically converted into a Markov chain. The resulting differential equations based on the Markov chain model are solved in order to evaluate the system reliability. Further sensitivity analyses using ASAP applied to CTMC equations are performed to study the influence of uncertainties in input data to the reliability measures and to get the confidence in the final reliability results. The methods to generate the Markov chain and the ASAP for the Markov chain equations have been implemented into the new computer code system QUEFT/MARKOMAGS/MCADJSEN for reliability and sensitivity analysis of physical systems. The validation of this code system has been carried out by using simple problems for which analytical solutions can be obtained. Typical sensitivity results show that the numerical solution using ASAP is robust, stable and accurate. The method and the code system developed during this work can be used further as an efficient and flexible tool to evaluate the sensitivities of reliability measures for any physical system analyzed using the Markov chain. Reliability and sensitivity analyses using these methods have been performed during this work for the IFMIF Accelerator System Facilities. The reliability studies using Markov chain have been concentrated around the availability of the main subsystems of this complex physical system for a typical mission time. The sensitivity studies for two typical responses using ASAP have been

  9. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; hide

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  10. Permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback for adjustably suspending an element on a single axis. The magnetic actuator includes a pair of opposing electromagnets and provides bi-directional forces along the single axis to the suspended element. Permanent magnets in flux feedback loops from the opposing electromagnets establish a reference permanent magnet flux-bias to linearize the force characteristics of the electromagnets to extend the linear range of the actuator without the need for continuous bias currents in the electromagnets.

  11. Adjoint based optimal control of partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media with applications to CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Simon, Moritz

    2014-11-14

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. With the target of optimizing CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. Our objective is to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, while time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system, formulate the optimal control problem and derive the continuous adjoint equations. For the discretization we apply a variant of the so-called BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method that we further stabilize by a periodic averaging feature to reduce oscillations. The timestep-wise Lagrange function of the control problem is implemented as a variational form in Sundance, a toolbox for rapid development of parallel FE simulations, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. We discuss the BOX method and our implementation in Sundance. The MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT, using limited-memory BFGS updates for approximating second derivatives. Finally, we present and discuss different types of optimal control results.

  12. Reactor neutron flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Yasushi; Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a device for displaying an approximate neutron flux distribution to recognize the neutron flux distribution of the whole reactor in a short period of time. The device of the present invention displays, the results of measurement for neutron fluxes collected by a data collecting section on every results of the measurements at measuring points situating at horizontally identical positions of the reactor core. In addition, every results of the measurements at the measuring points situating at the identical height in the reactor core are accumulated, and the results of the integration are graphically displayed. With such procedures, the neutron flux distribution in the entire reactor is approximately displayed. Existent devices could not recognize the neutron flux distribution of the entire reactor at a glance and it took much time for the recognition. The device of the present invention can recognize the neutron flux distribution of the entire reactor in a short period of time. (I.S.)

  13. Flux compactifications and generalized geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grana, Mariana

    2006-01-01

    Following the lectures given at CERN Winter School 2006, we present a pedagogical overview of flux compactifications and generalized geometries, concentrating on closed string fluxes in type II theories. We start by reviewing the supersymmetric flux configurations with maximally symmetric four-dimensional spaces. We then discuss the no-go theorems (and their evasion) for compactifications with fluxes. We analyse the resulting four-dimensional effective theories for Calabi-Yau and Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications, concentrating on the flux-induced superpotentials. We discuss the generic mechanism of moduli stabilization and illustrate with two examples: the conifold in IIB and a T 6 /(Z 3 x Z 3 ) torus in IIA. We finish by studying the effective action and flux vacua for generalized geometries in the context of generalized complex geometry

  14. California's Future Carbon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  15. Neutron fluxes in test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Communicate the fact that high-power water-cooled test reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) cannot provide fast flux levels as high as sodium-cooled fast test reactors. The memo first presents some basics physics considerations about neutron fluxes in test reactors and then uses ATR, HFIR and JHR as an illustration of the performance of modern high-power water-cooled test reactors.

  16. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation.......In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  17. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  18. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  19. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; Gerstl, Matthias P.; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Müller, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. PMID:28406903

  20. Squeezing Flux Out of Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Merging transcriptomics or metabolomics data remains insufficient for metabolic flux estimation. Ramirez et al. integrate a genome-scale metabolic model with extracellular flux data to predict and validate metabolic differences between white and brown adipose tissue. This method allows both metab...

  1. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocities and source parameters have been a long standing challenge in seismology since the first attempts to mitigate trade-off between very different parameters influencing travel-times (Spencer and Gubbins 1980, Pavlis and Booker 1980) since the early development in the 1970s (Aki et al 1976, Aki and Lee 1976, Crosson 1976). There is a strong trade-off between earthquake source positions, initial times and velocities during the tomographic inversion: mitigating these trade-offs is usually carried empirically (Lemeur et al 1997). This procedure is not optimal and may lead to errors in the velocity reconstruction as well as in the source localization. For a better simultaneous estimation of such multi-parametric reconstruction problem, one may take benefit of improved local optimization such as full Newton method where the Hessian influence helps balancing between different physical parameter quantities and improving the coverage at the point of reconstruction. Unfortunately, the computation of the full Hessian operator is not easily computed in large models and with large datasets. Truncated Newton (TCN) is an alternative optimization approach (Métivier et al. 2012) that allows resolution of the normal equation H Δm = - g using a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. It only requires to be able to compute the gradient of the misfit function and Hessian-vector products. Traveltime maps can be computed in the whole domain by numerical modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). The gradient and the Hessian-vector products for velocities can be computed without ray-tracing using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state methods for the cost of 1 and 2 additional modeling step (Plessix 2006, Métivier et al. 2012). Reciprocity allows to compute accurately the gradient and the full Hessian for each coordinates of the sources and for their initial times. Then the resolution of the problem is done through two nested loops. The model update Δm is

  2. Principal Metabolic Flux Mode Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Sahely; Blomberg, Peter; Castillo, Sandra; Rousu, Juho; Wren, Jonathan

    2018-02-06

    In the analysis of metabolism, two distinct and complementary approaches are frequently used: Principal component analysis (PCA) and stoichiometric flux analysis. PCA is able to capture the main modes of variability in a set of experiments and does not make many prior assumptions about the data, but does not inherently take into account the flux mode structure of metabolism. Stoichiometric flux analysis methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Elementary Mode Analysis, on the other hand, are able to capture the metabolic flux modes, however, they are primarily designed for the analysis of single samples at a time, and not best suited for exploratory analysis on a large sets of samples. We propose a new methodology for the analysis of metabolism, called Principal Metabolic Flux Mode Analysis (PMFA), which marries the PCA and stoichiometric flux analysis approaches in an elegant regularized optimization framework. In short, the method incorporates a variance maximization objective form PCA coupled with a stoichiometric regularizer, which penalizes projections that are far from any flux modes of the network. For interpretability, we also introduce a sparse variant of PMFA that favours flux modes that contain a small number of reactions. Our experiments demonstrate the versatility and capabilities of our methodology. The proposed method can be applied to genome-scale metabolic network in efficient way as PMFA does not enumerate elementary modes. In addition, the method is more robust on out-of-steady steady-state experimental data than competing flux mode analysis approaches. Matlab software for PMFA and SPMFA and data set used for experiments are available in https://github.com/aalto-ics-kepaco/PMFA. sahely@iitpkd.ac.in, juho.rousu@aalto.fi, Peter.Blomberg@vtt.fi, Sandra.Castillo@vtt.fi. Detailed results are in Supplementary files. Supplementary data are available at https://github.com/aalto-ics-kepaco/PMFA/blob/master/Results.zip.

  3. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  4. Specification of ROP flux shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Gray, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    The CANDU 9 480/SEU core uses 0.9% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium) fuel. The use f SEU fuel enables the reactor to increase the radial power form factor from 0.865, which is typical in current natural uranium CANDU reactors, to 0.97 in the nominal CANDU 9 480/SEU core. The difference is a 12% increase in reactor power. An additional 5% increase can be achieved due to a reduced refuelling ripple. The channel power limits were also increased by 3% for a total reactor power increase of 20%. This report describes the calculation of neutron flux distributions in the CANDU 9 480/SEU core under conditions specified by the C and I engineers. The RFSP code was used to calculate of neutron flux shapes for ROP analysis. Detailed flux values at numerous potential detector sites were calculated for each flux shape. (author). 6 tabs., 70 figs., 4 refs.

  5. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  6. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  7. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  8. Flux tubes at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cea, Paolo [INFN, Sezione di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cosmai, Leonardo [INFN, Sezione di Bari,Via G. Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cuteri, Francesca; Papa, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria & INFN-Cosenza,Ponte Bucci, cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Cosenza) (Italy)

    2016-06-07

    The chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair, with its peculiar tube-like shape, can be nicely described, at zero temperature, within the dual superconductor scenario for the QCD confining vacuum. In this work we investigate, by lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the SU(3) pure gauge theory, the fate of chromoelectric flux tubes across the deconfinement transition. We find that, if the distance between the static sources is kept fixed at about 0.76 fm ≃1.6/√σ and the temperature is increased towards and above the deconfinement temperature T{sub c}, the amplitude of the field inside the flux tube gets smaller, while the shape of the flux tube does not vary appreciably across deconfinement. This scenario with flux-tube “evaporation” above T{sub c} has no correspondence in ordinary (type-II) superconductivity, where instead the transition to the phase with normal conductivity is characterized by a divergent fattening of flux tubes as the transition temperature is approached from below. We present also some evidence about the existence of flux-tube structures in the magnetic sector of the theory in the deconfined phase.

  9. Physics of magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ryutova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first account of the physics of magnetic flux tubes from their fundamental properties to collective phenomena in an ensembles of flux tubes. The physics of magnetic flux tubes is absolutely vital for understanding fundamental physical processes in the solar atmosphere shaped and governed by magnetic fields. High-resolution and high cadence observations from recent space and  ground-based instruments taken simultaneously at different heights and temperatures not only show the ubiquity of filamentary structure formation but also allow to study how various events are interconnected by system of magnetic flux tubes. The book covers both theory and observations. Theoretical models presented in analytical and phenomenological forms are tailored for practical applications. These are welded with state-of-the-art observations from early decisive ones to the most recent data that open a new phase-space for exploring the Sun and sun-like stars. Concept of magnetic flux tubes is central to various magn...

  10. Flux driven turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Waltz, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with tokamak plasma turbulence in the case where fluxes are fixed and profiles are allowed to fluctuate. These systems are intermittent. In particular, radially propagating fronts, are usually observed over a broad range of time and spatial scales. The existence of these fronts provide a way to understand the fast transport events sometimes observed in tokamaks. It is also shown that the confinement scaling law can still be of the gyroBohm type in spite of these large scale transport events. Some departure from the gyroBohm prediction is observed at low flux, i.e. when the gradients are close to the instability threshold. Finally, it is found that the diffusivity is not the same for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than at fixed temperature gradient, with the same time averaged profile. (author)

  11. Looking for high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1994-01-01

    The neutron is a powerful and versatile probe of both the structure and dynamics of condensed matter. However unlike other techniques such as X-ray, electron or light scattering, its interaction with matter is rather weak. Historically neutron scattering has always been intensity limited and scientists are always looking for more intense sources. These come in two kinds - fission reactors and spallation sources (in which neutrons are released from a target bombardment by beams). Unfortunately the power density of high flux reactors is approaching a technical limit and it will be difficult to achieve a large increase of neutron fluxes above typical present values as represented for example by the high flux reactor at ILL, Grenoble

  12. DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s –2 to 320 km s –1 , thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 μT, 6 R ☉ above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 × 10 11 Wb (1.6 × 10 19 Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day –1 and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 × 10 13 Wb yr –1 (6 × 10 21 Mx yr –1 ) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to ∼ – 0.2 nT yr –1 change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

  13. The gradiometer flux qubit without an external flux bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C E; Liu, Y; Chi, C C

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the potential of the gradiometer flux qubit (GFQ), which should be insensitive to flux noise because of the nature of the gradiometer structure. However, to enjoy the benefit of such a design, we must be careful in choosing the initial condition. In the fluxoid quantization condition the flux integer n, which is set to zero in the usual single-loop flux qubit analysis, plays an important role in the GFQ potential. We found that it is impossible to construct a double-well potential if we choose the wrong initial condition. For a qubit application, n must be a small odd integer and the best choice would be n = 1. We also provide a precise and efficient numerical method for calculating the energy spectrum of the arbitrary GFQ potential; this will become useful in designing the circuitry parameters. The state control and read-out schemes are also optimized to a situation where a minimum requirement for using electronics is possible, which reduces noise from instruments directly

  14. The flux database concerted action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.; Donnelly, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the background to the UIR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved so far by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative and outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation. Particular emphasis is placed on the proforma used for data entry, on the database help file and on the approach adopted to indicate data quality. Refs. 3 (author)

  15. Black branes in flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2013-10-01

    We construct charged black branes in type IIA flux compactifications that are dual to (2 + 1)-dimensional field theories at finite density. The internal space is a general Calabi-Yau manifold with fluxes, with internal dimensions much smaller than the AdS radius. Gauge fields descend from the 3-form RR potential evaluated on harmonic forms of the Calabi-Yau, and Kaluza-Klein modes decouple. Black branes are described by a four-dimensional effective field theory that includes only a few light fields and is valid over a parametrically large range of scales. This effective theory determines the low energy dynamics, stability and thermodynamic properties. Tools from flux compactifications are also used to construct holographic CFTs with no relevant scalar operators, that can lead to symmetric phases of condensed matter systems stable to very low temperatures. The general formalism is illustrated with simple examples such as toroidal compactifications and manifolds with a single size modulus. We initiate the classification of holographic phases of matter described by flux compactifications, which include generalized Reissner-Nordstrom branes, nonsupersymmetric AdS2×R2 and hyperscaling violating solutions.

  16. High flux compact neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-01-01

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of ∼10 11 n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation

  17. Dirichlet Forms and Dirichlet Operators for Gibbs Measures of Quantum Unbounded Spin Systems: Essential Self-Adjointness and Log-Sobolev Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hye Young; Park, Yong Moon; Yoo, Hyun Jae

    1998-02-01

    For each γ ∈ [0, 1] we consider the Dirichlet form ℰ_μ ^γ and the associated Dirichlet operator H_μ ^γ for the Gibbs measure μ of quantum unbounded spin systems interacting via superstable and regular potential. The Gibbs measure μ is related to the Gibbs state of the system via a (functional) Euclidean integral procedure. The configuration space for the spin systems is given by Ω : = E^{{Z}^v } , E: = \\{ {ω in C( {[ {0,1} ];{R}^d } ):ω ( 0 ) = ω ( 1 )} \\}. We formulate Dirichlet forms in the framework of rigged Hilbert spaces which are related to the space Ω. Under appropriate conditions on the potential, we show that the Dirichlet operator H_μ ^{( γ )} is essentially self-adjoint on the domain of smooth cylinder functions. We give sufficient conditions on the potential so that the corresponding Gibbs measure is uniformly log-concave (ULC). This property gives the spectral gap of the Dirichlet operator H_μ ^{( γ )} at the lower end of the spectrum. Furthermore, we prove that under the conditions of (ULC), the unique Gibbs measure μ satisfies the log-Sobolev inequality (LS). We use an approximate argument used in the study of the same subjects for loop spaces, which in turn is a modification of the method originally developed by S. Albeverio, Yu. G. Kondratiev, and M. Röckner.

  18. Theory and verification for the GRASP II code for adjoint-sensitivity analysis of steady-state and transient ground-water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RamaRao, B.S.; Reeves, M. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Calibration of a numerical model of the regional ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, has been performed by an interative parameter-fitting procedure. Parameterization has been secured by choosing to assign the transmissivity values at a limited number of selected locations, designated as pilot points. The transmissivity distribution in the model is derived by kriging the combined pool of measured and pilot-plant transmissivities. Iterating on the twin steps of sequentially adding additional pilot point(s) and kriging leads to the model of required accuracy, as judged by a weighted least-square-error objective function. At the end of calibration, it must be ensured that the correlation structure of the measured transmissivities is broadly preserved by the pilot-plant transmissivities. Adjoint-sensitivity analysis of the model has been coupled with kriging to provide objectively the optimal location of the pilot points during an iteration. The pilot-point transmissivities have been adjusted by modeler's judgement incorporating information, where available, on local geologic conditions and large-scale hydraulic interference tests, in order to minimize the objective function. 43 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. A family of integrable differential–difference equations, its bi-Hamiltonian structure and binary nonlinearization of the Lax pairs and adjoint Lax pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xixiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We deduce a family of integrable differential–difference equations. ► We present a discrete Hamiltonian operator involving two arbitrary real parameters. ► We establish the bi-Hamiltonian structure for obtained integrable family. ► Liouvolle integrability of the obtained family is demonstrated. ► Every equation in obtained family is factored through the binary nonlinearization. - Abstract: A family of integrable differential–difference equations is derived by the method of Lax pairs. A discrete Hamiltonian operator involving two arbitrary real parameters is introduced. When the parameters are suitably selected, a pair of discrete Hamiltonian operators is presented. Bi-Hamiltonian structure of obtained family is established by discrete trace identity. Then, Liouville integrability for the obtained family is proved. Ultimately, through the binary nonlinearization of the Lax pairs and adjoint Lax pairs, every differential–difference equation in obtained family is factored by an integrable symplectic map and a finite-dimensional integrable system in Liouville sense.

  20. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W.

    1994-06-01

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation

  1. Flavour mixings in flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmuller, Wilfried; Schweizer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    A multiplicity of quark-lepton families can naturally arise as zero-modes in flux compactifications. The flavour structure of quark and lepton mass matrices is then determined by the wave function profiles of the zero-modes. We consider a supersymmetric SO(10) x U(1) model in six dimensions compactified on the orbifold T 2 =Z 2 with Abelian magnetic flux. A bulk 16-plet charged under the U(1) provides the quark-lepton generations whereas two uncharged 10-plets yield two Higgs doublets. Bulk anomaly cancellation requires the presence of additional 16- and 10-plets. The corresponding zero-modes form vectorlike split multiplets that are needed to obtain a successful flavour phenomenology. We analyze the pattern of flavour mixings for the two heaviest families of the Standard Model and discuss possible generalizations to three and more generations.

  2. Flux through a Markov chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, Elena; Lima, Ricardo; Ourrad, Ouerdia; Spinelli, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The flux through a Markov chain of a conserved quantity (mass) is studied. • Mass is supplied by an external source and ends in the absorbing states of the chain. • Meaningful for modeling open systems whose dynamics has a Markov property. • The analytical expression of mass distribution is given for a constant source. • The expression of mass distribution is given for periodic or random sources. - Abstract: In this paper we study the flux through a finite Markov chain of a quantity, that we will call mass, which moves through the states of the chain according to the Markov transition probabilities. Mass is supplied by an external source and accumulates in the absorbing states of the chain. We believe that studying how this conserved quantity evolves through the transient (non-absorbing) states of the chain could be useful for the modelization of open systems whose dynamics has a Markov property.

  3. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.; Hietala, V.M.; Ginley, D.S.; Tigges, C.P.; Phillips, J.M.; Siegal, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a family of digital logic circuits based on superconducting flux flow transistors that show high speed, reasonable signal levels, large fan-out, and large noise margins. The circuits are made from high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and have been shown to operate at over 90 K. NOR gates have been demonstrated with fan-outs of more than 5 and fully loaded switching times less than a fixture-limited 50 ps. Ring-oscillator data suggest inverter delay times of about 40ps when using a 3-μm linewidths. Simple flip-flops have also been demonstrated showing large noise margins, response times of less than 30 ps, and static power dissipation on the order of 30 nW. Among other uses, this logic family is appropriate as an interface between logic families such as single flux quantum and conventional semiconductor logic

  4. Surface fluxes in heterogeneous landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay Hasager, C.

    1997-01-01

    The surface fluxes in homogeneous landscapes are calculated by similarity scaling principles. The methodology is well establish. In heterogeneous landscapes with spatial changes in the micro scale range, i e from 100 m to 10 km, advective effects are significant. The present work focus on these effects in an agricultural countryside typical for the midlatitudes. Meteorological and satellite data from a highly heterogeneous landscape in the Rhine Valley, Germany was collected in the large-scale field experiment TRACT (Transport of pollutants over complex terrain) in 1992. Classified satellite images, Landsat TM and ERS SAR, are used as basis for roughness maps. The roughnesses were measured at meteorological masts in the various cover classes and assigned pixel by pixel to the images. The roughness maps are aggregated, i e spatially averaged, into so-called effective roughness lengths. This calculation is performed by a micro scale aggregation model. The model solves the linearized atmospheric flow equations by a numerical (Fast Fourier Transform) method. This model also calculate maps of friction velocity and momentum flux pixel wise in heterogeneous landscapes. It is indicated how the aggregation methodology can be used to calculate the heat fluxes based on the relevant satellite data i e temperature and soil moisture information. (au) 10 tabs., 49 ills., 223 refs.

  5. Neutron flux control systems validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hascik, R.

    2003-01-01

    In nuclear installations main requirement is to obtain corresponding nuclear safety in all operation conditions. From the nuclear safety point of view is commissioning and start-up after reactor refuelling appropriate period for safety systems verification. In this paper, methodology, performance and results of neutron flux measurements systems validation is presented. Standard neutron flux measuring chains incorporated into the reactor protection and control system are used. Standard neutron flux measuring chain contains detector, preamplifier, wiring to data acquisition unit, data acquisition unit, wiring to display at control room and display at control room. During reactor outage only data acquisition unit and wiring and displaying at reactor control room is verified. It is impossible to verify detector, preamplifier and wiring to data acquisition recording unit during reactor refuelling according to low power. Adjustment and accurate functionality of these chains is confirmed by start-up rate (SUR) measurement during start-up tests after refuelling of the reactors. This measurement has direct impact to nuclear safety and increase operational nuclear safety level. Briefly description of each measuring system is given. Results are illustrated on measurements performed at Bohunice NPP during reactor start-up tests. Main failures and their elimination are described (Authors)

  6. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Argete

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass and SEE = 81 Wm-2 over corn canopy. The calculated fluxes compared reasonably well with those obtained using the Penman equations.For an energy budget research with limited instrumentation, the aerodynamic method performed satisfactorily in estimating the daytime fluxes, when atmospheric conditions are fully convective, but failed when conditions were stably stratified as during nighttime.

  7. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while ...

  8. Surface fluxes over natural landscapes using scintillometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijninger, W.M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the demand for reliable area-averaged fluxes associated with natural landscapes this thesis investigates a relative new measurement technique known as the scintillation method. For homogeneous areas the surface fluxes can be derived with reasonable accuracy. However, fluxes

  9. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Equilibria corresponding to the energy extrema while conserving these invariants for parallel flows yield three classes of ... parallel heat flux, due to the boundary condition Β · n = 0, that the total energy, is conserved. In all HR, K, S, and the total mass, ... Zero net current flux tubes are qualitatively similar to the flux tube with ...

  10. Flux of Cadmium through Euphausiids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benayoun, G.; Fowler, S.W.; Oregioni, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flux of the heavy metal cadmium through the euphausiid Meganyctiphanes norvegica was examined. Radiotracer experiments showed that cadmium can be accumulated either directly from water or through the food chain. When comparing equilibrium cadmium concentration factors based on stable element measurements with those obtained from radiotracer experiments, it is evident that exchange between cadmium in the water and that in euphausiid tissue is a relatively slow process, indicating that, in the long term, ingestion of cadmium will probably be the more important route for the accumulation of this metal. Approximately 10% of cadmium ingested by euphausiids was incorporated into internal tissues when the food source was radioactive Artemia. After 1 month cadmium, accumulated directly from water, was found to be most concentrated in the viscera with lesser amounts in eyes, exoskeleton and muscle, respectively. Use of a simple model, based on the assumption that cadmium taken in by the organism must equal cadmium released plus that accumulated in tissue, allowed assessment of the relative importance of various metabolic parameters in controlling the cadmium flux through euphausiids. Fecal pellets, due to their relatively high rate of production and high cadmium content, accounted for 84% of the total cadmium flux through M. norvegica. Comparisons of stable cadmium concentrations in natural euphausiid food and the organism's resultant fecal pellets indicate that the cadmium concentration in ingested material was increased nearly 5-fold during its passage through the euphausiid. From comparisons of all routes by which cadmium can be released from M. norvegica to the water column, it is concluded that fecal pellet deposition represents the principal mechanism effecting the downward vertical transport of cadmium by this species. (author)

  11. Four-collector flux sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, W.J. Jr.; Bullis, R.H.; Mongeon, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    A flowmeter based on ion drift techniques was developed for measuring the rate of flow of a fluid through a given cross-section. Ion collectors are positioned on each side of an immediately adjacent to ion source. When air flows axially through the region in which ions are produced and appropriate electric fields are maintained between the collectors, an electric current flows to each collector due to the net motion of the ions. The electric currents and voltages and other parameters which define the flow are combined in an electric circuit so that the flux of the fluid can be determined. (DN)

  12. Tokamak disruption heat flux simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langhoff, M.; Hess, G.; Gahl, J.; Ingram, R.

    1990-01-01

    A coaxial plasma gun system, operating in the deflagration mode, has been built and fired at the University of New Mexico. This system, powered by a 100 kJ capacitor bank, was designed to give a variable pulse length of approximately 50-100 us. The gun is intended to deliver to a target an energy deposition density of 1 kJ per cm 2 via impact with a deuterium plasma possessing a highly directed energy. This system should simulate on the target, over an area of approximately 10 cm 2 , the heat flux of a tokamak plasma disruption on plasma facing components. Current diagnostics for the system are rather rudimentary but sufficient for determination of plasma pulse characteristics and energy transfer to target. Electrical measurements include bank voltage measured via resistive voltage dividers, and bank current measured via Rogowski coil. The shape of the plasma, its position relative to the target area, and the final impact area, is determined via open-shutter photography and the use of witness plates. Total energy deposited onto targets will be determined through simple calorimetry and careful target mass measurements. Preliminary results describing the ablation of carbon targets exposed to disruption like heat fluxes will be presented as well as a description of the experimental apparatus

  13. Neutron flux enhancement at LASREF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility produces a 1-mA beam of protons at an energy of 800 MeV. Since 1985, the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has made use of the neutron flux that is generated as the incident protons interact with the nuclei in targets and a copper beam stop. A variety of basic and applied experiments in radiation damage and radiation effects have been completed. Recent studies indicate that the flux at LASREF can be increased by at least a factor of ten from the present level of about 5 E+17 m -2 s -1 . This requires changing the beam-stop material from Cu to W and optimizing the geometry of the beam-target interaction region. These studies are motivated by the need for a large volume, high energy, and high intensity neutron source in the development of materials for advanced energy concepts such as fusion reactors. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over a semi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    42

    vapour fluxes in Mangrove ecosystems, Sundarbans (India). The above observations are. 57 .... with the help of PAR. 115 sensor. Soil heat flux plates were used for the measurement of soil heat flux. ..... where Rn is net radiation, G is the soil heat flux, H is sensible heat flux and LE is the latent. 233 heat flux. 234. We have ...

  15. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  16. Local rectification of heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, M.; Cui, Y. Y.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Simón, M. A.; Muga, J. G.

    2017-09-01

    We present a chain-of-atoms model where heat is rectified, with different fluxes from the hot to the cold baths located at the chain boundaries when the temperature bias is reversed. The chain is homogeneous except for boundary effects and a local modification of the interactions at one site, the “impurity”. The rectification mechanism is due here to the localized impurity, the only asymmetrical element of the structure, apart from the externally imposed temperature bias, and does not rely on putting in contact different materials or other known mechanisms such as grading or long-range interactions. The effect survives if all interaction forces are linear except the ones for the impurity.

  17. Nuclear transmutation by flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    2001-01-01

    A new idea for the transmutation of minor actinides, long (and even short) lived fission products is presented. It is based an the property of neutron flux compression in nuclear (fast and/or thermal) reactors possessing spatially non-stationary critical masses. An advantage factor for the burn-up fluence of the elements to be transmuted in the order of magnitude of 100 and more is obtainable compared with the classical way of transmutation. Three typical examples of such transmuters (a subcritical ringreactor with a rotating reflector, a sub-critical ring reactor with a rotating spallation source, the socalled ''pulsed energy amplifier'', and a fast burn-wave reactor) are presented and analysed with regard to this purpose. (orig.) [de

  18. Insects, infestations and nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalzik, B.

    2012-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by a high temporal and spatial variability in the vertical transfer of energy and matter within the canopy and the soil compartment. The mechanisms and controlling factors behind canopy processes and system-internal transfer dynamics are imperfectly understood at the moment. Seasonal flux diversities and inhomogeneities in throughfall composition have been reported from coniferous and deciduous forests, and in most cases leaf leaching has been considered as principle driver for differences in the amount and quality of nutrients and organic compounds (Tukey and Morgan 1963). Since herbivorous insects and the processes they initiate received less attention in past times, ecologists now emphasize the need for linking biological processes occurring in different ecosystem strata to explain rates and variability of nutrient cycling (Bardgett et al. 1998, Wardle et al. 2004). Consequently, herbivore insects in the canopies of forests are increasingly identified to play an important role for the (re)cycling and availability of nutrients, or, more generally, for the functioning of ecosystems not only in outbreak situations but also at endemic (non-outbreak) density levels (Stadler et al. 2001, Hunter et al. 2003). Before, little attention was paid to insect herbivores when quantifying element and energy fluxes through ecosystems, although the numerous and different functions insects fulfill in ecosystems (e.g. as pollinators, herbivores or detritivores) were unanimously recognized (Schowalter 2000). Amongst the reasons for this restraint was the argument that the total biomass of insects tends to be relatively low compared to the biomass of trees or the pool of soil organic matter (Ohmart et al. 1983). A second argument which was put forward to justify the inferior role of insects in nutrient cycling were the supposed low defoliation losses between 5-10% of the annual leaf biomass, or net primary production, due to insect herbivory under

  19. Heat Flux Inhibition by Whistlers: Experimental Confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Heat flux in weakly magnetized collisionless plasma is, according to theoretical predictions, limited by whistler turbulence that is generated by heat flux instabilities near threshold. Observations of solar wind electrons by Gary and coworkers appear to confirm the limit on heat flux as being roughly the product of the magnetic energy density and the electron thermal velocity, in agreement with prediction (Pistinner and Eichler 1998)

  20. Dimensional reduction of a generalized flux problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized flux problem with Abelian and non-Abelian fluxes is considered. In the Abelian case we shall show that the generalized flux problem for tight-binding models of noninteracting electrons on either 2n- or (2n + 1)-dimensional lattice can always be reduced to an n-dimensional hopping problem. A residual freedom in this reduction enables one to identify equivalence classes of hopping Hamiltonians which have the same spectrum. In the non-Abelian case, the reduction is not possible in general unless the flux tensor factorizes into an Abelian one times are element of the corresponding algebra

  1. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  2. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Ran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic compounds, can be upward into the air as well as downward to the surface and therefore should be modeled as bi-directional fluxes. Model parameterizations of dry deposition in air quality models have been represented by simple electrical resistance analogs for almost 30 years. Uncertainties in surface flux modeling in global to mesoscale models are being slowly reduced as more field measurements provide constraints on parameterizations. However, at the same time, more chemical species are being added to surface flux models as air quality models are expanded to include more complex chemistry and are being applied to a wider array of environmental issues. Since surface flux measurements of many of these chemicals are still lacking, resistances are usually parameterized using simple scaling by water or lipid solubility and reactivity. Advances in recent years have included bi-directional flux algorithms that require a shift from pre-computation of deposition velocities to fully integrated surface flux calculations within air quality models. Improved modeling of the stomatal component of chemical surface fluxes has resulted from improved evapotranspiration modeling in land surface models and closer integration between meteorology and air quality models. Satellite-derived land use characterization and vegetation products and indices are improving model representation of spatial and temporal variations in surface flux processes. This review describes the current state of chemical dry deposition modeling, recent progress in bi-directional flux modeling, synergistic model development research with field measurements, and coupling with meteorological land surface models.

  3. Sensorless Direct Flux Vector Control of Synchronous Reluctance Motors Including Standstill, MTPA and Flux Weakening

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefi-Talouki, Arzhang; Pescetto, Paolo; Pellegrino, Gian-Mario Luigi

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a sensorless direct flux vector control scheme for synchronous reluctance motor drives. Torque is controlled at constant switching frequency, via the closed loop regulation of the stator flux linkage vector and of the current component in quadrature with it, using the stator flux oriented reference frame. A hybrid flux and position observer combines back-electromotive force integration with pulsating voltage injection around zero speed. Around zero speed, the position obse...

  4. Flux compactifications, gauge algebras and De Sitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Linares, Roman; Roest, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of (non-)geometric fluxes allows for N = 1 moduli stabilisation in a De Sitter vacuum. The aim of this Letter is to assess to what extent this is true in N = 4 compactifications. First we identify the correct gauge algebra in terms of gauge and (non-)geometric fluxes. We then show

  5. Neutron flux measurement by mobile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verchain, M.

    1987-01-01

    Various incore instrumentation systems and their technological evolution are first reviewed. Then, for 1300 MWe PWR nuclear power plant, temperature and neutron flux measurement are described. Mobile fission chambers, with their large measuring range and accurate location allow a good knowledge of the core. Other incore measures are possible because of flux detector thimble tubes inserted in the reactor core [fr

  6. Fast flux module detection using matroid theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Arne C; Bruggeman, Frank J; Olivier, Brett G; Stougie, Leen

    2015-05-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is one of the most often applied methods on genome-scale metabolic networks. Although FBA uniquely determines the optimal yield, the pathway that achieves this is usually not unique. The analysis of the optimal-yield flux space has been an open challenge. Flux variability analysis is only capturing some properties of the flux space, while elementary mode analysis is intractable due to the enormous number of elementary modes. However, it has been found by Kelk et al. (2012) that the space of optimal-yield fluxes decomposes into flux modules. These decompositions allow a much easier but still comprehensive analysis of the optimal-yield flux space. Using the mathematical definition of module introduced by Müller and Bockmayr (2013b), we discovered useful connections to matroid theory, through which efficient algorithms enable us to compute the decomposition into modules in a few seconds for genome-scale networks. Using that every module can be represented by one reaction that represents its function, in this article, we also present a method that uses this decomposition to visualize the interplay of modules. We expect the new method to replace flux variability analysis in the pipelines for metabolic networks.

  7. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.; Genthon, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  8. Increased heat fluxes near a forest edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W; van Breugel, PB; Moors, EJ; Nieveen, JP

    2002-01-01

    Observations of sensible and latent heat flux above forest downwind of a forest edge show these fluxes to be larger than the available energy over the forest. The enhancement averages to 56 W m(-2), or 16% of the net radiation, at fetches less than 400 m, equivalent to fetch to height ratios less

  9. Increased heat fluxes near a forest edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.; Breugel, van P.B.; Moors, E.J.; Nieveen, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of sensible and latent heat flux above forest downwind of a forest edge show these fluxes to be larger than the available energy over the forest. The enhancement averages to 56 W mm2, or 16 f the net radiation, at fetches less than 400 m, equivalent to fetch to height ratios less than

  10. Initiation of CMEs by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The initial CME model includes a magnetic flux rope in spherical, axisymmetric geometry. The initial configuration consists of a magnetic flux rope embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar ...

  11. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C., E-mail: cliu@pppl.gov [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  12. Anthropogenic heat flux estimation from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Marconcini, Mattia; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean Philippe; Grimmond, C.S.B.; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Frate, Del Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mitraka, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Landier, Lucas; Gabey, Andy; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2016-01-01

    H2020-Space project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of Copernicus Sentinels to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component of the Urban Energy Budget (UEB). URBANFLUXES advances the current knowledge of the impacts

  13. ANthropogenic heat FLUX estimation from Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Marconcini, Mattia; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean Philippe; Grimmong, C.S.B.; Feigenwinter, Christian; Lindberg, Fredrik; Frate, Del Fabio; Klostermann, Judith; Mi, Zina; Esch, Thomas; Landier, Lucas; Gabey, Andy; Parlow, Eberhard; Olofson, Frans

    2017-01-01

    The H2020-Space project URBANFLUXES (URBan ANthrpogenic heat FLUX from Earth observation Satellites) investigates the potential of Copernicus Sentinels to retrieve anthropogenic heat flux, as a key component of the Urban Energy Budget (UEB). URBANFLUXES advances the current knowledge of the

  14. Optical magnetic flux generation in superconductor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The generation of the magnetic flux quanta inside the superconductors is studied as a new effect to destroy ... Ultrafast phenomena; femtosecond laser; optical magnetic flux generation. PACS Nos 85.25. .... [8] M Tonouchi, M Tani, Z Wang, K Sakai, S Tomozawa, M Hangyo, Y Murakami and S. Nakashima, Jpn. J.

  15. Multi-circular flux motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kharashi, Eyhab Aly, E-mail: EyhabElkharahi@hotmail.com [Faculty of Engineering, Electrical Power and Machines Department, Ain Shams University, 1 El-Sarayat Street, Abdou Basha Square, Abbassia 11517, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The paper uses the multi-circular rotor in the switched reluctance motor to increase its output torque and its efficiency. {yields} Finite element is used to model the new SRM accurately. {yields} The Matlab/Simulink is used to dynamically model the new SRM. {yields} The paper compares the torque capability of the multi-circular rotor SRM. {yields} The new SRM produces approximately double the torque of its equivalent conventional SRM. - Abstract: The paper introduces a new type of electrical machines which has significantly high output torque. The toothed-rotor in the conventional electrical machine is replaced by a multi-circular rotor to increase the saliency and to shorten the flux loops consequently the output torque increases. The paper presents the design steps of this new type of electrical machine and also examines its performance. In addition, the paper compares the percentage increase in output torque from the proposed new electric machine to its equivalent conventional motor. Then the paper proceeds to discuss the relation between the switching on angle and the maximum speed, the torque ripples, and the efficiency.

  16. Crystal growth of emerald by flux method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Mikio; Narita, Eiichi; Okabe, Taijiro; Morishita, Toshihiko.

    1979-01-01

    Emerald crystals have been formed in two binary fluxes of Li 2 O-MoO 2 and Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 using the slow cooling method and the temperature gradient method under various conditions. In the flux of Li 2 O-MoO 3 carried out in the range of 2 -- 5 of molar ratios (MoO 3 /Li 2 O), emerald was crystallized in the temperature range from 750 to 950 0 C, and the suitable crystallization conditions were found to be the molar ratio of 3 -- 4 and the temperature about 900 0 C. In the flux of Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 carried out in the range of 1.7 -- 5 of molar ratios (V 2 O 5 /Li 2 O), emerald was crystallized in the temperature range from 900 to 1150 0 . The suitable crystals were obtained at the molar ratio of 3 and the temperature range of 1000 -- 1100 0 C. The crystallization temperature rised with an increase in the molar ratio of the both fluxes. The emeralds grown in two binary fluxes were transparent green, having the density of 2.68, the refractive index of 1.56, and the two distinct bands in the visible spectrum at 430 and 600nm. The emerald grown in Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 flux was more bluish green than that grown in Li 2 O-MoO 3 flux. The size of the spontaneously nucleated emerald grown in the former flux was larger than the latter, when crystallized by the slow cooling method. As for the solubility of beryl in the two fluxes, Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 flux was superior to Li 2 O-MoO 3 flux whose small solubility of SiO 2 caused an experimental problem to the temperature gradient method. The suitability of the two fluxes for the crystal growth of emerald by the flux method was discussed from the view point of various properties of above-mentioned two fluxes. (author)

  17. Heat Flux Distribution of Antarctica Unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Yasmina M.; Catalán, Manuel; Jordan, Tom A.; Golynsky, Alexander; Golynsky, Dmitry; Eagles, Graeme; Vaughan, David G.

    2017-11-01

    Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth. Understanding its ice sheet dynamics is crucial to unraveling past global climate change and making robust climatic and sea level predictions. Of the basic parameters that shape and control ice flow, the most poorly known is geothermal heat flux. Direct observations of heat flux are difficult to obtain in Antarctica, and until now continent-wide heat flux maps have only been derived from low-resolution satellite magnetic and seismological data. We present a high-resolution heat flux map and associated uncertainty derived from spectral analysis of the most advanced continental compilation of airborne magnetic data. Small-scale spatial variability and features consistent with known geology are better reproduced than in previous models, between 36% and 50%. Our high-resolution heat flux map and its uncertainty distribution provide an important new boundary condition to be used in studies on future subglacial hydrology, ice sheet dynamics, and sea level change.

  18. Flux Modulation in the Electrodynamic Loudspeaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Morten; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of flux modulation in the electrodynamic loudspeaker with main focus on the effect on the force factor. A measurement setup to measure the AC flux modulation with static voice coil is explained and the measurements shows good consistency with FEA simulations....... Measurements of the generated AC flux modulation shows, that eddy currents are the main source to magnetic losses in form of phase lag and amplitude changes. Use of a copper cap shows a decrease in flux modulation amplitude at the expense of increased power losses. Finally, simulations show...... that there is a high dependency between the generated AC flux modulation from the voice coil and the AC force factor change....

  19. Spacecraft-produced neutron fluxes on Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, T. C.; Furst, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Baum, J. H.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Perry, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges are reported for the Skylab spacecraft. Detectors composed of uranium, thorium, and bismuth foils with mica as a fission track recorder, as well as boron foils with cellulose acetate as an alpha-particle recorder, were deployed at different positions in the Orbital Workshop. It was found that the Skylab neutron flux was dominated by high energy (greater than 1 MeV) contributions and that there was no significant time variation in the fluxes. Firm upper limits of 7-15 neutrons/sq cm-sec, depending on the detector location in the spacecraft, were established for fluxes above 1 MeV. Below 1 MeV, the neutron fluxes were about an order of magnitude lower. The neutrons are interpreted as originating from the interactions of leakage protons from the radiation belt with the spacecraft.

  20. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Lars K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation and the analytical part is fairly advanced, a lack of appropriate modelling software solutions for all modelling aspects in flux studies is limiting the application of metabolic flux analysis. Results We have developed OpenFLUX as a user friendly, yet flexible software application for small and large scale 13C metabolic flux analysis. The application is based on the new Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU framework, significantly enhancing computation speed for flux calculation. From simple notation of metabolic reaction networks defined in a spreadsheet, the OpenFLUX parser automatically generates MATLAB-readable metabolite and isotopomer balances, thus strongly facilitating model creation. The model can be used to perform experimental design, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis either using the built-in gradient-based search or Monte Carlo algorithms or in user-defined algorithms. Exemplified for a microbial flux study with 71 reactions, 8 free flux parameters and mass isotopomer distribution of 10 metabolites, OpenFLUX allowed to automatically compile the EMU-based model from an Excel file containing metabolic reactions and carbon transfer mechanisms, showing it's user-friendliness. It reliably reproduced the published data and optimum flux distributions for the network under study were found quickly ( Conclusion We have developed a fast, accurate application to perform steady-state 13C metabolic flux analysis. OpenFLUX will strongly facilitate and

  1. The exhibition"La France au CERN" was inaugurated by Danièle Hulin, Directrice adjointe Secteur Physique, Chimie, Sciences pour l'Ingénieur (PCSI), Ministère délégué à l'Enseignement supérieur et à la recherche.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    The exhibition"La France au CERN" was inaugurated by Danièle Hulin, Directrice adjointe Secteur Physique, Chimie, Sciences pour l'Ingénieur (PCSI), Ministère délégué à l'Enseignement supérieur et à la recherche.

  2. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. The experiments have contributed to the design of a flux trap in which a thermal flux of nearly 10 9 was obtained, with an enhancement of 6.61

  3. CO2 flux geothermometer for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Fridriksson, T.; Oladottir, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A new geothermometer (TCO2 Flux) is proposed based on soil diffuse CO2 flux and shallow temperature measurements made on areas of steam heated, thermally altered ground above active geothermal systems. This CO2 flux geothermometer is based on a previously reported CO2 geothermometer that was designed for use with fumarole analysis. The new geothermometer provides a valuable additional exploration tool for estimating subsurface temperatures in high-temperature geothermal systems. Mean TCO2 Flux estimates fall within the range of deep drill hole temperatures at Wairakei (New Zealand), Tauhara (New Zealand), Rotokawa (New Zealand), Ohaaki (New Zealand), Reykjanes (Iceland) and Copahue (Argentina). The spatial distribution of geothermometry estimates is consistent with the location of major upflow zones previously reported at the Wairakei and Rotokawa geothermal systems. TCO2 Flux was also evaluated at White Island (New Zealand) and Reporoa (New Zealand), where limited sub-surface data exists. Mode TCO2 Flux at White Island is high (320 °C), the highest of the systems considered in this study. However, the geothermometer relies on mineral-water equilibrium in neutral pH reservoir fluids, and would not be reliable in such an active and acidic environment. Mean TCO2 Flux at Reporoa (310 °C) is high, which indicates Reporoa has a separate upflow from the nearby Waiotapu geothermal system; an outflow from Waiotapu would not be expected to have such high temperature.

  4. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  5. Magnetic refrigeration using flux compression in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israelsson, U.E.; Strayer, D.M.; Jackson, H.W.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using flux compression in high-temperature superconductors to produce the large time-varying magnetic fields required in a field cycled magnetic refrigerator operating between 20 K and 4 K is presently investigated. This paper describes the refrigerator concept and lists limitations and advantages in comparison with conventional refrigeration techniques. The maximum fields obtainable by flux compression in high-temperature superconductor materials, as presently prepared, are too low to serve in such a refrigerator. However, reports exist of critical current values that are near usable levels for flux pumps in refrigerator applications. 9 refs

  6. Evolution of magnetic flux ropes associated with flux transfer events and interplanetary magnetic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.Q.; Lee, L.C.; Wang, S.; Akasofu, S.I.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft observations suggest that flux transfer events and interplanetary magnetic clouds may be associated with magnetic flux ropes which are magnetic flux tubes containing helical magnetic field lines. In the magnetic flux ropes, the azimuthal magnetic field (B θ ) is superposed on the axial field (B z ). In this paper the time evolution of a localized magnetic flux rope is studied. A two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulation code with a cylindrical symmetry is developed to study the wave modes associated with the evolution of flux ropes. It is found that in the initial phase both the fast magnetosonic wave and the Alfven wave are developed in the flux rope. After this initial phase, the Alfven wave becomes the dominant wave mode for the evolution of the magnetic flux rope and the radial expansion velocity of the flux rope is found to be negligible. Numerical results further show that even for a large initial azimuthal component of the magnetic field (B θ ≅ 1-4 B z ) the propagation velocity along the axial direction of the flux rope remains to be the Alfven velocity. Diagnoses show that after the initial phase the transverse kinetic energy equals the transverse magnetic energy, which is characteristic of the Alfven mode. It is also found that the localized magnetic flux rope tends to evolve into two separate magnetic ropes propagating in opposite directions. The simulation results are used to study the evolution of magnetic flux ropes associated with flux transfer events observed at the Earth's dayside magnetopause and magnetic clouds in the interplanetary space

  7. Accuracy of surface heat fluxes from observations of operational satellites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Sugimori, Y.

    Uncertainties in the flux estimates, resulting from the use of bulk method and remotely sensed data are worked out and are presented for individual and total fluxes. These uncertainties in satellite derived fluxes are further compared...

  8. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  9. 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 400 Area at Hanford is home primarily to the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), a DOE-owned, formerly operating, 400-megawatt (thermal) liquid-metal (sodium)-cooled...

  10. Pulse power applications of flux compression generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics are presented for two different types of explosive driven flux compression generators and a megavolt pulse transformer. Status reports are given for rail gun and plasma focus programs for which the generators serve as power sources

  11. Rotating flux compressor for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.; Linton, T.W.; Phillips, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The rotating flux compressor (RFC) converts rotational kinetic energy into an electrical output pulse which would have higher energy than the electrical energy initially stored in the compressor. An RFC has been designed in which wedge-shaped rotor blades pass through the air gaps between successive turns of a solenoid, the stator. Magnetic flux is generated by pulsing the stator solenoids when the inductance is a maximum, i.e., when the flux fills the stator-solenoid volume. Connecting the solenoid across a load conserves the flux which is compressed within the small volume surrounding the stator periphery when the rotor blades cut into the free space between the stator plates, creating a minimum-inductance condition. The unique features of this design are: (1) no electrical connections (brushes) to the rotor; (2) no conventional windings; and (3) no maintenance. The device has been tested up to 5000 rpm of rotor speed

  12. Modelling drug flux through microporated skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhevskiy, Alexey S; Guy, Richard H; Anissimov, Yuri G

    2016-11-10

    A simple mathematical equation has been developed to predict drug flux through microporated skin. The theoretical model is based on an approach applied previously to water evaporation through leaf stomata. Pore density, pore radius and drug molecular weight are key model parameters. The predictions of the model were compared with results derived from a simple, intuitive method using porated area alone to estimate the flux enhancement. It is shown that the new approach predicts significantly higher fluxes than the intuitive analysis, with transport being proportional to the total pore perimeter rather than area as intuitively anticipated. Predicted fluxes were in good general agreement with experimental data on drug delivery from the literature, and were quantitatively closer to the measured values than those derived from the intuitive, area-based approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Flux Tube Dynamics in the Dual Superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampert, M.; Svetitsky, B.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied plasma oscillations in a flux tube created in a dual superconductor. The theory contains an Abelian gauge field coupled magnetically to a Higgs field that confines electric charge via the dual Meissner effect. Starting from a static flux tube configuration, with electric charges at either end, we release a fluid of electric charges in the system that accelerate and screen the electric field. The weakening of the electric field allows the flux tube to collapse, and the inertia of the charges forces it open again. We investigate both Type I and Type II superconductors, with plasma frequencies both above and below the threshold for radiation into the Higgs vacuum. (The parameters appropriate to QCD are in the Type II regime; the plasma frequency depends on the mass taken for the fluid constituents.) The coupling of the plasma oscillations to the Higgs field making up the flux tube is the main new feature in our work

  14. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    the concentration and flux fields against those of a uniform forested surface. We use an atmospheric boundary layer two-equation closure model that accounts for the flow dynamics and vertical divergence of CO2 sources/sinks within a plant canopy. This paper characterizes the spatial variation of CO2 fluxes...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...... monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated...

  15. Magnetic flux generator for balanced membrane loudspeaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehder, Jörg; Rombach, Pirmin; Hansen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a magnetic flux generator with an application in a hearing aid loudspeaker produced in microsystem technology (MST). The technology plans for two different designs for the magnetic flux generator utilizing a softmagnetic substrate or electroplated NiCoFe as c......CoFe as core material are presented and the production and characterization of four different mono- and double-layer planar coil types are reported....

  16. Stochastic flux analysis of chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Lynch, James F

    2013-12-07

    Chemical reaction networks provide an abstraction scheme for a broad range of models in biology and ecology. The two common means for simulating these networks are the deterministic and the stochastic approaches. The traditional deterministic approach, based on differential equations, enjoys a rich set of analysis techniques, including a treatment of reaction fluxes. However, the discrete stochastic simulations, which provide advantages in some cases, lack a quantitative treatment of network fluxes. We describe a method for flux analysis of chemical reaction networks, where flux is given by the flow of species between reactions in stochastic simulations of the network. Extending discrete event simulation algorithms, our method constructs several data structures, and thereby reveals a variety of statistics about resource creation and consumption during the simulation. We use these structures to quantify the causal interdependence and relative importance of the reactions at arbitrary time intervals with respect to the network fluxes. This allows us to construct reduced networks that have the same flux-behavior, and compare these networks, also with respect to their time series. We demonstrate our approach on an extended example based on a published ODE model of the same network, that is, Rho GTP-binding proteins, and on other models from biology and ecology. We provide a fully stochastic treatment of flux analysis. As in deterministic analysis, our method delivers the network behavior in terms of species transformations. Moreover, our stochastic analysis can be applied, not only at steady state, but at arbitrary time intervals, and used to identify the flow of specific species between specific reactions. Our cases study of Rho GTP-binding proteins reveals the role played by the cyclic reverse fluxes in tuning the behavior of this network.

  17. Determination flux in the Reactor JEN-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manas Diaz, L.; Montes Ponce de leon, J.

    1960-01-01

    This report summarized several irradiations that have been made to determine the neutron flux distributions in the core of the JEN-1 reactor. Gold foils of 380 μ gr and Mn-Ni (12% de Ni) of 30 mg have been employed. the epithermal flux has been determined by mean of the Cd radio. The resonance integral values given by Macklin and Pomerance have been used. (Author) 9 refs

  18. Flux at a point in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, E.D.; Schrandt, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The current state of the art of calculating flux at a point with MCNP is discussed. Various techniques are touched upon, but the main emphasis is on the fast improved version of the once-more-collided flux estimator, which has been modified to treat neutrons thermalized by the free gas model. The method is tested on several problems on interest and the results are presented

  19. Controlling fluxes for microbial metabolic engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdeva, Gairik

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents novel synthetic biology tools and design principles usable for microbial metabolic engineering. Controlling metabolic fluxes is essential for biological manufacturing of fuels, materials, and high value chemicals. Insulating the flow of metabolites is a successful natural strategy for metabolic flux regulation. Recently, approaches using scaffolds, both in vitro and in vivo, to spatially co-localize enzymes have reported significant gains in product yields. RNA is suitabl...

  20. Mold Flux Crystallization and Mold Thermal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Elizabeth Irene

    Mold flux plays a small but critical role in the continuous casting of steel. The carbon-coated powder is added at the top of the water-cooled copper mold, over time it melts and infiltrates the gap between the copper mold and the solidifying steel strand. Mold powders serve five primary functions: (1) chemical insulation, (2) thermal insulation, (3) lubrication between the steel strand and mold, (4) absorption of inclusions, and (5) promotion of even heat flux. All five functions are critical to slab casting, but surface defect prevention is primarily controlled through even heat flux. Glassy fluxes have high heat transfer and result in a thicker steel shell. Steels with large volumetric shrinkage on cooling must have a crystalline flux to reduce the radiative heat transfer and avoid the formation of cracks in the shell. Crystallinity plays a critical role in steel shell formation, therefore it is important to study the thermal conditions that promote each phase and its morphology. Laboratory tests were performed to generate continuous cooling transformation (CCT) and time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams. Continuous cooling transformation tests were performed in an instrumented eight cell step chill mold. Results showed that cuspidine was the only phase formed in conventional fluxes and all observed structures were dendritic. An isothermal tin bath quench method was also developed to isothermally age glassy samples. Isothermal tests yielded different microstructures and different phases than those observed by continuous cooling. Comparison of aged tests with industrial flux films indicates similar faceted structures along the mold wall, suggesting that mold flux first solidifies as a glass along the mold wall, but the elevated temperature devitrifies the glassy structure forming crystals that cannot form by continuous cooling.

  1. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Zwickl, R.D.; Smith, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Normally the approx. >80-eV electrons which carry the solar wind electron heat flux are collimated along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the direction pointing outward away from the sun. Occasionally, however, collimated fluxes of approx. >80-eV electrons are observed traveling both parallel and antiparallel to the IMF. Here we present the results of a survey of such bidirectional electron heat flux events as observed with the plasma and magnetic field experiments aboard ISEE 3 at times when the spacecraft was not magnetically connected to the earth's bow shock. The onset of a bidirectional electron heat flux at ISEE 3 usually signals spacecraft entry into a distinct solar wind plasma and field entity, most often characterized by anomalously low proton and electron temperatures, a strong, smoothly varying magnetic field, a low plasma beta, and a high total pressure. Significant field rotations often occur at the beginning and/or end of bidirectional heat flux events, and, at times, the large field rotations characteristic of ''magnetic clouds'' are present. Approximately half of all bidirectional heat flux events are associated with and follow interplanetary shocks, while the other events have no obvious shock associations

  2. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent flux measurements are key to understanding ecosystem scale energy and matter exchange, including atmospheric trace gases. While the eddy covariance approach has evolved as an invaluable tool to quantify fluxes of e.g. CO2 and H2O continuously, it is limited to very few atmospheric constituents for which sufficiently fast analyzers exist. High instrument cost, lack of field-readiness or high power consumption (e.g. many recent laser-based systems requiring strong vacuum) further impair application to other tracers. Alternative micrometeorological approaches such as conditional sampling might overcome major limitations. Although the idea of eddy accumulation has already been proposed by Desjardin in 1972 (Desjardin, 1977), at the time it could not be realized for trace gases. Major simplifications by Businger and Oncley (1990) lead to it's widespread application as 'Relaxed Eddy Accumulation' (REA). However, those simplifications (flux gradient similarity with constant flow rate sampling irrespective of vertical wind velocity and introduction of a deadband around zero vertical wind velocity) have degraded eddy accumulation to an indirect method, introducing issues of scalar similarity and often lack of suitable scalar flux proxies. Here we present a real implementation of a true eddy accumulation system according to the original concept. Key to our approach, which we call 'Conditional Eddy Sampling' (CES), is the mathematical formulation of conditional sampling in it's true form of a direct eddy flux measurement paired with a performant real implementation. Dedicated hardware controlled by near-real-time software allows full signal recovery at 10 or 20 Hz, very fast valve switching, instant vertical wind velocity proportional flow rate control, virtually no deadband and adaptive power management. Demonstrated system performance often exceeds requirements for flux measurements by orders of magnitude. The system's exceptionally low power consumption is ideal

  3. A finite element calculation of flux pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    A flux pump is not only a fascinating example of the power of Faraday’s concept of flux lines, but also an attractive way of powering superconducting magnets without large electronic power supplies. However it is not possible to do this in HTS by driving a part of the superconductor normal, it must be done by exceeding the local critical density. The picture of a magnet pulling flux lines through the material is attractive, but as there is no direct contact between flux lines in the magnet and vortices, unless the gap between them is comparable to the coherence length, the process must be explicable in terms of classical electromagnetism and a nonlinear V-I characteristic. In this paper a simple 2D model of a flux pump is used to determine the pumping behaviour from first principles and the geometry. It is analysed with finite element software using the A formulation and FlexPDE. A thin magnet is passed across one or more superconductors connected to a load, which is a large rectangular loop. This means that the self and mutual inductances can be calculated explicitly. A wide strip, a narrow strip and two conductors are considered. Also an analytic circuit model is analysed. In all cases the critical state model is used, so the flux flow resistivity and dynamic resistivity are not directly involved, although an effective resistivity appears when J c is exceeded. In most of the cases considered here is a large gap between the theory and the experiments. In particular the maximum flux transferred to the load area is always less than the flux of the magnet. Also once the threshold needed for pumping is exceeded the flux in the load saturates within a few cycles. However the analytic circuit model allows a simple modification to allow for the large reduction in I c when the magnet is over a conductor. This not only changes the direction of the pumped flux but leads to much more effective pumping.

  4. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2015-01-01

    Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low......-frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low......-frequency contributions to vertical turbulent surface fluxes. For high flux rates (|Sensible heat flux| > 40Wm-2, |latent heat flux|> 20Wm-2 and |CO2 flux|> 100 mmolm-2 d-1/ we found that the average relative difference between fluxes estimated by ogive optimization and the conventional method was low (5–20 %) suggesting...

  5. A model for heliospheric flux-ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Linton, M.; Vourlidas, A.; Hidalgo, M. A. U.

    2017-12-01

    This work is presents an analytical flux-rope model, which explores different levels of complexity starting from a circular-cylindrical geometry. The framework of this series of models was established by Nieves-Chinchilla et al. 2016 with the circular-cylindrical analytical flux rope model. The model attempts to describe the magnetic flux rope topology with distorted cross-section as a possible consequence of the interaction with the solar wind. In this model, the flux rope is completely described in a non-orthogonal geometry. The Maxwell equations are solved using tensor calculus consistent with the geometry chosen, invariance along the axial direction, and with the assumption of no radial current density. The model is generalized in terms of the radial and azimuthal dependence of the poloidal current density component and axial current density component. The misalignment between current density and magnetic field is studied in detail for several example profiles of the axial and poloidal current density components. This theoretical analysis provides a map of the force distribution inside of the flux-rope. For reconstruction of the heliospheric flux-ropes, the circular-cylindrical reconstruction technique has been adapted to the new geometry and applied to in situ ICMEs with a flux-rope entrained and tested with cases with clear in situ signatures of distortion. The model adds a piece in the puzzle of the physical-analytical representation of these magnetic structures that should be evaluated with the ultimate goal of reconciling in-situ reconstructions with imaging 3D remote sensing CME reconstructions. Other effects such as axial curvature and/or expansion could be incorporated in the future to fully understand the magnetic structure.

  6. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  7. Derivative processes for modelling metabolic fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žurauskienė, Justina; Kirk, Paul; Thorne, Thomas; Pinney, John; Stumpf, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: One of the challenging questions in modelling biological systems is to characterize the functional forms of the processes that control and orchestrate molecular and cellular phenotypes. Recently proposed methods for the analysis of metabolic pathways, for example, dynamic flux estimation, can only provide estimates of the underlying fluxes at discrete time points but fail to capture the complete temporal behaviour. To describe the dynamic variation of the fluxes, we additionally require the assumption of specific functional forms that can capture the temporal behaviour. However, it also remains unclear how to address the noise which might be present in experimentally measured metabolite concentrations. Results: Here we propose a novel approach to modelling metabolic fluxes: derivative processes that are based on multiple-output Gaussian processes (MGPs), which are a flexible non-parametric Bayesian modelling technique. The main advantages that follow from MGPs approach include the natural non-parametric representation of the fluxes and ability to impute the missing data in between the measurements. Our derivative process approach allows us to model changes in metabolite derivative concentrations and to characterize the temporal behaviour of metabolic fluxes from time course data. Because the derivative of a Gaussian process is itself a Gaussian process, we can readily link metabolite concentrations to metabolic fluxes and vice versa. Here we discuss how this can be implemented in an MGP framework and illustrate its application to simple models, including nitrogen metabolism in Escherichia coli. Availability and implementation: R code is available from the authors upon request. Contact: j.norkunaite@imperial.ac.uk; m.stumpf@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24578401

  8. Measuring Convective Mass Fluxes Over Tropical Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David

    2017-04-01

    Deep convection forms the upward branches of all large-scale circulations in the tropics. Understanding what controls the form and intensity of vertical convective mass fluxes is thus key to understanding tropical weather and climate. These mass fluxes and the corresponding conditions supporting them have been measured by recent field programs (TPARC/TCS08, PREDICT, HS3) in tropical disturbances considered to be possible tropical storm precursors. In reality, this encompasses most strong convection in the tropics. The measurements were made with arrays of dropsondes deployed from high altitude. In some cases Doppler radar provided additional measurements. The results are in some ways surprising. Three factors were found to control the mass flux profiles, the strength of total surface heat fluxes, the column-integrated relative humidity, and the low to mid-tropospheric moist convective instability. The first two act as expected, with larger heat fluxes and higher humidity producing more precipitation and stronger lower tropospheric mass fluxes. However, unexpectedly, smaller (but still positive) convective instability produces more precipitation as well as more bottom-heavy convective mass flux profiles. Furthermore, the column humidity and the convective instability are anti-correlated, at least in the presence of strong convection. On spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers, the virtual temperature structure appears to be in dynamic balance with the pattern of potential vorticity. Since potential vorticity typically evolves on longer time scales than convection, the potential vorticity pattern plus the surface heat fluxes then become the immediate controlling factors for average convective properties. All measurements so far have taken place in regions with relatively flat sea surface temperature (SST) distributions. We are currently seeking funding for a measurement program in the tropical east Pacific, a region that exhibits strong SST gradients and

  9. Turbulent Fogwater Flux Measurements Above A Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Eugster, W.; Buetzberger, P.; Siegwolf, R.

    Many forest ecosystems in elevated regions receive a significant fraction of their wa- ter and nutrient input by the interception of fogwater. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the suitability of the eddy covariance technique for the direct measure- ment of turbulent liquid water fluxes. Since summer 2001 a fogwater flux measure- ment equipment has been running at a montane site above a mixed forest canopy in Switzerland. The measurement equipment consists of a high-speed size-resolving droplet spectrometer and a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. The chemical composition of the fogwater was determined from samples collected with a modified Caltech active strand collector. The deposition of nutrients by fog (occult deposition) was calculated by multiplying the total fogwater flux (total of measured turbulent and calculated gravitational flux) during each fog event by the ionic concentrations found in the collected fogwater. Several uncertainties still exist as far as the accuracy of the measurements is con- cerned. Although there is no universal statistical approach for testing the quality of the liquid water flux data directly, results of independent data quality checks of the two time series involved in the flux computation and accordingly the two instruments (ultrasonic anemometer and the droplet spectrometer) are presented. Within the measurement period, over 80 fog events with a duration longer than 2.5 hours were analyzed. An enormous physical and chemical heterogeneity among these fog events was found. We assume that some of this heterogeneity is due to the fact that fog or cloud droplets are not conservative entities: the turbulent flux of fog droplets, which can be referred to as the liquid water flux, is affected by phase change processes and coagulation. The measured coexistence of upward fluxes of small fog droplets (di- ameter < 10 µm) with the downward transport of larger droplets indicates the influ- ence of such processes. With the

  10. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  11. CO2 flux from Javanese mud volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M. R.; Arzilli, F.; Chiarugi, A.; Marliyani, G. I.; Anggara, F.; Harijoko, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Studying the quantity and origin of CO2 emitted by back‐arc mud volcanoes is critical to correctly model fluid‐dynamical, thermodynamical, and geochemical processes that drive their activity and to constrain their role in the global geochemical carbon cycle. We measured CO2 fluxes of the Bledug Kuwu mud volcano on the Kendeng Fold and thrust belt in the back arc of Central Java, Indonesia, using scanning remote sensing absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the expelled gas is rich in CO2 with a volume fraction of at least 16 vol %. A lower limit CO2 flux of 1.4 kg s−1 (117 t d−1) was determined, in line with the CO2 flux from the Javanese mud volcano LUSI. Extrapolating these results to mud volcanism from the whole of Java suggests an order of magnitude total CO2 flux of 3 kt d−1, comparable with the expected back‐arc efflux of magmatic CO2. After discussing geochemical, geological, and geophysical evidence we conclude that the source of CO2 observed at Bledug Kuwu is likely a mixture of thermogenic, biogenic, and magmatic CO2, with faulting controlling potential pathways for magmatic fluids. This study further demonstrates the merit of man‐portable active remote sensing instruments for probing natural gas releases, enabling bottom‐up quantification of CO2 fluxes. PMID:28944134

  12. CO2 flux from Javanese mud volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queißer, M.; Burton, M. R.; Arzilli, F.; Chiarugi, A.; Marliyani, G. I.; Anggara, F.; Harijoko, A.

    2017-06-01

    Studying the quantity and origin of CO2 emitted by back-arc mud volcanoes is critical to correctly model fluid-dynamical, thermodynamical, and geochemical processes that drive their activity and to constrain their role in the global geochemical carbon cycle. We measured CO2 fluxes of the Bledug Kuwu mud volcano on the Kendeng Fold and thrust belt in the back arc of Central Java, Indonesia, using scanning remote sensing absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the expelled gas is rich in CO2 with a volume fraction of at least 16 vol %. A lower limit CO2 flux of 1.4 kg s-1 (117 t d-1) was determined, in line with the CO2 flux from the Javanese mud volcano LUSI. Extrapolating these results to mud volcanism from the whole of Java suggests an order of magnitude total CO2 flux of 3 kt d-1, comparable with the expected back-arc efflux of magmatic CO2. After discussing geochemical, geological, and geophysical evidence we conclude that the source of CO2 observed at Bledug Kuwu is likely a mixture of thermogenic, biogenic, and magmatic CO2, with faulting controlling potential pathways for magmatic fluids. This study further demonstrates the merit of man-portable active remote sensing instruments for probing natural gas releases, enabling bottom-up quantification of CO2 fluxes.

  13. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. It should be noted that merely placing a slab of polypropylene in the beam will not yield significant multiplication as neutrons are primarily scattered away

  14. The Flux Database Concerted Action (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.G.; Donnelly, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    The background to the IUR action on the development of a flux database for radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems is summarised. The action is discussed in terms of the objectives, the deliverables and the progress achieved by the flux database working group. The paper describes the background to the current initiative, outlines specific features of the database and supporting documentation, and presents findings from the working group's activities. The aim of the IUR flux database working group is to bring together researchers to collate data from current experimental studies investigating aspects of radionuclide transfer in soil-plant systems. The database will incorporate parameters describing the time-dependent transfer of radionuclides between soil, plant and animal compartments. Work under the EC Concerted Action considers soil-plant interactions. This initiative has become known as the radionuclide flux database. It is emphasised that the word flux is used in this case simply to indicate the flow of radionuclides between compartments in time. (author)

  15. About Merging Threshold and Critical Flux Concepts into a Single One: The Boundary Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Stoller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades much effort was put in understanding fouling phenomena on membranes. One successful approach to describe fouling issues on membranes is the critical flux theory. The possibility to measure a maximum value of the permeate flux for a given system without incurring in fouling issues was a breakthrough in membrane process design. However, in many cases critical fluxes were found to be very low, lower than the economic feasibility of the process. The knowledge of the critical flux value must be therefore considered as a good starting point for process design. In the last years, a new concept was introduced, the threshold flux, which defines the maximum permeate flow rate characterized by a low constant fouling rate regime. This concept, more than the critical flux, is a new practical tool for membrane process designers. In this paper a brief review on critical and threshold flux will be reported and analyzed. And since the concepts share many common aspects, merged into a new concept, called the boundary flux, the validation will occur by the analysis of previously collected data by the authors, during the treatment of olive vegetation wastewater by ultrafiltration and nanofiltration membranes.

  16. Eddy covariance based methane flux in Sundarbans mangroves, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eddy covariance based methane flux in Sundarbans mangroves, India ... Eddy covariance; mangrove forests; methane flux; Sundarbans. ... In order to quantify the methane flux in mangroves, an eddy covariance flux tower was recently erected in the largest unpolluted and undisturbed mangrove ecosystem in Sundarbans ...

  17. Fluxes of nitrogen in Chaliyar River Estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Xavier, J.K.; Joseph, T.; Paimpillii, J.S.

    the instantaneous nutrient fluxes. The net fluxes are the algebraic sums of the instantaneous fluxes over the tidal cycle sampled divided by the number of observations in the tidal cycle. Net fluxes for all the stations with its cross sectional averages for each...

  18. Generating energy dependent neutron flux maps for effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For activation analysis and irradiation scheme of miniature neutron source reactor, designers or engineers usually require information on thermal neutron flux levels and other energy group flux levels (such as fast, resonance and epithermal). A methodology for readily generating such flux maps and flux profiles for any ...

  19. Non-geometric fluxes and mixed-symmetry potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.A.; Penas, V.A.; Riccioni, F.; Risoli, S.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the relation between generalised fluxes and mixed-symmetry potentials. We refer to the fluxes that cannot be described even locally in the framework of supergravity as ‘non-geometric’. We first consider the NS fluxes, and point out that the non-geometric R flux is dual to a mixed-symmetry

  20. Neutron-diffraction investigations of flux-lines in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forgan, E.M. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Lee, S.L. [Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom); McKPaul, D. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom); Mook, H.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cubitt, R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    SANS has proved an extremely useful tool for investigating flux-line structures within the bulk of superconductors. With high-T{sub c} materials, the scattered intensities are weak, but careful measurements are giving important new information about flux lattices, flux pinning and flux-lattice melting. (author). 10 refs.

  1. Standardized Automated CO2/H2O Flux Systems for Individual Research Groups and Flux Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Begashaw, Israel; Fratini, Gerardo; Griessbaum, Frank; Kathilankal, James; Xu, Liukang; Franz, Daniela; Joseph, Everette; Larmanou, Eric; Miller, Scott; Papale, Dario; Sabbatini, Simone; Sachs, Torsten; Sakai, Ricardo; McDermitt, Dayle

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, spatial and temporal flux data coverage improved significantly, and on multiple scales, from a single station to continental networks, due to standardization, automation, and management of data collection, and better handling of the extensive amounts of generated data. With more stations and networks, larger data flows from each station, and smaller operating budgets, modern tools are required to effectively and efficiently handle the entire process. Such tools are needed to maximize time dedicated to authoring publications and answering research questions, and to minimize time and expenses spent on data acquisition, processing, and quality control. Thus, these tools should produce standardized verifiable datasets and provide a way to cross-share the standardized data with external collaborators to leverage available funding, promote data analyses and publications. LI-COR gas analyzers are widely used in past and present flux networks such as AmeriFlux, ICOS, AsiaFlux, OzFlux, NEON, CarboEurope, and FluxNet-Canada, etc. These analyzers have gone through several major improvements over the past 30 years. However, in 2016, a three-prong development was completed to create an automated flux system which can accept multiple sonic anemometer and datalogger models, compute final and complete fluxes on-site, merge final fluxes with supporting weather soil and radiation data, monitor station outputs and send automated alerts to researchers, and allow secure sharing and cross-sharing of the station and data access. Two types of these research systems were developed: open-path (LI-7500RS) and enclosed-path (LI-7200RS). Key developments included: • Improvement of gas analyzer performance • Standardization and automation of final flux calculations onsite, and in real-time • Seamless integration with latest site management and data sharing tools In terms of the gas analyzer performance, the RS analyzers are based on established LI-7500/A and LI-7200

  2. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  3. Automated flux chamber for investigating gas flux at water-air interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Nguyen Thanh; Silverstein, Samuel; Lundmark, Lars; Reyier, Henrik; Crill, Patrick; Bastviken, David

    2013-01-15

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). Representative measurements of GHG fluxes from aquatic ecosystems to the atmosphere are vital for quantitative understanding of relationships between biogeochemistry and climate. Fluxes occur at high temporal variability at diel or longer scales, which are not captured by traditional short-term deployments (often in the order of 30 min) of floating flux chambers. High temporal frequency measurements are necessary but also extremely labor intensive if manual flux chamber based methods are used. Therefore, we designed an inexpensive and easily mobile automated flux chamber (AFC) for extended deployments. The AFC was designed to measure in situ accumulation of gas in the chamber and also to collect gas samples in an array of sample bottles for subsequent analysis in the laboratory, providing two independent ways of CH(4) concentration measurements. We here present the AFC design and function together with data from initial laboratory tests and from a field deployment.

  4. Freezing E3-brane instantons with fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, M.; Martucci, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Collinucci, A. [Theory Group, Physics Department, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Physique Theorique et Mathematique Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2012-07-15

    E3-instantons that generate non-perturbative superpotentials in IIB N = 1 compactifications have a much more frequent occurrence than currently believed. Worldvolume fluxes will typically lift the E3-brane geometric moduli and their fermionic superpartners, leaving only the two required universal fermionic zero-modes. We consistently incorporate SL(2,Z) monodromies and world-volume fluxes in the effective theory of the E3-brane fermions and study the resulting zero modes spectrum, highlighting the relation between F-theory and perturbative IIB results. This leads us to a IIB derivation of the index for generation of superpotential terms, which reproduces and generalizes available results. Furthermore, we show how E3 worldvolume fluxes can be explicitly constructed in a one-modulus compactification, such that the instanton has exactly two fermonic zero-modes. This construction is readily applicable to numerous scenarios. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Heat-Flux Gage thermophosphor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, K.W.

    1991-08-01

    This document describes the installation, hardware requirements, and application of the Heat-Flux Gage (Version 1.0) software package developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Applied Technology Division. The developed software is a single component of a thermographic phosphor-based temperature and heat-flux measurement system. The heat-flux transducer was developed by EG G Energy Measurements Systems and consists of a 1- by 1-in. polymethylpentene sheet coated on the front and back with a repeating thermographic phosphor pattern. The phosphor chosen for this application is gadolinium oxysulphide doped with terbium. This compound has a sensitive temperature response from 10 to 65.6{degree}C (50--150{degree}F) for the 415- and 490-nm spectral emission lines. 3 refs., 17 figs.

  6. Comic ray flux anisotropies caused by astrospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, K.; Strauss, R. D.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Fichtner, H.

    2016-09-01

    Huge astrospheres or stellar wind bubbles influence the propagation of cosmic rays at energies up to the TeV range and can act as small-scale sinks decreasing the cosmic ray flux. We model such a sink (in 2D) by a sphere of radius 10 pc embedded within a sphere of a radius of 1 kpc. The cosmic ray flux is calculated by means of backward stochastic differential equations from an observer, which is located at r0, to the outer boundary. It turns out that such small-scale sinks can influence the cosmic ray flux at the observer's location by a few permille (i.e. a few 0.1%), which is in the range of the observations by IceCube, Milagro and other large area telescopes.

  7. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  8. The FLUKA atmospheric neutrino flux calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G.; Montaruli, T.; Sala, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo model is here described in all details, starting from the latest data on primary cosmic ray spectra. The importance of a 3-D calculation and of its consequences have been already debated in a previous paper. Here instead the focus is on the absolute flux. We stress the relevant aspects of the hadronic interaction model of FLUKA in the atmospheric neutrino flux calculation. This model is constructed and maintained so to provide a high degree of accuracy in the description of particle production. The accuracy achieved in the comparison with data from accelerators and cross checked with data on particle production in atmosphere certifies the reliability of shower calculation in atmosphere. The results presented here can be already used for analysis by current experiments on atmospheric neutrinos. However they represent an intermediate step towards a final release, since this calculation does not yet include the...

  9. MHD energy fluxes for late type dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of MHD wave generation by turbulent motions in stratified stellar atmospheres with embedded uniform magnetic fields is calculated. In contradiction with previous results, it is shown that there is no significant increase in the efficiency of wave generation because of the presence of magnetic fields, at least within the theory's limits of applicability. It is shown that MHD energy fluxes for late-type stars are less than those obtained for acoustic waves in a magnetic-field-free atmosphere, and do not vary enough for a given spectral type in order to explain observed UV and X-ray fluxes. Thus, the results show that MHD energy fluxes obtained if stellar surface magnetic fields are uniform cannot explain the observed stellar coronal emissions.

  10. Color magnetic flux tubes in dense QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto

    2009-01-01

    QCD is expected to be in the color-flavor locking phase in high baryon density, which exhibits color superconductivity. The most fundamental topological objects in the color superconductor are non-Abelian vortices which are topologically stable color magnetic flux tubes. We present numerical solutions of the color magnetic flux tube for diverse choices of the coupling constants based on the Ginzburg-Landau Lagrangian. We also analytically study its asymptotic profiles and find that they are different from the case of usual superconductors. We propose the width of color magnetic fluxes and find that it is larger than naive expectation of the Compton wavelength of the massive gluon when the gluon mass is larger than the scalar mass.

  11. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the

  12. Open string wavefunctions in flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Cámara, Pablo G

    2009-01-01

    We consider compactifications of type I supergravity on manifolds with SU(3) structure, in the presence of RR fluxes and magnetized D9-branes, and analyze the generalized Dirac and Laplace-Beltrami operators associated to the D9-brane worldvolume fields. These compactifications are T-dual to standard type IIB toroidal orientifolds with NSNS and RR 3-form fluxes and D3/D7 branes. By using techniques of representation theory and harmonic analysis, the spectrum of open string wavefunctions can be computed for Lie groups and their quotients, as we illustrate with explicit twisted tori examples. We find a correspondence between irreducible unitary representations of the Kaloper-Myers algebra and families of Kaluza-Klein excitations. We perform the computation of 2- and 3-point couplings for matter fields in the above flux compactifications, and compare our results with those of 4d effective supergravity.

  13. U-dual fluxes and Generalized Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Aldazabal, G; Camara, Pablo G; Grana, M

    2010-01-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of generic string flux compactifications, making use of Exceptional Generalized Geometry (EGG) as an organizing principle. In particular, we establish the precise map between fluxes, gaugings of maximal 4d supergravity and EGG, identifying the complete set of gaugings that admit an uplift to 10d heterotic or type IIB supegravity backgrounds. Our results reveal a rich structure, involving new deformations of 10d supergravity backgrounds, such as the RR counterparts of the $\\beta$-deformation. These new deformations are expected to provide the natural extension of the $\\beta$-deformation to full-fledged F-theory backgrounds. Our analysis also provides some clues on the 10d origin of some of the particularly less understood gaugings of 4d supergravity. Finally, we derive the explicit expression for the effective superpotential in arbitrary N = 1 heterotic or type IIB orientifold compactifications, for all the allowed fluxes.

  14. Hamiltonian boundary term and quasilocal energy flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Nester, James M.; Tung, R.-S.

    2005-01-01

    The Hamiltonian for a gravitating region includes a boundary term which determines not only the quasilocal values but also, via the boundary variation principle, the boundary conditions. Using our covariant Hamiltonian formalism, we found four particular quasilocal energy-momentum boundary term expressions; each corresponds to a physically distinct and geometrically clear boundary condition. Here, from a consideration of the asymptotics, we show how a fundamental Hamiltonian identity naturally leads to the associated quasilocal energy flux expressions. For electromagnetism one of the four is distinguished: the only one which is gauge invariant; it gives the familiar energy density and Poynting flux. For Einstein's general relativity two different boundary condition choices correspond to quasilocal expressions which asymptotically give the ADM energy, the Trautman-Bondi energy and, moreover, an associated energy flux (both outgoing and incoming). Again there is a distinguished expression: the one which is covariant

  15. Evaluating Energy Flux in Vibrofluidized Granular Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular flows require sustained input of energy for fluidization. A level of fluidization depends on the amount of heat flux provided to the flow. In general, the dissipation of the grains upon interaction balances the heat inputs and the resultant flow patterns can be described using hydrodynamic models. However, with the increase in packing fraction, the heat fluxes prediction of the cell increases. Here, a comparison is made for the proposed theoretical models against the MD simulations data. It is observed that the variation of packing fraction in the granular cell influences the heat flux at the base. For the elastic grain-base interaction, the predictions vary appreciably compared to MD simulations, suggesting the need to accurately model the velocity distribution of grains for averaging.

  16. Warped Kähler potentials and fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martucci, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The four-dimensional effective theory for type IIB warped flux compactifications proposed in https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP03(2015)067 is completed by taking into account the backreaction of the Kähler moduli on the three-form fluxes. The only required modification consists in a flux-dependent contribution to the chiral fields parametrising the Kähler moduli. The resulting supersymmetric effective theory satisfies the no-scale condition and consistently combines previous partial results present in the literature. Similar results hold for M-theory warped compactifications on Calabi-Yau fourfolds, whose effective field theory and Kähler potential are also discussed.

  17. Type IIB flux compactifications on twistor bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaanpur, Ali, E-mail: aimaanpu@modares.ac.ir

    2014-02-05

    We construct a U(1) bundle over N(1,1), usually considered as an SO(3) bundle on CP{sup 2}, and show that type IIB supergravity can be consistently compactified over it. With the five form flux turned on, there is a solution for which the metric becomes Einstein. We further turn on 3-form fluxes and show that there is a one parameter family of solutions. In particular, there is a limiting solution of large 3-form fluxes for which two U(1) fiber directions of the metric shrink to zero size. We also discuss compactifications over N(1,1) to AdS{sub 3}. All solutions turn out to be non-supersymmetric.

  18. Enumerating Flux Vacua With Enhanced Symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWolfe, O.

    2004-11-12

    We study properties of flux vacua in type IIB string theory in several simple but illustrative models. We initiate the study of the relative frequencies of vacua with vanishing superpotential W = 0 and with certain discrete symmetries. For the models we investigate we also compute the overall rate of growth of the number of vacua as a function of the D3-brane charge associated to the fluxes, and the distribution of vacua on the moduli space. The latter two questions can also be addressed by the statistical theory developed by Ashok, Denef and Douglas, and our results are in good agreement with their predictions. Analysis of the first two questions requires methods which are more number-theoretic in nature. We develop some elementary techniques of this type, which are based on arithmetic properties of the periods of the compactification geometry at the points in moduli space where the flux vacua are located.

  19. Atmosphere–Surface Fluxes of CO2 using Spectral Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2010-01-01

    Different flux estimation techniques are compared here in order to evaluate air–sea exchange measurement methods used on moving platforms. Techniques using power spectra and cospectra to estimate fluxes are presented and applied to measurements of wind speed and sensible heat, latent heat and CO2...... fluxes. Momentum and scalar fluxes are calculated from the dissipation technique utilizing the inertial subrange of the power spectra and from estimation of the cospectral amplitude, and both flux estimates are compared to covariance derived fluxes. It is shown how even data having a poor signal......-to-noise ratio can be used for flux estimations....

  20. Software applications for flux balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Koh, Geoffrey; Chung, Bevan K S; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2014-01-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a widely used computational method for characterizing and engineering intrinsic cellular metabolism. The increasing number of its successful applications and growing popularity are possibly attributable to the availability of specific software tools for FBA. Each tool has its unique features and limitations with respect to operational environment, user-interface and supported analysis algorithms. Presented herein is an in-depth evaluation of currently available FBA applications, focusing mainly on usability, functionality, graphical representation and inter-operability. Overall, most of the applications are able to perform basic features of model creation and FBA simulation. COBRA toolbox, OptFlux and FASIMU are versatile to support advanced in silico algorithms to identify environmental and genetic targets for strain design. SurreyFBA, WEbcoli, Acorn, FAME, GEMSiRV and MetaFluxNet are the distinct tools which provide the user friendly interfaces in model handling. In terms of software architecture, FBA-SimVis and OptFlux have the flexible environments as they enable the plug-in/add-on feature to aid prospective functional extensions. Notably, an increasing trend towards the implementation of more tailored e-services such as central model repository and assistance to collaborative efforts was observed among the web-based applications with the help of advanced web-technologies. Furthermore, most recent applications such as the Model SEED, FAME, MetaFlux and MicrobesFlux have even included several routines to facilitate the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models. Finally, a brief discussion on the future directions of FBA applications was made for the benefit of potential tool developers.

  1. Can Polar Fields Explain Missing Open Flux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, J.; Downs, C.; Caplan, R. M.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.

    2017-12-01

    The "open" magnetic field is the portion of the Sun's magnetic field that extends out into the heliosphere and becomes the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Both the IMF and the Sun's magnetic field in the photosphere have been measured for many years. In the standard paradigm of coronal structure, the open magnetic field originates primarily in coronal holes. The regions that are magnetically closed trap the coronal plasma and give rise to the streamer belt. This basic picture is qualitatively reproduced by models of coronal structure using photospheric magnetic fields as input. If this paradigm is correct, there are two primary observational constraints on the models: (1) The open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes observed in emission, and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. Linker et al. (2017, ApJ, submitted) investigated the July 2010 time period for a range of observatory maps and both PFSS and MHD models. We found that all of the model/map combinations underestimated the interplanetary magnetic flux, unless the modeled open field regions were larger than observed coronal holes. An estimate of the open magnetic flux made entirely from solar observations (combining detected coronal hole boundaries with observatory synoptic magnetic maps) also underestimated the interplanetary magnetic flux. The magnetic field near the Sun's poles is poorly observed and may not be well represented in observatory maps. In this paper, we explore whether an underestimate of the polar magnetic flux during this time period could account for the overall underestimate of open magnetic flux. Research supported by NASA, AFOSR, and NSF.

  2. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  3. Wet Deposition Flux of Reactive Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, S.; Heald, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Reactive organic carbon (ROC) is the sum of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) and primary and secondary organic aerosols (OA). ROC plays a key role in driving the chemistry of the atmosphere, affecting the hydroxyl radical concentrations, methane lifetime, ozone formation, heterogeneous chemical reactions, and cloud formation, thereby impacting human health and climate. Uncertainties on the lifecycle of ROC in the atmosphere remain large. In part this can be attributed to the large uncertainties associated with the wet deposition fluxes. Little is known about the global magnitude of wet deposition as a sink of both gas and particle phase organic carbon, making this an important area for research and sensitivity testing in order to better understand the global ROC budget. In this study, we simulate the wet deposition fluxes of the reactive organic carbon of the troposphere using a global chemistry transport model, GEOS-Chem. We start by showing the current modeled global distribution of ROC wet deposition fluxes and investigate the sensitivity of these fluxes to variability in Henry's law solubility constants and spatial resolution. The average carbon oxidation state (OSc) is a useful metric that depicts the degree of oxidation of atmospheric reactive carbon. Here, we present for the first time the simulated gas and particle phase OSc of the global troposphere. We compare the OSc in the wet deposited reactive carbon flux and the dry deposited reactive carbon flux to the OSc of atmospheric ROC to gain insight into the degree of oxidation in deposited material and, more generally, the aging of organic material in the troposphere.

  4. Depicting CH4 fluxes and drivers dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengel, S.; Billesbach, D. P.; Hughes, H.; Humphreys, E.; Lee, J.; Noormets, A.; Verfaillie, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Since the advancement in CH4 eddy covariance flux measurements, monitoring of CH4 emissions is becoming more widespread. Since CH4 fluxes are not as predictable or as easily interpretable as CO2 fluxes, understanding their emission patterns often still challenging. As these are spatially (ecosystem and latitudinal) and temporal very divers and often event based, a better understanding or interpretation of results is required. An improvement in understanding does also increase the reliability of gap-filling methods as annual greenhouse gas budgets rely on high quality data. There are generalised additive models (Wood 2001) that can easily be applied to sites, models where a relationship between the response variable, in this case CH4 and explanatory variables (drivers) is established. Relevant for CH4flux dynamics are the smoothing function that is applied, where each predictor variable is separated into sections and a polynomial function fitted. On the one hand such models are rarely used as they are difficult to interpret since no parameter values are retuned. On the other hand, such models are very good for prediction and explanatory analysis in estimating the functional nature of a response. Applying such models to CH4 eddy flux data does improve our understanding of the dynamics of CH4 emissions and the respective meteorological drivers. Furthermore, such models combined with tree models (interactions between the explanatory variables), can visualise precise dynamics and easily applied to individual sites. These models are simple tools in understanding of these complex fluxes, as they can include a variety of drivers, and their relevance tested by the model. Model input variables should be as independent as possible (avoiding cross-correlation), avoiding redundant inputs, as models should follow the principle of parsimony of being simple but not too simple. Wood SN (2001). mgcv: GAMs and generalized ridge regression for R. R news.

  5. Diffusive flux of energy in binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, R.S.

    1976-04-01

    The diffusive flux of energy j tilde is studied through the reduced diffusive flux of energy K tilde, which obeys equations of the form: sim(delta K tilde/delta grad rho sub(α))= sim(delta K tilde/delta grad theta)=0. By a representation theorem, herein proved, is obtained a general representation for K tilde which is simplified, for the case of binary mixtures, using the principle of objectivity. Some consequences of this representation are discussed such as the symmetry of the partial stresses T 1 tilde and T 2 tilde and the difference between the normal stresses [pt

  6. Observation of a Coulomb flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensite, Jeff; Chung, Kristian

    2018-03-01

    In Coulomb gauge there is a longitudinal color electric field associated with a static quark-antiquark pair. We have measured the spatial distribution of this field, and find that it falls off exponentially with transverse distance from a line joining the two quarks. In other words there is a Coulomb flux tube, with a width that is somewhat smaller than that of the minimal energy flux tube associated with the asymptotic string tension. A confinement criterion for gauge theories with matter fields is also proposed.

  7. Atmospheric electron flux at airplane altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, R.; Chiba, J.; Ogawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Kifune, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Nishimura, J.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a new detector to systematically measure the cosmic-ray electron flux at airplane altitudes. We loaded a lead-glass-based electron telescope onto a commercial cargo airplane. The first experiment was carried out using the air route between Narita (Japan) and Sydney (Australia); during this flight we measured the electron flux at various altitudes and latitudes. The thresholds of the electron energies were 1, 2, and 4 GeV. The results agree with a simple estimation using one-dimensional shower theory. A comparison with a Monte Carlo calculation was made

  8. Growth of zircaloy 4 under neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morize, P.; Baicry, J.; Morlot, G.; Sciers, P.; Lehmann, D.

    1982-06-01

    Between 300 and 385 0 C, and under neutron fluxes between 0.5 and 2.10 14 n/cm 2 /s, the growth of zircaloy tubes is nil in the plane perpendicular to the axis, and can be represented by the equation: Δl/l=4.6610 -14 (phit)sup(0.49) in the axial direction. In the area investigated, neither the irradiation temperature nor the instantaneous flux has any effect on the metallurgical state (relieved or recrystallized) [fr

  9. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  10. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'Dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W., Jr.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  11. Flux pinning characteristics of YBCO coated conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Watanabe, T.; Fukumoto, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E.S.; Kiss, T.; Watanabe, T.; Miyata, S.; Ibi, A.; Muroga, T.; Yamada, Y.; Shiohara, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Flux pinning properties of PLD-processed YBCO coated conductors deposited on IBAD substrate are investigated. The thickness of YBCO layer is changed in the range of 0.27-1.0 μm. The thickness dependence of critical current density, n-value and irreversibility field are measured in a wide range of magnetic field. The results are compared with the theoretical flux creep-flow model. It is found that these pinning properties are strongly influenced by the thickness as well as the pinning strength. Optimum condition for high field application of this superconductor is discussed

  12. Planck intermediate results - LII. Planet flux densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akrami, Y.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of flux density are described for five planets, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, across the six Planck High Frequency Instrument frequency bands (100–857 GHz) and these are then compared with models and existing data. In our analysis, we have also included estimates of the...... experiments. In particular, we observe that the flux densities measured by Planck HFI and WMAP agree to within 2%. These results allow experiments operating in the mm-wavelength range to cross-calibrate against Planck and improve models of radiative transport used in planetary science....

  13. Flux pinning and flux flow studies in superconductors using flux flow noise techniques. Progress report, April 1-December 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joiner, W.C.H.

    1979-12-01

    Flux flow noise power spectra were investigated, and information obtained through such spectra is applied to describe flux flow and pinning in situations where volume pinning force data is also available. In one case, the application of noise data to PB 80 In 20 samples after recovery and after high temperature annealing is discussed. This work is consistent with a recent model for flux flow noise generation. In the second case we discuss experiments designed to change the fluxoid transit path length, which according to the model should affect both the noise amplitude and the parameter α specifying the longest subpulse times in terms of the average transit time, tau/sub c/. Transient flux flow voltages when a current is switched on after field cycling a Pb 60 In 40 sample have been discovered. Noise spectra have been measured during the transient. These observations are discussed along with a simple model which fits the data. A surprising result is that the transient decay times increase with the applied current. Other characteristics of Pb 60 In 40 after cold working are also discussed

  14. An Overview of Flux Pumps for HTS Coils

    OpenAIRE

    Coombs, Timothy Arthur; Geng, Jianzhao; Fu, L; Matsuda, K

    2016-01-01

    High-Tc superconducting (HTS) flux pumps are capable of injecting flux into closed HTS magnets without electrical contact. It is becoming a promising alternative of current source in powering HTS coils. This paper reviews the recent progress in flux pumps for HTS coil magnets. Different types of HTS flux pumps are introduced. The physics of these flux pumps are explained and comparisons are made. J. Geng would like to acknowledge Cambridge Trust for offering Cambridge International Scholar...

  15. Integrated passive flux measurement in groundwater: design and performance of iFLUX samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreydt, Goedele; Razaei, Meisam; Meire, Patrick; Van Keer, Ilse; Bronders, Jan; Seuntjens, Piet

    2017-04-01

    The monitoring and management of soil and groundwater is a challenge. Current methods for the determination of movement or flux of pollution in groundwater use no direct measurements but only simulations based on concentration measurements and Darcy velocity estimations. This entails large uncertainties which cause remediation failures and higher costs for contaminated site owners. On top of that, the lack of useful data makes it difficult to get approval for a risk-based management approach which completely avoids costly remedial actions. The iFLUX technology is a key development of Dr. Goedele Verreydt at the University of Antwerp and VITO. It is supported by the passive flux measurement technology as invented by Prof. Mike Annable and his team at the University of Florida. The iFLUX technology includes an in situ measurement device for capturing dynamic groundwater quality and quantity, the iFLUX sampler, and an associated interpretation and visualization method. The iFLUX sampler is a modular passive sampler that provides simultaneous in situ point determinations of a time-averaged target compound mass flux and water flux. The sampler is typically installed in a monitoring well where it intercepts the groundwater flow and captures the compounds of interest. The sampler consists of permeable cartridges which are each packed with a specific sorbent matrix. The sorbent matrix of the water flux cartridge is impregnated with known amounts of water soluble resident tracers. These tracers are leached from the matrix at rates proportional to the groundwater flux. The measurements of the contaminants and the remaining resident tracer are used to determine groundwater and target compound fluxes. Exposure times range from 1 week to 6 months, depending on the expected concentration and groundwater flow velocity. The iFLUX sampler technology has been validated and tested at several field projects. Currently, 4 cartridges are tested and available: 1 waterflux cartridge to

  16. A flux footprint analysis to understand ecosystem fluxes in an intensively managed landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Rodriguez, L. C.; Goodwell, A. E.; Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    Flux tower studies in agricultural sites have mainly been done at plot scale, where the footprint of the instruments is small such that the data reveals the behaviour of the nearby crop on which the study is focused. In the Midwestern United States, the agricultural ecosystem and its associated drainage, evapotranspiration, and nutrient dynamics are dominant influences on interactions between the soil, land, and atmosphere. In this study, we address large-scale ecohydrologic fluxes and states in an intensively managed landscape based on data from a 25m high eddy covariance flux tower. We show the calculated upwind distance and flux footprint for a flux tower located in Central Illinois as part of the Intensively Managed Landscapes Critical Zone Observatory (IMLCZO). In addition, we calculate the daily energy balance during the summer of 2016 from the flux tower measurements and compare with the modelled energy balance from a representative corn crop located in the flux tower footprint using the Multi-Layer Canopy model, MLCan. The changes in flux footprint over the course of hours, days, and the growing season have significant implications for the measured fluxes of carbon and energy at the flux tower. We use MLCan to simulate these fluxes under land covers of corn and soybeans. Our results demonstrate how the instrument heights impact the footprint of the captured eddy covariance fluxes, and we explore the implication for hydrological analysis. The convective turbulent atmosphere during the daytime shows a wide footprint of more than 10 km2, which reaches 3km length for the 90% contribution, where buoyancy is the dominant mechanism driving turbulence. In contrast, the stable atmosphere during the night-time shows a narrower footprint that goes beyond 8km2 and grows in the direction of the prevalent wind, which exceeds 4 km in length. This study improves our understanding of agricultural ecosystem behaviour in terms of the magnitude and variability of fluxes and

  17. Apparatus for measuring low thermal fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranovitch, R.; Warnery, M.

    1972-01-01

    Device for the measurement of slight wall heat fluxes, made up of a metallic contact plate combined with a shaft; temperature measurement elements are spaced along the shaft which is kept at a cold adjustable reference temperature lower than that of the walls; heat insulation is provided for the exposed part of the plate and for the shaft [fr

  18. Terrestrial water fluxes dominated by transpiration: Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Schlaepfer; Brent E. Ewers; Bryan N. Shuman; David G. Williams; John M. Frank; William J. Massman; William K. Lauenroth

    2014-01-01

    The fraction of evapotranspiration (ET) attributed to plant transpiration (T) is an important source of uncertainty in terrestrial water fluxes and land surface modeling (Lawrence et al. 2007, Miralles et al. 2011). Jasechko et al. (2013) used stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios from 73 large lakes to investigate the relative roles of evaporation (E) and T in ET...

  19. EUV mirror based absolute incident flux detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-03-23

    A device for the in-situ monitoring of EUV radiation flux includes an integrated reflective multilayer stack. This device operates on the principle that a finite amount of in-band EUV radiation is transmitted through the entire multilayer stack. This device offers improvements over existing vacuum photo-detector devices since its calibration does not change with surface contamination.

  20. Solitary wave propagation in solar flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdelyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time-dependent dynamic evolution, and interaction of nonlinear propagating (i.e., solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint, which is typical for photospheric regions. Nonlinear waves that develop into solitary waves are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2.0D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions, axisymmetric solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes in a magnetic flux tube are applied. In the present case, we focus on the sausage mode only. The dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. The equilibrium state is perturbed by a Gaussian at the flux tube footpoint. Two solitary solutions are found by solving the full nonlinear MHD equations. First, the nonlinear wave propagation with external sound speed is investigated. Next, the solitary wave propagating close to the tube speed, also found in the numerical solution, is studied. In contrast to previous analytical and numerical works, here no approximations were made to find the solitary solutions. A natural application of the present study may be spicule formation in the low chromosphere. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested

  1. Annual Cycles of Surface Shortwave Radiative Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Gupta, Shashi K.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The annual cycles of surface shortwave flux are investigated using the 8-yr dataset of the surface radiation budget (SRB) components for the period July 1983-June 1991. These components include the downward, upward, and net shortwave radiant fluxes at the earth's surface. The seasonal cycles are quantified in terms of principal components that describe the temporal variations and empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) that describe the spatial patterns. The major part of the variation is simply due to the variation of the insolation at the top of the atmosphere, especially for the first term, which describes 92.4% of the variance for the downward shortwave flux. However, for the second term, which describes 4.1% of the variance, the effect of clouds is quite important and the effect of clouds dominates the third term, which describes 2.4% of the variance. To a large degree the second and third terms are due to the response of clouds to the annual cycle of solar forcing. For net shortwave flux at the surface, similar variances are described by each term. The regional values of the EOFs are related to climate classes, thereby defining the range of annual cycles of shortwave radiation for each climate class.

  2. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  3. Predicting flux decline of reverse osmosis membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.C.; Hanemaayer, J.H.; Smolders, C.A.; Kostense, A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model predicting flux decline of reverse osmosis membranes due to colloidal fouling has been verified. This mathema- tical model is based on the theory of cake or gel filtration and the Modified Fouling Index (MFI). Research was conducted using artificial colloidal solutions and a

  4. Self-powered neutron flux detector assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; McIntyre, I.L.

    1980-01-01

    A self-powered neutron flux detector has both the central emitter electrode and its surrounding collector electrode made of inconel 600. The lead cables may also be made of inconel. Other nickel alloys, or iron, nickel, titamium, chromium, zirconium or their alloys may also be used for the electrodes

  5. Radiation linewidth of flux-flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Dmitriev, P.N.; Ermakov, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    (applied magnetic field) are taken. A profile of the FFO radiation line is measured in different regimes of FFO operation and compared to the theoretical models. A Lorentzian shape of the FFO line is observed both at Fiske steps (FSs) in the resonant regime and on the flux-flow step (FFS) at high voltages...

  6. SLC positron source flux concentrator modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Lamare, J.; Kulikov, A.; Cassel, R.; Nesterov, V.

    1991-06-01

    The modulator for the SLC e+ source flux concentrator provides 16 kA in a 5 μs sinusoidal half wave current for a pure inductive load, at 120 Hz. The modulator incorporates 10 EEV CX1622 thyratrons in a switching network. It provides reliable operation with acceptable thyratron lifetime. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. AVERAGE FLUXES FROM HETEROGENEOUS VEGETATED REGIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLAASSEN, W

    Using a surface-layer model, fluxes of heat and momentum have been calculated for flat regions with regularly spaced step changes in surface roughness and stomatal resistance. The distance between successive step changes is limited to 10 km in order to fill the gap between micro-meteorological

  8. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2000) 21, 299 302. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation. Α. Mangalam* & V. Krishan†, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala,. Bangalore 560 034, India. *e mail: mangalam @ iiap. ernet. in. † e mail: vinod@iiap.ernet.in. Abstract. We study the relaxation of a compressible plasma to ...

  9. Optical magnetic flux generation in superconductor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The generation of the magnetic flux quanta inside the superconductors is studied as a new effect to destroy superconductivity using femtosecond (fs) laser. The vortices are successfully generated in the YBa2Cu3O7−δ thin film striplines by the fs laser. It is revealed that the vortex distribution in the strip reflects the fs ...

  10. Physicochemical Flux and Phytoplankton diversity in Shagari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2007-03-20

    Mar 20, 2007 ... Physicochemical Flux and Phytoplankton diversity in Shagari Reservoir,Sokoto, Nigeria. *1I.M. Magami, 1T. Adamu and 2A.A. Aliero. 1Zoology Unit, Department of Biological Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria. 2Botany Unit, Department of Biological Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo ...

  11. Examining gas flux responses to restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands play an important role in the flux of gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Wetland ecosystems are characterized by slow decomposition and, often, high productivity, making them net sinks of carbon dioxide. However, under some conditions, such as ti...

  12. Modelling radiocesium fluxes in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.; Kliashtorin, A.; Mamikhin, S.; Shcheglov, A.; Rafferty, B.; Dvornik, A.; Zhuchenko, T.; Kuchma, N.

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of radiocesium inventories and fluxes has been carried out in forest ecosystems in Ukraine, Belarus and Ireland to determine distributions and rates of migration. This information has been used to construct and calibrate mathematical models which are being used to predict the likely longevity of contamination of forests and forest products such as timber following the Chernobyl accident

  13. MAGNETIC FLUX CANCELLATION IN ELLERMAN BOMBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, A.; Mathioudakis, M.; Nelson, C. J.; Henriques, V. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Doyle, J. G. [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh, BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Scullion, E. [Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Ray, T., E-mail: areid29@qub.ac.uk [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2016-06-01

    Ellerman Bombs (EBs) are often found to be co-spatial with bipolar photospheric magnetic fields. We use H α imaging spectroscopy along with Fe i 6302.5 Å spectropolarimetry from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), combined with data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory , to study EBs and the evolution of the local magnetic fields at EB locations. EBs are found via an EB detection and tracking algorithm. Using NICOLE inversions of the spectropolarimetric data, we find that, on average, (3.43 ± 0.49) × 10{sup 24} erg of stored magnetic energy disappears from the bipolar region during EB burning. The inversions also show flux cancellation rates of 10{sup 14}–10{sup 15} Mx s{sup −1} and temperature enhancements of 200 K at the detection footpoints. We investigate the near-simultaneous flaring of EBs due to co-temporal flux emergence from a sunspot, which shows a decrease in transverse velocity when interacting with an existing, stationary area of opposite polarity magnetic flux, resulting in the formation of the EBs. We also show that these EBs can be fueled further by additional, faster moving, negative magnetic flux regions.

  14. Demystifying Electric Flux and Gauss's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Many physics students have experienced the difficulty of internalizing concepts in electrostatics. After studying concrete, measurable details in mechanics, they are challenged by abstract ideas such as electric fields, flux, Gauss's law, and electric potential. There are a few well-known hands-on activities that help students get experience with…

  15. What controls sediment flux in dryland channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, K.; Singer, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Theories for the development of longitudinal and grain size profiles in perennial fluvial systems are well developed, allowing for generalization of sediment flux and sorting in these fluvial systems over decadal to millennial time scales under different forcings (e.g., sediment supply, climate changes, etc). However, such theoretical frameworks are inadequate for understanding sediment flux in dryland channels subject to spatially and temporally discontinuous streamflow, where transport capacity is usually much lower than sediment supply. In such fluvial systems, channel beds are poorly sorted with weak vertical layering, poorly defined bar forms, minimal downstream fining, and straight longitudinal profiles. Previous work in dryland channels has documented sediment flux at higher rates than their humid counterparts once significant channel flow develops, pulsations in bed material transport under constant discharge, and oscillations in dryland channel width that govern longitudinal patterns in erosion and deposition. These factors point to less well appreciated controls on sediment flux in dryland valley floors that invite further study. This paper investigates the relative roles of hydrology, bed material grain size, and channel width on sediment flux rates in the Rambla de Nogalte in southeastern Spain. Topographic valley cross sections and hillslope and channel particle sizes were collected from an ephemeral-river reach. Longitudinal grain-size variation on the hillslopes and on the channel bed were analysed in order to determine the relationship between hillslope supply characteristics and channel grain-size distribution and longitudinal changes. Local fractional estimates of bed-material transport in the channel were calculated using a range of channel discharge scenarios in order to examine the effect of channel hydrology on sediment transport. Numerical modelling was conducted to investigate runoff connectivity from hillslopes to channel and to examine the

  16. The Solar-flux Third Granulation Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David F.; Oostra, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The velocity shifts of spectral lines as a function of line strength, so-called the third signature of granulation, are investigated using three published solar-flux atlases. We use flux atlases because we wish to treat the Sun as a star, against which stellar observations can be compared and judged. The atlases are critiqued and compared to the lower-resolution observations taken with the Elginfield stellar spectrograph. Third-signature plots are constructed for the 6020–6340 Å region. No dependence on excitation potential or wavelength is found over this wavelength span. The shape of the plots from the three solar atlases is essentially the same, with rms line-core velocity differences of 30–35 m s‑1. High-resolution atlas data are degraded to the level of the Elginfield spectrograph and compared to direct observations taken with that spectrograph. The line-core velocities show good agreement, with rms differences of 38 m s‑1. A new standard curve is derived and compared with the previously published one. Only small differences in shape are found, but a significant (+97 m s‑1) change in the zero point is indicated. The bisector of the Fe I 6253 line is mapped onto the third-signature plots and flux deficits are derived, which measure the granule/lane flux imbalance. The lower spectral resolution lowers the flux deficit area slightly and moves the peak of the deficit 0.3–0.5 km s‑1 toward higher velocities. These differences, while significant, are not large compared to measurement errors for stellar data.

  17. Flux trapping and shielding in irreversible superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    Flux trappings and shielding experiments were carried out on Pb, Nb, Pb-Bi, Nb-Sn, and Nb-Ti samples of various shapes. Movable Hall probes were used to measure fields near or inside the samples as a function of position and of applied field. The trapping of transverse multipole magnetic fields in tubular samples was accomplished by cooling the samples in an applied field and then smoothly reducing the applied field to zero. Transverse quadrupole and sextupole fields with gradients of over 2000 G/cm were trapped with typical fidelity to the original impressed field of a few percent. Transverse dipole fields of up to 17 kG were also trapped with similar fidelity. Shielding experiments were carried out by cooling the samples in zero field and then gradually applying an external field. Flux trapping and shielding abilities were found to be limited by two factors, the pinning strength of the material, and the susceptibility of a sample to flux jumping. The trapping and shielding behavior of flat disk samples in axial fields and thin-walled tubular samples in transverse fields was modeled. The models, which were based on the concept of the critical state, allowed a connection to be made between the pinning strength and critical current level, and the flux trapping and shielding abilities. Adiabatic and dynamic stability theories are discussed and applied to the materials tested. Good qualitative, but limited quantitative agreement was obtained between the predictions of the theoretical stability criteria and the observed flux jumping behavior

  18. How Giant Magnetospheres Maintain Their Magnetic Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic flux lost from a planet must be returned [Maxwell's first law, there are no magnetic monopoles (div(B) = 0)], and the dominant mechanism by which this is achieved is still to be determined. Here we compare a mechanism for magnetic flux return via small-scale plasma circulation. The existence of bi-modal superposed electron distributions at Jupiter and Saturn was a surprise to Voyager researchers [e.g. Sittler et al., 1983] that remains something of a mystery to this day. Electrons are virtually massless and are expected to rapidly thermalize to a single distribution. Observations by the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn have elucidated on the source of the hot electron component - small scale isolated flux tubes (commonly referred to as `injection events') that bubble planetward, returning magnetic flux that had been convected outward by centrifugal forces or stripped away during magnetospheric reconfigurations, such as substorms [Rymer et al., 2008]. Saturn is an ideal place to study injection events; relatively quiescent, aligned magnetic and geographic spins axes and a nice fast rotation rate in comparison to plasma drift speeds. The other magnetospheric laboratories in our solar system (Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune) will be more challenging. In this presentation we describe predictions for how plasma injection will be manifest as a function of magnetic field strength, topology and planetary spin rate and its importance in conservation of magnetic flux globally. Sittler, E. C., Jr., K. W. Ogilvie, and J. D. Scudder, 1983. Survey of low-energy plasma electrons in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyager 1 and 2, J. Geophys. Res., 88, 8847- 8870. Rymer, A. M., Mauk, B. H. , Hill, T. W., Paranicas, C., Mitchell, D. G., Coates, A. J., Young, D. T. , 2008. Electron circulation in Saturn's magnetosphere. J. Geophys. Res.113, A01201.

  19. Comparison between Evapotranspiration Fluxes Assessment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casola, A.; Longobardi, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge of hydrological processes acting in the water balance is determinant for a rational water resources management plan. Among these, the water losses as vapour, in the form of evapotranspiration, play an important role in the water balance and the heat transfers between the land surface and the atmosphere. Mass and energy interactions between soil, atmosphere and vegetation, in fact, influence all hydrological processes modificating rainfall interception, infiltration, evapotraspiration, surface runoff and groundwater recharge.A numbers of methods have been developed in scientific literature for modelling evapotranspiration. They can be divided in three main groups: i) traditional meteorological models, ii) energy fluxes balance models, considering interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere, and iii) remote sensing based models. The present analysis preliminary performs a study of fluxes directions and an evaluation of energy balance closure in a typical Mediterranean short vegetation area, using data series recorded from an eddy covariance station, located in the Campania region, Southern Italy. The analysis was performed on different seasons of the year with the aim to assess climatic forcing features impact on fluxes balance, to evaluate the smaller imbalance and to highlight influencing factors and sampling errors on balance closure. The present study also concerns evapotranspiration fluxes assessment at the point scale. Evapotranspiration is evaluated both from empirical relationships (Penmann-Montheit, Penmann F AO, Prestley&Taylor) calibrated with measured energy fluxes at mentioned experimental site, and from measured latent heat data scaled by the latent heat of vaporization. These results are compared with traditional and reliable well known models at the plot scale (Coutagne, Turc, Thorthwaite).

  20. Flux quantisation in superconductivity rings and the mixed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture introduces the concept of the macroscopic superconducting wave function and describes how this accounts for the Meissner Effect and flux quantisation. The experimental confirmation of flux quantisation in LTC, HTC and hybrid LTC/HTC rings will be briefly discussed. Flux quantisation in the superconducting mixed state leads to the formation of the Abrikosov flux in line lattice. Experiments confirming the flux line lattice in HTC superconductors by magnetic decoration and recent low angle neutron diffraction will be described. An extension of the mixed state model to granular superconductors with giant flux lines will also be briefly considered. (orig.)

  1. The limitation and modification of flux-limited diffusion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengan; Huang Wenkai

    1986-01-01

    The limitation of various typical flux-limited diffusion theory and advantages of asymptotic diffusion theory with time absorption constant are analyzed and compared. The conclusions are as following: Though the flux-limited problem in neutron diffusion theory are theoretically solved by derived flux-limited diffusion equation, it's going too far to limit flux due to the inappropriate assumption in deriving flux-limited diffusion equation. The asymptotic diffusion theory with time absorption constant has eliminated the above-mentioned limitation, and it is more accurate than flux-limited diffusion theory in describing neutron transport problem

  2. Inverse modeling of the terrestrial carbon flux in China with flux covariance among inverted regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Jiang, F.; Chen, J. M.; Ju, W.; Wang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of the role of ocean and terrestrial biosphere in the global carbon cycle, their response and feedback to climate change is required for the future projection of the global climate. China has the largest amount of anthropogenic CO2 emission, diverse terrestrial ecosystems and an unprecedented rate of urbanization. Thus information on spatial and temporal distributions of the terrestrial carbon flux in China is of great importance in understanding the global carbon cycle. We developed a nested inversion with focus in China. Based on Transcom 22 regions for the globe, we divide China and its neighboring countries into 17 regions, making 39 regions in total for the globe. A Bayesian synthesis inversion is made to estimate the terrestrial carbon flux based on GlobalView CO2 data. In the inversion, GEOS-Chem is used as the transport model to develop the transport matrix. A terrestrial ecosystem model named BEPS is used to produce the prior surface flux to constrain the inversion. However, the sparseness of available observation stations in Asia poses a challenge to the inversion for the 17 small regions. To obtain additional constraint on the inversion, a prior flux covariance matrix is constructed using the BEPS model through analyzing the correlation in the net carbon flux among regions under variable climate conditions. The use of the covariance among different regions in the inversion effectively extends the information content of CO2 observations to more regions. The carbon flux over the 39 land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2004 to 2009. In order to investigate the impact of introducing the covariance matrix with non-zero off-diagonal values to the inversion, the inverted terrestrial carbon flux over China is evaluated against ChinaFlux eddy-covariance observations after applying an upscaling methodology.

  3. Sensors for Metering Heat Flux Area Density and Metrological Equipment for the Heat Flux Density Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, D. O.

    2018-04-01

    The demand in measuring and studies of heat conduction of various media is very urgent now. This article considers the problem of heat conduction monitoring and measurement in various media and materials in any industries and branches of science as well as metrological support of the heat flux measurement equipment. The main study objects are both the sensors manufactured and facilities onto which these sensors will be installed: different cladding structures of the buildings, awnings, rocket fairings, boiler units, internal combustion engines. The Company develops and manufactures different types of heat flux sensors: thermocouple, thin-film, heterogeneous gradient as well as metrological equipment for the gauging calibration of the heat flux density measurement. The calibration shall be performed using both referencing method in the unit and by fixed setting of the heat flux in the unit. To manufacture heterogeneous heat flux gradient sensors (HHFGS) the Company developed and designed a number of units: diffusion welding unit, HHFGS cutting unit. Rather good quality HHFGS prototypes were obtained. At this stage the factory tests on the equipment for the heat flux density measurement equipment are planned. A high-sensitivity heat flux sensor was produced, now it is tested at the Construction Physics Research Institute (Moscow). It became possible to create thin-film heat flux sensors with the sensitivity not worse than that of the sensors manufactured by Captec Company (France). The Company has sufficient premises to supply the market with a wide range of sensors, to master new sensor manufacture technologies which will enable their application range.

  4. Nitric oxide fluxes from an agricultural soil using a flux-gradient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N. M.; Wagner-Riddle, C.; Thurtell, G. W.; Beauchamp, E. G.

    1999-05-01

    Soil emission of nitric oxide may be a significant source of NOx in rural areas. Agricultural practices may enhance these emissions by addition of nitrogen fertilizers. A system that enables continuous measurement of NO fluxes from agricultural surfaces using the flux-gradient method was developed. Hourly differences in NO concentrations in air sampled at two intake heights (0.6 and 1 m) were determined using a chemiluminescence analyzer. Eddy diffusivities were determined using wind profiles (cup anemometers), and stability corrections calculated using a 5 cm path sonic anemometer. Fast switching of sampling between air intake heights (every 30 s) and determination of concentration values at a frequency of 2 Hz minimized the errors due to fluctuations in background concentration. Low travel times for air samples in the tubing (˜8 s) were estimated to result in small errors in flux values (chemical reactions. The overall resolution of the system was estimated as ˜1 ng N m-2s-1. NO fluxes from a bare soil were measured quasi-continuously from January to June 1995 at Elora, Canada, comprising a total of 1833 hourly values. Daily NO fluxes before nitrogen fertilization were small, increasing after nitrogen fertilizer was added (>10 ng N m-2 s-1). Monthly NO fluxes estimated were similar to those observed in previous studies. The designed system could be easily modified to measure NOx and NO fluxes by using an additional chemiluminescence analyzer. The system also could be adapted to measure fluxes sequentially from various plots, enabling testing of agricultural practices on NO emissions.

  5. Effect of chamber enclosure time on soil respiration flux: A comparison of linear and non-linear flux calculation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandel, Tanka P; Lærke, Poul Erik; Elsgaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    -deployment fluxes by linear regression techniques. Thus, usually the cumulative flux curve becomes downward concave due to the decreased gas diffusion rate. Non-linear models based on biophysical theory usually fit to such curvatures and may reduce the underestimation of fluxes. In this study, we examined...... the effect of increasing chamber enclosure time on SR flux rates calculated using a linear, an exponential and a revised Hutchinson and Mosier model (HMR). Soil respiration rates were measured with a closed chamber in combination with an infrared gas analyzer. During SR flux measurements the chamber......) to obtain a range of fluxes with different shapes of flux curves. The linear method provided more stable flux results during short enclosure times (few min) but underestimated initial fluxes by 15–300% after 45 min deployment time. Non-linear models reduced the underestimation as average underestimation...

  6. Regional nitrous oxide flux in Amazon basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felippe, Monica Tais Siqueira D'Amelio

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Globally, the main sources of N 2 O are nitrification and denitrification in soils. About two thirds of the soil emissions occur in the tropics and approximately 20% originate in wet rain forest ecosystems, like the Amazon forest. The work presented here involves aircraft vertical profiles of N 2 O from the surface to 4 km over two sites in the Eastern and Central Amazon: Tapajos National Forest (2000-2009) and Cuieiras Biologic Reserve (2004-2007), and the estimation of N 2 O fluxes for regions upwind of these sites using two methods: Column Integration Technique and Inversion Model - FLEXPART. To our knowledge, these regional scale N 2 O measurements in Amazonia are unique and represent a new approach to looking regional scale emissions. For the both methods, the fluxes upwind of Cuieiras Biologic Reserve exhibited little seasonality, and the annual mean was 1.9 ±1.6 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 for the Column Integration Technique and 2.3±0.9 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 for Inversion Model - FLEXPART. For fluxes upwind of Tapajos Nacional Forest, the Inversion Model - FLEXPART presented about half (0.9±1.7 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 ) of the Column Integration Technique (2.0±1.1 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 ) for the same period (2004-2008). One reason could be because the inversion model does not consider anthropic activities, once it had a good representation for less impacted area. Both regions presented similar emission during wet season. By Column Integration Technique, fluxes upwind Tapajos Nacional Forest were similar for dry and wet seasons. The dry season N 2 O fluxes exhibit significant correlations with CO fluxes, indicating a larger than expected source of N 2 O from biomass burning. The average CO:N 2 O ratio for all 38 profiles sampled during the dry season was 82±69 mol CO:molN 2 O and suggests a larger biomass burning contribution to the global N 2 O budget than previously reported. (author)

  7. Gauge fluxes in F-theory compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ling

    2016-07-13

    In this thesis, we study the geometry and physics of gauge fluxes in F-theory compactifications to four dimensions. Motivated by the phenomenological requirement of chiral matter in realistic model building scenarios, we develop methods for a systematic analysis of primary vertical G{sub 4}-fluxes on torus-fibred Calabi-Yau fourfolds. In particular, we extend the well-known description of fluxes on elliptic fibrations with sections to the more general set-up of genus-one fibrations with multi-sections. The latter are known to give rise to discrete abelian symmetries in F-theory. We test our proposal for constructing fluxes in such geometries on an explicit model with SU(5) x Z{sub 2} symmetry, which is connected to an ordinary elliptic fibration with SU(5) x U(1) symmetry by a conifold transition. With our methods we systematically verify anomaly cancellation and tadpole matching in both models. Along the way, we find a novel way of understanding anomaly cancellation in 4D F-theory in purely geometric terms. This observation is further strengthened by a similar analysis of an SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1){sup 2} model. The obvious connection of this particular model with the Standard Model is then investigated in a more phenomenologically motivated survey. There, we will first provide possible matchings of the geometric spectrum with the Standard Model states, which highlights the role of the additional U(1) factor as a selection rule. In a second step, we then utilise our novel methods on flux computations to set up a search algorithm for semi-realistic chiral spectra in our Standard- Model-like fibrations over specific base manifolds B. As a demonstration, we scan over three choices P{sup 3}, Bl{sub 1}P{sup 3} and Bl{sub 2}P{sup 3} for the base. As a result we find a consistent flux that gives the chiral Standard Model spectrum with a vector-like triplet exotic, which may be lifted by a Higgs mechanism.

  8. Effects of quartz on crystallization behavior of mold fluxes and microstructural characteristics of flux film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Liu; Xiuli, Han; Mingduo, Li; Di, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Mold fluxes are mainly prepared using cement clinker, quartz, wollastonite, borax, fluorite, soda ash and other mineral materials. Quartz, as one of the most common and essential materials, was chosen for this study to analyze itseffects on crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate, crystal incubation time, crystallization ratio and phases of flux film. We used the research methods of process mineralogy with the application of the single hot thermocouple technique, heat flux simulator, polarizing microscope, X-ray diffraction, etc. Results: By increasing the quartz content from 16 mass% to 24 mass%, the crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate and crystallization ratio of flux film decreased, and the crystal incubation time was extended. Meanwhile, the mineralogical structure of the flux film changed, with a large amount of wollastonite precipitation and a significant decrease in the cuspidine content until it reached zero. This showed a steady decline in the heat transfer control capacity of the flux film. The reason for the results above is that, by increasing the quartz content, the silicon-oxygen tetrahedron network structure promoted a rise in viscosity and restrained ion migration, inhibiting crystal nucleation and growth, leading to the weakening of the crystallization and a decline in the crystallization ratio.

  9. Comparison between elementary flux modes analysis and 13C-metabolic fluxes measured in bacterial and plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurton-Aimar, Marie; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Monier, Antoine; Vallée, François; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Colombié, Sophie

    2011-06-20

    (13)C metabolic flux analysis is one of the pertinent ways to compare two or more physiological states. From a more theoretical standpoint, the structural properties of metabolic networks can be analysed to explore feasible metabolic behaviours and to define the boundaries of steady state flux distributions. Elementary flux mode analysis is one of the most efficient methods for performing this analysis. In this context, recent approaches have tended to compare experimental flux measurements with topological network analysis. Metabolic networks describing the main pathways of central carbon metabolism were set up for a bacteria species (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and a plant species (Brassica napus) for which experimental flux maps were available. The structural properties of each network were then studied using the concept of elementary flux modes. To do this, coefficients of flux efficiency were calculated for each reaction within the networks by using selected sets of elementary flux modes. Then the relative differences - reflecting the change of substrate i.e. a sugar source for C. glutamicum and a nitrogen source for B. napus - of both flux efficiency and flux measured experimentally were compared. For both organisms, there is a clear relationship between these parameters, thus indicating that the network structure described by the elementary flux modes had captured a significant part of the metabolic activity in both biological systems. In B. napus, the extension of the elementary flux mode analysis to an enlarged metabolic network still resulted in a clear relationship between the change in the coefficients and that of the measured fluxes. Nevertheless, the limitations of the method to fit some particular fluxes are discussed. This consistency between EFM analysis and experimental flux measurements, validated on two metabolic systems allows us to conclude that elementary flux mode analysis could be a useful tool to complement (13)C metabolic flux analysis

  10. Lepton fluxes from atmospheric charm revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzelli, M.V.; Moch, S.; Sigl, G.

    2015-07-01

    We update predictions for lepton fluxes from the hadroproduction of charm quarks in the scattering of primary cosmic rays with the Earth's atmosphere. The calculation of charm-pair hadroproduction applies the latest results from perturbative QCD through next-to-next-to-leading order and modern parton distributions, together with estimates on various sources of uncertainties. Our predictions for the lepton fluxes turn out to be compatible, within the uncertainty band, with recent results in the literature. However, by taking into account contributions neglected in previous works, our total uncertainties are much larger. The predictions are crucial for the interpretation of results from neutrino experiments like IceCube, when disentangling signals of neutrinos of astrophysical origin from the atmospheric background.

  11. Observations on fluxes near anti-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen-Maldonado, Diego [Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park,Postbus 94485, Amsterdam, 1090 GL The (Netherlands); Diaz, Juan; Riet, Thomas Van [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, K.University Leuven,Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven, B-3001 (Belgium); Vercnocke, Bert [Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park,Postbus 94485, Amsterdam, 1090 GL The (Netherlands)

    2016-01-20

    We revisit necessary conditions for gluing local (anti-)D3 throats into flux throats with opposite charge. These consistency conditions typically reveal singularities in the 3-form fluxes whose meaning is being debated. In this note we prove, under well-motivated assumptions, that unphysical singularities can potentially be avoided when the anti-branes polarise into spherical NS5 branes, with a specific radius. If a consistent solution can then indeed be found, our analysis seems to suggests a rather large correction to the radius of the polarization sphere compared to the probe result. We furthermore comment on the gluing conditions at finite temperature and point out that one specific assumption of a recent no-go theorem can be broken if anti-branes are indeed to polarise into spherical NS5 branes at zero temperature.

  12. Earth-like sand fluxes on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N T; Ayoub, F; Avouac, J-P; Leprince, S; Lucas, A; Mattson, S

    2012-05-09

    Strong and sustained winds on Mars have been considered rare, on the basis of surface meteorology measurements and global circulation models, raising the question of whether the abundant dunes and evidence for wind erosion seen on the planet are a current process. Recent studies showed sand activity, but could not determine whether entire dunes were moving--implying large sand fluxes--or whether more localized and surficial changes had occurred. Here we present measurements of the migration rate of sand ripples and dune lee fronts at the Nili Patera dune field. We show that the dunes are near steady state, with their entire volumes composed of mobile sand. The dunes have unexpectedly high sand fluxes, similar, for example, to those in Victoria Valley, Antarctica, implying that rates of landscape modification on Mars and Earth are similar.

  13. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kerry; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Vic; Zeitlin, Cary; Cleghorn, Tim; Cucinotta, Frank; Saganti, Premkumar; Atwell, William; Turner, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range

  14. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP...... production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP......, there was no significant difference between groups. These results show that the primary reduced TCA cycle flux in diabetic myotubes is not explained by defects in specific part of the TCA cycle but rather results from a general downregulation of the TCA cycle....

  15. Anthropogenic methane ebullition and continuous flux measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshboul, Zeyad

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: Methane, Wastewater, Effluent, Anaerobic treatment. Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have shown to emit significant amount of methane during treatment processes. While most of studies cover only in-plant diffusive methane flux, magnitude and sources of methane ebullition have not well assessed. Moreover, the reported results of methane emissions from WWTPs are based on low spatial and temporal resolution. Using a continuous measurement approach of methane flux rate for effluent system and secondary clarifier treatment process at one WWTP in Southwest Germany, our results show that high percentage of methane is emitted by ebullition during the anaerobic treatment (clarification pond) with high spatial and temporal variability. Our measurements revealed that no ebullition is occur at the effluent system. The observed high contribution of methane ebullition to the total in-plant methane emission, emphasizes the need for considering in-plant methane emission by ebullition as well as the spatial and temporal variability of these emissions.

  16. Flux Limiter Lattice Boltzmann for Compressible Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Li Yingjun; Xu Aiguo; Zhang Guangcai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new flux limiter scheme with the splitting technique is successfully incorporated into a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for shacked compressible flows. The proposed flux limiter scheme is efficient in decreasing the artificial oscillations and numerical diffusion around the interface. Due to the kinetic nature, some interface problems being difficult to handle at the macroscopic level can be modeled more naturally through the LB method. Numerical simulations for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability show that with the new model the computed interfaces are smoother and more consistent with physical analysis. The growth rates of bubble and spike present a satisfying agreement with the theoretical predictions and other numerical simulations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  17. Flux qubit to a transmission line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberlein, Max; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Xie, Edwar; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Within the last decade, superconducting qubits coupled to microwave resonators have been extensively studied within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. Ultimately, quantum computing seems within reach in such architectures. However, error correction schemes are necessary to achieve the required fidelity in multi-qubit operations, drastically increasing the number of qubits involved. In this work, we couple a flux qubit to a transmission line where it interacts with itinerant microwave photons granting access to all-optical quantum computing. In this approach, travelling photons generate entanglement between two waveguides, containing the qubit information. In this presentation, we show experimental data on flux qubits coupled to transmission lines. Furthermore, we will discuss entanglement generation between two separate paths.

  18. Chiral charge flux and electroweak baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funakubo, Koichi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kakuto, Akira; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Takenaga, Kazunori; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    1995-06-01

    By treating CP-violating interaction of the electroweak bubble wall as a perturbative term, chiral charge flux through the bubble wall is estimated. It is found that the absolute value of the flux F{sub Q} has a sharp peak at m{sub 0} - a - T with F{sub Q}/(uT{sup 3}) - 10{sup -3}(Q{sub L}-Q{sub R}){Delta}{theta}. Here m{sub 0} is the fermion mass, 1/a is the wall thickness, T is the temperature at which the bubbles are growing, u is the wall velocity, Q{sub L(R)} is the chiral charge of the relevant left (right)-handed fermion and {Delta}{theta} is the measure of CP violation. (author).

  19. Data system for automatic flux mapping applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, R.M.; Neuner, J.A.; Couch, R.D. Jr.; Kasinoff, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    This patent discloses interface circuitry for coupling the data from neutron flux detectors in a reactor core to microprocessors. This circuitry minimizes the microprocessor time required to accept data and provides a technique for measuring variable frequency data from the in-core detectors within a minimum amount of hardware and with crystal-controlled accuracy. A frequency link is employed to transmit data with good isolation, and the information is measured using a programmable timer

  20. 2 π gaseous flux proportional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, E.A.; Costello, E.D.; Di Carlo, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    A counting system has been developed in order to measure carbon-14 samples obtained in the course of a study of a plasmapheresis treatment for diabetic children. The system is based on the use of a 2π gaseous flux proportional detector especially designed for the stated purpose. The detector is described and experiment results are given, determining the characteristic parameters which set up the working conditions. (Author) [es