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Sample records for adjoint difference method

  1. Double-Difference Adjoint Tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a double-difference method for the inversion of seismic wavespeed structure by adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model-based predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby largely canceling out the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography, a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography, one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  2. Ocean acoustic tomography from different receiver geometries using the adjoint method.

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an ocean acoustic tomography inversion using the adjoint method in a shallow water environment is presented. The propagation model used is an implicit Crank-Nicolson finite difference parabolic equation solver with a non-local boundary condition. Unlike previous matched-field processing works using the complex pressure fields as the observations, here, the observed signals are the transmission losses. Based on the code tests of the tangent linear model, the adjoint model, and the gradient, the optimization problem is solved by a gradient-based minimization algorithm. The inversions are performed in numerical simulations for two geometries: one in which hydrophones are sparsely distributed in the horizontal direction, and another in which the hydrophones are distributed vertically. The spacing in both cases is well beyond the half-wavelength threshold at which beamforming could be used. To deal with the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a linear differential regularization operator of the sound-speed profile is used to smooth the inversion results. The L-curve criterion is adopted to select the regularization parameter, and the optimal value can be easily determined at the elbow of the logarithms of the residual norm of the measured-predicted fields and the norm of the penalty function.

  3. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wave speed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding non-uniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and practically. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  4. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    Yuan, Yanhua O; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relat...

  5. Adjoint method and runaway electron avalanche

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Boozer, Allen H.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-02-01

    The adjoint method for the study of runaway electron dynamics in momentum space Liu et al (2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 010702) is rederived using the Green’s function method, for both the runaway probability function (RPF) and the expected loss time (ELT). The RPF and ELT obtained using the adjoint method are presented, both with and without the synchrotron radiation reaction force. The adjoint method is then applied to study the runaway electron avalanche. Both the critical electric field and the growth rate for the avalanche are calculated using this fast and novel approach.

  6. Extraction of macroscopic and microscopic adjoint concepts using a lattice Boltzmann method and discrete adjoint approach

    Hekmat, Mohamad Hamed; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    In the present research, we tried to improve the performance of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) -based adjoint approach by utilizing the mesoscopic inherent of the LB method. In this regard, two macroscopic discrete adjoint (MADA) and microscopic discrete adjoint (MIDA) approaches are used to answer the following two challenging questions. Is it possible to extend the concept of the macroscopic and microscopic variables of the flow field to the corresponding adjoint ones? Further, similar to the conservative laws in the LB method, is it possible to find the comparable conservation equations in the adjoint approach? If so, then a definite framework, similar to that used in the flow solution by the LB method, can be employed in the flow sensitivity analysis by the MIDA approach. This achievement can decrease the implementation cost and coding efforts of the MIDA method in complicated sensitivity analysis problems. First, the MADA and MIDA equations are extracted based on the LB method using the duality viewpoint. Meanwhile, using an elementary case, inverse design of a two-dimensional unsteady Poiseuille flow in a periodic channel with constant body forces, the procedure of analytical evaluation of the adjoint variables is described. The numerical results show that similar correlations between the distribution functions can be seen between the corresponding adjoint ones. Besides, the results are promising, emphasizing the flow field adjoint variables can be evaluated via the adjoint distribution functions. Finally, the adjoint conservative laws are introduced.

  7. Tsunami waveform inversion by adjoint methods

    Pires, Carlos; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2001-09-01

    An adjoint method for tsunami waveform inversion is proposed, as an alternative to the technique based on Green's functions of the linear long wave model. The method has the advantage of being able to use the nonlinear shallow water equations, or other appropriate equation sets, and to optimize an initial state given as a linear or nonlinear function of any set of free parameters. This last facility is used to perform explicit optimization of the focal fault parameters, characterizing the initial sea surface displacement of tsunamigenic earthquakes. The proposed methodology is validated with experiments using synthetic data, showing the possibility of recovering all relevant details of a tsunami source from tide gauge observations, providing that the adjoint method is constrained in an appropriate manner. It is found, as in other methods, that the inversion skill of tsunami sources increases with the azimuthal and temporal coverage of assimilated tide gauge stations; furthermore, it is shown that the eigenvalue analysis of the Hessian matrix of the cost function provides a consistent and useful methodology to choose the subset of independent parameters that can be inverted with a given dataset of observations and to evaluate the error of the inversion process. The method is also applied to real tide gauge series, from the tsunami of the February 28, 1969, Gorringe Bank earthquake, suggesting some reasonable changes to the assumed focal parameters of that event. It is suggested that the method proposed may be able to deal with transient tsunami sources such as those generated by submarine landslides.

  8. Adjoint method for hybrid guidance loop state-space models

    Weiss, M.; Bucco, D.

    2015-01-01

    A framework is introduced to develop the theory of the adjoint method for models including both continuous and discrete dynamics. The basis of this framework consists of the class of impulsive linear dynamic systems. It allows extension of the adjoint method to more general models that include multi

  9. Analysis of Nonlinear Missile Guidance Systems Through Linear Adjoint Method

    Khaled Gamal Eltohamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a linear simulation algorithm, the adjoint method, is modified and employed as an efficient tool for analyzing the contributions of system parameters to the miss - distance of a nonlinear time-varying missile guidance system model. As an example for the application of the linear adjoint method, the effect of missile flight time on the miss - distance is studied. Since the missile model is highly nonlinear and a time-varying linearized model is required to apply the adjoint method, a new technique that utilizes the time-reversed linearized coefficients of the missile as a replacement for the time-varying describing functions is applied and proven to be successful. It is found that, when compared with Monte Carlo generated results, simulation results of this linear adjoint technique provide acceptable accuracy and can be produced with much less effort.

  10. Adjoint method for the optimum planning of industrial pollutant sources

    LIU Feng; HU Fei; ZHU Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The optimum planning of industrial pollutant sources, which optimizes the economic object without violating environmental constraints, is an important and hard task to be conquered. In this paper, an adjoint method is developed to solve the problem. The penalty function is introduced to deal with the environmental inequality constraints, and Lagrange function is constructed to derive the adjoint equation and the gradient of the object function. In this means, the gradient of the object function can be calculated by solving the adjoint equation, and the information from the gradient is used to make the object function descend and approach to an optimal solution after some iterations. A two-dimensional, simplified model is used for numerical experiments. The theoretical derivations are verified by the results of the experiments. Furthermore, the adjoint method is shown to be of excellent convergence and efficiency, which is adaptive to the fast development of air quality numerical models and super computers.

  11. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bodony, Daniel J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  12. Adjoint Methods for Guiding Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Tsunami Modeling

    Davis, B. N.; LeVeque, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    One difficulty in developing numerical methods for tsunami modeling is the fact that solutions contain time-varying regions where much higher resolution is required than elsewhere in the domain, particularly when tracking a tsunami propagating across the ocean. The open source GeoClaw software deals with this issue by using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to selectively refine around propagating waves. For problems where only a target area of the total solution is of interest (e.g., one coastal community), a method that allows identifying and refining the grid only in regions that influence this target area would significantly reduce the computational cost of finding a solution. In this work, we show that solving the time-dependent adjoint equation and using a suitable inner product with the forward solution allows more precise refinement of the relevant waves. We present the adjoint methodology first in one space dimension for illustration and in a broad context since it could also be used in other adaptive software, and potentially for other tsunami applications beyond adaptive refinement. We then show how this adjoint method has been integrated into the adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the open source GeoClaw software and present tsunami modeling results showing that the accuracy of the solution is maintained and the computational time required is significantly reduced through the integration of the adjoint method into adaptive mesh refinement.

  13. STUDY ON THE ADJOINT METHOD IN DATA ASSIMILATION AND THE RELATED PROBLEMS

    吕咸青; 吴自库; 谷艺; 田纪伟

    2004-01-01

    It is not reasonable that one can only use the adjoint of model in data assimilation.The simulated numerical experiment shows that for the tidal model,the result of the adjoint of equation is almost the same as that of the adjoint of model:the averaged absolute difference of the amplitude between observations and simulation is less than 5.0 cm and that of the phase-lag is less than 5.0°.The results are both in good agreement with the observed M2 tide in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.For comparison,the traditional methods also have been used to simulate M2 tide in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.The initial guess values of the boundary conditions are given first,and then are adjusted to acquire the simulated results that are as close as possible to the observations.As the boundary conditions contain 72 values,which should be adjusted and how to adjust them can only be partially solved by adjusting them many times.The satisfied results are hard to acquire even gigantic efforts are done.Here,the automation of the treatment of the open boundary conditions is realized.The method is unique and superior to the traditional methods.It is emphasized that if the adjoint of equation is used,tedious and complicated mathematical deduction can be avoided.Therefore the adjoint of equation should attract much attention.

  14. Approximation of weak adjoints by reverse automatic differentiation of BDF methods

    Beigel, Dörte; Wirsching, Leonard; Bock, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    With this contribution, we shed light on the relation between the discrete adjoints of multistep backward differentiation formula (BDF) methods and the solution of the adjoint differential equation. To this end, we develop a functional-analytic framework based on a constrained variational problem and introduce the notion of weak adjoint solutions. We devise a finite element Petrov-Galerkin interpretation of the BDF method together with its discrete adjoint scheme obtained by reverse internal numerical differentiation. We show how the finite element approximation of the weak adjoint is computed by the discrete adjoint scheme and prove its asymptotic convergence in the space of normalized functions of bounded variation. We also obtain asymptotic convergence of the discrete adjoints to the classical adjoints on the inner time interval. Finally, we give numerical results for non-adaptive and fully adaptive BDF schemes. The presented framework opens the way to carry over the existing theory on global error estimat...

  15. Earthquake Source Modeling using Time-Reversal or Adjoint Methods

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years there have been great advances in earthquake source modeling. Despite the effort, many questions about earthquake source physics remain unanswered. In order to address some of these questions, it is useful to reconstruct what happens on the fault during an event. In this study we focus on determining the slip distribution on a fault plane, or a moment-rate density, as a function of time and space. This is a difficult process involving many trade offs between model parameters. The difficulty lies in the fact that earthquakes are not a controlled experiment, we don't know when and where they will occur, and therefore we have only limited control over what data will be acquired for each event. As a result, much of the advance that can be made, is by extracting more information out of the data that is routinely collected. Here we use a technique that uses 3D waveforms to invert for the slip on a fault plane during rupture. By including 3D wave-forms we can use parts of the wave-forms that are often discarded, as they are altered by structural effects in ways that cannot be accurately predicted using 1D Earth models. However, generating 3D synthetic is computationally expensive. Therefore we turn to an `adjoint' method (Tarantola Geoph.~1984, Tromp et al.~GJI 2005), that reduces the computational cost relative to methods that use Green's function libraries. In it's simplest form an adjoint method for inverting for source parameters can be viewed as a time-reversal experiment performed with a wave-propagation code (McMechan GJRAS 1982). The recorded seismograms are inserted as simultaneous sources at the location of the receiver and the computed wave field (which we call the adjoint wavefield) is recorded on an array around the earthquake location. Here we show, mathematically, that for source inversions for a moment tensor (distributed) source, the time integral of the adjoint strain is the quantity to monitor. We present the results of time

  16. Finite-frequency tomography using adjoint methods-Methodology and examples using membrane surface waves

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2007-03-01

    We employ adjoint methods in a series of synthetic seismic tomography experiments to recover surface wave phase-speed models of southern California. Our approach involves computing the Fréchet derivative for tomographic inversions via the interaction between a forward wavefield, propagating from the source to the receivers, and an `adjoint' wavefield, propagating from the receivers back to the source. The forward wavefield is computed using a 2-D spectral-element method (SEM) and a phase-speed model for southern California. A `target' phase-speed model is used to generate the `data' at the receivers. We specify an objective or misfit function that defines a measure of misfit between data and synthetics. For a given receiver, the remaining differences between data and synthetics are time-reversed and used as the source of the adjoint wavefield. For each earthquake, the interaction between the regular and adjoint wavefields is used to construct finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, which we call event kernels. An event kernel may be thought of as a weighted sum of phase-specific (e.g. P) banana-doughnut kernels, with weights determined by the measurements. The overall sensitivity is simply the sum of event kernels, which defines the misfit kernel. The misfit kernel is multiplied by convenient orthonormal basis functions that are embedded in the SEM code, resulting in the gradient of the misfit function, that is, the Fréchet derivative. A non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm is used to iteratively improve the model while reducing the misfit function. We illustrate the construction of the gradient and the minimization algorithm, and consider various tomographic experiments, including source inversions, structural inversions and joint source-structure inversions. Finally, we draw connections between classical Hessian-based tomography and gradient-based adjoint tomography.

  17. Analytic Solutions of Some Self-Adjoint Equations by Using Variable Change Method and Its Applications

    Mehdi Delkhosh; Mohammad Delkhosh

    2012-01-01

    Many applications of various self-adjoint differential equations, whose solutions are complex, are produced (Arfken, 1985; Gandarias, 2011; and Delkhosh, 2011). In this work we propose a method for the solving some self-adjoint equations with variable change in problem, and then we obtain a analytical solutions. Because this solution, an exact analytical solution can be provided to us, we benefited from the solution of numerical Self-adjoint equations (Mohynl-Din, 2009; Allame and Azal, 2011;...

  18. Adjoint complement to viscous finite-volume pressure-correction methods

    Stück, Arthur; Rung, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    A hybrid-adjoint Navier-Stokes method for the pressure-based computation of hydrodynamic objective functional derivatives with respect to the shape is systematically derived in three steps: The underlying adjoint partial differential equations and boundary conditions for the frozen-turbulence Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are considered in the first step. In step two, the adjoint discretisation is developed from the primal, unstructured finite-volume discretisation, such that adjoint-consistent approximations to the adjoint partial differential equations are obtained following a so-called hybrid-adjoint approach. A unified, discrete boundary description is outlined that supports high- and low-Reynolds number turbulent wall-boundary treatments for both the adjoint boundary condition and the boundary-based gradient formula. The third component focused in the development of the industrial adjoint CFD method is the adjoint counterpart to the primal pressure-correction algorithm. The approach is verified against the direct-differentiation method and an application to internal flow problems is presented.

  19. The state-space approach to the method of adjoints for hybrid guidance loop models

    Weiss, M.; Bucco, D.

    2009-01-01

    A framework is introduced to develop the theory of the Adjoint Method for models including both continuous and discrete dynamics. The basis of this framework consists of the class of impulsive linear dynamical systems. It allows extension of the Adjoint Method to more general models that include mul

  20. Trajectory Optimization Using Adjoint Method and Chebyshev Polynomial Approximation for Minimizing Fuel Consumption During Climb

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Hornby, Gregory; Ishihara, Abe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two methods of trajectory optimization to obtain an optimal trajectory of minimum-fuel- to-climb for an aircraft. The first method is based on the adjoint method, and the second method is based on a direct trajectory optimization method using a Chebyshev polynomial approximation and cubic spine approximation. The approximate optimal trajectory will be compared with the adjoint-based optimal trajectory which is considered as the true optimal solution of the trajectory optimization problem. The adjoint-based optimization problem leads to a singular optimal control solution which results in a bang-singular-bang optimal control.

  1. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  2. Analytic Solutions of Some Self-Adjoint Equations by Using Variable Change Method and Its Applications

    Mehdi Delkhosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications of various self-adjoint differential equations, whose solutions are complex, are produced (Arfken, 1985; Gandarias, 2011; and Delkhosh, 2011. In this work we propose a method for the solving some self-adjoint equations with variable change in problem, and then we obtain a analytical solutions. Because this solution, an exact analytical solution can be provided to us, we benefited from the solution of numerical Self-adjoint equations (Mohynl-Din, 2009; Allame and Azal, 2011; Borhanifar et al. 2011; Sweilam and Nagy, 2011; Gülsu et al. 2011; Mohyud-Din et al. 2010; and Li et al. 1996.

  3. Multi-objective optimization strategies using adjoint method and game theory in aerodynamics

    Zhili Tang

    2006-01-01

    There are currently three different game strategies originated in economics:(1) Cooperative games (Pareto front),(2)Competitive games (Nash game) and (3)Hierarchical games (Stackelberg game).Each game achieves different equilibria with different performance,and their players play different roles in the games.Here,we introduced game concept into aerodynamic design, and combined it with adjoint method to solve multicriteria aerodynamic optimization problems.The performance distinction of the equilibria of these three game strategies was investigated by numerical experiments.We computed Pareto front, Nash and Stackelberg equilibria of the same optimization problem with two conflicting and hierarchical targets under different parameterizations by using the deterministic optimization method.The numerical results show clearly that all the equilibria solutions are inferior to the Pareto front.Non-dominated Pareto front solutions are obtained,however the CPU cost to capture a set of solutions makes the Pareto front an expensive tool to the designer.

  4. THE EXISTENCE OF PERIODIC SOLUTIONS TO SECOND ORDER SELF-ADJOINT DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the existence of periodic solutions to a class of second order self-adjoint difference equations. By the least action principle and saddle point theorem in the critical point theory, some new results are obtained. As an application, we also give two examples to demonstrate our main results.

  5. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  6. An adjoint sensitivity-based data assimilation method and its comparison with existing variational methods

    Yonghan Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An adjoint sensitivity-based data assimilation (ASDA method is proposed and applied to a heavy rainfall case over the Korean Peninsula. The heavy rainfall case, which occurred on 26 July 2006, caused torrential rainfall over the central part of the Korean Peninsula. The mesoscale convective system (MCS related to the heavy rainfall was classified as training line/adjoining stratiform (TL/AS-type for the earlier period, and back building (BB-type for the later period. In the ASDA method, an adjoint model is run backwards with forecast-error gradient as input, and the adjoint sensitivity of the forecast error to the initial condition is scaled by an optimal scaling factor. The optimal scaling factor is determined by minimising the observational cost function of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var method, and the scaled sensitivity is added to the original first guess. Finally, the observations at the analysis time are assimilated using a 3D-Var method with the improved first guess. The simulated rainfall distribution is shifted northeastward compared to the observations when no radar data are assimilated or when radar data are assimilated using the 3D-Var method. The rainfall forecasts are improved when radar data are assimilated using the 4D-Var or ASDA method. Simulated atmospheric fields such as horizontal winds, temperature, and water vapour mixing ratio are also improved via the 4D-Var or ASDA method. Due to the improvement in the analysis, subsequent forecasts appropriately simulate the observed features of the TL/AS- and BB-type MCSs and the corresponding heavy rainfall. The computational cost associated with the ASDA method is significantly lower than that of the 4D-Var method.

  7. Using Adjoint Methods to Improve 3-D Velocity Models of Southern California

    Liu, Q.; Tape, C.; Maggi, A.; Tromp, J.

    2006-12-01

    We use adjoint methods popular in climate and ocean dynamics to calculate Fréchet derivatives for tomographic inversions in southern California. The Fréchet derivative of an objective function χ(m), where m denotes the Earth model, may be written in the generic form δχ=int Km(x) δln m(x) d3x, where δln m=δ m/m denotes the relative model perturbation. For illustrative purposes, we construct the 3-D finite-frequency banana-doughnut kernel Km, corresponding to the misfit of a single traveltime measurement, by simultaneously computing the 'adjoint' wave field s† forward in time and reconstructing the regular wave field s backward in time. The adjoint wave field is produced by using the time-reversed velocity at the receiver as a fictitious source, while the regular wave field is reconstructed on the fly by propagating the last frame of the wave field saved by a previous forward simulation backward in time. The approach is based upon the spectral-element method, and only two simulations are needed to produce density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels. This method is applied to the SCEC southern California velocity model. Various density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels are presented for different phases in the seismograms. We also generate 'event' kernels for Pnl, S and surface waves, which are the Fréchet kernels of misfit functions that measure the P, S or surface wave traveltime residuals at all the receivers simultaneously for one particular event. Effectively, an event kernel is a sum of weighted Fréchet kernels, with weights determined by the associated traveltime anomalies. By the nature of the 3-D simulation, every event kernel is also computed based upon just two simulations, i.e., its construction costs the same amount of computation time as an individual banana-doughnut kernel. One can think of the sum of the event kernels for all available earthquakes, called the 'misfit' kernel, as a graphical

  8. Development of a Matlab/Simulink tool to facilitate system analysis and simulation via the adjoint and covariance methods

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2007-01-01

    The COVariance and ADjoint Analysis Tool (COVAD) is a specially designed software tool, written for the Matlab/Simulink environment, which allows the user the capability to carry out system analysis and simulation using the adjoint, covariance or Monte Carlo methods. This paper describes phase one o

  9. Adjoint Parameter Sensitivity Analysis for the Hydrodynamic Lattice Boltzmann Method with Applications to Design Optimization

    Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    We present an adjoint parameter sensitivity analysis formulation and solution strategy for the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The focus is on design optimization applications, in particular topology optimization. The lattice Boltzmann method is briefly described with an in-depth discussion...... a generalized geometry optimization formulation and derive the corresponding sensitivity analysis for the single relaxation LBM for both topology and shape optimization applications. Using numerical examples, we verify the accuracy of the analytical sensitivity analysis through a comparison with finite...

  10. A new method for computing the eigenfunctions and their adjoints of the dynamo operator

    Schrinner, M; Jiang, J; Hoyng, P

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method to determine the eigensolutions of the induction and the dynamo equation in a fluid embedded in vacuum. The magnetic field is expanded in a complete set of functions. The new method is based on the biorthogonality of the adjoint electric current and the vector potential with an inner product defined by a volume integral over the fluid domain. The advantage of this method is that the velocity and the dynamo coefficients of the induction and the dynamo equation do not have to be differentiated and thus even numerically determined tabulated values of the coefficients produce reasonable results. We provide test calculations and compare with published results obtained by the classical treatment based on the biorthogonality of the magnetic field and its adjoint. We especially consider dynamos with mean-field coefficients determined from direct numerical simulations of the geodynamo and compare with initial value calculations and the full MHD simulations.

  11. Optimization of prostate cancer treatment plans using the adjoint transport method and discrete ordinates codes

    Yoo, S.; Henderson, D.L. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Thomadsen, B.R. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Dept. of Human Oncology, Madison (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is a type of radiation in which radioactive sources are implanted directly into cancerous tissue. Determination of dose delivered to tissue by photons emitted from implanted seeds is an important step in the treatment plan process. In this paper we will investigate the use of the discrete ordinates method and the adjoint method to calculate absorbed dose in the regions of interest. MIP (mixed-integer programming) is used to determine the optimal seed distribution that conforms the prescribed dose to the tumor and delivers minimal dose to the sensitive structures. The patient treatment procedure consists of three steps: (1) image acquisition with the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and assessing the region of interest, (2) adjoint flux computation with discrete ordinate code for inverse dose calculation, and (3) optimization with the MIP branch-and-bound method.

  12. Topology Optimization of Turbulent Fluid Flow with a Sensitive Porosity Adjoint Method (SPAM)

    Philippi, B

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive porosity adjoint method (SPAM) for optimizing the topology of fluid machines has been proposed. A sensitivity function with respect to the porosity has been developed. In the first step of the optimization process, porous media are introduced into the flow regime according to the sensitivity function. Then the optimized porous media are transformed to solid walls. The turbulent flow in porous media is accounted for by a modified eddy-viscosity based turbulence model. Its influence on the adjoint equations is nevertheless neglected, which refers to the so called frozen turbulence assumption. A test case of application in terms of the turbulent rough wall channel flow shows that a considerable reduction of the objective function can be obtained by this method. The transformation from porous media to solid walls may have important effect on the optimization results.

  13. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    Bruckner, Florian; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet is demonstrated.

  14. Aerodynamic Optimization Based on Continuous Adjoint Method for a Flexible Wing

    Zhaoke Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic optimization based on continuous adjoint method for a flexible wing is developed using FORTRAN 90 in the present work. Aerostructural analysis is performed on the basis of high-fidelity models with Euler equations on the aerodynamic side and a linear quadrilateral shell element model on the structure side. This shell element can deal with both thin and thick shell problems with intersections, so this shell element is suitable for the wing structural model which consists of two spars, 20 ribs, and skin. The continuous adjoint formulations based on Euler equations and unstructured mesh are derived and used in the work. Sequential quadratic programming method is adopted to search for the optimal solution using the gradients from continuous adjoint method. The flow charts of rigid and flexible optimization are presented and compared. The objective is to minimize drag coefficient meanwhile maintaining lift coefficient for a rigid and flexible wing. A comparison between the results from aerostructural analysis of rigid optimization and flexible optimization is shown here to demonstrate that it is necessary to include the effect of aeroelasticity in the optimization design of a wing.

  15. First-arrival traveltime tomography for anisotropic media using the adjoint-state method

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2016-05-27

    Traveltime tomography using transmission data has been widely used for static corrections and for obtaining near-surface models for seismic depth imaging. More recently, it is also being used to build initial models for full-waveform inversion. The classic traveltime tomography approach based on ray tracing has difficulties in handling large data sets arising from current seismic acquisition surveys. Some of these difficulties can be addressed using the adjoint-state method, due to its low memory requirement and numerical efficiency. By coupling the gradient computation to nonlinear optimization, it avoids the need for explicit computation of the Fréchet derivative matrix. Furthermore, its cost is equivalent to twice the solution of the forward-modeling problem, irrespective of the size of the input data. The presence of anisotropy in the subsurface has been well established during the past few decades. The improved seismic images obtained by incorporating anisotropy into the seismic processing workflow justify the effort. However, previous literature on the adjoint-state method has only addressed the isotropic approximation of the subsurface. We have extended the adjoint-state technique for first-arrival traveltime tomography to vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media. Because δ is weakly resolvable from surface seismic alone, we have developed the mathematical framework and procedure to invert for vNMO and η. Our numerical tests on the VTI SEAM model demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to invert for near-surface model parameters and reveal the accuracy achievable by the algorithm.

  16. Adjoint code generator

    CHENG Qiang; CAO JianWen; WANG Bin; ZHANG HaiBin

    2009-01-01

    The adjoint code generator (ADG) is developed to produce the adjoint codes, which are used to analytically calculate gradients and the Hessian-vector products with the costs independent of the number of the independent variables. Different from other automatic differentiation tools, the implementation of ADG has advantages of using the least program behavior decomposition method and several static dependence analysis techniques. In this paper we first address the concerned concepts and fundamentals, and then introduce the functionality and the features of ADG. In particular, we also discuss the design architecture of ADG and implementation details including the recomputation and storing strategy and several techniques for code optimization. Some experimental results in several applications are presented at the end.

  17. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  18. Adjustment of Tsunami Source Parameters By Adjoint Methods

    Pires, C.; Miranda, P.

    Tsunami waveforms recorded at tide gauges can be used to adjust tsunami source pa- rameters and, indirectly, seismic focal parameters. Simple inversion methods, based on ray-tracing techniques, only used a small fraction of available information. More elab- orate techniques, based on the Green's functions methods, also have some limitations in their scope. A new methodology, using a variational approach, allows for a much more general inversion, which can directly optimize focal parameters of tsunamigenic earthquakes. Idealized synthetic data and an application to the 1969 Gorringe Earth- quake are used to validate the methodology.

  19. Globally Conservative, Hybrid Self-Adjoint Angular Flux and Least-Squares Method Compatible with Void

    Laboure, Vincent M.; McClarren, Ryan G.; Wang, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a method for the second-order form of the transport equation that is both globally conservative and compatible with voids, using Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM). The main idea is to use the Least-Squares (LS) form of the transport equation in the void regions and the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) form elsewhere. While the SAAF formulation is globally conservative, the LS formulation need a correction in void. The price to pay for this fix is the loss of sy...

  20. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet as well as an optimal design application are demonstrated.

  1. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet as well as an optimal design application are demonstrated. PMID:28098851

  2. Aerodynamic Optimization of the Nose Shape of a Train Using the Adjoint Method

    Jorge Munoz-Paniagua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is used in this paper for the aerodynamic optimization of the nose shape of a train. This method has been extensively applied in aircraft or ground vehicle aerodynamic optimization, but is still in progress in train aerodynamics. Here we consider this innovative optimization method and present its application to reduce the aerodynamic drag when the train is subjected to front wind. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, highlighting the requirements, limitations and capabilities of it. Furthermore, a significant reduction of the aerodynamic drag in a short number of solver calls is aimed as well. The independence of the computational cost with respect to the number of design variables that define the optimal candidate is stressed as the most interesting characteristic of the adjoint method. This behavior permits a more complete modification of the shape of the train nose because the number of design variables is not a constraint anymore. The information obtained from the sensitivity field permits determining the regions of the geometry where a small modification of the nose shape might introduce a larger improvement of the train performance. A good agreement between this information and the successive geometry modifications is observed here.

  3. Comparison of Observation Impacts in Two Forecast Systems using Adjoint Methods

    Gelaro, Ronald; Langland, Rolf; Todling, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    An experiment is being conducted to compare directly the impact of all assimilated observations on short-range forecast errors in different operational forecast systems. We use the adjoint-based method developed by Langland and Baker (2004), which allows these impacts to be efficiently calculated. This presentation describes preliminary results for a "baseline" set of observations, including both satellite radiances and conventional observations, used by the Navy/NOGAPS and NASA/GEOS-5 forecast systems for the month of January 2007. In each system, about 65% of the total reduction in 24-h forecast error is provided by satellite observations, although the impact of rawinsonde, aircraft, land, and ship-based observations remains significant. Only a small majority (50- 55%) of all observations assimilated improves the forecast, while the rest degrade it. It is found that most of the total forecast error reduction comes from observations with moderate-size innovations providing small to moderate impacts, not from outliers with very large positive or negative innovations. In a global context, the relative impacts of the major observation types are fairly similar in each system, although regional differences in observation impact can be significant. Of particular interest is the fact that while satellite radiances have a large positive impact overall, they degrade the forecast in certain locations common to both systems, especially over land and ice surfaces. Ongoing comparisons of this type, with results expected from other operational centers, should lead to more robust conclusions about the impacts of the various components of the observing system as well as about the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies used to assimilate them.

  4. Estimation of Oceanic Eddy Viscosity Profile and Wind Stress Drag Coefficient Using Adjoint Method

    Qilin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjoint method is used to assimilate pseudoobservations to simultaneously estimate the OEVP and the WSDC in an oceanic Ekman layer model. Five groups of experiments are designed to investigate the influences that the optimization algorithms, step-length, inverse integral time of the adjoint model, prescribed vertical distribution of eddy viscosity, and regularization parameter exert on the inversion results. Experimental results show that the best estimation results are obtained with the GD algorithm; the best estimation results are obtained when the step-length is equal to 1 in Group 2; in Group 3, 8 days of inverse integral time yields the best estimation results, and good assimilation efficiency is achieved by increasing iteration steps when the inverse integral time is reduced; in Group 4, the OEVP can be estimated for some specific distributions; however, when the VEVCs increase along with the depth at the bottom of water, the estimation results are relatively poor. For this problem, we use extrapolation method to deal with the VEVCs in layers in which the estimation results are poor; the regularization method with appropriate regularization parameter can indeed improve the experiment result to some extent. In all experiments in Groups 2-3, the WSDCs are inverted successfully within 100 iterations.

  5. Magnetic Field Separation Around Planets Using an Adjoint-Method Approach

    Nabert, Christian; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Heyner, Daniel; Othmer, Carsten

    The two spacecraft of the BepiColombo mission will reach planet Mercury in 2022. The magnetometers on-board these polar orbiting spacecraft will provide a detailed map of the magnetic field in Mercury's environment. Unfortunately, a separation of the magnetic field into internal and external parts using the classical Gauss-algorithm is not possible due to strong electric currents in the orbit region of the spacecraft. These currents are due to the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's planetary magnetic field. We use an MHD code to simulate this interaction process. This requires a first choice of Mercury's planetary field which is used and modified until the simulation results fit to the actual measurements. This optimization process is carried out most efficiently using an adjoint-method. The adjoint-method is well known for its low computational cost in order to determine sensitivities required for the minimization. In a first step, the validity of our approach to separate magnetic field contributions into internal and external parts is demonstrated using synthetic generated data. Furthermore, we apply our approach to satellite measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. We can compare the results with the well known planetary field of the Earth to prove practical suitability.

  6. Numerical Study on Initial Field of Pollution in the Bohai Sea with an Adjoint Method

    Chunhui Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the simulation of a marine ecosystem dynamical model in the Bohai Sea, routine monitoring data are assimilated to study the initial field of pollution by using the adjoint method. In order to reduce variables that need to be optimized and make the simulation results more reasonable, an independent grid is selected every four grids both in longitude and latitude, and only the pollutant concentrations of these independent grids needed to be optimized while the other grids were calculated by interpolation method. Based on this method, the stability and reliability of this model were proved by a set of twin experiments. Therefore, this model could be applied in real experiment to simulate the initial field of the total nitrogen (totalN in May, 2009. Moreover, the distribution of totalN in any time step could be calculated by this model, and the monthly mean distribution in May in the Bohai Sea could be obtained.

  7. Data assimilation for massive autonomous systems based on a second-order adjoint method

    Ito, Shin-ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Kano, Masayuki; Inoue, Junya

    2016-10-01

    Data assimilation (DA) is a fundamental computational technique that integrates numerical simulation models and observation data on the basis of Bayesian statistics. Originally developed for meteorology, especially weather forecasting, DA is now an accepted technique in various scientific fields. One key issue that remains controversial is the implementation of DA in massive simulation models under the constraints of limited computation time and resources. In this paper, we propose an adjoint-based DA method for massive autonomous models that produces optimum estimates and their uncertainties within reasonable computation time and resource constraints. The uncertainties are given as several diagonal elements of an inverse Hessian matrix, which is the covariance matrix of a normal distribution that approximates the target posterior probability density function in the neighborhood of the optimum. Conventional algorithms for deriving the inverse Hessian matrix require O (C N2+N3) computations and O (N2) memory, where N is the number of degrees of freedom of a given autonomous system and C is the number of computations needed to simulate time series of suitable length. The proposed method using a second-order adjoint method allows us to directly evaluate the diagonal elements of the inverse Hessian matrix without computing all of its elements. This drastically reduces the number of computations to O (C ) and the amount of memory to O (N ) for each diagonal element. The proposed method is validated through numerical tests using a massive two-dimensional Kobayashi phase-field model. We confirm that the proposed method correctly reproduces the parameter and initial state assumed in advance, and successfully evaluates the uncertainty of the parameter. Such information regarding uncertainty is valuable, as it can be used to optimize the design of experiments.

  8. The method of rigged spaces in singular perturbation theory of self-adjoint operators

    Koshmanenko, Volodymyr; Koshmanenko, Nataliia

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents the newly developed method of rigged Hilbert spaces as a modern approach in singular perturbation theory. A key notion of this approach is the Lax-Berezansky triple of Hilbert spaces embedded one into another, which specifies the well-known Gelfand topological triple. All kinds of singular interactions described by potentials supported on small sets (like the Dirac δ-potentials, fractals, singular measures, high degree super-singular expressions) admit a rigorous treatment only in terms of the equipped spaces and their scales. The main idea of the method is to use singular perturbations to change inner products in the starting rigged space, and the construction of the perturbed operator by the Berezansky canonical isomorphism (which connects the positive and negative spaces from a new rigged triplet). The approach combines three powerful tools of functional analysis based on the Birman-Krein-Vishik theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators, the theory of singular quadra...

  9. Recent advances in the spectral green's function method for monoenergetic slab-geometry fixed-source adjoint transport problems in S{sub N} formulation

    Curbelo, Jesus P.; Alves Filho, Hermes; Barros, Ricardo C., E-mail: jperez@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: halves@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: rcbarros@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2015-07-01

    The spectral Green's function (SGF) method is a numerical method that is free of spatial truncation errors for slab-geometry fixed-source discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) adjoint problems. The method is based on the standard spatially discretized adjoint S{sub N} balance equations and a nonstandard adjoint auxiliary equation expressing the node-average adjoint angular flux, in each discretization node, as a weighted combination of the node-edge outgoing adjoint fluxes. The auxiliary equation contains parameters which act as Green's functions for the cell-average adjoint angular flux. These parameters are determined by means of a spectral analysis which yields the local general solution of the S{sub N} equations within each node of the discretization grid. In this work a number of advances in the SGF adjoint method are presented: the method is extended to adjoint S{sub N} problems considering linearly anisotropic scattering and non-zero prescribed boundary conditions for the forward source-detector problem. Numerical results to typical model problems are considered to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the o offered method. (author)

  10. The forward sensitivity and adjoint-state methods of glacial isostatic adjustment

    Martinec, Zdeněk; Sasgen, Ingo; Velímský, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new method for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity, the so-called the forward sensitivity method (FSM), and a method for computing the gradient of data misfit with respect to viscosity parameters, the so-called adjoint-state method (ASM), are presented. These advanced formal methods complement each other in the inverse modelling of GIA-related observations. When solving this inverse problem, the first step is to calculate the forward sensitivities by the FSM and use them to fix the model parameters that do not affect the forward model solution, as well as identifying and removing redundant parts of the inferred viscosity structure. Once the viscosity model is optimized in view of the forward sensitivities, the minimization of the data misfit with respect to the viscosity parameters can be carried out by a gradient technique which makes use of the ASM. The aim is this paper is to derive the FSM and ASM in the forms that are closely associated with the forward solver of GIA developed by Martinec. Since this method is based on a continuous form of the forward model equations, which are then discretized by spectral and finite elements, we first derive the continuous forms of the FSM and ASM and then discretize them by the spectral and finite elements used in the discretization of the forward model equations. The advantage of this approach is that all three methods (forward, FSM and ASM) have the same matrix of equations and use the same methodology for the implementation of the time evolution of stresses. The only difference between the forward method and the FSM and ASM is that the different numerical differencing schemes for the time evolution of the Maxwell and generalized Maxwell viscous stresses are applied in the respective methods. However, it requires only a little extra computational time for carrying out the FSM and ASM numerically. An

  11. An adjoint data assimilation method for optimizing frictional parameters on the afterslip area

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Afterslip sometimes triggers subsequent earthquakes within a timescale of days to several years. Thus, it may be possible to predict the occurrence of such a triggered earthquake by simulating the spatio-temporal evolution of afterslip with estimated frictional parameters. To demonstrate the feasibility of this idea, we consider a plate interface model where afterslip propagates between two asperities following a rate-and-state friction law, and we adopt an adjoint data assimilation method to optimize frictional parameters. Synthetic observation data are sampled as the slip velocities on the plate interface during 20 days. It is found that: (1) all frictional parameters are optimized if the data sets consists not only of the early phase of afterslip or acceleration, but also of the decaying phase or deceleration; and (2) the prediction of the timing of the triggered earthquake is improved by using adjusted frictional parameters.

  12. New optimality criteria methods - Forcing uniqueness of the adjoint strains by corner-rounding at constraint intersections

    Rozvany, G. I. N.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1992-01-01

    In new, iterative continuum-based optimality criteria (COC) methods, the strain in the adjoint structure becomes non-unique if the number of active local constraints is greater than the number of design variables for an element. This brief note discusses the use of smooth envelope functions (SEFs) in overcoming economically computational problems caused by the above non-uniqueness.

  13. Numerical study on spatially varying bottom friction coefficient of a 2D tidal model with adjoint method

    Lu, Xianqing; Zhang, Jicai

    2006-10-01

    Based on the simulation of M2 tide in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea, TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are assimilated into a 2D tidal model to study the spatially varying bottom friction coefficient (BFC) by using the adjoint method. In this study, the BFC at some grid points are selected as the independent BFC, while the BFC at other grid points can be obtained through linear interpolation with the independent BFC. Two strategies for selecting the independent BFC are discussed. In the first strategy, one independent BFC is uniformly selected from each 1°×1° area. In the second one, the independent BFC are selected based on the spatial distribution of water depth. Twin and practical experiments are carried out to compare the two strategies. In the twin experiments, the adjoint method has a strong ability of inverting the prescribed BFC distributions combined with the spatially varying BFC. In the practical experiments, reasonable simulation results can be obtained by optimizing the spatially varying independent BFC. In both twin and practical experiments, the simulation results with the second strategy are better than those with the first one. The BFC distribution obtained from the practical experiment indicates that the BFC in shallow water are larger than those in deep water in the Bohai Sea, the North Yellow Sea, the South Yellow Sea and the East China Sea individually. However, the BFC in the East China Sea are larger than those in the other areas perhaps because of the large difference of water depth or bottom roughness. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the model results are more sensitive to the independent BFC near the land.

  14. Damage Detection of Bridges Using Vibration Data by Adjoint Variable Method

    Akbar Mirzaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research entails a theoretical and numerical study on a new damage detection method for bridges, using response sensitivity in time domain. This method, referred to as “adjoint variable method,” is a finite element model updating sensitivity based method. Governing equation of the bridge-vehicle system is established based on finite element formulation. In the inverse analysis, the new approach is presented to identify elemental flexural rigidity of the structure from acceleration responses of several measurement points. The computational cost of sensitivity matrix is the main concern associated with damage detection by these methods. The main advantage of the proposed method is the inclusion of an analytical method to augment the accuracy and speed of the solution. The reliable performance of the method to precisely identify the location and intensity of all types of predetermined single, multiple, and random damages over the whole domain of moving vehicle speed is shown. A comparison study is also carried out to demonstrate the relative effectiveness and upgraded performance of the proposed method in comparison to the similar ordinary sensitivity analysis methods. Moreover, various sources of errors including the effects of noise and primary errors on the numerical stability of the proposed method are discussed.

  15. Continuous-Energy Adjoint Flux and Perturbation Calculation using the Iterated Fission Probability Method in Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® and Underlying Applications

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.; Malvagi, F.

    2014-06-01

    Pile-oscillation experiments are performed in the MINERVE reactor at the CEA Cadarache to improve nuclear data accuracy. In order to precisely calculate small reactivity variations (experiments, a reference calculation need to be achieved. This calculation may be accomplished using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® by using the eigenvalue difference method. This "direct" method has shown limitations in the evaluation of very small reactivity effects because it needs to reach a very small variance associated to the reactivity in both states. To answer this problem, it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4® and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4® is described. To illustrate the effciency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the "direct" estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the "direct" method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high precision. Other applications of

  16. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  17. Globally Conservative, Hybrid Self-Adjoint Angular Flux and Least-Squares Method Compatible with Void

    Laboure, Vincent M; Wang, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a method for the second-order form of the transport equation that is both globally conservative and compatible with voids, using Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM). The main idea is to use the Least-Squares (LS) form of the transport equation in the void regions and the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) form elsewhere. While the SAAF formulation is globally conservative, the LS formulation need a correction in void. The price to pay for this fix is the loss of symmetry of the bilinear form. We first derive this Conservative LS (CLS) formulation in void. Second we combine the SAAF and CLS forms and end up with an hybrid SAAF-CLS method, having the desired properties. We show that extending the theory to near-void regions is a minor complication and can be done without affecting the global conservation of the scheme. Being angular discretization agnostic, this method can be applied to both discrete ordinates (SN) and spherical harmonics (PN) methods. However, since a globally conse...

  18. The adjoint method for general EEG and MEG sensor-based lead field equations

    Vallaghe, Sylvain; Papadopoulo, Theodore; Clerc, Maureen [INRIA, Projet Odyssee, Sophia Antipolis (France)], E-mail: Sylvain.Vallaghe@sophia.inria.fr

    2009-01-07

    Most of the methods for the inverse source problem in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) use a lead field as an input. The lead field is the function which relates any source in the brain to its measurements at the sensors. For complex geometries, there is no analytical formula of the lead field. The common approach is to numerically compute the value of the lead field for a finite number of point sources (dipoles). There are several drawbacks: the model of the source space is fixed (a set of dipoles), and the computation can be expensive for as much as 10 000 dipoles. The common idea to bypass these problems is to compute the lead field from a sensor point of view. In this paper, we use the adjoint method to derive general EEG and MEG sensor-based lead field equations. Within a simple framework, we provide a complete review of the explicit lead field equations, and we are able to extend these equations to non-pointlike sensors.

  19. Using Adjoint-Based Forecast Sensitivity Method to Evaluate TAMDAR Data Impacts on Regional Forecasts

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the impact of Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR observations on regional 24-hour forecast error reduction over the Continental United States (CONUS domain using adjoint-based forecast sensitivity to observation (FSO method as the diagnostic tool. The relative impact of TAMDAR observations on reducing the forecast error was assessed by conducting the WRFDA FSO experiments for two two-week-long periods, one in January and one in June 2010. These experiments assimilated operational TAMDAR data and other conventional observations, as well as GPS refractivity (GPSREF. FSO results show that rawinsonde soundings (SOUND and TAMDAR exhibit the largest observation impact on 24 h WRF forecast, followed by GeoAMV, aviation routine weather reports (METAR, GPSREF, and synoptic observations (SYNOP. At 0000 and 1200 UTC, TAMDAR has an equivalent impact to SOUND in reducing the 24-hour forecast error. However, at 1800 UTC, TAMDAR has a distinct advantage over SOUND, which has the sparse observation report at these times. In addition, TAMDAR humidity observations at lower levels of the atmosphere (700 and 850 hPa have a significant impact on 24 h forecast error reductions. TAMDAR and SOUND observations present a qualitatively similar observation impact between FSO and Observation System Experiments (OSEs.

  20. A three-dimensional finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) for solute-transport modeling

    Heberton, C.I.; Russell, T.F.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the U.S. Geological Survey Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) algorithm that solves an integral form of the solute-transport equation, incorporating an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive and sink terms. Like the algorithm in the original version of the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model, ELLAM uses a method of characteristics approach to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The ELLAM algorithm, however, is based on an integral formulation of conservation of mass and uses appropriate numerical techniques to obtain global conservation of mass. The implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for an explicit formulation. Consequently, ELLAM allows large transport time increments to be used. ELLAM can produce qualitatively good results using a small number of transport time steps. A description of the ELLAM numerical method, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. The ELLAM algorithm was evaluated for the same set of problems used to test and evaluate Version 1 and Version 2 of MOC3D. These test results indicate that ELLAM offers a viable alternative to the explicit and implicit solvers in MOC3D. Its use is desirable when mass balance is imperative or a fast, qualitative model result is needed. Although accurate solutions can be generated using ELLAM, its efficiency relative to the two previously documented solution algorithms is problem dependent.

  1. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V. [Calculation Dept., Skoda JS plc, Orlik 266, 31606 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  2. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    multiple experiments or numerical simulations. Alternatively an inverse design method can be used. An adjoint optimization method can be used to achieve the optimum blowing rate. It is shown that the method works for both geometry optimization and active control of the flow in order to deflect the flow in desirable ways. An adjoint optimization method is described. It is used to determine the blowing distribution in the diverging section of a convergent-divergent nozzle that gives a desired pressure distribution in the nozzle. Both the direct and adjoint problems and their associated boundary conditions are developed. The adjoint method is used to determine the blowing distribution required to minimize the shock strength in the nozzle to achieve a known target pressure and to achieve close to an ideally expanded flow pressure. A multi-block structured solver is developed to calculate the flow solution and associated adjoint variables. Two and three-dimensional calculations are performed for internal and external of the nozzle domains. A two step MacCormack scheme based on predictor- corrector technique is was used for some calculations. The four and five stage Runge-Kutta schemes are also used to artificially march in time. A modified Runge-Kutta scheme is used to accelerate the convergence to a steady state. Second order artificial dissipation has been added to stabilize the calculations. The steepest decent method has been used for the optimization of the blowing velocity after the gradients of the cost function with respect to the blowing velocity are calculated using adjoint method. Several examples are given of the optimization of blowing using the adjoint method.

  3. Optimization of Open Boundary Conditions in a 3D Internal Tidal Model with the Adjoint Method around Hawaii

    Anzhou Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of inverse problem, the optimization of open boundary conditions (OBCs in a 3D internal tidal model is investigated with the adjoint method. Fourier coefficients of M2 internal tide on four open boundaries, which are regarded as OBCs, are inverted simultaneously. During the optimization, the steepest descent method is used to minimize cost function. The reasonability and feasibility of the model are tested by twin experiments (TEs. In TE1, OBCs on four open boundaries are successfully inverted by using independent point (IP strategy, suggesting that IP strategy is useful in parameter estimation. Results of TE2 indicate that the model is effective even by assimilating inaccurate “observations.” Based on conclusions of TEs, the M2 internal tide around Hawaii is simulated by assimilating T/P data in practical experiment. The simulated cochart shows good agreement with that obtained from the Oregon State University tidal model and T/P observations. Careful inspection shows that the major difference between simulated results and OSU model results is short-scale fluctuations superposed on coamplitude lines, which can be treated as the surface manifestation modulated by the internal tide. The computed surface manifestation along T/P tracks is comparable to the estimation in previous work.

  4. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  5. Towards magnetic sounding of the Earth's core by an adjoint method

    Li, K.; Jackson, A.; Livermore, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated and sustained by the so called geodynamo system in the core. Measurements of the geomagnetic field taken at the surface, downwards continued through the electrically insulating mantle to the core-mantle boundary (CMB), provide important constraints on the time evolution of the velocity, magnetic field and temperature anomaly in the fluid outer core. The aim of any study in data assimilation applied to the Earth's core is to produce a time-dependent model consistent with these observations [1]. Snapshots of these ``tuned" models provide a window through which the inner workings of the Earth's core, usually hidden from view, can be probed. We apply a variational data assimilation framework to an inertia-free magnetohydrodynamic system (MHD) [2]. Such a model is close to magnetostrophic balance [3], to which we have added viscosity to the dominant forces of Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz and buoyancy, believed to be a good approximation of the Earth's dynamo in the convective time scale. We chose to study the MHD system driven by a static temperature anomaly to mimic the actual inner working of Earth's dynamo system, avoiding at this stage the further complication of solving for the time dependent temperature field. At the heart of the models is a time-dependent magnetic field to which the core-flow is enslaved. In previous work we laid the foundation of the adjoint methodology, applied to a subset of the full equations [4]. As an intermediate step towards our ultimate vision of applying the techniques to a fully dynamic mode of the Earth's core tuned to geomagnetic observations, we present the intermediate step of applying the adjoint technique to the inertia-free Navier-Stokes equation in continuous form. We use synthetic observations derived from evolving a geophysically-reasonable magnetic field profile as the initial condition of our MHD system. Based on our study, we also propose several different strategies for accurately

  6. The forward and adjoint sensitivity methods of glacial isostatic adjustment: Existence, uniqueness and time-differencing scheme

    Martinec, Zdenek; Sasgen, Ingo; Velimsky, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two new methods for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity are presented: the forward sensitivity method (FSM) and the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM). These advanced formal methods are based on the time-domain,spectral-finite element method for modelling the GIA response of laterally heterogeneous earth models developed by Martinec (2000). There are many similarities between the forward method and the FSM and ASM for a general physical system. However, in the case of GIA, there are also important differences between the forward and sensitivity methods. The analysis carried out in this study results in the following findings. First, the forward method of GIA is unconditionally solvable, regardless of whether or not a combined ice and ocean-water load contains the first-degree spherical harmonics. This is also the case for the FSM, however, the ASM must in addition be supplemented by nine conditions on the misfit between the given GIA-related data and the forward model predictions to guarantee the existence of a solution. This constrains the definition of data least-squares misfit. Second, the forward method of GIA implements an ocean load as a free boundary-value function over an ocean area with a free geometry. That is, an ocean load and the shape of ocean, the so-called ocean function, are being sought, in addition to deformation and gravity-increment fields, by solving the forward method. The FSM and ASM also apply the adjoint ocean load as a free boundary-value function, but instead over an ocean area with the fixed geometry given by the ocean function determined by the forward method. In other words, a boundary-value problem for the forward method of GIA is free with respect to determining (i) the boundary-value data over an ocean area and (ii) the ocean function itself, while the boundary-value problems for the FSM and ASM are free only with respect to

  7. Estimation of Open Boundary Conditions for an Internal Tidal Model with Adjoint Method: A Comparative Study on Optimization Methods

    Haibo Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on an internal tidal model, the practical performances of the limited-memory BFGS (L-BFGS method and two gradient descent (GD methods (the normal one with Wolfe’s line search and the simplified one are investigated computationally through a series of ideal experiments in which the open boundary conditions (OBCs are inverted by assimilating the interior observations with the adjoint method. In the case that the observations closer to the unknown boundary are included for assimilation, the L-BFGS method performs the best. As compared with the simplified GD method, the normal one really uses less iteration to reach a satisfactory solution, but its advantage over the simplified one is much smaller than expected. In the case that only the observations that are further from the unknown boundary are assimilated, the simplified GD method performs the best instead, whereas the performances of the other two methods are not satisfactory. The advanced L-BFGS algorithm and Wolfe’s line search still need to be improved when applied to the practical cases. The simplified GD method, which is controllable and easy to implement, should be regarded seriously as a choice, especially when the classical advanced optimization techniques fail or perform poorly.

  8. Generalized adjoint systems

    Serakos, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    This book defines and develops the generalized adjoint of an input-output system. It is the result of a theoretical development and examination of the generalized adjoint concept and the conditions under which systems analysis using adjoints is valid. Results developed in this book are useful aids for the analysis and modeling of physical systems, including the development of guidance and control algorithms and in developing simulations. The generalized adjoint system is defined and is patterned similarly to adjoints of bounded linear transformations. Next the elementary properties of the generalized adjoint system are derived. For a space of input-output systems, a generalized adjoint map from this space of systems to the space of generalized adjoints is defined. Then properties of the generalized adjoint map are derived. Afterward the author demonstrates that the inverse of an input-output system may be represented in terms of the generalized adjoint. The use of generalized adjoints to determine bounds for ...

  9. The truncated Newton using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state method: a new approach for traveltime tomography without rays

    Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.

    2013-12-01

    Traveltime tomography algorithms generally use ray tracing. The use of rays in tomography may not be suitable for handling very large datasets and perform tomography in very complex media. Traveltime maps can be computed through finite-difference approach (FD) and avoid complex ray-tracing algorithm for the forward modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). However, rays back-traced from receiver to source following the gradient of traveltime are still used to compute the Fréchet derivatives. As a consequence, the sensitivity information computed using back-traced rays is not numerically consistent with the FD modeling used (the derivatives are only a rough approximation of the true derivatives of the forward modeling). Leung & Quian (2006) proposed a new approach that avoid ray tracing where the gradient of the misfit function is computed using the adjoint-state method. An adjoint-state variable is thus computed simultaneously for all receivers using a numerical method consistent with the forward modeling, and for the computational cost of one forward modeling. However, in their formulation, the receivers have to be located at the boundary of the investigated model, and the optimization approach is limited to simple gradient-based method (i.e. steepest descent, conjugate gradient) as only the gradient is computed. However, the Hessian operator has an important role in gradient-based reconstruction methods, providing the necessary information to rescale the gradient, correct for illumination deficit and remove artifacts. Leung & Quian (2006) uses LBFGS, a quasi-Newton method that provides an improved estimation of the influence of the inverse Hessian. Lelievre et al. (2011) also proposed a tomography approach in which the Fréchet derivatives are computed directly during the forward modeling using explicit symbolic differentiation of the modeling equations, resulting in a consistent Gauss-Newton inversion. We are interested here in the use of a new optimization approach

  10. Spectral-Element Simulations of Wave Propagation in Porous Media: Finite-Frequency Sensitivity Kernels Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2008-12-01

    successfully performed. We present finite-frequency sensitivity kernels for wave propagation in porous media based upon adjoint methods. We first show that the adjoint equations in porous media are similar to the regular Biot equations upon defining an appropriate adjoint source. Then we present finite-frequency kernels for seismic phases in porous media (e.g., fast P, slow P, and S). These kernels illustrate the sensitivity of seismic observables to structural parameters and form the basis of tomographic inversions. Finally, we show an application of this imaging technique related to the detection of buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) in porous environments.

  11. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    Much, Albert [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  12. Convergence of a semi-discretization scheme for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation: A new approach with the adjoint method

    Cagnetti, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a numerical scheme for the one dimensional time dependent Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the periodic setting. This scheme consists in a semi-discretization using monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian in the spacial variable. From classical viscosity solution theory, these schemes are known to converge. In this paper we present a new approach to the study of the rate of convergence of the approximations based on the nonlinear adjoint method recently introduced by L.C. Evans. We estimate the rate of convergence for convex Hamiltonians and recover the O(h) convergence rate in terms of the L∞ norm and O(h) in terms of the L1 norm, where h is the size of the spacial grid. We discuss also possible generalizations to higher dimensional problems and present several other additional estimates. The special case of quadratic Hamiltonians is considered in detail in the end of the paper. © 2013 IMACS.

  13. Quantifying the loss of information in source attribution problems using the adjoint method in global models of atmospheric chemical transport

    Santillana, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    It is of crucial importance to be able to identify the location of atmospheric pollution sources in our planet. Global models of atmospheric transport in combination with diverse Earth observing systems are a natural choice to achieve this goal. It is shown that the ability to successfully reconstruct the location and magnitude of an instantaneous source in global chemical transport models (CTMs) decreases rapidly as a function of the time interval between the pollution release and the observation time. A simple way to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon is proposed based on the effective -undesired- numerical diffusion present in current Eulerian CTMs and verified using idealized numerical experiments. The approach presented consists of using the adjoint-based optimization method in a state-of-the-art CTM, GEOS-Chem, to reconstruct the location and magnitude of a realistic pollution plume for multiple time scales. The findings obtained from these numerical experiments suggest a time scale of 2 days a...

  14. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocities and source parameters have been a long standing challenge in seismology since the first attempts to mitigate trade-off between very different parameters influencing travel-times (Spencer and Gubbins 1980, Pavlis and Booker 1980) since the early development in the 1970s (Aki et al 1976, Aki and Lee 1976, Crosson 1976). There is a strong trade-off between earthquake source positions, initial times and velocities during the tomographic inversion: mitigating these trade-offs is usually carried empirically (Lemeur et al 1997). This procedure is not optimal and may lead to errors in the velocity reconstruction as well as in the source localization. For a better simultaneous estimation of such multi-parametric reconstruction problem, one may take benefit of improved local optimization such as full Newton method where the Hessian influence helps balancing between different physical parameter quantities and improving the coverage at the point of reconstruction. Unfortunately, the computation of the full Hessian operator is not easily computed in large models and with large datasets. Truncated Newton (TCN) is an alternative optimization approach (Métivier et al. 2012) that allows resolution of the normal equation H Δm = - g using a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. It only requires to be able to compute the gradient of the misfit function and Hessian-vector products. Traveltime maps can be computed in the whole domain by numerical modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). The gradient and the Hessian-vector products for velocities can be computed without ray-tracing using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state methods for the cost of 1 and 2 additional modeling step (Plessix 2006, Métivier et al. 2012). Reciprocity allows to compute accurately the gradient and the full Hessian for each coordinates of the sources and for their initial times. Then the resolution of the problem is done through two nested loops. The model update Δm is

  15. Adjoint Error Estimation for Linear Advection

    Connors, J M; Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A; Woodward, C S

    2011-03-30

    An a posteriori error formula is described when a statistical measurement of the solution to a hyperbolic conservation law in 1D is estimated by finite volume approximations. This is accomplished using adjoint error estimation. In contrast to previously studied methods, the adjoint problem is divorced from the finite volume method used to approximate the forward solution variables. An exact error formula and computable error estimate are derived based on an abstractly defined approximation of the adjoint solution. This framework allows the error to be computed to an arbitrary accuracy given a sufficiently well resolved approximation of the adjoint solution. The accuracy of the computable error estimate provably satisfies an a priori error bound for sufficiently smooth solutions of the forward and adjoint problems. The theory does not currently account for discontinuities. Computational examples are provided that show support of the theory for smooth solutions. The application to problems with discontinuities is also investigated computationally.

  16. Aerospace Applications of Adjoint Theory

    2010-01-01

    program. Peterson [12], and later Howe [13] and Tarrant [14), illustrated how the method could be easily applied to the performance analysis of generic...Hill Book Company, New York, NY, 1965. [14] Tarrant , G.A., " The Method of Adjoint Systems and its Application to Guided Missile Noise Studies

  17. Assessing the Impact of Advanced Satellite Observations in the NASA GEOS-5 Forecast System Using the Adjoint Method

    Gelaro, Ron; Liu, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Meta

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. In this talk, we present results from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. The tool has been running in various off-line configurations for some time, and is scheduled to run as a regular part of the real-time forecast suite beginning in autumn 20 I O. We focus on the impacts of the newest components of the satellite observing system, including AIRS, IASI and GPS. For AIRS and IASI, it is shown that the vast majority of the channels assimilated have systematic positive impacts (of varying magnitudes), although some channels degrade the forecast. Of the latter, most are moisture-sensitive or near-surface channels. The impact of GPS observations in the southern hemisphere is found to be a considerable overall benefit to the system. In addition, the spatial variability of observation impacts reveals coherent patterns of positive and negative impacts that may point to deficiencies in the use of certain observations over, for example, specific surface types. When performed in conjunction with selected observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies appears to pose a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and

  18. Model adjointization and its cost

    CHENG Qiang; ZHANG Linbo; WANG Bin

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the least program behavior decomposition method (LPBD) is put forward from a program structure point of view. This method can be extensively used both in algorithms of automatic differentiation (AD) and in tools design, and does not require programs to be evenly separable but the cost in terms of operations count and memory is similar to methods using checkpointing. This article starts by summarizing the rules of adjointization and then presents the implementation of LPBD. Next, the definition of the separable program space, based on the fundamental assumptions (FA) of automatic differentiation, is given and the differentiation cost functions are derived. Also,two constants of fundamental importance in AD, σ and μ, are derived under FA. Under the assumption of even separability, the adjoint cost of simple and deep decomposition is subsequently discussed quantitatively using checkpointing. Finally, the adjoint costs in terms of operations count and memory through the LPBD method are shown to be uniformly dependent on the depth of structure or decomposition.

  19. Adjoint Methods for Adjusting Three-Dimensional Atmosphere and Surface Properties to Fit Multi-Angle Multi-Pixel Polarimetric Measurements

    Martin, William G.; Cairns, Brian; Bal, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This paper derives an efficient procedure for using the three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties and improve their fit with multi-angle/multi-pixel radiometric and polarimetric measurements of scattered sunlight. The proposed adjoint method uses the 3D VRTE to compute the measurement misfit function and the adjoint 3D VRTE to compute its gradient with respect to all unknown parameters. In the remote sensing problems of interest, the scalar-valued misfit function quantifies agreement with data as a function of atmosphere and surface properties, and its gradient guides the search through this parameter space. Remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface in a three-dimensional region may require thousands of unknown parameters and millions of data points. Many approaches would require calls to the 3D VRTE solver in proportion to the number of unknown parameters or measurements. To avoid this issue of scale, we focus on computing the gradient of the misfit function as an alternative to the Jacobian of the measurement operator. The resulting adjoint method provides a way to adjust 3D atmosphere and surface properties with only two calls to the 3D VRTE solver for each spectral channel, regardless of the number of retrieval parameters, measurement view angles or pixels. This gives a procedure for adjusting atmosphere and surface parameters that will scale to the large problems of 3D remote sensing. For certain types of multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements, this encourages the development of a new class of three-dimensional retrieval algorithms with more flexible parametrizations of spatial heterogeneity, less reliance on data screening procedures, and improved coverage in terms of the resolved physical processes in the Earth?s atmosphere.

  20. The continuous adjoint approach to the k-ω SST turbulence model with applications in shape optimization

    Kavvadias, I. S.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Dimitrakopoulos, G.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the gradient of aerodynamic objective functions with respect to design variables, in problems governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the k-ω SST turbulence model, is computed using the continuous adjoint method, for the first time. Shape optimization problems for minimizing drag, in external aerodynamics (flows around isolated airfoils), or viscous losses in internal aerodynamics (duct flows) are considered. Sensitivity derivatives computed with the proposed adjoint method are compared to those computed with finite differences or a continuous adjoint variant based on the frequently used assumption of frozen turbulence; the latter proves the need for differentiating the turbulence model. Geometries produced by optimization runs performed with sensitivities computed by the proposed method and the 'frozen turbulence' assumption are also compared to quantify the gain from formulating and solving the adjoint to the turbulence model equations.

  1. SQP-methods for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints: adjoint variables, sensitivity analysis and real-time control

    Büskens, Christof; Maurer, Helmut

    2000-08-01

    Parametric nonlinear optimal control problems subject to control and state constraints are studied. Two discretization methods are discussed that transcribe optimal control problems into nonlinear programming problems for which SQP-methods provide efficient solution methods. It is shown that SQP-methods can be used also for a check of second-order sufficient conditions and for a postoptimal calculation of adjoint variables. In addition, SQP-methods lead to a robust computation of sensitivity differentials of optimal solutions with respect to perturbation parameters. Numerical sensitivity analysis is the basis for real-time control approximations of perturbed solutions which are obtained by evaluating a first-order Taylor expansion with respect to the parameter. The proposed numerical methods are illustrated by the optimal control of a low-thrust satellite transfer to geosynchronous orbit and a complex control problem from aquanautics. The examples illustrate the robustness, accuracy and efficiency of the proposed numerical algorithms.

  2. Generalized uncertainty principle and self-adjoint operators

    Balasubramanian, Venkat, E-mail: vbalasu8@uwo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Das, Saurya, E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Vagenas, Elias C., E-mail: elias.vagenas@ku.edu.kw [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2015-09-15

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Neumann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  3. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Self-Adjoint Operators

    Balasubramanian, Venkat; Vagenas, Elias C

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Newmann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  4. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  5. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Urichuk, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows, and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  6. A reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    The adjoint method has been used very often for variational data assimilation. The computational cost to run the adjoint model often exceeds several original model runs and the method needs significant programming efforts to implement the adjoint model code. The work proposed here is variational data assimilation based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) which avoids the implementation of the adjoint of the tangent linear approximation of the original nonlinear model. An ensemble of the forward model simulations is used to determine the approximation of the covariance matrix and only the dominant eigenvectors of this matrix are used to define a model subspace. The adjoint of the tangent linear model is replaced by the reduced adjoint based on this reduced space. Thus the adjoint model is run in reduced space with negligible computational cost. Once the gradient is obtained in reduced space it is projected back in full space and the minimization process is carried in full space. In the paper the reduced adjoint approach to variational data assimilation is introduced. The characteristics and performance of the method are illustrated with a number of data assimilation experiments in a ground water subsurface contaminant model. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. An Application of the Adjoint Method to a Statistical-Dynamical Tropical-Cyclone Prediction Model (SD-90) Ⅱ: Real Tropical Cyclone Cases

    2006-01-01

    In the first paper in this series, a variational data assimilation of ideal tropical cyclone (TC) tracks was performed for the statistical-dynamical prediction model SD-90 by the adjoint method, and a prediction of TC tracks was made with good accuracy for tracks containing no sharp turns. In the present paper, the cases of real TC tracks are studied. Due to the complexity of TC motion, attention is paid to the diagnostic research of TC motion. First, five TC tracks are studied. Using the data of each entire TC track, by the adjoint method, five TC tracks are fitted well, and the forces acting on the TCs are retrieved. For a given TC, the distribution of the resultant of the retrieved force and Coriolis force well matches the corresponding TC track, i.e., when a TC turns, the resultant of the retrieved force and Coriolis force acts as a centripetal force, which means that the TC indeed moves like a particle; in particular, for TC 9911, the clockwise looping motion is also fitted well. And the distribution of the resultant appears to be periodic in some cases. Then, the present method is carried out for a portion of the track data for TC 9804, which indicates that when the amount of data for a TC track is sufficient, the algorithm is stable. And finally, the same algorithm is implemented for TCs with a double-eyewall structure, namely Bilis (2000) and Winnie (1997),and the results prove the applicability of the algorithm to TCs with complicated mesoscale structures if the TC track data are obtained every three hours.

  8. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  9. The compressible adjoint equations in geodynamics: equations and numerical assessment

    Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    The adjoint method is a powerful means to obtain gradient information in a mantle convection model relative to past flow structure. While the adjoint equations in geodynamics have been derived for the conservation equations of mantle flow in their incompressible form, the applicability of this approximation to Earth is limited, because density increases by almost a factor of two from the surface to the Core Mantle Boundary. Here we introduce the compressible adjoint equations for the conservation equations in the anelastic-liquid approximation. Our derivation applies an operator formulation in Hilbert spaces, to connect to recent work in seismology (Fichtner et al (2006)) and geodynamics (Horbach et al (2014)), where the approach was used to derive the adjoint equations for the wave equation and incompressible mantle flow. We present numerical tests of the newly derived equations based on twin experiments, focusing on three simulations. A first, termed Compressible, assumes the compressible forward and adjoint equations, and represents the consistent means of including compressibility effects. A second, termed Mixed, applies the compressible forward equation, but ignores compressibility effects in the adjoint equations, where the incompressible equations are used instead. A third simulation, termed Incompressible, neglects compressibility effects entirely in the forward and adjoint equations relative to the reference twin. The compressible and mixed formulations successfully restore earlier mantle flow structure, while the incompressible formulation yields noticeable artifacts. Our results suggest the use of a compressible formulation, when applying the adjoint method to seismically derived mantle heterogeneity structure.

  10. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. An adjoint based method for the inversion of the Juno and Cassini gravity measurements into wind fields

    Galanti, Eli

    2016-01-01

    During 2016-17 the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. This data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus allowing only calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model, is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends...

  12. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  13. AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO WIND FIELDS

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2016-04-01

    During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  14. Hamiltonian realizations of nonlinear adjoint operators

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Gray, W. Steven

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of state-space realizations for nonlinear adjoint operators. In particular, the relationships between nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operators, Hamiltonian extensions and port-controlled Hamiltonian systems are established. Then, characterizations of the adjoints of control

  15. Eigenvalues of singular differential operators by finite difference methods. II.

    Baxley, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    Note is made of an earlier paper which defined finite difference operators for the Hilbert space L2(m), and gave the eigenvalues for these operators. The present work examines eigenvalues for higher order singular differential operators by using finite difference methods. The two self-adjoint operators investigated are defined by a particular value in the same Hilbert space, L2(m), and are strictly positive with compact inverses. A class of finite difference operators is considered, with the idea of application to the theory of Toeplitz matrices. The approximating operators consist of a good approximation plus a perturbing operator.

  16. Optimization Design of Transonic Winglet Based on Discrete Adjoint Method%基于伴随算子的翼尖小翼优化设计

    杨洋; 刘学强; 覃宁

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic optimization design of transonic winglet is presented in this paper. The Osher scheme is used to solve the Navier- Stokes equations to obtain the aerodynamic coefficients. The turbulence model is k - ω model. A discrete adjoint solver is used to calculate efficiently the gradients, which make it possible to optimize for a large number of design variables. The coefficient design method is used for original design. The results show that the optimization of winglet can improve to 5. 8% ,and validate this method%采用基于伴随算子的优化设计方法,对跨音速翼尖小翼进行了优化设计.其中,采用基于多块结构网格的流场解算器计算气动力.解算器的空间离散采用Osher格式,湍流模型采用k-ω两方程模型.优化设计结果表明,采用优化设计后的翼尖小翼,能改善机翼的气动特性,在巡航状态下翼尖小翼能增加机翼的升阻比5.8%,从数值计算的角度表明了方法的有效性.

  17. Nonlinear self-adjointness and conservation laws

    Ibragimov, N H, E-mail: nib@bth.se [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden)

    2011-10-28

    The general concept of nonlinear self-adjointness of differential equations is introduced. It includes the linear self-adjointness as a particular case. Moreover, it embraces the strict self-adjointness (definition 1) and quasi-self-adjointness introduced earlier by the author. It is shown that the equations possessing nonlinear self-adjointness can be written equivalently in a strictly self-adjoint form by using appropriate multipliers. All linear equations possess the property of nonlinear self-adjointness, and hence can be rewritten in a nonlinear strictly self-adjoint form. For example, the heat equation u{sub t} - {Delta}u = 0 becomes strictly self-adjoint after multiplying by u{sup -1}. Conservation laws associated with symmetries are given in an explicit form for all nonlinearly self-adjoint partial differential equations and systems. (fast track communication)

  18. Adjoint string breaking in the pseudoparticle approach

    Szasz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We apply the pseudoparticle approach to SU(2) Yang-Mills theory and perform a detailed study of the potential between two static charges for various representations. Whereas for charges in the fundamental representation we find a linearly rising confining potential, we clearly observe string breaking, when considering charges in the adjoint representation. We also demonstrate Casimir scaling and compute gluelump masses for different spin and parity. Numerical results are in qualitative agreement with lattice results.

  19. Convergence Rates and Explicit Error Bounds of Hill's Method for Spectra of Self-Adjoint Differential Operators

    Tanaka, Ken'ichiro; Murashige, Sunao

    2012-01-01

    We present the convergence rates and the explicit error bounds of Hill's method, which is a numerical method for computing the spectra of ordinary differential operators with periodic coefficients. This method approximates the operator by a finite dimensional matrix. On the assumption that the operator is selfadjoint, it is shown that, under some conditions, we can obtain the convergence rates of eigenvalues with respect to the dimension and the explicit error bounds. Numerical examples demon...

  20. Optimal Multistage Algorithm for Adjoint Computation

    Aupy, Guillaume; Herrmann, Julien; Hovland, Paul; Robert, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We reexamine the work of Stumm and Walther on multistage algorithms for adjoint computation. We provide an optimal algorithm for this problem when there are two levels of checkpoints, in memory and on disk. Previously, optimal algorithms for adjoint computations were known only for a single level of checkpoints with no writing and reading costs; a well-known example is the binomial checkpointing algorithm of Griewank and Walther. Stumm and Walther extended that binomial checkpointing algorithm to the case of two levels of checkpoints, but they did not provide any optimality results. We bridge the gap by designing the first optimal algorithm in this context. We experimentally compare our optimal algorithm with that of Stumm and Walther to assess the difference in performance.

  1. Convergence Rates and Explicit Error Bounds of Hill's Method for Spectra of Self-Adjoint Differential Operators

    Tanaka, Ken'ichiro

    2012-01-01

    We present the convergence rates and the explicit error bounds of Hill's method, which is a numerical method for computing the spectra of ordinary differential operators with periodic coefficients. This method approximates the operator by a finite dimensional matrix. On the assumption that the operator is selfadjoint, it is shown that, under some conditions, we can obtain the convergence rates of eigenvalues with respect to the dimension and the explicit error bounds. Numerical examples demonstrate that we can verify these conditions using Gershgorin's theorem for some real problems. Main theorems are proved using the Dunford integrals which project an eigenvector to the corresponding eigenspace.

  2. Extension of the ADjoint Approach to a Laminar Navier-Stokes Solver

    Paige, Cody

    The use of adjoint methods is common in computational fluid dynamics to reduce the cost of the sensitivity analysis in an optimization cycle. The forward mode ADjoint is a combination of an adjoint sensitivity analysis method with a forward mode automatic differentiation (AD) and is a modification of the reverse mode ADjoint method proposed by Mader et al.[1]. A colouring acceleration technique is presented to reduce the computational cost increase associated with forward mode AD. The forward mode AD facilitates the implementation of the laminar Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The forward mode ADjoint method is applied to a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics solver. The resulting Euler and viscous ADjoint sensitivities are compared to the reverse mode Euler ADjoint derivatives and a complex-step method to demonstrate the reduced computational cost and accuracy. Both comparisons demonstrate the benefits of the colouring method and the practicality of using a forward mode AD. [1] Mader, C.A., Martins, J.R.R.A., Alonso, J.J., and van der Weide, E. (2008) ADjoint: An approach for the rapid development of discrete adjoint solvers. AIAA Journal, 46(4):863-873. doi:10.2514/1.29123.

  3. Unsteady adjoint of pressure loss for a fundamental transonic turbine vane

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Laskowski, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    High fidelity simulations, e.g., large eddy simulation are often needed for accurately predicting pressure losses due to wake mixing in turbomachinery applications. An unsteady adjoint of such high fidelity simulations is useful for design optimization in these aerodynamic applications. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions using a large eddy simulation model for a vane from VKI using aerothermal objectives. The unsteady adjoint method is effective in capturing the gradient for a short time interval aerothermal objective, whereas the method provides diverging gradients for long time-averaged thermal objectives. As the boundary layer on the suction side near the trailing edge of the vane is turbulent, it poses a challenge for the adjoint solver. The chaotic dynamics cause the adjoint solution to diverge exponentially from the trailing edge region when solved backwards in time. This results in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions. An energy analysis of the unstea...

  4. On adjoint symmetry equations, integrating factors and solutions of nonlinear ODEs

    Guha, Partha [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Inselstrasse 22, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Choudhury, A Ghose [Department of Physics, Surendranath College, 24/2 Mahatma Gandhi Road, Calcutta-700 009 (India); Khanra, Barun [Sailendra Sircar Vidyalaya, 62A Shyampukur Street, Calcutta-700 004 (India)], E-mail: partha.guha@mis.mpg.de, E-mail: a_ghosechoudhury@rediffmail.com, E-mail: barunkhanra@rediffmail.com

    2009-03-20

    We consider the role of the adjoint equation in determining explicit integrating factors and first integrals of nonlinear ODEs. In Chandrasekar et al (2006 J. Math. Phys. 47 023508), the authors have used an extended version of the Prelle-Singer method for a class of nonlinear ODEs of the oscillator type. In particular, we show that their method actually involves finding a solution of the adjoint symmetry equation. Next, we consider a coupled second-order nonlinear ODE system and derive the corresponding coupled adjoint equations. We illustrate how the coupled adjoint equations can be solved to arrive at a first integral.

  5. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    Bozdağ, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-12-01

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named `Titan', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used `crustal corrections'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ˜30 s body-wave data with ˜60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ˜17 s body waves with ˜45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the resolution

  6. Hamiltonian Realizations of Nonlinear Adjoint Operators

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Gray, W. Steven

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses state-space realizations for nonlinear adjoint operators. In particular the relationship among nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operators, Hamiltonian extensions and port-controlled Hamiltonian systems are clarified. The characterization of controllability, observability and Hankel ope

  7. Quasi self-adjoint nonlinear wave equations

    Ibragimov, N H [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden); Torrisi, M; Tracina, R, E-mail: nib@bth.s, E-mail: torrisi@dmi.unict.i, E-mail: tracina@dmi.unict.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, University of Catania (Italy)

    2010-11-05

    In this paper we generalize the classification of self-adjoint second-order linear partial differential equation to a family of nonlinear wave equations with two independent variables. We find a class of quasi self-adjoint nonlinear equations which includes the self-adjoint linear equations as a particular case. The property of a differential equation to be quasi self-adjoint is important, e.g. for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation. (fast track communication)

  8. Challenges in adjoint-based well location optimization when using well models

    Ashoori, E.; Jansen, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    There is a general consensus that the most efficient method for large-scale well location optimization is gradient-based with gradients computed with an adjoint formulation. Handels et al. (2007) (later published in journal form as Zandvliet et al., 2008), were the first to use the adjoint method fo

  9. Real data assimilation for optimization of frictional parameters and prediction of afterslip in the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake inferred from slip velocity by an adjoint method

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshihisa; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2015-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimizes the parameters used in a numerical model with a constraint of model dynamics achieving the better fit to observations. Optimized parameters can be utilized for the subsequent prediction with a numerical model and predicted physical variables are presumably closer to observations that will be available in the future, at least, comparing to those obtained without the optimization through data assimilation. In this work, an adjoint data assimilation system is developed for optimizing a relatively large number of spatially inhomogeneous frictional parameters during the afterslip period in which the physical constraints are a quasi-dynamic equation of motion and a laboratory derived rate and state dependent friction law that describe the temporal evolution of slip velocity at subduction zones. The observed variable is estimated slip velocity on the plate interface. Before applying this method to the real data assimilation for the afterslip of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, a synthetic data assimilation experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of optimizing the frictional parameters in the afterslip area. It is confirmed that the current system is capable of optimizing the frictional parameters A-B, A and L by adopting the physical constraint based on a numerical model if observations capture the acceleration and decaying phases of slip on the plate interface. On the other hand, it is unlikely to constrain the frictional parameters in the region where the amplitude of afterslip is less than 1.0 cm d-1. Next, real data assimilation for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake is conducted to incorporate slip velocity data inferred from time dependent inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System time-series. The optimized values of A-B, A and L are O(10 kPa), O(102 kPa) and O(10 mm), respectively. The optimized frictional parameters yield the better fit to the observations and the better prediction skill of slip

  10. 基于伴随算子的气动布局优化技术及其在大飞机机翼减阻中的应用%Wing optimization of large airplane by adjoint method

    吴文华; 陶洋; 陈德华; 王元靖; 黄勇

    2011-01-01

    为了提高大型飞机机翼的气动性能,发展了基于Bezier-Bernstein曲线的机翼气动布局参数化技术和网格变形技术,以及基于Navier-Stokes方程的流场解算器、伴随算子解算器和二次规划寻优算法,形成了气动布局优化软件.通过改变约束条件、设计参数范围和初始点,对机翼进行了一系列的极多参数和多约束的气动布局精细优化设计,得到了良好的优化结果,优化结果表明该优化方法是高效和可靠的.%The optimization software was developed to improve the performance of the wing of large airplane. This software include the three main techniques: the aerodynamic configuration parameterization and grid update technique based on Bezier-Bernstein curve parameterization method; the flow solver and adjoint solver based on three-dimensional (3 D) Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations; the optimization method based on sequential quadratic programming algorithm. This paper did series optimization for a wing with many design variables and different constraints and get some excellent results, The analysis to the result shows the optimization method is reliable and efficient.

  11. Adjoint-based Gradient Estimation Using the Space-time Solutions of Unknown Conservation Law Simulations

    Chen, Han

    2016-01-01

    Many control applications can be formulated as optimization constrained by conservation laws. Such optimization can be efficiently solved by gradient-based methods, where the gradient is obtained through the adjoint method. Traditionally, the adjoint method has not been able to be implemented in "gray-box" conservation law simulations. In gray-box simulations, the analytical and numerical form of the conservation law is unknown, but the space-time solution of relevant flow quantities is available. Without the adjoint gradient, optimization can be challenging for problems with many control variables. However, much information about the gray-box simulation is contained in its space-time solution, which motivates us to estimate the adjoint gradient by leveraging the space-time solution. This article considers a type of gray-box simulations where the flux function is partially unknown. A method is introduced to estimate the adjoint gradient at a cost independent of the number of control variables. The method firs...

  12. Adjoint Functors and Representation Dimensions

    Chang Chang XI

    2006-01-01

    We study the global dimensions of the coherent functors over two categories that are linked by a pair of adjoint functors. This idea is then exploited to compare the representation dimensions of two algebras. In particular, we show that if an Artin algebra is switched from the other, then they have the same representation dimension.

  13. Adjoint-based Optimal Flow Control for Compressible DNS

    Otero, J Javier; Sandberg, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    A novel adjoint-based framework oriented to optimal flow control in compressible direct numerical simulations is presented. Also, a new formulation of the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions is introduced, which enhances the stability of the adjoint simulations. The flow configuration chosen as a case study consists of a two dimensional open cavity flow with aspect ratio $L/H=3$ and Reynolds number $Re=5000$. This flow configuration is of particular interest, as the turbulent and chaotic nature of separated flows pushes the adjoint approach to its limit. The target of the flow actuation, defined as cost, is the reduction of the pressure fluctuations at the sensor location. To exploit the advantages of the adjoint method, a large number of control parameters is used. The control consists of an actuating sub-domain where a two-dimensional body force is applied at every point within the sub-volume. This results in a total of $2.256 \\cdot 10^6$ control parameters. The final actuation achieved a successful ...

  14. Analysis on observing optimization for the wind-driven circulation by an adjoint approach

    王东晓; 吴国雄; 朱江; 兰健

    2000-01-01

    The adjoint approach is a variational method which is often applied to data assimilation widely in meteorology and oceanography. It is used for analyses on observing optimization for the wind-driven Sverdrup circulation. The adjoint system developed by Thacker and Long (1992), which is based on the GFDL Byran-Cox model, includes three components, i. e. the forward model, the adjoint model and the optimal algorithm. The GFDL Byran-Cox model was integrated for a long time driven by a batch of ideal wind stresses whose meridional component is set to null and zonal component is a sine function of latitudes in a rectangle box with six vertical levels and 2 by 2 degree horizontal resolution. The results are regarded as a "real" representative of the wind-driven Sverdrup circulation, from which the four dimensional fields are allowed to be sampled in several ways, such as sampling at the different levels or along the different vertical sections. To set the different samples, the fields of temperature, salinity

  15. Sonic Boom Mitigation Through Aircraft Design and Adjoint Methodology

    Rallabhandi, Siriam K.; Diskin, Boris; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to design of the supersonic aircraft outer mold line (OML) by optimizing the A-weighted loudness of sonic boom signature predicted on the ground. The optimization process uses the sensitivity information obtained by coupling the discrete adjoint formulations for the augmented Burgers Equation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) equations. This coupled formulation links the loudness of the ground boom signature to the aircraft geometry thus allowing efficient shape optimization for the purpose of minimizing the impact of loudness. The accuracy of the adjoint-based sensitivities is verified against sensitivities obtained using an independent complex-variable approach. The adjoint based optimization methodology is applied to a configuration previously optimized using alternative state of the art optimization methods and produces additional loudness reduction. The results of the optimizations are reported and discussed.

  16. Adjoint-based approach to Enhancing Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed adjoint method for multi-component compressible flow is used to measure sensitivity of the mixing rate to initial perturbations in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT instabilities are performed at moderate Reynolds numbers. The DNS are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint provides a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). In this work, a QoI is defined based on the time-integrated scalar field to quantify the mixing rate. Therefore, the adjoint solution is used to measure sensitivity of this QoI to a set of initial perturbations, and inform a gradient-based line search to optimize mixing. We first demonstrate the adjoint approach in the linear regime and compare the optimized initial conditions to the expected values from linear stability analysis. The adjoint method is then used in the high Reynolds number limit where theory is no longer valid. Finally, chaos is known to contaminate the accuracy of the adjoint gradient in turbulent flows when integrated over long time horizons. We assess the influence of chaos on the accuracy of the adjoint gradient to guide the work of future studies on adjoint-based sensitivity of turbulent mixing. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  17. Singular Potentials in Quantum Mechanics and Ambiguity in the Self-Adjoint Hamiltonian

    Tamás Fülöp

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available For a class of singular potentials, including the Coulomb potential (in three and less dimensions and $V(x = g/x^2$ with the coefficient $g$ in a certain range ($x$ being a space coordinate in one or more dimensions, the corresponding Schrödinger operator is not automatically self-adjoint on its natural domain. Such operators admit more than one self-adjoint domain, and the spectrum and all physical consequences depend seriously on the self-adjoint version chosen. The article discusses how the self-adjoint domains can be identified in terms of a boundary condition for the asymptotic behaviour of the wave functions around the singularity, and what physical differences emerge for different self-adjoint versions of the Hamiltonian. The paper reviews and interprets known results, with the intention to provide a practical guide for all those interested in how to approach these ambiguous situations.

  18. Adjoint analysis of mixed continuous/discrete systems in simulink

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2010-01-01

    The adjoint simulation method is a well established and efficient tool for gaining insight and understanding of key parameters affecting the behaviour and performance of a guided missile homing system. Traditionally, the method has been employed by various missile companies during the preliminary an

  19. An Adjoint-Based Adaptive Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Song, Hajoon

    2013-10-01

    A new hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/four-dimensional variational data assimilation (EnKF/4D-VAR) approach is introduced to mitigate background covariance limitations in the EnKF. The work is based on the adaptive EnKF (AEnKF) method, which bears a strong resemblance to the hybrid EnKF/three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) method. In the AEnKF, the representativeness of the EnKF ensemble is regularly enhanced with new members generated after back projection of the EnKF analysis residuals to state space using a 3D-VAR [or optimal interpolation (OI)] scheme with a preselected background covariance matrix. The idea here is to reformulate the transformation of the residuals as a 4D-VAR problem, constraining the new member with model dynamics and the previous observations. This should provide more information for the estimation of the new member and reduce dependence of the AEnKF on the assumed stationary background covariance matrix. This is done by integrating the analysis residuals backward in time with the adjoint model. Numerical experiments are performed with the Lorenz-96 model under different scenarios to test the new approach and to evaluate its performance with respect to the EnKF and the hybrid EnKF/3D-VAR. The new method leads to the least root-mean-square estimation errors as long as the linear assumption guaranteeing the stability of the adjoint model holds. It is also found to be less sensitive to choices of the assimilation system inputs and parameters.

  20. MS S4.03.002 - Adjoint-Based Design for Configuration Shaping

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a method of inverse design for low sonic boom using adjoint-based gradient computations. It outlines a method for shaping a configuration in order to match a prescribed near-field signature.

  1. Eigenvalues of singular differential operators by finite difference methods. I.

    Baxley, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    Approximation of the eigenvalues of certain self-adjoint operators defined by a formal differential operator in a Hilbert space. In general, two problems are studied. The first is the problem of defining a suitable Hilbert space operator that has eigenvalues. The second problem concerns the finite difference operators to be used.

  2. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  3. Radiation source reconstruction with known geometry and materials using the adjoint

    Hykes, Joshua M.; Azmy, Yousry Y., E-mail: jmhykes@ncsu.edu, E-mail: yyazmy@ncsu.gov [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We present a method to estimate an unknown isotropic source distribution, in space and energy, using detector measurements when the geometry and material composition are known. The estimated source distribution minimizes the difference between the measured and computed responses of detectors located at a selected number of points within the domain. In typical methods, a forward flux calculation is performed for each source guess in an iterative process. In contrast, we use the adjoint flux to compute the responses. Potential applications of the proposed method include determining the distribution of radio-contaminants following a nuclear event, monitoring the flow of radioactive fluids in pipes to determine hold-up locations, and retroactive reconstruction of radiation fields using workers' detectors' readings. After presenting the method, we describe a numerical test problem to demonstrate the preliminary viability of the method. As expected, using the adjoint flux reduces the number of transport solves to be proportional to the number of detector measurements, in contrast to methods using the forward flux that require a typically larger number proportional to the number of spatial mesh cells. (author)

  4. Local fibred right adjoints are polynomial

    Kock, Anders; Kock, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense......For any locally cartesian closed category E, we prove that a local fibred right adjoint between slices of E is given by a polynomial. The slices in question are taken in a well known fibred sense...

  5. Goal-oriented space-time adaptivity for transient dynamics using a modal description of the adjoint solution

    Verdugo, Francesc; Parés, Núria; Díez, Pedro

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a space-time adaptive strategy for transient elastodynamics. The method aims at computing an optimal space-time discretization such that the computed solution has an error in the quantity of interest below a user-defined tolerance. The methodology is based on a goal-oriented error estimate that requires accounting for an auxiliary adjoint problem. The major novelty of this paper is using modal analysis to obtain a proper approximation of the adjoint solution. The idea of using a modal-based description was introduced in a previous work for error estimation purposes. Here this approach is used for the first time in the context of adaptivity. With respect to the standard direct time-integration methods, the modal solution of the adjoint problem is highly competitive in terms of computational effort and memory requirements. The performance of the proposed strategy is tested in two numerical examples. The two examples are selected to be representative of different wave propagation phenomena, one being a 2D bulky continuum and the second a 2D domain representing a structural frame.

  6. Monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, A; Lacagnina, G; Pica, C

    2008-01-01

    In QCD with adjoint fermions (aQCD) the deconfining transition takes place at a lower temperature than the chiral transition. We study the two transitions by use of the Polyakov Loop, the monopole order parameter and the chiral condensate. The deconfining transition is first order, the chiral is a crossover. The order parameters for confinement are not affected by the chiral transition. We conclude that the degrees of freedom relevant to confinement are different from those describing chiral symmetry.

  7. On the adjoint operator in photoacoustic tomography

    Arridge, Simon R.; Betcke, Marta M.; Cox, Ben T.; Lucka, Felix; Treeby, Brad E.

    2016-11-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging biomedical imaging from coupled physics technique, in which the image contrast is due to optical absorption, but the information is carried to the surface of the tissue as ultrasound pulses. Many algorithms and formulae for PAT image reconstruction have been proposed for the case when a complete data set is available. In many practical imaging scenarios, however, it is not possible to obtain the full data, or the data may be sub-sampled for faster data acquisition. In such cases, image reconstruction algorithms that can incorporate prior knowledge to ameliorate the loss of data are required. Hence, recently there has been an increased interest in using variational image reconstruction. A crucial ingredient for the application of these techniques is the adjoint of the PAT forward operator, which is described in this article from physical, theoretical and numerical perspectives. First, a simple mathematical derivation of the adjoint of the PAT forward operator in the continuous framework is presented. Then, an efficient numerical implementation of the adjoint using a k-space time domain wave propagation model is described and illustrated in the context of variational PAT image reconstruction, on both 2D and 3D examples including inhomogeneous sound speed. The principal advantage of this analytical adjoint over an algebraic adjoint (obtained by taking the direct adjoint of the particular numerical forward scheme used) is that it can be implemented using currently available fast wave propagation solvers.

  8. Determining scaling laws from geodynamic simulations using adjoint gradients.

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Whereas significant progress has been made in modelling of lithospheric and crustal scale processes in recent years, it often remains a challenge to understand which of the many model parameters is of key importance for a particular simulation. Determining this is usually done by manually changing the model input parameters and performing new simulations. For a few cases, such as for crustal-scale folding instabilities (with viscous rheologies, e.g. [1]) or for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, one can use existing scaling laws to obtain such insights. Yet, for a more general case, it is not straightforward to do this (apart from running many simulations). Here, we test a different approach which computes gradients of the model parameters using adjoint based methods, which has the advantage that we can test the influence of an independent number of parameters on the system by computing and analysing the covariance matrix and the gradient of the parameter space. This method might give us the chance to get insights on which parameters affect for example subduction processes and how strong the system depends on their influence. [1] Fernandez, N., & Kaus, B. J. (2014). Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models of multilayer detachment folding. Tectonophysics, 632, 199-217.

  9. A general nonlinear inverse transport algorithm using forward and adjoint flux computations

    Norton, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Iterative approaches to the nonlinear inverse transport problem are described, which give rise to the structure that best predicts a set of transport observations. Such methods are based on minimizing a global error functional measuring the discrepancy between predicted and observed transport data. Required for this minimization is the functional gradient (Frechet derivative) of the global error evaluated with respect to a set of unknown material parameters (specifying boundary locations, scattering cross sections, etc.) which are to be determined. It is shown how this functional gradient is obtained from numerical solutions to the forward and adjoint transport problems computed once per iteration. This approach is not only far more efficient, but also more accurate, than a finite-difference method for computing the gradient of the global error. The general technique can be applied to inverse-transport problems of all descriptions, provided only that solutions to the forward and adjoint problems can be found numerically. As an illustration, two inverse problems are treated: the reconstruction of an anisotropic scattering function in a one-dimensional homogeneous slab and the two-dimensional imaging of a spatially-varying scattering cross section.

  10. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  11. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  12. The Roots of Adjoint Polynomial of the Graphs Contain Triangles

    YECheng-fu

    2004-01-01

    We denote h(G,x) as the adjoint polynomial of graph G. In [5], Ma obtained the interpolation properties of the roots of adjoint polynomial of graphs containing triangles. By the properties, we prove the non-zero root of adjoint polynomial of Dn and Fn are single multiple.

  13. On a difference scheme for nonlocal heat transfer boundary-value problem

    Akhymbek, Meiram E.; Sadybekov, Makhmud A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of solving nonlocal problems for the heat equation with finite difference method. The main important feature of these problems is their non-self-adjointness. This non-self-adjointness causes major difficulties in their analytical and numerical solving. The problems, which boundary conditions do not possess strong regularity, are less studied. The scope of study of the paper justifies possibility of building a stable difference scheme with weights for abovementioned type of problems.

  14. Adjoint Based A Posteriori Analysis of Multiscale Mortar Discretizations with Multinumerics

    Tavener, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we derive a posteriori error estimates for linear functionals of the solution to an elliptic problem discretized using a multiscale nonoverlapping domain decomposition method. The error estimates are based on the solution of an appropriately defined adjoint problem. We present a general framework that allows us to consider both primal and mixed formulations of the forward and adjoint problems within each subdomain. The primal subdomains are discretized using either an interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method or a continuous Galerkin method with weakly imposed Dirichlet conditions. The mixed subdomains are discretized using Raviart- Thomas mixed finite elements. The a posteriori error estimate also accounts for the errors due to adjoint-inconsistent subdomain discretizations. The coupling between the subdomain discretizations is achieved via a mortar space. We show that the numerical discretization error can be broken down into subdomain and mortar components which may be used to drive adaptive refinement.Copyright © by SIAM.

  15. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations: Applications Toward Complex 3D Configutations

    Brezillon, Joël; Dwight, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast and accurate evaluations of the gradients with respect to the design parameters - is seen as a promising strategy. After describing the theory of the viscous discrete adjoint method and its impleme...

  16. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations: Applications towards Complex 3D Configurations

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast and accurate evaluations of the gradients with respect to the design parameters - is seen as a promising strategy. After describing the theory of the viscous discrete adjoint method and its impleme...

  17. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio;

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the...

  18. Adjoint accuracy for the full-Stokes ice flow model: limits to the transmission of basal friction variability to the surface

    Martin, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the numerical assessment of the accuracy of an adjoint-based gradient in the perspective of variational data assimilation and parameter identification in glaciology. Using noisy synthetic data, we quantify the ability to identify the friction coefficient for such methods with a non-linear friction law. The exact adjoint problem is solved, based on second order numerical schemes, and a comparison with the so called "self-adjoint" approximation, neglecting the viscosity dependency to the velocity (leading to an incorrect gradient), common in glaciology, is carried out. For data with a noise of $1\\%$, a lower bound of identifiable wavelengths of $10$ ice thicknesses in the friction coefficient is established, when using the exact adjoint method, while the "self-adjoint" method is limited, even for lower noise, to a minimum of $20$ ice thicknesses wavelengths. The second order exact gradient method therefore provides robustness and reliability for the parameter identification process. In othe...

  19. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  20. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    Z. Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr−1, with wetland methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr−1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 were in the range of 14.6–30.4 Tg yr−1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr−1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr−1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.

  1. Monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Lacagnina, G; Pica, C

    2006-01-01

    Two distinct phase transitions occur at different temperatures in QCD with adjoint fermions (aQCD): deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration. In this model, quarks do no explicitely break the center Z(3) symmetry and therefore the Polyakov loop is a good order parameter for the deconfinement transition. We study monopole condensation by inspecting the expectation value of an operator which creates a monopole. Such a quantity is expected to be an order parameter for the deconfinement transition as in the case of fundamental fermions.

  2. Advances in Global Adjoint Tomography -- Massive Data Assimilation

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity are key to understanding a myriad of processes in Earth's interior. Resolving these properties requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3-D Earth models and an iterative inversion strategy. In the wake of successes in regional studies(e.g., Chen et al., 2007; Tape et al., 2009, 2010; Fichtner et al., 2009, 2010; Chen et al.,2010; Zhu et al., 2012, 2013; Chen et al., 2015), we are employing adjoint tomography based on a spectral-element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999, 2002) on a global scale using the supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After 15 iterations, we have obtained a high-resolution transversely isotropic Earth model (M15) using traveltime data from 253 earthquakes. To obtain higher resolution images of the emerging new features and to prepare the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity, we expanded the original dataset with approximately 4,220 additional global earthquakes (Mw5.5-7.0) --occurring between 1995 and 2014-- and downloaded 300-minute-long time series for all available data archived at the IRIS Data Management Center, ORFEUS, and F-net. Ocean Bottom Seismograph data from the last decade are also included to maximize data coverage. In order to handle the huge dataset and solve the I/O bottleneck in global adjoint tomography, we implemented a python-based parallel data processing workflow based on the newly developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). With the help of the data selection tool MUSTANG developed by IRIS, we cleaned our dataset and assembled event-based ASDF files for parallel processing. We have started Centroid Moment Tensors (CMT) inversions for all 4,220 earthquakes with the latest model M15, and selected high-quality data for measurement. We will statistically investigate each channel using synthetic seismograms calculated in M15 for updated CMTs and identify problematic channels. In addition to data screening, we also modified

  3. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  4. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  5. Tracking influential haze source areas in North China using an adjoint model, GRAPES-CUACE

    An, X. Q.; Zhai, S. X.; Jin, M.; Gong, S. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Based upon the adjoint theory, the adjoint of the aerosol module in the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) was developed and tested for its correctness. Through statistic comparison, BC (black carbon aerosol) concentrations simulated by GRAPES-CUACE were generally consistent with observations from Nanjiao (one urban observation station) and Shangdianzi (one rural observation station) stations. To track the most influential emission-sources regions and the most influential time intervals for the high BC concentration during the simulation period, the adjoint model was adopted to simulate the sensitivity of average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) with respect to BC emission amount over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions were selected based on administrative division and sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint model was used to quantify the effects of emission-sources reduction in different time intervals over different regions by one independent simulation. Effects of different emission reduction strategies based on adjoint sensitivity information show that the more influential regions (regions with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions, and the influence effectiveness of sensitivity-oriented regions was greater than the administrative divisions. The influence of emissions on the objective function decreases sharply approximately for the pollutants emitted 17-18 h ago in this episode. Therefore, controlling critical emission regions during critical time intervals on the basis of adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative specified regions during an experiential time period.

  6. Study on Anti-inflammatory Effect and Adjoint Toxical and Side Effects of Different Extract from Fructus Bruceae%鸦胆子不同组分抗炎与伴随毒副作用研究

    杨倩; 吕莉莉; 张丽美; 孙蓉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To offer experimental basement for the elucidation of dependablity between "toxicity-efficacy" by researching the adjoint toxical and side effects of anti-inflammatory effect of water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae. Methods The model of ear swelling by croton oil and granuloma by agar were made and model mice were administrated with water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae of high, middle and low dosage 3/7 days continually. The activities of serum ALT, AST and contents of Cr, BUN were detected while the ratio of liver and kidney to body was measured. Results Both ear swelling by croton oil and granuloma by agar can be inhibited by multiple intragastric administration of water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae. The swelling depressive rate of water extract was higher than that of alcohol extract and showed a well "dose-effect" relationship. The activities of serum ALT, AST and ratio of liver to body showed little change, but both the contents of Cr and BUN and ratio of kidney to body increased significantly with doses and time. Conclusion Both water and alcohol extract from Fructus Bruceae at effective dosage could efficiently inhibit acute and chronic inflammation. At the same time some toxical and side effects can be caused to kidney, however, the occurrence mechanism of its toxical and side effects still need further study.%目的 对鸦胆子水提、醇提组分发挥抗炎药效剂量下出现的伴随毒副作用进行观察与研究,为阐明其"毒性-功效"相关性提供实验依据.方法 建立小鼠巴豆油耳肿胀模型和琼脂肉芽肿模型,并分别给小鼠灌胃高、中、低不同剂量的鸦胆子水提、醇提组分连续3天和7天,末次给药后取血检测血清丙氨酸氨基转移酶(ALT)、天门冬氨酸氨基转移酶(AST)活性及肌Of(Cr)、尿素氮(BUN)含量变化并取肝、肾称重计算脏体比值.结果 连续多次给小鼠灌胃药效剂量的鸦胆子水提和醇提组分均可明

  7. The order-preserving convergence for spectral approximation of self-adjoint completely continuous operators

    YANG YiDu; CHEN Zhen

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the order-preserving convergence for spectral approximation of the self-adjoint completely continuous operator T. Under the condition that the approximate operator Th converges to T in norm, it is proven that the k-th eigenvalue of Th converges to the k-th eigenvalue of T.(We sorted the positive eigenvalues in decreasing order and negative eigenvalues in increasing order.) Then we apply this result to conforming elements,nonconforming elements and mixed elements of self-adjoint elliptic differential operators eigenvalue problems, and prove that the k-th approximate eigenvalue obtained by these methods converges to the k-th exact eigenvalue.

  8. Adjoint Vector Method-based Optimal Disturbance Rejection for Multiple-delay Systems%基于伴随向量方法的多延时系统最优扰动抑制

    雷靖; 白雪玲

    2012-01-01

    The paper considers the optimal disturbance rejection problem for continuous-time systems with state, control, and measurement delays. Firstly, the conditions of system transformation are analyzed and the approach is proposed , based on which the original system is transformed into one without delays. Then combining the system and the exosystem to an augmented system, the optimal disturbance rejection control problem is converted to an optimal state regulator problem. The necessity is proved by using Pontryagin minimum principle and the sufficiency is proved applying dynamic programming. The physical unrealization problem of disturbance vector and optimal performance index is solved by defining an adjoint vector. Finally, numerical simulations are made to compare the system responses using some different control laws. The effectiveness and simplicity of the designed control law are demonstrated.%研究包含有状态、控制和测量延时连续系统的最优扰动抑制问题.首先分析并提出了系统转换的方法,将原系统转化为无延时项的连续系统.然后将该系统与扰动系统联立为增广系统,并将最优扰动抑制问题转化为最优状态调节器问题.运用Pontryagin极小值原理证明最优控制的必要性,运用动态规划法证明其充分性;通过定义伴随向量解决了扰动向量和最优性能指标物理不可实现的问题.最后运用数据仿真将几种不同控制律作用下的系统响应作比较,验证所设计控制律的有效性及简易性.

  9. Chiral transition of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Capdevilla, R.M. [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Doff, A., E-mail: agomes@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Natale, A.A., E-mail: natale@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170 Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    The chiral symmetry breaking transition of quarks in the fundamental and adjoint representation is studied in a model where the gap equation contains two contributions, one containing a confining propagator and another corresponding to the exchange of one-dressed dynamically massive gluons. When quarks are in the fundamental representation the confinement effect dominates the chiral symmetry breaking while the gluon exchange is suppressed due to the dynamical gluon mass effect in the propagator and in the coupling constant. In this case the chiral and deconfinement transition temperatures are approximately the same. For quarks in the adjoint representation, due to the larger Casimir eigenvalue, the gluon exchange is operative and the chiral transition happens at a larger temperature than the deconfinement one.

  10. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the anomalous dimension of the Dirac fermion mass operator to be less than one in the conformal window.

  11. Chiral phases of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Natale, A. A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC 09210-170, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Física Teórica - UNESP Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bl.II - 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-22

    We consider a QCD chiral symmetry breaking model where the gap equation contains an effective confining propagator and a dressed gluon propagator with a dynamically generated mass. This model is able to explain the ratios between the chiral transition and deconfinement temperatures in the case of fundamental and adjoint quarks. It also predicts the recovery of the chiral symmetry for a large number of quarks (n{sub f} ≈ 11 – 13) in agreement with lattice data.

  12. Solution of the self-adjoint radiative transfer equation on hybrid computer systems

    Gasilov, V. A.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Chetverushkin, B. N.

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for simulating three-dimensional radiative energy transfer for the use in the software designed for the predictive simulation of plasma with high energy density on parallel computers is proposed. A highly scalable algorithm that takes into account the angular dependence of the radiation intensity and is free of the ray effect is developed based on the solution of a second-order equation with a self-adjoint operator. A distinctive feature of this algorithm is a preliminary transformation of rotation to eliminate mixed derivatives with respect to the spatial variables, simplify the structure of the difference operator, and accelerate the convergence of the iterative solution of the equation. It is shown that the proposed method correctly reproduces the limiting cases—isotropic radiation and the directed radiation with a δ-shaped angular distribution.

  13. Supersymmetric Descendants of Self-Adjointly Extended Quantum Mechanical Hamiltonians

    Al-Hashimi, M H; Shalaby, A; Wiese, U -J

    2013-01-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  14. On the inequivalence of renormalization and self-adjoint extensions for quantum singular interactions

    Camblong, Horacio E. [Department of Physics, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117-1080 (United States)]. E-mail: camblong@usfca.edu; Epele, Luis N. [Laboratorio de Fisica Teorica, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67-1900 La Plata (Argentina); Fanchiotti, Huner [Laboratorio de Fisica Teorica, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67-1900 La Plata (Argentina); Garcia Canal, Carlos A. [Laboratorio de Fisica Teorica, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67-1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ordonez, Carlos R. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5506 (United States); World Laboratory Center for Pan-American Collaboration in Science and Technology, University of Houston Center, Houston, TX 77204-5506 (United States)

    2007-05-14

    A unified S-matrix framework of quantum singular interactions is presented for the comparison of self-adjoint extensions and physical renormalization. For the long-range conformal interaction the two methods are not equivalent, with renormalization acting as selector of a preferred extension and regulator of the unbounded Hamiltonian.

  15. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  16. Confining vs. conformal scenario for SU(2) with 2 adjoint fermions. Mesonic spectrum

    Pica, Claudio; Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio;

    2010-01-01

    The Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model, based on the SU(2) gauge group with two Dirac adjoint fermions, is expected to lie close to the lower boundary of the conformal window. As such, it is believed to possess a dynamics different enough from QCD to be a viable candidate for a Technicolor t...

  17. 3-D crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath NE China revealed by ambient noise adjoint tomography

    Liu, Yaning; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Min; Yang, Wencai

    2017-03-01

    We construct a new 3-D shear wave speed model of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath Northeast China using the ambient noise adjoint tomography method. Without intermediate steps of measuring phase dispersion, the adjoint tomography inverts for shear wave speeds of the crust and uppermost mantle directly from 6-40 s waveforms of Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) of Rayleigh waves, which are derived from interferometry of two years of ambient noise data recorded by the 127 Northeast China Extended Seismic Array stations. With an initial 3-D model derived from traditional asymptotic surface wave tomography method, adjoint tomography refines the 3-D model by iteratively minimizing the frequency-dependent traveltime misfits between EGFs and synthetic Green's functions measured in four period bands: 6-15 s, 10-20 s, 15-30 s, and 20-40 s. Our new model shows shear wave speed anomalies that are spatially correlated with known tectonic units such as the Great Xing'an range and the Changbaishan mountain range. The new model also reveals low wave speed conduits in the mid-lower crust and the uppermost mantle with a wave speed reduction indicative of partial melting beneath the Halaha, Xilinhot-Abaga, and Jingpohu volcanic complexes, suggesting that the Cenozoic volcanism in the area has a deep origin. Overall, the adjoint tomographic images show more vertically continuous velocity anomalies with larger amplitudes due to the consideration of the finite frequency and 3-D effects.

  18. Local Volatility Calibration Using An Adjoint Proxy

    Gabriel TURINICI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We document the calibration of the local volatility in a framework similar to Coleman, Li and Verma. The quality of a surface is assessed through a functional to be optimized; the specificity of the approach is to separate the optimization (performed with any suitable optimization algorithm from the computation of the functional where we use an adjoint (as in L. Jiang et. al. to obtain an approximation; moreover our main calibration variable is the implied volatility (the procedure can also accommodate the Greeks. The procedure performs well on benchmarks from the literature and on FOREX data.

  19. Elementary operators on self-adjoint operators

    Molnar, Lajos; Semrl, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and let and be standard *-operator algebras on H. Denote by and the set of all self-adjoint operators in and , respectively. Assume that and are surjective maps such that M(AM*(B)A)=M(A)BM(A) and M*(BM(A)B)=M*(B)AM*(B) for every pair , . Then there exist an invertible bounded linear or conjugate-linear operator and a constant c[set membership, variant]{-1,1} such that M(A)=cTAT*, , and M*(B)=cT*BT, .

  20. Development of CO2 inversion system based on the adjoint of the global coupled transport model

    Belikov, Dmitry; Maksyutov, Shamil; Chevallier, Frederic; Kaminski, Thomas; Ganshin, Alexander; Blessing, Simon

    2014-05-01

    We present the development of an inverse modeling system employing an adjoint of the global coupled transport model consisting of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) Eulerian transport model (TM) and the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM) FLEXPART. NIES TM is a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, which solves the continuity equation for a number of atmospheric tracers on a grid spanning the entire globe. Spatial discretization is based on a reduced latitude-longitude grid and a hybrid sigma-isentropic coordinate in the vertical. NIES TM uses a horizontal resolution of 2.5°×2.5°. However, to resolve synoptic-scale tracer distributions and to have the ability to optimize fluxes at resolutions of 0.5° and higher we coupled NIES TM with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART. The Lagrangian component of the forward and adjoint models uses precalculated responses of the observed concentration to the surface fluxes and 3-D concentrations field simulated with the FLEXPART model. NIES TM and FLEXPART are driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis dataset. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian part is less complicated, as LPDMs calculate the sensitivity of measurements to the surrounding emissions field by tracking a large number of "particles" backwards in time. Developing of the adjoint to Eulerian part was performed with automatic differentiation tool the Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) software (http://www.FastOpt.com). This method leads to the discrete adjoint of NIES TM. The main advantage of the discrete adjoint is that the resulting gradients of the numerical cost function are exact, even for nonlinear algorithms. The overall advantages of our method are that: 1. No code modification of Lagrangian model is required, making it applicable to combination of global NIES TM and any Lagrangian model; 2. Once run, the Lagrangian output can be applied to any chemically neutral gas; 3. High-resolution results can be obtained over

  1. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    Liu, Chang; Boozer, Allen H; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    A new method to obtain the runaway probability and the expected slowing-down time for runaway electrons is developed, by solving the adjoint Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. The runaway probability function has a smooth transition at the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to the effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. The expected slowing-down time gives a new way to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. The result shows that the decay rate of high energy electron is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field, which helps elucidate the hysteresis effect seen in the runaway electron population. Given the same numerical accuracy, the new method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Adjoint analysis of the source and path sensitivities of basin-guided waves

    Day, Steven M.; Roten, Daniel; Olsen, Kim B.

    2012-05-01

    Simulations of earthquake rupture on the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) reveal large amplifications in the San Gabriel and Los Angeles Basins (SGB and LAB) apparently associated with long-range path effects. Geometrically similar excitation patterns can be recognized repeatedly in different SAF simulations (e.g. Love wave-like energy with predominant period around 4 s, channelled southwestwardly from the SGB into LAB), yet the amplitudes with which these distinctive wavefield patterns are excited change, depending upon source details (slip distribution, direction and velocity of rupture). We describe a method for rapid calculation of the sensitivity of such predicted wavefield features to perturbations of the source kinematics, using a time-reversed (adjoint) wavefield simulation. The calculations are analogous to those done in adjoint tomography, and the same time-reversed calculation also yields path-sensitivity kernels that give further insight into the excitation mechanism. For rupture on the southernmost 300 km of SAF, LAB excitation is greatest for slip concentrated between the northern Coachella Valley and the transverse ranges, propagating to the NE and with rupture velocities between 3250 and 3500 m s-1 along that fault segment; that is, within or slightly above the velocity range (between Rayleigh and S velocities) that is energetically precluded in the limit of a sharp rupture front, highlighting the potential value of imposing physical constraints (such as from spontaneous rupture models) on source parametrizations. LAB excitation is weak for rupture to the SW and for ruptures in either direction located north of the transverse transverse ranges, whereas Ventura Basin (VTB) is preferentially excited by NE ruptures situated north of the transverse ranges. Path kernels show that LAB excitation is mediated by surface waves deflected by the velocity contrast along the southern margin of the transverse ranges, having most of their energy in basement rock

  3. Parameter and state estimation with a time-dependent adjoint marine ice sheet model

    D. N. Goldberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To date, assimilation of observations into large-scale ice models has consisted predominantly of time-independent inversions of surface velocities for basal traction, bed elevation, or ice stiffness, and has relied primarily on analytically-derived adjoints of diagnostic ice velocity models. To overcome limitations of such "snapshot" inversions, i.e. their inability to assimilate time-dependent data, or to produce initial states with minimum artificial drift and suitable for time-dependent simulations, we have developed an adjoint of a time-dependent parallel glaciological flow model. The model implements a hybrid shallow shelf-shallow ice stress balance, involves a prognostic equation for ice thickness evolution, and can represent the floating, fast-sliding, and frozen bed regimes of a marine ice sheet. The adjoint is generated by a combination of analytic methods and the use of algorithmic differentiation (AD software. Several experiments are carried out with idealized geometries and synthetic observations, including inversion of time-dependent surface elevations for past thicknesses, and simultaneous retrieval of basal traction and topography from surface data. Flexible generation of the adjoint for a range of independent uncertain variables is exemplified through sensitivity calculations of grounded ice volume to changes in basal melting of floating and basal sliding of grounded ice. The results are encouraging and suggest the feasibility, using real observations, of improved ice sheet state estimation and comprehensive transient sensitivity assessments.

  4. Self-adjointness of the Gaffney Laplacian on Vector Bundles

    Bandara, Lashi, E-mail: lashi.bandara@chalmers.se [Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Mathematical Sciences (Sweden); Milatovic, Ognjen, E-mail: omilatov@unf.edu [University of North Florida, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We study the Gaffney Laplacian on a vector bundle equipped with a compatible metric and connection over a Riemannian manifold that is possibly geodesically incomplete. Under the hypothesis that the Cauchy boundary is polar, we demonstrate the self-adjointness of this Laplacian. Furthermore, we show that negligible boundary is a necessary and sufficient condition for the self-adjointness of this operator.

  5. On the product of the self-adjoint operators

    Wulf Rehder

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A proof is given for the fact that the product of two self-adjoint operators, one of which is also positive, is again self-adjoint if and only if the product is normal. This theorem applies, in particular, if one operator is an orthogonal projection. In general, the positivity requirement cannot be dropped.

  6. Haydock's recursive solution of self-adjoint problems. Discrete spectrum

    Moroz, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Haydock's recursive solution is shown to underline a number of different concepts such as (i) quasi-exactly solvable models, (ii) exactly solvable models, (iii) three-term recurrence solutions based on Schweber's quantization criterion in Hilbert spaces of entire analytic functions, and (iv) a discrete quantum mechanics of Odake and Sasaki. A recurrent theme of Haydock's recursive solution is that the spectral properties of any self-adjoint problem can be mapped onto a corresponding sequence of polynomials {pn(E) } in energy variable E. The polynomials {pn(E) } are orthonormal with respect to the density of states n0(E) and energy eigenstate | E > is the generating function of {pn(E) } . The generality of Haydock's recursive solution enables one to see the different concepts from a unified perspective and mutually benefiting from each other. Some results obtained within the particular framework of any of (i) to (iv) may have much broader significance.

  7. Correspondence of the eigenvalues of a non-self-adjoint operator to those of a self-adjoint operator

    Weir, John

    2008-01-01

    We prove that the eigenvalues of a certain highly non-self-adjoint operator correspond, up to scaling by a positive constant, to those of a self-adjoint operator with compact resolvent; hence there are infinitely many eigenvalues which accumulate only at infinity.

  8. Adjoint operators and perturbation theory of black holes

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, R

    2000-01-01

    We present a new approach for finding conservation laws in the perturbation theory of black holes which applies for the more general cases of non-Hermitian equations governing the perturbations. The approach is based on a general result which establishes that a covariantly conserved current can be obtained from a solution of any system of homogeneous linear differential equations and a solution of the adjoint system. It is shown that the results obtained from the present approach become essentially the same (with some diferences) to those obtained by means of the traditional methods in the simplest black hole geometry corresponding to the Schwarzschild space-time. The future applications of our approach for studying the perturbations of black hole space-time in string theory is discussed.

  9. Non-variational approximation of discrete eigenvalues of self-adjoint operators

    Boulton, Lyonell

    2005-01-01

    We establish sufficiency conditions in order to achieve approximation to discrete eigenvalues of self-adjoint operators in the second-order projection method suggested recently by Levitin and Shargorodsky, [math.SP/0212087]. We find explicit estimates for the eigenvalue error and study in detail two concrete model examples. Our results show that, unlike the majority of the standard methods, second-order projection strategies combine non-pollution and approximation at a very high level of gene...

  10. Gauge Mediation Models with Adjoint Messengers

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar; Un, Cem Salih

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a non-zero U(1)_B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  11. J-对称微分算子自共轭域的辛几何刻画(Ⅲ)%Symplectic Geometry Characterization of Self-Adjoint Domainsfor J-Symmetric Differential Operators (Ⅲ)

    王志敬; 李丽君

    2011-01-01

    研究了二阶奇型J-对称微分算子辛几何刻画问题,通过构造商空间,应用辛几何的方法讨论了二阶J-对称微分算子的自共轭扩张问题.给出了与二阶微分算子自共轭域相对应的完全J-Lagrangian子流型的分类与描述.%The symplectic geometry characterization of second order singular J - symmetric differential operators was investigated. By constructing different quotient spaces, self-adjoint extensions of second order J - symmetric differential operators were studied using the method of symplectic geometry. Then classification and description of complete J - Lagrangian submanifold corresponding with self-adjoint domains of second order differential operators were obtained.

  12. Parameter identification of multi-body railway vehicle models - Application of the adjoint state approach

    Kraft, S.; Puel, G.; Aubry, D.; Funfschilling, C.

    2016-12-01

    For the calibration of multi-body models of railway vehicles, the identification of the model parameters from on-track measurement is required. This involves the solution of an inverse problem by minimising the misfit function which describes the distance between model and measurement using optimisation methods. The application of gradient-based optimisation methods is advantageous but necessitates an efficient approach for the computation of the gradients considering the large number of model parameters and the costly evaluation of the forward model. This work shows that the application of the adjoint state approach to the nonlinear vehicle-track multi-body system is suitable, reducing on the one hand the computational cost and increasing on the other hand the precision of the gradients. Gradients from the adjoint state method are computed for vehicle models and validated taking into account measurement noise.

  13. Adjoint analyses of enhanced solidification for shape optimization in conjugate heat transfer problem

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Suzuki, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, an adjoint-based shape-optimization method has been developed for designing extended heat transfer surfaces in conjugate heat transfer problems. Here we specifically consider heat conduction-dominated solidification problem under different thermal boundary conditions: (i) the isothermal condition, and (ii) the conjugate condition with thermal coupling between the solidified liquid and the solid wall inside the domain bounded by the extended heat transfer surface. In the present shape-optimization scheme, extended heat transfer surfaces are successively refined in a local way based on the variational information of a cost functional with respect to the shape modification. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless method is employed for dealing with the complex boundary shape. For high-resolution analyses with boundary-fitted node arrangement, we have introduced a bubble-mesh method combined with a high-efficiency algorithm for searching neighboring bubbles within a cut-off distance. The present technique can be easily applied to convection problems including high Reynolds number flow. We demonstrate, for the isothermal boundary condition, that the present optimization leads to tree-like fin shapes, which achieve the temperature field with global similarity for different initial fin shapes. We will also show the computational results for the conjugate condition, which would regularize the present optimization due to the fin-efficiency effect.

  14. Efficient Construction of Discrete Adjoint Operators on Unstructured Grids Using Complex Variables

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Kleb, William L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology is developed and implemented to mitigate the lengthy software development cycle typically associated with constructing a discrete adjoint solver for aerodynamic simulations. The approach is based on a complex-variable formulation that enables straightforward differentiation of complicated real-valued functions. An automated scripting process is used to create the complex-variable form of the set of discrete equations. An efficient method for assembling the residual and cost function linearizations is developed. The accuracy of the implementation is verified through comparisons with a discrete direct method as well as a previously developed handcoded discrete adjoint approach. Comparisons are also shown for a large-scale configuration to establish the computational efficiency of the present scheme. To ultimately demonstrate the power of the approach, the implementation is extended to high temperature gas flows in chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, several fruitful research and development avenues enabled by the current work are suggested.

  15. Efficient Construction of Discrete Adjoint Operators on Unstructured Grids by Using Complex Variables

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Kleb, William L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology is developed and implemented to mitigate the lengthy software development cycle typically associated with constructing a discrete adjoint solver for aerodynamic simulations. The approach is based on a complex-variable formulation that enables straightforward differentiation of complicated real-valued functions. An automated scripting process is used to create the complex-variable form of the set of discrete equations. An efficient method for assembling the residual and cost function linearizations is developed. The accuracy of the implementation is verified through comparisons with a discrete direct method as well as a previously developed handcoded discrete adjoint approach. Comparisons are also shown for a large-scale configuration to establish the computational efficiency of the present scheme. To ultimately demonstrate the power of the approach, the implementation is extended to high temperature gas flows in chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, several fruitful research and development avenues enabled by the current work are suggested.

  16. An alternative factorization of the quantum harmonic oscillator and two-parameter family of self-adjoint operators

    Arcos-Olalla, Rafael, E-mail: olalla@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Reyes, Marco A., E-mail: marco@fisica.ugto.mx [Departamento de Física, DCI Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-10-01

    We introduce an alternative factorization of the Hamiltonian of the quantum harmonic oscillator which leads to a two-parameter self-adjoint operator from which the standard harmonic oscillator, the one-parameter oscillators introduced by Mielnik, and the Hermite operator are obtained in certain limits of the parameters. In addition, a single Bernoulli-type parameter factorization, which is different from the one introduced by M.A. Reyes, H.C. Rosu, and M.R. Gutiérrez [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2145], is briefly discussed in the final part of this work. -- Highlights: ► Factorizations with operators which are not mutually adjoint are presented. ► New two-parameter and one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operators are introduced. ► Their eigenfunctions are two- and one-parameter deformed Hermite functions.

  17. Self-Adjointness Criterion for Operators in Fock Spaces

    Falconi, Marco, E-mail: marco.falconi@univ-rennes1.fr [Université de Rennes I, IRMAR and Centre Henri Lebesgue (France)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper we provide a criterion of essential self-adjointness for operators in the tensor product of a separable Hilbert space and a Fock space. The class of operators we consider may contain a self-adjoint part, a part that preserves the number of Fock space particles and a non-diagonal part that is at most quadratic with respect to the creation and annihilation operators. The hypotheses of the criterion are satisfied in several interesting applications.

  18. Optimizing Spectral Wave Estimates with Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps

    2014-02-18

    forecasts of nearshore wave conditions are important to a diverse constituency, including vacation destinations such as Miami Beach or San Diego, coastal...a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 FEB 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...Sensitivity maps for wave spectra For any type of adjoint, sensitivity maps may be constructed from adjoint output to track the response of system properties

  19. Nonlinear self adjointness, conservation laws and exact solutions of ill-posed Boussinesq equation

    Yaşar, Emrullah; San, Sait; Özkan, Yeşim Sağlam

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the ill-posed Boussinesq equation which arises in shallow water waves and non-linear lattices. We prove that the ill-posed Boussinesq equation is nonlinearly self-adjoint. Using this property and Lie point symmetries, we construct conservation laws for the underlying equation. In addition, the generalized solitonary, periodic and compact-like solutions are constructed by the exp-function method.

  20. Adjoint gradient-based approach for aerodynamic optimization of transport aircraft

    Ilic, Caslav

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic design of transport aircraft has been steadily improved over past several decades, to the point where today highly-detailed shape control is needed to achieve further improvements. Aircraft manufacturers are therefore increasingly looking into formal optimization methods, driving high-fidelity CFD analysis of finely-parametrized candidate designs. We present an adjoint gradient-based approach for maximizing the aerodynamic performance index relevant to cruise-climb mission segment...

  1. Universal Racah matrices and adjoint knot polynomials: Arborescent knots

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2016-04-01

    By now it is well established that the quantum dimensions of descendants of the adjoint representation can be described in a universal form, independent of a particular family of simple Lie algebras. The Rosso-Jones formula then implies a universal description of the adjoint knot polynomials for torus knots, which in particular unifies the HOMFLY (SUN) and Kauffman (SON) polynomials. For E8 the adjoint representation is also fundamental. We suggest to extend the universality from the dimensions to the Racah matrices and this immediately produces a unified description of the adjoint knot polynomials for all arborescent (double-fat) knots, including twist, 2-bridge and pretzel. Technically we develop together the universality and the "eigenvalue conjecture", which expresses the Racah and mixing matrices through the eigenvalues of the quantum R-matrix, and for dealing with the adjoint polynomials one has to extend it to the previously unknown 6 × 6 case. The adjoint polynomials do not distinguish between mutants and therefore are not very efficient in knot theory, however, universal polynomials in higher representations can probably be better in this respect.

  2. Universal Racah matrices and adjoint knot polynomials. I. Arborescent knots

    Mironov, A

    2015-01-01

    By now it is well established that the quantum dimensions of descendants of the adjoint representation can be described in a universal form, independent of a particular family of simple Lie algebras. The Rosso-Jones formula then implies a universal description of the adjoint knot polynomials for torus knots, which in particular unifies the HOMFLY (SU_N) and Kauffman (SO_N) polynomials. For E_8 the adjoint representation is also fundamental. We suggest to extend the universality from the dimensions to the Racah matrices and this immediately produces a unified description of the adjoint knot polynomials for all arborescent (double-fat) knots, including twist, 2-bridge and pretzel. Technically we develop together the universality and the "eigenvalue conjecture", which expresses the Racah and mixing matrices through the eigenvalues of the quantum R-matrix, and for dealing with the adjoint polynomials one has to extend it to the previously unknown 6x6 case. The adjoint polynomials do not distinguish between mutant...

  3. Development of an adjoint model of GRAPES-CUACE and its application in tracking influential haze source areas in north China

    An, Xing Qin; Xian Zhai, Shi; Jin, Min; Gong, Sunling; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol adjoint module of the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global-Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) is constructed based on the adjoint theory. This includes the development and validation of the tangent linear and the adjoint models of the three parts involved in the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol module: CAM (Canadian Aerosol Module), interface programs that connect GRAPES and CUACE, and the aerosol transport processes that are embedded in GRAPES. Meanwhile, strict mathematical validation schemes for the tangent linear and the adjoint models are implemented for all input variables. After each part of the module and the assembled tangent linear and adjoint models is verified, the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol is developed and used in a black carbon (BC) receptor-source sensitivity analysis to track influential haze source areas in north China. The sensitivity of the average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) is calculated with respect to the BC amount emitted over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions are selected based on the administrative division or the sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint sensitivity results are then used to quantify the effect of reducing the emission sources at different time intervals over different regions. It is indicated that the more influential regions (with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions. Instead, the influence per unit area of the sensitivity selected regions is greater. Therefore, controlling the most influential regions during critical time intervals based on the results of the adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative regions during an experimental time period.

  4. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    Kang, Y. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  5. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  6. The order-preserving convergence for spectral approximation of self-adjoint completely continuous operators

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the order-preserving convergence for spectral approximation of the self-adjoint completely continuous operator T.Under the condition that the approximate operator Th converges to T in norm,it is proven that the k-th eigenvalue of Th converges to the k-th eigenvalue of T.(We sorted the positive eigenvalues in decreasing order and negative eigenvalues in increasing order.) Then we apply this result to conforming elements,nonconforming elements and mixed elements of self-adjoint elliptic differential operators eigenvalue problems,and prove that the k-th approximate eigenvalue obtained by these methods converges to the k-th exact eigenvalue.

  7. Weyl theorems for the polluted set of self-adjoint operators in Galerkin approximations

    Boulton, Lyonell; Lewin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a self-adjoint operator on a separable Hilbert space H and let (L_n) be a sequence of finite dimensional subspaces of the domain of A, approximating H in the large n limit. Denote by A_n the compression of A to L_n. In general the spectrum of A is only a subset of the limit of the spectra of A_n and the latter might differ from the former in a non-trivial "polluted set". In this paper we show that this polluted set is determined by the existence of particular Weyl sequences of singular type. This characterization allows us to identify verifiable conditions on self-adjoint perturbations B, ensuring that the polluted set of B is identical to that of A. The results reported are illustrated by means of several canonical examples and they reveal the many subtleties involved in the systematic study of spectral pollution.

  8. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using the Discrete Adjoint of the Navier-Stokes Equations: Applications towards Complex 3D Configurations

    Brezillon, J.; Dwight, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Within the next few years, numerical shape optimization based on high fidelity methods is likely to play a strategic role in future aircraft design. In this context, suitable tools have to be developed for solving aerodynamic shape optimization problems, and the adjoint approach - which allows fast

  9. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  10. Adjoint based optimal control of partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media with applications to CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs

    Simon, Moritz

    2014-11-14

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. With the target of optimizing CO2 sequestration in underground reservoirs, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. Our objective is to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, while time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system, formulate the optimal control problem and derive the continuous adjoint equations. For the discretization we apply a variant of the so-called BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method that we further stabilize by a periodic averaging feature to reduce oscillations. The timestep-wise Lagrange function of the control problem is implemented as a variational form in Sundance, a toolbox for rapid development of parallel FE simulations, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. We discuss the BOX method and our implementation in Sundance. The MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT, using limited-memory BFGS updates for approximating second derivatives. Finally, we present and discuss different types of optimal control results.

  11. Generalized rectangular finite difference beam propagation method.

    Sujecki, Slawomir

    2008-08-10

    A method is proposed that allows for significant improvement of the numerical efficiency of the standard finite difference beam propagation algorithm. The advantages of the proposed method derive from the fact that it allows for an arbitrary selection of the preferred direction of propagation. It is demonstrated that such flexibility is particularly useful when studying the properties of obliquely propagating optical beams. The results obtained show that the proposed method achieves the same level of accuracy as the standard finite difference beam propagation method but with lower order Padé approximations and a coarser finite difference mesh.

  12. Method of Tallying Adjoint Fluence and Calculating Kinetics Parameters in Monte Carlo Codes%在蒙特卡罗程序中统计共轭通量并计算中子动力学参数的方法

    汪量子; 姚栋; 王侃

    2012-01-01

    A method of using iterated fission probability to estimate the adjoint fluence during particles simulation, and using it as the weighting function to calculate kinetics parameters βell and A in Monte Carlo codes, was introduced in this paper. Implements of this method in continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP and multi-group Monte Carlo code MCMG are both elaborated. Verification results show that, with regardless additional computing cost, using this method, the adjoint fluence accounted by MCMG matches well with the result computed by ANISN, and the kinetics parameters calculated by MCNP agree very well with benchmarks. This method is proved to be reliable, and the function of calculating kinetics parameters in Monte Carlo codes is carried out effectively, which could be the basement for Monte Carlo codes' utility in the analysis of nuclear reactors' transient behavior.%文章介绍了在蒙特卡罗程序中,使用反复裂变几率的统计结果作为共轭通量的估计,并作为权重函数计算动力学参数βeff和Λ的方法,阐释了在连续能量蒙特卡罗程序MCNP和多群蒙特卡罗程序MCMG中实现这种方法的过程.数值校验结果表明:在几乎不带来附加计算量的同时,在MCMG中使用该方法统计得到的共轭通量与ANISN的共轭通量计算结果符合较好,在MCNP中使用该方法计算得到的中子动力学参数与基准测量结果符合较好.在蒙特卡罗程序中实现了高效率计算中子动力学参数的功能,为蒙特卡罗程序进一步用于反应堆动态行为的分析奠定了基础.

  13. On the wavelet optimized finite difference method

    Jameson, Leland

    1994-01-01

    When one considers the effect in the physical space, Daubechies-based wavelet methods are equivalent to finite difference methods with grid refinement in regions of the domain where small scale structure exists. Adding a wavelet basis function at a given scale and location where one has a correspondingly large wavelet coefficient is, essentially, equivalent to adding a grid point, or two, at the same location and at a grid density which corresponds to the wavelet scale. This paper introduces a wavelet optimized finite difference method which is equivalent to a wavelet method in its multiresolution approach but which does not suffer from difficulties with nonlinear terms and boundary conditions, since all calculations are done in the physical space. With this method one can obtain an arbitrarily good approximation to a conservative difference method for solving nonlinear conservation laws.

  14. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Xie, Zhinan; Bozdaǧ, Ebru; Sales de Andrade, Elliott; Peter, Daniel; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  15. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-06-13

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  16. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Bozdag, Ebru; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Peter, Daniel B; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the $K_\\alpha$ sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersi...

  17. An adjoint-based scheme for eigenvalue error improvement

    Merton, S.R.; Smedley-Stevenson, R.P., E-mail: Simon.Merton@awe.co.uk, E-mail: Richard.Smedley-Stevenson@awe.co.uk [AWE plc, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Pain, C.C.; El-Sheikh, A.H.; Buchan, A.G., E-mail: c.pain@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: a.el-sheikh@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: andrew.buchan@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    A scheme for improving the accuracy and reducing the error in eigenvalue calculations is presented. Using a rst order Taylor series expansion of both the eigenvalue solution and the residual of the governing equation, an approximation to the error in the eigenvalue is derived. This is done using a convolution of the equation residual and adjoint solution, which is calculated in-line with the primal solution. A defect correction on the solution is then performed in which the approximation to the error is used to apply a correction to the eigenvalue. The method is shown to dramatically improve convergence of the eigenvalue. The equation for the eigenvalue is shown to simplify when certain normalizations are applied to the eigenvector. Two such normalizations are considered; the rst of these is a fission-source type of normalisation and the second is an eigenvector normalisation. Results are demonstrated on a number of demanding elliptic problems using continuous Galerkin weighted nite elements. Moreover, the correction scheme may also be applied to hyperbolic problems and arbitrary discretization. This is not limited to spatial corrections and may be used throughout the phase space of the discrete equation. The applied correction not only improves fidelity of the calculation, it allows assessment of the reliability of numerical schemes to be made and could be used to guide mesh adaption algorithms or to automate mesh generation schemes. (author)

  18. Nonlinear Self-Adjoint Classification of a Burgers-KdV Family of Equations

    Júlio Cesar Santos Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of strictly, quasi, weak, and nonlinearly self-adjoint differential equations are revisited. A nonlinear self-adjoint classification of a class of equations with second and third order is carried out.

  19. Tracking down the ENSO delayed oscillator with an adjoint OGCM

    Van Oldenborgh, G J; Venzke, S; Eckert, C; Giering, R; Oldenborgh, Geert Jan van; Burgers, Gerrit; Venzke, Stephan; Eckert, Christian; Giering, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    The adjoint of an ocean general circulation model is used as a tool for investigating the causes of changes in ENSO SST indices. We identify adjoint Kelvin and Rossby waves in the sensitivities to sea level and wind stress at earlier times, which can be traced back for more than a year through western and weak eastern boundary reflections. Depending on the thermocline depth the first and second baroclinic modes are excited. The sensitivities to the heat flux and SST are local and decay in about a month. The sensitivities to the fluxes are converted into the influence of SST using the adjoint of a statistical atmosphere model. Focusing on SST perturbations in the index region itself, we recover, up to a scale factor, the delayed oscillator concept.

  20. State estimates and forecasts of the loop current in the Gulf of Mexico using the MITgcm and its adjoint

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    An ocean state estimate has been developed for the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model and its adjoint. The estimate has been tested by forecasting loop current (LC) evolution and eddy shedding in the GoM. The adjoint (or four-dimensional variational) method was used to match the model evolution to observations by adjusting model temperature and salinity initial conditions, open boundary conditions, and atmospheric forcing fields. The model was fit to satellite-derived along-track sea surface height, separated into temporal mean and anomalies, and gridded sea surface temperature for 2 month periods. The optimized state at the end of the assimilation period was used to initialize the forecast for 2 months. Forecasts explore practical LC predictability and provide a cross-validation test of the state estimate by comparing it to independent future observations. The model forecast was tested for several LC eddy separation events, including Eddy Franklin in May 2010 during the deepwater horizon oil spill disaster in the GoM. The forecast used monthly climatological open boundary conditions, atmospheric forcing, and run-off fluxes. The model performance was evaluated by computing model-observation root-mean-square difference (rmsd) during both the hindcast and forecast periods. The rmsd metrics for the forecast generally outperformed persistence (keeping the initial state fixed) and reference (forecast initialized using assimilated Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model 1/12° global analysis) model simulations during LC eddy separation events for a period of 1̃2 months.

  1. Time-dependent problems and difference methods

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Oliger, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . fills a considerable gap in the numerical analysis literature by providing a self-contained treatment . . . this is an important work written in a clear style . . . warmly recommended to any graduate student or researcher in the field of the numerical solution of partial differential equations."" -SIAM Review Time-Dependent Problems and Difference Methods, Second Edition continues to provide guidance for the analysis of difference methods for computing approximate solutions to partial differential equations for time-de

  2. Different partial volume correction methods lead to different conclusions

    Greve, Douglas N; Salat, David H; Bowen, Spencer L

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional group study of the effects of aging on brain metabolism as measured with (18)F-FDG-PET was performed using several different partial volume correction (PVC) methods: no correction (NoPVC), Meltzer (MZ), Müller-Gärtner (MG), and the symmetric geometric transfer matrix (SGTM) usin...

  3. Searching for Standard Model Adjoint Scalars with Diboson Resonance Signatures

    Carpenter, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the phenomenology of scalar fields in the adjoint representation of SM gauge groups. We write a general set of dimension 5 effective operators in which SM adjoint scalars couple to pairs of standard model bosons. Using these effective operators, we explore new possible decay channels of a scalar color octet into a gluon and a Z boson/ gluon and a photon. We recast several analyses from Run I of the LHC to find constraints on an a scalar octet decaying into these channels, and we project the discovery potential of color octets in our gluon+photon channel for the 14 TeV run of LHC.

  4. Compressions of maximal dissipative and self-adjoint linear relations and of dilations

    Azizov, T.Ya.; Dijksma, A.; Wanjala, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we generalize results from Stenger (1968) [30], Nudelman (2011) [28] and Azizov and Dijksma (2012) [7] to maximal dissipative and self-adjoint linear relations and discuss related results for nonnegative self-adjoint extensions of nonnegative symmetric linear relations and self-adjoint

  5. Constrained Multipoint Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using an Adjoint Formulation and Parallel Computers

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that treats the design of complex aircraft configurations subject to high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD), geometric constraints and multiple design points is described. The design process will be greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and distributed memory computer architectures. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on a higher order CFD method. In order to facilitate the integration of these high fidelity CFD approaches into future multi-disciplinary optimization (NW) applications, new methods must be developed which are capable of simultaneously addressing complex geometries, multiple objective functions, and geometric design constraints. In our earlier studies, we coupled the adjoint based design formulations with unconstrained optimization algorithms and showed that the approach was effective for the aerodynamic design of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations. In many of the results presented in these earlier works, geometric constraints were satisfied either by a projection into feasible space or by posing the design space parameterization such that it automatically satisfied constraints. Furthermore, with the exception of reference 9 where the second author initially explored the use of multipoint design in conjunction with adjoint formulations, our earlier works have focused on single point design efforts. Here we demonstrate that the same methodology may be extended to treat

  6. Large-volume results in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio; Patella, Agostino; Rago, Antonio; Roman, Sabin

    2014-01-01

    Taming finite-volume effects is a crucial ingredient in order to identify the existence of IR fixed points. We present the latest results from our numerical simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with 2 Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation on large volumes. We compare with previous results, and extrapolate to thermodynamic limit when possible.

  7. Non-self-adjoint hamiltonians defined by Riesz bases

    Bagarello, F., E-mail: fabio.bagarello@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell' Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, I-90128 Palermo, Italy and INFN, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Inoue, A., E-mail: a-inoue@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Mathematics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Trapani, C., E-mail: camillo.trapani@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    We discuss some features of non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians with real discrete simple spectrum under the assumption that the eigenvectors form a Riesz basis of Hilbert space. Among other things, we give conditions under which these Hamiltonians can be factorized in terms of generalized lowering and raising operators.

  8. On self-adjointness of singular Floquet Hamiltonians

    Duclos, Pierre; Jensen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Schrödinger equations with time-dependent interactions are studied. We investigate how to define the Floquet Hamiltonian as a self-adjoint operator, when the interaction is singular in time or space. Using these results we establish the existence of a bounded propagator, by applying a result given...

  9. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  10. Large-volume results in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio;

    2013-01-01

    Taming finite-volume effects is a crucial ingredient in order to identify the existence of IR fixed points. We present the latest results from our numerical simulations of SU(2) gauge theory with 2 Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation on large volumes. We compare with previous results, an...

  11. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino;

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are mas...

  12. Maintenance Approaches for Different Production Methods

    Mungani, Dzivhuluwani Simon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Various production methods are used in industry to manufacture or produce a variety of products needed by industry and consumers. The nature of a product determines which production method is most suitable or cost-effective. A continuous process is typically used to produce large volumes of liquids or gases. Batch processing is often used for small volumes, such as pharmaceutical products. This paper discusses a research project to determine the relationship between maintenance approaches and production methods. A survey was done to determine to what extent three maintenance approaches reliability-centred maintenance (RCM, total productive maintenance (TPM, and business-centred maintenance (BCM are used for three different processing methods (continuous process, batch process, and a production line method.

  13. Adjusting Teaching Methods with Different Students

    Jian Zhao

    2000-01-01

    @@ Teaching Chinese as a second language can draw upon certain assumptions and methods that are applicable to the student whatever his or her first language might be. But there are also significant features which vary among different student groups, for example, English and Japanese students.The more years that I teach Chinese to these two groups, the more I find these features of increasing focus and interest. In this article, I would like to describe the major differences in learning Chinese among students from these two groups. My focus will be placed on how to take advantage of these differences and adopt appropriate teaching approaches.

  14. Fourth order difference methods for hyperbolic IBVP's

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Olsson, Pelle

    1994-01-01

    Fourth order difference approximations of initial-boundary value problems for hyperbolic partial differential equations are considered. We use the method of lines approach with both explicit and compact implicit difference operators in space. The explicit operator satisfies an energy estimate leading to strict stability. For the implicit operator we develop boundary conditions and give a complete proof of strong stability using the Laplace transform technique. We also present numerical experiments for the linear advection equation and Burgers' equation with discontinuities in the solution or in its derivative. The first equation is used for modeling contact discontinuities in fluid dynamics, the second one for modeling shocks and rarefaction waves. The time discretization is done with a third order Runge-Kutta TVD method. For solutions with discontinuities in the solution itself we add a filter based on second order viscosity. In case of the non-linear Burger's equation we use a flux splitting technique that results in an energy estimate for certain different approximations, in which case also an entropy condition is fulfilled. In particular we shall demonstrate that the unsplit conservative form produces a non-physical shock instead of the physically correct rarefaction wave. In the numerical experiments we compare our fourth order methods with a standard second order one and with a third order TVD-method. The results show that the fourth order methods are the only ones that give good results for all the considered test problems.

  15. Application of variational principles and adjoint integrating factors for constructing numerical GFD models

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The proposed method is considered on an example of hydrothermodynamics and atmospheric chemistry models [1,2]. In the development of the existing methods for constructing numerical schemes possessing the properties of total approximation for operators of multiscale process models, we have developed a new variational technique, which uses the concept of adjoint integrating factors. The technique is as follows. First, a basic functional of the variational principle (the integral identity that unites the model equations, initial and boundary conditions) is transformed using Lagrange's identity and the second Green's formula. As a result, the action of the operators of main problem in the space of state functions is transferred to the adjoint operators defined in the space of sufficiently smooth adjoint functions. By the choice of adjoint functions the order of the derivatives becomes lower by one than those in the original equations. We obtain a set of new balance relationships that take into account the sources and boundary conditions. Next, we introduce the decomposition of the model domain into a set of finite volumes. For multi-dimensional non-stationary problems, this technique is applied in the framework of the variational principle and schemes of decomposition and splitting on the set of physical processes for each coordinate directions successively at each time step. For each direction within the finite volume, the analytical solutions of one-dimensional homogeneous adjoint equations are constructed. In this case, the solutions of adjoint equations serve as integrating factors. The results are the hybrid discrete-analytical schemes. They have the properties of stability, approximation and unconditional monotony for convection-diffusion operators. These schemes are discrete in time and analytic in the spatial variables. They are exact in case of piecewise-constant coefficients within the finite volume and along the coordinate lines of the grid area in each

  16. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Complex Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Farmer, James; Martinelli, Luigi; Saunders, David

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for complex aircraft configurations. Here control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which allows for a drastic reduction in computational costs over previous design methods (13, 12, 43, 38). In our earlier studies (19, 20, 22, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42) it was shown that this method could be used to devise effective optimization procedures for airfoils, wings and wing-bodies subject to either analytic or arbitrary meshes. Design formulations for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations have been demonstrated, showing that such methods can be devised for various governing equations (39, 25). In our most recent works (40, 42) the method was extended to treat wing-body configurations with a large number of mesh points, verifying that significant computational savings can be gained for practical design problems. In this paper the method is extended for the Euler equations to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. New elements include a multiblock-multigrid flow solver, a multiblock-multigrid adjoint solver, and a multiblock mesh perturbation scheme. Two design examples are presented in which the new method is used for the wing redesign of a transonic business jet.

  17. On the consistency of adjoint sensitivity analysis for structural optimization of linear dynamic problems

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Nakshatrala, Praveen B.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-based topology optimization typically involves thousands or millions of design variables. This makes efficient sensitivity analysis essential and for this the adjoint variable method (AVM) is indispensable. For transient problems it has been observed that the traditional AVM, based...... on a differentiate-then-discretize approach, may lead to inconsistent sensitivities. Herein this effect is explicitly demonstrated for a single dof system and the source of inconsistency is identified. Additionally, we outline an alternative discretize-then-differentiate AVM that inherently produces consistent...

  18. An update in monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    Lacagnina, G; D'Elia, M; Di Giacomo, A; Pica, C

    2007-01-01

    QCD with fermions in the adjoint representation (aQCD) is a model for which a deconfinement and a chiral phase transition take place at different temperatures. In this work, we present a study of the deconfinement transition in the dual superconductor picture based on the evaluation of an operator which carries magnetic charge. The expectation value of this operator signals monopole condensation and is an order parameter for deconfinement as in the case of fermions in the fundamental representation. We find a sharp first order deconfinement transition. We also study the effects of the chiral transition on the monopole order parameter and find them negligible.

  19. Adjoint sensitivity of global cloud droplet number to aerosol and dynamical parameters

    V. A. Karydis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the adjoint of a comprehensive cloud droplet formation parameterization for use in aerosol-cloud-climate interaction studies. The adjoint efficiently and accurately calculates the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC to all parameterization inputs (e.g., updraft velocity, water uptake coefficient, aerosol number and hygroscopicity with a single execution. The adjoint is then integrated within three dimensional (3-D aerosol modeling frameworks to quantify the sensitivity of CDNC formation globally to each parameter. Sensitivities are computed for year-long executions of the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM, using wind fields computed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS Global Circulation Model (GCM II', and the GEOS-Chem CTM, driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. We find that over polluted (pristine areas, CDNC is more sensitive to updraft velocity and uptake coefficient (aerosol number and hygroscopicity. Over the oceans of the Northern Hemisphere, addition of anthropogenic or biomass burning aerosol is predicted to increase CDNC in contrast to coarse-mode sea salt which tends to decrease CDNC. Over the Southern Oceans, CDNC is most sensitive to sea salt, which is the main aerosol component of the region. Globally, CDNC is predicted to be less sensitive to changes in the hygroscopicity of the aerosols than in their concentration with the exception of dust where CDNC is very sensitive to particle hydrophilicity over arid areas. Regionally, the sensitivities differ considerably between the two frameworks and quantitatively reveal why the models differ considerably in their indirect forcing estimates.

  20. Implicit finite difference methods on composite grids

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for eliminating time lags in the implicit finite-difference solution of partial differential equations are investigated analytically, with a focus on transient fluid dynamics problems on overlapping multicomponent grids. The fundamental principles of the approach are explained, and the method is shown to be applicable to both rectangular and curvilinear grids. Numerical results for sample problems are compared with exact solutions in graphs, and good agreement is demonstrated.

  1. Measurements and Terminology of Different Measure Methods

    FANG Fang; ZHANG Wei-yuan; ZHANG Wen-bin

    2005-01-01

    Body measuring is very important for garment sizing and pattern making. In this paper, we study the difference of the landmarks between the traditional method and 3D scanner and we also select the 19 circumference measurements,29 height and length measurements, 18 breadth and depth measurements and 3 other measurements, which are quite important in fashion body measuring, to compare the terminology of them in these two measuring method. 3D scanners seem better than the traditional method on these aspects, which are the number of measurements, speed,privacy and data accuracy, but they are limited on measuring posture. And there is no uniform standard for the scanners and the definitions of the measurements in the scanners are diversified.

  2. Self-adjointness of the Product of Two Hamiltonian Operators under the Limit Circle Case%极限圆型Hamilton算子乘积的自伴性

    郑召文; 刘宝圣

    2012-01-01

    本文讨论了极限圆型Hamilton算子乘积的自伴性,利用Calkin方法及奇异Hamilton系统自伴扩张的一般构造理论,给出了在极限圆型时判定Hamilton算子乘积自伴的一个充要条件.%In this paper, the self-adjointness of the product of two Hamiltonian op- erators under the limit circle case is considered. Using the Calkin method and the construction of self-adjoint extension for singular Hamiltonian systems, the necessary and sufficient conditions which make the product of two Hamiltonian operators under the limit circle case being a self-adjoint operator are obtained.

  3. Mapping Emissions that Contribute to Air Pollution Using Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis

    Bastien, L. A. J.; Mcdonald, B. C.; Brown, N. J.; Harley, R.

    2014-12-01

    The adjoint of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) is used to map emissions that contribute to air pollution at receptors of interest. Adjoint tools provide an efficient way to calculate the sensitivity of a model response to a large number of model inputs, a task that would require thousands of simulations using a more traditional forward sensitivity approach. Initial applications of this technique, demonstrated here, are to benzene and directly-emitted diesel particulate matter, for which atmospheric reactions are neglected. Emissions of these pollutants are strongly influenced by light-duty gasoline vehicles and heavy-duty diesel trucks, respectively. We study air quality responses in three receptor areas where populations have been identified as especially susceptible to, and adversely affected by air pollution. Population-weighted air basin-wide responses for each pollutant are also evaluated for the entire San Francisco Bay area. High-resolution (1 km horizontal grid) emission inventories have been developed for on-road motor vehicle emission sources, based on observed traffic count data. Emission estimates represent diurnal, day of week, and seasonal variations of on-road vehicle activity, with separate descriptions for gasoline and diesel sources. Emissions that contribute to air pollution at each receptor have been mapped in space and time using the adjoint method. Effects on air quality of both relative (multiplicative) and absolute (additive) perturbations to underlying emission inventories are analyzed. The contributions of local versus upwind sources to air quality in each receptor area are quantified, and weekday/weekend and seasonal variations in the influence of emissions from upwind areas are investigated. The contribution of local sources to the total air pollution burden within the receptor areas increases from about 40% in the summer to about 50% in the winter due to increased atmospheric stagnation. The effectiveness of control

  4. Effective condition number for finite difference method

    Li, Zi-Cai; Chien, Cheng-Sheng; Huang, Hung-Tsai

    2007-01-01

    For solving the linear algebraic equations Ax=b with the symmetric and positive definite matrix A, from elliptic equations, the traditional condition number in the 2-norm is defined by Cond.=[lambda]1/[lambda]n, where [lambda]1 and [lambda]n are the maximal and minimal eigenvalues of the matrix A, respectively. The condition number is used to provide the bounds of the relative errors from the perturbation of both A and b. Such a Cond. can only be reached by the worst situation of all rounding errors and all b. For the given b, the true relative errors may be smaller, or even much smaller than the Cond., which is called the effective condition number in Chan and Foulser [Effectively well-conditioned linear systems, SIAM J. Sci. Statist. Comput. 9 (1988) 963-969] and Christiansen and Hansen [The effective condition number applied to error analysis of certain boundary collocation methods, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 54(1) (1994) 15-36]. In this paper, we propose the new computational formulas for effective condition number Cond_eff, and define the new simplified effective condition number Cond_E. For the latter, we only need the eigenvector corresponding to the minimal eigenvalue of A, which can be easily obtained by the inverse power method. In this paper, we also apply the effective condition number for the finite difference method for Poisson's equation. The difference grids are not supposed to be quasiuniform. Under a non-orthogonality assumption, the effective condition number is proven to be O(1) for the homogeneous boundary conditions. Such a result is extraordinary, compared with the traditional , where hmin is the minimal meshspacing of the difference grids used. For the non-homogeneous Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, the effective condition number is proven to be O(h-1/2) and , respectively, where h is the maximal meshspacing of the difference grids. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the analysis made.

  5. Evaluation of toothbrush disinfection via different methods

    Adil BASMAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using a dishwasher or different chemical agents, including 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, a mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, and 50% white vinegar, for toothbrush disinfection. Sixty volunteers were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 10. Participants brushed their teeth using toothbrushes with standard bristles, and they disinfected the toothbrushes according to instructed methods. Bacterial contamination of the toothbrushes was compared between the experimental groups and the control group. Data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Duncan's multiple range tests, with 95% confidence intervals for multiple comparisons. Bacterial contamination of toothbrushes from individuals in the experimental groups differed from those in the control group (p < 0.05. The most effective method for elimination of all tested bacterial species was 50% white vinegar, followed in order by 2% NaOCl, mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, dishwasher use, and tap water (control. The results of this study show that the most effective method for disinfecting toothbrushes was submersion in 50% white vinegar, which is cost-effective, easy to access, and appropriate for household use.

  6. Evaluation of toothbrush disinfection via different methods.

    Basman, Adil; Peker, Ilkay; Akca, Gulcin; Alkurt, Meryem Toraman; Sarikir, Cigdem; Celik, Irem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using a dishwasher or different chemical agents, including 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), a mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, and 50% white vinegar, for toothbrush disinfection. Sixty volunteers were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 10). Participants brushed their teeth using toothbrushes with standard bristles, and they disinfected the toothbrushes according to instructed methods. Bacterial contamination of the toothbrushes was compared between the experimental groups and the control group. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Duncan's multiple range tests, with 95% confidence intervals for multiple comparisons. Bacterial contamination of toothbrushes from individuals in the experimental groups differed from those in the control group (p method for elimination of all tested bacterial species was 50% white vinegar, followed in order by 2% NaOCl, mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, dishwasher use, and tap water (control). The results of this study show that the most effective method for disinfecting toothbrushes was submersion in 50% white vinegar, which is cost-effective, easy to access, and appropriate for household use.

  7. Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods

    Lo, Y. T. Eunice; Charlton-Perez, Andrew J.; Lott, Fraser C.; Highwood, Eleanor J.

    2016-12-01

    Sulphate aerosol injection has been widely discussed as a possible way to engineer future climate. Monitoring it would require detecting its effects amidst internal variability and in the presence of other external forcings. We investigate how the use of different detection methods and filtering techniques affects the detectability of sulphate aerosol geoengineering in annual-mean global-mean near-surface air temperature. This is done by assuming a future scenario that injects 5 Tg yr‑1 of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere and cross-comparing simulations from 5 climate models. 64% of the studied comparisons would require 25 years or more for detection when no filter and the multi-variate method that has been extensively used for attributing climate change are used, while 66% of the same comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection using a trend-based filter. This highlights the high sensitivity of sulphate aerosol geoengineering detectability to the choice of filter. With the same trend-based filter but a non-stationary method, 80% of the comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection. This does not imply sulphate aerosol geoengineering should be deployed, but suggests that both detection methods could be used for monitoring geoengineering in global, annual mean temperature should it be needed.

  8. Learning phacoemulsification. Results of different teaching methods.

    Hennig Albrecht

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the learning curves of three eye surgeons converting from sutureless extracapsular cataract extraction to phacoemulsification using different teaching methods. Posterior capsule rupture (PCR as a per-operative complication and visual outcome of the first 100 operations were analysed. The PCR rate was 4% and 15% in supervised and unsupervised surgery respectively. Likewise, an uncorrected visual acuity of > or = 6/18 on the first postoperative day was seen in 62 (62% of patients and in 22 (22% in supervised and unsupervised surgery respectively.

  9. Nonself-adjoint semicrossed products by abelian semigroups

    Fuller, Adam Hanley

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\mathcal{S}$ be the semigroup $\\mathcal{S}=\\sum^{\\oplus k}_{i=1}\\Sc{S}_i$, where for each $i\\in I$, $\\mathcal{S}_i$ is a countable subsemigroup of the additive semigroup $\\B{R}_+$ containing 0. We consider representations of $\\mathcal{S}$ as contractions $\\{T_s\\}_{s\\in\\mathcal{S}}$ on a Hilbert space with the Nica-covariance property: $T_s^*T_t=T_tT_s^*$ whenever $t\\wedge s=0$. We show that all such representations have a unique minimal isometric Nica-covariant dilation. This result is used to help analyse the nonself-adjoint semicrossed product algebras formed from Nica-covariant representations of the action of $\\mathcal{S}$ on an operator algebra $\\mathcal{A}$ by completely contractive endomorphisms. We conclude by calculating the $C^*$-envelope of the isometric nonself-adjoint semicrossed product algebra (in the sense of Kakariadis and Katsoulis).

  10. Three-Dimensional Turbulent RANS Adjoint-Based Error Correction

    Park, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering problems commonly require functional outputs of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with specified accuracy. These simulations are performed with limited computational resources. Computable error estimates offer the possibility of quantifying accuracy on a given mesh and predicting a fine grid functional on a coarser mesh. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the associated adjoint problem for the functional of interest. An adjoint-based error correction procedure is demonstrated for transonic inviscid and subsonic laminar and turbulent flow. A mesh adaptation procedure is formulated to target uncertainty in the corrected functional and terminate when error remaining in the calculation is less than a user-specified error tolerance. This adaptation scheme is shown to yield anisotropic meshes with corrected functionals that are more accurate for a given number of grid points then isotropic adapted and uniformly refined grids.

  11. Adjoint-based shape optimization of fin geometry for enhanced solid/liquid phase-change process

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the control of heat transfer processes, which play a critical role in various engineering devices/systems, has gained renewed attention. The present study aims to establish an adjoint-based shape optimization method for high-performance heat transfer processes involving phase-change phenomena. A possible example includes the application to the thermal management technique using phase-change material. Adjoint-based shape optimization scheme is useful to optimal shape design and optimal control of systems, for which the base function of the solution is unknown and the solution includes an infinite number of degrees of freedom. Here we formulate the shape-optimization scheme based on adjoint heat conduction analyses, focusing on the shape optimization of fin geometry. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method that is suited for dealing with complex boundary geometry is employed, and the enthalpy method is adopted for analyzing the motion of the phase-change interface. We examine in detail the effect of the initial geometry and the node distribution in the MLPG analysis upon the final solution of the shape optimization. Also, we present a new strategy for the computation using bubble mesh.

  12. Dirac lattices, zero-range potentials, and self-adjoint extension

    Bordag, M.; Muñoz-Castañeda, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the electromagnetic field in the presence of polarizable point dipoles. In the corresponding effective Maxwell equation these dipoles are described by three dimensional delta function potentials. We review the approaches handling these: the self-adjoint extension, regularization/renormalization and the zero range potential methods. Their close interrelations are discussed in detail and compared with the electrostatic approach which drops the contributions from the self fields. For a homogeneous two dimensional lattice of dipoles we write down the complete solutions, which allow, for example, for an easy numerical treatment of the scattering of the electromagnetic field on the lattice or for investigating plasmons. Using these formulas, we consider the limiting case of vanishing lattice spacing, i.e., the transition to a continuous sheet. For a scalar field and for the TE polarization of the electromagnetic field this transition is smooth and results in the results known from the continuous sheet. Especially for the TE polarization, we reproduce the results known from the hydrodynamic model describing a two dimensional electron gas. For the TM polarization, for polarizability parallel and perpendicular to the lattice, in both cases, the transition is singular. For the parallel polarizability this is surprising and different from the hydrodynamic model. For perpendicular polarizability this is what was known in literature. We also investigate the case when the transition is done with dipoles described by smeared delta function, i.e., keeping a regularization. Here, for TM polarization for parallel polarizability, when subsequently doing the limit of vanishing lattice spacing, we reproduce the result known from the hydrodynamic model. In case of perpendicular polarizability we need an additional renormalization to reproduce the result obtained previously by stepping back from the dipole approximation.

  13. Arrangements, multiderivations, and adjoint quotient map of type ADE

    Yoshinaga, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this paper is a survey on algebro-geometric aspects of sheaves of logarithmic vector fields of hyperplane arrangements. In the second part we prove that the relative de Rham cohomology (of degree two) of ADE-type adjoint quotient map is naturally isomorphic to the module of certain multiderivations. The isomorphism is obtained by the Gauss-Manin derivative of the Kostant-Kirillov form.

  14. Efficiency of different methods for seeding grasslands

    Vesna Očić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In Croatia, the economic effects of different grassland sowing methods are still insufficiently explored. In order to detect the difference between grassland sowing methods a three-year field trialswere performed to determine the production and economic value of grasslands sown by: direct seeding into corn stubble field with row distance of 18 cm (DSK18 or ii 9 cm (DSK9, iii conventional seeding (KS, iv sod-seeding in existing grassland (RPTDS and v natural grassland as control (KPT. In the whole research period the highest average green mass productivity was achieved by conventional seeding (38.84 t/ha, while the lowest green mass yield had natural grassland and sod-seeded natural grassland (10.92 and 11.63 t/ha of green mass. Observed per unit of area, difference in production values ranged from 3276 kn, which was achieved with natural grass to 17.478 kn/ha, which was achieved by conventional seeding. Looking at the production efficiency, direct seeding into corn stubble field with row distance of 9 cm (3.17 has the largest coefficient, while natural grassland is on the economy border with coefficient 1.00. Relations between invested and obtained, which was measured with value of Gross Margin, is in range from 6 kn/ha (natural grassland to 11.420 kn/ha, which was achieved by conventional seeding. Looking at the production of hay, conventional seeding with 7.11 t/ha of hay had the maximum productivity, while the natural grassland and sod-seeded natural grassland had the lowest production (2.87 and 2.86 t/ha.

  15. Adjoint Optimization of Multistage Axial Compressor Blades with Static Pressure Constraint at Blade Row Interface

    Yu, Jia; Ji, Lucheng; Li, Weiwei; Yi, Weilin

    2016-06-01

    Adjoint method is an important tool for design refinement of multistage compressors. However, the radial static pressure distribution deviates during the optimization procedure and deteriorates the overall performance, producing final designs that are not well suited for realistic engineering applications. In previous development work on multistage turbomachinery blade optimization using adjoint method and thin shear-layer N-S equations, the entropy production is selected as the objective function with given mass flow rate and total pressure ratio as imposed constraints. The radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows is introduced as a new constraint in the present paper. The approach is applied to the redesign of a five-stage axial compressor, and the results obtained with and without the constraint on the radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows are discussed in detail. The results show that the redesign without the radial static pressure distribution constraint (RSPDC) gives an optimal solution that shows deviations on radial static pressure distribution, especially at rotor exit tip region. On the other hand, the redesign with the RSPDC successfully keeps the radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows and make sure that the optimization results are applicable in a practical engineering design.

  16. One-dimensional scattering problem, self-adjoint extensions, renormalizations and point $\\delta$-interactions for Coulomb potential

    Mineev, V S

    2003-01-01

    In the paper the one-dimensional one-center scattering problem with the initial potential $\\alpha |x|^{-1}$ on the whole axis is treated and reduced to the search for allowable self-adjoint extensions. Using the laws of conservation as necessary conditions in the singular point alongside with account of the analytical structure of fundamental solutions, it allows us to receive exact expressions for the wave functions (i.e. for the boundary conditions), scattering coefficients and the singular corrections to the potential, as well as the corresponding bound state spectrum. It turns out that the point $\\delta$-shaped correction to the potential should be present without fail at any choice of the allowable self-adjoint extension, moreover a form of these corrections corresponds to the form of renormalization terms obtained in quantum electrodynamics. Thus, the proposed method shows the unequivocal connection among the boundary conditions, scattering coefficients and $\\delta$-shaped additions to the potential. Ta...

  17. Hybrid Active Noise Control using Adjoint LMS Algorithms

    Nam, Hyun Do; Hong, Sik Ki [Dankook University (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    A multi-channel hybrid active noise control(MCHANC) is derived by combining hybrid active noise control techniques and adjoint LMS algorithms, and this algorithm is applied to an active noise control system in a three dimensional enclosure. A MCHANC system uses feed forward and feedback filters simultaneously to cancel noises in an enclosure. The adjoint LMs algorithm, in which the error is filtered through an adjoint filter of the secondary channel, is also used to reduce the computational burden of adaptive filters. The overall attenuation performance and convergence characteristics of MCHANC algorithm is better than both multiple-channel feed forward algorithms and multiple-channel feedback algorithms. In a large enclosure, the acoustic reverberation can be very long, which means a very high order feed forward filter must be used to cancel the reverberation noises. Strong reverberation noises are generally narrow band and low frequency, which can be effectively predicted and canceled by a feedback adaptive filters. So lower order feed forward filter taps can be used in MCHANC algorithm which combines advantages of fast convergence and small excess mean square error. In this paper, computer simulations and real time implementations is carried out on a TMS320C31 processor to evaluate the performance of the MCHANC systems. (author). 11 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Adjoint inversion modeling of Asian dust emission using lidar observations

    K. Yumimoto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation system for a regional dust model (RAMS/CFORS-4DVAR; RC4 is applied to an adjoint inversion of a heavy dust event over eastern Asia during 20 March–4 April 2007. The vertical profiles of the dust extinction coefficients derived from NIES Lidar network are directly assimilated, with validation using observation data. Two experiments assess impacts of observation site selection: Experiment A uses five Japanese observation sites located downwind of dust source regions; Experiment B uses these and two other sites near source regions. Assimilation improves the modeled dust extinction coefficients. Experiment A and Experiment B assimilation results are mutually consistent, indicating that observations of Experiment A distributed over Japan can provide comprehensive information related to dust emission inversion. Time series data of dust AOT calculated using modeled and Lidar dust extinction coefficients improve the model results. At Seoul, Matsue, and Toyama, assimilation reduces the root mean square differences of dust AOT by 35–40%. However, at Beijing and Tsukuba, the RMS differences degrade because of fewer observations during the heavy dust event. Vertical profiles of the dust layer observed by CALIPSO are compared with assimilation results. The dense dust layer was trapped at potential temperatures (θ of 280–300 K and was higher toward the north; the model reproduces those characteristics well. Latitudinal distributions of modeled dust AOT along the CALIPSO orbit paths agree well with those of CALIPSO dust AOT, OMI AI, and MODIS coarse-mode AOT, capturing the latitude at which AOTs and AI have high values. Assimilation results show increased dust emissions over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia; especially for 29–30 March, emission flux is about 10 times greater. Strong dust uplift fluxes over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia cause the heavy dust event. Total optimized dust emissions are 57

  19. Numerical conformal mapping via a boundary integral equation with the adjoint generalized Neumann kernel

    Nasser, Mohamed M. S.; Murid, Ali H. M.; Sangawi, Ali W. K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new uniquely solvable boundary integral equation for computing the conformal mapping, its derivative and its inverse from bounded multiply connected regions onto the five classical canonical slit regions. The integral equation is derived by reformulating the conformal mapping as an adjoint Riemann-Hilbert problem. From the adjoint Riemann-Hilbert problem, we derive a boundary integral equation with the adjoint generalized Neumann kernel for the derivative of the boundary...

  20. Efficient Adjoint Computation of Hybrid Systems of Differential Algebraic Equations with Applications in Power Systems

    Abhyankar, Shrirang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Anitescu, Mihai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Hong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool to describe power system dynamic behavior in response to parameter variations. It is a central component in preventive and corrective control applications. The existing approaches for sensitivity calculations, namely, finite-difference and forward sensitivity analysis, require a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of sensitivity parameters. In this work, we investigate, implement, and test a discrete adjoint sensitivity approach whose computational effort is effectively independent of the number of sensitivity parameters. The proposed approach is highly efficient for calculating trajectory sensitivities of larger systems and is consistent, within machine precision, with the function whose sensitivity we are seeking. This is an essential feature for use in optimization applications. Moreover, our approach includes a consistent treatment of systems with switching, such as DC exciters, by deriving and implementing the adjoint jump conditions that arise from state and time-dependent discontinuities. The accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated in comparison with the forward sensitivity analysis approach.

  1. Global Adjoint Tomography: Combining Big Data with HPC Simulations

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The steady increase in data quality and the number of global seismographic stations have substantially grown the amount of data available for construction of Earth models. Meanwhile, developments in the theory of wave propagation, numerical methods and HPC systems have enabled unprecedented simulations of seismic wave propagation in realistic 3D Earth models which lead the extraction of more information from data, ultimately culminating in the use of entire three-component seismograms.Our aim is to take adjoint tomography further to image the entire planet which is one of the extreme cases in seismology due to its intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. We have started low resolution (T > 27 s, soon will be > 17 s) global inversions with 253 earthquakes for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Recent improvements in our 3D solvers, such as the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package, will allow us perform higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer-duration (~180 m) simulations to take the advantage of high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves to improve imbalanced ray coverage as a result of uneven distribution of sources and receivers on the globe. Our initial results after 10 iterations already indicate several prominent features reported in high-resolution continental studies, such as major slabs (Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich, etc.) and enhancement in plume structures (the Pacific superplume, the Hawaii hot spot, etc.). Our ultimate goal is to assimilate seismic data from more than 6,000 earthquakes within the magnitude range 5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. To take full advantage of this data set on ORNL's computational resources, we need a solid framework for managing big data sets during pre-processing (e.g., data requests and quality checks), gradient calculations, and post-processing (e

  2. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  3. Calculating Air Quality and Climate Co-Benefits Metrics from Adjoint Elasticities in Chemistry-Climate Models

    Spak, S.; Henze, D. K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The science and policy communities both need common metrics that clearly, comprehensively, and intuitively communicate the relative sensitivities of air quality and climate to emissions control strategies, include emissions and process uncertainties, and minimize the range of error that is transferred to the metric. This is particularly important because most emissions control policies impact multiple short-lived climate forcing agents, and non-linear climate and health responses in space and time limit the accuracy and policy value of simple emissions-based calculations. Here we describe and apply new second-order elasticity metrics to support the direct comparison of emissions control policies for air quality and health co-benefits analyses using adjoint chemical transport and chemistry-climate models. Borrowing an econometric concept, the simplest elasticities in the atmospheric system are the percentage changes in concentrations due to a percentage change in the emissions. We propose a second-order elasticity metric, the Emissions Reduction Efficiency, which supports comparison across compounds, to long-lived climate forcing agents like CO2, and to other air quality impacts, at any temporal or spatial scale. These adjoint-based metrics (1) possess a single uncertainty range; (2) allow for the inclusion of related health and other impacts effects within the same framework; (3) take advantage of adjoint and forward sensitivity models; and (4) are easily understood. Using global simulations with the adjoint of GEOS-Chem, we apply these metrics to identify spatial and sectoral variability in the climate and health co-benefits of sectoral emissions controls on black carbon, sulfur dioxide, and PM2.5. We find spatial gradients in optimal control strategies on every continent, along with differences among megacities.

  4. Adaptive boundaryless finite-difference method.

    Lopez-Mago, Dorilian; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2013-02-01

    The boundaryless beam propagation method uses a mapping function to transform the infinite real space into a finite-size computational domain [Opt. Lett.21, 4 (1996)]. This leads to a bounded field that avoids the artificial reflections produced by the computational window. However, the method suffers from frequency aliasing problems, limiting the physical region to be sampled. We propose an adaptive boundaryless method that concentrates the higher density of sampling points in the region of interest. The method is implemented in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinate systems. It keeps the same advantages of the original method but increases accuracy and is not affected by frequency aliasing.

  5. Mass anomalous dimension in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    Bursa, Francis; Keegan, Liam; Pica, Claudio; Pickup, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We study SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two flavours of Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. We measure the running of the coupling in the Schroedinger Functional (SF) scheme and find it is consistent with the existence of an infrared fixed point (IRFP). We discuss how systematic errors affect the evidence for an IRFP. We present the first measurement of the running of the mass in the SF scheme. Assuming the existence of a fixed point, we can deduce the anomalous dimension at the fixed point. At the current level of accuracy, we can estimate 0.05 < gamma < 0.56 at the IRFP.

  6. Bimetric Gravity From Adjoint Frame Field In Four Dimensions

    Guo, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We provide a novel model of gravity by using adjoint frame fields in four dimensions. It has a natural interpretation as a gravitational theory of a complex metric field, which describes interactions between two real metrics. The classical solutions establish three appealing features. The spherical symmetric black hole solution has an additional hair, which includes the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The de Sitter solution is realized without introducing a cosmological constant. The constant flat background breaks the Lorentz invariance spontaneously, although the Lorentz breaking effect can be localized to the second metric while the first metric still respects the Lorentz invariance.

  7. Self-adjoint Extensions for the Neumann Laplacian and Applications

    S. A. NAZAROV; J. SOKO(L)OWSKI

    2006-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for the analysis of shape optimization problems. The technique uses the asymptotic analysis of boundary value problems in singularly perturbed geometrical domains. The asymptotics of solutions are derived in the framework of compound and matched asymptotics expansions. The analysis involves the so-called interior topology variations. The asymptotic expansions are derived for a model problem, however the technique applies to general elliptic boundary value problems. The self-adjoint extensions of elliptic operators and the weighted spaces with detached asymptotics are exploited for the modelling of problems with small defects in geometrical domains. The error estimates for proposed approximations of shape functionals are provided.

  8. QCD thermodynamics from 3d adjoint Higgs model

    Karsch, Frithjof; Patkós, András; Petreczky, P; Szép, Z; Szep, Zs.

    1998-01-01

    The screening masses of hot SU(N) gauge theory, defined as poles of the corresponding propagators are studied in 3d adjoint Higgs model, considered as an effective theory of QCD, using coupled gap equations and lattice Monte-Carlo simulations (for N=2). Using so-called lambda gauges non-perturbative evidence for gauge independence of the pole masses within this class of gauges is given. A possible application of the screening masses for the resummation of the free energy is discussed.

  9. On the Norm Convergence of the Self-Adjoint Trotter–Kato Product Formula with Error Bound

    Takashi Ichinose; Hideo Tamura

    2002-02-01

    The norm convergence of the Trotter–Kato product formula with error bound is shown for the semigroup generated by that operator sum of two nonnegative self-adjoint operators and which is self-adjoint.

  10. Pressure estimation from PIV like data of compressible flows by boundary driven adjoint data assimilation

    Lemke, Mathias; Reiss, Julius; Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is one of the major tools to measure velocity fields in experiments. However, other flow properties like density or pressure are often of vital interest, but usually cannot be measured non-intrusively. There are many approaches to overcome this problem, but none is fully satisfactory. Here the computational method of an adjoint based data assimilation for this purpose is discussed. A numerical simulation of a flow is adapted to given velocity data. After successful adaption, previously unknown quantities can be taken from the - necessarily complete - simulation data. The main focus of this work is the efficient implementation of this approach by boundary driven optimisation. Synthetic test cases are presented to allow an assessment of the method.

  11. Adaptive finite difference methods in fluid dynamics

    Berger, Marsha J.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptive method to solve partial differential equations in fluid mechanics is presented. The approach requires internal boundary conditions that must be conservative, data structures for keeping track of several layers of fine grid patches, error estimation, and heuristics for automatic grid generation. In practical calculations gains in computer efficiency up to 10 over nonadaptive methods are observed. The whole procedure takes 3000 lines of FORTRAN code.

  12. On rational R-matrices with adjoint SU(n) symmetry

    Stronks, Laurens; Schuricht, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Using the representation theory of Yangians we construct the rational R-matrix which takes values in the adjoint representation of SU(n). From this we derive an integrable SU(n) spin chain with lattice spins transforming under the adjoint representation. However, the resulting Hamiltonian is found to be non-Hermitian.

  13. Nonlinear Hilbert Adjoints : Properties and Applications to Hankel Singular Value Analysis

    Gray, W. Steven; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The notion of an adjoint operator for a nonlinear mapping has few interpretations in the literature. In this paper a new nonlinear Hilbert adjoint operator is proposed. It is shown to unite several existing concepts and provides an essential tool for singular value analysis of nonlinear Hankel opera

  14. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation; Sistema de equacoes P1 adjuntas para a moderacao de neutrons

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  15. Sensitivity Analysis for Reactor Period Induced by Positive Reactivity Using One-point Adjoint Kinetic Equation

    Chiba, G.; Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2014-04-01

    In order to better predict a kinetic behavior of a nuclear fission reactor, an improvement of the delayed neutron parameters is essential. The present paper specifies important nuclear data for a reactor kinetics: Fission yield and decay constant data of 86Ge, some bromine isotopes, 94Rb, 98mY and some iodine isotopes. Their importance is quantified as sensitivities with a help of the adjoint kinetic equation, and it is found that they are dependent on an inserted reactivity (or a reactor period). Moreover, dependence of sensitivities on nuclear data files is also quantified using the latest files. Even though the currently evaluated data are used, there are large differences among different data files from a view point of the delayed neutrons.

  16. Comparison of several finite-difference methods

    Biringen, S.; Saati, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present numerical study establishes that, with the MacCormack and 'two-four' methods, the solution accuracy obtainable in problems involving wave propagation, shock-wave and contact discontinuities, and viscous effects, will be strongly dependent on Courant number. The application of flux correction to the MacCormack and two-four methods is noted to significantly attenuate dispersion errors; the ensuing solutions capture the discontinuities in the shock-tube problem with improved accuracy and resolution, and are free of dispersion errors for the viscous Burgers' equation.

  17. On the Self-adjointness of the Product Operators of Two mth-Order Differential Operators on [0, +∞)

    Jian Ye AN; Jiong SUN

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, the self-adjointness of the product of two mth-order differential operators on [0, +∞) is studied. By means of the construction theory of self-adjoint operators and matrix computation, we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition to ensure that the product operator is self-adjoint, which extends the results in the second order case.

  18. Self-adjoint oscillator operator from a modified factorization

    Reyes, Marco A. [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico); Rosu, H.C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICyT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Gutierrez, M. Ranferi [Departamento de Fisica, DCI Campus Leon, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal E143, 37150 Leon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2011-05-30

    By using an alternative factorization, we obtain a self-adjoint oscillator operator of the form L{sub δ}=d/(dx) (p{sub δ}(x)d/(dx) )-((x{sup 2})/(p{sub δ}(x)) +p{sub δ}(x)-1), where p{sub δ}(x)=1+δe{sup -x{sup 2}}, with δ element of (-1,∞) an arbitrary real factorization parameter. At positive values of δ, this operator interpolates between the quantum harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian for δ=0 and a scaled Hermite operator at high values of δ. For the negative values of δ, the eigenfunctions look like deformed quantum mechanical Hermite functions. Possible applications are mentioned. -- Highlights: → We present a generalization of the Mielnik factorization. → We study the case of linear relationship between the factorization coefficients. → We introduce a new one-parameter self-adjoint oscillator operator. → We show its properties depending on the values of the parameter.

  19. Adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with $T_{7}$ flavor symmetry

    Arbeláez, Carolina; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Iván

    2015-01-01

    We propose an adjoint $SU(5)$ GUT model with a $T_{7}$ family symmetry and an extra $Z_{2}\\otimes Z_{2}^{\\prime }\\otimes Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ discrete group, that successfully describes the prevailing Standard Model (SM) fermion mass and mixing pattern. The observed hierarchy of the charged fermion masses and the quark mixing angles arises from the $Z_{3}\\otimes Z_{4}\\otimes Z_{12}$ symmetry breaking, which occurs near the GUT scale. The light active neutrino masses are generated by type I and type III seesaw mechanisms mediated by the fermionic $SU(5)$ singlet and the adjoint $\\mathbf{24}$-plet. The model predicts the effective Majorana neutrino mass parameter of neutrinoless double beta decay to be $m_{\\beta \\beta }=$ 4 and 50 meV for the normal and the inverted neutrino spectrum, respectively. We construct several benchmark scenarios, which lead to $SU(5)$ gauge coupling unification and are compatible with the known phenomenological constraints originating from the lightness of neutrinos, prot...

  20. Developing shock-capturing difference methods

    TU Guo-hua; YUAN Xiang-jiang; LU Li-peng

    2007-01-01

    A new shock-capturing method is proposed which is based on upwind schemes and flux-vector splittings. Firstly, original upwind schemes are projected along characteristic directions. Secondly, the amplitudes of the characteristic decompositions are carefully controlled by limiters to prevent non-physical oscillations. Lastly, the schemes are converted into conservative forms, and the oscillation-free shock-capturing schemes are acquired. Two explicit upwind schemes (2nd-order and 3rd-order) and three compact upwind schemes (3rd-order, 5th-order and 7th-order) are modified by the method for hyperbolic systems and the modified schemes are checked on several one-dimensional and two-dimensional test cases. Some numerical solutions of the schemes are compared with those of a WENO scheme and a MP scheme as well as a compact-WENO scheme. The results show that the method with high order accuracy and high resolutions can capture shock waves smoothly.

  1. Abstract Level Parallelization of Finite Difference Methods

    Edwin Vollebregt

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A formalism is proposed for describing finite difference calculations in an abstract way. The formalism consists of index sets and stencils, for characterizing the structure of sets of data items and interactions between data items (“neighbouring relations”. The formalism provides a means for lifting programming to a more abstract level. This simplifies the tasks of performance analysis and verification of correctness, and opens the way for automaticcode generation. The notation is particularly useful in parallelization, for the systematic construction of parallel programs in a process/channel programming paradigm (e.g., message passing. This is important because message passing, unfortunately, still is the only approach that leads to acceptable performance for many more unstructured or irregular problems on parallel computers that have non-uniform memory access times. It will be shown that the use of index sets and stencils greatly simplifies the determination of which data must be exchanged between different computing processes.

  2. Central differences, Euler numbers and symbolic methods

    Dowker, J S

    2013-01-01

    I relate some coefficients encountered when computing the functional determinants on spheres to the central differentials of nothing. In doing this I use some historic works, in particular transcribing the elegant symbolic formalism of Jeffery (1861) into central difference form which has computational advantages for Euler numbers, as discovered by Shovelton (1915). I derive sum rules for these, and for the central differentials, the proof of which involves an interesting expression for powers of sech x as multiple derivatives. I present a more general, symbolic treatment of central difference calculus which allows known, and unknown, things to be obtained in an elegant and compact fashion gaining, at no cost, the expansion of the powers of the inverse sinh, a basic central function. Systematic use is made of the operator 2 asinh(D/2). Umbral calculus is employed to compress the operator formalism. For example the orthogonality/completeness of the factorial numbers, of the first and second kinds, translates, ...

  3. Adjoint-weighted variational formulation for the direct solution of plane stress inverse elasticity problems

    Barbone, Paul E; Rivas, Carlos E [College of Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Harari, Isaac; Albocher, Uri [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Ramat Aviv (Israel); Oberai, Assad A; Goenzen, Sevan [Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)], E-mail: barbone@bu.edu, E-mail: harari@eng.tau.ac.il, E-mail: oberaa@rpi.edu

    2008-11-01

    We describe a novel variational formulation of the inverse elasticity problem given interior data. The strong form of this problem is governed by equations of pure advective transport. To address this problem, we generalize the adjoint-weighted variational equation (AWE) formulation, originally developed for flow of a passive scalar. Here, we shall study the properties of the AWE formulation in the context of inverse plane stress elasticity imaging. We show that the solution of the AWE formulation is equivalent to that of the strong form when both are well posed. We prove that the Galerkin discretization of the AWE formulation leads to a stable, convergent numerical method, and prove optimal rates of convergence.

  4. The spectrum and mass anomalous dimension of SU(2) adjoint QCD with two Dirac flavours

    Bergner, Georg; Montvay, Istvan; Münster, Gernot; Piemonte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present the results of our investigation of SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation, also known as Minimal Walking Technicolour. We have done numerical lattice simulations of this theory at two different values of the gauge coupling and several fermion masses. Our results include the particle spectrum and the mass anomalous dimension. The spectrum contains so far unconsidered states, a fermion-gluon state and flavour singlet mesons. The mass anomalous dimension is determined from the scaling of the masses and the mode number. The remnant dependence of the universal mass ratios and mass anomalous dimension on the gauge coupling indicates the relevance of scaling corrections.

  5. Towards adjoint-based inversion of time-dependent mantle convection with non-linear viscosity

    Li, Dunzhu; Gurnis, Michael; Stadler, Georg

    2017-01-01

    We develop and study an adjoint-based inversion method for the simultaneous recovery of initial temperature conditions and viscosity parameters in time-dependent mantle convection from the current mantle temperature and historic plate motion. Based on a realistic rheological model with temperature- and strain rate-dependent viscosity, we formulate the inversion as a PDE-constrained optimization problem. The objective functional includes the misfit of surface velocity (plate motion) history, the misfit of the current mantle temperature, and a regularization for the uncertain initial condition. The gradient of this functional with respect to the initial temperature and the uncertain viscosity parameters is computed by solving the adjoint of the mantle convection equations. This gradient is used in a preconditioned quasi-Newton minimization algorithm. We study the prospects and limitations of the inversion, as well as the computational performance of the method using two synthetic problems, a sinking cylinder and a realistic subduction model. The subduction model is characterized by the migration of a ridge toward a trench whereby both plate motions and subduction evolve. The results demonstrate: (1) for known viscosity parameters, the initial temperature can be well recovered, as in previous initial condition-only inversions where the effective viscosity was given; (2) for known initial temperature, viscosity parameters can be recovered accurately, despite the existence of trade-offs due to ill-conditioning; (3) for the joint inversion of initial condition and viscosity parameters, initial condition and effective viscosity can be reasonably recovered, but the high dimension of the parameter space and the resulting ill-posedness may limit recovery of viscosity parameters.

  6. Analyzing of coffee quality with different methods

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained by the analysis of the samples of coffee mostly consumed on our market showed that the coffee quality corresponds to the values as given in the Law of Health Food. It was not found that any of the parameters which determine food quality exceeded permitted values. Content of heavy metals and aflatoxines is below permitted values. The least content of caffeine was determined in a coffee sample roasted in the private roaster’s shop, and only in it the presence of coffee surrogates/substitutes was not proved. The obtained results of the coffee analysis showed that the coffees of most popular producers are very equal, and results of caffeine analysis are even more equal. This indicates the most probable fact that coffee is of the same origin, and that later, on during production, a different mixture was made, which affects the final product and gives aroma and taste to the liquid.

  7. Self-adjoint integral operator for bounded nonlocal transport

    Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-11-01

    An integral operator is developed to describe nonlocal transport in a one-dimensional system bounded on both ends by material walls. The "jump" distributions associated with nonlocal transport are taken to be Lévy α -stable distributions, which become naturally truncated by the bounding walls. The truncation process results in the operator containing a self-consistent, convective inward transport term (pinch). The properties of the integral operator as functions of the Lévy distribution parameter set [α ,γ ] and the wall conductivity are presented. The integral operator continuously recovers the features of local transport when α =2 . The self-adjoint formulation allows for an accurate description of spatial variation in the Lévy parameters in the nonlocal system. Spatial variation in the Lévy parameters is shown to result in internally generated flows. Examples of cold-pulse propagation in nonlocal systems illustrate the capabilities of the methodology.

  8. Finite volume effects in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    Patella, Agostino; Lucini, Biagio; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Many evidences from lattice simulations support the idea that SU(2) with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation (also called Minimal Walking Technicolor) is IR conformal. A possible way to see this is through the behavior of the spectrum of the mass-deformed theory. When fermions are massive, a mass-gap is generated and the theory is confined. IR-conformality is recovered in the chiral limit: masses of particles vanish in the chiral limit, while their ratios stay finite. In order to trust this analysis one has to relay on the infinite volume extrapolation. We will discuss the finite volume effects on the mesonic spectrum, investigated by varying the size of the lattice and by changing the boundary conditions for the fields.

  9. Adjoint Assimilation in Marine Ecosystem Models and an Example of Application

    XU Qing; LIU Yuguang; L(U) Xianqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at a review of the work carried out to date on the adjoint assimilation of data in marine ecosystem models since 1995. The structure and feature of the adjoint assimilation in marine ecosystem models are also introduced.To illustrate the application of the adjoint technique and its merits, a 4-variable ecosystem model coupled with a 3-D physical model is established for the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea. The chlorophyll concentration data derived from the SeaWiFS ocean colour data are assimilated in the model with the technique. Some results are briefly presented.

  10. Quantum cosmology of scalar-tensor theories and self-adjointness

    Almeida, C R; Fabris, J C; Moniz, P V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of the self-adjointness for the case of a quantum minisuperspace Hamiltonian retrieved from a Brans-Dicke (BD) action is investigated. Our matter content is presented in terms of a perfect fluid, onto which the Schutz's formalism will be applied. We use the von Neumann theorem and the similarity with the Laplacian operator in one of the variables to determine the cases where the Hamiltonian is self-adjoint and if it admits self-adjoint extensions. For the latter, we study which extension is physically more suitable.

  11. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  12. A Method of Controlling Synchronization in Different Systems

    陈骏; 刘曾荣

    2003-01-01

    A new control method to synchronize between two different systems is proposed and the mathematical proof of this method is provided. Moreover, numerical simulation validates the efficiency of the proposed method.

  13. Self-adjointness and conservation laws of a generalized Burgers equation

    Ibragimov, N H [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden); Torrisi, M; Tracina, R, E-mail: nib@bth.se, E-mail: torrisi@dmi.unict.it, E-mail: tracina@dmi.unict.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, University of Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2011-04-08

    A (2 + 1)-dimensional generalized Burgers equation is considered. Having written this equation as a system of two dependent variables, we show that it is quasi self-adjoint and find a nontrivial additional conservation law.

  14. Self-adjoint extensions of the Pauli equation in the presence of a magnetic monopole

    Karat, E R; Karat, Edwin R; Schulz, Michael B

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for a nonrelativistic electron with spin in the presence of a magnetic monopole and note that it is not self-adjoint in the lowest two angular momentum modes. We then use von Neumann's theory of self-adjoint extensions to construct a self-adjoint operator with the same functional form. In general, this operator will have eigenstates in which the lowest two angular momentum modes mix, thereby removing conservation of angular momentum. Because the same effect occurs for a spinless particle with a sufficiently attractive inverse square potential, we also study this system. We use this simpler Hamiltonian to compare the eigenfunctions corresponding to a particular self-adjoint extension with the eigenfunctions satisfying a boundary condition consistent with probability conservation.

  15. Almost commuting self-adjoint matrices: The real and self-dual cases

    Loring, Terry A.; Sørensen, Adam P. W.

    2016-08-01

    We show that a pair of almost commuting self-adjoint, symmetric matrices is close to a pair of commuting self-adjoint, symmetric matrices (in a uniform way). Moreover, we prove that the same holds with self-dual in place of symmetric and also for paths of self-adjoint matrices. Since a symmetric, self-adjoint matrix is real, we get a real version of Huaxin Lin’s famous theorem on almost commuting matrices. Similarly, the self-dual case gives a version for matrices over the quaternions. To prove these results, we develop a theory of semiprojectivity for real C*-algebras and also examine various definitions of low-rank for real C*-algebras.

  16. Adjoint-Free Variational Data Assimilation into a Regional Wave Model

    2015-07-01

    linearized model is localized both in space and time. Holthuijsen et al. (1997) explored a similar technique using a limited number of nonlocal ...Adjoint-Free Variational Data Assimilation into a Regional Wave Model GLEB PANTELEEV University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, and National...wave prediction model [Wave Model (WAM)]. The algorithm employs the adjoint-free technique and was tested in a series of data assimilation experiments

  17. Self-adjoint Time Operator is the Rule for Discrete Semibounded Hamiltonians

    Galapon, E A

    2002-01-01

    We prove explicitly that to every discrete, semibounded Hamiltonian with constant degeneracy and with finite sum of the squares of the reciprocal of its eigenvalues and whose eigenvectors span the entire Hilbert space there exists a characteristic self-adjoint time operator which is canonically conjugate to the Hamiltonian in a dense subspace of the Hilbert space. Moreover, we show that each characteristic time operator generates an uncountable class of self- adjoint operators canonically conjugate with the same Hamiltonian.

  18. The adjoint neutron transport equation and the statistical approach for its solution

    Saracco, Paolo; Ravetto, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The adjoint equation was introduced in the early days of neutron transport and its solution, the neutron importance, has ben used for several applications in neutronics. The work presents at first a critical review of the adjoint neutron transport equation. Afterwards, the adjont model is constructed for a reference physical situation, for which an analytical approach is viable, i.e. an infinite homogeneous scattering medium. This problem leads to an equation that is the adjoint of the slowing-down equation that is well-known in nuclear reactor physics. A general closed-form analytical solution to such adjoint equation is obtained by a procedure that can be used also to derive the classical Placzek functions. This solution constitutes a benchmark for any statistical or numerical approach to the adjoint equation. A sampling technique to evaluate the adjoint flux for the transport equation is then proposed and physically interpreted as a transport model for pseudo-particles. This can be done by introducing appr...

  19. Adjoint based data assimilation for phase field model using second order information of a posterior distribution

    Ito, Shin-Ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Junya

    Phase field (PF) method, which phenomenologically describes dynamics of microstructure evolutions during solidification and phase transformation, has progressed in the fields of hydromechanics and materials engineering. How to determine, based on observation data, an initial state and model parameters involved in a PF model is one of important issues since previous estimation methods require too much computational cost. We propose data assimilation (DA), which enables us to estimate the parameters and states by integrating the PF model and observation data on the basis of the Bayesian statistics. The adjoint method implemented on DA not only finds an optimum solution by maximizing a posterior distribution but also evaluates the uncertainty in the estimations by utilizing the second order information of the posterior distribution. We carried out an estimation test using synthetic data generated by the two-dimensional Kobayashi's PF model. The proposed method is confirmed to reproduce the true initial state and model parameters we assume in advance, and simultaneously estimate their uncertainties due to quality and quantity of the data. This result indicates that the proposed method is capable of suggesting the experimental design to achieve the required accuracy.

  20. Big Data Challenges in Global Seismic 'Adjoint Tomography' (Invited)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    The challenge of imaging Earth's interior on a global scale is closely linked to the challenge of handling large data sets. The related iterative workflow involves five distinct phases, namely, 1) data gathering and culling, 2) synthetic seismogram calculations, 3) pre-processing (time-series analysis and time-window selection), 4) data assimilation and adjoint calculations, 5) post-processing (pre-conditioning, regularization, model update). In order to implement this workflow on modern high-performance computing systems, a new seismic data format is being developed. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is designed to replace currently used data formats with a more flexible format that allows for fast parallel I/O. The metadata is divided into abstract categories, such as "source" and "receiver", along with provenance information for complete reproducibility. The structure of ASDF is designed keeping in mind three distinct applications: earthquake seismology, seismic interferometry, and exploration seismology. Existing time-series analysis tool kits, such as SAC and ObsPy, can be easily interfaced with ASDF so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages. ASDF accommodates an automated, efficient workflow for global adjoint tomography. Manually managing the large number of simulations associated with the workflow can rapidly become a burden, especially with increasing numbers of earthquakes and stations. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the possibility of automating the entire workflow. Scientific Workflow Management Software (SWfMS) allows users to execute workflows almost routinely. SWfMS provides additional advantages. In particular, it is possible to group independent simulations in a single job to fit the available computational resources. They also give a basic level of fault resilience as the workflow can be resumed at the correct state preceding a failure. Some of the best candidates for our particular workflow

  1. Application of adjoint assimilation technique in simulating tides and tidal currents of the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    Cheng Yongcun; Lu Xianqing; Liu Yuguang; Xu Qing

    2007-01-01

    Considering the interaction of different tidal waves, an adjoint numerical model is developed to simulate M2, S2, K1 and O1 tidal waves in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea(B-Y-E) simultaneously. Compared with previous researches, by using the adjoint assimilation technique to inverse open boundary conditions and bottom friction coefficients based on altimetric data from TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P)and tidal gauges data, the precision of the numerical simulation is significantly improved. Selecting 14 days of simulated results after t11e initial warming run to conduct harmonic analysis, the results can show the characteristics of M2, S2, K1 and O1 tidal wave systems perfectly in B-Y-E. Compared with 9 current stations, the calculated harmonic constants of tidal currents for M2 and K1 are in good agreement With the observed ones.

  2. Mixed Methods and Action Research: similar or different?

    2011-01-01

    This article attempts to analyse and compare ELT studies grounded solely in mixed methods and ELT action research studies based on a mixed methods approach in order to identify to what degree action research studies combining different methods in a single study comply with the principles of rigorous mixed methods study.

  3. Conformal vs confining scenario in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, L; Patella, A; Pica, C; Rago, A

    2009-01-01

    The masses of the lowest-lying states in the meson and in the gluonic sector of an SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation are measured on the lattice at a fixed value of the lattice coupling $\\beta = 4/g_0^2 = 2.25$ for values of the bare fermion mass $m_0$ that span a range between the quenched regime and the massless limit, and for various lattice volumes. Even for light constituent fermions the lightest glueballs are found to be lighter than the lightest mesons. Moreover, the string tension between two static fundamental sources strongly depends on the mass of the dynamical fermions and becomes of the order of the inverse squared lattice linear size before the chiral limit is reached. The implications of these findings for the phase of the theory in the massless limit are discussed and a strategy for discriminating between the (near-)conformal and the confining scenario is outlined.

  4. A new method of time difference measurement: The time difference method by dual phase coincidence points detection

    Zhou, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In the high accurate measurement of periodic signals, the greatest common factor frequency and its characteristics have special functions. A method of time difference measurement - the time difference method by dual 'phase coincidence points' detection is described. This method utilizes the characteristics of the greatest common factor frequency to measure time or phase difference between periodic signals. It can suit a very wide frequency range. Measurement precision and potential accuracy of several picoseconds were demonstrated with this new method. The instrument based on this method is very simple, and the demand for the common oscillator is low. This method and instrument can be used widely.

  5. Compact finite difference method for American option pricing

    Zhao, Jichao; Davison, Matt; Corless, Robert M.

    2007-09-01

    A compact finite difference method is designed to obtain quick and accurate solutions to partial differential equation problems. The problem of pricing an American option can be cast as a partial differential equation. Using the compact finite difference method this problem can be recast as an ordinary differential equation initial value problem. The complicating factor for American options is the existence of an optimal exercise boundary which is jointly determined with the value of the option. In this article we develop three ways of combining compact finite difference methods for American option price on a single asset with methods for dealing with this optimal exercise boundary. Compact finite difference method one uses the implicit condition that solutions of the transformed partial differential equation be nonnegative to detect the optimal exercise value. This method is very fast and accurate even when the spatial step size h is large (h[greater-or-equal, slanted]0.1). Compact difference method two must solve an algebraic nonlinear equation obtained by Pantazopoulos (1998) at every time step. This method can obtain second order accuracy for space x and requires a moderate amount of time comparable with that required by the Crank Nicolson projected successive over relaxation method. Compact finite difference method three refines the free boundary value by a method developed by Barone-Adesi and Lugano [The saga of the American put, 2003], and this method can obtain high accuracy for space x. The last two of these three methods are convergent, moreover all the three methods work for both short term and long term options. Through comparison with existing popular methods by numerical experiments, our work shows that compact finite difference methods provide an exciting new tool for American option pricing.

  6. Comparison of Thermal Properties Measured by Different Methods

    Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Kukkonen, Ilmo [Geological Survey of Finland, Helsinki (Finland); Haelldahl, Lars [Hot Disk AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    A strategy for a thermal site descriptive model of bedrock is under development at SKB. In the model different kinds of uncertainties exist. Some of these uncertainties are related to the potential errors in the methods used for determining thermal properties of rock. In two earlier investigations thermal properties of rock samples were analysed according to the TPS method (transient plane source). Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were determined using the TPS method. For a comparison, the same samples have been measured at the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF), using different laboratory methods. In this later investigation, the thermal conductivity was determined using the divided-bar method and the specific heat capacity using a calorimetric method. The mean differences between the results of different methods are relatively low but the results of individual samples show large variations. The thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method gives for most samples slightly higher values, in average about 3%, than the TPS method. The specific heat capacity measured by the calorimetric method gives lower values, in average about 2%, than the TPS method. Consequently, the thermal diffusivity calculated from thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity gives higher values, in average about 6%, than the TPS method. Reasons for the differences are estimated mainly to be dependent on differences between the samples, errors in the temperature dependence of specific heat and in the transformation from volumetric to specific heat. The TPS measurements are performed using two pieces (sub-samples) of rock. Only one of these two sub-samples was measured using the divided bar method and the calorimetric method. Further, sample preparation involved changes in the size of some of the samples. The mean differences between the results of different methods are within the margins of error reported by the measuring laboratories. However, systematic errors in

  7. The drag-adjoint field of a circular cylinder wake at Reynolds numbers 20, 100 and 500

    Wang, Qiqi

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the adjoint solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. We focus on flow across a circular cylinder at three Reynolds numbers, ReD = 20, 100 and 500. The objective function in the adjoint formulation is the drag on the cylinder. We use classical fluid mechanics approaches to analyze the adjoint solution, which is a vector field similar to a flow field. Production and dissipation of kinetic energy of the adjoint field is discussed. We also derive the evolution of circulation of the adjoint field along a closed material contour. These analytical results are used to explain three numerical solutions of the adjoint equations presented in this paper: The adjoint solution at ReD = 20, a viscous steady state flow, exhibits a downstream suction and an upstream jet, opposite of expected behavior of a flow field. The adjoint solution at ReD = 100, a periodic 2D unsteady flow, exhibits periodic, bean shaped circulation the near wake region. The adjoint solution at ReD = 500, a turbulent 3D unsteady flow,...

  8. A Solution to Study Different Homing Methods Using a PLC

    Mihai Rață

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a positioning control with stepper motors it is very important to know zero location. For this purpose it is necessary a homing command. This paper presents a solution that allows the study of different methods implemented to find a home position (also called: zero point and to observe the differences between these methods.

  9. Least-Squares PN Formulation of the Transport Equation Using Self-Adjoint-Angular-Flux Consistent Boundary Conditions.

    Vincent M. Laboure; Yaqi Wang; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the Least-Squares (LS) PN form of the transport equation compatible with voids in the context of Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM).We first deriveweakly imposed boundary conditions which make the LS weak formulation equivalent to the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) variational formulation with a void treatment, in the particular case of constant cross-sections and a uniform mesh. We then implement this method in Rattlesnake with the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework using a spherical harmonics (PN) expansion to discretize in angle. We test our implementation using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) and find the expected convergence behavior both in angle and space. Lastly, we investigate the impact of the global non-conservation of LS by comparing the method with SAAF on a heterogeneous test problem.

  10. Variational assimilation of stratospheric remote sounding data by an adjoint chemistry-transport-model

    Klasen, D.

    2003-07-01

    In recent years high resolution data have become available due to the deployment of satellite born instruments observing the state of a large number of stratospheric constituents with unprecedentedly high horizontal and vertical resolution. These measurements are valuable for accessing the state of the atmosphere and for helping to develop guidelines for its preservation as a protection layer for terrestrial life. Nevertheless, the measurements alone offer limited direct information. They require interpretation and combination with other information sources to accurately describe the state of the atmosphere. By combining measurements with atmospheric models, the measurements' scatter in time and space can be mitigated and their interpretation improved. A chemistry-transport model (CTM) version of the Cologne model of the middle atmosphere (COMMA) has been developed to model transport and chemical transformation of atmospheric trace gases. In this thesis, the method of four-dimensional variational data assimilation is used to realize the above-mentioned combination in a mathematically rigorous way. The goal is to identify the most probable chemical state of the atmosphere using all available information. As chemistry-transport modelling is an initial value problem, those initial conditions are sought which result in best compliance of the model state with available information during the time period considered. As a measure of compliance, a cost function is specified, whose gradient is needed for minimising the cost function, and which can be obtained by means of an adjoint model. To this end, the adjoint code to the CTM was developed. As a last building block of the data assimilation system, the L-BFGS algorithm for the minimization of the cost function was added. The adjoint model of the middle atmosphere of Cologne CTM (AMMOC-CTM) data-assimilation system thereby developed was tested by applying it to data measured by the cryogenic infrared spectrometer and

  11. The Consistency of a Bounded, Self-Adjoint Time Operator Canonically Conjugate to a Hamiltonian with Non-empty Point Spectrum

    Galapon, E A

    1999-01-01

    Pauli's well known theorem (W. Pauli, Hanbuch der Physik vol. 5/1, ed. S. Flugge, (1926) p.60) asserts that the existence of a self-adjoint time operator canonically conjugate to a given Hamiltonian implies that the time operator and the Hamitlonian posses completely continuous spectra spanning the entire real line. Thus the conclusion that there exists no self-adjoint time operator conjugate to a Hamiltonian with a spectrum which is a proper subspace of the real line. But we challenge this conclusion. We show rigourously the consitency of assuming a bounded, self-adjoint time operator conjugate to a Hamiltonian with an unbounded, or semibounded, or finitely countable point spectrum. Pauli implicitly assumed unconditionally that the domain of the Hamiltonian is invariant under the action of $U_\\beta=\\exp(-i\\beta T)$, where $T$ is the time operator, for arbitrary real number $\\betaA$. But we show that the $\\beta$'s are at most the differences of the eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian. And this happens, under some ...

  12. A COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT CONTRACTION METHODS FOR MONOTONE VARIATIONAL INEQUALITIES

    Bingsheng He; Xiang Wang; Junfeng Yang

    2009-01-01

    It is interesting to compare the efficiency of two methods when their computational loads in each iteration are equal. In this paper, two classes of contraction methods for monotone variational inequalities are studied in a unified framework. The methods of both classes can be viewed as prediction-correction methods, which generate the same test vector in the prediction step and adopt the same step-size rule in the correction step. The only difference is that they use different search directions. The computational loads of each iteration of the different classes are equal. Our analysis explains theoretically why one class of the contraction methods usually outperforms the other class. It is demonstrated that many known methods belong to these two classes of methods. Finally, the presented numerical results demonstrate the validity of our analysis.

  13. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    Shadid, J. N.; Smith, T. M.; Cyr, E. C.; Wildey, T. M.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. In this respect the understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In this study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-based computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. Initial results are presented that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.

  14. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and histopathology scores. These data may also have implications on human pancreas procurement as use of an

  15. Light Adjoint Quarks in the Instanton-Dyon Liquid Model IV

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the instanton-dyon liquid model with $N_f$ Majorana quark flavors in the adjoint representation of color $SU_c(2)$ at finite temperature. We briefly recall the index theorem on $S^1\\times R^3$ for twisted adjoint fermions in a BPS dyon background of arbitrary holonomy, and use the ADHM construction to explicit the adjoint anti-periodic zero modes. We use these results to derive the partition function of an interacting instanton-dyon ensemble with $N_f$ light and anti-periodic adjoint quarks. We develop the model in details by mapping the theory on a 3-dimensional quantum effective theory with adjoint quarks with manifest $SU(N_f)\\times Z_{4N_f}$ symmetry. Using a mean-field analysis at weak coupling and strong screening, we show that center symmetry requires the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, which is shown to only take place for $N_f=1$. For a sufficiently dense liquid, we find that the ground state is center symmetric and breaks spontaneously flavor symmetry through $SU(N_f)\\times Z_{4N...

  16. Light adjoint quarks in the instanton-dyon liquid model. IV.

    Liu, Yizhuang; Shuryak, Edward; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the instanton-dyon liquid model with Nf Majorana quark flavors in the adjoint representation of color S Uc(2 ) at finite temperature. We briefly recall the index theorem on S1×R3 for twisted adjoint fermions in a Bogomolny-Prasad-Sommerfeld (BPS) dyon background of arbitrary holonomy and use the Atiyah-Drinfeld-Hitchin-Manin (ADHM) construction to derive the adjoint antiperiodic zero modes. We use these results to derive the partition function of an interacting instanton-dyon ensemble with Nf light and antiperiodic adjoint quarks. We develop the model in details by mapping the theory on a three-dimensional quantum effective theory with adjoint quarks with manifest S U (Nf)×Z4 Nf symmetry. Using a mean-field analysis at weak coupling and strong screening, we show that center symmetry requires the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, which is shown to only take place for Nf=1 . For a sufficiently dense liquid, we find that the ground state is center symmetric and breaks spontaneously flavor symmetry through S U (Nf)×Z4 Nf→O (Nf). As the liquid dilutes with increasing temperature, center symmetry and chiral symmetry are restored. We present numerical and analytical estimates for the transition temperatures.

  17. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  18. Development of Variational Data Assimilation Methods for the MoSST Geodynamo Code

    Egbert, G. D.; Erofeeva, S.; Kuang, W.; Tangborn, A.; Dimitrova, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    A range of different approaches to data assimilation for Earth's geodynamo are now being pursued, from sequential schemes based on approximate covariances of various degrees of sophistication, to variational methods for models of varying degrees of physical completeness. While variational methods require development of adjoint (and possible tangent linear) variants on the forward code---a challenging programming task for a fully self-consistent modern dynamo code---this approach may ultimately offer significant advantages. For example, adjoint based variational approaches allow initial, boundary, and forcing terms to be explicitly adjusted to combine data from modern and historical eras into dynamically consistent maps of core state, including flow, buoyancy and magnetic fields. Here we describe development of tangent linear and adjoint codes for the Modular Scalable Self-consistent Three-dimensional (MoSST) geodynamo simulator, and present initial results from simple synthetic data assimilation experiments. Our approach has been to develop the exact linearization and adjoint of the actual discrete functions represented by the computer code. To do this we use a 'divide-and-concur' approach: the code is decomposed as the sequential action of a series of linear and non-linear procedures on specified inputs. Non-linear procedures are first linearized about a pre-computed input background state (derived by running the non-linear forward model), and a tangent linear time-step code is developed. For small perturbations of initial state the linearization appears to remain valid for times comparable to the secular variation time-scale. Adjoints for each linear (or linearized) procedure were then developed and tested separately (for symmetry), and then merged into adjoint procedures of increasing complexity. We have completed development of the adjoint for a serial version of the MoSST code, explore time limits of forward operator linearization, and discuss next steps

  19. An Efficient Radial Basis Function Mesh Deformation Scheme within an Adjoint-Based Aerodynamic Optimization Framework

    Poirier, Vincent

    Mesh deformation schemes play an important role in numerical aerodynamic optimization. As the aerodynamic shape changes, the computational mesh must adapt to conform to the deformed geometry. In this work, an extension to an existing fast and robust Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh movement scheme is presented. Using a reduced set of surface points to define the mesh deformation increases the efficiency of the RBF method; however, at the cost of introducing errors into the parameterization by not recovering the exact displacement of all surface points. A secondary mesh movement is implemented, within an adjoint-based optimization framework, to eliminate these errors. The proposed scheme is tested within a 3D Euler flow by reducing the pressure drag while maintaining lift of a wing-body configured Boeing-747 and an Onera-M6 wing. As well, an inverse pressure design is executed on the Onera-M6 wing and an inverse span loading case is presented for a wing-body configured DLR-F6 aircraft.

  20. Psychological traits underlying different killing methods among Malaysian male murderers.

    Kamaluddin, Mohammad Rahim; Shariff, Nadiah Syariani; Nurfarliza, Siti; Othman, Azizah; Ismail, Khaidzir H; Mat Saat, Geshina Ayu

    2014-04-01

    Murder is the most notorious crime that violates religious, social and cultural norms. Examining the types and number of different killing methods that used are pivotal in a murder case. However, the psychological traits underlying specific and multiple killing methods are still understudied. The present study attempts to fill this gap in knowledge by identifying the underlying psychological traits of different killing methods among Malaysian murderers. The study adapted an observational cross-sectional methodology using a guided self-administered questionnaire for data collection. The sampling frame consisted of 71 Malaysian male murderers from 11 Malaysian prisons who were selected using purposive sampling method. The participants were also asked to provide the types and number of different killing methods used to kill their respective victims. An independent sample t-test was performed to establish the mean score difference of psychological traits between the murderers who used single and multiple types of killing methods. Kruskal-Wallis tests were carried out to ascertain the psychological trait differences between specific types of killing methods. The results suggest that specific psychological traits underlie the type and number of different killing methods used during murder. The majority (88.7%) of murderers used a single method of killing. Multiple methods of killing was evident in 'premeditated' murder compared to 'passion' murder, and revenge was a common motive. Examples of multiple methods are combinations of stabbing and strangulation or slashing and physical force. An exception was premeditated murder committed with shooting, when it was usually a single method, attributed to the high lethality of firearms. Shooting was also notable when the motive was financial gain or related to drug dealing. Murderers who used multiple killing methods were more aggressive and sadistic than those who used a single killing method. Those who used multiple methods or

  1. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  2. Forward and adjoint radiance Monte Carlo models for quantitative photoacoustic imaging

    Hochuli, Roman; Powell, Samuel; Arridge, Simon; Cox, Ben

    2015-03-01

    In quantitative photoacoustic imaging, the aim is to recover physiologically relevant tissue parameters such as chromophore concentrations or oxygen saturation. Obtaining accurate estimates is challenging due to the non-linear relationship between the concentrations and the photoacoustic images. Nonlinear least squares inversions designed to tackle this problem require a model of light transport, the most accurate of which is the radiative transfer equation. This paper presents a highly scalable Monte Carlo model of light transport that computes the radiance in 2D using a Fourier basis to discretise in angle. The model was validated against a 2D finite element model of the radiative transfer equation, and was used to compute gradients of an error functional with respect to the absorption and scattering coefficient. It was found that adjoint-based gradient calculations were much more robust to inherent Monte Carlo noise than a finite difference approach. Furthermore, the Fourier angular discretisation allowed very efficient gradient calculations as sums of Fourier coefficients. These advantages, along with the high parallelisability of Monte Carlo models, makes this approach an attractive candidate as a light model for quantitative inversion in photoacoustic imaging.

  3. Hot QCD, k-strings and the adjoint monopole gas model

    Altes, C P K; Altes, Chris P. Korthals; Meyer, Harvey B.

    2005-01-01

    When the magnetic sector of hot QCD, 3D SU(N) Yang-Mills theory, is described as a dilute gas of non-Abelian monopoles in the adjoint representation of the magnetic group, Wilson loops of N-ality k are known to obey a periodic k(N-k) law. Lattice simulations have confirmed this prediction to a few percent for N=4 and 6. We describe in detail how the magnetic flux of the monopoles produces different area laws for spatial Wilson k-loops. A simple physical argument is presented, why the predicted and observed Casimir scaling is allowed in the large-N limit by usual power-counting arguments. The same scaling is also known to hold in two-loop perturbation theory for the spatial 't Hooft loop, which measures the electric flux. We then present new lattice data for 3D N=8 k-strings as long as 3`fm' that provide further confirmation. Finally we suggest new tests in theories with spontaneous breaking and in SO(4n+2) gauge groups.

  4. Improved forward wave propagation and adjoint-based sensitivity kernel calculations using a numerically stable finite-element PML

    Xie, Zhinan; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Martin, Roland

    2014-01-01

    an efficient infinite-domain truncation method suitable for accurately truncating an infinite domain governed by the second-order elastic wave equation written in displacement and computed based on a finite-element (FE) method. In this paper, we make several steps towards this goal. First, we make the 2-D...... in both formulations, in particular if very small mesh elements are present inside the absorbing layer, but we explain how these instabilities can be delayed as much as needed by using a stretching factor to reach numerical stability in practice for applications. Fourthly, in the case of adjoint problems...... with perfectly matched absorbing layers we introduce a computationally efficient boundary storage strategy by saving information along the interface between the CFS-UPML and the main domain only, thus avoiding the need to solve a backward wave propagation problem inside the CFS-UPML, which is known to be highly...

  5. Evaluation of Three Different Osteosynthesis Methods for Mandibular Angle Fractures

    Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de Gorla; Reis, José Maurício Dos Santos Nunes;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of different rigid fixation methods in mandible angle fractures. Three different plates were tested: one 4-hole grid miniplate, one 8-hole curved grid miniplate, and one 4-hole straight miniplate.For the loading tests, 30 polyurethane ...

  6. Explicit finite difference methods for the delay pseudoparabolic equations.

    Amirali, I; Amiraliyev, G M; Cakir, M; Cimen, E

    2014-01-01

    Finite difference technique is applied to numerical solution of the initial-boundary value problem for the semilinear delay Sobolev or pseudoparabolic equation. By the method of integral identities two-level difference scheme is constructed. For the time integration the implicit rule is being used. Based on the method of energy estimates the fully discrete scheme is shown to be absolutely stable and convergent of order two in space and of order one in time. The error estimates are obtained in the discrete norm. Some numerical results confirming the expected behavior of the method are shown.

  7. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods (13, 12, 44, 38). The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method (19, 20, 21, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42, 43, 9) was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations (39, 25). In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that the basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures [241. In this paper, our concem will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  8. Explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for curvilinear coordinates.

    Guo, Zhaoli; Zhao, T S

    2003-06-01

    In this paper a finite-difference-based lattice Boltzmann method for curvilinear coordinates is proposed in order to improve the computational efficiency and numerical stability of a recent method [R. Mei and W. Shyy, J. Comput. Phys. 143, 426 (1998)] in which the collision term of the Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation for discrete velocities is treated implicitly. In the present method, the implicitness of the numerical scheme is removed by introducing a distribution function different from that being used currently. As a result, an explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for curvilinear coordinates is obtained. The scheme is applied to a two-dimensional Poiseuille flow, an unsteady Couette flow, a lid-driven cavity flow, and a steady flow around a circular cylinder. The numerical results are in good agreement with the results of previous studies. Extensions to other lattice Boltzmann models based on nonuniform meshes are also discussed.

  9. Chebyshev Finite Difference Method for Fractional Boundary Value Problems

    Boundary

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical method for fractional differential equations using Chebyshev finite difference method. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo sense. Numerical results show that this method is of high accuracy and is more convenient and efficient for solving boundary value problems involving fractional ordinary differential equations. AMS Subject Classification: 34A08 Keywords and Phrases: Chebyshev polynomials, Gauss-Lobatto points, fractional differential equation, finite difference 1. Introduction The idea of a derivative which interpolates between the familiar integer order derivatives was introduced many years ago and has gained increasing importance only in recent years due to the development of mathematical models of a certain situations in engineering, materials science, control theory, polymer modelling etc. For example see [20, 22, 25, 26]. Most fractional order differential equations describing real life situations, in general do not have exact analytical solutions. Several numerical and approximate analytical methods for ordinary differential equation Received: December 2014; Accepted: March 2015 57 Journal of Mathematical Extension Vol. 9, No. 3, (2015, 57-71 ISSN: 1735-8299 URL: http://www.ijmex.com Chebyshev Finite Difference Method for Fractional Boundary Value Problems H. Azizi Taft Branch, Islamic Azad University Abstract. This paper presents a numerical method for fractional differential equations using Chebyshev finite difference method. The fractional derivative

  10. CFD-based method of determining form factor k for different ship types and different drafts

    Wang, Jinbao; Yu, Hai; Zhang, Yuefeng; Xiong, Xiaoqing

    2016-09-01

    The value of form factor k at different drafts is important in predicting full-scale total resistance and speed for different types of ships. In the ITTC community, most organizations predict form factor k using a low-speed model test. However, this method is problematic for ships with bulbous bows and transom. In this article, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-based method is introduced to obtain k for different type of ships at different drafts, and a comparison is made between the CFD method and the model test. The results show that the CFD method produces reasonable k values. A grid generating method and turbulence model are briefly discussed in the context of obtaining a consistent k using CFD.

  11. CFD-Based Method of Determining Form Factor k for Different Ship Types and Different Drafts

    Xiaoqing Xiong

    2016-01-01

    The value of form factor k at different drafts is important in predicting full-scale total resistance and speed for different types of ships. In the ITTC community, most organizations predict form factor k using a low-speed model test. However, this method is problematic for ships with bulbous bows and transom. In this article, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-based method is introduced to obtain k for different type of ships at different drafts, and a comparison is made between the CFD method and the model test. The results show that the CFD method produces reasonable k values. A grid generating method and turbulence model are briefly discussed in the context of obtaining a consistent k using CFD.

  12. The Roots of Adjoint Polynomial of the Graphs Contain Triangles%一类含三角形图的伴随多项式的根

    冶成福

    2004-01-01

    We denote h(G, x) as the adjoint polynomial of graph G. In [5], Ma obtained the interpolation properties of the roots of adjoint polynomial of graphs containing triangles.By the properties, we prove the non-zero root of adjoint polynomial of Dn and Fn are single multiple.

  13. Analysis of surface asperity flattening based on two different methods

    Li, Hejie; Öchsner, Andreas; Ni, Guowei; Wei, Dongbin; Jiang, Zhengyi

    2016-11-01

    The stress state is an important parameter in metal forming processes, which significantly influences the strain state and microstructure of products, affecting their surface qualities. In order to make the metal products have a good surface quality, the surface stress state must be optimised. In this study, two classical methods, the upper bound method and the crystal plasticity finite element method, were investigated. The differences between the two methods were discussed in regard to the model, the velocity field, and the strain field. Then the related surface roughness is deduced.

  14. Time-dependent optimal heater control using finite difference method

    Li, Zhen Zhe; Heo, Kwang Su; Choi, Jun Hoo; Seol, Seoung Yun [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Thermoforming is one of the most versatile and economical process to produce polymer products. The drawback of thermoforming is difficult to control thickness of final products. Temperature distribution affects the thickness distribution of final products, but temperature difference between surface and center of sheet is difficult to decrease because of low thermal conductivity of ABS material. In order to decrease temperature difference between surface and center, heating profile must be expressed as exponential function form. In this study, Finite Difference Method was used to find out the coefficients of optimal heating profiles. Through investigation, the optimal results using Finite Difference Method show that temperature difference between surface and center of sheet can be remarkably minimized with satisfying temperature of forming window.

  15. Differential and difference equations a comparison of methods of solution

    Maximon, Leonard C

    2016-01-01

    This book, intended for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics and engineering, presents a detailed comparison of the important methods of solution for linear differential and difference equations - variation of constants, reduction of order, Laplace transforms and generating functions - bringing out the similarities as well as the significant differences in the respective analyses. Equations of arbitrary order are studied, followed by a detailed analysis for equations of first and second order. Equations with polynomial coefficients are considered and explicit solutions for equations with linear coefficients are given, showing significant differences in the functional form of solutions of differential equations from those of difference equations. An alternative method of solution involving transformation of both the dependent and independent variables is given for both differential and difference equations. A comprehensive, detailed treatment of Green’s functions and the associat...

  16. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT NUMERICAL INTERFACE METHODS ON HYDRODYNAMICS INSTABILITY

    FRANCOIS, MARIANNE M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DENDY, EDWARD D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LOWRIE, ROBERT B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LIVESCU, DANIEL [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEINKAMP, MICHAEL J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-11

    The authors compare the effects of different numerical schemes for the advection and material interface treatments on the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, using the RAGE hydro-code. The interface growth and its surface density (interfacial area) versus time are investigated. The surface density metric shows to be better suited to characterize the difference in the flow, than the conventional interface growth metric. They have found that Van Leer's limiter combined to no interface treatment leads to the largest surface area. Finally, to quantify the difference between the numerical methods they have estimated the numerical viscosity in the linear-regime at different scales.

  17. A comparison of four different block bootstrap methods

    Boris Radovanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a description of four different block bootstrap methods, i.e., non-overlapping block bootstrap, overlapping block bootstrap (moving block bootstrap, stationary block bootstrap and subsampling. Furthermore, the basic goal of this paper is to quantify relative efficiency of each mentioned block bootstrap procedure and then to compare those methods. To achieve the goal, we measure mean square errors of estimation variance returns. The returns are calculated from 1250 daily observations of Serbian stock market index values BELEX15 from April 2009 to April 2014. Thereby, considering the effects of potential changes in decisions according to variations in the sample length and purposes of the use, this paper introduces stability analysis which contains robustness testing of the different sample size and the different block length. Testing results indicate some changes in bootstrap method efficiencies when altering the sample size or the block length.

  18. Economic Consequences of DifferentLean Percentage Estimation Methods

    Zdravko Tolušić

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic effects of the choice of two different lean percentage estimation methods and terminal sire breed were investigated on 53 pig carcasses divided in two groups. In the 1st group were progeny of Pietrain used as terminal sire (n=25 and in 2nd the progeny of Large White terminal sire. It was found that the breed of terminal sire haven.t had influence on cold carcass weight and fat thickness measured for TP method of lean percentage estimation. Inclusion of Pietrain as terminal sire had influence on MLD thickness measured for TP and INS methods which was significantly higher, while fat thickness measured for instrumental method was significantly lower (p<0.01. Carcasses of the same group had higher lean percentage estimated by TP and INS methods (p<0.05 and p<0.01, resp.. Also, different methods of lean percentage estimation resulted in different classification of the carcasses into SEUROP classes. The choice of the lean percentage estimation method had no significant effect on the price of the carcasses from 2nd group which had Large White as terminal sire, while in pig carcasses from the 1st group (Pietrain as terminal sire, the choice of lean percentage method of estimation determined the price of the carcasses, and by this also economic surplus (or loss of the producers. It is concluded that both methods are equally applicable in the case of Large White crossbreeds, while caution should be taken in the case of pig carcasses originated from Pietrain as terminal sire because carcasses of such pigs reached higher prices when estimated by instrumental method.

  19. Comparison between different synchronization methods of identical chaotic systems

    Haeri, Mohammad [Advanced Control System Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, P.O. Box 11365-9363 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: haeri@sina.sharif.edu; Khademian, Behzad [Advanced Control System Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, P.O. Box 11365-9363 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    This paper studies and compares three nonadaptive (bidirectional, unidirectional, and sliding mode) and two adaptive (active control and backstepping) synchronization methods on the synchronizing of four pairs of identical chaotic systems (Chua's circuit, Roessler system, Lorenz system, and Lue system). Results from computer simulations are presented in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the methods and to compare them based on different criteria.

  20. Combined Method of Datum Transformation Between Different Coordinate Systems

    2002-01-01

    The similarity transformation model between different coordinate systems is not accurate enough to describe the discrepancy of them.Therefore,the coordinate transformation from the coordinate frame with poor accuracy to that with high accuracy cannot guarantee a high precision of transformation.In this paper,a combined method of similarity transformation and regressive approximating is presented.The local error accumulation and distortion are taken into consideration and the precision of coordinate system is improved by using the recommended method.

  1. Estimation of citicoline sodium in tablets by difference spectrophotometric method

    Sagar Suman Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present work deals with development and validation of a novel, precise, and accurate spectrophotometric method for the estimation of citicoline sodium (CTS in tablets. This spectrophotometric method is based on the principle that CTS shows two different forms that differs in the absorption spectra in basic and acidic medium. Materials and Methods: The present work was being carried out on Shimadzu 1800 Double Beam UV-visible spectrophotometer. Difference spectra were generated using 10 mm quartz cells over the range of 200-400 nm. Solvents used were 0.1 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl. Results: The maxima and minima in the difference spectra of CTS were found to be 239 nm and 283 nm, respectively. Amplitude was calculated from the maxima and minima of spectrum. The drug follows linearity in the range of 1-50 μ/ml (R 2 = 0.999. The average % recovery from the tablet formulation was found to be 98.47%. The method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use: ICH Q2(R1 Validation of Analytical Procedures: Text and Methodology guidelines. Conclusion: This method is simple and inexpensive. Hence it can be applied for determination of the drug in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  2. Preliminary comparison of different reduction methods of graphene oxide

    Yu Shang; Dong Zhang; Yanyun Liu; Chao Guo

    2015-02-01

    The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is a promising route to bulk produce graphene-based sheets. Different reduction processes result in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with different properties. In this paper three reduction methods, chemical, thermal and electrochemical reduction, were compared on three aspects including morphology and structure, reduction degree and electrical conductivity by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction(XRD), the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrum, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and four-point probe conductivity measurement. Understanding the different characteristics of different RGO by preliminary comparison is helpful in tailoring the characteristics of graphene materials for diverse applications and developing a simple, green, and efficient method for the mass production of graphene.

  3. Structural features of carbon materials synthesized by different methods

    Streletskii, O. A.; Ivanenko, I. P.; Khvostov, V. V.; Savchenko, N. F.; Nishchak, O. Yu.; Aleksandrov, A. F.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of three types of carbon structures synthesized by different methods, such as arc discharge plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon in a magnetic field, chemical dehydrohalogenation of the poly(vinyl chloride)/poly(vinylidene chloride) precursor, and pulsed plasma ion assisted deposition. It has been found that the samples prepared by different methods have a common feature, i.e., the presence of three-dimensional clusters based on sp 2- or sp 3-bonds surrounded by quasi-one-dimensional carbon chains. It has been shown that the structure of carbon materials changes depending on the synthesis conditions.

  4. Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method in Nanophotonics

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra

    is obtained through free space squeezing technique, and nonuniform orthogonal grids are built to greatly improve the accuracy of simulations of highly heterogeneous nanostructures. Examples of the use of the finite-difference frequency-domain method in this thesis range from simulating localized modes...... is often indispensable. This thesis presents the development of rigorous finite-difference method, a very general tool to solve Maxwell’s equations in arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, with an emphasis on the frequency-domain formulation. Enhanced performance of the perfectly matched layers...

  5. Solution of Higher-Order ODEs Using Backward Difference Method

    Mohamed Bin Suleiman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The current numerical technique for solving a system of higher-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs is to reduce it to a system of first-order equations then solving it using first-order ODE methods. Here, we propose a method to solve higher-order ODEs directly. The formulae will be derived in terms of backward difference in a constant stepsize formulation. The method developed will be validated by solving some higher-order ODEs directly with constant stepsize. To simplify the evaluations of the integration coefficients, we find the relationship between various orders. The result presented confirmed our hypothesis.

  6. Palatine tonsil volume estimation using different methods after tonsillectomy.

    Sağıroğlu, Ayşe; Acer, Niyazi; Okuducu, Hacı; Ertekin, Tolga; Erkan, Mustafa; Durmaz, Esra; Aydın, Mesut; Yılmaz, Seher; Zararsız, Gökmen

    2016-06-15

    This study was carried out to measure the volume of the palatine tonsil in otorhinolaryngology outpatients with complaints of adenotonsillar hypertrophy and chronic tonsillitis who had undergone tonsillectomy. To date, no study has investigated palatine tonsil volume using different methods and compared with subjective tonsil size in the literature. For this purpose, we used three different methods to measure palatine tonsil volume. The correlation of each parameter with tonsil size was assessed. After tonsillectomy, palatine tonsil volume was measured by Archimedes, Cavalieri and Ellipsoid methods. Mean right-left palatine tonsil volumes were calculated as 2.63 ± 1.34 cm(3) and 2.72 ± 1.51 cm(3) by the Archimedes method, 3.51 ± 1.48 cm(3) and 3.37 ± 1.36 cm(3) by the Cavalieri method, and 2.22 ± 1.22 cm(3) and 2.29 ± 1.42 cm(3) by the Ellipsoid method, respectively. Excellent agreement was found among the three methods of measuring volumetric techniques according to Bland-Altman plots. In addition, tonsil grade was correlated significantly with tonsil volume.

  7. Self-adjoint extensions of Coulomb systems in 1,2 and 3 dimensions

    de Oliveira, Cesar R

    2008-01-01

    We study the nonrelativistic quantum Coulomb hamiltonian (i.e., inverse of distance potential) in $R^n$, n = 1, 2, 3. We characterize their self-adjoint extensions and, in the unidimensional case, present a discussion of controversies in the literature, particularly the question of the permeability of the origin. Potentials given by fundamental solutions of Laplace equation are also briefly considered.

  8. Blind range influence on guidance loop performance: An adjoint-based analysis

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of adjoint simulation for assessing the miss distance performance of a generic guidance system under the influence of a blind range condition. The term "blind range" refers to that final portion of the missile trajectory for which sensor data are not available.

  9. The Schur Transformation for Generalized Nevanlinna Functions : Interpolation and Self-Adjoint Operator Realizations

    Alpay, Daniel; Dijksma, Aad; Langer, Heinz; Shondin, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    The Schur transformation for generalized Nevanlinna functions has been defined and applied in [2]. In this paper we discuss its relation to a basic interpolation problem and study its effect on the minimal self-adjoint operator (or relation) realization of a generalized Nevanlinna function.

  10. Generational (age) differences in nursing students' preferences for teaching methods.

    Walker, Jean T; Martin, Tina; White, Jill; Elliott, Rowena; Norwood, Anne; Mangum, Carl; Haynie, Lisa

    2006-09-01

    A generational age transformation is occurring in nursing classrooms across the United States. Nurse educators need to prepare for the different values and expectations of students from Generation X and the newly emerging Generation Y in the educational environment. This quantitative, descriptive research begins to examine the preferences and expectations of these generations regarding teaching methods.

  11. Hyperbolic function method for solving nonlinear differential-different equations

    Zhu Jia-Min

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm is devised to obtained exact travelling wave solutions of differential-different equations by means of hyperbolic function. For illustration, we apply the method to solve the discrete nonlinear (2+1)-dimensional Toda lattice equation and the discretized nonlinear mKdV lattice equation, and successfully constructed some explicit and exact travelling wave solutions.

  12. Experimental Study for the Different Methods of Generating Millimeter Waves

    Aamer Jamal Albaghdadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a analytical comparison and experimental implementation of different methods used in generating a low phase noise millimeter wave signals is presented. Four techniques were experimented and compared, Multiplication, phase lock loop (PLL, Injection locking (IL, and Injection locking with phase lock loop (ILPLL. The comparison and experimental results of a laboratory discussed.

  13. Fourth-Order Difference Methods for Hyperbolic IBVPs

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Olsson, Pelle

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we consider fourth-order difference approximations of initial-boundary value problems for hyperbolic partial differential equations. We use the method of lines approach with both explicit and compact implicit difference operators in space. The explicit operator satisfies an energy estimate leading to strict stability. For the implicit operator we develop boundary conditions and give a complete proof of strong stability using the Laplace transform technique. We also present numerical experiments for the linear advection equation and Burgers' equation with discontinuities in the solution or in its derivative. The first equation is used for modeling contact discontinuities in fluid dynamics; the second one is used for modeling shocks and rarefaction waves. The time discretization is done with a third-order Runge-Kutta TVD method. For solutions with discontinuities in the solution itself we add a filter based on second-order viscosity. In case of the non-linear Burgers' equation we use a flux splitting technique that results in an energy estimate for certain difference approximations, in which case also an entropy condition is fulfilled. In particular we shall demonstrate that the unsplit conservative form produces a non-physical shock instead of the physically correct rarefaction wave. In the numerical experiments we compare our fourth-order methods with a standard second-order one and with a third-order TVD method. The results show that the fourth-order methods are the only ones that give good results for all the considered test problems.

  14. The difference in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids measured by different methods and its rationalization

    Aparna Zagabathuni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A suspension of particles below 100 nm in size, usually termed as nanofluid, often shows a notable enhancement in thermal conductivity, when measured by the transient hot-wire method. In contrast, when the conductivity of the same nanofluid is measured by the laser flash method, the enhancement reported is about one order of magnitude lower. This difference has been quantitatively resolved for the first time on the basis of the collision-mediated heat transfer model for nanofluids proposed earlier by our research group. Based on the continuum simulation coupled with stochastic analysis, the present theoretical prediction agrees well with the experimental observations from different measuring methods reported in the literature, and fully accounts for the different results from the two measuring methods mentioned above. This analysis also gives an indication that the nanofluids are unlikely to be effective for heat transfer in microchannels.

  15. The difference in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids measured by different methods and its rationalization.

    Zagabathuni, Aparna; Ghosh, Sudipto; Pabi, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    A suspension of particles below 100 nm in size, usually termed as nanofluid, often shows a notable enhancement in thermal conductivity, when measured by the transient hot-wire method. In contrast, when the conductivity of the same nanofluid is measured by the laser flash method, the enhancement reported is about one order of magnitude lower. This difference has been quantitatively resolved for the first time on the basis of the collision-mediated heat transfer model for nanofluids proposed earlier by our research group. Based on the continuum simulation coupled with stochastic analysis, the present theoretical prediction agrees well with the experimental observations from different measuring methods reported in the literature, and fully accounts for the different results from the two measuring methods mentioned above. This analysis also gives an indication that the nanofluids are unlikely to be effective for heat transfer in microchannels.

  16. The mimetic finite difference method for elliptic problems

    Veiga, Lourenço Beirão; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the theoretical and computational aspects of the mimetic finite difference method for a wide class of multidimensional elliptic problems, which includes diffusion, advection-diffusion, Stokes, elasticity, magnetostatics and plate bending problems. The modern mimetic discretization technology developed in part by the Authors allows one to solve these equations on unstructured polygonal, polyhedral and generalized polyhedral meshes. The book provides a practical guide for those scientists and engineers that are interested in the computational properties of the mimetic finite difference method such as the accuracy, stability, robustness, and efficiency. Many examples are provided to help the reader to understand and implement this method. This monograph also provides the essential background material and describes basic mathematical tools required to develop further the mimetic discretization technology and to extend it to various applications.

  17. Impact of Different Obesity Assessment Methods after Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Caroline N. M. Nunes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal obesity is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, identifying the best method for measuring waist circumference (WC is a priority. Objective: To evaluate the eight methods of measuring WC in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS as a predictor of cardiovascular complications during hospitalization. Methods: Prospective study of patients with ACS. The measurement of WC was performed by eight known methods: midpoint between the last rib and the iliac crest (1, point of minimum circumference (2; immediately above the iliac crest (3, umbilicus (4, one inch above the umbilicus (5, one centimeter above the umbilicus (6, smallest rib and (7 the point of greatest circumference around the waist (8. Complications included: angina, arrhythmia, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, hypotension, pericarditis and death. Logistic regression tests were used for predictive factors. Results: A total of 55 patients were evaluated. During the hospitalization period, which corresponded on average to seven days, 37 (67% patients had complications, with the exception of death, which was not observed in any of the cases. Of these complications, the only one that was associated with WC was angina, and with every cm of WC increase, the risk for angina increased from 7.5 to 9.9%, depending on the measurement site. It is noteworthy the fact that there was no difference between the different methods of measuring WC as a predictor of angina. Conclusion: The eight methods of measuring WC are also predictors of recurrent angina after acute coronary syndromes.

  18. Comparison of three different methods of total carbon dioxide measurement.

    Kilborn, Susan H.; Bonnett, Brenda N.; Pook, Harold A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare total carbon dioxide (TCO(2)) levels measured by three different methods. Two hundred jugular venous blood samples from dogs admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Ontario Veterinary College with various clinical disorders were analyzed by the Radiometer blood gas analyzer (BGA) and the Coulter DACOS analyzer. In 70 of these samples, TCO(2) was also measured by the Kodak Ektachem DTE chemistry analyzer. Comparison of the agreement between methods revealed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) of 0.63, 0.79, and 0.82 for the DACOS-Ektachem, DACOS-BGA and Ektachem-BGA comparisons, respectively. Evaluation of the effect of storage time on TCO(2) content of stored serum samples measured on the DACOS analyzer revealed a decrease of almost 2 mmol/L and a decrease in the intraclass correlation coefficient values between the DACOS analyzer and other methods after 7 hours storage time. The results of this observational study revealed lower agreement between the three methods in this study than previously reported between other methods of TCO(2) measurement. Possible reasons for the lower than expected agreement in this study included changes in DACOS values because of storage and differences in methodologies between the methods.

  19. More than Method?: A Discussion of Paradigm Differences within Mixed Methods Research

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2011-01-01

    This article challenges the idea that mixed methods research (MMR) constitutes a coherent research paradigm and explores how different research paradigms exist within MMR. Tracing paradigmatic differences at the level of methods, ontology, and epistemology, two MMR strategies are discussed: nested analysis, recently presented by the American…

  20. An Effective Method for Seeking Conservation Laws of Partial Differential Equations

    QIN Mao-Chang; MEI Feng-Xiang; FAN Gui-Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces an effective method for seeking localconservation laws of general partial differential equations (PDEs). The well-known variational principle does not involve in this method. Alternatively, the conservation laws can be derived from symmetries, which include the symmetries of the associated linearized equation of the PDEs,and the adjoint symmetries of the adjoint equation of the PDEs.

  1. Localization of metastases from medullary thyroid carcinoma using different methods

    Cabezas, R.C.; Berna, L.; Estorch, M.; Carrio, I.; Garcia-Ameijeiras, A.

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed the efficiency of three different noninvasive methods in the localization of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Nine patients (six females and three males) with biochemical evidence of disease after primary surgery were subjected to {sup 131}I anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) antibody, {sup 131}I meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG), and computed tomography. Another female patient, in biochemical remission for six years after initial surgery, was also studied using the same methods. Three of the ten patients had negative results with all three methods (including the patient in remission). The other seven patients showed abnormal uptake of labeled anti-CEA antibody in various localizations; only two of these patients had a corresponding pathological image by computed tomography and only one by {sup 131}I MIBG. These preliminary results suggest that {sup 131}I anti-CEA scanning may be the most sensitive noninvasive method for the localization of MTC recurrences.

  2. Vibro-acoustic design sensitivity analysis using the wave-based method

    Koo, Kunmo; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim; Wang, Semyung

    2011-08-01

    Conventional element-based methods, such as the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM), require mesh refinements at higher frequencies in order to converge. Therefore, their applications are limited to low frequencies. Compared to element-based methods, the wave-based method (WBM) adopts exact solutions of the governing differential equation instead of simple polynomials to describe the dynamic response variables within the subdomains. As such, the WBM does not require a finer division of subdomains as the frequency increases in order to exhibit high computational efficiency. In this paper, the design sensitivity formulation of a semi-coupled structural-acoustic problem is implemented using the WBM. Here, the results of structural harmonic analyses are imported as the boundary conditions for the acoustic domain, which consists of multiple wave-based subdomains. The cross-sectional area of each beam element is considered as a sizing design variable. Then, the adjoint variable method (AVM) is used to efficiently compute the sensitivity. The adjoint variable is obtained from structural reanalysis using an adjoint load composed of the system matrix and an evaluation of the wave functions of each boundary. The proposed sensitivity formulation is subsequently applied to a two-dimensional (2D) vehicle model. Finally, the sensitivity results are compared to the finite difference sensitivity results, which show good agreement.

  3. Field evaluation of broiler gait score using different sampling methods

    AFS Cordeiro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is today the world's largest broiler meat exporter; however, in order to keep this position, it must comply with welfare regulations while maintaining low production costs. Locomotion problems restrain bird movements, limiting their access to drinking and feeding equipment, and therefore their survival and productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate locomotion deficiency in broiler chickens reared under stressful temperature conditions using three different sampling methods of birds from three different ages. The experiment consisted in determining the gait score of 28, 35, 42 and 49-day-old broilers using three different known gait scoring methods: M1, birds were randomly selected, enclosed in a circle, and then stimulated to walk out of the circle; M2, ten birds were randomly selected and gait scored; and M3, birds were randomly selected, enclosed in a circle, and then observed while walking away from the circle without stimulus to walking. Environmental temperature, relative humidity, and light intensity inside the poultry houses were recorded. No evidence of interaction between scoring method and age was found however, both method and age influenced gait score. Gait score was found to be lower at 28 days of age. The evaluation using the ten randomly selected birds within the house was the method that presented the less reliable results. Gait score results when birds were stimulated to walk were lower than when they were not simulated, independently of age. The gait scores obtained with the three tested methods and ages were higher than those considered acceptable. The highest frequency of normal gait score (0 represented 50% of the flock. These results may be related to heat stress during rearing. Average gait score incresead with average ambient temperature, relative humidity, and light intensity. The evaluation of gait score to detect locomotion problems of broilers under rearing conditions seems subjective and

  4. Impact of Different Obesity Assessment Methods after Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Nunes, Caroline N. M.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Farah, Elaine; Fusco, Daniéliso; Azevedo, Paula S.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M., E-mail: lzornoff@cardiol.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Abdominal obesity is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, identifying the best method for measuring waist circumference (WC) is a priority. To evaluate the eight methods of measuring WC in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as a predictor of cardiovascular complications during hospitalization. Prospective study of patients with ACS. The measurement of WC was performed by eight known methods: midpoint between the last rib and the iliac crest (1), point of minimum circumference (2); immediately above the iliac crest (3), umbilicus (4), one inch above the umbilicus (5), one centimeter above the umbilicus (6), smallest rib and (7) the point of greatest circumference around the waist (8). Complications included: angina, arrhythmia, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, hypotension, pericarditis and death. Logistic regression tests were used for predictive factors. A total of 55 patients were evaluated. During the hospitalization period, which corresponded on average to seven days, 37 (67%) patients had complications, with the exception of death, which was not observed in any of the cases. Of these complications, the only one that was associated with WC was angina, and with every cm of WC increase, the risk for angina increased from 7.5 to 9.9%, depending on the measurement site. It is noteworthy the fact that there was no difference between the different methods of measuring WC as a predictor of angina. The eight methods of measuring WC are also predictors of recurrent angina after acute coronary syndromes.

  5. Comparison of different diagnostic methods in infants with Cholestasis

    Seyed Mohsen Dehghani; Mahmood Haghighat; Mohammad Hadi Imanieh; Bita Geramizadeh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate different methods in differentiating idiopathic neonatal hepatitis from biliary atresia.METHODS: Sixty-five infants with cholestatic jaundice and final diagnosis of idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia were studied prospectively from September 2003 to March 2006. A thorough history and physical examination were undertaken and the liver enzymes were examined. All cases underwent abdominal ultrasonography, hepatobiliary scintigraphy,and percutaneous liver biopsy. The accuracy, sensitivity,specificity and predictive values of these various methods were compared.RESULTS: There were 34 girls and 31 boys, among them 46 subjects had idiopathic neonatal hepatitis (age,61 ± 17 d) and 19 had biliary atresia (age, 64 ± 18 d).The mean age at onset of jaundice was significantly lower in cases of biliary atresia when compared to idiopathic neonatal hepatitis cases (9 ± 13 d vs 20 ± 21 d;P = 0.032). The diagnostic accuracy of different methods was as follows: liver biopsy, 96.9%; clinical evaluation,70.8%; ultrasonography, 69.2%; hepatobiliary scintigraphy, 58.5%; and liver enzymes, 50.8%.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that clinical evaluation by an experienced pediatric hepatologist and a biopsy of the liver are considered as the most reliable methods to differentiate idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia.

  6. Acoustic radiation force analysis using finite difference time domain method.

    Grinenko, A; Wilcox, P D; Courtney, C R P; Drinkwater, B W

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force exerted by standing waves on particles is analyzed using a finite difference time domain Lagrangian method. This method allows the acoustic radiation force to be obtained directly from the solution of nonlinear fluid equations, without any assumptions on size or geometry of the particles, boundary conditions, or acoustic field amplitude. The model converges to analytical results in the limit of small particle radii and low field amplitudes, where assumptions within the analytical models apply. Good agreement with analytical and numerical models based on solutions of linear scattering problems is observed for compressible particles, whereas some disagreement is detected when the compressibility of the particles decreases.

  7. Aerosol Health Impact Source Attribution Studies with the CMAQ Adjoint Air Quality Model

    Turner, M. D.

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an air pollutant consisting of a mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the sources and distributions of PM2.5 is important for many reasons, two of which are that PM2.5 has an adverse effect on human health and also an effect on climate change. Recent studies have suggested that health benefits resulting from a unit decrease in black carbon (BC) are four to nine times larger than benefits resulting from an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. The goal of this thesis is to quantify the role of emissions from different sectors and different locations in governing the total health impacts, risk, and maximum individual risk of exposure to BC both nationally and regionally in the US. We develop and use the CMAQ adjoint model to quantify the role of emissions from all modeled sectors, times, and locations on premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC. From a national analysis, we find that damages resulting from anthropogenic emissions of BC are strongly correlated with population and premature death. However, we find little correlation between damages and emission magnitude, suggesting that controls on the largest emissions may not be the most efficient means of reducing damages resulting from BC emissions. Rather, the best proxy for locations with damaging BC emissions is locations where premature deaths occur. Onroad diesel and nonroad vehicle emissions are the largest contributors to premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC, while onroad gasoline emissions cause the highest deaths per amount emitted. Additionally, emissions in fall and winter contribute to more premature deaths (and more per amount emitted) than emissions in spring and summer. From a regional analysis, we find that emissions from outside each of six urban areas account for 7% to 27% of the premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC within the region. Within the region encompassing New York City and Philadelphia

  8. Convergence of a finite difference method for combustion model problems

    YING; Long'an

    2004-01-01

    We study a finite difference scheme for a combustion model problem. A projection scheme near the combustion wave, and the standard upwind finite difference scheme away from the combustion wave are applied. Convergence to weak solutions with a combustion wave is proved under the normal Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Some conditions on the ignition temperature are given to guarantee the solution containing a strong detonation wave or a weak detonation wave. Convergence to strong detonation wave solutions for the random projection method is also proved.

  9. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    Humbird, Kelli D

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory, and can be obtained in significantly less computational time.

  10. Droplet number prediction uncertainties from CCN: an integrated assessment using observations and a global adjoint model

    R. H. Moore

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI chemical transport model with a cloud droplet parameterization adjoint to quantify the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration to uncertainties in predicting CCN concentrations. Published CCN closure prediction uncertainties for six different sets of simplifying compositional and mixing state assumptions are used as proxies for modeled CCN uncertainty arising from application of those scenarios. It is found that cloud droplet number concentrations are fairly insensitive to CCN-active aerosol number concentrations over the continents (∂Nd/∂Na ~ 10–30%, but the sensitivities exceed 70% in pristine regions such as the Alaskan Arctic and remote oceans. Since most of the anthropogenic indirect forcing is concentrated over the continents, this work shows that the application of Köhler theory and attendant simplifying assumptions in models is not a major source of uncertainty in predicting cloud droplet number or anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing for the liquid, stratiform clouds simulated in these models. However, it does highlight the sensitivity of some remote areas to pollution brought into the region via long-range transport (e.g. biomass burning or from seasonal biogenic sources (e.g. phytoplankton as a source of dimethylsulfide in the southern oceans. Since these transient processes are not captured well by the climatological emissions inventories employed by current large-scale models, the uncertainties in aerosol-cloud interactions during these events could be much larger than those uncovered here. This finding motivates additional measurements in these pristine regions, which have recieved little attention to date, in order to quantify the impact of, and uncertainty associated with, transient processes in effecting changes in cloud properties.

  11. Passage to the Differences for the BDF's Methods

    Abdelouahab Salmi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we give an improvement to the backward differentiation formula (BDF. We use a formula for the differences that permits us to determine the new coefficients αi^ and γi ^in function of the classical coefficients αi and γi of this method. Our proposed approach decreases the error and the cost of computation. Numerical results for concrete problems are given to support the theory.

  12. Refinement of thermal imager minimum resolvable temperature difference calculating method

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Mykytenko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Calculating methods, which accurately predict minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD), are of significant interest for many years. The article deals with improvement the accuracy of determining the thermal imaging system MRTD by elaboration the visual perception model. We suggest MRTD calculating algorithm, which is based on a reliable approximation of the human visual system modulation transfer function (MTF) proposed by N. Nill. There was obtained a new expression for the bandwidth evaluation, which is independent of angular size of the Foucault bar target.

  13. High Order Finite Difference Methods for Multiscale Complex Compressible Flows

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    The classical way of analyzing finite difference schemes for hyperbolic problems is to investigate as many as possible of the following points: (1) Linear stability for constant coefficients; (2) Linear stability for variable coefficients; (3) Non-linear stability; and (4) Stability at discontinuities. We will build a new numerical method, which satisfies all types of stability, by dealing with each of the points above step by step.

  14. Finite difference methods for the solution of unsteady potential flows

    Caradonna, F. X.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various problems which are confronted in the development of an unsteady finite difference potential code. This review is conducted mainly in the context of what is done for a typical small disturbance and full potential methods. The issues discussed include choice of equation, linearization and conservation, differencing schemes, and algorithm development. A number of applications including unsteady three-dimensional rotor calculation, are demonstrated.

  15. A Review on Different Virtual Learning Methods in Pharmacy Education

    Amin Noori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual learning is a type of electronic learning system based on the web. It models traditional in- person learning by providing virtual access to classes, tests, homework, feedbacks and etc. Students and teachers can interact through chat rooms or other virtual environments. Web 2.0 services are usually used for this method. Internet audio-visual tools, multimedia systems, a disco CD-ROMs, videotapes, animation, video conferencing, and interactive phones can all be used to deliver data to the students. E-learning can occur in or out of the classroom. It is time saving with lower costs compared to traditional methods. It can be self-paced, it is suitable for distance learning and it is flexible. It is a great learning style for continuing education and students can independently solve their problems but it has its disadvantages too. Thereby, blended learning (combination of conventional and virtual education is being used worldwide and has improved knowledge, skills and confidence of pharmacy students.The aim of this study is to review, discuss and introduce different methods of virtual learning for pharmacy students.Google scholar, Pubmed and Scupus databases were searched for topics related to virtual, electronic and blended learning and different styles like computer simulators, virtual practice environment technology, virtual mentor, virtual patient, 3D simulators, etc. are discussed in this article.Our review on different studies on these areas shows that the students are highly satisfied withvirtual and blended types of learning.

  16. Parallel finite-difference time-domain method

    Yu, Wenhua

    2006-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FTDT) method has revolutionized antenna design and electromagnetics engineering. This book raises the FDTD method to the next level by empowering it with the vast capabilities of parallel computing. It shows engineers how to exploit the natural parallel properties of FDTD to improve the existing FDTD method and to efficiently solve more complex and large problem sets. Professionals learn how to apply open source software to develop parallel software and hardware to run FDTD in parallel for their projects. The book features hands-on examples that illustrate the power of parallel FDTD and presents practical strategies for carrying out parallel FDTD. This detailed resource provides instructions on downloading, installing, and setting up the required open source software on either Windows or Linux systems, and includes a handy tutorial on parallel programming.

  17. A finite-difference method for transonic airfoil design.

    Steger, J. L.; Klineberg, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes an inverse method for designing transonic airfoil sections or for modifying existing profiles. Mixed finite-difference procedures are applied to the equations of transonic small disturbance theory to determine the airfoil shape corresponding to a given surface pressure distribution. The equations are solved for the velocity components in the physical domain and flows with embedded shock waves can be calculated. To facilitate airfoil design, the method allows alternating between inverse and direct calculations to obtain a profile shape that satisfies given geometric constraints. Examples are shown of the application of the technique to improve the performance of several lifting airfoil sections. The extension of the method to three dimensions for designing supercritical wings is also indicated.

  18. Face recognition by combining eigenface method with different wavelet subbands

    MA Yan; LI Shun-bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ A method combining eigenface with different wavelet subbands for face recognition is proposed.Each training image is decomposed into multi-subbands for extracting their eigenvector sets and projection vectors.In the recognition process,the inner product distance between the projection vectors of the test image and that of the training image are calculated.The training image,corresponding to the maximum distance under the given threshold condition,is considered as the final result.The experimental results on the ORL and YALE face database show that,compared with the eigenface method directly on the image domain or on a single wavelet subband,the recognition accuracy using the proposed method is improved by 5% without influencing the recognition speed.

  19. Long term performance of different radon remedial methods in Sweden

    Clavensjoe, B

    2002-01-01

    The object of this project was to investigate the long time effectiveness of different radon remedial methods. The ten years project started 1991. From start the investigation comprised of 105 dwellings (91 single-family houses and 14 flats in multi-family buildings). In all of the dwellings remedial measures were carried out in the eighties. Before and immediately after the reduction the local measured the radon concentrations. New measurements of the radon concentrations have been made every third year; in 1991, 1994, 1997 and in 2000. Twelve different radon remedial methods and method combinations were used. The radon sources were building materials as well as sub-soils. In all of the dwellings the radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track films during 3 months (January-March) measurements and in half of them the air change rates by passive tracer gas methods. The results of the 2000 and the 1991 (within brackets) studies showed that the radon concentration was up to 200 Bq/m sup 3 in 54 (54) sin...

  20. Comparative analysis of different methods for graphene nanoribbon synthesis

    Tošić Dragana D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs are thin strips of graphene that have captured the interest of scientists due to their unique structure and promising applications in electronics. This paper presents the results of a comparative analysis of morphological properties of graphene nanoribbons synthesized by different methods. Various methods have been reported for graphene nanoribons synthesis. Lithography methods usually include electron-beam (e-beam lithography, atomic force microscopy (AFM lithography, and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM lithography. Sonochemical and chemical methods exist as well, namely chemical vapour deposition (CVD and anisotropic etching. Graphene nanoribbons can also be fabricated from unzipping carbon nanotubes (CNTs. We propose a new highly efficient method for graphene nanoribbons production by gamma irradiation of graphene dispersed in cyclopentanone (CPO. Surface morphology of graphene nanoribbons was visualized with atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that dimensions of graphene nanoribbons are inversely proportional to applied gamma irradiation dose. It was established that the narrowest nanoribbons were 10-20 nm wide and 1 nm high with regular and smooth edges. In comparison to other synthesis methods, dimensions of graphene nanoribbons synthesized by gamma irradiation are slightly larger, but the yield of nanoribbons is much higher. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for structural analysis of graphene nanoribbons. Results of photoluminescence spectroscopy revealed for the first time that synthesized nanoribbons showed photoluminescence in the blue region of visible light in contrast to graphene nanoribbons synthesized by other methods. Based on disclosed facts, we believe that our synthesis method has good prospects for potential future mass production of graphene nanoribbons with uniform size, as well as for future investigations of carbon nanomaterials for

  1. Comparison of different microsurgery methods for trigeminal neuralgia

    Zihang Xie; Lin Chen; Yan Wang; Zhiqiang Cui; Shijie Wang; Qiang Ao; Yuqi Zhang; Huancong Zuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of different microsurgical methods on surgical outcomes and complications, and to improve the surgical outcomes for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: The clinical data of 109 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, who were treated with microsurgery, were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were divided into 3 groups according to surgical modality: the trigeminal neuralgia decompression group (TND group, 19 patients), the TND and rhizotomy group (rhizotomy group, 55 patients), and the TND and selective lesioning group (lesioning group, 35 patients). The mid-term and short-term effects of microsurgery, and the occurrences of com-plications, were compared between the 3 groups. Results: There were no statistical differences in the frequency of complications between the 3 groups (P > 0.05). Eighty-four patients were followed up for 6 to 33 months. The rate of pain disappearance was found to be 94.4% in the TND group, and 100% in both the rhizotomy and lesioning groups; thus, no significant differences were found between these 3 groups (P > 0.05). Additionally, 50% of the patients in the rhizotomy group and 3.6% of the patients in the lesioning group had facial numbness while no patients were affected with facial numbness in the TND group, and the differences between these 3 groups were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Microsurgery is effective and safe for trigeminal neuralgia. The use of TND, in combination with selective lesioning, ensures therapeutic efficacy and improves the quality of life in postoperative patients.

  2. [Fetal responses to different methods of electrocution of pregnant sows].

    Peisker, Nina; Preissel, Anne-Kathrin; Ritzmann, Mathias; Schuster, Tibor; Thomes, Rainer; Henke, Julia

    2008-01-01

    The fetal stress responses in sows euthanized by electrical current during their second and last trimester of pregnancy (G1 and G2) were evaluated. Three methods of euthanasia of pregnant sows generally applicable to cases of epizootic or emergency slaughter were investigated: 1. conventional application of electrical current to the head and heart (HH); 2. application of electrical current to the head, heart and the uterus (HHU); 3. application of electrical current to the head, heart and from the upper body to the vagina (HHV). Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section at intervals of 3 to 4 minutes and remained attached to the sow by the umbilical cord. Fetal vitality, reflexes, heart rate, blood pressure, rectal body temperature, intracardial arteriovenous pCO2, pH and lactic acid were monitored for a period of 30 minutes. No method was found to kill the fetal pigs immediately. In fetuses at G1 there were no significant differences between the HH and HHU and HHV methods. Fetuses at G2 showed a significantly faster decrease in heart rate and blood pressure as well as a shorter period of time for the absence of fetal body movements and reflexes for the HHT method, compared to the other methods. Since it is not yet known to what extent the fetal pig experiences pain and suffering, the prolonged process of dying for the in utero fetus due to hypoxia which includes struggling and gasps is inconsistent with criteria for humane euthanasia and animal welfare.

  3. Comparative Study of Rice Morphogenesis wit Different Cultivation Methods

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of this study was to compare the morphological char- acteristics of rice (Oryza sativa L.) with different cultivation methods and investigate the dynamics of organ growth and development characteristics of different rice culti- vars. [Method] Based on continuous field observation and destructive sampling over a growing season, detailed organ morphological data were obtained including leaf length, node number, plant height, tiller number, leaf angle, leaf area and specific leaf weight, to compare organ morphological differences among 4 rice cultivars of Baidao (indica), Jinnanfeng (japonica), 9325 (japonica) and 9915 (japonica) with 3 cultivation methods of field planting in Weigang, pot planting in Weigang, and field planting in Jiangpu. [Result] Maximum leaf length of each node gradually increased at the early growth stage and decreased at the later growth stage, the relationship between maximum leaf length and node position can be described by the equations y=a,,-~ and y=ax+b; node number, growth duration, leaf length and plant height of pot planting rice in Weigang were smaller than that of the other two field planting meth- ods; the relationship between plant height and sunshine duration, plant height and GDD (growing degree days) can be described by the equation y=ax+b, 19.23 ℃.d of GDD (≥10 ≥-d) and 8.12 h of sunshine duration were required to increase 1 cm of plant height; plant height, tiller number, and leaf area of Baidao were higher than that of the other 3 laponica rice cultivars, but the specific leaf weight and leaf angle were smaller. [Conclusion] Comparison of morphological characteristic differ- ences among rice cultivars is an important way to select water-saving and drought- tolerant rice varieties. In this study, the experimental results can be integrated into a rice functional-architectural model to simulate rice organ growth dynamics in a three- dimensional space, thereby providing reference for selecting water

  4. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    Finn, John M., E-mail: finn@lanl.gov [T-5, Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  5. Using different methods to assess the discomfort during car driving.

    Ravnik, David; Otáhal, Stanislav; Dodic Fikfak, Metoda

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the discomfort caused by car driving. Discomfort estimates were achieved by self-administered questionnaire, measured by different testing methods, and through the goniometry of principal angles. Data from a total of 200 non-professional drivers who fulfilled the questionnaire was analysed. 118 subjects were analysed by goniometry and 30 drivers were assessed using the OWAS (Ovaco orking Posture Analysis), RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment), and CORLETT tests. The aim of this paper was to assess the appearance of the discomfort and to find some correlations between drivers' postures. Results suggest that different levels of discomfort are perceived in different body regions when driving cars. Differences appear mostly between the genders concerning the discomfort. With the questionnaire and the different estimation techniques, it is possible to identify 'at risk' drivers and ensure urgent attention when necessary. It can be concluded that the questionnare and the CORLETT test are good in predicting location of discomfort. TheB org CRI10scale is good indicator of the level of the discomfort, while OWAS and RULA can appraise the body posture to predict discomfort appearance. According to the goniometry data, the drivers posture could be one of the contributing factors in appearing of discomfort.

  6. Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors of the Weak Adjoint Matrix and m -Weak Adjoint Matrix%弱伴随矩阵及m重弱伴随矩阵的特征值与特征向量

    张慧; 刘兴祥; 冯学利

    2011-01-01

    We study the weak adjoint matrix and m- weak adjoint matrix's eigenvalues,eigenvectors and their corresponding eigenvalues eigenvector'relationship.%研究了弱伴随矩阵、m重弱伴随矩阵的特征值、特征向量与其对应矩阵的特征值、特征向量的关系。

  7. Cotton-textile wastewater management: investigating different treatment methods.

    Georgiou, D; Aivasidis, A

    2012-01-01

    The cotton-textile industry consumes significant amounts of water during manufacturing, creating high volumes of wastewater needing treatment. The organic-load concentration of cotton-textile wastewater is equivalent to a medium-strength municipal wastewater; the color of the water, however, remains a significant environmental issue. This research, in cooperation with a cotton-textile manufacturer, investigated different treatment methods and different combinations of methods to identify the most cost-effective approaches to treating textile wastewater. Although activated-sludge is economical, it can only be used as part of an integrated wastewater management system because it cannot decolorize wastewater. Coagulation/flocculation methods are able to decolorize cotton-wastewater; however, this process creates high amounts of wastewater solids, thus significantly increasing total treatment costs. Chemical oxidation is an environmentally friendly technique that can only be used as a polishing step because of high operating costs. Anaerobic digestion in a series of fixed-bed bioreactors with immobilized methanogens using acetic acid as a substrate and a pH-control agent followed by activated-sludge treatment was found to be the most cost-effective and environmentally safe cotton-textile wastewater management approach investigated.

  8. Evaluation of the positional difference between two common geocoding methods.

    Duncan, Dustin T; Castro, Marcia C; Blossom, Jeffrey C; Bennett, Gary G; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2011-05-01

    Geocoding, the process of matching addresses to geographic coordinates, is a necessary first step when using geographical information systems (GIS) technology. However, different geocoding methodologies can result in different geographic coordinates. The objective of this study was to compare the positional (i.e. longitude/latitude) difference between two common geocoding methods, i.e. ArcGIS (Environmental System Research Institute, Redlands, CA, USA) and Batchgeo (freely available online at http://www.batchgeo.com). Address data came from the YMCA-Harvard After School Food and Fitness Project, an obesity prevention intervention involving children aged 5-11 years and their families participating in YMCA-administered, after-school programmes located in four geographically diverse metropolitan areas in the USA. Our analyses include baseline addresses (n = 748) collected from the parents of the children in the after school sites. Addresses were first geocoded to the street level and assigned longitude and latitude coordinates with ArcGIS, version 9.3, then the same addresses were geocoded with Batchgeo. For this analysis, the ArcGIS minimum match score was 80. The resulting geocodes were projected into state plane coordinates, and the difference in longitude and latitude coordinates were calculated in meters between the two methods for all data points in each of the four metropolitan areas. We also quantified the descriptions of the geocoding accuracy provided by Batchgeo with the match scores from ArcGIS. We found a 94% match rate (n = 705), 2% (n = 18) were tied and 3% (n = 25) were unmatched using ArcGIS. Forty-eight addresses (6.4%) were not matched in ArcGIS with a match score ≥80 (therefore only 700 addresses were included in our positional difference analysis). Six hundred thirteen (87.6%) of these addresses had a match score of 100. Batchgeo yielded a 100% match rate for the addresses that ArcGIS geocoded. The median for longitude and latitude coordinates

  9. Evaluation of Different Methods of Sperm Immunization in Mice

    H Moatamed

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antifertility effects of naturally occuring antisperm antibody (ASA in infertile couples and studies on experimental immunization of various animals with sperm antigens represent ASA as an immunocontraceptive target. The effects of different factors on sperm immunogenecity and ASA production have been studied and different results have been reported. In this study, whole sperm immunization was evaluated. Methods: In this experimental study, whole mice sperm with different adjuvants i.e. complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA, incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (ICFA, cholera toxin subunit-β (CTS-β were administrated to mice by different routes; Intramuscular (IM, Subcutaneous (SC, Intranasal (IN, Intra peritoneal (IP, Intrarectal (IR, Intravaginal (IVA and oral. Control groups were inoculated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS plus corresponding adjuvant. Immunization was carried out on day 0,7,14,28 and ASA titers were detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA technique. The results were compared between control and experimental groups by Mann Whitney and Fisher exact tests. Results: The number of positive mice for ASA in IM, IN and SC experimental and control groups were significantly different (P=0.01, P=0.01, P=0.04 respectively. However, there were no significant differences between the IR, IVA, and oral experimental and control groups. No differences were observed between ASA in vaginal washing of all groups. Due to high mortality, the IP group was excluded from the study. Conclusion: It can be concluded that whole sperm antigen can induce immune response in female mice by IM, SC and IN routes, but not through IAV, IR and oral administration routes.

  10. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Coupled Reactor Physics Problems: Method Development for Multi-Physics in Reactors

    Perkó, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents novel adjoint and spectral methods for the sensitivity and uncertainty (S&U) analysis of multi-physics problems encountered in the field of reactor physics. The first part focuses on the steady state of reactors and extends the adjoint sensitivity analysis methods well establish

  11. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  12. Finite difference methods for coupled flow interaction transport models

    Shelly McGee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding chemical transport in blood flow involves coupling the chemical transport process with flow equations describing the blood and plasma in the membrane wall. In this work, we consider a coupled two-dimensional model with transient Navier-Stokes equation to model the blood flow in the vessel and Darcy's flow to model the plasma flow through the vessel wall. The advection-diffusion equation is coupled with the velocities from the flows in the vessel and wall, respectively to model the transport of the chemical. The coupled chemical transport equations are discretized by the finite difference method and the resulting system is solved using the additive Schwarz method. Development of the model and related analytical and numerical results are presented in this work.

  13. ESR studies on flint with a difference-spectrum method

    Walther, R.; Zilles, D.

    Dating of fired flints with ESR is often difficult because of disturbing signals in the ESR spectrum. Flint samples from the archaeological sites 'San Quintin de Mediona' (NE Spain) and 'Berigoule' (in the south of France) were used for studies on the Al centre in heated material. Our samples measured at 100 K show the Al signal with very weak hyperfine structure and an unidentified disturbing signal, similar to the spectra described by Porat and Schwarcz (1991). We tested a new method for subtracting the spectrum of a disturbing signal from the Al spectrum (as an alternative procedure to the method proposed by Porat and Schwarcz, 1991), using different measurement temperatures. The DE determination with these filtered Al spectra was carried out and was compared with the usual procedure on one flint sample. For comparison with the ESR results we measured TL on some of the samples.

  14. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  15. Comparative analysis of different methods for image enhancement

    吴笑峰; 胡仕刚; 赵瑾; 李志明; 李劲; 唐志军; 席在芳

    2014-01-01

    Image enhancement technology plays a very important role to improve image quality in image processing. By enhancing some information and restraining other information selectively, it can improve image visual effect. The objective of this work is to implement the image enhancement to gray scale images using different techniques. After the fundamental methods of image enhancement processing are demonstrated, image enhancement algorithms based on space and frequency domains are systematically investigated and compared. The advantage and defect of the above-mentioned algorithms are analyzed. The algorithms of wavelet based image enhancement are also deduced and generalized. Wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) is a method for detecting the fractal dimension of a signal, it is well used for image enhancement. The image techniques are compared by using the mean (μ), standard deviation (s), mean square error (MSE) and PSNR (peak signal to noise ratio). A group of experimental results demonstrate that the image enhancement algorithm based on wavelet transform is effective for image de-noising and enhancement. Wavelet transform modulus maxima method is one of the best methods for image enhancement.

  16. A comparative analysis of different DEM interpolation methods

    P.V. Arun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of geospatial entities generally entails Digital Elevation Models (DEMs that are interpolated to establish three dimensional co-ordinates for the entire terrain. The accuracy of generated terrain model depends on the interpolation mechanism adopted and hence it is needed to investigate the comparative performance of different approaches in this context. General interpolation techniques namely Inverse Distance Weighted, kriging, ANUDEM, Nearest Neighbor, and Spline approaches have been compared. Differential ground field survey has been conducted to generate reference DEM as well as specific set of test points for comparative evaluation. We have also investigated the suitability of Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper Digital Elevation Mapper for Indian terrain by comparing it with the Survey of India (SOI Digital Elevation Model (DEM. Contours were generated at different intervals for comparative analysis and found SRTM as more suitable. The terrain sensitivity of various methods has also been analyzed with reference to the study area.

  17. The efficiency study of different purification methods for liquid scintillator

    Hu, Wei; Yu, Boxiang; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Li; Cai, Xiao; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    JUNO is an experiment aimed at detecting neutrino mass hierarchy. The innermost part of the JUNO detector is formed by 20,000 tons of liquid scintillator which should have very low level of radioactive materials, such as 238U, 232Th, and 40K. Since the radioactive level of raw LAB(the solvent of LS)cannot reach so stringent requirements of JUNO, the purification for LAB plays an extremely important role in LS production. This article studies the efficiency of several different purification methods for LS, like distillation, water extraction and Al2O3 purification.

  18. A review of current finite difference rotor flow methods

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1986-01-01

    Rotary-wing computational fluid dynamics is reaching a point where many three-dimensional, unsteady, finite-difference codes are becoming available. This paper gives a brief review of five such codes, which treat the small disturbance, conservative and nonconservative full-potential, and Euler flow models. A discussion of the methods of applying these codes to the rotor environment (including wake and trim considerations) is followed by a comparison with various available data. These data include tests of advancing lifting and nonlifting, and hovering model rotors with significant supercritical flow regions. The codes are also compared for computational efficiency.

  19. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited ...

  20. Meat Quality of Chicken Breast Subjected to Different Thawing Methods

    MR Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Freezing is one of the methods to preserve and guarantee the quality of meat until it reaches the consumer. Even though freezing is classified as a mild form of preservation, it causes meat changes resulting from the formation of ice crystals that subsequently affect the tenderness and functionality of meat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical and structural characteristics of chicken half breast submitted to fast freezing (-36 °C for 2 hours and thawed by five different methods (under refrigeration, in a microwave, in a oven with air circulation, placed in cold water, or at room temperature. After thawing, the following parameters were evaluated: moisture content, drip loss (syneresis, water activity (aw, and shear force. Samples were also histologically evaluated by light microscopy. The results indicated that, despite being submitted to fast freezing, thawing affected (p <0.05 most of the physicochemical and structural properties of the meat, except for aw. Thawing in cold water (packed in low-density polyethylene bags and placed in cold water at approximately 10 °C for 2 hours and 15 minutes presented the best results due to lesser damage to the cell structure, as shown by the lower drip loss, higher moisture content, and greater tenderness of the samples compared to those thawed using the other methods. Histological examination showed that muscle fiber structural features and organization were maintained. Thawing at low temperatures seems to cause less damage to the meat structure and allows maintaining of its properties. It was concluded that the meat quality is not related only with the freezing method, but also with the method and conditions used in thawing.

  1. Use of different investigation methods of soil for forensic purpose

    Kristina Štibelj

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With its specific background and methods, geology may help forensic scientists considerably when doingresearches and analyses. Based on the procedures used in the National Forensic Laboratory, we have beenresearching and comparing 15 soil samples from different locations. We divided them into 3 groups, of which eachcomprised one pair of samples of the same location. By comparing colour, density and mineral composition in thesoil samples, we tried to determine which two samples originated from the same location. We were comparingthe results of individually used research methods and tried to evaluate which provide the best sample matches.Furthermore, we were comparing how the mineral composition of the samples and their bedrock match. The bestmatch was achieved by applying the method of X-ray powder diffraction, which clearly showed identical samplescollected from the same location. When measuring density, the values varied according to the location site, fromwhich the comparative and conflicting samples were taken. The change of density was observed in the distanceof less than one meter. For the field of forensic science the exact location of sample collection is of crucial importance.The proximity of sample collecting has considerable impact on density, as longer distances do not providecomparative results, whereas a short distance may present us with highly matching samples, the method which iswidely considered applicable in forensic science. By applying the method of X-ray powder it is possible to acquirecomparative results at the distance of several meters; in forensic science, however, this does not provide acceptableresults for defining the identity of the location.

  2. Physiologic responses of grizzly bears to different methods of capture.

    Cattet, Marc R; Christison, Katina; Caulkett, Nigel A; Stenhouse, Gordon B

    2003-07-01

    The physiologic effects of two methods of capture, chemical immobilization of free-ranging (FR) bears by remote injection from a helicopter and physical restraint (PR) by leg-hold snare prior to chemical immobilization, were compared in 46 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) handled during 90 captures between 1999 and 2001. Induction dosages and times were greater for FR bears than PR bears, a finding consistent with depletion of, or decreased sensitivity to, catecholamines. Free-ranging bears also had higher rectal temperatures 15 min following immobilization and temperatures throughout handling that correlated positively with induction time. Physically restrained bears had higher white blood cell counts, with more neutrophils and fewer lymphocytes and eosinophils, than did FR bears. This white blood cell profile was consistent with a stress leukogram, possibly affected by elevated levels of serum cortisol. Serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase were higher in PR bears that suggested muscle injury. Serum concentrations of sodium and chloride also were higher in PR bears and attributed to reduced body water volume through water deprivation and increased insensible water loss. Overall, different methods of capture resulted in different patterns of physiologic disturbance. Reducing pursuit and drug induction times should help to minimize increase in body temperature and alteration of acid-base balance in bears immobilized by remote injection. Minimizing restraint time and ensuring snare-anchoring cables are short should help to minimize loss of body water and prevent serious muscle injury in bears captured by leg-hold snare.

  3. SIMULATION OF POLLUTANTS IN RIVER SYSTEMS USING FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD

    ZAHEER Iqbal; CUI Guang Bai

    2002-01-01

    This paper using finite difference scheme for the numerical solution of advection-dispersion equation develops a one-dimensional water quality model. The model algorithm has some modification over other steady state models including QUAL2E, which have been used steady state implementation of implicit backward-difference numerical scheme. The computer program in the developed model contains a special unsteady state implementation of four point implicit upwind numerical schemes using double sweep method. The superiority of this method in the modeling procedure results the simulation efficacy under simplified conditions of effluent discharge from point and non-point sources. The model is helpful for eye view assessment of degree of interaction between model variables for strategic planning purposes. The model has been applied for the water quality simulation of the Hanjiang River basin using flow computation model. Model simulation results have shown the pollutants prediction, dispersion and impact on the existing water quality.Model test shows the model validity comparing with other sophisticated models. Sensitivity analysis was performed to overview the most sensitive parameters followed by calibration and verification process.

  4. Evaluation of the positional difference between two common geocoding methods

    Dustin T. Duncan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Geocoding, the process of matching addresses to geographic coordinates, is a necessary first step when using geographical information systems (GIS technology. However, different geocoding methodologies can result in different geographic coordinates. The objective of this study was to compare the positional (i.e. longitude/latitude difference between two common geocoding methods, i.e. ArcGIS (Environmental System Research Institute, Redlands, CA, USA and Batchgeo (freely available online at http://www.batchgeo.com. Address data came from the YMCA-Harvard After School Food and Fitness Project, an obesity prevention intervention involving children aged 5-11 years and their families participating in YMCAadministered, after-school programmes located in four geographically diverse metropolitan areas in the USA. Our analyses include baseline addresses (n = 748 collected from the parents of the children in the after school sites. Addresses were first geocoded to the street level and assigned longitude and latitude coordinates with ArcGIS, version 9.3, then the same addresses were geocoded with Batchgeo. For this analysis, the ArcGIS minimum match score was 80. The resulting geocodes were projected into state plane coordinates, and the difference in longitude and latitude coordinates were calculated in meters between the two methods for all data points in each of the four metropolitan areas. We also quantified the descriptions of the geocoding accuracy provided by Batchgeo with the match scores from ArcGIS. We found a 94% match rate (n = 705, 2% (n = 18 were tied and 3% (n = 25 were unmatched using ArcGIS. Forty-eight addresses (6.4% were not matched in ArcGIS with a match score ≥80 (therefore only 700 addresses were included in our positional difference analysis. Six hundred thirteen (87.6% of these addresses had a match score of 100. Batchgeo yielded a 100% match rate for the addresses that ArcGIS geocoded. The median for longitude and latitude

  5. Adjoint-Based a Posteriori Error Estimation for Coupled Time-Dependent Systems

    Asner, Liya

    2012-01-01

    We consider time-dependent parabolic problem s coupled across a common interface which we formulate using a Lagrange multiplier construction and solve by applying a monolithic solution technique. We derive an adjoint-based a posteriori error representation for a quantity of interest given by a linear functional of the solution. We establish the accuracy of our error representation formula through numerical experimentation and investigate the effect of error in the adjoint solution. Crucially, the error representation affords a distinction between temporal and spatial errors and can be used as a basis for a blockwise time-space refinement strategy. Numerical tests illustrate the efficacy of the refinement strategy by capturing the distinctive behavior of a localized traveling wave solution. The saddle point systems considered here are equivalent to those arising in the mortar finite element technique for parabolic problems. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. Essential self-adjointness of n-dimensional Dirac operators with a variable mass term

    Kalf, Hubert; Yamada, Osanobu

    2001-06-01

    We give some results about the essential self-adjointness of the Dirac operator H=∑j=1nαj pj+m(x) αn+1+V(x) IN (N=2 [(n+1)/2]), on [C0∞(Rn{0})]N, where the αj (j=1,2,…,n) are Dirac matrices and m(x) and V(x) are real-valued functions. We are mainly interested in a singularity of V(x) and m(x) near the origin which preserves the essential self-adjointness of H. As a result, if m=m(r) is spherically symmetric or m(x)≡V(x), then we can permit a singularity of m and V which is stronger than that of the Coulomb potential.

  7. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  8. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography using forward and adjoint Monte Carlo models of radiance

    Hochuli, Roman; Arridge, Simon; Cox, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Forward and adjoint Monte Carlo (MC) models of radiance are proposed for use in model-based quantitative photoacoustic tomography. A 2D radiance MC model using a harmonic angular basis is introduced and validated against analytic solutions for the radiance in heterogeneous media. A gradient-based optimisation scheme is then used to recover 2D absorption and scattering coefficients distributions from simulated photoacoustic measurements. It is shown that the functional gradients, which are a challenge to compute efficiently using MC models, can be calculated directly from the coefficients of the harmonic angular basis used in the forward and adjoint models. This work establishes a framework for transport-based quantitative photoacoustic tomography that can fully exploit emerging highly parallel computing architectures.

  9. Neutrino masses in SU(5) x U(1){sub F} with adjoint flavons

    Nardi, Enrico [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Frascati (Italy); IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Restrepo, Diego; Velasquez, Mauricio [Universidad de Antioquia, Instituto de Fisica, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    We present a SU(5) x U(1){sub F} supersymmetric model for neutrino masses and mixings that implements the seesaw mechanism by means of the heavy SU(2) singlets and triplets states contained in three adjoints of SU(5). We discuss how Abelian U(1){sub F} symmetries can naturally yield non-hierarchical light neutrinos even when the heavy states are strongly hierarchical, and how it can also ensure that R-parity arises as an exact accidental symmetry. By assigning two flavons that break U(1){sub F} to the adjoint representation of SU(5) and assuming universality for all the fundamental couplings, the coefficients of the effective Yukawa and Majorana mass operators become calculable in terms of group theoretical quantities. There is a single free parameter in the model, however, at leading order the structure of the light neutrinos mass matrix is determined in a parameter independent way. (orig.)

  10. A new method for precursory information extraction: Slope-difference information method

    2001-01-01

    A new method for precursory information extraction, i.e.,slope-difference information method is proposed in the paper for the daily-mean-value precursory data sequence. Taking Tangshan station as an example, the calculation of full-time-domain leveling data is made, which is tested and compared with several other methods. The results indicate that the method is very effective for extracting short-term precursory information from the daily mean values after the optimization is made. Therefore, it is valuable for popularization and application.

  11. Assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis: Variability of different methods

    Troelsen, Anders; Elmengaard, Brian; Soeballe, Kjeld (Orthopedic Research Unit, Univ. Hospital of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)), e-mail: a_troelsen@hotmail.com; Roemer, Lone (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)); Kring, Soeren (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Aabenraa Hospital, Aabenraa (Denmark))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Reliable assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis is crucial in young adults who may benefit from joint-preserving surgery. Purpose: To investigate the variability of different methods for diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis. Material and Methods: By each of four observers, two assessments were done by vision and two by angle construction. For both methods, the intra- and interobserver variability of center-edge and acetabular index angle assessment were analyzed. The observers' ability to diagnose hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis were assessed. All measures were compared to those made on computed tomography scan. Results: Intra- and interobserver variability of angle assessment was less when angles were drawn compared with assessment by vision, and the observers' ability to diagnose hip dysplasia improved when angles were drawn. Assessment of osteoarthritis in general showed poor agreement with findings on computed tomography scan. Conclusion: We recommend that angles always should be drawn for assessment of hip dysplasia on pelvic radiographs. Given the inherent variability of diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia, a computed tomography scan could be considered in patients with relevant hip symptoms and a center-edge angle between 20 deg and 30 deg. Osteoarthritis should be assessed by measuring the joint space width or by classifying the Toennis grade as either 0-1 or 2-3

  12. Three Different Methods of Estimating LAI in a Small Watershed

    Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.; Beverly, D.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a critical input of models that improve predictive understanding of ecology, hydrology, and climate change. Multiple techniques exist to quantify LAI, most of which are labor intensive, and all often fail to converge on similar estimates. . Recent large-scale bark beetle induced mortality greatly altered LAI, which is now dominated by younger and more metabolically active trees compared to the pre-beetle forest. Tree mortality increases error in optical LAI estimates due to the lack of differentiation between live and dead branches in dense canopy. Our study aims to quantify LAI using three different LAI methods, and then to compare the techniques to each other and topographic drivers to develop an effective predictive model of LAI. This study focuses on quantifying LAI within a small (~120 ha) beetle infested watershed in Wyoming's Snowy Range Mountains. The first technique estimated LAI using in-situ hemispherical canopy photographs that were then analyzed with Hemisfer software. The second LAI estimation technique was use of the Kaufmann 1982 allometrerics from forest inventories conducted throughout the watershed, accounting for stand basal area, species composition, and the extent of bark beetle driven mortality. The final technique used airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) first DMS returns, which were used to estimating canopy heights and crown area. LIDAR final returns provided topographical information and were then ground-truthed during forest inventories. Once data was collected, a fractural analysis was conducted comparing the three methods. Species composition was driven by slope position and elevation Ultimately the three different techniques provided very different estimations of LAI, but each had their advantage: estimates from hemisphere photos were well correlated with SWE and snow depth measurements, forest inventories provided insight into stand health and composition, and LIDAR were able to quickly and

  13. The Different Methods of Displacement Monitoring at Loading Tests of Bridges or Different Structures

    Kovačič Boštjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By measuring the displacements and deformations at different structures we deal in the Faculty of Civil Engineering, transportation Engineering and Architecture in University of Maribor for about 20 years. At that time we measured over 600 structures. Most loading tests of bridges and Viaducts were made. The measurements of movements needed to be as precise and accurate as possible. To do that laboratory test of instruments were made to see which instrument gives us reliable results. Displacements can be determined by geodetic and physical methods, depends of the construction. The use of geodetic methods are still preferable. In the paper the measurements with the total station, the level and rotation level, photogrammetry and solutions on the field by physical methods with inductive transducers are presented. We need to measure displacements as quick as possible but efficiently because we can not repeat the measurements under the same conditions. Also the surveying on the bridge and in the lab with the comparison of methods is presented under the different hard terrain conditions - water beneath the construction, big height of the structure, unapproachability, large span structures.

  14. Group Analysis of Nonlinear Internal Waves in Oceans. I: Self-adjointness, conservation laws, invariant solutions

    Ibragimov, Nail H

    2011-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the group analysis of equations of motion of two-dimensional uniformly stratified rotating fluids used as a basic model in geophysical fluid dynamics. It is shown that the nonlinear equations in question have a remarkable property to be self-adjoint. This property is crucial for constructing conservation laws provided in the present paper. Invariant solutions are constructed using certain symmetries. The invariant solutions are used for defining internal wave beams.

  15. Running of the coupling and quark mass in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    Bursa, Francis; Keegan, Liam; Pica, Claudio; Pickup, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We simulate SU(2) gauge theory with two massless Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. We calculate the running of the Schroedinger Functional coupling and the renormalised quark mass over a wide range of length scales. The running of the coupling is consistent with the existence of an infrared fixed point (IRFP), and we find 0.07 < gamma < 0.56 at the IRFP, depending on the value of the critical coupling.

  16. On Lipschitz Perturbations of a Self-Adjoint Strongly Positive Operator

    Dinu Teodorescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study semilinear equations of the form Au+λF(u=f, where A is a linear self-adjoint operator, satisfying a strong positivity condition, and F is a nonlinear Lipschitz operator. As applications we develop Krasnoselskii and Ky Fan type approximation results for certain pair of maps and to illustrate the usability of the obtained results, the existence of solution of an integral equation is provided.

  17. Adjoint Sensitivities of Time-Periodic Nonlinear Structural Dynamics via Model Reduction

    2009-10-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2009-3241 ADJOINT SENSITIVITIES OF TIME-PERIODIC NONLINEAR STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS VIA MODEL REDUCTION Bret Stanford, Philip...SENSITIVITIES OF TIME-PERIODIC NONLINEAR STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS VIA MODEL REDUCTION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... structural dynamics problems 1 , which require the solution of a system of equations many times within each time step for a nonlinear system (to

  18. Study of a self-adjoint operator indicating the direction of time within standard quantum mechanics

    Strauss, Y; Machnes, S; Horwitz, L P

    2011-01-01

    In [J. Math. Phys. 51 (2010) 022104] a self-adjoint operator was introduced that has the property that it indicates the direction of time within the framework of standard quantum mechanics, in the sense that as a function of time its expectation value decreases monotonically for any initial state. In this paper we study some of this operator's properties. In particular, we derive its spectrum and generalized eigenstates, and treat the example of the free particle.

  19. Adjoint representation of the graded Lie algebra osp(2/1; C) and its exponentiation

    Ilyenko, K

    2003-01-01

    We construct explicitly the grade star Hermitian adjoint representation of osp(2/1; C) graded Lie algebra. Its proper Lie subalgebra, the even part of the graded Lie algebra osp(2/1; C), is given by su(2) compact Lie algebra. The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula is considered and reality conditions for the Grassman-odd transformation parameters, which multiply the pair of odd generators of the graded Lie algebra, are clarified.

  20. Comparison of two different methods of detecting residual caries

    Kütük, Zeynep Bilge; Ergin, Esra; Yalçın Çakır, Filiz; Gürgan, Sevil

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the fluorescence-aided caries excavation (FACE) device to detect residual caries by comparing conventional methods in vivo. Materials and Methods A total of 301 females and 202 males with carious teeth participated in this study. The cavity preparations were done by grade 4 (Group 1, 154 teeth), grade 5 (Group 2, 176 teeth), and postgraduate (Group 3, 173 teeth) students. After caries excavation using a handpiece and hand instruments, the presence of residual caries was evaluated by 2 investigators who were previously calibrated for visual-tactile assessment with and without magnifying glasses and trained in the use of a FACE device. The tooth number, cavity type, and presence or absence of residual caries were recorded. The data were analyzed using the Chi-square test, the Fisher's Exact test, or the McNemar test as appropriate. Kappa statistics was used for calibration. In all tests, the level of significance was set at p = 0.05. Results Almost half of the cavities prepared were Class II (Class I, 20.9%; Class II, 48.9%; Class III, 20.1%; Class IV, 3.4%; Class V, 6.8%). Higher numbers of cavities left with caries were observed in Groups 1 and 2 than in Group 3 for all examination methods. Significant differences were found between visual inspection with or without magnifying glasses and inspection with a FACE device for all groups (p < 0.001). More residual caries were detected through inspection with a FACE device (46.5%) than through either visual inspection (31.8%) or inspection with a magnifying glass (37.6%). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the FACE device may be an effective method for the detection of residual caries. PMID:28194364

  1. PURE CULTURE METHOD: GIARDIA LAMBLIA FROM DIFFERENT STOOL SAMPLES

    H.A YOUSEFI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Giardiasis is one of the health problems in the world including Iran. To determine the biochemical and biological problems and also identification of various strains, it is essential to obtain pure culture and then mass production of Giardia lamblia. The goal of this study was to isolate this protozoa purely.
    Methods. Giardia lamblia cysts were isolated from 50 stool samples by use of floating of a four - layer of sucrose method. The cysts were transfered to an inducing solution. Subsequently, they were cultured in a modified culture medium (TYIS-33. Following excystation of trophozoite and its multiplication, the parasite was caltured and purified.
    Findings. Excitation of trophozoite was observed in 40 samples (80 percent from which 22 samples (55 percent yielded pure culture. The doubling time was approximately 13hr and the peak of parasite was observed between third and fourth days.
    Conclusion. The proliferation and growth rate of Giardia lamblia have enabled us to use this method widely. Cystein and ascorbic acid which are present in the induction solution, have a key role in excystation of trophozoite. Purification and passage of samples has facilitated the culture of this parasite in vitro. Therefore this method has yielded better results in comparison with other studies. This is probably due to a decrease in the amount of bovine bile or using different strains of Giardia lamblia in the present study.

  2. Estimation of water percolation by different methods using TDR

    Alisson Jadavi Pereira da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge on water percolation into the soil in irrigated areas is fundamental for solving problems of drainage, pollution and the recharge of underground aquifers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percolation estimated by time-domain-reflectometry (TDR in a drainage lysimeter. We used Darcy's law with K(θ functions determined by field and laboratory methods and by the change in water storage in the soil profile at 16 points of moisture measurement at different time intervals. A sandy clay soil was saturated and covered with plastic sheet to prevent evaporation and an internal drainage trial in a drainage lysimeter was installed. The relationship between the observed and estimated percolation values was evaluated by linear regression analysis. The results suggest that percolation in the field or laboratory can be estimated based on continuous monitoring with TDR, and at short time intervals, of the variations in soil water storage. The precision and accuracy of this approach are similar to those of the lysimeter and it has advantages over the other evaluated methods, of which the most relevant are the possibility of estimating percolation in short time intervals and exemption from the predetermination of soil hydraulic properties such as water retention and hydraulic conductivity. The estimates obtained by the Darcy-Buckingham equation for percolation levels using function K(θ predicted by the method of Hillel et al. (1972 provided compatible water percolation estimates with those obtained in the lysimeter at time intervals greater than 1 h. The methods of Libardi et al. (1980, Sisson et al. (1980 and van Genuchten (1980 underestimated water percolation.

  3. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  4. Effects of different strength training methods on postexercise energetic expenditure.

    Da Silva, Rodrigo Lavinas; Brentano, Michel Arias; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2010-08-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of strength training in increasing energetic expenditure (EE) both during and after training sessions, there are no studies available that analyze the influence on EE of the order in which exercises are performed. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to verify whether the order in which exercises are performed, represented by 2 different methods of strength training (circuit [CT] and pre-exhaustion [PE]), influences the magnitude of the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) as well as the EE. Eight nonstrength-trained women participated in the study. Two strength training sessions, with different orders of execution, were held with 7 exercises performed with loads of between 50% and 55% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). The oxygen uptake was measured before the training sessions, and the difference between the values found was taken as the EPOC of each training session and used in later analysis. No significant differences were found in either the EPOC (CT: 7.19 L +/- 6.17 an. PE: 7.22 +/- 5.84 L) or the postexercise EE (CT: 34.67 +/- 29.76 Kcal, PE: 34.77 +/- 28.15 Kcal) of the 2 training methodologies. Our results indicate that, in strength training, the magnitude of the EPOC is not linked to the order in which the exercises are performed. However, the absence of recovery periods between the sets and the exercises promotes an increase in the magnitude of the EPOC to the levels found in training sessions with higher percentages of 1RM.

  5. Probing Seesaw in an Adjoint SUSY SU(5) Model at LHC

    Awasthi, Ram Lal; Mitra, Manimala

    2010-01-01

    The SU(5) GUT model extended with fermions in the adjoint $24_F$ representation predicts triplet fermions in the 100 GeV mass range, opening up the possibility of testing seesaw at LHC. However, once the model is supersymmerized, the triplet fermion mass is constrained to be close to the GUT scale for the gauge couplings to unify. We propose an extension of the SUSY SU(5) model where type II seesaw can be tested at LHC. In this model we add a matter chiral field in the adjoint $\\hat{24}_F$ representation and Higgs chiral superfields in the symmetric $\\hat{15}_H$ and $\\hat{\\bar{15}}_H$ representations. We call this the symmetric adjoint SUSY SU(5) model. The triplet scalar and triplet fermion masses in this model are predicted to be in the 100 GeV and $10^{13}$ GeV range respectively, while the mass of the singlet fermion remains unconstrained. This gives a type I plus type II plus type III seesaw mass term for the neutrinos. The triplet scalars with masses $\\sim 100$ GeV range can be produced at the LHC. We b...

  6. SUSY SU(5) with singlet plus adjoint matter and A{sub 4} family symmetry

    Cooper, Iain K., E-mail: ikc1g08@soton.ac.u [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); King, Stephen F., E-mail: sfk@hep.phys.soton.ac.u [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Luhn, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.luhn@soton.ac.u [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    We propose a supersymmetric (SUSY) SU(5) Grand Unified Theory (GUT) including a single right-handed neutrino singlet and an adjoint matter representation below the GUT scale and extend this model to include an A{sub 4} family symmetry and a gauged anomaly-free Abelian group. In our approach hierarchical neutrino masses result from a combined type I and type III seesaw mechanism, and the A{sub 4} symmetry leads to tri-bimaximal mixing which arises indirectly. The mixing between the single right-handed neutrino and the matter in the adjoint is forbidden by excluding an adjoint Higgs, leading to a diagonal heavy Majorana sector as required by constrained sequential dominance. The model also reproduces a realistic description of quark and charged lepton masses and quark mixings, including the Georgi-Jarlskog relations and the leptonic mixing sum rules s=rcos{delta} and a=-r{sup 2}/4 with r={theta}{sub C}/3.

  7. On the validity of tidal turbine array configurations obtained from steady-state adjoint optimisation

    Jacobs, Christian T; Kramer, Stephan C; Funke, Simon W

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the optimal amount of power from an array of tidal turbines requires an intricate understanding of tidal dynamics and the effects of turbine placement on the local and regional scale flow. Numerical models have contributed significantly towards this understanding, and more recently, adjoint-based modelling has been employed to optimise the positioning of the turbines in an array in an automated way and improve on simple, regular man-made configurations. Adjoint-based optimisation of high-resolution and ideally 3D transient models is generally a very computationally expensive problem. As a result, existing work on the adjoint optimisation of tidal turbine placement has been mostly limited to steady-state simulations in which very high, non-physical values of the background viscosity are required to ensure that a steady-state solution exists. However, such compromises may affect the reliability of the modelled turbines, their wakes and interactions, and thus bring into question the validity of the co...

  8. Learning and retention of quantum concepts with different teaching methods

    Carl Wieman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured mastery and retention of conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics in a modern physics course. This was studied for two equivalent cohorts of students taught with different pedagogical approaches using the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey. We measured the impact of pedagogical approach both on the original conceptual learning and on long-term retention. The cohort of students who had a very highly rated traditional lecturer scored 19% lower than the equivalent cohort that was taught using interactive engagement methods. However, the amount of retention was very high for both cohorts, showing only a few percent decrease in scores when retested 6 and 18 months after completion of the course and with no exposure to the material in the interim period. This high level of retention is in striking contrast to the retention measured for more factual learning from university courses and argues for the value of emphasizing conceptual learning.

  9. Learning and retention of quantum concepts with different teaching methods

    Deslauriers, Louis; Wieman, Carl

    2011-06-01

    We measured mastery and retention of conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics in a modern physics course. This was studied for two equivalent cohorts of students taught with different pedagogical approaches using the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey. We measured the impact of pedagogical approach both on the original conceptual learning and on long-term retention. The cohort of students who had a very highly rated traditional lecturer scored 19% lower than the equivalent cohort that was taught using interactive engagement methods. However, the amount of retention was very high for both cohorts, showing only a few percent decrease in scores when retested 6 and 18 months after completion of the course and with no exposure to the material in the interim period. This high level of retention is in striking contrast to the retention measured for more factual learning from university courses and argues for the value of emphasizing conceptual learning.

  10. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed.

  11. Astigmatic changes following pterygium removal: Comparison of 5 different methods

    Rana Altan-Yaycioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate the effect of surgery type on the postoperative astigmatism in pterygium surgery. Settings and Design: Retrospective comparative clinical trial. Materials and Methods: Data of 240 eyes that underwent pterygium excision were investigated. Following removal of the pterygium, patients underwent 5 different types of surgeries: Conjunctival autograft with sutures (CAG-s or fibrin glue (CAG-g, conjunctival rotational flap (CRF, or amniotic membrane transplantation with either suture (AMT-s or with glue (AMT-g. The preoperative and postoperative keratometric measurements, evaluated using an automated keratorefractometer, were noted. Statistical Analysis: The overall changes in BCVA and astigmatic degree were evaluated using Wilcoxon signed rank test. The difference in astigmatic values between groups was calculated using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The most commonly performed procedure was CAG-s (N = 115, followed by CAG-g (N = 53, CRF (N = 47, AMT-s (N = 15, and AMT-g (N = 10. Following surgery, astigmatic values decreased from 3.47 ± 2.50 D to 1.29 ± 1.07 D (P < 0.001, paired t test. The changes in astigmatism was significantly related to the preoperative size of the pterygium (ρ = 3.464, P = 0.005. The postoperative astigmatism correlated with preoperative astigmatism (ρ = 0.351, P < 0.001, Spearman correlation analysis. The changes in astigmatic values was not related to the method of surgery (P = 0.055, ANOVA. Conclusion: Pterygium results in high corneal astigmatism, which decreases to an acceptable level following excision. According to our study, the type of grafting as CAG, CRF or AMT or the use of suture or glue to fixate the graft does not have a significant effect on the change in astigmatism degree.

  12. A Comparison of Different Methods for Fissure Caries Detection

    Peycheva K.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to compare the diagnostic capabilities of three different diagnostic methods: Quantitative Laser Fluorescence (QLF − DIAGNOdent Classic (DD, Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF − SoproLife daylight and blue fluorescence, and their relevance to ICDAS II system in detection of fissure caries lesions in permanent molars. Permanent molars (n = 45 are divided in two groups: 1 third molars, n = 35; 2 first and second molars, n = 10. They are examined by 2 examiners with and without magnification x5 using ICDAS II, SoproLife “day light” and “blue light” (405nm, LIF, DIAGNOdent Classic − emitting laser light on 655nm, QLF. The results are proven with histological bucco-lingual or mesio-distal sections through the body of the lesion with diamond blade rinsed with water. Photos of all occlusal surfaces of the molars are taken before and after the sections. The lowest overdiagnosis rate is found with SoproLife camera. When visual examination is applied overdiagnoses are fewer than with DD. DD is not capable to differentiate white and brown spots from a caries lesion. Soprolife is not capable to differentiate brown spots from a caries lesion. The most accurate method in this in vitro study for diagnosis of fissure caries is LIF (SoproLife − 75.6% of the teeth are correctly diagnosed, followed by ICDAS (57.8% and QLF (DIAGNOdent (40%.

  13. Comparison of different additive manufacturing methods using computed tomography

    Paras Shah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM allows for fast fabrication of three dimensional objects with the use of considerably less resources, less energy consumption and shorter supply chain than would be the case in traditional manufacturing. AM has gained significance due to its cost effective method which boasts the ability to produce components with a previously unachievable level of geometric complexity in prototyping and end user industrial applications, such as aerospace, automotive and medical industries. However these processes currently lack reproducibility and repeatability with some ‘prints’ having a high probability of requiring rework or even scrapping due to out of specification or high porosity levels, leading to failure due to structural stresses. It is therefore imperative that robust quality systems be implemented such that the waste level of these processes can be significantly decreased. This study presents an artefact that is optimised for characterisation of form using computed tomography (CT with representative geometric dimensioning and tolerancing features and internal channels and structures comparable to cooling channels in heat exchangers. Furthermore the optimisation of the CT acquisition conditions for this artefact are presented in light of feature dimensions and form analysis. This paper investigates the accuracy and capability of CT measurements compared with reference measurements from coordinate measuring machine (CMM, as well as focus on the evaluation of different AM methods.

  14. Thermal properties of flax fiber scoured by different methods

    Zheng Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of flax roves untreated and treated were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravity analyzer (TGA in order to understand their thermal behavior in more detail and to evaluate the effect of scouring processing on the thermal behavior. Flax roves were treated with six kinds of methods including biological scouring, one bath, two bath, bleaching, alkali scouring and industry chemical scouring as standards. Results showed that all treatments improved thermal stability of flax roves. The results indicated that glass transition temperature (Tg decreased after scouring besides the sample by directly bleaching. It is more difficult to determine the endothermic peak of flax treated by chemical scouring in industry because it takes a very flat course. A distinct endothermic peak was observed for the untreated flax rove, while a distinct exothermic peak in different temperature interval was revealed for other four treated flax rove samples. For TGA analysis, thermal degradation of flax roves studied consists of three regions of the initial, main, and char decomposition, and the third stage consists of secondary weight loss and carbonization for flax roves with biological scouring, one-bath and two-bath. Besides, different residue left indicates that the bio-scoured flax roves are lost with volatile products and does not contribute to char formation. These results provide valuable preferences for mechanism and top value added application of bio-scouring in flax roves.

  15. Method for Attaining Caraway Seed Oil Fractions with Different Composition.

    Shiwakoti, Santosh; Poudyal, Shital; Saleh, Osama; Astatkie, Tess; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D

    2016-06-01

    Caraway (Carum carvi L.) is a medicinal and aromatic plant; its seeds (fruits) are used as spice and they contain essential oils. We hypothesized that by collecting caraway oil at different time points during the extraction process, we could obtain oil fractions with distinct chemical composition. A hydrodistillation time (HDT) study was conducted to test the hypothesis. The caraway seed oil fractions were collected at eight different HDT (at 0 - 2, 2 - 7, 7 - 15, 15 - 30, 30 - 45, 45 - 75, 75 - 105, and 105 - 135 min). Additionally, a non-stop HD for 135 min was conducted as a control. Most of the oil was eluted early in the HD process. The non-stop HDT treatment yielded 2.76% oil by weight. Of the 24 essential oil constituents, limonene (77 - 19% of the total oil) and carvone (20 - 79%) were the major ones. Other constituents included myrcene (0.72 - 0.16%), trans-carveol (0.07 - 0.39%), and β-caryophyllene (0.07 - 0.24%). Caraway seed oil with higher concentration of limonene can be obtained by sampling oil fractions early in HD process; conversely, oil with high concentration of carvone can be obtained by excluding the fractions eluted early in the HD process. We demonstrated a method of obtaining caraway seed oil fractions with various and unique composition. These novel oil fractions with unique composition are not commercially available and could have much wider potential uses, and also target different markets compared to the typical caraway essential oil.

  16. Repairability of Compomers with Different Methods of Surface Conditioning

    P.Samimi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Considering the cost and amount of time and also the quantity of tooth loss in the process of cavity preparation, repair of the restoration instead of itsreplacement would be much more efficient.Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different methods of surface conditioning on the shear bond strength of repaired compomers.Materials and Methods: Sixty blocks of compomer were prepared in acrylic molds and then they were randomly divided into five groups of 12. Group I (control groupreceived no treatment. The remaining samples were immersed in 37 ºC distilled water for one week, then the surfaces were roughened with a coarse diamond bur. Samples ineach group were prepared by different surface treatment and conditioning: In group II specimens were conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid for 20s. Specimens in group III were etched with 10% polyacrylic acid for 20s. In group IV 1.23% acidulated phosphatefluoride was applied for 30s, and compomer surfaces were sandblasted with 50μm Al2O3 powder in group V. After the initial preparations, all groups were treated with silane and resin before bonding of the second mix of compomer. Shear forces were applied with a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5mm/min. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests.Results: The mean shear bond strengths and standard deviations (in parentheses for groups I to V were 31.56(10.86, 20.02(5.49, 17.74(7.34, 19.31(4.31 and 27.7(6.33MPa, respectively. The mean bond strengths for Groups I and V were significantly higher than that of the other groups (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results showed that among the surface treatments used in this study,sandblasting with alumina could be the best surface preparation method for repairing compomer restorations.

  17. Double-difference seismic tomography method and its applications

    Zhang, Haijiang

    We have developed a double-difference (DD) seismic tomography method that uses both absolute arrival times and differential travel times. By taking into account path anomaly biases between event pairs explicitly, DD tomography has the ability to determine the absolute and relative event locations and velocity structure accurately with the direct use of the more accurate differential travel times (from catalog and/or waveform cross correlation (WCC) data). We represented the Earth with a Cartesian (flat-Earth) model at a local scale and used a pseudo-bending ray tracing algorithm to find rays and travel times between events and stations. At a regional scale, the spherical shape of the Earth is taken into account by parameterizing a spherical surface inside a Cartesian volume of grid nodes. Finite-difference ray tracing algorithms are utilized to deal with velocity discontinuities such as Conrad, Moho and subducting slab boundary. The synthetic test shows that DD tomography produces more accurate event locations and velocity structure than standard tomography. The applications of local scale DD tomography to datasets from the Hayward fault and the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault yield a sharper velocity contrast along the fault for the former dataset and a more apparent low-velocity fault zone for the latter dataset. For the Parkfield, California dataset, we use both the absolute and differential S-P data to estimate a more consistent Vp/Vs ratio model with the local geological setting. We have imaged the seismic velocity structure of the subducting slabs beneath Northern Honshu, Japan and the Wellington region, New Zealand with unprecedented resolution by applying the regional scale DD tomography method to the two planes of seismicity of the double seismic zone. Our models support the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes are enabled by dehydration reactions of hydrous minerals. To reduce the mismatch between the ray distribution and the regular

  18. Pan evaporation modeling using six different heuristic computing methods in different climates of China

    Wang, Lunche; Kisi, Ozgur; Zounemat-Kermani, Mohammad; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Pan evaporation (Ep) plays important roles in agricultural water resources management. One of the basic challenges is modeling Ep using limited climatic parameters because there are a number of factors affecting the evaporation rate. This study investigated the abilities of six different soft computing methods, multi-layer perceptron (MLP), generalized regression neural network (GRNN), fuzzy genetic (FG), least square support vector machine (LSSVM), multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems with grid partition (ANFIS-GP), and two regression methods, multiple linear regression (MLR) and Stephens and Stewart model (SS) in predicting monthly Ep. Long-term climatic data at various sites crossing a wide range of climates during 1961-2000 are used for model development and validation. The results showed that the models have different accuracies in different climates and the MLP model performed superior to the other models in predicting monthly Ep at most stations using local input combinations (for example, the MAE (mean absolute errors), RMSE (root mean square errors), and determination coefficient (R2) are 0.314 mm/day, 0.405 mm/day and 0.988, respectively for HEB station), while GRNN model performed better in Tibetan Plateau (MAE, RMSE and R2 are 0.459 mm/day, 0.592 mm/day and 0.932, respectively). The accuracies of above models ranked as: MLP, GRNN, LSSVM, FG, ANFIS-GP, MARS and MLR. The overall results indicated that the soft computing techniques generally performed better than the regression methods, but MLR and SS models can be more preferred at some climatic zones instead of complex nonlinear models, for example, the BJ (Beijing), CQ (Chongqing) and HK (Haikou) stations. Therefore, it can be concluded that Ep could be successfully predicted using above models in hydrological modeling studies.

  19. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT OPERATION METHODS ON METHANE HYDRATE FORMATION

    HAO Wenfeng; FAN Shuanshi; WANG Jinqu

    2003-01-01

    Three experiments of static state storage method, low-temperature and constant-pressure storage method and low-temperature and constant-pressure storage method were carried out to investigate which method was best in gas hydrate. The relationships of hydrate rate, capacity and liquid temperature versus time were derived and three results were contrasted. The experimental results show lowtemperature and constant-pressure method is better than the other two methods because it's operation period is shorter and storage capacity is larger than the other two. Low-temperature and constant-pressure method is the best method. So new method will be new research objective.

  20. An applied examination of different weighting methods for the root expected mean square difference and root mean square difference indices.

    Huggins, Anne Corinne

    2012-01-01

    It is possible that functions used to link tests are sensitive to subpopulations of test takers. The REMSD and RMSD(x) are weighted effect sizes of linking invariance, yet it is often unclear how the weights are most appropriately applied when subpopulation group sizes are heterogeneous. The objective of this research is to apply two different weighting methods to the REMSD and RMSD(x) functions while testing for population invariance in a linkage across subpopulations of disparate sample sizes, and to subsequently compare the results across these differentially weighted effect sizes. The findings demonstrate that utilizing proportional weights in the REMSD and RMSD(x) indices can underestimate differences in linking functions for small subpopulations.

  1. Approximation of eigenvalues of some unbounded self-adjoint discrete Jacobi matrices by eigenvalues of finite submatrices

    Maria Malejki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the problem of approximation of eigenvalues of some self-adjoint operator in the Hilbert space \\(l^2(\\mathbb{N}\\ by eigenvalues of suitably chosen principal finite submatrices of an infinite Jacobi matrix that defines the operator considered. We assume the Jacobi operator is bounded from below with compact resolvent. In our research we estimate the asymptotics (with \\(n\\to \\infty\\ of the joint error of approximation for the first \\(n\\ eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the operator by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the finite submatrix of order \\(n \\times n\\. The method applied in our research is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method and Volkmer's results included in [H. Volkmer, Error Estimates for Rayleigh-Ritz Approximations of Eigenvalues and Eigenfunctions of the Mathieu and Spheroidal Wave Equation, Constr. Approx. 20 (2004, 39-54]. We extend the method to cover a class of infinite symmetric Jacobi matrices with three diagonals satisfying some polynomial growth estimates.

  2. Comparison of different methods of temperature measurement in children

    Pavlović Momčilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The consequences of failing to notice fever in children can be serious. On the other hand, false positive reading can result in unnecessary investigation or diagnostic approach. The aim of this study was to compare different ways of body temperature measurement. Material and methods This prospective study was carried out on Pediatric Department of General Hospital in Subotica during 10 months (March-December 2006. In 263 children aged 1 month to 18 years of age, the body temperature was obtained from 4 measurement sites: tactile assessment, forehead and ear by electronic thermometer, rectal temperature in small children (up to 2 years of age or axillar temperature in older children by mercury thermometer. Tympanic thermometry was considered as a standard for fever detection. Results The sensitivity of rectal temperature to detect fever is 46.67%, while specificity is 92.19%. The sensitivity of fever detection by electronic thermometry on the forehead is lower according to rectal thermometry - 36.08%, while specificity is 95.18%. The lowest values of sensitivity are recorded in axillar thermometry (35.82%, specificity is 90.20%. The correlation coefficient is higher between tympanic and rectal temperature measurement (r=0.5076, p<0.0005, than between tympanic and forehead measurements (r=0.5076, p<0,0005, while the lowest was between tympanic and axillar measurement sites (r=0.4933, p<0.0005. Conclusions The results of our study and literature data show that the most accurate methods of thermometry are rectal measurement of body temperature in small children and tympanic thermometry in children over 2 years of age.

  3. Different Methods for Prostate Biopsy and Biopsy Protocols

    Mahyar Ghafoori

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate carcinoma is one of the most common"nmalignancies among men. Increasing mortality rates due"nto prostate carcinoma have been observed worldwide."nThis disease usually progresses imperceptibly, for this"nreason; screening programs aimed at early detection"nhave been developed. The prostate specific antigen"n(PSA test is among the best screening tools available"nin medicine today because it is recognized as the best"nmarker for its early detection."nIn case of abnormal rise in PSA, the patient usually"nrefers for prostate biopsy under the guide of trans"nrectal ultrasonography (TRUS. Different methods are"nrecognized for prostate biopsy that may be divided"ninto two main categories namely, systematic biopsy"nand targeted biopsy."nIn systematic biopsy we divide the prostate gland"nrandomly to different sections and obtain biopsy"nspecimens from each section.The protocol of systematic biopsy is different among"ndifferent institutions. The number of biopsy specimens"ncould be started from less than 6 to more than 20"nbiopsies in some institutions. Increasing the number"nof biopsy specimens increases the detection rate for"nprostate cancer increasing the complications such"nas post biopsy prostatitis and septicemia, which are"nthe most important, as well. In scheduling a biopsy"nprotocol with high number of biopsies it is preferred"nto hospitalize the patient and prescribe intravenous"nantibiotics."nTargeted biopsy of the prostate means obtaining biopsy"nspecimens from a pathologic lesion that is suspicious"nfor prostate cancer. Different modalities could be"nused for detecting prostate cancer within the prostate"ngland. Transrectal ultrasonography, ultrasonography"nwith the use of ultrasound contrast agents, MRI of the"nprostate with the use of endorectal coil, dynamic MR"nstudy with contrast agent, diffusion weighted imaging"nof the prostate and MR spectroscopy all could help"nin the detection of a suspicious tumoral mass in the

  4. New Retrieval Method Based on Relative Entropy for Language Modeling with Different Smoothing Methods

    Huo Hua; Liu Junqiang; Feng Boqin

    2006-01-01

    A language model for information retrieval is built by using a query language model to generate queries and a document language model to generate documents. The documents are ranked according to the relative entropies of estimated document language models with respect to the estimated query language model. Two popular and relatively efficient smoothing methods, the JelinekMercer method and the absolute discounting method, are used to smooth the document language model in estimation of the document language. A combined model composed of the feedback document language model and the collection language model is used to estimate the query model. A performacne comparison between the new retrieval method and the existing method with feedback is made,and the retrieval performances of the proposed method with the two different smoothing techniques are evaluated on three Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) data sets. Experimental results show that the method is effective and performs better than the basic language modeling approach; moreover, the method using the Jelinek-Mercer technique performs better than that using the absolute discounting technique, and the perfomance is sensitive to the smoothing paramters.

  5. Bargmann Symmetry Constraint for a Family of Liouville Integrable Differential-Difference Equations

    徐西祥

    2012-01-01

    A family of integrable differential-difference equations is derived from a new matrix spectral problem. The Hamiltonian forms of obtained differential-difference equations are constructed. The Liouville integrability for the obtained integrable family is proved. Then, Bargmann symmetry constraint of the obtained integrable family is presented by binary nonliearization method of Lax pairs and adjoint Lax pairs. Under this Bargmann symmetry constraints, an integrable symplectic map and a sequences of completely integrable finite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems in Liouville sense are worked out, and every integrable differential-difference equations in the obtained family is factored by the integrable symplectie map and a completely integrable tinite-dimensionai Hamiltonian system.

  6. Tunnels: different construction methods and its use for pipelines installation

    Mattos, Tales; Soares, Ana Cecilia; Assis, Slow de; Bolsonaro, Ralfo; Sanandres, Simon [Petroleo do Brasil S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In a continental dimensions country like Brazil, the pipeline modal faces the challenge of opening ROW's in the most different kind of soils with the most different geomorphology. To safely fulfill the pipeline construction demand, the ROW opening uses all techniques in earthworks and route definition and, where is necessary, no digging techniques like horizontal directional drilling, micro tunneling and also full size tunnels design for pipelines installation in high topography terrains to avoid geotechnical risks. PETROBRAS has already used the tunnel technique to cross higher terrains with great construction difficult, and mainly to make it pipeline maintenance and operation easier. For the GASBOL Project, in Aparados da Serra region and in GASYRG, in Bolivia, two tunnels were opened with approximately 700 meters and 2,000 meters each one. The GASBOL Project had the particularity of being a gallery with only one excavation face, finishing under the hill and from this point was drilled a vertical shaft was drilled until the top to install the pipeline section, while in GASYRG Project the tunnel had two excavation faces. Currently, two projects are under development with tunnels, one of then is the Caraguatatuba-Taubate gas pipeline (GASTAU), with a 5 km tunnel, with the same concepts of the GASBOL tunnel, with a gallery to be opened with the use of a TBM (Tunneling Boring Machine), and a shaft to the surface, and the gas pipeline Cabiunas-Reduc III (GASDUC III) project is under construction with a 3.7 km tunnel, like the GASYRG tunnel with two faces. This paper presents the main excavation tunneling methods, conventional and mechanized, presenting the most relevant characteristics from both and, in particular, the use of tunnels for pipelines installation. (author)

  7. Comparing performance of modern genotype imputation methods in different ethnicities

    Roshyara, Nab Raj; Horn, Katrin; Kirsten, Holger; Ahnert, Peter; Scholz, Markus

    2016-10-01

    A variety of modern software packages are available for genotype imputation relying on advanced concepts such as pre-phasing of the target dataset or utilization of admixed reference panels. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of modern imputation methods on the basis of the publicly available POPRES samples. Good quality genotypes were masked and re-imputed by different imputation frameworks: namely MaCH, IMPUTE2, MaCH-Minimac, SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2 and MaCH-Admix. Results were compared to evaluate the relative merit of pre-phasing and the usage of admixed references. We showed that the pre-phasing framework SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2 can overestimate the certainty of genotype distributions resulting in the lowest percentage of correctly imputed genotypes in our case. MaCH-Minimac performed better than SHAPEIT-IMPUTE2. Pre-phasing always reduced imputation accuracy. IMPUTE2 and MaCH-Admix, both relying on admixed-reference panels, showed comparable results. MaCH showed superior results if well-matched references were available (Nei’s GST ≤ 0.010). For small to medium datasets, frameworks using genetically closest reference panel are recommended if the genetic distance between target and reference data set is small. Our results are valid for small to medium data sets. As shown on a larger data set of population based German samples, the disadvantage of pre-phasing decreases for larger sample sizes.

  8. Generational differences of baccalaureate nursing students' preferred teaching methods and faculty use of teaching methods

    Delahoyde, Theresa

    Nursing education is experiencing a generational phenomenon with student enrollment spanning three generations. Classrooms of the 21st century include the occasional Baby Boomer and a large number of Generation X and Generation Y students. Each of these generations has its own unique set of characteristics that have been shaped by values, trends, behaviors, and events in society. These generational characteristics create vast opportunities to learn, as well as challenges. One such challenge is the use of teaching methods that are congruent with nursing student preferences. Although there is a wide range of studies conducted on student learning styles within the nursing education field, there is little research on the preferred teaching methods of nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to compare the preferred teaching methods of multi-generational baccalaureate nursing students with faculty use of teaching methods. The research study included 367 participants; 38 nursing faculty and 329 nursing students from five different colleges within the Midwest region. The results of the two-tailed t-test found four statistically significant findings between Generation X and Y students and their preferred teaching methods including; lecture, listening to the professor lecture versus working in groups; actively participating in group discussion; and the importance of participating in group assignments. The results of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found seventeen statistically significant findings between levels of students (freshmen/sophomores, juniors, & seniors) and their preferred teaching methods. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching method by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of data.

  9. Antigen retrieval techniques in immunohistochemistry: comparison of different methods.

    Pileri, S A; Roncador, G; Ceccarelli, C; Piccioli, M; Briskomatis, A; Sabattini, E; Ascani, S; Santini, D; Piccaluga, P P; Leone, O; Damiani, S; Ercolessi, C; Sandri, F; Pieri, F; Leoncini, L; Falini, B

    1997-09-01

    Routine sections of normal and pathological samples fixed in 10 per cent buffered formalin or B5, including EDTA-decalcified bone-marrow biopsies, were tested with 61 antibodies following heating in three different fluids: 0.01 M citrate buffer (pH 6.0), 0.1 M Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and 1 mM EDTA-NaOH solution (pH 8.0). The sections underwent either three cycles of microwave treatment (5 min each) or pressure cooking for 1-2 min. The alkaline phosphatase/anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) technique was used as the standard detection method; with 16 antibodies a slightly modified streptavidin-biotin complex (SABC)-immunoperoxidase technique was applied in parallel. The results obtained were compared with those observed without any antigen retrieval (AR), or following section digestion with 0.05 per cent protease XIV at 37 degrees C for 5 min. Chess-board titration tests showed that all antibodies but one profited by AR. Protease XIV digestion represented the gold standard for five antibodies, while 55 produced optimal results following the application of heat-based AR. By comparison with the other fluids, EDTA appeared to be superior in terms of both staining intensity and the number of marked cells. These results were independent of tissue processing, immunohistochemical approach, and heating device. Pressure cooking was found to be more convenient on practical grounds, as it allowed the simultaneous handling of a large number of slides and a time saving of 1 min 30 s, representing the proper time for the treatment.

  10. Comparison Study on the Performances of Finite Volume Method and Finite Difference Method

    Renwei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vorticity-stream function method and MAC algorithm are adopted to systemically compare the finite volume method (FVM and finite difference method (FDM in this paper. Two typical problems—lid-driven flow and natural convection flow in a square cavity—are taken as examples to compare and analyze the calculation performances of FVM and FDM with variant mesh densities, discrete forms, and treatments of boundary condition. It is indicated that FVM is superior to FDM from the perspective of accuracy, stability of convection term, robustness, and calculation efficiency. Particularly ,when the mesh is coarse and taken as 20×20, the results of FDM suffer severe oscillation and even lose physical meaning.

  11. COMPARISON OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF DIFFERENT METHODS OF MINING WASTE DISPOSAL TECHNOLOGY USING AHP METHOD

    Justyna Kubicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exploitation of tailing ponds sites for storing all types of waste materials creates multiple problems concerning waste disposal and the environmental impact of the waste. Tailing ponds waste may comprise e.g. flotation tailings from ore enrichment plants. Despite the fact that companies / corporations use state-of-the-art methods of extraction and processing of copper ore, and introduce modern systems of organization and production management, the area located closest to the reservoir is exposed to its negative effects. Many types of waste material are a valuable source of secondary raw materials which are suitable for use by various industries. Examples of such materials are mining waste (flotation tailings, usually neutral to the environment, whose quantities produced in the process of exploitation of minerals is sizeable. The article compares different technological methods of mining waste disposal using AHP method and their environmental impact.

  12. Comparison of different measuring methods for body temperature in lactating cows under different climatic conditions.

    Ammer, Stefanie; Lambertz, Christian; Gauly, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the research described here was to compare different methods of body temperature (BT) measurements in dairy cows. It was hypothesised that reticular temperature (RET) values reflect the physiological status of the animals in an equivalent way to rectal (RT) and vaginal (VT) measurements. RT, VT and RET temperatures of twelve lactating Holstein-Friesian cows were measured over five consecutive days in June and October 2013. While RT and VT were manually measured three times a day, RET was automatically recorded at 10 min intervals using a bolus in the reticulum. For comparison with RT and VT, different RET values were used: single values at the respective recording times (RET-SIN), and mean (RET-MEAN) and median (RET-MED) values of 2 h prior to RT and VT measurements. Overall, body temperatures averaged 38·1 ± 0·6, 38·2 ± 0·4, 38·7 ± 0·9, 38·5 ± 0·7 and 38·7 ± 0·5 °C for RT, VT, RET-SIN, RET-MEAN and RET-MED, respectively. RT and VT were lower than all RET measurements, while RET-SIN and RET-MED were higher than RET-MEAN (P < 0·001). RET-MEAN and RET-MED values were higher in the morning, whereas RT and VT were greatest in the evening (P < 0·001). Overall, records of RT and VT were strongly correlated (r = 0·75; P < 0·001). In contrast to RET-SIN and RET-MEAN, RET-MED was higher correlated to RT and VT. In June, coefficients were higher between all methods than in October. Relation of barn T to RT and VT was stronger when compared to RET measurements. RET-SIN was higher correlated to barn T than RET-MEAN or RET-MED. Correlation between VT and barn T was strongest (r = 0·48; P < 0·001). In summary, RET-MED showed highest correlation with VT and RT. However, single RET measurements (influenced by water or feed intake) can lead to extreme variations and differences to single VT and RT values.

  13. High oleic sunflower biodiesel: quality control and different purification methods

    Pighinelli, Anna L.M.T.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to evaluate the production of biodiesel using ethanol and sunflower oil. The extraction of the sunflower oil was evaluated first. An experimental design was used to estimate the influence of the independent variables grain temperature (25º to 110ºC and expeller rotation (85 to 119rpm on the crude oil. The best result obtained was 68.38%, achieved with a rotation from 100 to 115rpm, grain temperature ranging from 25º to 30ºC and moisture content of around 7%. The next study consisted of transesterification, evaluating the influence of the ethanol, oil molar ratio and the catalyst concentration (sodium methylate on the ester-rich phase yield. The highest yield was 98.39% obtained with a molar ratio of 9:1 and 3% catalyst. An experiment was then carried out on a small reactor and the biodiesel produced was purified by three different methods: acidified water, silica and distillation. The quality aspects of the purified biodiesel samples were evaluated according to the Brazilian specifications for biodiesel, and distillation was shown to be the best method of purification.

    El objetivo del presente trabajo es evaluar la producción de biodiesel usando etanol y aceite de girasol. La extracción del aceite de girasol fue evaluada primero. Un diseño experimental fue usado para estimar la influencia de las variables independientes: temperatura del grano (25º a 110ºC y rotación del expeller (85 a 119 rpm en la obtención del aceite crudo. El mejor resultado obtenido fue un 68,38%, conseguido con una rotación de 100 a 115 rpm, una temperatura del grano de 25º a 30ºC y un contenido de humedad de alrededor del 7%. El siguiente estudio mediante transesterificación, evaluó la influencia de la relación molar etanol: aceite y concentración de catalizador (metilato sódico en el rendimiento de la fase rica en esteres. El rendimiento más alto fue 98,39% obtenido con una relación molar de 9.1 y 3% de

  14. A finite difference method of solving anisotropic scattering problems

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of solving radiative transfer problems is described including a comparison of its speed with that of the doubling method, and a discussion of its accuracy and suitability for computations involving variable optical properties. The method uses a discretization in angle to produce a coupled set of first-order differential equations which are integrated between discrete depth points to produce a set of recursion relations for symmetric and anti-symmetric angular sums of the radiation field at alternate depth points. The formulation given here includes depth-dependent anisotropic scattering, absorption, and internal sources, and allows arbitrary combinations of specular and non-Lambertian diffuse reflection at either or both boundaries. Numerical tests of the method show that it can return accurate emergent intensities even for large optical depths. The method is also shown to conserve flux to machine accuracy in conservative atmospheres

  15. Total N difference method and 15N isotope dilution methode - A comparative study on N-fixation

    2002-01-01

    In the study, the 15N fixation of a number of green manure crops were studied using either the 15N dilution technique, or the simple total N difference method. The results of the two methods were not very different, and the total N difference method seemed to give as good results as the more complicated and expencive 15N dillution method.

  16. Approximate Solution Methods for Linear Stochastic Difference Equations. I. Moments

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1983-01-01

    The cumulant expansion for linear stochastic differential equations is extended to the case of linear stochastic difference equations. We consider a vector difference equation, which contains a deterministic matrix A0 and a random perturbation matrix A1(t). The expansion proceeds in powers of ατc, w

  17. Drug absorption efficiency in Caenorhbditis elegans delivered by different methods.

    Shan-Qing Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caenorhbditis elegans has being vigorously used as a model organism in many research fields and often accompanied by administrating with various drugs. The methods of delivering drugs to worms are varied from one study to another, which make difficult in comparing results between studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the drug absorption efficiency in C. elegans using five frequently used methods with resveratrol with low aqueous solubility and water-soluble 5-Fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUDR as positive compounds. The drugs were either applied to the LB medium with bacteria OP50, before spreading onto Nematode Growth Medium (NGM plates (LB medium method, or to the NGM with live (NGM live method or dead bacteria (NGM dead method, or spotting the drug solution to the surface of plates directly (spot dead method, or growing the worms in liquid medium (liquid growing method. The concentration of resveratrol and FUDR increased gradually within C. elegans and reached the highest during 12 hours to one day and then decreased slowly. At the same time point, the higher the drug concentration, the higher the metabolism rate. The drug concentrations in worms fed with dead bacteria were higher than with live bacteria at the same time point. Consistently, the drug concentration in medium with live bacteria decreased much faster than in medium with dead bacteria, reach to about half of the original concentration within 12 hours. CONCLUSION: Resveratrol with low aqueous solubility and water-soluble FUDR have the same absorption and metabolism pattern. The drug metabolism rate in worms was both dosage and time dependent. NGM dead method and liquid growing method achieved the best absorption efficiency in worms. The drug concentration within worms was comparable with that in mice, providing a bridge for dose translation from worms to mammals.

  18. Intertwining operators for non-self-adjoint Hamiltonians and bicoherent states

    Bagarello, F.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the construction of what we will call exactly solvable models, i.e., of quantum mechanical systems described by an Hamiltonian H whose eigenvalues and eigenvectors can be explicitly constructed out of some minimal ingredients. In particular, motivated by PT-quantum mechanics, we will not insist on any self-adjointness feature of the Hamiltonians considered in our construction. We also introduce the so-called bicoherent states, we analyze some of their properties and we show how they can be used for quantizing a system. Some examples, both in finite and in infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, are discussed.

  19. Self-adjoint Extensions of Schrödinger Operators with ?-magnetic Fields on Riemannian Manifolds

    T. Mine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the magnetic Schr¨odinger operator on a Riemannian manifold M. We assume the magnetic field is given by the sum of a regular field and the Dirac δ measures supported on a discrete set Γ in M. We give a complete characterization of the self-adjoint extensions of the minimal operator, in terms of the boundary conditions. The result is an extension of the former results by Dabrowski-Šťoviček and Exner-Šťoviček-Vytřas.

  20. Diagonalization of a self-adjoint operator acting on a Hilbert module

    Parfeny P. Saworotnow

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available For each bounded self-adjoint operator T on a Hilbert module H over an H*-algebra A there exists a locally compact space m and a certain A-valued measure μ such that H is isomorphic to L2(μ⊗A and T corresponds to a multiplication with a continuous function. There is a similar result for a commuting family of normal operators. A consequence for this result is a representation theorem for generalized stationary processes.

  1. Self-adjointness and the Casimir effect with confined quantized spinor matter

    Sitenko, Yurii A

    2015-01-01

    A generalization of the MIT bag boundary condition for spinor matter is proposed basing on the requirement that the Dirac hamiltonian operator be self-adjoint. An influence of a background magnetic field on the vacuum of charged spinor matter confined between two parallel material plates is studied. Employing the most general set of boundary conditions at the plates in the case of the uniform magnetic field directed orthogonally to the plates, we find the pressure from the vacuum onto the plates. In physically plausible situations, the Casimir effect is shown to be repulsive, independently of a choice of boundary conditions and of a distance between the plates.

  2. On Maximal Abelian Self-adjoint Subalgebras of Factors of Type Ⅱ1

    Li Guang WANG

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we show that if (N) is a proper subfactor of a factor (M) of type Ⅱ1 with finite Jones index, then there is a maximal abelian self-adjoint subalgebra (masa) (A) of (N) that is not a masa in (M). Popa showed that there is a proper subfactor (R)O of the hyperfinite type Ⅱ1 factor (R) such that each masa in (R)O is also a masa in (R). We shall give a detailed proof of Popa's result.

  3. Propagators of hot SU(2) gauge theory from 3d adjoint Higgs model

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2000-01-01

    We study propagators of the lattice 3d adjoint Higgs model, considered as an effective theory of 4d SU(2) gauge theory at high temperature. The propagators are calculated in so-called lambda-gauges. From the long distance behaviour of the propagators we extract the screening masses. It is shown that the pole masses extracted from the propagators agree well with the screening masses obtained recently in finite temperature SU(2) theory. The gauge dependence of the screening masses is also discussed.

  4. Screening Masses of Hot SU(2) Gauge Theory from the 3D Adjoint Higgs Model

    Karsch, Frithjof; Petreczky, P

    1999-01-01

    We study the Landau gauge propagators of the lattice SU(2) 3d adjoint Higgs model, considered as an effective theory of high temperature 4d SU(2) gauge theory. From the long distance behaviour of the propagators we extract the screening masses. It is shown that the pole masses extracted from the propagators agree well with the screening masses obtained recently in finite temperature SU(2) theory. The relation of the propagator masses to the masses extracted from gauge invariant correlators is also discussed. In so-called lambda gauges non-perturbative evidence is given for the gauge independence of pole masses within this class of gauges.

  5. Influence Of Different Methods Of Operative Treatment On Ovarian Reserve.

    V Simrok

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper presents the results of ovarian reserve estimation for 125 women with the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS who have undergone various methods of surgical treatment - resection of the ovaries, thermokauterisation and drilling by laser (Ho-Yag. Ovarian reserve was estimated according to the amount of antral follicles, level of follitropin and Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS, also named anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH. Blood flow in ovarian tissue was also examined after various methods of surgical treatment. The study has shown that the gentlest method of surgical treatment is drilling by Ho-Yag laser, which is least likely to injure the tissue of ovaries, and also this method is most effective in enhancing and preserving ovarian reserve.

  6. Importance of English and Different Methods of Teaching English

    Reddy, Dr. P. Sreenivasulu

    2013-01-01

    Todays world considers English as a global language. The present article explains how the teaching of English started with Grammar-Translation Method and secured a strong hold in the field of teaching English, though its basic assumptions were questionable. It also examines the principles of Direct Method and its insistence on establishing a bond between the experience and expression. In an effort to meet the needs of the Indian students of English, we learn that Michael West proposed the Rea...

  7. Determination of Ketoconazole in tablets by using three different methods

    Biljana Gjorgjeska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole has been widely used as an antifungal drug  that is formulated as tablets, cream and over­the­counter ketoconazole shampoo. The aim of this research was to study and to standardize an ultraviolet spectrophotometric (UVS method, potentiometric  and a high  performance  liquid  chromatographic  (HPLC method  for  the determination  of ketoconazole in commercially available Oromycosal® tablets. These three methods were compared and discussed with respect to  their  sensitivity,  selectivity  and ready­applicability  in  routine  analytical  work.   Absorption  spectra and spectrophotometric determinations were carried out on the UVS spectrophotometer. Investigated concentrations were in range from  0.003 to  0.02mg?dm­3. The absorbance was measured at 224  nm.  In potentiometric  titrations  glass  and saturated (KCl calomel electrode were used. HPLC analyses of ketoconazole were carried in the presence of econazole as internal standard. It can be concluded that the described methods are simple, fast and reliable for determination of ketoconazole in pharmaceutical preparations. The preparation of the samples is easy, the excipients do not  interfere in the methods, so they can be used in routine quality control analysis.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method

    Gan, Z. L.; Ishak, M. H. H.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Khor, Soon Fuat

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the three dimensional (3D) simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA) to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM) code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced. PMID:27454872

  9. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method.

    Abas, Aizat; Gan, Z L; Ishak, M H H; Abdullah, M Z; Khor, Soon Fuat

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the three dimensional (3D) simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA) to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM) code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method.

    Aizat Abas

    Full Text Available This paper studies the three dimensional (3D simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced.

  12. Second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) for computing exactly and efficiently first- and second-order sensitivities in large-scale linear systems: II. Illustrative application to a paradigm particle diffusion problem

    Cacuci, Dan G.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents an illustrative application of the second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis methodology (2nd-ASAM) to a paradigm neutron diffusion problem, which is sufficiently simple to admit an exact solution, thereby making transparent the underlying mathematical derivations. The general theory underlying 2nd-ASAM indicates that, for a physical system comprising Nα parameters, the computation of all of the first- and second-order response sensitivities requires (per response) at most (2Nα + 1) "large-scale" computations using the first-level and, respectively, second-level adjoint sensitivity systems (1st-LASS and 2nd-LASS). Very importantly, however, the illustrative application presented in this work shows that the actual number of adjoint computations needed for computing all of the first- and second-order response sensitivities may be significantly less than (2Nα + 1) per response. For this illustrative problem, four "large-scale" adjoint computations sufficed for the complete and exact computations of all 4 first- and 10 distinct second-order derivatives. Furthermore, the construction and solution of the 2nd-LASS requires very little additional effort beyond the construction of the adjoint sensitivity system needed for computing the first-order sensitivities. Very significantly, only the sources on the right-sides of the diffusion (differential) operator needed to be modified; the left-side of the differential equations (and hence the "solver" in large-scale practical applications) remained unchanged. All of the first-order relative response sensitivities to the model parameters have significantly large values, of order unity. Also importantly, most of the second-order relative sensitivities are just as large, and some even up to twice as large as the first-order sensitivities. In the illustrative example presented in this work, the second-order sensitivities contribute little to the response variances and covariances. However, they have the

  13. Three lectures on global boundary conditions and the theory of self--adjoint extensions of the covariant Laplace--Beltrami and Dirac operators on Riemannian manifolds with boundary

    Ibort, A

    2012-01-01

    In these three lectures we will discuss some fundamental aspects of the theory of self-adjoint extensions of the covariant Laplace-Beltrami and Dirac operators on compact Riemannian manifolds with smooth boundary emphasizing the relation with the theory of global boundary conditions. Self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators, specially of the Laplace-Beltrami and Dirac operators, are fundamental in Quantum Physics as they determine either the energy of quantum systems and/or their unitary evolution. The well-known von Neumann's theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is not always easily applicable to differential operators, while the description of extensions in terms of boundary conditions constitutes a more natural approach. Thus an effort is done in offering a description of self-adjoint extensions in terms of global boundary conditions showing how an important family of self-adjoint extensions for the Laplace-Beltrami and Dirac operators are easily describable in this way. Moreover ...

  14. High-order finite-difference methods for Poisson's equation

    van Linde, Hendrik Jan

    1971-01-01

    In this thesis finite-difference approximations to the three boundary value problems for Poisson’s equation are given, with discretization errors of O(H^3) for the mixed boundary value problem, O(H^3 |ln(h)| for the Neumann problem and O(H^4)for the Dirichlet problem respectively . First an operator

  15. Learning and Retention of Quantum Concepts with Different Teaching Methods

    Deslauriers, Louis; Wieman, Carl

    2011-01-01

    We measured mastery and retention of conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics in a modern physics course. This was studied for two equivalent cohorts of students taught with different pedagogical approaches using the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey. We measured the impact of pedagogical approach both on the original conceptual learning…

  16. EXTERNAL BODY FORCE IN FINITE DIFFERENCE LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHOD

    CHEN Sheng; LIU Zhao-hui; SHI Bao-chang; ZHENG Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    A new finite difference lattice Boltzmann scheme is developed. Because of analyzing the influence of external body force roundly, the correct Navier-Stokes equations with the external body force are recovered, without any additional unphysical terms. And some numerical results are presented. The result which close agreement with analytical data shows the good performance of the model.

  17. Accuracy of genomic selection using different methods to define haplotypes

    Calus, M.P.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Roos, de S.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic selection uses total breeding values for juvenile animals, predicted from a large number of estimated marker haplotype effects across the whole genome. In this study the accuracy of predicting breeding values is compared for four different models including a large number of markers, at diffe

  18. A Finite Difference-Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion

    2014-10-21

    model using a blending function in 1D, though again, the focus is on preset, unchang- ing local/ nonlocal regions. In contrast, this work will focus on...Fracture. 2014; 190:39-52. 14. ABSTRACT A method is presented for the modeling of brittle elastic fracture which combines peridynamics and a finite...propagation modeling , while peridynamics is automatically inserted in high strain areas to model crack initiation and growth. The dispersion

  19. Optimization and Comparison of Different Digital Mammographic Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods

    2008-04-01

    isocentric motion in breast tomosynthesis. We have published our results in Medical Physics , the premiere peer-reviewed journal in the field of... Medical Physics ; please see Appendix #1 for the reprinted publication. 1.2. Characterize the effect of three acquisition parameters including total...working on a Medical Physics journal manuscript preparation for GFB algorithm. We have used impulse response and MTF analysis method to compare BP and

  20. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva; Anderson Luiz Bezerra da Silveira; Fabrízio Di Masi; Cláudio Melibeu Bentes; Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa; Jefferson da Silva Novaes

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4025/actascihealthsci.v36i1.15581 This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on the static muscle strength (SMS). Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a) hand grip without stretching; b) hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexor...

  1. [Comparative study of different diagnostic methods in pulmonary alveolitis].

    Makhmudova, S Iu

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate and analyze, clinical and roentgenological manifestations of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) and idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis (IFA) 89 patients underwent bronchoscopy survey and functional test of lungs. Average age of patients was 38,3+/-5,8. Among examined 89 patients 31 (34,8%) patients were poultry farmers, 30 (33,7%) - millers, and 28 (31,5%) - tobacco-growers. EAA was found among 22 poultry farmers, 19 tobacco-growers, and 19 millers. IFA was found among 11 millers, 9 tobacco-growers and 9 poultry farmers. Acute respiratory disease (ARD) was found among 58 patients; 38 patients suffer from lung diseases. Control group consisted of 20 healthy people. Along with general blood analysis, all patients underwent - roentgenological analysis of thorax in two shifts. Recent studies show that CT lung screening is more sensitive than standard lung screening methods in detecting lung disease. Comparative analysis allowed concluding that Real-Time CT method is the most effective. CT lung screening is more sensitive than standard lung screening methods in detecting lung diseases.

  2. Decomposition of almost Poisson structure of non-self-adjoint dynamical systems

    2009-01-01

    Non-self-adjoint dynamical systems, e.g., nonholonomic systems, can admit an almost Poisson structure, which is formulated by a kind of Poisson bracket satisfying the usual properties except for the Jacobi identity. A general theory of the almost Poisson structure is investigated based on a decompo- sition of the bracket into a sum of a Poisson one and an almost Poisson one. The corresponding rela- tion between Poisson structure and symplectic structure is proved, making use of Jacobiizer and symplecticizer. Based on analysis of pseudo-symplectic structure of constraint submanifold of Chaplygin’s nonholonomic systems, an almost Poisson bracket for the systems is constructed and decomposed into a sum of a canonical Poisson one and an almost Poisson one. Similarly, an almost Poisson structure, which can be decomposed into a sum of canonical one and an almost "Lie-Poisson" one, is also constructed on an affine space with torsion whose autoparallels are utilized to describe the free motion of some non-self-adjoint systems. The decomposition of the almost Poisson bracket di- rectly leads to a decomposition of a dynamical vector field into a sum of usual Hamiltionian vector field and an almost Hamiltonian one, which is useful to simplifying the integration of vector fields.

  3. Optimization of computations for adjoint field and Jacobian needed in 3D CSEM inversion

    Dehiya, Rahul; Singh, Arun; Gupta, Pravin K.; Israil, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the features and results of a newly developed code, based on Gauss-Newton optimization technique, for solving three-dimensional Controlled-Source Electromagnetic inverse problem. In this code a special emphasis has been put on representing the operations by block matrices for conjugate gradient iteration. We show how in the computation of Jacobian, the matrix formed by differentiation of system matrix can be made independent of frequency to optimize the operations at conjugate gradient step. The coarse level parallel computing, using OpenMP framework, is used primarily due to its simplicity in implementation and accessibility of shared memory multi-core computing machine to almost anyone. We demonstrate how the coarseness of modeling grid in comparison to source (comp`utational receivers) spacing can be exploited for efficient computing, without compromising the quality of the inverted model, by reducing the number of adjoint calls. It is also demonstrated that the adjoint field can even be computed on a grid coarser than the modeling grid without affecting the inversion outcome. These observations were reconfirmed using an experiment design where the deviation of source from straight tow line is considered. Finally, a real field data inversion experiment is presented to demonstrate robustness of the code.

  4. Improving the Fit of a Land-Surface Model to Data Using its Adjoint

    Raoult, Nina; Jupp, Tim; Cox, Peter; Luke, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are crucial components of the Earth System Models (ESMs) which are used to make coupled climate-carbon cycle projections for the 21st century. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used in the climate and weather forecast models of the UK Met Office. In this study, JULES is automatically differentiated using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or adjoint, of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed, to search for locally optimum parameter sets by calibrating against observations. We present an introduction to the adJULES system and demonstrate its ability to improve the model-data fit using eddy covariance measurements of gross primary production (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes. adJULES also has the ability to calibrate over multiple sites simultaneously. This feature is used to define new optimised parameter values for the 5 Plant Functional Types (PFTS) in JULES. The optimised PFT-specific parameters improve the performance of JULES over 90% of the FLUXNET sites used in the study. These reductions in error are shown and compared to reductions found due to site-specific optimisations. Finally, we show that calculation of the 2nd derivative of JULES allows us to produce posterior probability density functions of the parameters and how knowledge of parameter values is constrained by observations.

  5. Tide-surge adjoint modeling: A new technique to understand forecast uncertainty

    Wilson, Chris; Horsburgh, Kevin J.; Williams, Jane; Flowerdew, Jonathan; Zanna, Laure

    2013-10-01

    For a simple dynamical system, such as a pendulum, it is easy to deduce where and when applied forcing might produce a particular response. However, for a complex nonlinear dynamical system such as the ocean or atmosphere, this is not as obvious. Knowing when or where the system is most sensitive, to observational uncertainty or otherwise, is key to understanding the physical processes, improving and providing reliable forecasts. We describe the application of adjoint modeling to determine the sensitivity of sea level at a UK coastal location, Sheerness, to perturbations in wind stress preceding an extreme North Sea storm surge event on 9 November 2007. Sea level at Sheerness is one of the most important factors used to decide whether to close the Thames Flood Barrier, which protects London. Adjoint modeling has been used by meteorologists since the 1990s, but is a relatively new technique for ocean modeling. It may be used to determine system sensitivity beyond the scope of ensemble modeling and in a computationally efficient way. Using estimates of wind stress error from Met Office forecasts, we find that for this event total sea level at Sheerness is most sensitive in the 3 h preceding the time of its unperturbed maximum level and over a radius of approximately 300 km. We also find that the pattern of sensitivity follows a simple sequence when considered in the reverse-time direction.

  6. Time trade-off: one methodology, different methods

    Attema, Arthur; Edelaar-Peeters, Yvette; Versteegh, Matthijs; Stolk, Elly

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAbstract There is no scientific consensus on the optimal specification of the time trade-off (TTO) task. As a consequence, studies using TTO to value health states may share the core element of trading length of life for quality of life, but can differ considerably on many other elements. While this pluriformity in specifications advances the understanding of TTO from a methodological point of view, it also results in incomparable health state values. Health state values are appli...

  7. A finite difference method for free boundary problems

    Fornberg, Bengt

    2010-04-01

    Fornberg and Meyer-Spasche proposed some time ago a simple strategy to correct finite difference schemes in the presence of a free boundary that cuts across a Cartesian grid. We show here how this procedure can be combined with a minimax-based optimization procedure to rapidly solve a wide range of elliptic-type free boundary value problems. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Learning and retention of quantum concepts with different teaching methods

    Carl Wieman; Louis Deslauriers

    2011-01-01

    We measured mastery and retention of conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics in a modern physics course. This was studied for two equivalent cohorts of students taught with different pedagogical approaches using the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey. We measured the impact of pedagogical approach both on the original conceptual learning and on long-term retention. The cohort of students who had a very highly rated traditional lecturer scored 19% lower than the equivalent cohort that w...

  9. Classification of Strains of Bacillus sphaericus by Different Statistical Methods

    MERCAN, Nazime

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the sensitivies of 21 strains of Bacillus sphaericus to 20 different antibiotics were determined with the antibiotic disc susceptibility test. By measuring the diameters of the inhibition zones in terms of millimetres, the obtained values were analysed using the SPSS for Windows package and classifications were made. With these analyses, 21 strains were clustered into 5 groups. In our study, strains IAB 59 and 2297 were placed into a separate class. In addition, those antibioti...

  10. Measuring Developmental Differences With an Age-of-Attainment Method

    Warren O. Eaton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensitive measurement of variation in rate of attainment is an underutilized but useful indicator of individual differences in development. To assess such individuality, we used longitudinal parental diary checklists of infant attainments to estimate the ages at which ubiquitous developmental milestones like sitting and walking were reached. Parents using this diary checklist have been shown to be valid reporters of milestone attainments. Present analyses show that multiple definitions of milestone onset have high reliability as well. Babies differ considerably in their rates of development, and such individual differences in rates may be predicted from other variables with survival (event history analysis. Ages of attainment for sustained sitting, crawling, and walking were calculated for 519 infants and predicted using 11 common covariates. Our discovery that babies of younger mothers reach these milestones sooner than those of older mothers reveals the value of an age-of-attainment (AOA approach. A framework with a SAS program for collecting and analyzing AOA data is presented.

  11. Removal of polyvinylpyrrolidone from wastewater using different methods.

    Julinová, Markéta; Kupec, Jan; Houser, Josef; Slavík, Roman; Marusincová, Hana; Cervenáková, Lenka; Klívar, Stanislav

    2012-12-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is a frequently used polymer in the pharmaceutical and foodstuff industries. Because it is not subject to metabolic changes and is virtually nondegradable, trace concentrations of PVP are often found in community wastewaters. The literature finds that the partial removal of PVP in wastewater treatment plants probably occurs through sorption. The primary objective of this study was to find an effective method to remove PVP from wastewaters. In this regard, the literature indicates the theoretical potential to use specific enzymes (e.g., gamma-lactamases, amidases) to gradually degrade PVP molecules. Polyvinylpyrrolidone biodegradability tests were conducted using suitable heterogeneous cultures (activated sludge) collected from a conventional wastewater treatment plant, treatment plants connected to a pharmaceutical factory, and using select enzymes. Aerobic biodegradation of PVP in a conventional wastewater environment was ineffective, even after adaptation of activated sludge using the nearly identical monomer 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Another potential method for PVP removal involves pretreating the polymer prior to biological degradation. Based on the results (approximately 10 to 15% biodegradation), pretreatment was partially effective, realistically, it could only be applied with difficulty at wastewater treatment plants. Sorption of PVP to an active carbon sorbent (Chezacarb S), which corresponded to the Langmuir isotherm, and sorption to activated sludge, which corresponded to the Freundlich isotherm, were also evaluated. From these sorption tests, it can be concluded that the considerable adsorption of PVP to activated sludge occurred primarily at low PVP concentrations. Based on the test results, the authors recommend the following methods for PVP removal from wastewater: (1) sorption; (2) application of specific microorganisms; and (3) alkaline hydrolysis, which is the least suitable of the three for use in wastewater treatment

  12. Effect of Different Rearing Methods on the Weight of Rabbits

    Mónika Gyovai

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to study the effect of the nutrient supply at foetal, suckling and growing age on the body weight of rabbits. 242 new-born rabbits were divided into three groups on the basis of their birth weight (Low = 34-45 g, Medium = 53-58 g, High = 65-70 g. One half of the litters were nursed by one doe, while the other half by two does. After weaning at 21 days of age, half of the rabbits were fed ad libitum, while the other half were fed restricted (ca. 85-90% of the ad lib.. All of the 12 groups were divided into two subgroups randomly: first artificial insemination (AI at 15.5 or 18.5 weeks of age. All of the studied factors had significant effects on the body weight of rabbits. At four weeks of age the influence of birth weight was the highest (L: 0.51, H: 0.67 kg, P<0.05. A significant difference was found between the groups nursed by one or two does (0.52 and 0.64 kg. At nine weeks of age the effect of all factors were similar. At 15 weeks of age the following differences were found: L: 3.03, H: 3.37 kg, one or two does: 3.11 and 3.26 kg, rest. and ad lib.: 3.00 and 3.37 kg, respectively. The highest difference was found between the group of low birth weight, nursed by one doe and fed restricted (2.75 kg and that of high birth weight, nursed by two does and fed ad libitum (3.81 kg.

  13. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia.

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Mancini, Enrico; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-02-11

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic activity. Overall, fed-batch cultivation was clearly the most efficient method compared to batch and CSTR. Specifically, by saving incubation time up to 150%, fed-batch reactors were acclimatised to nearly 2-fold higher FAN levels with a 37%-153% methanogenic activity improvement, compared to batch method. Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540mgNH3-NL(-1).

  14. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  15. Competing indentation deformation mechanisms in glass using different strengthening methods

    Luo, Jian; Lezzi, Peter; Vargheese, K. Deenamma; Tandia, Adama; Harris, Jason; Mauro, John

    2016-11-01

    Chemical strengthening via ion exchange, thermal tempering, and lamination are proven techniques for strengthening of oxide glasses. For each of these techniques, the strengthening mechanism is conventionally ascribed to the linear superposition of the compressive stress profile on the glass surface. However, in this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the underlying indentation deformation mechanism beyond the simple linear superposition of compressive and indentation stresses. In particular, the plastic zone can be dramatically different from the commonly assumed hemispherical shape, which leads to a completely different stress field and resulting crack system. We show that the indentation-induced fracture is controlled by two competing mechanisms: the compressive stress itself and a potential reduction in free volume that can increase the driving force for crack formation. Chemical strengthening via ion exchange tends to escalate the competition between these two effects, while thermal tempering tends to reduce it. Lamination of glasses with differential thermal expansion falls in between. The crack system also depends on the indenter geometry and the loading stage, i.e., loading vs. after unloading. It is observed that combining thermal tempering or high free volume content with ion exchange or lamination can impart a relatively high compressive stress and reduce the driving force for crack formation. Therefore, such a combined approach might offer the best overall crack resistance for oxide glasses.

  16. Competing indentation deformation mechanisms in glass using different strengthening methods

    Jian Luo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical strengthening via ion exchange, thermal tempering, and lamination are proven techniques for strengthening of oxide glasses. For each of these techniques, the strengthening mechanism is conventionally ascribed to the linear superposition of the compressive stress profile on the glass surface. However, in this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the underlying indentation deformation mechanism beyond the simple linear superposition of compressive and indentation stresses. In particular, the plastic zone can be dramatically different from the commonly assumed hemispherical shape, which leads to a completely different stress field and resulting crack system. We show that the indentation-induced fracture is controlled by two competing mechanisms: the compressive stress itself and a potential reduction in free volume that can increase the driving force for crack formation. Chemical strengthening via ion exchange tends to escalate the competition between these two effects, while thermal tempering tends to reduce it. Lamination of glasses with differential thermal expansion falls in between. The crack system also depends on the indenter geometry and the loading stage, i.e., loading vs. after unloading. It is observed that combining thermal tempering or high free volume content with ion exchange or lamination can impart a relatively high compressive stress and reduce the driving force for crack formation. Therefore, such a combined approach might offer the best overall crack resistance for oxide glasses.

  17. Nonlinear Self-Adjointness, Conservation Laws and Soliton-Cnoidal Wave Interaction Solutions of (2+1)-Dimensional Modified Dispersive Water-Wave System

    Xia, Ya-Rong; Xin, Xiang-Peng; Zhang, Shun-Li

    2017-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave (MDWW) system which will be proved nonlinear self-adjointness. This property is applied to construct conservation laws corresponding to the symmetries of the system. Moreover, via the truncated Painlevé analysis and consistent tanh-function expansion (CTE) method, the soliton-cnoidal periodic wave interaction solutions and corresponding images will be eventually achieved. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11371293, 11505090, the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province under Grant No. 2014JM2-1009, Research Award Foundation for Outstanding Young Scientists of Shandong Province under Grant No. BS2015SF009 and the Science and Technology Innovation Foundation of Xi’an under Grant No. CYX1531WL41

  18. Availability of heavy metals in minesoils measured by different methods

    Lago, Manoel; Arenas, Daniel; Vega, Flora; Andrade, Luisa

    2013-04-01

    Most of environmental regulations concerning soil pollution commonly include the total heavy metal content as the reference for determining contamination levels. Nevertheless the total content includes all different chemical forms and it rarely gives information on mobility, availability and toxicity (Pueyo et al., 2004). To be able to determine the concentrations of contaminants that cause toxicity it is important to study the available content, the one that can interact with an organism and be incorporated in its structure (Vangronsveld and Cunningham, 1998). There are many techniques that determine the operationally defined as available content in soils. Most of them use a reagent that causes the displacement of the ions by electrostatic attraction (Pueyo et al., 2004). The aim of this work is to compare the agreement among different extractants (Cl2Ca, EDTA, DTPA, bidistilled water (BDW) and low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) when Ni and Zn concentrations are measured in the extractions from five mine soils (Touro, Spain). The sequence of soils according to total contents of Ni and Zn is S4>S5>S1>S3>S2 and S4>S1>S5>S2>S3, respectively. In all cases Zn total contents are higher than Ni varying from two times higher (S5) to four times higher (S2). Zn concentration is also higher than Ni in the Cl2Ca extractions but the opposite happens in DTPA extractions. Both metal concentrations in the EDTA, BDW and LMWOA extractions are quite similar in each soil. This first approximation already shows there is no agreement among the different techniques used for determining heavy metal availability in soils. Nevertheless it was found that soils sequence according to Zn and Ni concentrations in all available extractions techniques (with the exception of BDW) is the same. According to the Ni and Zn contents in Cl2Ca, DTPA, EDTA and LMWOA extractions the sequence is S3> S4> S5> S1> S2. The S3 is the soil with the highest content of available Ni and Zn whilst it is the

  19. Matching Intelligence Teaching Methods with Different Learners' Needs

    David L. Blenkhorn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current trends suggest that academia may be well “behind the curve” in delivering effective competitive and market intelligence programs and course offerings to students. There are many reasons why this state of affairs has occurred, and prominent among them is nature of challenges experienced by instructors in disseminating and teaching students the prominent competencies they need to acquire in order to be successful in the changing workplace. Applying cluster analysis to our teaching experiences and the scholarship, we develop a normative conceptual model that contrasts traditional and evolving pedagogical methods. Furthermore, we make the case that new learning tools and technologies which are revolutionizing the way information is taught need to be matched up with the new ways in which unique segments of contemporary intelligence students approach learning.

  20. Quality of dry ginger (Zingiber officinale) by different drying methods.

    E, Jayashree; R, Visvanathan; T, John Zachariah

    2014-11-01

    Ginger rhizomes sliced to various lengths of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 mm and whole rhizomes were dried from an initial moisture content of 81.3 % to final moisture content of less than 10 % by various drying methods like sun drying, solar tunnel drying and cabinet tray drying at temperatures of 50, 55, 60 and 65 °C. Slicing of ginger rhizomes significantly reduced the drying time of ginger in all the drying methods. It was observed that drying of whole ginger rhizomes under sun took the maximum time (9 days) followed by solar tunnel drying (8 days). Significant reduction in essential oil and oleoresin content of dry ginger was found as the slice length decreased. The important constituents of ginger essential oil like zingiberene, limonene, linalool, geraniol and nerolidol as determined using a gas chromatography was also found to decrease during slicing and as the drying temperature increased. The pungency constituents in the oleoresin of ginger like total gingerols and total shogoals as determined using a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography also showed a decreasing trend on slicing and with the increase in drying temperature. It was observed from the drying studies that whole ginger rhizomes dried under sun drying or in a solar tunnel drier retained the maximum essential oil (13.9 mg/g) and oleoresin content (45.2 mg/g) of dry ginger. In mechanical drying, the drying temperature of 60 °C was considered optimum however there was about 12.2 % loss in essential oil at this temperature.

  1. Cost Analysis of Different Digital Fir Filter Design Methods

    Amninder Singh,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available FIR digital filters are widely used in the communication world. The implementation cost of filter circuit is counted by the number of multipliers & adders used, that decides the chip area. In this paper, design techniques of low pass FIR filter using the different windows are presented. The simulation is done in MATLAB. It is shown that filter designed using Hamming and Blackman windows are better than rest of the windows used. Out of two, Hamming window is better as its transition width is narrow, 0.019 than Blackman, 0.034. Further the performance analysis of Kaiser Window, Equiripple and Minimum phase filters was obtained, for same 0.04 transition width. There is a disparity in implementation cost & area. The minimum phase filter can be implemented with lesser number of filter coefficients with tolerable pass-band, stop-band ripples specifications.

  2. Comparative Properties of Amazonian Oils Obtained by Different Extraction Methods

    Cláudio Galuppo Diniz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Camb., babaçu (Orbignya phalerata Mart., buriti (Mauritia flexuosa, and passion fruit (Passiflora edulis oils were studied to determine their antibacterial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities, as well as their total phenol and carotenoid contents. The fatty acid contents were determined by GC-MS. The three types of passion fruit oils studied were refined, cold pressed or extracted from seeds in a Soxhlet apparatus. The oils thus obtained showed differences in antioxidant activity and carotenoid content, but were similar in regard to total phenols. Buriti and pequi had the highest carotenoid contents, while refined and cold pressed passion fruit oil displayed the highest antioxidant activity. Pequi oil was the only oil to display antibacterial and cytotoxic activity.

  3. Rehabilitation of a Total Maxillectomy Patient by Three Different Methods

    Ramesh; Kumar, C.Dinesh; Sharma, Neeraj; S, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of a patient with orbital defect is highly a challenging task, requiring an individualized design of the technique for each patient. The disfigurement associated with the loss of facial structures causes significant emotional stress and physical burdens.Various treatment modalities are available, one of which is the use of implants. Although implant-supported orbital prosthesis has a superior outcome, it may not be advisable in all the patients due to economic factors. The treatment of choice includes the silicone orbital prosthesis due to its life-like appearance. This article describes three different techniques, it’s advantages and limitations of fabricating a silicone orbital prosthesis for the same patient to achieve ideal fit and aesthetics. PMID:25478462

  4. Quantitative Methods for Comparing Different Polyline Stream Network Models

    Danny L. Anderson; Daniel P. Ames; Ping Yang

    2014-04-01

    Two techniques for exploring relative horizontal accuracy of complex linear spatial features are described and sample source code (pseudo code) is presented for this purpose. The first technique, relative sinuosity, is presented as a measure of the complexity or detail of a polyline network in comparison to a reference network. We term the second technique longitudinal root mean squared error (LRMSE) and present it as a means for quantitatively assessing the horizontal variance between two polyline data sets representing digitized (reference) and derived stream and river networks. Both relative sinuosity and LRMSE are shown to be suitable measures of horizontal stream network accuracy for assessing quality and variation in linear features. Both techniques have been used in two recent investigations involving extracting of hydrographic features from LiDAR elevation data. One confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE, when using LiDAR-derived DEMs. The other demonstrated a new method of delineating stream channels directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM, showing that the direct delineation from LiDAR point clouds yielded an excellent and much better match, as indicated by the LRMSE.

  5. Assessment of breast cancer tumour size using six different methods

    Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Uder, Michael; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Adamietz, Boris [Erlangen University Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Haeberle, Lothar; Fasching, Peter A.; Bani, Mayada R.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W. [Erlangen University Hospital, University Breast Center, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany); Wachter, David [Erlangen University Hospital, Institute of Pathology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Tumour size estimates using mammography (MG), conventional ultrasound (US), compound imaging (CI) and real-time elastography (RTE) were compared with histopathological specimen sizes. The largest diameters of 97 malignant breast lesions were measured. Two US and CI measurements were made: US1/CI1 (hypoechoic nucleus only) and US2/CI2 (hypoechoic nucleus plus hyperechoic halo). Measurements were compared with histopathological tumour sizes using linear regression and Bland-Altman plots. Size prediction was best with ultrasound (US/CI/RTE: R{sup 2} 0.31-0.36); mammography was poorer (R{sup 2} = 0.19). The most accurate method was US2, while US1 and CI1 were poorest. Bland-Altman plots showed better size estimation with US2, CI2 and RTE, with low variation, while mammography showed greatest variability. Smaller tumours were better assessed than larger ones. CI2 and US2 performed best for ductal tumours and RTE for lobular cancers. Tumour size prediction accuracy did not correlate significantly with breast density, but on MG tumours were more difficult to detect in high-density tissue. The size of ductal tumours is best predicted with US2 and CI2, while for lobular cancers RTE is best. Hyperechoic tumour surroundings should be included in US and CI measurements and RTE used as an additional technique in the clinical staging process. (orig.)

  6. Time trade-off: one methodology, different methods.

    Attema, Arthur E; Edelaar-Peeters, Yvette; Versteegh, Matthijs M; Stolk, Elly A

    2013-07-01

    There is no scientific consensus on the optimal specification of the time trade-off (TTO) task. As a consequence, studies using TTO to value health states may share the core element of trading length of life for quality of life, but can differ considerably on many other elements. While this pluriformity in specifications advances the understanding of TTO from a methodological point of view, it also results in incomparable health state values. Health state values are applied in health technology assessments, and in that context comparability of information is desired. In this article, we discuss several alternative specifications of TTO presented in the literature. The defining elements of these specifications are identified as being either methodological, procedural or analytical in nature. Where possible, it is indicated how these elements affect health state values (i.e., upward or downward). Finally, a checklist for TTO studies is presented, which incorporates a list of choices to be made by researchers who wish to perform a TTO task. Such a checklist enables other researchers to align methodologies in order to enhance the comparability of health state values.

  7. Screw dislocations in GaN grown by different methods

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Zakharov, D.; Jasinski, J.; O' Keefe, M.A.; Morkoc, H.

    2003-05-27

    A study of screw dislocations in Hydride-Vapor-Phase-Epitaxy (HVPE) template and Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy (MBE) over-layers was performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) in plan-view and in cross-section. It was observed that screw dislocations in the HVPE layers were decorated by small voids arranged along the screw axis. However, no voids were observed along screw dislocations in MBE overlayers. This was true both for MBE samples grown under Ga-lean and Ga-rich conditions. Dislocation core structures have been studied in these samples in the plan-view configuration. These experiments were supported by image simulation using the most recent models. A direct reconstruction of the phase and amplitude of the scattered electron wave from a focal series of high-resolution images was applied. It was shown that the core structures of screw dislocations in the studied materials were filled. The filed dislocation cores in an MBE samples were stoichiometric. However, in HVPE materials, single atomic columns show substantial differences in intensities and might indicate the possibility of higher Ga concentration in the core than in the matrix. A much lower intensity of the atomic column at the tip of the void was observed. This might suggest presence of lighter elements, such as oxygen, responsible for their formation.

  8. Competition of different methods for recovering energy from waste.

    Friege, Henning; Fendel, Ansgar

    2011-10-01

    Waste-to-energy (WtE) facilities have been established worldwide as a sustainable method for the disposal of residual waste. In the present study the following competing WtE systems were compared: (1) municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) with energy recovery; (2) co-incineration of waste in old lignite or coal-fired power plants; (3) substitute [refuse-derived fuel (RDF)] incinerators with energy recovery; and (4) co-incineration of defined waste fractions in cement kilns. In general the municipal solid waste incinerators in Europe are designed for a broad range of municipal and commercial waste without a pre-treatment of the waste. All other WtE processes including the cement kilns require a pre-treatment and are more limited in terms of RDF composition; namely particle size, chlorine content, calorific value. As to Germany, the emission limit values for all facilities are similar. A sensitivity analysis of the economics of boilers using RDF and municipal solid waste leads to the conclusion that the feasibility of RDF incinerators might partially recover if the prices for primary energy increase again. On the other hand, pre-treatment of waste leads to higher costs for RDF. Incineration and recycling capacities are large enough in middle Europe to avoid landfilling of organic waste. The steep decline of gate fees observed in some national spot markets is a clear indicator of an already existing overcapacity. Considering the enormous amount of greenhouse gas emissions saved by WtE facilities in comparison with landfilling, free capacities of WtE installations should be used to incinerate waste from EU member states where waste disposal is still predominantly based on landfilling.

  9. Hermitian separability and transition from singlet to adjoint BFKL equations in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills Theory

    Bondarenko, S

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the next-to-leading order~(NLO) correction to the eigenvalue of the BFKL equation in the adjoint representation and investigate its properties in analogy with the singlet BFKL in planar $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills Theory~(SYM). We show that the adjoint NLO BFKL eigenvalue is needed to be slightly modified in order to have a property of hermitian separability present for the singlet BFKL. After this modification the adjoint NLO BFKL eigenvalue is expressed through holomorphic and antiholomophic parts of the leading order eigenvalue and their derivatives. The proposed choice of the modified NLO expression is supported by the fact that it is possible to obtain the same result in a relatively straightforward way directly from the singlet NLO BFKL eigenvalue replacing alternating series by series of constant sign. This transformation corresponds to changing cylindrical topology of the singlet BFKL to the planar topology of the adjoint BFKL. We believe that the original NLO calculation of Fadin and ...

  10. Exact Values of Bernstein -Widths for Some Classes of Periodic Functions with Formal Self-Adjoint Linear Differential Operators

    Guo Feng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We consider the classes of periodic functions with formal self-adjoint linear differential operators , which include the classical Sobolev class as its special case. With the help of the spectral of linear differential equations, we find the exact values of Bernstein -width of the classes in the for .

  11. Learning Science, Learning about Science, Doing Science: Different Goals Demand Different Learning Methods

    Hodson, Derek

    2014-01-01

    This opinion piece paper urges teachers and teacher educators to draw careful distinctions among four basic learning goals: learning science, learning about science, doing science and learning to address socio-scientific issues. In elaboration, the author urges that careful attention is paid to the selection of teaching/learning methods that…

  12. American method and comparison of the different methods of internal ballistics

    B. Patnaik

    1952-01-01

    Full Text Available Le Duc's method gave good results in almost all cases. But in all cases American ammunition was used in American guns and it is doubtful if the method would give equally good results when applied to British guns or British propellants. The advantage of Le Duc's method, however, in its simplicity compared with the other theoretical methods and the quickness with which results can be calculated by this method.

  13. Non-analogue Monte Carlo method, application to neutron simulation; Methode de Monte Carlo non analogue, application a la simulation des neutrons

    Morillon, B.

    1996-12-31

    With most of the traditional and contemporary techniques, it is still impossible to solve the transport equation if one takes into account a fully detailed geometry and if one studies precisely the interactions between particles and matters. Only the Monte Carlo method offers such a possibility. However with significant attenuation, the natural simulation remains inefficient: it becomes necessary to use biasing techniques where the solution of the adjoint transport equation is essential. The Monte Carlo code Tripoli has been using such techniques successfully for a long time with different approximate adjoint solutions: these methods require from the user to find out some parameters. If this parameters are not optimal or nearly optimal, the biases simulations may bring about small figures of merit. This paper presents a description of the most important biasing techniques of the Monte Carlo code Tripoli ; then we show how to calculate the importance function for general geometry with multigroup cases. We present a completely automatic biasing technique where the parameters of the biased simulation are deduced from the solution of the adjoint transport equation calculated by collision probabilities. In this study we shall estimate the importance function through collision probabilities method and we shall evaluate its possibilities thanks to a Monte Carlo calculation. We compare different biased simulations with the importance function calculated by collision probabilities for one-group and multigroup problems. We have run simulations with new biasing method for one-group transport problems with isotropic shocks and for multigroup problems with anisotropic shocks. The results show that for the one-group and homogeneous geometry transport problems the method is quite optimal without splitting and russian roulette technique but for the multigroup and heterogeneous X-Y geometry ones the figures of merit are higher if we add splitting and russian roulette technique.

  14. Adjoint Sensitivity Experiments of a Meso-β-scale Vortex in the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River

    2006-01-01

    A relatively independent and small-scale heavy rainfall event occurred to the south of a slow eastward-moving meso-α-scale vortex. The analysis shows that a meso-β-scale system is heavily responsible for the intense precipitation. An attempt to simulate it met with some failures. In view of its small scale, short lifetime and relatively sparse observations at the initial time, an adjoint model was used to examine the sensitivity of the meso-β-scale vortex simulation with respect to initial conditions. The adjoint sensitivity indicates how small perturbations of initial model variables anywhere in the model domain can influence the central vorticity of the vortex. The largest sensitivity for both the wind and temperature perturbation is located below 700 hPa, especially at the low level. The largest sensitivity for the water vapor perturbation is located below 500 hPa, especially at the middle and low levels. The horizontal adjoint sensitivity for all variables is mainly located toward the upper reaches of the Yangtze River with respect to the simulated meso-β-scale system in Hunan and Jiangxi provinces with strong locality. The sensitivity shows that warm cyclonic perturbations in the upper reaches can have a great effect on the development of the meso-β-scale vortex. Based on adjoint sensitivity, forward sensitivity experiments were conducted to identify factors influencing the development of the meso-β-scale vortex and to explore ways of improving the prediction. A realistic prediction was achieved by using adjoint sensitivity to modify the initial conditions and implanting a warm cyclone at the initial time in the upper reaches of the river with respect to the meso-β-scale vortex,as is commonly done in tropical cyclone prediction.

  15. F-theorem, duality and SUSY breaking in one-adjoint Chern-Simons-Matter theories

    Morita, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    We extend previous work on N=2 Chern-Simons theories coupled to a single adjoint chiral superfield using localization techniques and the F-maximization principle. We provide tests of a series of proposed 3D Seiberg dualities and a new class of tests of the conjectured F-theorem. In addition, a proposal is made for a modification of the F-maximization principle that takes into account the effects of decoupling fields. Finally, we formulate and provide evidence for a new general non-perturbative constraint on spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in three dimensions based on Q-deformed S^3 partition functions computed via localization. An explicit illustration based on the known analytic solution of the Chern-Simons matrix model is presented.

  16. Adjoint-optimization algorithm for spatial reconstruction of a scalar source

    Wang, Qi; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Meneveau, Charles; Zaki, Tamer

    2016-11-01

    Identifying the location of the source of passive scalar transported in a turbulent environment based on remote measurements is an ill-posed problem. A conjugate-gradient algorithm is proposed, and relies on eddy-resolving simulations of both the forward and adjoint scalar transport equations to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the source. The formulation can naturally accommodate measurements from multiple sensors. The algorithm is evaluated for scalar dispersion in turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 180). As the distance between the source and sensor increases, the accuracy of the source recovery deteriorates due to diffusive effects. Improvement in performance is demonstrated for higher Prantl numbers and also with increasing number of sensors. This study is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant CNS 1461870).

  17. Fermions in higher representations. Some results about SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    Del Debbio, L; Pica, C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the lattice formulation of gauge theories with fermions in arbitrary representations of the color group, and present the implementation of the RHMC algorithm for simulating dynamical Wilson fermions. A first dataset is presented for the SU(2) gauge theory with two fermions in the adjoint representation, which has been proposed as a possible technicolor candidate. Simulations are performed on 8^3x16 lattices, at fixed lattice spacing. The PCAC mass, the pseudoscalar, vector and axial meson masses, the pseudoscalar meson decay constant are computed. The extrapolation to the chiral limit is discussed. However more extensive investigations are needed in order to control the systematic errors in the numerical results, and then understand in detail the phase structure of these theories.

  18. Confining vs. conformal scenario for SU(2) with adjoint fermions Gluonic observables

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Walking technicolor is a mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking without Higgs field. The Higgs mechanism is provided by chiral symmetry breaking in the technicolor theory. An essential ingredient is the vicinity to an IR fixed point, which could reconcile technicolor with the electroweak precision tests. SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac adjoint fermions has been proposed as a candidate for walking technicolor. Understanding whether this theory is confining or IR-conformal is a challenging problem, which can be addressed by means of numerical simulations. We have pointed out that a clean signal for the existence of an IR fixed point in this theory can be obtained by comparing the mesonic and gluonic sectors. We review some technical details of our calculations. Possible systematic errors are discussed.

  19. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  20. One-loop adjoint masses for non-supersymmetric intersecting branes

    Anastasopoulos, P. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). 1. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Antoniadis, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Benakli, K. [CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique et Haute Energies; Goodsell, M.D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vichi, A. [Institute de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    We consider breaking of supersymmetry in intersecting D-brane configurations by slight deviation of the angles from their supersymmetric values. We compute the masses generated by radiative corrections for the adjoint scalars on the brane world-volumes. In the open string channel, the string two-point function receives contributions only from the infrared and the ultraviolet limits. The latter is due to tree-level closed string uncanceled NS-NS tadpoles, which we explicitly reproduce from the effective Born-Infeld action. On the other hand, the infrared region reproduces the one-loop mediation of supersymmetry breaking in the effective gauge theory, via messengers and their Kaluza-Klein excitations. In the toroidal set-up considered here, it receives contributions only from N {approx} 4 and N {approx} 2 supersymmetric configurations, and thus always leads at leading order to a tachyonic direction, in agreement with effective field theory expectations. (orig.)