WorldWideScience

Sample records for adipose stromal cells

  1. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for chronic myocardial ischemia (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2012-01-01

    . In addition, we give an introduction to the first-in-man clinical trial, MyStromalCell Trial, which is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using culture-expanded ADSCs obtained from adipose-derived cells from abdominal adipose tissue and stimulated with VEGF-A(165) the week...

  2. File list: His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell S...04,SRX019497,SRX019503 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell S...15,SRX019508,SRX019494 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 RNA polymerase Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell S...17,SRX019503,SRX019497 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...ell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Histone Adipocyte Adipose stromal cell S...11,SRX019515,SRX019508 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...019497,SRX019518,SRX019504,SRX019511,SRX019515,SRX019508 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...019504,SRX019510,SRX019496,SRX019517,SRX019503,SRX019497 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...019518,SRX019504,SRX019511,SRX019515,SRX019508,SRX019494 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 All antigens Adipocyte Adipose stromal c...019496,SRX019511,SRX019518,SRX019504,SRX019497,SRX019503 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose stromal ...cell SRX019491,SRX469459,SRX469457 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose stromal ...cell SRX019491,SRX469459,SRX469457 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose stromal ...cell SRX019491,SRX469459,SRX469457 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.50.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 Input control Adipocyte Adipose stromal ...cell SRX019491,SRX469459,SRX469457 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  9. File list: NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell hg19 No description Adipocyte Adipose stromal... cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_stromal_cell.bed ...

  10. Senescence and quiescence in adipose-derived stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rebekka Harary; Follin, Bjarke; Lund, Lisbeth Drozd

    2017-01-01

    cycle regulation and expression of cyclins, p21 and p27. hPL rejuvenates FBS-expanded ASCs with regard to cell cycle regulation and expression of cyclins, p21 and p27. This indicates a reversible arrest. Therefore, we conclude that ASCs expanded until P7 are not senescent regardless of culture......Background aims. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive sources for cell-based therapies. The hypoxic niche of ASCs in vivo implies that cells will benefit from hypoxia during in vitro expansion. Human platelet lysate (hPL) enhances ASC proliferation rates, compared with fetal bovine...... serum (FBS) at normoxia. However, the low proliferation rates of FBS-expanded ASCs could be signs of senescence or quiescence. We aimed to determine the effects of hypoxia and hPL on the expansion of ASCs and whether FBS-expanded ASCs are senescent or quiescent. Methods. ASCs expanded in FBS or h...

  11. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Pincu, Yair; Huntsman, Heather D.; Zou, Kai; De Lisio, Michael; Ziad S. Mahmassani; Michael R. Munroe; Garg, Koyal; Jensen, Tor; Boppart, Marni D.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which e...

  12. Gold nanoparticles cellular toxicity and recovery: adipose Derived Stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are currently used in numerous medical applications. Herein, we describe their in vitro impact on human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) using 13 nm and 45 nm citrate-coated AuNPs. In their non-differentiated state, ADSCs were penetrated by the AuNPs and stored in vacuoles. The presence of the AuNPs in ADSCs resulted in increased population doubling times, decreased cell motility and cell-mediated collagen contraction. The degree to which the cells were impacted was a function of particle concentration, where the smaller particles required a sevenfold higher concentration to have the same effect as the larger ones. Furthermore, AuNPs reduced adipogenesis as measured by lipid droplet accumulation and adiponectin secretion. These effects correlated with transient increases in DLK1 and with relative reductions in fibronectin. Upon removal of exogenous AuNPs, cellular NP levels decreased and normal ADSC functions were restored. As adiponectin helps regulate energy metabolism, local fluctuations triggered by AuNPs can lead to systemic changes. Hence, careful choice of size, concentration and clinical application duration of AuNPs is warranted.

  13. The Fate of the Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells during Angiogenesis and Adipogenesis after Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki Yong; Yim, Sangjun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jin, Ung Sik; Lim, SooA; Eo, SuRak; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won

    2018-02-01

    Cell-assisted lipotransfer is a process in which fat grafting is supplemented with autologous adipose-derived stromal cells. Since the efficacy of the technique was demonstrated, studies have focused on the mechanism by which cell-assisted lipotransfer enhances the rate of graft survival. However, the microenvironmental changes in donor and recipient tissue associated with cell-assisted lipotransfer remain unclear. The authors introduced an animal model of cell-assisted lipotransfer using two different transgenic reporter mice. Donor fat from green fluorescent protein-expressing C57BL/6J mice and donor adipose-derived stromal cells from DsRed-expressing C57BL/6J mice were co-transplanted into recipient C57BL/6J mice. During adipose remodeling after cell-assisted lipotransfer, the fate of each donor adipocyte and donor adipose-derived stromal cell was traced using immunofluorescent staining with the whole-mount method. Adipose-derived stromal cell supplementation altered inflammation and promoted angiogenesis and subsequent revascularization in recipient tissue. Tracing at postoperative week 4 revealed that surviving donor adipose-derived stromal cells participated in angiogenesis by differentiating into endothelial cells. Moreover, newly differentiated fat from donor adipose-derived stromal cells and recipient tissue integrated with surviving donor fat, leading to improved retention of the graft. Adipose-derived stromal cell supplementation resulted in a quantitative difference in angiogenesis and adipogenesis during adipose remodeling according to the concentration of adipose-derived stromal cells. The authors characterized the dynamic changes occurring in donor adipose-derived stromal cells and fat and recipient tissue by tracing these cellular components following cell-assisted lipotransfer. The authors' findings highlight the therapeutic value of cell-assisted lipotransfer in tissue transplantation.

  14. Adipose Extracellular Matrix/Stromal Vascular Fraction Gel: A Novel Adipose Tissue-Derived Injectable for Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, Ziqing; Liao, Yunjun; Zhang, Pan; Ma, Jingjing; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells and other stromal vascular fraction cells were used more often for stem cell therapy, even though limitations such as poor cell retention rate, complicated and expensive isolation processes, and the use of specific laboratory equipment need to be overcome. Here, the authors developed a novel but simple method for generating an injectable mixture of stromal vascular fraction cells and native adipose extracellular matrix. It is a purely mechanical process in which lipoaspirate is processed into an extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel. The standard processing procedure was established using quantized tests. The therapeutic potential of the product for wound healing was then tested. Extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel derived from lipoaspirate and processed using a standard Coleman technique, followed by 1 minute of mechanical processing by passage back and forth between two 10-ml syringes at a flow rate of 10 ml/second, showed the highest adipose-derived stem cell and endothelial cell density. The stromal vascular fraction cells within the product also showed potential for multipotent differentiation similar to that of normal fat samples. In addition, the product showed better therapeutic results than stromal vascular fraction cell suspension when used to treat a nude mouse model of wound healing. Extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel is an autologous injectable derived from native extracellular matrix and is a functional cellular component generated using a simple mechanical process. As such, it may offer a novel mode of tissue repair suitable for clinical application in stem cell therapies.

  15. Different wound healing properties of dermis, adipose, and gingiva mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boink, M.A.; van den Broek, L.J.; Roffel, S.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Gefen, A.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Gibbs, S.

    2016-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with better scar quality than skin wounds. Deep skin wounds where adipose tissue is exposed, have a greater risk of forming hypertrophic scars. Differences in wound healing and final scar quality might be related to differences in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their

  16. Virally and physically transgenized equine adipose-derived stromal cells as a cargo for paracrine secreted factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavirani Sandro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells have been shown to have multiple lineage differentiation properties and to be suitable for tissues regeneration in many degenerative processes. Their use has been proposed for the therapy of joint diseases and tendon injuries in the horse. In the present report the genetic manipulation of Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells has been investigated. Results Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells were successfully virally transduced as well as transiently and stably transfected with appropriate parameters, without detrimental effect on their differentiation properties. Moreover, green fluorescent protein alone, fused to neo gene, or co-expressed as bi-cistronic reporter constructs, driven by viral and house-keeping gene promoters, were tested. The better expressed cassette was employed to stably transfect Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for cell therapy purposes. Stably transfected Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells with a heterologous secreted viral antigen were able to immunize horses upon injection into the lateral wall of the neck. Conclusion This study provides the methods to successfully transgenize Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells both by lentiviral vector and by transfection using optimized constructs with suitable promoters and reporter genes. In conclusion these findings provide a working platform for the delivery of potentially therapeutic proteins to the site of cells injection via transgenized Equine Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells.

  17. Adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells as therapeutic vehicles against glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Krasheninnikova, Maria Alieva

    2012-01-01

    Lately adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) have emerged as cellular vehicles for therapy of solid tumors, due to their ease of isolation and manipulation, and wound/tumor homing capacity. HAMSCs have been successfully used in suicide gene therapy, employing the prodrug activating system based on Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ganciclovir (GCV). In the current study we demonstrate an effective model of glioblastoma therapy based on the use of genetically modif...

  18. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Pincu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which exercise training can mitigate such changes. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on control or HFD for 8 weeks prior to and following initiation of a 16 week treadmill exercise program. ADSCs (Sca-1+CD45− were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and mRNA was evaluated using high throughput qPCR. Stromal cells were also obtained from skeletal muscle (MDSC. HFD decreased the quantity of ADSCs and markedly altered gene expression related to ECM remodeling (Col1α1, MMP2, MMP9, Timp1. Exercise did not reverse these changes. MDSCs were minimally altered by HFD or exercise. Overall, the data from this study suggest that ADSCs decrease in quantity and contribute to adipose ECM remodeling in response to obesity, and exercise training does not significantly impact these outcomes.

  19. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincu, Yair; Huntsman, Heather D; Zou, Kai; De Lisio, Michael; Mahmassani, Ziad S; Munroe, Michael R; Garg, Koyal; Jensen, Tor; Boppart, Marni D

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which exercise training can mitigate such changes. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on control or HFD for 8weeks prior to and following initiation of a 16week treadmill exercise program. ADSCs (Sca-1(+)CD45(-)) were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and mRNA was evaluated using high throughput qPCR. Stromal cells were also obtained from skeletal muscle (MDSC). HFD decreased the quantity of ADSCs and markedly altered gene expression related to ECM remodeling (Col1α1, MMP2, MMP9, Timp1). Exercise did not reverse these changes. MDSCs were minimally altered by HFD or exercise. Overall, the data from this study suggest that ADSCs decrease in quantity and contribute to adipose ECM remodeling in response to obesity, and exercise training does not significantly impact these outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Yang; Zhenghua Xiao; Xiaomei Ren; Haiyan Long; Hong Qian; Kunlong Ma; Yingqiang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by ...

  1. Mechanical properties of cross-linked collagen meshes after human adipose derived stromal cells seeding

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa, I. (Ignacio); Peña, E. (Estefanía); Andreu, E.J. (Enrique José); Perez-Ilzarbe, M. (Maitane); Robles, J.E. (José Enrique); Alcaine, C. (C.); Lopez, T. (Tania); Prosper, F. (Felipe); Doblare, M. (M.)

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of collagen meshes derived from porcine dermis as scaffolds for repairing pelvic organ prolapses. Mechanical properties of collagen meshes with different cross-linking percentages before and after Adipose Derived Stromal Cells (ADSC) seeding were studied as well as the cell-scaffold interaction. Uniaxial tensile tests of the collagen meshes with three different cross-linking percentages (full-, partial-, and non...

  2. Engineering of an angiogenic niche by perfusion culture of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerino, Giulia; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Eckstein, Friedrich; Martin, Ivan; Scherberich, Arnaud; Marsano, Anna

    2017-10-27

    In vitro recapitulation of an organotypic stromal environment, enabling efficient angiogenesis, is crucial to investigate and possibly improve vascularization in regenerative medicine. Our study aims at engineering the complexity of a vascular milieu including multiple cell-types, a stromal extracellular matrix (ECM), and molecular signals. For this purpose, the human adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), composed of a heterogeneous mix of pericytes, endothelial/stromal progenitor cells, was cultured under direct perfusion flow on three-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolds. Perfusion culture of SVF-cells reproducibly promoted in vitro the early formation of a capillary-like network, embedded within an ECM backbone, and the release of numerous pro-angiogenic factors. Compared to static cultures, perfusion-based engineered constructs were more rapidly vascularized and supported a superior survival of delivered cells upon in vivo ectopic implantation. This was likely mediated by pericytes, whose number was significantly higher (4.5-fold) under perfusion and whose targeted depletion resulted in lower efficiency of vascularization, with an increased host foreign body reaction. 3D-perfusion culture of SVF-cells leads to the engineering of a specialized milieu, here defined as an angiogenic niche. This system could serve as a model to investigate multi-cellular interactions in angiogenesis, and as a module supporting increased grafted cell survival in regenerative medicine.

  3. [Adipose-derived stromal cells: history, isolation, immunomodulatory properties and clinical perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheuil, N; Chaput, B; Ménard, C; Varin, A; Garrido, I; Grolleau, J L; Sensébé, L; Watier, E; Tarte, K

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, the clinical use of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASC) in regenerative medicine is rapidly increasing. ASC belong to the mesenchymal stromal cells initially obtained from the bone marrow. Their limited differentiation capacity in vivo into functional mature cells has led to a reassessment of their mechanisms of action. One of the major clinical interests appears related to paracrine effects through a temporary production of trophic and immunomodulatory factors. Our purpose is to provide a review on the latest knowledge in the field of ASC, mechanisms of action, mainly immunomodulatory/immunosuppressive properties, methods of obtention, with a focus on clinical perspectives particularly in the field of cellular therapy and fat grafting technique in plastic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential effects of adipose tissue stromal cells on the apoptosis, growth and invasion of bladder urothelial carcinoma between the superficial and invasive types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki-Nanri, Maki; Aoki, Shigehisa; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Udo, Kazuma; Nishijima-Matsunobu, Aki; Kakihara, Nahoko; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Uozumi, Jiro; Toda, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the interaction between adipose tissue stromal cells and bladder cancer cells. Superficial (RT4) and invasive (EJ) urothelial carcinoma cells were cultured on adipose tissue stromal cell-embedded or non-embedded collagen gel. Cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, western blot and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Adipose tissue stromal cells inhibited growth of RT4, while they promoted the apoptosis. In contrast, adipose tissue stromal cells promoted growth of EJ, but they did not affect the apoptosis. Adipose tissue stromal cells slightly promoted expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in RT4 and EJ. Adipose tissue stromal cells promoted display of the molecular-targeted agent human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 in only RT4. In turn, RT4 and EJ enhanced α-smooth muscle actin (myofibroblast marker) and S-100 protein (adipocyte marker) expression of adipose tissue stromal cells, respectively. These findings suggest that: (i) adipose tissue stromal cells might suppress the progression of superficial-type cancer, whereas they might promote that of invasive type; (ii) adipose tissue stromal cell-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway might play differential roles in both types of bladder cancer; (iii) human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 could represent a critical therapeutic agent for the superficial type under adipose tissue stromal cells-cancer interaction; and (iv) superficial bladder cancer might promote myofibroblast differentiation of adipose tissue stromal cells as a cancer-associate phenotype, whereas invasive bladder cancer might promote their adipocyte differentiation. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kiyoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Ii, Masaaki, E-mail: masaii@art.osaka-med.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Asahi, Michio [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Azuma, Haruhito [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  6. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells: Tissue Localization, Characterization, and Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Baer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue as a stem cell source is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources. It is easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (ASCs yields a high amount of stem cells, which is essential for stem-cell-based therapies and tissue engineering. Several studies have provided evidence that ASCs in situ reside in a perivascular niche, whereas the exact localization of ASCs in native adipose tissue is still under debate. ASCs are isolated by their capacity to adhere to plastic. Nevertheless, recent isolation and culture techniques lack standardization. Cultured cells are characterized by their expression of characteristic markers and their capacity to differentiate into cells from meso-, ecto-, and entodermal lineages. ASCs possess a high plasticity and differentiate into various cell types, including adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes, hepatocytes, neural cells, and endothelial and epithelial cells. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that ASCs are a heterogeneous mixture of cells containing subpopulations of stem and more committed progenitor cells. This paper summarizes and discusses the current knowledge of the tissue localization of ASCs in situ, their characterization and heterogeneity in vitro, and the lack of standardization in isolation and culture methods.

  7. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cells Inhibit TGF-beta 1-Induced Differentiation of Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Keloid Scar-Derived Fibroblasts in a Paracrine Fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiekman, Maroesjka; Przybyt, Ewa; Plantinga, Josee A.; Gibbs, Susan; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells augment wound healing and skin regeneration. It is unknown whether and how they can also influence dermal scarring. The authors hypothesized that adipose tissue-derived stromal cells inhibit adverse differentiation of dermal fibroblasts induced by the

  8. Transcriptomic comparisons between cultured human adipose tissue-derived pericytes and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, sometimes called mesenchymal stem cells, are cultured cells able to give rise to mature mesenchymal cells such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and to secrete a wide range of trophic and immunomodulatory molecules. Evidence indicates that pericytes, cells that surround and maintain physical connections with endothelial cells in blood vessels, can give rise to MSCs (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2008 [1]; Caplan and Correa, 2011 [2]. We have compared the transcriptomes of highly purified, human adipose tissue pericytes subjected to culture-expansion in pericyte medium or MSC medium, with that of human adipose tissue MSCs isolated with traditional methods to test the hypothesis that their transcriptomes are similar (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2015 [3]. Here, we provide further information and analyses of microarray data from three pericyte populations cultured in pericyte medium, three pericyte populations cultured in MSC medium, and three adipose tissue MSC populations deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67747.

  9. Caffeine inhibits adipogenic differentiation of primary adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Hui; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Yeh, Yao-Tsung; Chen, Kuan-Ming; Yeh, Hua; Su, Shu-Jem

    2013-09-01

    Caffeine consumption has been related to loss of body weight and modulates lipid metabolism. However, impacts of caffeine on adipogenic differentiation have not been well determined yet. The present study evaluated the effects of caffeine on adipogenesis using primary rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and a mouse bone marrow stromal cell line (M2-10B4) in vitro. ADSCs and M2-10B4 were continuously exposed to caffeine (0.1-1mM) during adipogenic differentiation for 7 and 12 days, respectively. Oil red O and Nile red staining showed that caffeine reduced lipid droplet and adipocyte levels in both cell types. In addition, Nile red staining and FACScan flow cytometry showed that caffeine dose-dependently decreased adipocyte differentiation from 20% to 50% of the control ADSCs and M2-10B4 cells. Caffeine decreased the expression of adipogenesis-related genes including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α, adipocyte lipid binding protein, lipoprotein lipase, leptin, and TNFα in a dose-dependent manner. Rather, low concentration of caffeine (0.1mM) significantly increased IL-6 expression, but unexpectedly inhibited that at a concentration more than 0.3mM. Taken together, caffeine was able to effectively inhibit adipogenic differentiation of ADSCs and M2-10B4 cells partly through its inhibition of adipogenesis-related factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Senescence and quiescence in adipose-derived stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rebekka Harary; Follin, Bjarke; Lund, Lisbeth Drozd

    2017-01-01

    serum (FBS) at normoxia. However, the low proliferation rates of FBS-expanded ASCs could be signs of senescence or quiescence. We aimed to determine the effects of hypoxia and hPL on the expansion of ASCs and whether FBS-expanded ASCs are senescent or quiescent. METHODS: ASCs expanded in FBS or h...... cycle regulation and expression of cyclins, p21 and p27. hPL rejuvenates FBS-expanded ASCs with regard to cell cycle regulation and expression of cyclins, p21 and p27. This indicates a reversible arrest. Therefore, we conclude that ASCs expanded until P7 are not senescent regardless of culture...

  11. Stromal Cells Derived from Visceral and Obese Adipose Tissue Promote Growth of Ovarian Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Obesity, and in particular visceral obesity, has been associated with an increased risk of developing cancers as well as higher rates of mortality following diagnosis. The impact of obesity on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC, which contribute to the formation of tumor stroma, is unknown. Here we hypothesized that visceral source and diet-induced obesity (DIO changes the ASC phenotype, contributing to the tumor promoting effects of obesity. We found that ASC isolated from subcutaneous (SC-ASC and visceral (V-ASC white adipose tissue(WAT of lean(Le and obese(Ob mice exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers expression, and had comparable effects on ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration. Obese and visceral derived ASC proliferated slower and exhibited impaired differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro as compared to ASC derived from subcutaneous WAT of lean mice. Intraperitoneal co-injection of ovarian cancer cells with obese or visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased growth of intraperitoneal ID8 tumors as compared to controls. Obese and V-ASC increased stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells, including CD3+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages. Obese and visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased expression of chemotactic factors IL-6, MIP-2, and MCP-1 when cultured with tumor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that obese and V-ASC have a unique phenotype, with more limited proliferation and differentiation capacity but enhanced expression of chemotactic factors in response to malignant cells which support infiltration of inflammatory cells and support tumor growth and dissemination.

  12. Stromal Cells Derived from Visceral and Obese Adipose Tissue Promote Growth of Ovarian Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Solley, Travis N; Wei, Caimiao; Parikh, Aaroh; Court, Laurence; Burks, Jared K; Andreeff, Michael; Woodward, Wendy A; Dadbin, Ali; Kolonin, Mikhail G; Lu, Karen H; Klopp, Ann H

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, and in particular visceral obesity, has been associated with an increased risk of developing cancers as well as higher rates of mortality following diagnosis. The impact of obesity on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), which contribute to the formation of tumor stroma, is unknown. Here we hypothesized that visceral source and diet-induced obesity (DIO) changes the ASC phenotype, contributing to the tumor promoting effects of obesity. We found that ASC isolated from subcutaneous (SC-ASC) and visceral (V-ASC) white adipose tissue(WAT) of lean(Le) and obese(Ob) mice exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers expression, and had comparable effects on ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration. Obese and visceral derived ASC proliferated slower and exhibited impaired differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro as compared to ASC derived from subcutaneous WAT of lean mice. Intraperitoneal co-injection of ovarian cancer cells with obese or visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased growth of intraperitoneal ID8 tumors as compared to controls. Obese and V-ASC increased stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells, including CD3+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages. Obese and visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased expression of chemotactic factors IL-6, MIP-2, and MCP-1 when cultured with tumor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that obese and V-ASC have a unique phenotype, with more limited proliferation and differentiation capacity but enhanced expression of chemotactic factors in response to malignant cells which support infiltration of inflammatory cells and support tumor growth and dissemination.

  13. Mechanical properties of cross-linked collagen meshes after human adipose derived stromal cells seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Ignacio; Peña, Estefania; Andreu, Enrique J; Pérez-Ilzarbe, Maitane; Robles, Jose E; Alcaine, Clara; López, Tania; Prósper, Felipe; Doblaré, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    The main goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of collagen meshes derived from porcine dermis as scaffolds for repairing pelvic organ prolapses. Mechanical properties of collagen meshes with different cross-linking percentages before and after Adipose Derived Stromal Cells (ADSC) seeding were studied as well as the cell-scaffold interaction. Uniaxial tensile tests of the collagen meshes with three different cross-linking percentages (full-, partial-, and noncross-linked) were carried out along orthogonal directions. Their mechanical properties were studied with the same tests before and after seeding with human derived adipose stem cells (ADSC) after 1 and 7 days. Histological analyses were performed to determine adhesion and proliferation of ADSC. Significant differences in mechanical properties of the unseeded meshes were observed between each orthogonal direction independently of the cross-linking percentage. A better cell adhesion rate was observed in the cross-linked meshes. An increase in the mechanical properties after cell seeding was observed with a direct relation with the degree of cross-linking. All meshes analyzed showed a marked anisotropy that should be taken into account during the surgical procedure. The cross-linking treatment increased cell adhesion and the mechanical properties of the collagen meshes after seeding. These results suggest that the mechanical properties of this type of collagen mesh could be useful as scaffolds for repair of pelvic organ prolapse. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Expansion of adipose mesenchymal stromal cells is affected by human platelet lysate and plating density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Dominik; Stiehl, Thomas; Schellenberg, Anne; Bokermann, Gudrun; Joussen, Sylvia; Koch, Carmen; Walenda, Thomas; Pallua, Norbert; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Suschek, Christoph V; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The composition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) changes in the course of in vitro culture expansion. Little is known how these cell preparations are influenced by culture media, plating density, or passaging. In this study, we have isolated MSCs from human adipose tissue in culture medium supplemented with either fetal calf serum (FCS) or human platelet lysate (HPL). In addition, culture expansion was simultaneously performed at plating densities of 10 or 10,000 cells/cm(2). The use of FCS resulted in larger cells, whereas HPL significantly enhanced proliferation. Notably, HPL also facilitated expansion for more population doublings than FCS (43 ± 3 vs. 22 ± 4 population doubling; p < 0.001), while plating density did not have a significant effect on long-term growth curves. To gain further insight into population dynamics, we conceived a cellular automaton model to simulate expansion of MSCS. It is based on the assumptions that the number of cell divisions is limited and that due to contact inhibition proliferation occurs only at the rim of colonies. The model predicts that low plating densities result in more heterogeneity with regard to cell division history, and favor subpopulations of higher migratory activity. In summary, HPL is a suitable serum supplement for isolation of MSC from adipose tissue and facilitates more population doublings than FCS. Cellular automaton computer simulations provided additional insights into how complex population dynamics during long-term expansion are affected by plating density and migration.

  15. Characterization of Human Knee and Chin Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Kouidhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal study findings have revealed that individual fat depots are not functionally equivalent and have different embryonic origins depending on the anatomic location. Mouse bone regeneration studies have also shown that it is essential to match the Hox code of transplanted cells and host tissues to achieve correct repair. However, subcutaneous fat depots from any donor site are often used in autologous fat grafting. Our study was thus carried out to determine the embryonic origins of human facial (chin and limb (knee fat depots and whether they had similar features and molecular matching patterns. Paired chin and knee fat depots were harvested from 11 subjects and gene expression profiles were determined by DNA microarray analyses. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs from both sites were isolated and analyzed for their capacity to proliferate, form clones, and differentiate. Chin and knee fat depots expressed a different HOX code and could have different embryonic origins. ASCs displayed a different phenotype, with chin-ASCs having the potential to differentiate into brown-like adipocytes, whereas knee-ASCs differentiated into white adipocytes. These results highlighted different features for these two fat sites and indicated that donor site selection might be an important factor to be considered when applying adipose tissue in cell-based therapies.

  16. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery.

  17. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Xiao, Zhenghua; Ren, Xiaomei; Long, Haiyan; Qian, Hong; Ma, Kunlong; Guo, Yingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery.

  18. Decellularized adipose tissue microcarriers as a dynamic culture platform for human adipose-derived stem/stromal cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Claire; Kornmuller, Anna; Brown, Cody; Hoare, Todd; Flynn, Lauren E

    2017-03-01

    With the goal of designing a clinically-relevant expansion strategy for human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs), methods were developed to synthesize porous microcarriers derived purely from human decellularized adipose tissue (DAT). An electrospraying approach was applied to generate spherical DAT microcarriers with an average diameter of 428 ± 41 μm, which were soft, compliant, and stable in long-term culture without chemical crosslinking. Human ASCs demonstrated enhanced proliferation on the DAT microcarriers relative to commercially-sourced Cultispher-S microcarriers within a spinner culture system over 1 month. ASC immunophenotype was maintained post expansion, with a trend for reduced expression of the cell adhesion receptors CD73, CD105, and CD29 under dynamic conditions. Upregulation of the early lineage-specific genes PPARγ, LPL, and COMP was observed in the ASCs expanded on the DAT microcarriers, but the cells retained their multilineage differentiation capacity. Comparison of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in 2-D cultures prepared with ASCs pre-expanded on the DAT microcarriers or Cultispher-S microcarriers revealed similar adipogenic and enhanced osteogenic marker expression in the DAT microcarrier group, which had undergone a higher population fold change. Further, histological staining results suggested a more homogeneous differentiation response in the ASCs expanded on the DAT microcarriers as compared to either Cultispher-S microcarriers or tissue culture polystyrene. A pilot chondrogenesis study revealed higher levels of chondrogenic gene and protein expression in the ASCs expanded on the DAT microcarriers relative to all other groups, including the baseline controls. Overall, this study demonstrates the promise of applying dynamic culture with tissue-specific DAT microcarriers as a means of deriving regenerative cell populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-glycanated Decorin Is a Drug Target on Human Adipose Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexes C. Daquinag

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Adipose stromal cells (ASCs have been identified as a mesenchymal cell population recruited from white adipose tissue (WAT by tumors and supporting cancer progression. We have previously reported the existence of a non-glycanated decorin isoform (ngDCN marking mouse ASCs. We identified a peptide CSWKYWFGEC that binds to ngDCN and hence can serve as a vehicle for ASC-directed therapy delivery. We used hunter-killer peptides composed of CSWKYWFGEC and a pro-apoptotic moiety to deplete ASCs and suppress growth of mouse tumors. Here, we report the discovery of the human non-glycanated decorin isoform. We show that CSWKYWFGEC can be used as a probe to identify ASCs in human WAT and tumors. We demonstrate that human ngDCN is expressed on ASC surface. Finally, we validate ngDCN as a molecular target for pharmacological depletion of human ASCs with hunter-killer peptides. We propose that ngDCN-targeting agents could be developed for obesity and cancer treatment.

  20. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Proteolytic Isoforms of SPARC Induce Adipose Stromal Cell Mobilization in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chieh; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are mesenchymal adipocyte progenitors that reside in the peri-endothelium of fat tissue. ASC mobilization and migration accompany white adipose tissue (WAT) remodeling and pathological conditions. Mechanisms regulating ASC trafficking are largely unknown. We previously reported that binding of the matricellular protein secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) to β1 integrin on ASC surface induces their motility. Here, we show that SPARC is required for ASC mobilization. We report two SPARC proteolytic isoforms, C-SPARC (lacking the N terminus) and N-SPARC (lacking the C terminus), generated in mesenteric WAT of obese mice. C-SPARC, but not N-SPARC, binds to β1 integrin on ASC, while N-SPARC preferentially binds to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and blocks ECM/integrin interaction. Interestingly, both C-SPARC and N-SPARC induce ASC deadhesion from the ECM, which is associated with modulation of integrin-dependent FAK-ERK signaling and integrin-independent ILK-Akt signaling. We show that these SPARC isoforms, acting on ASC through distinct mechanisms, have an additive effect in inducing ASC migration. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  2. DHP-derivative and low oxygen tension effectively induces human adipose stromal cell reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ki Jee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODS: In this study, we utilized a combination of low oxygen tension and a novel anti-oxidant, 4-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl-derivative (DHP-d to directly induce adipose tissue stromal cells (ATSC to de-differentiate into more primitive stem cells. De-differentiated ATSCs was overexpress stemness genes, Rex-1, Oct-4, Sox-2, and Nanog. Additionally, demethylation of the regulatory regions of Rex-1, stemnesses, and HIF1alpha and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were finally resulted in an improved stem cell behavior of de-differentiate ATSC (de-ATSC. Proliferation activity of ATSCs after dedifferentiation was induced by REX1, Oct4, and JAK/STAT3 directly or indirectly. De-ATSCs showed increased migration activity that mediated by P38/JUNK and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, regenerative efficacy of de-ATSC engrafted spinal cord-injured rats and chemical-induced diabetes animals were significantly restored their functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our stem cell remodeling system may provide a good model which would provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying ATSC proliferation and transdifferentiation. Also, these multipotent stem cells can be harvested may provide us with a valuable reservoir of primitive and autologous stem cells for use in a broad spectrum of regenerative cell-based disease therapy.

  3. Encapsulation of Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells in Alginate Hydrogel Spheroids Using a Direct-Write Three-Dimensional Printing System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Stuart K; Touroo, Jeremy S; Church, Kenneth H; Hoying, James B

    2013-01-01

    ... structures for implantation in regenerative medicine therapies. Studies were performed using a direct write three-dimensional bioprinting system to fabricate adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell spheroids. Human fat...

  4. Adipose stromal cells contain phenotypically distinct adipogenic progenitors derived from neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Sowa

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs contain phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations of cells, but their developmental origin and their relative differentiation potential remain elusive. In the present study, we aimed at investigating how and to what extent the neural crest contributes to ASCs using Cre-loxP-mediated fate mapping. ASCs harvested from subcutaneous fat depots of either adult P0-Cre/or Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-reporter mice contained a few neural crest-derived ASCs (NCDASCs. This subpopulation of cells was successfully expanded in vitro under standard culture conditions and their growth rate was comparable to non-neural crest derivatives. Although NCDASCs were positive for several mesenchymal stem cell markers as non-neural crest derivatives, they exhibited a unique bipolar or multipolar morphology with higher expression of markers for both neural crest progenitors (p75NTR, Nestin, and Sox2 and preadipocytes (CD24, CD34, S100, Pref-1, GATA2, and C/EBP-delta. NCDASCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes with high efficiency but their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential was markedly attenuated, indicating their commitment to adipogenesis. In vivo, a very small proportion of adipocytes were originated from the neural crest. In addition, p75NTR-positive neural crest-derived cells were identified along the vessels within the subcutaneous adipose tissue, but they were negative for mural and endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that ASCs contain neural crest-derived adipocyte-restricted progenitors whose phenotype is distinct from that of non-neural crest derivatives.

  5. Adipose stromal vascular fraction cell construct sustains coronary microvascular function after acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Amanda J.; Touroo, Jeremy S.; Hoying, James B.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional tissue construct was created using adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells and evaluated as a microvascular protection treatment in a myocardial infarction (MI) model. This study evaluated coronary blood flow (BF) and global left ventricular function after MI with and without the SVF construct. Fischer-344 rats were separated into four groups: sham operation (sham), MI, MI Vicryl patch (no cells), and MI SVF construct (MI SVF). SVF cells were labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Immediately postinfarct, constructs were implanted onto the epicardium at the site of ischemia. Four weeks postsurgery, the coronary BF reserve was significantly decreased by 67% in the MI group and 75% in the MI Vicryl group compared with the sham group. The coronary BF reserve of the sham and MI SVF groups in the area at risk was not significantly different (sham group: 83 ± 22% and MI SVF group: 57 ± 22%). Griffonia simplicifolia I and GFP-positive SVF immunostaining revealed engrafted SVF cells around microvessels in the infarct region 4 wk postimplant. Overall heart function, specifically ejection fraction, was significantly greater in MI SVF hearts compared with MI and MI Vicryl hearts (MI SVF: 66 ± 4%, MI: 37 ± 8%, and MI Vicryl: 29 ± 6%). In conclusion, adipose-derived SVF cells can be used to construct a novel therapeutic modality for treating microvascular instability and ischemia through implantation on the epicardial surface of the heart. The SVF construct implanted immediately after MI not only maintains heart function but also sustains microvascular perfusion and function in the infarct area by sustaining the coronary BF reserve. PMID:22140045

  6. Effect of canine cortical bone demineralization on osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangrae Jo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Demineralized bone allografts and mesenchymal stromal cells have been used to promote bone regeneration. However, the degree to which cortical bone should be demineralized for use in combination with adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (Ad-MSCs remains to be clarified. In this study, the in vitro osteogenic ability of Ad-MSCs on allografts was investigated in relation to the extent of demineralization. Three treatment groups were established by varying exposure time to 0.6 N HCL: partially demineralized (PDB; 12 h, fully demineralized (FDB; 48 h, and non-demineralized bone (NDB; 0 h, as a control. Allografts were prepared as discs 6 mm in diameter for in vitro evaluation, and their demineralization and structure were evaluated by micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. Ad-MSC adhesion and proliferation were measured by MTS assay, and osteogenesis-related gene expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. PDB and FDB demineralization rates were 57.13 and 92.30%, respectively. Moreover, Ad-MSC adhesion rates on NDB, PDB, and FDB were 53.41, 60.65, and 61.32%, respectively. Proliferation of these cells on FDB increased significantly after 2 days of culture compared to the other groups (P < 0.05. Furthermore, expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, BMP-7, and TGF-β in the FDB group on culture day 3 was significantly elevated in comparison to the other treatments. Given its biocompatibility and promotion of the osteogenic differentiation of Ad-MSCs, our results suggest that FDB may be a suitable scaffold for use in the repair of bone defects.

  7. Evaluation of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, David D; Kisiday, John D; Kawcak, Chris E; Werpy, Natasha M; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the assessment of clinical, biochemical, and histologic effects of intraarticular administered adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in the middle carpal joint of all horses, the contralateral joint being sham-operated. All horses received treatment on Day 14. Eight horses received placebo treatment and eight horses received adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction in their osteoarthritis-affected joint. The final eight horses were treated the in osteoarthritis-affected joint with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Evaluations included clinical, radiographic, synovial fluid analysis, gross, histologic, histochemical, and biochemical evaluations. No adverse treatment-related events were observed. The model induced a significant change in all but two parameters, no significant treatment effects were demonstrated, with the exception of improvement in synovial fluid effusion PGE2 levels with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to placebo. A greater improvement was seen with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and placebo treatment. Overall, the findings of this study were not significant enough to recommend the use of stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis represented in this model.

  8. Adipose-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction Cell Effects on a Rodent Model of Thin Endometrium.

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    Robert K Hunter

    Full Text Available Endometrial dysfunction affects approximately 1% of infertile women, and there is currently no standard therapy for improving fertility treatment outcomes in these patients. In our study, we utilized a rodent model of thin endometrium to test whether intrauterine application of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells (SVF could improve morphological and physiological markers of endometrial receptivity. Using anhydrous ethanol, endometrial area and gland density were significantly reduced in our model of thin endometrium. Application of SVF was associated with a 29% reduction in endometrial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression and significant increases in uterine artery systolic/diastolic velocity ratios and resistance index values, suggesting reduced diastolic microvascular tone. However, no significant improvements in endometrial area or gland density were observed following SVF treatment. 3D confocal imaging demonstrated poor engraftment of SVF cells into recipient tissue, which likely contributed to the negative results of this study. We suspect modified treatment protocols utilizing adjuvant estrogen and/or tail vein cell delivery may improve SVF retention and therapeutic response in subsequent studies. SVF is an easily-obtainable cell product with regenerative capability that may have a future role in the treatment of infertile women with endometrial dysfunction.

  9. Morphological changes in paraurethral area after introduction of tissue engineering construct on the basis of adipose tissue stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, A V; Arutyunyan, I V; Bol'shakova, G B; Volkov, A V; Gol'dshtein, D V

    2009-10-01

    We studied morphological changes in the paraurethral area of Wistar rats after introduction of tissue engineering constructs on the basis of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells and gelatin sponge. The tissue engineering construct containing autologous culture of the stromal fraction of the adipose tissue was most effective. After introduction of this construct we observed more rapid degradation of the construct matrix and more intensive formation of collagen fibers.

  10. Making the switch: alternatives to foetal bovine serum for adipose-derived stromal cell expansion

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    Carla Dessels

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs are being used extensively in clinical trials. These trials require that ASCs are prepared using good manufacturing procedures (GMPs and are safe for use in humans. The majority of clinical trials in which ASCs are expanded make use of fetal bovine serum (FBS. While FBS is used traditionally in the research setting for in vitro expansion, it does carry the risk of xenoimmunization and zoonotic transmission when used for expanding cells destined for therapeutic purposes. In order to ensure a GMP quality product for cellular therapy, in vitro expansion of ASCs has been undertaken using xeno-free (XF, chemically-defined, and human blood-derived alternatives. These investigations usually include the criteria proposed by the International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT and International Fat Applied Technology Society (IFATS. The majority of studies use these criteria to compare plastic-adherence, morphology, the immunophenotype and the trilineage differentiation of ASCs under the different medium supplemented conditions. Based on these studies, all of the alternatives to FBS seem to be suitable replacements; however, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. Very few studies have investigated the effects of the supplements on the immunomodulation of ASCs; the transcriptome, proteome and secretome; and the ultimate effects in appropriate animal models. The selection of medium supplementation will depend on the downstream application of the ASCs and their efficacy and safety in preclinical studies.

  11. Adipose-Derived Cells (Stromal Vascular Fraction Transplanted for Orthopedical or Neurological Purposes: Are They Safe Enough?

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    Katarzyna Siennicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells are used in numerous clinical trials, the safety of their application is still a matter of concern. We have analysed the clinical results of the autologous adipose-derived stem cell treatment (stromal vascular fraction (SVF containing adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitors, and blood mononuclear cells for orthopedic (cartilage, bone, tendon, or combined joint injuries and neurologic (multiple sclerosis diseases. Methods of adipose tissue collection, cell isolation and purification, and resulting cell numbers, viability, and morphology were considered, and patient’s age, sex, disease type, and method of cell administration (cell numbers per single application, treatment numbers and frequency, and methods of cell implantation were analysed and searched for the unwanted clinical effects. Results of cellular therapy were compared retrospectively to those obtained with conventional medication without SVF application. SVF transplantation was always the accessory treatment of patients receiving “standard routine” therapies of their diseases. Clinical experiments were approved by the Bioethical Medical Committees supervising the centers where patients were hospitalised. The conclusion of the study is that none of the treated patients developed any serious adverse event, and autologous mesenchymal stem (stromal cell clinical application is a safe procedure resulting in some beneficial clinical effects (not analysed in this study.

  12. Adult stromal cells derived from human adipose tissue provoke pancreatic cancer cell death both in vitro and in vivo.

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    Beatrice Cousin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate. ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available.

  13. Culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells in different media

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    Gesiane Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue - derived stromal vascular fraction cells in two different cell culture media. Five adult horses were submitted to bone marrow aspiration from the sternum, and then from the adipose tissue of the gluteal region near the base of the tail. Mononuclear fraction and stromal vascular fraction were isolated from the samples and cultivated in DMEM medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum or in AIM-V medium. The cultures were observed once a week with an inverted microscope, to perform a qualitative analysis of the morphology of the cells as well as the general appearance of the cell culture. Colony-forming units (CFU were counted on days 5, 15 and 25 of cell culture. During the first week of culture, differences were observed between the samples from the same source maintained in different culture media. The number of colonies was significantly higher in samples of bone marrow in relation to samples of adipose tissue.

  14. The impact of cell source, culture methodology, culture location, and individual donors on gene expression profiles of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torensma, R.; Prins, H.J.; Schrama, E.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Martens, A.C.M.; Roelofs, H.; Jansen, B.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, display a high degree of heterogeneity. To shed light on the causes of this heterogeneity, MSCs were collected from either human BM (n=5) or adipose tissue (AT) (n=5), and expanded using 2 different culture methods: one

  15. Hydrolyzed fish collagen induced chondrogenic differentiation of equine adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, O; Reich, C; Wenisch, S; Hild, A; Burg-Roderfeld, M; Siebert, H-C; Arnhold, S

    2010-12-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells which, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into various lineages such as the osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic. In this study, we investigated the effect of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in comparison to hydrolyzed fish collagen in terms of the chondrogenic differentiation potential of ADSCs. ADSCs were isolated from subcutaneous fat of horses by liposuction. Chondrogenesis was investigated using a pellet culture system. The differentiation medium was either supplemented with TGF-β1 (5 ng/ml) or fish collagen (0.5 mg/ml) for a 3 week period. After the 3 weeks in vitro differentiation, RT-PCR and histological staining for proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen were performed to evaluate the degree of chondrogenic differentiation and the formation of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM). The differentiation of ADSCs induced by TGF-β1 showed a high expression of glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Histological analysis of cultures stimulated by hydrolyzed fish collagen demonstrated an even higher GAG expression than cultures stimulated under standard conditions by TGF-β1. The expression of cartilage-specific type II collagen and Sox9 was about the same in both stimulated cultures. In this study, chondrogenesis was as effectively induced by hydrolyzed fish collagen as it was successfully induced by TGF-β1. These findings demonstrated that hydrolyzed fish collagen alone has the potential to induce and maintain ADSCs-derived chondrogenesis. These results support the application of ADSCs in equine veterinary tissue engineering, especially for cartilage repair.

  16. Cell-Assisted Lipotransfer Using Autologous Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Alleviation of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Sheikh, Søren Paludan; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-07-01

    : Lymphedema is one of the most frequent side effects following cancer treatment, and treatment opportunities for it are currently lacking. Stem cell therapy has been proposed as a possible novel treatment modality. This study was the first case in which freshly isolated adipose-derived stromal cells were used to treat lymphedema. Treatment was given as a cell-assisted lipotransfer in which 4.07 × 10(7) cells were injected with 10 ml of lipoaspirate in the axillary region. Four months after treatment, the patient reported a great improvement in daily symptoms, reduction in need for compression therapy, and volume reduction of her affected arm. There were no adverse events. The outcome for this patient provides support for the potential use of cellular therapy for lymphedema treatment. We have begun a larger study to further test the feasibility and safety of this procedure (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02592213). Lymphedema is a very debilitating side effect of cancer treatment and has very few treatment options. Stem cell therapy has the potential to change the treatment paradigm from a conservative to a more curative approach. Freshly isolated, autologous, adipose-derived stromal cells were combined with a fat-graft procedure to treat lymphedema. The treated patient had great improvement in daily symptoms, a reduced need for compression therapy, and a reduction in arm volume after 4 months. There were no adverse events. The use of cellular therapy for lymphedema treatment is supported by this patient's outcome. A phase II study has begun to further test its feasibility and safety. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Caffeine regulates osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of primary adipose-derived stem cells and a bone marrow stromal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Jem; Chang, Kee-Lung; Su, Shu-Hui; Yeh, Yao-Tsung; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chen, Kuan-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Caffeine consumption reportedly influences bone mineral density and body weight. However, the effects of caffeine on bone metabolism are still controversial, and whether the dosage of caffeine influences osteogenic differentiation is yet to be clarified. In the present study, we cultured primary adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and a bone marrow stromal cell line (M2-10B4) in osteogenic differentiation media containing varying concentrations of caffeine. Caffeine had biphasic effects: 0.1 mM caffeine significantly enhanced mineralization and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Consistent with these observations, a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mM upregulated the osteogenic differentiation marker genes ALP and osteocalcin (OCN), and elevated osteoprotegerin (OPG), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) levels. However, a concentration of caffeine greater than 0.3 mM suppressed the differentiation of both the cell types. These findings indicate that caffeine has a beneficial effect on ADSCs and bone marrow stromal cells, enhancing differentiation to osteoblasts; this effect, which is mediated via RUNX2 activation at low doses is significantly suppressed at high doses.

  18. Identical effects of VEGF and serum-deprivation on phenotype and function of adipose-derived stromal cells from healthy donors and patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Follin, Bjarke; Tratwal, Josefine Catharina P; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) stimulated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and serum-deprived, are applied in the first in-man double-blind placebo-controlled MyStromalCell Trial, as a novel therapeutic option for treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD). This in vitro study ...... explored the effect of VEGF and serum deprivation on endothelial differentiation capacity of ASCs from healthy donors and IHD patients....

  19. Enhanced Healing of Diabetic Wounds by Topical Administration of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cells Overexpressing Stromal-Derived Factor-1: Biodistribution and Engraftment Analysis by Bioluminescent Imaging

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    Giuliana Di Rocco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ulcers represent a major health problem in diabetic patients resulting in pain and discomfort. Conventional therapy does not guarantee adequate wound repair. In diabetes, impaired healing is partly due to poor endothelial progenitor cells mobilisation and homing, with altered levels of the chemokine stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 at the wound site. Adipose tissue-associated stromal cells (AT-SCs can provide an accessible source of progenitor cells secreting proangiogenic factors and differentiating into endothelial-like cells. We demonstrated that topical administration of AT-SCs genetically modified ex vivo to overexpress SDF-1, promotes wound healing into diabetic mice. In particular, by in vivo bioluminescent imaging analysis, we monitored biodistribution and survival after transplantation of luciferase-expressing cells. In conclusion, this study indicates the therapeutic potential of AT-SCs administration in wound healing, through cell differentiation, enhanced cellular recruitment at the wound site, and paracrine effects associated with local growth-factors production.

  20. Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells inhibit TGF-β1-induced differentiation of human dermal fibroblasts and keloid scar-derived fibroblasts in a paracrine fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekman, Maroesjka; Przybyt, Ewa; Plantinga, Josée A; Gibbs, Susan; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C

    2014-10-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells augment wound healing and skin regeneration. It is unknown whether and how they can also influence dermal scarring. The authors hypothesized that adipose tissue-derived stromal cells inhibit adverse differentiation of dermal fibroblasts induced by the pivotal factor in scarring, namely, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. TGF-β1-treated adult human dermal fibroblasts and keloid scar-derived fibroblasts were incubated with adipose tissue-derived stromal cell-conditioned medium and assessed for proliferation and differentiation, particularly the production of collagen, expression of SM22α, and development of hypertrophy and contractility. TGF-β1-induced proliferation of adult human dermal fibroblasts was abolished by adipose tissue-derived stromal cell-conditioned medium. Simultaneously, the medium reduced SM22α gene and protein expression of TGF-β1-treated adult human dermal fibroblasts, and their contractility was reduced also. Furthermore, the medium strongly reduced transcription of collagen I and III genes and their corresponding proteins. In contrast, it tipped the balance of matrix turnover to degradation through stimulating gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2, and MMP-14, whereas MMP-2 activity was up-regulated also. Even in end-stage myofibroblasts (i.e., keloid scar-derived fibroblasts), adipose tissue-derived stromal cell-conditioned medium suppressed TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast contraction and collagen III gene expression. The authors show that adipose tissue-derived stromal cells inhibit TGF-β1-induced adverse differentiation and function of adult human dermal fibroblasts and TGF-β1-induced contraction in keloid scar-derived fibroblasts, in a paracrine fashion.

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Metformin on Osteopontin Expression in Mice Adipose-Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells and Adipose Tissue

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    Agnieszka Śmieszek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is applied not only as antidiabetic drug, but also in the treatment of obesity or as antiaging drug. The first part of the research discussed the effect of metformin at concentrations of 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM on the morphology, ultrastructure, and proliferation potential of mice adipose-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs in vitro. Additionally, we determined the influence of metformin on mice adipose tissue metabolism. This study has shown for the first time that metformin inhibits the proliferative potential of ASCs in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, we have found a significant correlation between the activity of ASCs and osteopontin at the mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that 5 mM and 10 mM metformin have cytotoxic effect on ASCs, causing severe morphological, ultrastructural, and apoptotic changes. The reduced level of OPN in the adipose tissue of metformin-treated animals strongly correlated with the lower expression of Ki67 and CD105 and increased caspase-3. The metformin influenced also circulating levels of OPN, which is what was found with systemic and local action of metformin. The results are a valuable source of information regarding the in vitro effect of metformin on adipose-derived stem cells.

  2. Fluorescent Immortalized Human Adipose Derived Stromal Cells (hASCs-TS/GFP+) for Studying Cell Drug Delivery Mediated by Microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocce, Valentina; Balducci, Luigi; Falchetti, Maria L; Pascucci, Luisa; Ciusani, Emilio; Brini, Anna T; Sisto, Francesca; Piovani, Giovanna; Alessandri, Giulio; Parati, Eugenio; Cabeza, Laura; Pessina, Augusto

    2017-11-24

    A new tool for the drug delivery is based on the use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) loaded in vitro with anti-cancer drugs. Unfortunately, the restricted lifespan of MSCs represents a significant limitation to produce them in high amounts and for long time studies. Immortalized MSCs from adipose tissue (hASCs) have been generated as good source of cells with stable features. These cells could improve the development of standardized procedures for both in vitro and preclinical studies. Furthermore they facilitate procedures for preparing large amounts of secretome containing microvesicles (MVs). We used human adipose tissue derived MSCs immortalized with hTERT+SV40 (TS) genes and transfected with GFP (hASCs-TS/GFP+). This line was investigated for its ability to uptake and release anticancer drugs. Microvesicles associated to paclitaxel (MVs/PTX) were isolated, quantified, and tested on pancreatic cancer cells. The line hASCs-TS/GFP+ maintained the main mesenchymal characters and was able to uptake and release, in active form, both paclitaxel and gemcitabine. From paclitaxel loaded hASCs-TS/GFP+ cells were isolated microvesicles in sufficient amount to inhibit "in vitro" the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells. Our study suggests that human immortalized MSCs could be used for a large scale production of cells for mediated drug delivery. Moreover, the secretion of drug-associated MVs could represent a new way for producing new drug formulation by "biogenesis". In the context of the "advanced cell therapy procedure", the MVs/PTX production would use less resource and time and it could possibly contribute to simplification of GMP procedures. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Treatment of Patients with Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease (MyStromalCell Trial: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study

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    Abbas Ali Qayyum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the effect of intramyocardial injections of autologous VEGF-A165-stimulated adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs in patients with refractory angina. MyStromalCell trial is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study including sixty patients with CCS/NYHA class II-III, left ventricular ejection fraction > 40%, and at least one significant coronary artery stenosis. Patients were treated with ASC or placebo in a 2 : 1 ratio. ASCs from the abdomen were culture expanded and stimulated with VEGF-A165. At 6 months follow-up, bicycle exercise tolerance increased significantly in time duration 22 s (95%CI −164 to 208 s (P=0.034, in watt 4 (95%CI −33 to 41, 0.048, and in METs 0.2 (95%CI −1.4 to 1.8 (P=0.048 in the ASC group while there was a nonsignificant increase in the placebo group in time duration 9 s (95%CI −203 to 221 s (P=0.053, in watt 7 (95%CI −40 to 54 (P=0.41, and in METs 0.1 (95%CI −1.7 to 1.9 (P=0.757. The difference between the groups was not significant (P=0.680, P=0.608, and P=0.720 for time duration, watt, and METs, resp.. Intramyocardial delivered VEGF-A165-stimulated ASC treatment was safe but did not improve exercise capacity compared to placebo. However, exercise capacity increased in the ASC but not in the placebo group. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01449032.

  4. Characterization and Immunomodulatory Effects of Canine Adipose Tissue- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

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    Keith A Russell

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC hold promise for both cell replacement and immune modulation strategies owing to their progenitor and non-progenitor functions, respectively. Characterization of MSC from different sources is an important and necessary step before clinical use of these cells is widely adopted. Little is known about the biology and function of canine MSC compared to their mouse or human counterparts. This knowledge-gap impedes development of canine evidence-based MSC technologies.We hypothesized that canine adipose tissue (AT and bone marrow (BM MSC (derived from the same dogs will have similar differentiation and immune modulatory profiles. Our objectives were to evaluate progenitor and non-progenitor functions as well as other characteristics of AT- and BM-MSC including 1 proliferation rate, 2 cell surface marker expression, 3 DNA methylation levels, 4 potential for trilineage differentiation towards osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cell fates, and 5 immunomodulatory potency in vitro.1 AT-MSC proliferated at more than double the rate of BM-MSC (population doubling times in days for passage (P 2, AT: 1.69, BM: 3.81; P3, AT: 1.80, BM: 4.06; P4, AT: 2.37, BM: 5.34; P5, AT: 3.20, BM: 7.21. 2 Canine MSC, regardless of source, strongly expressed cell surface markers MHC I, CD29, CD44, and CD90, and were negative for MHC II and CD45. They also showed moderate expression of CD8 and CD73 and mild expression of CD14. Minor differences were found in expression of CD4 and CD34. 3 Global DNA methylation levels were significantly lower in BM-MSC compared to AT-MSC. 4 Little difference was found between AT- and BM-MSC in their potential for adipogenesis and osteogenesis. Chondrogenesis was poor to absent for both sources in spite of adding varying levels of bone-morphogenic protein to our standard transforming growth factor (TGF-β3-based induction medium. 5 Immunomodulatory capacity was equal regardless of cell source when tested in

  5. Human platelet lysate as a fetal bovine serum substitute improves human adipose-derived stromal cell culture for future cardiac repair applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Naaijkens (Benno); H.W.M. Niessen (Hans ); H.-J. Prins (H.); P.A.J. Krijnen (Paul); T.J.A. Kokhuis (Tom); N. de Jong (Nico); V.W.M. van Hinsbergh (Victor); O. Kamp (Otto); K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.J.P. Musters (René); A. van Dijk (Annemieke); L.J.M. Juffermans (Lynda)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAdipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) are promising candidates for cell therapy, for example to treat myocardial infarction. Commonly, fetal bovine serum (FBS) is used in ASC culturing. However, FBS has several disadvantages. Its effects differ between batches and, when applied clinically,

  6. Human platelet lysate as a fetal bovine serum substitute improves human adipose-derived stromal cell culture for future cardiac repair applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naaijkens, B.A.; Niessen, H.W.M.; Prins, H.J.; Krijnen, P.A.J.; Kokhuis, T.J.A.; de Jong, N.; van Hinsbergh, V.W.M.; Kamp, O.; Helder, M.N.; Musters, R.J.P.; van Dijk, A.; Juffermans, L.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) are promising candidates for cell therapy, for example to treat myocardial infarction. Commonly, fetal bovine serum (FBS) is used in ASC culturing. However, FBS has several disadvantages. Its effects differ between batches and, when applied clinically,

  7. Rationale and Design of the First Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial with Allogeneic Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Ida

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic heart failure (IHF) has a poor prognosis in spite of optimal therapy. We have established a new allogeneic Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors. It is produced without animal products, in closed bioreactor systems...

  8. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  9. Human adipose stromal cells (ASC for the regeneration of injured cartilage display genetic stability after in vitro culture expansion.

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    Simona Neri

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration due to their multi-potency, immune-modulation and secretome activities, but safety remains one of the main concerns, particularly when in vitro manipulation, such as cell expansion, is performed before clinical application. Indeed, it is well documented that in vitro expansion reduces replicative potential and some multi-potency and promotes cell senescence. Furthermore, during in vitro aging there is a decrease in DNA synthesis and repair efficiency thus leading to DNA damage accumulation and possibly inducing genomic instability. The European Research Project ADIPOA aims at validating an innovative cell-based therapy where autologous adipose stromal cells (ASCs are injected in the diseased articulation to activate regeneration of the cartilage. The primary objective of this paper was to assess the safety of cultured ASCs. The maintenance of genetic integrity was evaluated during in vitro culture by karyotype and microsatellite instability analysis. In addition, RT-PCR array-based evaluation of the expression of genes related to DNA damage signaling pathways was performed. Finally, the senescence and replicative potential of cultured cells was evaluated by telomere length and telomerase activity assessment, whereas anchorage-independent clone development was tested in vitro by soft agar growth. We found that cultured ASCs do not show genetic alterations and replicative senescence during the period of observation, nor anchorage-independent growth, supporting an argument for the safety of ASCs for clinical use.

  10. The adipose tissue of origin influences the biological potential of human adipose stromal cells isolated from mediastinal and subcutaneous fat depots

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    Camilla Siciliano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Indirect evidence suggests that adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs possess different physiological and biological variations related to the anatomical localization of the adipose depots. Accordingly, to investigate the influence of the tissue origin on the intrinsic properties of ASCs and to assess their response to specific stimuli, we compared the biological, functional and ultrastructural properties of two ASC pools derived from mediastinal and subcutaneous depots (thoracic compartment by means of supplements such as platelet lysate (PL and FBS. Subcutaneous ASCs exhibited higher proliferative and clonogenic abilities than mediastinal counterpart, as well as increased secreted levels of IL-6 combined with lower amount of VEGF-C. In contrast, mediastinal ASCs displayed enhanced pro-angiogenic and adipogenic differentiation properties, increased cell diameter and early autophagic processes, highlighted by electron microscopy. Our results further support the hypothesis that the origin of adipose tissue significantly defines the biological properties of ASCs, and that a homogeneric function for all ASCs cannot be assumed.

  11. Cell-based cytotoxicity assays for engineered nanomaterials safety screening: exposure of adipose derived stromal cells to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Hadjiargyrou, M; Rafailovich, Miriam; Mironava, Tatsiana

    2017-07-11

    Increasing production of nanomaterials requires fast and proper assessment of its potential toxicity. Therefore, there is a need to develop new assays that can be performed in vitro, be cost effective, and allow faster screening of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Herein, we report that titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) can induce damage to adipose derived stromal cells (ADSCs) at concentrations which are rated as safe by standard assays such as measuring proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Specifically, we demonstrated that low concentrations of TiO2 NPs, at which cellular LDH, ROS, or proliferation profiles were not affected, induced changes in the ADSCs secretory function and differentiation capability. These two functions are essential for ADSCs in wound healing, energy expenditure, and metabolism with serious health implications in vivo. We demonstrated that cytotoxicity assays based on specialized cell functions exhibit greater sensitivity and reveal damage induced by ENMs that was not otherwise detected by traditional ROS, LDH, and proliferation assays. For proper toxicological assessment of ENMs standard ROS, LDH, and proliferation assays should be combined with assays that investigate cellular functions relevant to the specific cell type.

  12. Molecular Validation of Chondrogenic Differentiation and Hypoxia Responsiveness of Platelet-Lysate Expanded Adipose Tissue–Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galeano-Garces, Catalina; Camilleri, Emily T.; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Larson, Dirk R.; Qu, Wenchun; Smith, Jay; Dietz, Allan B.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Krych, Aaron J.; Larson, A. Noelle; Karperien, Marcel; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the optimal environmental conditions for chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs). In this investigation we specifically investigate the role of oxygen tension and 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Design: Both

  13. Platelet-Rich Plasma Influences Expansion and Paracrine Function of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells in a Dose-Dependent Fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Joep C. N.; Spiekman, Maroesjka; Stevens, H. P. Jeroen; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    Background: Lipofilling is a treatment modality to restore tissue volume. Both platelet-rich plasma and adipose-derived stromal cells have been reported to augment the efficacy of lipofilling, yet results are not conclusive. The authors hypothesized that the variation reported in literature is

  14. Rapid Attachment of Adipose Stromal Cells on Resorbable Polymeric Scaffolds Facilitates the One-Step Surgical Procedure for Cartilage and Bone Tissue Engineering Purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurgens, Wouter J.; Kroeze, Robert Jan; Bank, Ruud A.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; Helder, Marco N.

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue provides an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells. For clinical application, it would be beneficial to establish treatments in which SVF is obtained, seeded onto a scaffold, and returned into the patient within a single surgical procedure. In

  15. Rapid attachment of adipose stromal cells on resorbable polymeric scaffolds facilitates the one-step surgical procedure for cartilage and bone tissue engineering purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurgens, W.J.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.; Helder, M.N.

    2011-01-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue provides an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells. For clinical application, it would be beneficial to establish treatments in which SVF is obtained, seeded onto a scaffold, and returned into the patient within a single surgical procedure. In

  16. CD146 (MCAM in human cs-DLK1−/cs-CD34+ adipose stromal/progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Hörl

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To precisely characterize CD146 in adipose stromal/progenitor cells (ASCs we sorted the stromal vascular faction (SVF of human abdominal subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT according to cell surface (cs expression of CD146, DLK1 and CD34. This test identified three main SVF cell populations: ~50% cs-DLK1−/cs-CD34+/cs-CD146− ASCs, ~7.5% cs-DLK1+/cs-CD34dim/+/cs-CD146+ and ~7.5% cs-DLK1+/cs-CD34dim/+/cs-CD146− cells. All cells contained intracellular CD146. Whole mount fluorescent IHC staining of small vessels detected CD146+ endothelial cells (CD31+/CD34+/CD146+ and pericytes (CD31−/CD34−/CD146+ ASCs. The cells in the outer adventitial layer showed the typical ASC morphology, were strongly CD34+ and contained low amounts of intracellular CD146 protein (CD31−/CD34+/CD146+. Additionally, we detected wavy CD34−/CD146+ and CD34dim/CD146+ cells. CD34dim/CD146+ cells were slightly more bulky than CD34−/CD146+ cells. Both CD34−/CD146+ and CD34dim/CD146+ cells were detached from the inner pericyte layer and protruded into the outer adventitial layer. Cultured early passage ASCs contained low levels of CD146 mRNA, which was expressed in two different splicing variants, at a relatively high amount of the CD146-long form and at a relatively low amount of the CD146-short form. ASCs contained low levels of CD146 protein, which consisted predominantly long form and a small amount of short form. The CD146 protein was highly stable, and the majority of the protein was localized in the Golgi apparatus. In conclusion, the present study contributes to a better understanding of the spatial localization of CD34+/CD146+ and CD34−/CD146+ cells in the adipose niche of sWAT and identifies CD146 as intracellular protein in cs-DLK1−/cs-CD34+/cs-CD146− ASCs.

  17. Survival of human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue after xenogenic transplantation in immunocompetent mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, P; Vohrer, J; Schmal, H

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) represent an attractive cell population for tissue engineering purposes. As MSC are described as immunoprivileged, non-autologous applications seem possible. A basic requirement is the survival of MSC after transplantation in the host. The purpose...... of the current paper was to evaluate the survival of undifferentiated and osteogenically induced human MSC from different origins after transplantation in immunocompetent mice. METHODS: Human MSC were isolated from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ASC). After cultivation on mineralized collagen, MSC were...... transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompetent mice (n=12). Undifferentiated MSC (group A) were compared with osteogenic-induced MSC (group B). Human-specific in situ hybridization and anti-vimentin staining was used to follow MSC after transplantation. Quantitative evaluation of lymphocytes and macrophages...

  18. Des-acyl ghrelin inhibits the capacity of macrophages to stimulate the expression of aromatase in breast adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, CheukMan C; Docanto, Maria M; Zahid, Heba; Raffaelli, Francesca-Maria; Ferrero, Richard L; Furness, John B; Brown, Kristy A

    2017-06-01

    Des-acyl ghrelin is the unacylated form of the well-characterized appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin. It affects a number of physiological processes, including increasing adipose lipid accumulation and inhibiting adipose tissue inflammation. Breast adipose tissue inflammation in obesity is associated with an increase in the expression of the estrogen biosynthetic enzyme, aromatase, and is hypothesized to create a hormonal milieu conducive to tumor growth. We previously reported that des-acyl ghrelin inhibits the expression and activity of aromatase in isolated human adipose stromal cells (ASCs), the main site of aromatase expression in the adipose tissue. The current study aimed to examine the effect of des-acyl ghrelin on the capacity of mouse macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and human adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) to stimulate aromatase expression in primary human breast ASCs. RAW264.7 cells were treated with 0, 10 and 100pM des-acyl ghrelin following activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and cells and conditioned media were collected after 6 and 24h. The effect of des-acyl ghrelin on macrophage polarization was examined by assessing mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory M1-specific marker Cd11c and anti-inflammatory M2-specific marker Cd206, as well as expression of Tnf and Ptgs2, known mediators of the macrophage-dependent stimulation of aromatase. TNF protein in conditioned media was assessed by ELISA. The effect of RAW264.7 and ATM-conditioned media on aromatase expression in ASCs was assessed after 6h. Results demonstrate des-acyl ghrelin significantly increases the expression of Cd206 and suppresses the expression of Cd11c, Tnf and Ptgs2 in activated RAW264.7 cells. Treatment of RAW264.7 and ATMs with des-acyl ghrelin also significantly reduces the capacity of these cells to stimulate aromatase transcript expression in human breast ASCs. Overall, these findings suggest that in addition to direct effects on aromatase in ASCs, des-acyl ghrelin also

  19. The power of fat and its adipose-derived stromal cells: emerging concepts for fibrotic scar treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekman, Maroesjka; van Dongen, Joris A; Willemsen, Joep C; Hoppe, Delia L; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C

    2017-02-03

    Lipofilling or lipografting is a novel and promising treatment method for reduction or prevention of dermal scars after injury. Ample anecdotal evidence from case reports supports the scar-reducing properties of adipose tissue grafts. However, only a few properly controlled and designed clinical trials have been conducted thus far on this topic. Also, the underlying mechanism by which lipofilling improves scar aspect and reduces neuropathic scar pain remains largely undiscovered. Adipose-derived stromal or stem cells (ADSC) are often described to be responsible for this therapeutic effect of lipofilling. We review the recent literature and discuss anticipated mechanisms that govern anti-scarring capacity of adipose tissue and its ADSC. Both clinical and animal studies clearly demonstrated that lipofilling and ADSC influence processes associated with wound healing, including extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis and modulation of inflammation in dermal scars. However, randomized clinical trials, providing sufficient level of evidence for lipofilling and/or ADSC as an anti-scarring treatment, are lacking yet warranted in the near future. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Platelet-Rich Plasma Influences Expansion and Paracrine Function of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells in a Dose-Dependent Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Joep C N; Spiekman, Maroesjka; Stevens, H P Jeroen; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-03-01

    Lipofilling is a treatment modality to restore tissue volume. Both platelet-rich plasma and adipose-derived stromal cells have been reported to augment the efficacy of lipofilling, yet results are not conclusive. The authors hypothesized that the variation reported in literature is caused by a dose-dependent influence of platelet-rich plasma on adipose-derived stromal cells. Whole blood (n = 3) was used to generate platelet-rich plasma, which was diluted with Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium to 15%, 5%, and 1.7%, with 15% platelet-poor plasma and 10% fetal calf serum as controls. Pooled adipose-derived stromal cells (n = 3) were cultured in these media. Gene expression was assessed, along with angiogenic sprouting of endothelial cells by conditioned medium and platelet-rich plasma. platelet-rich plasma in culture medium affected the expression of genes in a dose-dependent manner. The 15% concentration stimulated proliferation almost eightfold. Mesenchymal markers were unaffected. Interestingly, expression of collagens type 1 and 3 increased at lower concentrations, whereas transforming growth factor-β showed reduced expression in lower concentrations. Proangiogenic gene expression was unaltered or strongly reduced in a dose-dependent manner. platelet-rich plasma promoted endothelial sprouting and survival in a dose-dependent manner; however, conditioned medium from adipose-derived stromal cells exposed to platelet-rich plasma blocked endothelial sprouting capabilities. The dose-dependent influence of platelet-rich plasma on the therapeutic capacity of adipose-derived stromal cells conditioned medium in vitro warrants caution in clinical trials.

  1. Acupoint Injection of Autologous Stromal Vascular Fraction and Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Treat Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Marx

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue show great therapeutic potential in veterinary medicine, but some points such as the use of fresh or cultured cells and route of administration need better knowledge. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, n=4 or allogeneic cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, n=5 injected into acupuncture points in dogs with hip dysplasia and weak response to drug therapy. Canine ASCs have proliferation and differentiation potential similar to ASCs from other species. After the first week of treatment, clinical evaluation showed marked improvement compared with baseline results in all patients treated with autologous SVF and three of the dogs treated with allogeneic ASCs. On days 15 and 30, all dogs showed improvement in range of motion, lameness at trot, and pain on manipulation of the joints, except for one ASC-treated patient. Positive results were more clearly seen in the SVF-treated group. These results show that autologous SVF or allogeneic ASCs can be safely used in acupoint injection for treating hip dysplasia in dogs and represent an important therapeutic alternative for this type of pathology. Further studies are necessary to assess a possible advantage of SVF cells in treating joint diseases.

  2. Acupoint injection of autologous stromal vascular fraction and allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells to treat hip dysplasia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Camila; Silveira, Maiele Dornelles; Selbach, Isabel; da Silva, Ariel Silveira; Braga, Luisa Maria Gomes de Macedo; Camassola, Melissa; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue show great therapeutic potential in veterinary medicine, but some points such as the use of fresh or cultured cells and route of administration need better knowledge. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, n = 4) or allogeneic cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, n = 5) injected into acupuncture points in dogs with hip dysplasia and weak response to drug therapy. Canine ASCs have proliferation and differentiation potential similar to ASCs from other species. After the first week of treatment, clinical evaluation showed marked improvement compared with baseline results in all patients treated with autologous SVF and three of the dogs treated with allogeneic ASCs. On days 15 and 30, all dogs showed improvement in range of motion, lameness at trot, and pain on manipulation of the joints, except for one ASC-treated patient. Positive results were more clearly seen in the SVF-treated group. These results show that autologous SVF or allogeneic ASCs can be safely used in acupoint injection for treating hip dysplasia in dogs and represent an important therapeutic alternative for this type of pathology. Further studies are necessary to assess a possible advantage of SVF cells in treating joint diseases.

  3. Toxicity and oxidative stress of canine mesenchymal stromal cells from adipose tissue in different culture passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arícia Gomes Sprada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stem cells in regenerative therapy have received attention from researchers in recent decades. The culture of these cells allows studies about their behavior and metabolism. Thus, cell culture is the basis for cell therapy and tissue engineering researches. A major concern regarding the use of cultivated stem cell in human or veterinary clinical routine is the risk of carcinogenesis. Cellular activities require a balanced redox state. However, when there is an imbalance in this state, oxidative stress occurs. Oxidative stress contributes to cytotoxicity, which may result in cell death or genomic alterations, favoring the development of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the behavior of cultured mesenchymal stem cells from canine adipose tissue according to its site of collection (omentum and subcutaneous evaluating the rate of proliferation, viability, level of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity over six passages. For this experiment, two samples of adipose tissue from subcutaneous and omentum where taken from a female dog corpse, 13 years old, Pitbull. The results showed greater levels of oxidative stress in the first and last passages of both groups, favoring cytotoxicity and cell death.

  4. Toward reconstruction of the subcutaneous fat layer with the use of adipose-derived stromal cell-seeded collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Katharina; Jakubietz, Michael G; Jakubietz, Rafael G; Schmidt, Karsten; Muhr, Christian; Bauer-Kreisel, Petra; Blunk, Torsten

    2014-12-01

    Complex injuries of the upper and lower extremities often result in scarring and subsequent adhesion formation, which may cause severe pain and distinctly reduce range of motion. In revision surgery, replacement of the missing subcutaneous tissue is desirable to prevent new adhesions, to cushion scarred tendons and nerves and to regain tissue elasticity. Therefore, the objective of this study was the in vitro evaluation of cell-seeded collagen matrices to serve as the basis for the reconstruction of the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer. Five commercially available acellular dermal collagen matrices were seeded with human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASC). Size and shape stability of cell-matrix constructs were assessed and cell adhesion onto the matrix surface was evaluated histologically. Adipogenic differentiation of hASC on matrices was evaluated by means of histological staining, triglyceride quantification, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction gene expression analysis. The collagen matrix Permacol was the only cell-seeded material that exhibited excellent size and shape stability. For Permacol and Strattice, successful seeding with continuous cell layers on top of the matrices was observed. For both matrices, histological staining, triglyceride quantification and messenger RNA expression of adipogenic transcription factors indicated substantial adipogenic differentiation of hASC after long-term induction as well as after short-term induction of only 4 days. Of all matrices investigated, only Permacol exhibited adequate handling stability and the development of a thin adipose tissue layer on top of the matrix. Thus, this matrix appears promising to be used in the development of a subcutaneous cushioning layer after complex injuries involving large scar formation. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Subchondral bone response to injected adipose-derived stromal cells for treating osteoarthritis using an experimental rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilli, A; Giavaresi, G; Ferrari, A; Salamanna, F; Desando, G; Grigolo, B; Martini, L; Fini, M

    2017-01-01

    Although articular cartilage is the target of osteoarthritis (OA), its deterioration is not always clearly associated with patient symptoms. Because a functional interaction between cartilage and bone is crucial, the pathophysiology of OA and its treatment strategy must focus also on subchondral bone. We investigated whether adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) injected into a joint at two different concentrations could prevent subchondral bone damage after the onset of mild OA in a rabbit model. We measured both volumetric and densitometric aspects of bone remodeling. Although OA can stimulate bone remodeling either catabolically or anabolically over time, the accelerated turnover does not allow complete mineralization of new bone and therefore gradually reduces its density. We measured changes in morphometric and densitometric bone parameters using micro-CT analysis and correlated them with the corresponding parameters in cartilage and meniscus. We found that ASCs promoted cartilage repair and helped counteract the accelerated bone turnover that occurs with OA.

  6. Proinflammatory interleukins' production by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: the impact of cell culture conditions and cell-to-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Elena; Andrianova, Irina; Rylova, Julia; Gornostaeva, Aleksandra; Bobyleva, Polina; Buravkova, Ludmila

    2015-08-01

    The impact of culture conditions and interaction with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the interleukin (IL) gene expression profile and proinflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 production by adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) was investigated. A microarray analysis revealed a wide range of IL genes either under standard (20%) or hypoxic (5%) O2 concentrations, some highly up-regulated at hypoxia. IL-6 and IL-8 production was inversely dependent on cell culture density. In early (first-third) passages, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was higher at 20% O2 and in late (8th-12th) passages under 5% O2. Interaction between ASCs and mononuclear cells in indirect setting was accompanied with a significant decrease of IL-6 and did not result in the elevation of IL-8 concentration. Thereby, the production of proinflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8) may be affected by the ASC intrinsic features (density in culture, and duration of expansion), as well as by microenvironmental factors, such as hypoxia and the presence of blood-borne cells. These data are important for elucidating ASC paracrine activity regulation in vitro. They would also be on demand for optimisation of the cell therapy protocols, based on the application of ASC biologically active substances. SIGNIFICANCE PARAGRAPH: Ex vivo expansion is widely used for increasing the number of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and improving of their quality. The present study was designed to elucidate the particular factors influencing the interleukin production in ASCs. The presented data specified the parameters (i.e. cell density, duration of cultivation, hypoxia, etc.) that should be taken in mind when ASCs are intended to be used in protocols implying their paracrine activity. These data would be of considerable interest for researchers and clinicians working in the biomedical science. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Stromal cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue seeded in a native collagen/elastin dermal substitute reduce wound contraction in full thickness skin defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, H J; Middelkoop, E; van Heemstra-Hoen, M; Wildevuur, C H; Westerhof, W

    1995-10-01

    Dermal substitutes seeded with cultured fibroblasts have been developed to improve dermal regeneration in full thickness wounds. Because of cell cultivation, 3 weeks are required before patients can be treated with these autologous adipose tissue. This substitute is easily fabricated within hours, which allows immediate treatment of full thickness defects. Porcine full thickness wounds were substituted with native collagen/alpha-elastin hydrolysate matrices. One group of matrices was left unseeded as negative control. The second was seeded with cultured dermal fibroblasts as positive control. The third was seeded with a stromal-vascular-fraction of adipose tissue, and the fourth was seeded with a stromal fraction with few vascular fragments (SF). All substitutes were covered with split skin mesh grafts and were protected against dehydration and infection with a microporous polyether urethane membrane. For 8 weeks, weekly biopsies were taken, myofibroblasts and fibroblasts were counted, thickness of the granulation tissue band was measured, and wound contraction and histology were evaluated. Negative control and stromal-vascular-fraction substitutes were invaded by high numbers of myofibroblasts and fibroblasts. They did not reduce wound contraction, and scar tissue was formed. SF substitutes reduced the accumulation of myofibroblasts and fibroblasts and prevented the formation of granulation tissue. As a result, dermal regeneration improved, and wound contraction was less than by the other substitutes. Adipose tissue cell isolates included vascular fragments containing endothelial cells. Seeded in dermal substitutes, these vascular fragments induced hypergranulation tissue formation and caused wound contraction. SF substitutes contained few endothelial cells. As a result, the contraction arresting effect of the seeded stromal cell fraction was effective. Our concept of a cellular dermal substitute seeded with stromal cells from adipose tissue is feasible and allows

  8. Gateway-compatible transposon vector to genetically modify human embryonic kidney and adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Spyros; Raskó, Tamas; Mátés, Lajos; Ivics, Zoltan; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Kouzi-Koliakou, Kokkona; Koliakos, George

    2012-07-01

    The Gateway technology cloning system and transposon technology represent state-of-the-art laboratory techniques. Combination of these molecular tools allows rapid cloning of target genes into expression vectors. Here, we describe a novel Gateway technology-compatible transposon plasmid that combines the advantages of Gateway recombination cloning with the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated transgene integrations. In our system the transposition is catalyzed by the novel hyperactive SB100x transposase, and provides highly efficient and precise transgene integrations into the host genome. A Gateway-compatible transposon plasmid was generated in which the potential target gene can be fused with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tag at the N-terminal. The vector utilizes the CAGGS promoter to control fusion protein expression. The transposon expression vector encoding the YFP-interferon-β protein (IFNB1) fusion protein together with the hyperactive SB100x transposase was used to generate stable cell lines in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and rat adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC). ASCs and HEK293 cells stably expressed and secreted the human IFNB1 for up to 4 weeks after transfection. The generated Gateway-compatible transposon plasmid can be utilized for numerous experimental approaches, such as gene therapy or high-throughput screening methods in primary cells, representing a valuable molecular tool for laboratory applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Tissue-Related Hypoxia Attenuates Proinflammatory Effects of Allogeneic PBMCs on Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polina I. Bobyleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose tissue-stromal derived cells (ASCs are considered a perspective tool for regenerative medicine. Depending on the application mode ASC/allogeneic immune cell interaction can occur in the systemic circulation under plenty high concentrations of O2 and in target tissues at lower O2 levels. Here we examined the effects of allogeneic PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs on ASCs under ambient (20% oxygen and “physiological” hypoxia (5% O2. As revealed with microarray analysis ASCs under 20% O2 were more affected by activated PBMCs, which was manifested in differential expression of more than 300 genes, whereas under 5% O2 only 140 genes were changed. Altered gene pattern was only partly overlapped at different O2 conditions. Under O2 ASCs retained their proliferative and differentiative capacities, mesenchymal phenotype, and intracellular organelle’ state. ASCs were proinflammatory activated on transcription level that was confirmed by their ability to suppress activation and proliferation of mitogen-stimulated PBMCs. ASC/PBMCs interaction resulted in anti-inflammatory shift of paracrine mediators in conditioning medium with significant increase of immunosuppressive LIF level. Our data indicated that under both ambient and tissue-related O2 ASCs possessed immunosuppressive potential and maintained functional activity. Under “physiological” hypoxia ASCs were less susceptible to “priming” by allogeneic mitogen-activated PBMCs.

  10. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  11. Human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells transduced with GFP lentiviral vectors: assessment of immunophenotype and differentiation capacity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vollenstee, Fiona A; Jackson, Carlo; Hoffmann, Danie; Potgieter, Marnie; Durandt, Chrisna; Pepper, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    Adipose derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (ASCs) are a heterogeneous population characterized by (a) their ability to adhere to plastic; (b) immunophenotypic expression of certain cell surface markers, while lacking others; and (c) the capacity to differentiate into lineages of mesodermal origin including osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. The long-term goal is to utilize these cells for clinical translation into cell-based therapies. However, preclinical safety and efficacy need to be demonstrated in animal models. ASCs can also be utilized as biological vehicles for vector-based gene delivery systems, since they are believed to home to sites of inflammation and infection in vivo. These factors motivated the development of a labelling system for ASCs using lentiviral vector-based green fluorescent protein (GFP) transduction. Human ASCs were transduced with GFP-expressing lentiviral vectors. A titration study determined the viral titer required to transduce the maximum number of ASCs. The effect of the transduced GFP lentiviral vector on ASC immunophenotypic expression of surface markers as well as their ability to differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes were assessed in vitro. A transduction efficiency in ASC cultures of approximately 80 % was observed with an MOI of ~118. No significant immunophenotypic differences were observed between transduced and non-transduced cells and both cell types successfully differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. We obtained >80 % transduction of ASCs using GFP lentiviral vectors. Transduced ASCs maintained plastic adherence, demonstrated ASC immunophenotype and the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage. This GFP-ASC transduction technique offers a potential tracking system for future pre-clinical studies.

  12. Identification of suitable reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis in rat adipose stromal cells induced to trilineage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno Paiva Dos; da Costa Diesel, Luciana Fraga; da Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Camassola, Melissa

    2016-12-15

    This study was designed to (i) identify stable reference genes for the analysis of gene expression during in vitro differentiation of rat adipose stromal cells (rASCs), (ii) recommend stable genes for individual treatment conditions, and (iii) validate these genes by comparison with normalization results from stable and unstable reference genes. On the basis of a literature review, eight genes were selected: Actb, B2m, Hprt1, Ppia, Rplp0, Rpl13a, Rpl5, and Ywhaz. Genes were ranked according to their stability under different culture conditions as assessed using GenNorm, NormFinder, and RefFinder algorithms. Although the employed algorithms returned different rankings, the most frequently top-ranked genes were: B2m and/or Ppia for all 28day treatments (ALL28); Ppia and Hprt1 (adipogenic differentiation; A28), B2m (chondrogenic differentiation; C28), Rpl5 (controls maintained in complete culture medium; CCM), Rplp0 (osteogenic differentiation for 3days; O3), Rpl13a and Actb (osteogenic differentiation for 7days; O7), Rplp0 and Ppia (osteogenic differentiation for 14days; O14), Hprt1 and Ppia (osteogenic differentiation for 28days; O28), as well as Actb (all osteogenesis time points combined; ALLOSTEO). The obtained results indicate that the performance of reference genes depends on the differentiation protocol and on the analysis time, thus providing valuable information for the design of RT-PCR experiments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Comparison of immunological properties of bone marrow stromal cells and adipose tissue-derived stem cells before and after osteogenic differentiation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Kornacker, Martin; Mehlhorn, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from various tissues and represent an attractive cell population for tissue-engineering purposes. MSCs from bone marrow (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) are negative for immunologically relevant surface markers and inhibit proliferation of allogenic...... T cells in vitro. Therefore, BMSCs are said to be available for allogenic cell therapy. Although the immunological characteristics of BMSCs have been the subject of various investigations, those of stem cells isolated from adipose tissue (ASCs) have not been adequately described. In addition......, the influence of osteogenic differentiation in vitro on the immunological characteristics of BMSCs and ASCs is the subject of this article. Before and after osteogenic induction, the influence of BMSCs and ASCs on the proliferative behavior of resting and activated allogenic peripheral blood mononuclear cells...

  14. Flow cytometry on the stromal-vascular fraction of white adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adipose tissue contains cell types other than adipocytes that may contribute to complications linked to obesity. For example, macrophages have been shown to infiltrate adipose tissue in response to a high-fat diet. Isolation of the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue allows one to use flow c...

  15. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell–matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures.

  16. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho, E-mail: sangho@snu.ac.kr

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide induces proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro via TLR4 activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzmann, Nicole; Salamon, Achim [Department of Cell Biology, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Fiedler, Tomas [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology and Hygiene, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are capable of multi-lineage differentiation and support regenerative processes. In bacterial infections, resident MSC can come intocontact with and need to react to bacterial components. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a typical structure of Gram-negative bacteria, increases the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSC. LPS is usually recognized by the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and induces pro-inflammatory reactions in numerous cell types. In this study, we quantified the protein expression of TLR4 and CD14 on adipose-derived MSC (adMSC) in osteogenic differentiation and investigated the effect of TLR4 activation by LPS on NF-κB activation, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. We found that TLR4 is expressed on adMSC whereas CD14 is not, and that osteogenic differentiation induced an increase of the amount of TLR4 protein whereas LPS stimulation did not. Moreover, we could show that NF-κB activation via TLR4 occurs upon LPS treatment. Furthermore, we were able to show that competitive inhibition of TLR4 completely abolished the stimulatory effect of LPS on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC. In addition, the inhibition of TLR4 leads to the complete absence of osteogenic differentiation of adMSC, even when osteogenically stimulated. Thus, we conclude that LPS induces proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of adMSC in vitro through the activation of TLR4 and that the TLR4 receptor seems to play a role during osteogenic differentiation of adMSC.

  18. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marro...

  20. Influence of vascular endothelial growth factor stimulation and serum deprivation on gene activation patterns of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tratwal, Josefine; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Juhl, Morten

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stimulation of mesenchymal stromal cells and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been used in multiple animal studies and clinical trials for regenerative purposes. VEGF stimulation is believed to promote angiogenesis and VEGF...... stimulation is usually performed under serum deprivation. Potential regenerative molecular mechanisms are numerous and the role of contributing factors is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of in vitro serum deprivation and VEGF stimulation on gene expression patterns...... of ASCs. METHODS: Gene expressions of ASCs cultured in complete medium, ASCs cultured in serum-deprived medium and ASCs stimulated with VEGF in serum-deprived medium were compared. ASC characteristics according to criteria set by the International Society of Cellular Therapy were confirmed by flow...

  1. Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Ameliorate Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Regulating Self-Reactive T Cell Responses and Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have emerged as a promising therapy for autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS. Administration of MSCs to MS patients has proven safe with signs of immunomodulation but their therapeutic efficacy remains low. The aim of the current study has been to further characterize the immunomodulatory mechanisms of adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs in vitro and in vivo using the EAE model of chronic brain inflammation in mice. We found that murine ASCs (mASCs suppress T cell proliferation in vitro via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 1/2 activities. mASCs also prevented the lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced maturation of dendritic cells (DCs in vitro. The addition of the COX-1/2 inhibitor indomethacin, but not the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME, reversed the block in DC maturation implicating prostaglandin (PG E2 in this process. In vivo, early administration of murine and human ASCs (hASCs ameliorated myelin oligodendrocyte protein- (MOG35-55- induced EAE in C57Bl/6 mice. Mechanistic studies showed that mASCs suppressed the function of autoantigen-specific T cells and also decreased the frequency of activated (CD11c+CD40high and CD11c+TNF-α+ DCs in draining lymph nodes (DLNs. In summary, these data suggest that mASCs reduce EAE severity, in part, through the impairment of DC and T cell function.

  2. Recombinant human collagen-based microspheres mitigate cardiac conduction slowing induced by adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoline W Smit

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction is hampered by poor cell retention, while it may also increase the risk of arrhythmias by providing an arrhythmogenic substrate. We previously showed that porcine adipose tissue-derived-stromal cells (pASC induce conduction slowing through paracrine actions, whereas rat ASC (rASC and human ASC (hASC induce conduction slowing by direct coupling. We postulate that biomaterial microspheres mitigate the conduction slowing influence of pASC by interacting with paracrine signaling.To investigate the modulation of ASC-loaded recombinant human collagen-based microspheres, on the electrophysiological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM.Unipolar extracellular electrograms, derived from microelectrode arrays (8x8 electrodes containing NRVM, co-cultured with ASC or ASC loaded microspheres, were used to determine conduction velocity (CV and conduction heterogeneity. Conditioned medium (Cme of (cocultures was used to assess paracrine mechanisms.Microspheres did not affect CV in control (NRVM monolayers. In co-cultures of NRVM and rASC, hASC or pASC, CV was lower than in controls (14.4±1.0, 13.0±0.6 and 9.0± 1.0 vs. 19.5±0.5 cm/s respectively, p<0.001. Microspheres loaded with either rASC or hASC still induced conduction slowing compared to controls (13.5±0.4 and 12.6±0.5 cm/s respectively, p<0.001. However, pASC loaded microspheres increased CV of NRVM compared to pASC and NRMV co-cultures (16.3±1.3 cm/s, p< 0.001 and did not differ from controls (p = NS. Cme of pASC reduced CV in control monolayers of NRVM (10.3±1.1 cm/s, p<0.001, similar to Cme derived from pASC-loaded microspheres (11.1±1.7 cm/s, p = 1.0. The presence of microspheres in monolayers of NRVM abolished the CV slowing influence of Cme pASC (15.9±1.0 cm/s, p = NS vs. control.The application of recombinant human collagen-based microspheres mitigates indirect paracrine conduction slowing through

  3. Characterization of porcine multipotent stem/stromal cells derived from skin, adipose, and ovarian tissues and their differentiation in vitro into putative oocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seung-Hee; Kumar, Basavarajappa Mohana; Kang, Eun-Ju; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Tae-Ho; Ock, Sun-A; Lee, Sung-Lim; Jeon, Byeong-Gyun; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2011-08-01

    The present study evaluated the alkaline phosphatase activity, cell cycle stage, expression of markers and early transcriptional factors, and in vitro differentiation into selected cell lineages of porcine stem/stromal cells (SCs) isolated from skin (SSCs), adipose, and ovarian (OSCs) tissues. Skin and adipose SCs were isolated from a 6-month-old miniature pig, whereas OSCs were isolated from a newly born piglet. Isolated cells exhibited fibroblast-like cell population with significant renewal capacity and formed colonies by cells out-growth. All cells were positive for alkaline phosphatase activity and showed a relatively lower population at G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. SCs derived from all tissues were strongly positive for cell surface markers, such as CD29, CD44, CD90, and vimentin. Further, relatively lower expression of cytokeratin and immunophenotype markers, such as major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), was also observed. SCs derived from all tissues positively expressed the transcription factors, such as Oct-3/4, Nanog, and Sox-2. After induction, all SCs successfully differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes and expressed the lineage specific marker genes. Further, cells from all tissues exhibited their potential for in vitro oogenesis with morphological changes and expression of markers during the germ-cell formation, namely Oct-4, growth differentiation factor 9b, c-Mos, Vasa, deleted in azoospermia-like gene, zona pellucida C, and follicle stimulating hormone receptor. Apart from basic features and selected lineage potential among all types of cells, OSCs possessed a greater ability to differentiate into the germ cell lineage in vitro.

  4. Promotion of Survival and Engraftment of Transplanted Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal and Vascular Cells by Overexpression of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Baldari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Short-term persistence of transplanted cells during early post-implant period limits clinical efficacy of cell therapy. Poor cell survival is mainly due to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment transplanted cells face at the site of implantation and to anoikis, driven by cell adhesion loss. We evaluated the hypothesis that viral-mediated expression of a gene conferring hypoxia resistance to cells before transplant could enhance survival of grafted cells in early stages after implant. We used adipose tissue as cell source because it consistently provides high yields of adipose-tissue-derived stromal and vascular cells (ASCs, suitable for regenerative purposes. Luciferase positive cells were transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing either green fluorescent protein as control or human manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2. Cells were then exposed in vitro to hypoxic conditions, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site. Cells overexpressing SOD2 displayed survival rates significantly greater compared to mock transduced cells. Similar results were also obtained in vivo after implantation into syngeneic mice and assessment of cell engraftment by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Taken together, these findings suggest that ex vivo gene transfer of SOD2 into ASCs before implantation confers a cytoprotective effect leading to improved survival and engraftment rates, therefore enhancing cell therapy regenerative potential.

  5. Human adipose-derived stromal cells in a clinically applicable injectable alginate hydrogel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarke Follin; Juhl, Morten; Cohen, Smadar

    2015-01-01

    is to inject the cells in an in situ cross-linked alginate hydrogel. METHODS: ASCs from abdominal human tissue were embedded in alginate hydrogel and alginate hydrogel modified with Arg-Gly-Asp motifs (RGD-alginate) and cultured for 1 week. Cell viability, phenotype, immunogenicity and paracrine activity were...... determined by confocal microscopy, dendritic cell co-culture, flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Luminex multiplex, and lymphocyte proliferation experiments. RESULTS: ASCs performed equally well in alginate and RGD-alginate. After 1 week of alginate culture, cell...... viability was >93%. Mesenchymal markers CD90 and CD29 were reduced compared with International Society for Cellular Therapy criteria. Cells sedimented from the alginates during cultivation regained the typical level of these markers, and trilineage differentiation was performed by standard protocols...

  6. Long-term in-vivo tumorigenic assessment of human culture-expanded adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacIsaac, Zoe Marie, E-mail: zmm4a@virgina.edu [University of Virginia (United States); Shang, Hulan, E-mail: shanghulan@gmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Agrawal, Hitesh, E-mail: hiteshdos@hotmail.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Yang, Ning, E-mail: ny6u@virgina.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Parker, Anna, E-mail: amp4v@virginia.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia (United States); Katz, Adam J., E-mail: ajk2f@virginia.edu [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Virginia (United States)

    2012-02-15

    After more than a decade of extensive experimentation, the promise of stem cells to revolutionize the field of medicine has negotiated their entry into clinical trial. Adipose tissue specifically holds potential as an attainable and abundant source of stem cells. Currently undergoing investigation are adipose stem cell (ASC) therapies for diabetes and critical limb ischemia, among others. In the enthusiastic pursuit of regenerative therapies, however, questions remain regarding ASC persistence and migration, and, importantly, their safety and potential for neoplasia. To date, assays of in vivo ASC activity have been limited by early end points. We hypothesized that with time, ASCs injected subcutaneously undergo removal by normal tissue turnover and homeostasis, and by the host's immune system. In this study, a high dose of culture expanded ASCs was formulated and implanted as multicellular aggregates into immunocompromised mice, which were maintained for over one year. Animals were monitored for toxicity, and surviving cells quantified at study endpoint. No difference in growth/weight or lifespan was found between cell-treated and vehicle treated animals, and no malignancies were detected in treated animals. Moreover, real-time PCR for a human specific sequence, ERV-3, detected no persistent ASCs. With the advent of clinical application, clarification of currently enigmatic stem cell properties has become imperative. Our study represents the longest duration determination of stem cell activity in vivo, and contributes strong evidence in support of the safety of adipose derived stem cell applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose stem cells promise novel clinical therapies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Before clinical translation, safety profiles must be further elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non-autologous adipose stem cells do not form tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subcutaneously injected non

  7. Comparison of Immunomodulation Properties of Porcine Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells Derived from the Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue, and Dermal Skin Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-A Ock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs demonstrate immunomodulation capacity that has been implicated in the reduction of graft-versus-host disease. Accordingly, we herein investigated the capacity of MSCs derived from several tissue sources to modulate both proinflammatory (interferon [IFN] γ and tumor necrosis factor [TNF] α and immunosuppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF] β and interleukin [IL] 10 employing xenogeneic human MSC-mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR test. Bone marrow-derived MSCs showed higher self-renewal capacity with relatively slow proliferation rate in contrast to adipose-derived MSCs which displayed higher proliferation rate. Except for the lipoprotein gene, there were no marked changes in osteogenesis- and adipogenesis-related genes following in vitro differentiation; however, the histological marker analysis revealed that adipose MSCs could be differentiated into both adipose and bone tissue. TGFβ and IL10 were detected in adipose MSCs and bone marrow MSCs, respectively. However, skin-derived MSCs expressed both IFNγ and IL10, which may render them sensitive to immunomodulation. The xenogeneic human MLR test revealed that MSCs had a partial immunomodulation capacity, as proliferation of activated and resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not affected, but this did not differ among MSC sources. MSCs were not tumorigenic when introduced into immunodeficient mice. We concluded that the characteristics of MSCs are tissue source-dependent and their in vivo application requires more in-depth investigation regarding their precise immunomodulation capacities.

  8. Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    results are hypothesis-generating and provide the foundation for future studies that will 1) validate the role for newly identified mediators of obesity...Specifically, we will develop the molecular and analytical tools to identify and classify the identity and function of individual cell types within the...easily dissociated (generally with limited ɝ minutes of trypsin digestion). Dissociating individual SVF cells from whole tissues efficiently to ensure

  9. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  10. Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    samples (Aim 2) due to the primary bariatric surgeon aiding us in obtaining these samples leaving this summer to another institution. We are currently...subjects having abdominal surgeries to examine depot- specific cell types and transcriptional profiles and finish the mouse experiments using paired

  11. Rhodamine bound maghemite as a long-term dual imaging nanoprobe of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cmiel, V.; Skopalík, J.; Poláková, K.; Solař, J.; Havrdová, M.; Milde, D.; Justan, I.; Magro, M.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Provazník, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, JUL (2017), s. 433-444 ISSN 0175-7571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : intracellular fluorescent labels * stem cell tracking * dual contrast agents * iron oxide nanoparticles * confocal microscopy * mesenchymal stromal cells * rhodamine Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2016

  12. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten; Brorsen, Sonja K; Søndergaard, Rebekka H; Kastrup, Jens; Ekblond, Annette

    2016-11-16

    Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) are a rich and convenient source of cells for clinical regenerative therapeutic approaches. However, applications of ASCs often require cell expansion to reach the needed dose. In this study, cultivation of ASCs from stromal vascular fraction (SVF) over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system) is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0) and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential was consistent with ISCT/IFATS standards for the ASC phenotype. Sterility, mycoplasma, and endotoxin tests were consistently negative. An average of 8.0 × 107 SVF cells loaded into a Quantum system yielded 8.96 × 107 ASCs P0, while 4.5 × 106 SVF cells seeded per T75 flask yielded an average of 2.37 × 106 ASCs-less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD) around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to safe and robust cell production. Notably, the use of the Quantum

  13. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Haack-Sørensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs are a rich and convenient source of cells for clinical regenerative therapeutic approaches. However, applications of ASCs often require cell expansion to reach the needed dose. In this study, cultivation of ASCs from stromal vascular fraction (SVF over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Methods Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded into either T75 flasks or a Quantum system that had been coated with cryoprecipitate. The cultivation of ASCs from SVF was performed in 3 ways: flask to flask; flask to Quantum system; and Quantum system to Quantum system. In all cases, quality controls were conducted for sterility, mycoplasmas, and endotoxins, in addition to the assessment of cell counts, viability, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential. Results The viability of ASCs passage 0 (P0 and P1 was above 96%, regardless of cultivation in flasks or Quantum system. Expression of surface markers and differentiation potential was consistent with ISCT/IFATS standards for the ASC phenotype. Sterility, mycoplasma, and endotoxin tests were consistently negative. An average of 8.0 × 107 SVF cells loaded into a Quantum system yielded 8.96 × 107 ASCs P0, while 4.5 × 106 SVF cells seeded per T75 flask yielded an average of 2.37 × 106 ASCs—less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Conclusion: Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to

  14. Flow cytometric cell sorting and in vitro pre-osteoinduction are not requirements for in vivo bone formation by human adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunsong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Tong; Zhao, Xianghui; Ma, Gui-e; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASCs) are a promising cell source for bone tissue engineering. However, before the clinical application of hASCs for the treatment of bone defects, key questions require answers, including whether pre-osteoinduction (OI) and flow cytometric cell purification are indispensible steps for in vivo bone formation by hASCs. In this study, hASCs were purified by flow cytometric cell sorting (FCCS). The osteogenic capabilities of hASCs and purified hASCs with or without pre-osteoinduction were examined through in vitro and in vivo experiments. We found that pre-OI enhanced the in vitro osteogenic capacity of hASCs. However, 8 weeks after in vivo implantation, there were no significant differences between hASCs and hASCs that had undergone OI (hASCs+OI) or between purified hASCs and purified hASCs+OI (P>0.05). Interestingly, we also found that purified hASCs had an osteogenic potential similar to that of unpurified hASCs in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that FCCS and in vitro pre-OI are not requirements for in vivo bone formation by hASCs.

  15. Flow cytometric cell sorting and in vitro pre-osteoinduction are not requirements for in vivo bone formation by human adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsong Liu

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASCs are a promising cell source for bone tissue engineering. However, before the clinical application of hASCs for the treatment of bone defects, key questions require answers, including whether pre-osteoinduction (OI and flow cytometric cell purification are indispensible steps for in vivo bone formation by hASCs. In this study, hASCs were purified by flow cytometric cell sorting (FCCS. The osteogenic capabilities of hASCs and purified hASCs with or without pre-osteoinduction were examined through in vitro and in vivo experiments. We found that pre-OI enhanced the in vitro osteogenic capacity of hASCs. However, 8 weeks after in vivo implantation, there were no significant differences between hASCs and hASCs that had undergone OI (hASCs+OI or between purified hASCs and purified hASCs+OI (P>0.05. Interestingly, we also found that purified hASCs had an osteogenic potential similar to that of unpurified hASCs in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that FCCS and in vitro pre-OI are not requirements for in vivo bone formation by hASCs.

  16. Tracking of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology after intralesional treatment of artificial equine tendon lesions : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geburek, Florian; Mundle, Kathrin; Conrad, Sabine; Hellige, Maren; Walliser, Ulrich; van Schie, Hans T M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/184641411; van Weeren, René|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628550; Skutella, Thomas; Stadler, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) are frequently used to treat equine tendinopathies. Up to now, knowledge about the fate of autologous AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) is very limited. The purpose of

  17. Identical effects of VEGF and serum-deprivation on phenotype and function of adipose-derived stromal cells from healthy donors and patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Bjarke; Tratwal, Josefine; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Kastrup, Jens; Ekblond, Annette

    2013-09-18

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) stimulated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and serum-deprived, are applied in the first in-man double-blind placebo-controlled MyStromalCell Trial, as a novel therapeutic option for treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD). This in vitro study explored the effect of VEGF and serum deprivation on endothelial differentiation capacity of ASCs from healthy donors and IHD patients. ASCs stimulated with rhVEGF(A165) in serum-deprived medium for one to three weeks were compared with ASCs in serum-deprived (2% fetal bovine serum) or complete medium (10% fetal bovine serum). Expression of VEGF receptors, endothelial and stem cell markers was measured using qPCR, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. In vitro tube formation and proliferation was also measured. ASCs from VEGF-stimulated and serum-deprived medium significantly increased transcription of transcription factor FOXF1, endothelial marker vWF and receptor VEGFR1 compared with ASCs from complete medium. ASCs maintained stem cell characteristics in all conditions. Tube formation of ASCs occurred in VEGF-stimulated and serum-deprived medium. The only difference between healthy and patient ASCs was a variation in proliferation rate. ASCs from IHD patients and healthy donors proved equally inclined to differentiate in endothelial direction by serum-deprivation, however with no visible additive effect of VEGF stimulation. The treatment did not result in complete endothelial differentiation, but priming towards endothelial lineage.

  18. Fascia Origin of Adipose Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xueying; Lyu, Ying; Wang, Weiyi; Zhang, Yanfei; Li, Danhua; Wei, Suning; Du, Congkuo; Geng, Bin; Sztalryd, Carole; Xu, Guoheng

    2016-05-01

    Adipocytes might arise from vascular stromal cells, pericytes and endothelia within adipose tissue or from bone marrow cells resident in nonadipose tissue. Here, we identified adipose precursor cells resident in fascia, an uninterrupted sheet of connective tissue that extends throughout the body. The cells and fragments of superficial fascia from the rat hindlimb were highly capable of spontaneous and induced adipogenic differentiation but not myogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Fascial preadipocytes expressed multiple markers of adipogenic progenitors, similar to subcutaneous adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) but discriminative from visceral ASCs. Such preadipocytes resided in fascial vasculature and were physiologically active in vivo. In growing rats, adipocytes dynamically arose from the adventitia to form a thin adipose layer in the fascia. Later, some adipocytes appeared to overlay on top of other adipocytes, an early sign for the formation of three-dimensional adipose tissue in fascia. The primitive adipose lobules extended invariably along blood vessels toward the distal fascia areas. At the lobule front, nascent capillaries wrapped and passed ahead of mature adipocytes to form the distal neovasculature niche, which might replenish the pool of preadipocytes and supply nutrients and hormones necessary for continuous adipogenesis. Our findings suggest a novel model for the origin of adipocytes from the fascia, which explains both neogenesis and expansion of adipose tissue. Fascial preadipocytes generate adipose cells to form primitive adipose lobules in superficial fascia, a subcutaneous nonadipose tissue. With continuous adipogenesis, these primitive adipose lobules newly formed in superficial fascia may be the rudiment of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Stem Cells 2016;34:1407-1419. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  19. The role of simvastatin in the osteogenesis of injectable tissue-engineered bone based on human adipose-derived stromal cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongsheng; Ni, Yongwei; Liu, Yunsong; Zeng, Baijin; Xu, Yongwei; Ge, Wenshu

    2010-07-01

    An injectable tissue-engineered bone (ITB) composed of human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (hPRP) was preliminarily constructed, but its osteogenic capability needs improving. This study aimed to evaluate if simvastatin can be applied as a bone anabolic agent for this ITB. We found 0.01 microm, 0.1 microm, and 1 microm simvastatin could induce hADSCs' osteoblastic differentiation in vitro that accompanied with non-inhibition on cell proliferation, high alkaline phosphatase activity, more mineralization deposition and more expression of osteoblast-related genes such as osteocalcin, core binding factor alpha1, bone morphogenetic protein-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Simvastatin at 1 mum seemed the most optimal concentration due to its high osteocalcin secretion in media (P investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stromal-vascular fraction content and adipose stem cell behavior are altered in morbid obese and post bariatric surgery ex-obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Karina R; Liechocki, Sally; Carneiro, João R; Claudio-da-Silva, Cesar; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Borojevic, Radovan; Baptista, Leandra S

    2015-04-14

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue is an interesting source of autologous stem cells with a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of obesity, metabolic syndromes and insulin resistance. We hypothesize that obesity could alter the stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) and adipose stem cell (ASCs) functions, which could compromise its regenerative behavior. Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate whether ASCs derived from post bariatric surgery ex-obese women maintain their functions in a similar fashion as do those from individuals who have never been obese. The SVF of subcutaneous adipose tissue from control (n = 6, body mass index - BMI - 27.5 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)), obese (n = 12, BMI 46.2 ± 5.1 kg/m(2)) and post bariatric surgery ex-obese (n = 7, initial BMI 47.8 ± 1.3 kg/m(2); final BMI 28.1 ± 1.1 kg/m(2)) women were isolated and evaluated by flow cytometry. ASCs were tested for lipid accumulation by perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and Oil Red O staining after adipogenic stimulus. The cytokines secreted by the ASCs and after lipid accumulation induction were also evaluated. The subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese and post bariatric surgery ex-obese women was enriched in pericytes (p = 0.0345). The number of supra-adventitial cells was not altered in the obese patients, but it was highly enriched in the post bariatric surgery ex-obese women (p = 0.0099). The ASCs of the post bariatric surgery ex-obese patients secreted more MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1; p = 0.0078). After lipid accumulation induction, the ASCs of the patients in all groups secreted less IL-6 than the ASCs with no adipogenic stimulus (p women had the lowest levels (p women; these changes are not completely restored after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss. The cellular alterations described in this study could affect the regenerative effects of adipose stem cells. Further investigations are required to avoid jeopardizing the

  1. TGF-β1 and GDF5 Act Synergistically to Drive the Differentiation of Human Adipose Stromal Cells toward Nucleus Pulposus-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombier, Pauline; Clouet, Johann; Boyer, Cécile; Ruel, Maëva; Bonin, Gaëlle; Lesoeur, Julie; Moreau, Anne; Fellah, Borhane-Hakim; Weiss, Pierre; Lescaudron, Laurent; Camus, Anne; Guicheux, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) primarily affects the central part of the intervertebral disc namely the nucleus pulposus (NP). DDD explains about 40% of low back pain and is characterized by massive cellular alterations that ultimately result in the disappearance of resident NP cells. Thus, repopulating the NP with regenerative cells is a promising therapeutic approach and remains a great challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of growth factor-driven protocols to commit human adipose stromal cells (hASCs) toward NP-like cell phenotype and the involvement of Smad proteins in this differentiation process. Here, we demonstrate that the transforming growth factor-β1 and the growth differentiation factor 5 synergistically drive the nucleopulpogenic differentiation process. The commitment of the hASCs was robust and highly specific as attested by the expression of NP-related genes characteristic of young healthy human NP cells. In addition, the engineered NP-like cells secreted an abundant aggrecan and type II collagen rich extracellular matrix comparable with that of native NP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these in vitro engineered cells survived, maintained their specialized phenotype and secretory activity after in vivo transplantation in nude mice subcutis. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting that the Smad 2/3 pathway mainly governed the acquisition of the NP cell molecular identity while the Smad1/5/8 pathway controlled the NP cell morphology. This study offers valuable insights for the development of biologically-inspired treatments for DDD by generating adapted and exhaustively characterized autologous regenerative cells. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Efficient generation of smooth muscle cells from adipose-derived stromal cells by 3D mechanical stimulation can substitute the use of growth factors in vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A M; Poot, André A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Occluding artery disease causes a high demand for bioartificial replacement vessels. We investigated the combined use of biodegradable and creep-free poly (1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with smooth muscle cells (SMC) derived by biochemical or mechanical stimulation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC) to engineer bioartificial arteries. Biochemical induction of cultured ASC to SMC was done with TGF-β1 for 7d. Phenotype and function were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunodetection and collagen contraction assays. The influence of mechanical stimulation on non-differentiated and pre-differentiated ASC, loaded in porous tubular PTMC scaffolds, was assessed after culturing under pulsatile flow for 14d. Assays included qRT-PCR, production of extracellular matrix and scanning electron microscopy. ASC adhesion and TGF-β1-driven differentiation to contractile SMC on PTMC did not differ from tissue culture polystyrene controls. Mesenchymal and SMC markers were increased compared to controls. Interestingly, pre-differentiated ASC had only marginal higher contractility than controls. Moreover, in 3D PTMC scaffolds, mechanical stimulation yielded well-aligned ASC-derived SMC which deposited ECM. Under the same conditions, pre-differentiated ASC-derived SMC maintained their SMC phenotype. Our results show that mechanical stimulation can replace TGF-β1 pre-stimulation to generate SMC from ASC and that pre-differentiated ASC keep their SMC phenotype with increased expression of SMC markers. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Adipose Stromal Cells from Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat Facilitate Migration of Ovarian Cancer Cells via IL-6/JAK2/STAT3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boyun; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Soochi; Haegeman, Guy; Tsang, Benjamin K; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Song, Yong Sang

    2017-04-01

    Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) play an important regulatory role in cancer progression and metastasis by regulating systemic inflammation and tissue metabolism. This study examined whether visceral and subcutaneous ASCs (V- and S-ASCs) facilitate the growth and migration of ovarian cancer cells. CD45(-) and CD31(-) double-negative ASCs were isolated from the subcutaneous and visceral fat using magnetic-activated cell sorting. Ovarian cancer cells were cultured in conditioned media (CM) obtained from ASCs to determine the cancer-promoting effects of ASCs. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Boyden chamber assay, and western blotting were performed to determine the proliferative activity, migration ability, and activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, respectively. CM from ASCs enhanced the migration of the ovarian cancer line, SKOV3, via activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Interestingly, in response to ASC-CM, the ascites cells derived from an ovarian cancer patient showed an increase in growth and migration. The migration of ovarian cancer cells was suppressed by blocking the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 using a neutralizing antibody against interleukin 6, small molecular inhibitors (e.g., WP1066 and TG101348), and silencing of STAT3 using siRNA. Anatomical differences between S- and V-ASCs did not affect the growth and migration of the ovarian cancer cell line and ascites cells from the ovarian cancer patients. ASCs may regulate the progression of ovarian cancer, and possibly provide a potential target for anticancer therapy.

  4. A xeno-free microcarrier-based stirred culture system for the scalable expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelo, Joana G; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Diogo, Maria Margarida; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2015-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are promising candidates for cell-based therapies and the development of microcarrier-based cultures in scalable bioreactors with well-defined xenogeneic-free components represent important milestones towards the clinical-scale production of these cells. In this work, we optimized our previously developed xeno-free microcarrier-based system for the scalable expansion of human MSC isolated from bone marrow (BM MSC) and adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASC). By adapting the agitation/feeding protocol at the initial cell seeding/cultivation stage in spinner flasks, we were able to maximize cell expansion rate and final cell yield. Maximal cell densities of 3.6 × 10(5) and 1.9 × 10(5) cells/mL were obtained for BM MSC (0.60 ± 0.04 day(-1) ) and ASC (0.9 ± 0.1 day(-1) ) cultures, upon seven and eight days of cultivation, respectively. Ready-to-use microcarriers Synthemax® II and Enhanced Attachment® supported identical expansion performance of BM MSC, turning those effective alternatives to the pre-coated plastic microcarriers used in our xeno-free scalable culture system. Importantly, expanded MSC maintained their immunophenotype and multilineage differentiation potential. Moreover, secretome analysis suggested a priming effect of stirred culture conditions on cytokine production by MSC. This culture system yielded considerable final cell densities that can be scaled-up to controlled large-scale bioreactors allowing a more efficient, safe and cost-effective MSC production for clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The effect of low static magnetic field on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of human adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marędziak, Monika, E-mail: monika.maredziak@gmail.com [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Śmieszek, Agnieszka, E-mail: smieszek.agnieszka@gmail.com [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A., E-mail: krtomaszewski@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow (Poland); Lewandowski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lewandowski@pwr.wroc.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztofmarycz@interia.pl [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the osteogenic properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). In this study in seven days viability assay we examined the impact of SMF on cells proliferation rate, population doubling time, and ability to form single-cell derived colonies. We have also examined cells' morphology, ultrastructure and osteogenic properties on the protein as well as mRNA level. We established a complex approach, which enabled us to obtain information about SMF and hASCs potential in the context of differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. We demonstrated that SMF enhances both viability and osteogenic properties of hASCs through higher proliferation factor and shorter population doubling time. We have also observed asymmetrically positioned nuclei and organelles after SMF exposition. With regards to osteogenic properties we observed increased levels of osteogenic markers i.e. osteopontin, osteocalcin and increased ability to form osteonodules with positive reaction to Alizarin Red dye. We have also shown that SMF besides enhancing osteogenic properties of hASCs, simultaneously decreases their ability to differentiate into adipogenic lineage. Our results clearly show a direct influence of SMF on the osteogenic potential of hASCs. These results provide key insights into the role of SMF on their cellular fate and properties. - Graphical abstract: Influence of static magnetic field on viability and differentiation properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells. Abbreviations: SMF – static magnetic field; hASCs – human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells; PF – proliferation factor; PDT – population doubling time; CFU-E –> colony forming unit efficiency; OPN – osteopontin; OCL – osteocalcin; Col – collagen type I; BMP-2 – bone morphogenetic protein 2; Ca – calcium; P – phosphorus. - Highlights: • Effects of static

  6. Osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stromal cells on 3-dimensional mesoporous TiO{sub 2} coating with magnesium impregnation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchinato, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.cecchinato@mah.se [Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden); Karlsson, Johan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Applied Surface Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara [Department of Histology, Microbiology, and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann [Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden); Zavan, Barbara [Department of Histology, Microbiology, and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Andersson, Martin [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Applied Surface Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jimbo, Ryo [Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö (Sweden); Department of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic response of human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADScs) to mesoporous titania (TiO{sub 2}) coatings produced with evaporation-induced self-assembly method (EISA) and loaded with magnesium. Our emphasis with the magnesium release functionality was to modulate progenitor cell osteogenic differentiation under standard culture conditions. Osteogenic properties of the coatings were assessed for stromal cells by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, colorimetric mitochondrial viability assay (MTT), colorimetric alkaline phosphates activity (ALP) assay and real time RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) it was shown that the surface expansion area (S{sub dr}) was strongly enhanced by the presence of magnesium. From MTT results it was shown that ADSc viability was significantly increased on mesoporous surfaces compared to the non-porous one at a longer cell culture time. However, no differences were observed between the magnesium impregnated and non-impregnated surfaces. The alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed that ADSc started to differentiate into the osteogenic phenotype after 2 weeks of culturing. The gene expression profile at 2 weeks of cell growth showed that such coatings were capable to incorporate specific osteogenic markers inside their interconnected nano-pores and, at 3 weeks, ADSc differentiated into osteoblasts. Interestingly, magnesium significantly promoted the osteopontin gene expression, which is an essential gene for the early biomaterial–cell osteogenic interaction. - Highlights: • The magnesium loading presents a transitory effect on mesoporous TiO{sub 2} surface topography • The mesoporous structure promotes cellular attachment and spreading • The mesoporous structure activates osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells in absence of osteogenic promoters • The physical adsorbed magnesium is suggested to be involved in the expression of

  7. Sonic hedgehog pathway suppression and reactivation accelerates differentiation of rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells toward insulin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Dian; Tabar, Mahmoud Hashemi; Moghimipour, Eskandar; Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Ghadiri, Ata A; Bakhshi, Elham Allah; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Ghafari, Mohammad Ali

    2017-08-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an intercellular signaling molecule that regulates pancreas development in mammals. Manipulation of Shh signaling pathway can be used as reliable approach to improve the generation of functional insulin-producing cells (IPCs) from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). In the present study, a novel differentiation protocol was used to produce IPCs from adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ATDMSCs) based on sequential inhibition and reactivation of Shh pathway. ATDMSCs were differentiated into IPCs via a 14-day basic protocol using 1% insulin transferrin selenium (ITS) and 1% nicotinamide in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium medium. A mixture of 0.25 µmol/L cyclopamine + 64 ng/mL basic fibroblast growth factor at day 3 of differentiation and 150 ng/mL recombinant Shh at day 11 of differentiation were used, respectively, to promote sequential inhibition and reactivation of Shh pathway. Insulin granule formation, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and gene expression pattern related to the pancreatic endocrine development and function were analyzed in manipulated and unmanipulated IPCs. IPCs obtained after Shh manipulation secreted higher amounts of insulin in vitro. This phenotype was accompanied by increased expression of both genes critical for β-cell function and transcription factors associated with their mature phenotype including Pdx1, MafA, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Ngn3, Isl1 and insulin at day 14 of differentiation. Our findings indicated that the early inhibition and late reactivation of Shh signaling pathway during the differentiation of ATDMSCs improved the functional properties of IPCs, a novel method that could be considered as an alternative approach for cell-based therapy for type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor BB Enhances Osteogenesis of Adipose-Derived But Not Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ben P; Hutton, Daphne L; Kozielski, Kristen L; Bishop, Corey J; Naved, Bilal; Green, Jordan J; Caplan, Arnold I; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Dorafshar, Amir H; Grayson, Warren L

    2015-09-01

    Tissue engineering using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) holds great promise for regenerating critically sized bone defects. While the bone marrow-derived MSC is the most widely studied stromal/stem cell type for this application, its rarity within bone marrow and painful isolation procedure have motivated investigation of alternative cell sources. Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) are more abundant and more easily procured; furthermore, they also possess robust osteogenic potency. While these two cell types are widely considered very similar, there is a growing appreciation of possible innate differences in their biology and response to growth factors. In particular, reports indicate that their osteogenic response to platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) is markedly different: MSCs responded negatively or not at all to PDGF-BB while ASCs exhibited enhanced mineralization in response to physiological concentrations of PDGF-BB. In this study, we directly tested whether a fundamental difference existed between the osteogenic responses of MSCs and ASCs to PDGF-BB. MSCs and ASCs cultured under identical osteogenic conditions responded disparately to 20 ng/ml of PDGF-BB: MSCs exhibited no difference in mineralization while ASCs produced more calcium per cell. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PDGFRβ within ASCs abolished their ability to respond to PDGF-BB. Gene expression was also different; MSCs generally downregulated and ASCs generally upregulated osteogenic genes in response to PDGF-BB. ASCs transduced to produce PDGF-BB resulted in more regenerated bone within a critically sized murine calvarial defect compared to control ASCs, indicating PDGF-BB used specifically in conjunction with ASCs might enhance tissue engineering approaches for bone regeneration. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Combined introduction of Bmi-1 and hTERT immortalizes human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells with low risk of transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatrai, Peter, E-mail: peter.tatrai@biomembrane.hu [Institute of Enzymology, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Karolina ut 29, H-1113 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1, H-4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Szepesi, Aron, E-mail: aron.szepesi@biomembrane.hu [Creative Cell Ltd., Puskas Tivadar utca 13, H-1119 Budapest (Hungary); Matula, Zsolt, E-mail: matula.zsolt@gmail.com [Creative Cell Ltd., Puskas Tivadar utca 13, H-1119 Budapest (Hungary); Szigeti, Anna, E-mail: anna.szigeti@biomembrane.hu [Creative Cell Ltd., Puskas Tivadar utca 13, H-1119 Budapest (Hungary); Buchan, Gyoengyi, E-mail: buchan@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1, H-4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Madi, Andras, E-mail: madi@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1, H-4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Stem Cell, Apoptosis and Genomics Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1, H-4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Uher, Ferenc, E-mail: uher@biomembrane.hu [Stem Cell Laboratory, Hungarian National Blood Transfusion Service, Dioszegi ut 64, H-1113 Budapest (Hungary); and others

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We immortalized human adipose stromal cells (ASCs) with hTERT, Bmi-1, and SV40T. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hTERT-only ASCs are prone to transformation, while Bmi-only ASCs become senescent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SV40T introduced along with hTERT abrogates proliferation control and multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hTERT combined with Bmi-1 yields stable phenotype up to 140 population doublings. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are increasingly being studied for their usefulness in regenerative medicine. However, limited life span and donor-dependent variation of primary cells such as ASCs present major hurdles to controlled and reproducible experiments. We therefore aimed to establish immortalized ASC cell lines that provide steady supply of homogeneous cells for in vitro work while retain essential features of primary cells. To this end, combinations of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), murine Bmi-1, and SV40 large T antigen (SV40T) were introduced by lentiviral transduction into ASCs. The resulting cell lines ASC{sup hTERT}, ASC{sup Bmi-1}, ASC{sup Bmi-1+hTERT} and ASC{sup SV40T+hTERT} were tested for transgene expression, telomerase activity, surface immunomarkers, proliferation, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, karyotype, tumorigenicity, and cellular senescence. All cell lines have maintained expression of characteristic surface immunomarkers, and none was tumorigenic. However, ASC{sup Bmi-1} had limited replicative potential, while the rapidly proliferating ASC{sup SV40T+hTERT} acquired chromosomal aberrations, departed from MSC phenotype, and lost differentiation capacity. ASC{sup hTERT} and ASC{sup hTERT+Bmi-1}, on the other hand, preserved all essential MSC features and did not senesce after 100 population doublings. Notably, a subpopulation of ASC{sup hTERT} also acquired aberrant karyotype and showed signs of transformation after long-term culture

  10. Implications of adipose-derived stromal cells in a 3D culture system for osteogenic differentiation: an in vitro and in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Francis H; Werner, Brian C; Liang, Haixiang; Shang, Hulan; Yang, Ning; Li, Xudong; Shimer, Adam L; Balian, Gary; Katz, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    Healthy mammalian cells in normal tissues are organized in complex three-dimensional (3D) networks that display nutrient and signaling gradients. Conventional techniques that grow cells in a 2D monolayer fail to reproduce the environment that is observed in vivo. In recent years, 3D culture systems have been used to mimic tumor microenvironments in cancer research and to emulate embryogenesis in stem cell cultures. However, there have been no studies exploring the ability for adipose-derived stromal (ADS) cells in a 3D culture system to undergo osteogenic differentiation. To characterize and investigate the in vitro and in vivo potential for human ADS cells in a novel 3D culture system to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Basic science and laboratory study. Human ADS cells were isolated and prepared as either a 2D monolayer or 3D multicellular aggregates (MAs). Multicellular aggregates were formed using the hanging droplet technique. Cells were treated in osteogenic medium in vitro, and cellular differentiation was investigated using gene expression, histology, and microCT at 1-, 2-, and 4-week time points. In vivo investigation involved creating a muscle pouch by developing the avascular muscular interval in the vastus lateralis of male athymic rats. Specimens were then pretreated with osteogenic medium and surgically implanted as (1) carrier (Matrigel) alone (control), (2) carrier with human ADS cells in monolayer, or (3) human ADS cells as MAs. In vivo evidence of osteogenic differentiation was evaluated with micro computed tomography and histologic sectioning at a 2-week time point. Human ADS cells cultured by the hanging droplet technique successfully formed MAs at the air-fluid interface. Adipose-derived stromal cells cultured in monolayer or as 3D MAs retain their ability to self-replicate and undergo multilineage differentiation as confirmed by increased runx2/Cbfa2, ALP, and OCN and increased matrix mineralization on histologic sectioning

  11. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on adipose derived stromal cell differentiation, morphology, ECM deposition and its susceptibility to bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Xu, Yan; Rafailovich, Miriam

    The growing annual production of Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles is proportional to an increase in the chances of occupational and consumer exposure. Considering, that these nanoparticles are currently being used in multiple personal care products many concerns have arisen about their health impact. Human skin is in constant contact with the external environment and is one of the most important routes of exposure to TiO2. In this study we have investigated the effect of two forms of TiO2, rutile and anatase, on human adipose derived stromal cells (ADSCs). Here, we focus on the effects of TiO2 exposure on intracellular lipid accumulation and expression of adipogenic markers; on whether different forms of TiO2 have similar effects on cell function; and whether nanoparticle localization inside cells correlates with loss of cell function. In addition presence of bacteria on the skin is taken into account in its complex interaction with ADSCs and TiO2 nanoparticles. Altogether, the present study indicates that nanosized TiO2 particles adversely effects the differentiation of ADSCs, have profound effects on cell function and increase the rate of bacterial infection.

  12. Flow cytometric characterization of culture expanded multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from horse adipose tissue: towards the definition of minimal stemness criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascucci, L; Curina, G; Mercati, F; Marini, C; Dall'Aglio, C; Paternesi, B; Ceccarelli, P

    2011-12-15

    In the last decades, multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells have been isolated from many adult tissues of different species. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has recently established that multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is the currently recommended designation. In this study, we used flow cytometry to evaluate the expression of several molecules related to stemness (CD90, CD44, CD73 and STRO-1) in undifferentiated, early-passaged MSCs isolated from adipose tissue of four donor horses (AdMSCs). The four populations unanimously expressed high levels of CD90 and CD44. On the contrary, they were unexpectedly negative to CD73. A small percentage of the cells, finally, showed the expression of STRO-1. This last result might be due to the existence of a small subpopulation of STRO-1+ cells or to a poor cross-reactivity of the antibody. A remarkable donor-to-donor consistency and reproducibility of these findings was demonstrated. The data presented herein support the idea that equine AdMSCs may be easily isolated and selected by adherence to tissue culture plastic and exhibit a surface profile characterized by some peculiar differences in comparison to those described in other species. Continued characterization of these cells will help to clarify several aspects of their biology and may ultimately enable the isolation of specific, purified subpopulations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  14. Human platelet lysate as a fetal bovine serum substitute improves human adipose-derived stromal cell culture for future cardiac repair applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaijkens, B A; Niessen, H W M; Prins, H-J; Krijnen, P A J; Kokhuis, T J A; de Jong, N; van Hinsbergh, V W M; Kamp, O; Helder, M N; Musters, R J P; van Dijk, A; Juffermans, L J M

    2012-04-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) are promising candidates for cell therapy, for example to treat myocardial infarction. Commonly, fetal bovine serum (FBS) is used in ASC culturing. However, FBS has several disadvantages. Its effects differ between batches and, when applied clinically, transmission of pathogens and antibody development against FBS are possible. In this study, we investigated whether FBS can be substituted by human platelet lysate (PL) in ASC culture, without affecting functional capacities particularly important for cardiac repair application of ASC. We found that PL-cultured ASC had a significant 3-fold increased proliferation rate and a significantly higher attachment to tissue culture plastic as well as to endothelial cells compared with FBS-cultured ASC. PL-cultured ASC remained a significant 25% smaller than FBS-cultured ASC. Both showed a comparable surface marker profile, with the exception of significantly higher levels of CD73, CD90, and CD166 on PL-cultured ASC. PL-cultured ASC showed a significantly higher migration rate compared with FBS-cultured ASC in a transwell assay. Finally, FBS- and PL-cultured ASC had a similar high capacity to differentiate towards cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, this study showed that culturing ASC is more favorable in PL-supplemented medium compared with FBS-supplemented medium.

  15. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Inhibits Apoptosis and Promotes Proliferation of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Isolated from Patients with Type 2 Diabetes by Reducing Cellular Oxidative Stress

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    Daria Nawrocka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting increasing number of people in developed countries. Therefore new strategies for treatment of T2D and its complications are of special interest. Nowadays, cellular therapies involving mesenchymal stromal cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASCs constitute a promising approach; however, there are still many obstacles concerning safety and effectiveness that need to be overcome before ASCs could be engaged for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. One of the challenges is preventing ASCs from deterioration caused by elevated oxidative stress present in diabetes milieu. In the current study we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF treatment on ASCs isolated from patients with diagnosed T2D. We demonstrate here that cell exposition to bFGF in 5 and 10 ng/mL dosages results in improved morphology, increased proliferative activity, reduced cellular senescence and apoptosis, and decreased oxidative stress, indicating recovery of ASCs’ function impaired by T2D. Therefore our results provide a support for bFGF as a potential therapeutic agent for improving stem cell-based approaches for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications.

  16. Improvement of Mouth Functional Disability in Systemic Sclerosis Patients over One Year in a Trial of Fat Transplantation versus Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

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    Maria Giuseppina Onesti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a multisystem disease characterized by cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Face and mouth changes include telangiectasia, sicca syndrome, and thinning and reduction of mouth width (microcheilia and opening (microstomia. We applied autologous fat transplantation compared with autologous adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs injection to evaluate the clinical improvement of mouth opening. Methods. From February to May 2013 ten consecutive SSc patients were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of Plastic Surgery Department of Sapienza University of Rome. Patients were divided into two groups as follows: 5 patients were treated with fat transplantation and 5 patients received infiltration of ADSCs produced by cell factory of our institution. To value mouth opening, we use the Italian version of Mouth Handicap in Systemic Sclerosis Scale (IvMHISS. Mouth opening was assessed in centimetres (Maximal Mouth Opening, MMO. In order to evaluate compliance and physician and patient satisfaction, we employed a Questionnaire of Satisfaction and the Visual Analogic Scale (VAS performed before starting study and 1 year after the last treatment. Results and Conclusion. We noticed that both procedures obtained significant results but neither one emerged as a first-choice technique. The present clinical experimentation should be regarded as a starting point for further experimental research and clinical trials.

  17. Potential Biomedical Application of Enzymatically Treated Alginate/Chitosan Hydrosols in Sponges—Biocompatible Scaffolds Inducing Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells

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    Anna Zimoch-Korzycka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Current regenerative strategies used for cartilage repair rely on biomaterial functionality as a scaffold for cells that may have potential in chondrogenic differentiation. The purpose of the research was to investigate the biocompatibility of enzymatically treated alginate/chitosan hydrosol sponges and their suitability to support chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose derived multipotent stromal cells (hASCs. The alginate/chitosan and enzyme/alginate/chitosan sponges were formed from hydrosols with various proportions and were used as a biomaterial in this study. Sponges were tested for porosity and wettability. The porosity of each sponge was higher than 80%. An equal dose of alginate and chitosan in the composition of sponges improved their swelling ability. It was found that equal concentrations of alginate and chitosan in hydrosols sponges assure high biocompatibility properties that may be further improved by enzymatic treatment. Importantly, the high biocompatibility of these biomaterials turned out to be crucial in the context of hydrosols’ pro-chondrogenic function. After exposure to the chondrogenic conditions, the hASCs in N/A/C and L/A/C sponges formed well developed nodules and revealed increased expression of collagen type II, aggrecan and decreased expression of collagen type I. Moreover, in these cultures, the reactive oxygen species level was lowered while superoxide dismutase activity increased. Based on the obtained results, we conclude that N/A/C and L/A/C sponges may have prospective application as hASCs carriers for cartilage repair.

  18. LL-37 stimulates the functions of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells via early growth response 1 and the MAPK pathway.

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    Yang, Yoolhee; Choi, Hyunju; Seon, Mira; Cho, Daeho; Bang, Sa Ik

    2016-04-19

    LL-37 is a naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide found in the wound bed and assists wound repair. No published study has characterized the role of LL-37 in the function(s) of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This study investigated the functions of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) activated by LL-37 by performing both in vitro assays with cultured cells and in vivo assays with C57BL/6 mice with hair loss. Human ASCs were isolated from healthy donors with written informed consent. To examine the effects of LL-37 on ASC function, cell proliferation and migration were measured by a cell counting kit (CCK-8) and a Transwell migration assay. Early growth response 1 (EGR1) mRNA expression was determined by microarray and real-time PCR analyses. The protein levels of EGR1 and regenerative factors were analyzed by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western blotting. LL-37 treatment enhanced the proliferation and migration of human ASCs expressing formyl peptide receptor like-1. Microarray and real-time PCR data showed that EGR1 expression was rapidly and significantly increased by LL-37 treatment. LL-37 treatment also enhanced the production of EGR1. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of EGR1 inhibited LL-37-enhanced ASC proliferation and migration. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was essential not only for LL-37-enhanced ASC proliferation and migration but also EGR1 expression; treatment with a specific inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, or c-Jun N-terminal kinase blocked the stimulatory effect of LL-37. EGR1 has a strong paracrine capability and can influence angiogenic factors in ASCs; therefore, we evaluated the secretion levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, thymosin beta-4, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and stromal cell-derived factor-1. LL-37 treatment increased the secretion of these regenerative factors. Moreover, treatment with the conditioned medium of ASCs

  19. Human adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells and their extracellular vesicles act differentially on lung mechanics and inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

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    de Castro, Ligia Lins; Xisto, Debora Gonçalves; Kitoko, Jamil Zola; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Olsen, Priscilla Christina; Redondo, Patricia Albuquerque Garcia; Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Weiss, Daniel Jay; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2017-06-24

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that can be difficult to treat due to its complex pathophysiology. Most current drugs focus on controlling the inflammatory process, but are unable to revert the changes of tissue remodeling. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are effective at reducing inflammation and tissue remodeling; nevertheless, no study has evaluated the therapeutic effects of extracellular vesicles (EVs) obtained from human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AD-MSC) on established airway remodeling in experimental allergic asthma. C57BL/6 female mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). Control (CTRL) animals received saline solution using the same protocol. One day after the last challenge, each group received saline, 10 5 human AD-MSCs, or EVs (released by 10 5  AD-MSCs). Seven days after treatment, animals were anesthetized for lung function assessment and subsequently euthanized. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lungs, thymus, and mediastinal lymph nodes were harvested for analysis of inflammation. Collagen fiber content of airways and lung parenchyma were also evaluated. In OVA animals, AD-MSCs and EVs acted differently on static lung elastance and on BALF regulatory T cells, CD3 + CD4 + T cells, and pro-inflammatory mediators (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin), but similarly reduced eosinophils in lung tissue, collagen fiber content in airways and lung parenchyma, levels of transforming growth factor-β in lung tissue, and CD3 + CD4 + T cell counts in the thymus. No significant changes were observed in total cell count or percentage of CD3 + CD4 + T cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes. In this immunocompetent mouse model of allergic asthma, human AD-MSCs and EVs effectively reduced eosinophil counts in lung tissue and BALF and modulated airway remodeling, but their effects on T cells differed in lung and thymus. EVs may hold promise for asthma; however, further studies are required to elucidate the different

  20. Intraoperative use of enriched collagen and elastin matrices with freshly isolated adipose-derived stem/stromal cells: a potential clinical approach for soft tissue reconstruction.

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    Alharbi, Ziyad; Almakadi, Sultan; Opländer, Christian; Vogt, Michael; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Pallua, Norbert

    2014-02-20

    Adipose tissue contains a large number of multipotent cells, which are essential for stem cell-based therapies. The combination of this therapy with suitable commercial clinically used matrices, such as collagen and elastin matrices (i.e. dermal matrices), is a promising approach for soft tissue reconstruction. We previously demonstrated that the liposuction method affects the adherence behaviour of freshly isolated adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) on collagen and elastin matrices. However, it remains unclear whether freshly isolated and uncultured ASCs could be directly transferred to matrices during a single transplantation operation without additional cell culture steps. After each fat harvesting procedure, ASCs were isolated and directly seeded onto collagen and elastin matrices. Different time intervals (i.e. 1, 3 and 24 h) were investigated to determine the time interval needed for cellular attachment to the collagen and elastin matrices. Resazurin-based vitality assays were performed after seeding the cells onto the collagen and elastin matrices. In addition, the adhesion and migration of ASCs on the collagen and elastin matrices were visualised using histology and two-photon microscopy. A time-dependent increase in the number of viable ASCs attached to the collagen and elastin matrices was observed. This finding was supported by mitochondrial activity and histology results. Importantly, the ASCs attached and adhered to the collagen and elastin matrices after only 1 h of ex vivo enrichment. This finding was also supported by two-photon microscopy, which revealed the presence and attachment of viable cells on the upper layer of the construct. Freshly isolated uncultured ASCs can be safely seeded onto collagen and elastin matrices for ex vivo cellular enrichment of these constructs after liposuction. Although we observed a significant number of seeded cells on the matrices after a 3-h enrichment time, we also observed an adequate number of isolated

  1. In situ normoxia enhances survival and proliferation rate of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells without increasing the risk of tumourigenesis.

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    Jane Ru Choi

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs natively reside in a relatively low-oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxic microenvironment in human body. Low oxygen tension (i.e., in situ normoxia, has been known to enhance the growth and survival rate of ASCs, which, however, may lead to the risk of tumourigenesis. Here, we investigated the tumourigenic potential of ASCs under their physiological condition to ensure their safe use in regenerative therapy. Human ASCs isolated from subcutaneous fat were cultured in atmospheric O2 concentration (21% O2 or in situ normoxia (2% O2. We found that ASCs retained their surface markers, tri-lineage differentiation potential, and self-renewal properties under in situ normoxia without altering their morphology. In situ normoxia displayed a higher proliferation and viability of ASCs with less DNA damage as compared to atmospheric O2 concentration. Moreover, low oxygen tension significantly up-regulated VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression and protein secretion while reducing the expression level of tumour suppressor genes p16, p21, p53, and pRb. However, there were no significant differences in ASCs telomere length and their relative telomerase activity when cultured at different oxygen concentrations. Collectively, even with high proliferation and survival rate, ASCs have a low tendency of developing tumour under in situ normoxia. These results suggest 2% O2 as an ideal culture condition for expanding ASCs efficiently while maintaining their characteristics.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells reveals novel patterns of gene expression during adipocyte differentiation

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    Melvin Anyasi Ambele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have undertaken an in-depth transcriptome analysis of adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs induced to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Gene expression was assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 post-induction and genes differentially expressed numbered 128, 218, 253 and 240 respectively. Up-regulated genes were associated with blood vessel development, leukocyte migration, as well as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. They also shared common pathways with certain obesity-related pathophysiological conditions. Down-regulated genes were enriched for immune response processes. KLF15, LMO3, FOXO1 and ZBTB16 transcription factors were up-regulated throughout the differentiation process. CEBPA, PPARG, ZNF117, MLXIPL, MMP3 and RORB were up-regulated only on days 14 and 21, which coincide with the maturation of adipocytes and could possibly serve as candidates for controlling fat accumulation and the size of mature adipocytes. In summary, we have identified genes that were up-regulated only on days 1 and 7 or days 14 and 21 that could serve as potential early and late-stage differentiation markers.

  3. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

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    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  4. Serum-free human MSC medium supports consistency in human but not in equine adipose-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell culture.

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    Schubert, Susanna; Brehm, Walter; Hillmann, Aline; Burk, Janina

    2017-09-19

    For clinical applications of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), serum-free culture is preferable to standardize cell products and prevent contamination with pathogens. In contrast to human MSCs, knowledge on serum-free culture of large animal MSCs is limited, despite its relevance for preclinical studies and development of veterinary cellular therapeutics. This study aimed to evaluate the suitability of a commercially available serum-free human MSC medium for culturing equine adipose-derived MSCs in comparison with human adipose MSCs. Enzyme-free isolation by explant technique and expansion of equine and human cells in the serum-free medium were feasible. However, serum-free culture altered the morphology and complicated handling of equine MSCs, with cell aggregation and spontaneous detachment of multilayers, compared to culture in standard medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. Furthermore, proliferation and the surface immunophenotype of equine cells were more variable compared to the controls and appeared to depend on the lot of the serum-free medium. Particularly the expression of CD90 was different between experimental groups (P cultured in serum-free medium (5.21-83.40%) compared to standard medium (86.20-99.50%). Additionally, small subpopulations expressing MSC exclusion markers such as CD14 (0.28-11.60%), CD34 (0.00-9.87%), CD45 (0.35-10.50%), or MHCII (0.00-3.67%) were found in equine samples after serum-free culture. In contrast, human samples displayed a more consistent morphology and a consistent CD29+ (98.60-99.90%), CD73+ (94.60-98.40%), CD90+ (99.60-99.90%), and CD105+ (97.40-99.80%) immunophenotype after culture in serum-free medium. The obtained data demonstrate that the serum-free medium was suitable for human MSC culture but did not lead to entirely satisfactory results in equine MSCs. This underlines that requirements regarding serum-free culture conditions are species-specific, indicating a need for serum-free media to be

  5. The power of fat and its adipose-derived stromal cells : emerging concepts for fibrotic scar treatment

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    Spiekman, Maroesjka; van Dongen, Joris A; Willemsen, Joep C; Hoppe, Delia L; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Lipofilling or lipografting is a novel and promising treatment method for reduction or prevention of dermal scars after injury. Ample anecdotal evidence from case reports supports the scar-reducing properties of adipose tissue grafts. However, only a few properly controlled and designed clinical

  6. Swine adipose stromal cells loaded with recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 virions expressing a foreign antigen induce potent humoral immune responses in pigs.

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    Donofrio, Gaetano; Taddei, Simone; Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Cavirani, Sandro; Martinelli, Nicola; Ottonello, Simone; Ferrari, Maura

    2011-01-29

    Increasingly effective vaccination strategies are needed to counteract the high incidence of contagious diseases associated with intensive swine breeding. Recombinant viral vaccines are a promising new avenue in this direction. Key features of viral vectors suitable for immunoprophylaxis are safety, ease of manipulation and the ability to replicate in a variety of hosts. Most of the above requirements are met by bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4), a non-pathogenic dsDNA virus capable of infecting a broad range of cell types in vitro. Here we report the results of an exploratory study using an engineered BoHV-4 virus (eBoHV-4) expressing two unrelated glycoprotein antigens from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), to assess the potential of recombinant BoHV-4 as a self-adjuvanted immunogen in pigs. Free eBoHV-4 virions and virions preloaded into homologous swine adipose-derived stromal cells (SADSC) were tested. Neither virus formulation elicited neutralizing anti-BoHV-4 antibodies, nor any disease symptom, yet both induced specific immune responses against the heterologous antigens. However, a much earlier (18 vs 28 days post-infection) and more robust neutralizing response against BVDV and BoHV-1 viruses was elicited by eBoHV-4-preinfected SADSCs compared to free virions. The data validate BoHV-4 as a safe and effective heterologous antigen carrier/producer and identify SADSCs as helpful tools for the formulation of increasingly efficacious recombinant immunogens for pig vaccination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin inhibit aromatase expression and activity in human adipose stromal cells: suppression of cAMP as a possible mechanism.

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    Docanto, Maria M; Yang, Fangyuan; Callaghan, Brid; Au, CheukMan C; Ragavan, Rahini; Wang, Xuyi; Furness, John B; Andrews, Zane B; Brown, Kristy A

    2014-08-01

    Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its expression within adipose stromal cells (ASCs) is believed to be the major driver of estrogen-dependent cancers in older women. Ghrelin is a gut-hormone that is involved in the regulation of appetite and known to bind to and activate the cognate ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a. The unacylated form of ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, binds weakly to GHSR1a but has been shown to play an important role in regulating a number of physiological processes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on aromatase in primary human ASCs. Primary human ASCs were isolated from adipose tissue of women undergoing cosmetic surgery. Real-time PCR and tritiated water-release assays were performed to examine the effect of treatment on aromatase transcript expression and aromatase activity, respectively. Treatments included ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, obestatin, and capromorelin (GHSR1a agonist). GHSR1a protein expression was assessed by Western blot and effects of treatment on Ca(2+) and cAMP second messenger systems were examined using the Flexstation assay and the Lance Ultra cAMP kit, respectively. Results demonstrate that pM concentrations of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin inhibit aromatase transcript expression and activity in ASCs under basal conditions and in PGE2-stimulated cells. Moreover, the effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are mediated via effects on aromatase promoter PII-specific transcripts. Neither the GHSR1a-specific agonist capromorelin nor obestatin had any effect on aromatase transcript expression or activity. Moreover, GHSR1a protein was undetectable by Western blot and neither ghrelin nor capromorelin elicited a calcium response in ASCs. Finally, ghrelin caused a significant decrease in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP in ASC. These findings suggest that ghrelin acts at alternate receptors in ASCs by decreasing intracellular cAMP levels. Ghrelin mimetics may be useful in the

  8. Canine Platelet Lysate Is Inferior to Fetal Bovine Serum for the Isolation and Propagation of Canine Adipose Tissue- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

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    Russell, Keith A; Gibson, Thomas W G; Chong, Andrew; Co, Carmon; Koch, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are increasingly investigated for their clinical utility in dogs. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is a common culture supplement used for canine MSC expansion. However, FBS content is variable, its clinical use carries risk of an immune response, and its cost is increasing due to global demand. Platelet lysate (PL) has proven to be a suitable alternative to FBS for expansion of human MSC. We hypothesized that canine adipose tissue (AT) and bone marrow (BM) MSC could be isolated and expanded equally in PL and FBS at conventionally-used concentrations with differentiation of these MSC unaffected by choice of supplement. Our objectives were to evaluate the use of canine PL in comparison with FBS at four stages: 1) isolation, 2) proliferation, 3) spontaneous differentiation, and 4) directed differentiation. 1) Medium with 10% PL was unable to isolate MSC. 2) MSC, initially isolated in FBS-supplemented media, followed a dose-dependent response with no significant difference between PL and FBS cultures at up to 20% (AT) or 30% (BM) enrichment. Beyond these respective peaks, proliferation fell in PL cultures only, while a continued dose-dependent proliferation response was noted in FBS cultures. 3) Further investigation indicated PL expansion culture was inducing spontaneous adipogenesis in concentrations as low as 10% and as early as 4 days in culture. 4) MSC isolated in FBS, but expanded in either FBS or PL, maintained ability to undergo directed adipogenesis and osteogenesis, but not chondrogenesis. Canine PL did not support establishment of MSC colonies from AT and BM, nor expansion of MSC, which appear to undergo spontaneous adipogenesis in response to PL exposure. In vivo studies are warranted to determine if concurrent use of MSC with any platelet-derived products such as platelet-rich plasma are associated with synergistic, neutral or antagonistic effects.

  9. Canine Platelet Lysate Is Inferior to Fetal Bovine Serum for the Isolation and Propagation of Canine Adipose Tissue- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

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    Keith A Russell

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are increasingly investigated for their clinical utility in dogs. Fetal bovine serum (FBS is a common culture supplement used for canine MSC expansion. However, FBS content is variable, its clinical use carries risk of an immune response, and its cost is increasing due to global demand. Platelet lysate (PL has proven to be a suitable alternative to FBS for expansion of human MSC.We hypothesized that canine adipose tissue (AT and bone marrow (BM MSC could be isolated and expanded equally in PL and FBS at conventionally-used concentrations with differentiation of these MSC unaffected by choice of supplement. Our objectives were to evaluate the use of canine PL in comparison with FBS at four stages: 1 isolation, 2 proliferation, 3 spontaneous differentiation, and 4 directed differentiation.1 Medium with 10% PL was unable to isolate MSC. 2 MSC, initially isolated in FBS-supplemented media, followed a dose-dependent response with no significant difference between PL and FBS cultures at up to 20% (AT or 30% (BM enrichment. Beyond these respective peaks, proliferation fell in PL cultures only, while a continued dose-dependent proliferation response was noted in FBS cultures. 3 Further investigation indicated PL expansion culture was inducing spontaneous adipogenesis in concentrations as low as 10% and as early as 4 days in culture. 4 MSC isolated in FBS, but expanded in either FBS or PL, maintained ability to undergo directed adipogenesis and osteogenesis, but not chondrogenesis.Canine PL did not support establishment of MSC colonies from AT and BM, nor expansion of MSC, which appear to undergo spontaneous adipogenesis in response to PL exposure. In vivo studies are warranted to determine if concurrent use of MSC with any platelet-derived products such as platelet-rich plasma are associated with synergistic, neutral or antagonistic effects.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits p53 in human breast adipose stromal cells: a novel mechanism for the regulation of aromatase in obesity and breast cancer.

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    Wang, Xuyi; Docanto, Maria M; Sasano, Hironobu; Lo, Camden; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and the majority of these cancers are estrogen dependent. Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its increased expression in breast adipose stromal cells (ASC) is a major driver of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. In particular, obesity-associated and tumor-derived factors, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), have been shown to drive the expression of aromatase by stimulating the activity of the proximal promoter II (PII). The tumor-suppressor p53 is a key regulator of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and is frequently mutated in breast cancer. Mutations in p53 are rare in tumor-associated ASCs. Therefore, it was hypothesized that p53 is regulated by PGE2 and involved in the PGE2-mediated regulation of aromatase. Results demonstrate that PGE2 causes a significant decrease in p53 transcript and nuclear protein expression, as well as phosphorylation at Ser15 in primary human breast ASCs. Stabilization of p53 with RITA leads to a significant decrease in the PGE2-stimulated aromatase mRNA expression and activity, and PII activity. Interaction of p53 with PII was demonstrated and this interaction is decreased in the presence of PGE2. Moreover, mutation of the identified p53 response element leads to an increase in the basal activity of the promoter. Immunofluorescence on clinical samples demonstrates that p53 is decreased in tumor-associated ASCs compared with ASCs from normal breast tissue, and that there is a positive association between perinuclear (inactive) p53 and aromatase expression in these cells. Furthermore, aromatase expression is increased in breast ASCs from Li-Fraumeni patients (germline TP53 mutations) compared with non-Li-Fraumeni breast tissue. Overall, our results demonstrate that p53 is a negative regulator of aromatase in the breast and its inhibition by PGE2 provides a novel mechanism for aromatase regulation in obesity and breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer

  11. Hair follicle growth by stromal vascular fraction-enhanced adipose transplantation in baldness

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    Perez-Meza D

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David Perez-Meza,1 Craig Ziering,2 Marcos Sforza,3 Ganesh Krishnan,4 Edward Ball,5 Eric Daniels6 1Ziering Medical, Marbella, Spain; 2Ziering Medical, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3The Hospital Group, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, 4Ziering Medical, Birmingham, 5Ziering Medical, London, UK; 6Kerastem Technologies, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Great interest remains in finding new and emerging therapies for the treatment of male and female pattern hair loss. The autologous fat grafting technique is >100 years old, with a recent and dramatic increase in clinical experience over the past 10–15 years. Recently, in 2001, Zuk et al published the presence of adipose-derived stem cells, and abundant research has shown that adipose is a complex, biological active, and important tissue. Festa et al, in 2011, reported that adipocyte lineage cells support the stem cell niche and help drive the complex hair growth cycle. Adipose-derived regenerative cells (also known as stromal vascular fraction [SVF] is a heterogeneous group of noncultured cells that can be reliably extracted from adipose by using automated systems, and these cells work largely by paracrine mechanisms to support adipocyte viability. While, today, autologous fat is transplanted primarily for esthetic and reconstructive volume, surgeons have previously reported positive skin and hair changes posttransplantation. This follicular regenerative approach is intriguing and raises the possibility that one can drive or restore the hair cycle in male and female pattern baldness by stimulating the niche with autologous fat enriched with SVF. In this first of a kind patient series, the authors report on the safety, tolerability, and quantitative, as well as photographic changes, in a group of patients with early genetic alopecia treated with subcutaneous scalp injection of enriched adipose tissue. The findings suggest that scalp stem cell-enriched fat grafting may represent a promising alternative approach to

  12. Differential Mechanisms of Myocardial Conduction Slowing by Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cells Derived From Different Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Sande, Judith N.; Smit, Nicoline W.; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van Amersfoorth, Shirley C. M.; Plantinga, Josee A.; van Dessel, Pascal F. H. M.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Harmsen, Marco C.; Coronel, Ruben

    : Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option to treat patients after myocardial infarction. However, the intramyocardial administration of large amounts of stem cells might generate a proarrhythmic substrate. Proarrhythmic effects can be explained by electrotonic and/or paracrine

  13. Spirulina platensis Improves Mitochondrial Function Impaired by Elevated Oxidative Stress in Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (ASCs) and Intestinal Epithelial Cells (IECs), and Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Daria; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is a steadily growing life-threatening endocrine disorder linked to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Inflammatory microenvironment of adipose tissue constitutes the direct tissue milieu for various cell populations, including adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs), widely considered as a potential therapeutic cell source in the course of the treatment of metabolic disorders. Moreover, elevated oxidative stress induces inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs)—the first-line cells exposed to dietary compounds. In the conducted research, we showed that in vitro application of Spirulina platensis contributes to the restoration of ASCs’ and IECs’ morphology and function through the reduction of cellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Enhanced viability, suppressed senescence, and improved proliferation of ASCs and IECs isolated from metabolic syndrome-affected individuals were evident following exposition to Spirulina. A protective effect of the investigated extract against mitochondrial dysfunction and degeneration was also observed. Moreover, our data demonstrate that Spirulina extract effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. In vivo studies showed that horses fed with a diet based on Spirulina platensis supplementation lost weight and their insulin sensitivity improved. Thus, our results indicate the engagement of Spirulina platensis nourishing as an interesting alternative approach for supporting the conventional treatment of equine metabolic syndrome. PMID:28771165

  14. Agent-based model of therapeutic adipose-derived stromal cell trafficking during ischemia predicts ability to roll on P-selectin.

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    Alexander M Bailey

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous delivery of human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASCs is a promising option for the treatment of ischemia. After delivery, hASCs that reside and persist in the injured extravascular space have been shown to aid recovery of tissue perfusion and function, although low rates of incorporation currently limit the safety and efficacy of these therapies. We submit that a better understanding of the trafficking of therapeutic hASCs through the microcirculation is needed to address this and that selective control over their homing (organ- and injury-specific may be possible by targeting bottlenecks in the homing process. This process, however, is incredibly complex, which merited the use of computational techniques to speed the rate of discovery. We developed a multicell agent-based model (ABM of hASC trafficking during acute skeletal muscle ischemia, based on over 150 literature-based rules instituted in Netlogo and MatLab software programs. In silico, trafficking phenomena within cell populations emerged as a result of the dynamic interactions between adhesion molecule expression, chemokine secretion, integrin affinity states, hemodynamics and microvascular network architectures. As verification, the model reasonably reproduced key aspects of ischemia and trafficking behavior including increases in wall shear stress, upregulation of key cellular adhesion molecules expressed on injured endothelium, increased secretion of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, quantified levels of monocyte extravasation in selectin knockouts, and circulating monocyte rolling distances. Successful ABM verification prompted us to conduct a series of systematic knockouts in silico aimed at identifying the most critical parameters mediating hASC trafficking. Simulations predicted the necessity of an unknown selectin-binding molecule to achieve hASC extravasation, in addition to any rolling behavior mediated by hASC surface expression of CD15s, CD34, CD62e, CD62p

  15. Agent-based model of therapeutic adipose-derived stromal cell trafficking during ischemia predicts ability to roll on P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Alexander M; Lawrence, Michael B; Shang, Hulan; Katz, Adam J; Peirce, Shayn M

    2009-02-01

    Intravenous delivery of human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASCs) is a promising option for the treatment of ischemia. After delivery, hASCs that reside and persist in the injured extravascular space have been shown to aid recovery of tissue perfusion and function, although low rates of incorporation currently limit the safety and efficacy of these therapies. We submit that a better understanding of the trafficking of therapeutic hASCs through the microcirculation is needed to address this and that selective control over their homing (organ- and injury-specific) may be possible by targeting bottlenecks in the homing process. This process, however, is incredibly complex, which merited the use of computational techniques to speed the rate of discovery. We developed a multicell agent-based model (ABM) of hASC trafficking during acute skeletal muscle ischemia, based on over 150 literature-based rules instituted in Netlogo and MatLab software programs. In silico, trafficking phenomena within cell populations emerged as a result of the dynamic interactions between adhesion molecule expression, chemokine secretion, integrin affinity states, hemodynamics and microvascular network architectures. As verification, the model reasonably reproduced key aspects of ischemia and trafficking behavior including increases in wall shear stress, upregulation of key cellular adhesion molecules expressed on injured endothelium, increased secretion of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, quantified levels of monocyte extravasation in selectin knockouts, and circulating monocyte rolling distances. Successful ABM verification prompted us to conduct a series of systematic knockouts in silico aimed at identifying the most critical parameters mediating hASC trafficking. Simulations predicted the necessity of an unknown selectin-binding molecule to achieve hASC extravasation, in addition to any rolling behavior mediated by hASC surface expression of CD15s, CD34, CD62e, CD62p, or CD65. In

  16. Culture expansion of adipose derived stromal cells. A closed automated Quantum Cell Expansion System compared with manual flask-based culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Follin, Bjarke; Juhl, Morten

    2016-01-01

    ) over two passages in the automated and functionally closed Quantum Cell Expansion System (Quantum system) is compared with traditional manual cultivation. Methods: Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from abdominal fat, suspended in α-MEM supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum and seeded......-less than the number of SVF cells seeded. ASCs P1 expanded in the Quantum system demonstrated a population doubling (PD) around 2.2 regardless of whether P0 was previously cultured in flasks or Quantum, while ASCs P1 in flasks only reached a PD of 1.0. Conclusion: Manufacturing of ASCs in a Quantum system...... enhances ASC expansion rate and yield significantly relative to manual processing in T-flasks, while maintaining the purity and quality essential to safe and robust cell production. Notably, the use of the Quantum system entails significantly reduced working hours and thereby costs....

  17. Comparison of clinical grade human platelet lysates for cultivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Morten; Tratwal, Josefine; Follin, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    different commercially available hPL fulfilling good manufacturing practice criteria for clinical use. BMSCs and ASCs cultured in Minimum Essential Medium Eagle-alpha supplemented with 5% PLT-Max (Mill Creek), Stemulate™ PL-S and Stemulate™ PL-SP (COOK General Biotechnology) were compared to standard...... culture conditions with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cell morphology, proliferation, phenotype, genomic stability, and differentiation potential were analyzed. RESULTS: Regardless of manufacturer, BMSCs and ASCs cultured in hPL media showed a significant increase in proliferation capacity compared to FBS...

  18. Characterization of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells isolated from diabetic patient's distal limbs with critical ischemia.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kočí, Zuzana; Turnovcová, Karolína; Dubský, M.; Baranovičová, Lenka; Holáň, Vladimír; Chudíčková, Milada; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 7 (2014), s. 597-604 ISSN 0263-6484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/0653; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03540S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-14961S; GA MŠk LO1309; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell therapy * diabetes * differentiation Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 2.005, year: 2014

  19. Stromal cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue seeded in a native collagen/elastin dermal substitute reduce wound contraction in full thickness skin defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H. J.; Middelkoop, E.; van Heemstra-Hoen, M.; Wildevuur, C. H.; Westerhof, W.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dermal substitutes seeded with cultured fibroblasts have been developed to improve dermal regeneration in full thickness wounds. Because of cell cultivation, 3 weeks are required before patients can be treated with these autologous adipose tissue. This substitute is easily fabricated

  20. Polyurethane/Polylactide-Blend Films Doped with Zinc Ions for the Growth and Expansion of Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (OECs and Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells (ASCs for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric biomaterials based on polyurethane and polylactide blends are promising candidates for regenerative medicine applications as biocompatible, bioresorbable carriers. In current research we showed that 80/20 polyurethane/polylactide blends (PU/PLDL with confirmed biological properties in vitro may be further improved by the addition of ZnO nanoparticles for the delivery of bioactive zinc oxide for cells. The PU/PLDL blends were doped with different concentrations of ZnO (0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05% and undertaken for in vitro biological evaluation using human adipose stromal stem cells (ASCs and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. The addition of 0.001% of ZnO to the biomaterials positively influenced the morphology, proliferation, and phenotype of cells cultured on the scaffolds. Moreover, the analysis of oxidative stress markers revealed that 0.001% of ZnO added to the material decreased the stress level in both cell lines. In addition, the levels of neural-specific genes were upregulated in OECs when cultured on sample 0.001 ZnO, while the apoptosis-related genes were downregulated in OECs and ASCs in the same group. Therefore, we showed that PU/PLDL blends doped with 0.001% of ZnO exert beneficial influence on ASCs and OECs in vitro and they may be considered for future applications in the field of regenerative medicine.

  1. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Future Regenerative System Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Lina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential use of stem cell-based therapies for repair and regeneration of various tissues and organs offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of disease. Despite the advances, the availability of stem cells remaining a challenge for both scientist and clinicians in pursuing regenerative medicine. CONTENT: Subcutaneous human adipose tissue is an abundant and accessible cell source for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Routinely, the adipose issue is digested with collagenase or related lytic enzymes to release a heterogeneous population for stromal vascular fraction (SVF cells. The SVF cells can be used directly or can be cultured in plastic ware for selection and expansion of an adherent population known as adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs. Their potential in the ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and other mesenchymal lineages, as well in their other clinically useful properties, includes stimulation of angiogenesis and suppression of inflammation. SUMMARY: Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cels suitable for the application of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The past decade has witnessed an explosion of preclinical data relating to the isolation, characterization, cryopreservation, differentiation, and transplantation of freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction cells and adherent, culture-expanded, adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and in animal models. KEYWORDS: adipose tissue, adult stem cells, regenerative medicine, mesenchymal stem cells.

  2. First-in-man intraglandular implantation of stromal vascular fraction and adipose-derived stem cells plus platelet-rich plasma in irradiation-induced gland damage: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comella K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristin Comella,1 Walter Bell2 1US Stem Cell, Inc, Sunrise, FL, USA; 2South African Stem Cell Institute, Parys, South Africa Background: Stromal vascular fraction (SVF is a mixture of cells which can be isolated from a mini-lipoaspirate of fat tissue. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a mixture of growth factors and other nutrients which can be obtained from peripheral blood. Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs can be isolated from fat tissue and expanded in culture. The SVF includes a variety of different cells such as ADSCs, pericytes, endothelial/progenitor cells, and a mix of different growth factors. The adipocytes (fat cells can be removed via centrifugation. Here, we describe the rationale and, to our knowledge, the first clinical implementation of SVF and PRP followed by repeat dosing of culture-expanded ADSCs into a patient with severe xerostomia postirradiation. Methods: Approximately 120 mLs of adipose tissue was removed via mini-lipoaspirate procedure under local anesthetic. The SVF was prepared from half of the fat and resuspended in PRP. The mixture was delivered via ultrasound directly into the submandibular and parotid glands on both the right and left sides. The remaining 60 mLs of fat was processed to culture-expand ADSCs. The patient received seven follow-up injections of the ADSCs plus PRP at 5, 8, 16, 18, 23, 28, and 31 months postliposuction. The subject was monitored over a period of 31 months for safety (adverse events, glandular size via ultrasound and saliva production. Results: Throughout the 31-month monitoring period, no safety events such as infection or severe adverse events were reported. The patient demonstrated an increase in gland size as measured by ultrasound which corresponded to increased saliva production. Conclusion: Overall, the patient reported improved quality of life and willingness to continue treatments. The strong safety profile and preliminary efficacy results warrant larger studies to determine

  3. Ethanol impairs differentiation of human adipocyte stromal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, David W; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Jones, Rosemarie; Considine, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Bioinformatic resources suggest that adipose tissue expresses mRNAs for alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) and ALDH2, and epidemiological studies indicate that heavy alcohol use reduces adipose tissue mass. We therefore characterized the expression of alcohol metabolizing enzymes in human, rat and mouse adipose tissue, preadipocytes, and adipocytes, the ability of adipocytes to metabolize ethanol, and the effects of ethanol on differentiation of human adipose stromal cells (hASCs). Adipose tissue, preadipocytes, and adipocytes were collected from rodents or from humans undergoing bariatric surgery. hASCs were differentiated in vitro using standard methods. Gene expression and cellular differentiation were analyzed by Western blotting, RT-PCR, and microscopy. Class I ADH was expressed in human > mouse > rat adipose tissue, whereas ALDH2 was high in all samples. ADH, catalase, and ALDH2 were induced during differentiation of hASCs. The presence of 50 mM ethanol markedly reduced the differentiation of hASCs; this effect was associated with inhibition of expression of transcription factors required for differentiation, but did not depend on the ability of the cells to metabolize ethanol. Human adipose tissue expresses alcohol oxidizing enzymes. The presence of ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations inhibits differentiation of hASCs. Ethanol could alter adipose tissue biology, inducing a form of acquired lipodystrophy, which is consistent with epidemiological studies. 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  4. Biphasic Polyurethane/Polylactide Sponges Doped with Nano-Hydroxyapatite (nHAp Combined with Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage and bone tissue injuries are common targets in regenerative medicine. The degeneration of cartilage tissue results in tissue loss with a limited ability to regenerate. However, the application of mesenchymal stem cells in the course of such condition makes it possible to manage this disorder by improving the structure of the remaining tissue and even stimulating its regeneration. Nevertheless, in the case of significant tissue loss, standard local injection of cell suspensions is insufficient, due to the low engraftment of transplanted cells. Introduction of mesenchymal stem cells on the surface of a compatible biomaterial can be a promising tool for inducing the regeneration by both retaining the cells at the desired site and filling the tissue gap. In order to obtain such a cell-biomaterial hybrid, we developed complex, biphasic polymer blend biomaterials composed of various polyurethane (PU-to-polylactide (PLA ratios, and doped with different concentrations of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp. We have determined the optimal blend composition and nano-hydroxyapatite concentration for adipose mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the biomaterial. We applied biological in vitro techniques, including cell viability assay, determination of oxidative stress factors level, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potentials as well as cell proteomic analysis. We have shown that the optimal composition of biphasic scaffold was 20:80 of PU:PLA with 20% of nHAp for osteogenic differentiation, and 80:20 of PU:PLA with 10% of nHAp for chondrogenic differentiation, which suggest the optimal composition of final biphasic implant for regenerative medicine applications.

  5. Safety Studies for Use of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model for Osteoarthritis to Support a Phase I Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M; Denbeigh, Janet M; Lin, Yang; Jones, Dakota L; de Mooij, Tristan; Lewallen, Eric A; Nie, Hai; Paradise, Christopher R; Radel, Darcie J; Dudakovic, Amel; Camilleri, Emily T; Larson, Dirk R; Qu, Wenchun; Krych, Aaron J; Frick, Matthew A; Im, Hee-Jeong; Dietz, Allan B; Smith, Jay; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2017-03-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) offer potential as a therapeutic option for clinical applications in musculoskeletal regenerative medicine because of their immunomodulatory functions and capacity for trilineage differentiation. In preparation for a phase I clinical trial using AMSCs to treat patients with osteoarthritis, we carried out preclinical studies to assess the safety of human AMSCs within the intra-articular joint space. Culture-expanded human AMSCs grown in human platelet-lysate were delivered via intra-articular injections into normal healthy rabbit knees and knees at risk for the development of osteoarthritis after bilateral medial anterior hemimeniscectomy. Treatment outcomes and safety were evaluated by assessing the general health, function, and behavior of the animals. Joint tissues were analyzed by x-ray, magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathology. Intra-articular AMSC therapy was well tolerated in this study. We did not observe adverse systemic reactions, nor did we find evidence of damage to intra-articular joint tissues. Thus, the data generated in this study show a favorable safety profile for AMSCs within the joint space in support of a phase I clinical trial evaluating the clinical utility of AMSCs to treat osteoarthritis. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:910-922. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hind limb ischemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Su; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin Chul

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) spheroid in a hind limb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hind limbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) of the spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blots. Spheroid + LLLT group had enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with the ASC group. The spheroid ASCs contributed to tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs increased with a concomitant decrease in apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hind limb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs and spheroid group. These data suggested that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhanced the survival of ASCs and stimulated the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hind limb. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adipose Progenitor Cell Secretion of GM-CSF and MMP9 Promotes a Stromal and Immunological Microenvironment That Supports Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, Francesca; Labanca, Valentina; Mancuso, Patrizia; Rabascio, Cristina; Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Manconi, Andrea; Bertolini, Francesco

    2017-09-15

    A cell population with progenitor-like phenotype (CD45-CD34+) resident in human white adipose tissue (WAT) is known to promote the progression of local and metastatic breast cancer and angiogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of the interaction have not been elucidated. In this study, we identified two proteins that were significantly upregulated in WAT-derived progenitors after coculture with breast cancer: granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9). These proteins were released by WAT progenitors in xenograft and transgenic breast cancer models. GM-CSF was identified as an upstream modulator. Breast cancer-derived GM-CSF induced GM-CSF and MMP9 release from WAT progenitors, and GM-CSF knockdown in breast cancer cells neutralized the protumorigenic activity of WAT progenitors in preclinical models. GM-CSF neutralization in diet-induced obese mice significantly reduced immunosuppression, intratumor vascularization, and local and metastatic breast cancer progression. Similarly, MMP9 inhibition reduced neoplastic angiogenesis and significantly decreased local and metastatic tumor growth. Combined GM-CSF neutralization and MMP9 inhibition synergistically reduced angiogenesis and tumor progression. High-dose metformin inhibited GM-CSF and MMP9 release from WAT progenitors in in vitro and xenograft models. In obese syngeneic mice, metformin treatment mimicked the effects observed with GM-CSF neutralization and MMP9 inhibition, suggesting these proteins as new targets for metformin. These findings support the hypothesis that GM-CSF and MMP9 promote the protumorigenic effect of WAT progenitors on local and metastatic breast cancer. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5169-82. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. The Cladophora glomerata Enriched by Biosorption Process in Cr(III Improves Viability, and Reduces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Equine Metabolic Syndrome Derived Adipose Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells (ASCs and Their Extracellular Vesicles (MV’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated in vitro effects of freshwater alga Cladophora glomerata water extract enriched during a biosorption process in Cr(III trivalent chromium and chromium picolinate on adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (ASCs and extracellular microvesicles (MVs in equine metabolic syndrome-affected horses. Chemical characterisation of natural Cladophora glomerata was performed with special emphasis on: vitamin C, vitamin E, total phenols, fatty acids, free and protein-bound amino acids as well as measured Cr in algal biomass. To examine the influence of Cladophora glomerata water extracts, in vitro viability, oxidative stress factor accumulation, apoptosis, inflammatory response, biogenesis of mitochondria, autophagy in ASCs of EMS and secretory activity manifested by MV release were investigated. For this purpose, various methods of molecular biology and microscopic observations (i.e., immunofluorescence staining, SEM, TEM, FIB observations, mRNA and microRNA expression by RT-qPCR were applied. The extract of Cladophora glomerata enriched with Cr(III ions reduced apoptosis and inflammation in ASCs of EMS horses through improvement of mitochondrial dynamics, decreasing of PDK4 expression and reduction of endoplastic reticulum stress. Moreover, it was found, that Cladophora glomerata and Cr(III induce antioxidative protection coming from enhanced SOD activity Therefore, Cladophora glomerata enriched with Cr(III ions might become an interesting future therapeutic agent in the pharmacological treatment of EMS horses.

  9. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzesiak, Jakub; Marycz, Krzysztof; Szarek, Dariusz; Bednarz, Paulina; Laska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane-polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane-polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzesiak, Jakub, E-mail: grzesiak.kuba@gmail.com [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Szarek, Dariusz [Department of Neurosurgery, Lower Silesia Specialist Hospital of T. Marciniak, Emergency Medicine Center, Traugutta 116, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Bednarz, Paulina [State Higher Vocational School in Tarnów, Mickiewicza 8, 33-100 Tarnów (Poland); Laska, Jadwiga [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology.

  11. Isolation and Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Porcine Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Hui-Yu; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Cheng, Ying-Hung; Mersmann, Harry J; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2016-03-31

    Obesity is an unconstrained worldwide epidemic. Unraveling molecular controls in adipose tissue development holds promise to treat obesity or diabetes. Although numerous immortalized adipogenic cell lines have been established, adipose-derived stem cells from the stromal vascular fraction of subcutaneous white adipose tissues provide a reliable cellular system ex vivo much closer to adipose development in vivo. Pig adipose-derived stem cells (pADSC) are isolated from 7- to 9-day old piglets. The dorsal white fat depot of porcine subcutaneous adipose tissues is sliced, minced and collagenase digested. These pADSC exhibit strong potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Moreover, the pADSC also possess multipotency, assessed by selective stem cell markers, to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell types including adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. These pADSC can be used for clarification of molecular switches in regulating classical adipocyte differentiation or in direction to other mesenchymal cell types of mesodermal origin. Furthermore, extended lineages into cells of ectodermal and endodermal origin have recently been achieved. Therefore, pADSC derived in this protocol provide an abundant and assessable source of adult mesenchymal stem cells with full multipotency for studying adipose development and application to tissue engineering of regenerative medicine.

  12. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Candido de Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures.

  13. The effect and safety of polylactic acid and adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell as an injectable bulking agent in urologic field: a 24-week follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Ho; Ko, Kyungtae; Choo, Min Soo; Lee, Won Ki; Jeong, Hyun Cheol; Cho, Sung Tae; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Hayoung; Kang, Won Hwa; Kim, Gun Poong; Yang, Dae Yul

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres and adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells have appropriate properties as an injectable bulking agent in urologic field. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats (2-week-old) were randomized into two groups. A total of 0.05 mL of PLA microsphere suspension and 0.05 mL of PLA microsphere suspension mixed with PKH26-labeled SVF cells were injected into bladder wall in group I and group II, respectively. At 2, 8, 16, and 24 weeks of PLA microspheres injection, the volumes of implants were measured and bladder tissues including implants were analyzed and compared grossly and histologically between groups. The distant organs were examined histologically to determine migration of PLA microspheres. At 24 weeks of implantation, 65-70% of injected volume was maintained and there was no significant difference between groups. In histological analyses, injected PLA microspheres were localized in muscular layer of bladder without infiltration into adjacent layer. From 8 to 16 weeks of injection, hybrid tissues contained collagen and actin were observed between PLA microspheres and these findings were more clear in group II. PHK26-labeled SVF cells were identified by fluorescence microscopy at all time points. There was no migration of PLA microspheres to other organs and no abnormality in weight gain and hematologic values. These results suggest the possibility of PLA microspheres as a potentially useful bulking agent in urologic field. And further investigation is needed to know synergic effect of SVF cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Safety and immunomodulatory effects of allogeneic canine adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells transplanted into the region of the lacrimal gland, the gland of the third eyelid and the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Ae; Reilly, Christopher M; Wood, Joshua A; Chung, Dai Jung; Carrade, Danielle D; Deremer, Sarah L; Seraphin, Rebecca L; Clark, Kaitlin C; Zwingenberger, Allison L; Borjesson, Dori L; Hayashi, Kei; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively studied as a cellular therapeutic for various pathologic conditions. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding regional and systemic safety of MSC transplantations, particularly with multiple deliveries of allogeneic cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and systemic immunomodulatory effects of repeated local delivery of allogeneic MSCs into the region of the lacrimal gland, the gland of the third eyelid and the knee joint in dogs. Allogeneic adipose tissue-derived canine MSCs were delivered to the regions of the lacrimal gland and the third eyelid gland as well as in the knee joints of six healthy laboratory beagles as follows: six times with 1-week intervals for delivery to the lacrimal gland and the third eyelid gland regions and three to four times with 1- to 2-week intervals for intra-articular transplantations. Dogs were sequentially evaluated by clinical examination. At the conclusion of the study, dogs were humanely euthanized, and a complete gross and histopathologic examination of all organ systems was performed. Mixed leukocyte reactions were also performed before the first transplantation and after the final transplantation. Clinical and pathologic examinations found no severe consequences after repeated MSC transplantations. Results of mixed leukocyte reactions demonstrated suppression of T-cell proliferation after MSC transplantations. This is the first study to demonstrate regional and systemic safety and systemic immunomodulatory effects of repeated local delivery of allogeneic MSCs in vivo. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Origin of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Dictates Their Reparative Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naftali-Shani, Nili; Itzhaki-Alfia, Ayelet; Landa-Rouben, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair....

  16. Nitric oxide mediates metabolic coupling of omentum-derived adipose stroma to ovarian and endometrial cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salimian Rizi, Bahar; Caneba, Christine; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Nabiyar, Ahmad W; Liu, Xinran; Chen, Kevin; Klopp, Ann; Nagrath, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Omental adipose stromal cells (O-ASC) are a multipotent population of mesenchymal stem cells contained in the omentum tissue that promote endometrial and ovarian tumor proliferation, migration, and drug resistance...

  17. Cryopreservation of stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue in a serum-free freezing medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Devireddy, Ram V

    2010-03-01

    Developing effective techniques for the cryopreservation of human adipose-derived adult stem cells could increase the usefulness of these cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, the use of serum and a commonly used cryoprotectant chemical, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), during cryopreservation storage restricts the direct translation of adult stem cells to in vivo applications. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue can be effectively cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen, using a freezing medium containing high molecular weight polymers, such as methylcellulose (MC) and/or polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP), as the cryoprotective agent (CPA) instead of DMSO. To this end, we investigated the post-freeze/thaw viability and apoptotic behaviour of SVF of adipose tissue frozen in 16 different media: (a) the traditional medium containing Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with 80% fetal calf serum (FCS) and 10% DMSO; (b) DMEM with 80% human serum (HS) and 10% DMSO; (c) DMEM with 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% or 10% DMSO; (d) DMEM with 1% MC and 10% of either HS or FCS or DMSO; (e) DMEM with 10% PVP and varying concentrations of FCS (0%, 10%, 40% or 80%); (f) DMEM with 10% PVP and 10% HS. Approximately 1 ml (10(6) cells/ml) of SVF cells were frozen overnight in a -80 degrees C freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 weeks before being rapidly thawed in a 37 degrees C water bath (1-2 min agitation), resuspended in culture medium and seeded in separate wells of a six-well plate for a 24 h incubation period at 37 degrees C. After 24 h, the thawed samples were analysed by brightfield microscopy and flow cytometry. The results suggest that the absence of DMSO (and the presence of MC) significantly increases the fraction of apoptotic and/or necrotic SVF cells. However, the percentage of viable cells obtained with 10% PVP and DMEM was comparable with that obtained in freezing

  18. Endothelial cells are essential for ovarian stromal tissue restructuring after xenotransplantation of isolated ovarian stromal cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dath, C; Dethy, A; Van Langendonckt, A; Van Eyck, A S; Amorim, C A; Luyckx, V; Donnez, J; Dolmans, M M

    2011-01-01

    .... To help improve the grafting technique, we investigated whether short-term xenografting of a suspension containing ovarian stromal and endothelial cells without follicles could enhance graft survival...

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Geoffrey M

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent adult stem cells with immunomodulatory properties. They uniquely express HLA class I antigen at a low level, and do not express HLA class II. Hence, for allogeneic administration, donor to recipient matching is not required; yet a prolonged chimeric state does not occur. Contrary to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cytotoxic drug therapy is not required to harvest, or administer, cells. Key Messages: MSC are obtained from marrow, adipose tissue or placenta. In our centre, MSC are isolated from a 10 ml donor marrow aspirate, by virtue of their adherence to plastic. They are expanded in culture, cryopreserved, and subjected to strict quality controls before release for intravenous administration. These activities occur in a dedicated, nationally accredited, laboratory. Initial observations of allogeneic MSC efficacy were in graft-versus-host disease. Both autologous and allogeneic MSC have since been evaluated in biologic refractory luminal and fistulising Crohn's disease (CD). Data from early-phase studies have suggested efficacy for luminal disease when allogeneic MSC were given intravenously and also suggested efficacy for fistulising disease when either allogeneic or autologous MSC were administered into fistulas. MSC treatment is not reported to have caused serious adverse events. Although in vitro criteria for defining MSC exist, a major challenge lies in how to define MSC for clinical use. MSC function in vivo is likely to be dependent upon donor immunological characteristics, and widely varying manufacturing processes between laboratories. MSC dose, frequency of administration, stage of disease, and presence of concomitant immunosuppression also require to be defined. MSC therapy may have future utility in CD, but considerable work is first required to determine appropriate phenotypic and functional characteristics of administered cells. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Platelet‐Derived Growth Factor BB Enhances Osteogenesis of Adipose‐Derived But Not Bone Marrow‐Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hung, Ben P; Hutton, Daphne L; Kozielski, Kristen L; Bishop, Corey J; Naved, Bilal; Green, Jordan J; Caplan, Arnold I; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Dorafshar, Amir H; Grayson, Warren L

    2015-01-01

    .... While the bone marrow‐derived MSC is the most widely studied stromal/stem cell type for this application, its rarity within bone marrow and painful isolation procedure have motivated investigation of alternative cell sources. Adipose...

  1. Human cord blood-derived platelet lysate enhances the therapeutic activity of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from Crohn's disease patients in a mouse model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Dorian; Ciciarello, Marilena; Valerii, Maria Chiara; De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Giordano, Rosaria; Parazzi, Valentina; Lazzari, Lorenza; Laureti, Silvio; Rizzello, Fernando; Cavo, Michele; Curti, Antonio; Lemoli, Roberto M; Spisni, Enzo; Catani, Lucia

    2015-09-09

    Due to their immunomodulatory properties, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been used for auto-immune disease treatment. Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis are two major inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), resulting from pathological immune responses to environmental or microbial antigens. Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that MSC-based cellular therapy hold promising potential for IBD treatment. However, open issues include the selection of the proper cell dose, the source and the optimal route of administration of MSCs for more effective results. Platelet lysate has gained clinical interest due to its efficacy in accelerating wound healing. Thus, we propose to combine the administration of MSCs with a human umbilical cord blood-derived platelet lysate (hCBPL) as a novel strategy to improve MSC-based therapy for IBD resolution. Colitis was induced in 8-week-old C57BL/6J mice by daily oral administration of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) (1.5 % w/v in tap water) for 9 days. MSCs were isolated from adipose tissue of CD patients (adCD-MSCs), expanded in proliferation medium, resuspended in hCBPL or PBS and administrated via enema for three times (1 × 10(6) cells/mouse/time) every other day starting on day +7 from DSS induction. The colitis evolution was evaluated by daily monitoring of body weight, stool consistency and bleeding. Histopathological analysis was performed. Inflammatory cytokine plasma levels were determined. adCD-MSCs stained with lipophilic membrane dye Nile Red, were injected in DSS mice as described above. Colon section of mice sacrificed 24 hours after last cell administration, were analyzed by confocal microscopy. We found that adCD-MSCs could be easily isolated and expanded from CD patients. Upon injection, adCD-MSCs exerted a therapeutic effect on DSS-induced colitis. Moreover, hCBPL increased adCD-MSCs efficacy by significantly reducing colitis scores, extension of the colon inflamed area and plasma levels of

  2. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The dec...

  3. STROMAL CELLS FROM SUBCUTANEOUS ADIPOSE-TISSUE SEEDED IN A NATIVE COLLAGEN/ELASTIN DERMAL SUBSTITUTE REDUCE WOUND CONTRACTION IN FULL-THICKNESS SKIN DEFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, HJC; MIDDELKOOP, E; VANHEEMSTRAHOEN, M; WILDEVUUR, CHR; WESTERHOF, W

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dermal substitutes seeded with cultured fibroblasts have been developed to improve dermal regeneration in full thickness wounds. Because of cell cultivation, 3 weeks are required before patients can be treated with these autologous cellular substitutes. We developed a dermal substitute

  4. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...

  5. "The preadipocyte factor" DLK1 marks adult mouse adipose tissue residing vascular cells that lack in vitro adipogenic differentiation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Line; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2009-01-01

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1) is expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and has frequently been referred to as "the" preadipocyte marker, yet the phenotype of DLK1(+) cells in adipose tissue remains undetermined. Herein, we demonstrate that DLK1(+) cells encompass around 1-2% of the adult mouse adipose stromal...

  6. Polymeric film of 6-arm-poly(ethylene glycol) amine graphene oxide with poly (ε-caprolactone): Adherence and growth of adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells culture on rat bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Marcela; Durán, Nelson; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Volpe, Bruno B.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Andrade, Patricia F.; De Souza, Joel G.; Fávaro, Wagner J.

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been more present in different fields related to health. The need to find a durable material, of easy use, and which does not interfere significantly in the growth and differentiation of stem cells for the construction of a scaffold for use in urologic surgery, with the purpose of reducing infections, regeneration times and even graft rejection during reconstitution in patients with urethral stricture was conducted a broad survey of information about this and came to the consensus of this project: using graphene oxide, a widely studied nanomaterials which has been presenting numerous beneficial results when in contact with the adipose-derived stem cells. Advanced techniques for the growth, differentiation and proliferation of adipose-derived stem cells were used, as well as the characterization of graphene oxide sheets. For this study, it was prepared the graphene oxide/6 ARM-Poly (ethylene glycol) amine films with poly (ε-caprolactone). The graphene suspension in organic solvent was prepared by using an ultrasonicator bath and subsequently, the film was formed by solvent evaporation. Total characterization of graphene oxide/6 ARM-PEG-amine/ poly (ε-caprolactone) film was carried out. It was tested growth and adhesion of adipose-derived stem cells on the film, as well as, were verified the histopathological effects of this scaffold when implanted in the urinary bladder to repair the lesion. Our results demonstrated that this scaffold with adipose-derived stem cells enhanced the repair in rat urinary bladder defect model, resulting in a regular bladder. Improved organized muscle bundles and urothelial layer were observed in animals treated with this scaffold with adipose-derived stem cells compared with those treated only suture thread or scaffold. Thus, our biomaterial could be suitable for tissue engineered urinary tract reconstruction.

  7. Cell adhesion and apoptosis in ovarian stromal hyperplasia and hyperthecosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabidze, N; Burkadze, G; Sabakhtarashvili, M

    2006-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate cell adhesion and apoptosis in ovarian stromal hyperplasia and hyperthecosis in reproductive women with and without polycystic ovarian disease. We have studied 104 patients with a histological diagnosis of ovarian stromal hyperthecosis and stromal hyperplasia. Paraffin sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, von Gieson and immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic protein) and E-cadherin (cell adhesion marker). We assessed the number of Bcl-2-positive and E-cadherin-positive cells. The patients were divided into 4 groups: group 1-33 patients with polycystic ovarian disease and coexistent stromal hyperthecosis, group 2-28 patients with polycystic ovarian disease and coexistent stromal hyperplasia, group 3-24 patients with ovarian stromal hyperthecosis, group 4-19 patients with ovarian stromal hyperplasia. Our results suggest that in ovarian stromal hyperthecosis and stromal hyperplasia coexistent with polycystic ovarian disease, E-cadherin-positivity in internal and external theca cells, and granulosa cells is associated with Bcl-2 expression. Therefore, ovarian cells expressing Bcl-2 and maintaining E-cadherin-positivity may be the viable cells that escape the apoptotic process. In ovarian stromal hyperthecosis without polycystic ovarian disease, luteinized stromal cells are potentially resistant to apoptosis as they are positive for Bcl-2. In ovarian stromal hyperplasia without polycystic ovarian disease, hyperplastic stromal cells are potentially susceptible to apoptosis as they are negative for Bcl-2. E-cadherin is negative both in stromal hyperthecosis and hyperplasia suggesting that E-cadherin expression in ovary is limited to granulosa and theca cells only. Described characteristics of cell adhesion and apoptosis may play a role in pathogenesis of ovarian stromal hyperthecosis and stromal hyperplasia with and without polycystic ovarian disease.

  8. Innate lymphoid cells and their stromal microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Zoltán; Vojkovics, Dóra; Balogh, Péter

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the interaction between antigen presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes, recent studies have revealed important roles for a diverse set of auxiliary cells that profoundly influence the induction and regulation of immune responses against pathogens. Of these the stromal cells composed of various non-hematopoietic constituents are crucial for the creation and maintenance of specialized semi-static three-dimensional lymphoid tissue microenvironment, whereas the more recently described innate lymphoid cells are generated by the diversification of committed lymphoid precursor cells independently from clonally rearranged antigen receptor genes. Recent findings have revealed important contributions by innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and protection against pathogens in a tissue-specific manner. Importantly, lymphoid stromal cells also influence the onset of immune responses in tissue-specific fashion, raising the possibility of tissue-specific stromal - innate lymphoid cell collaboration. In this review we summarize the main features and interactions between these two cells types, with particular emphasis on ILC type 3 cells and their microenvironmental partners. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, WA|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413648613; Türktas, Z; Duckers, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Until recently bone marrow was perceived to be the only significant reservoir of stem cells in the body. However, it is now recognized that there are other and perhaps even more abundant sources, which include adipose tissue. Subcutaneous fat is readily available in most patients, and can easily be

  10. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage......Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone...... and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance...

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells: misconceptions and evolving concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Donald G; Sensebé, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Nearly half a century has passed since the publication of the first articles describing plastic-adherent cells from bone marrow, referred to initially as colony-forming unit fibroblasts, then marrow stromal cells, mesenchymal stem cells and most recently multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). As expected, our understanding of the nature and biologic functions of MSCs has undergone major paradigm shifts over this time. Despite significant advances made in deciphering their complex biology and therapeutic potential in both experimental animal models and human clinical trials, numerous misconceptions regarding the nature and function of MSCs have persisted in the field. Continued propagation of these misconceptions in some cases may significantly impede the advancement of MSC-based therapies in clinical medicine. We have identified six prevalent misconceptions about MSCs that we believe affect the field, and we attempt to rectify them based on current available data. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PROSPECTS FOR APPLICATION OF Aplysinidae FAMILY MARINE SPONGE SKELETONS AND MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS IN TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Yu. Rogulska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Development of the new types of tissue engineered structures is one of the promising trends of current biotechnology. The study was directed to the assessment of prospects for the application of chitin-based skeletons derived from marine sponges of Aplysinidae family (Aplysina fulva and Aplysina aerophoba for creation of bioengineered constructs based on human mesenchymal stromal cells. After cleaning and demineralization procedures, sponge skeletons appeared as three-dimensional macroporous matrices formed by intersecting chitin fibrils. After seeding into chitin-based matrices the cells were attached to the surface of the fibrils and were able to spread and proliferate. Mesenchymal stromal cells within Aplysina fulva differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic directions under the influence of appropriate inductors. Demineralized skeletons derived from marine sponges of Aplysinidae family could be used as scaffolds for mesenchymal stromal cells which provides new opportunities for the creation of adipose and bone tissue engineered structures.

  13. PPARs and Adipose Cell Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Casteilla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of fat tissues in both energy balance and in the associated disorders arising when such balance is not maintained, adipocyte differentiation has been extensively investigated in order to control and inhibit the enlargement of white adipose tissue. The ability of a cell to undergo adipocyte differentiation is one particular feature of all mesenchymal cells. Up until now, the peroxysome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR subtypes appear to be the keys and essential players capable of inducing and controlling adipocyte differentiation. In addition, it is now accepted that adipose cells present a broad plasticity that allows them to differentiate towards various mesodermal phenotypes. The role of PPARs in such plasticity is reviewed here, although no definite conclusion can yet be drawn. Many questions thus remain open concerning the definition of preadipocytes and the relative importance of PPARs in comparison to other master factors involved in the other mesodermal phenotypes.

  14. Endothelial cells are essential for ovarian stromal tissue restructuring after xenotransplantation of isolated ovarian stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dath, C; Dethy, A; Van Langendonckt, A; Van Eyck, A S; Amorim, C A; Luyckx, V; Donnez, J; Dolmans, M M

    2011-06-01

    Grafting of isolated follicles represents an approach to prevent the risk of reimplanting malignant cells with cryopreserved ovarian fragments. Optimal conditions and cell types required to sustain human follicular growth need to be identified. To help improve the grafting technique, we investigated whether short-term xenografting of a suspension containing ovarian stromal and endothelial cells without follicles could enhance graft survival and revascularization. In human ovary, CD34 selectively labels endothelial cells of blood vessels. A CD34-replete ovarian stromal cell group, including stromal and endothelial cells, was obtained after enzymatic digestion of fresh human ovarian cortex. Magnetic-activated cell sorting was used to establish a CD34-depleted ovarian stromal cell group. Proportions of CD34-positive cells were evaluated by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Cell suspensions were embedded in human plasma clots and grafted (n = 10 for each group, 7 days) to the ovarian bursa of nude mice. Angiogenesis was quantified after human/mouse CD34 immunostaining. CD34-replete grafts had a well-organized and vascularized stromal structure, containing tubular components staining for human CD34 and corresponding to functional vessels, as evidenced by intraluminal red blood cells. CD34-depleted grafts tended to be smaller than CD34-replete grafts and poorly vascularized with central necrosis. Global microvessel density was higher in the CD34-replete than depleted group (337.9 versus 187.3 vessels/mm(2), P ovarian endothelial and stromal cells to ensure the formation of a well-vascularized and structured ovarian-like stroma after short-term xenografting, for future application in the transplantation of isolated follicles.

  15. Dendritic cells maintain dermal adipose–derived stromal cells in skin fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Jennifer J.; Zhu, Tong; Chyou, Susan; Dasoveanu, Dragos C.; Carballo, Camila; Tian, Sha; Magro, Cynthia M.; Rodeo, Scott; Spiera, Robert F.; Ruddle, Nancy H.; McGraw, Timothy E.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Lafyatis, Robert; Gordon, Jessica K.; Lu, Theresa T.

    2016-01-01

    Scleroderma is a group of skin-fibrosing diseases for which there are no effective treatments. A feature of the skin fibrosis typical of scleroderma is atrophy of the dermal white adipose tissue (DWAT). Adipose tissue contains adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ADSCs) that have regenerative and reparative functions; however, whether DWAT atrophy in fibrosis is accompanied by ADSC loss is poorly understood, as are the mechanisms that might maintain ADSC survival in fibrotic skin. Here, we have shown that DWAT ADSC numbers were reduced, likely because of cell death, in 2 murine models of scleroderma skin fibrosis. The remaining ADSCs showed a partial dependence on dendritic cells (DCs) for survival. Lymphotoxin β (LTβ) expression in DCs maintained ADSC survival in fibrotic skin by activating an LTβ receptor/β1 integrin (LTβR/β1 integrin) pathway on ADSCs. Stimulation of LTβR augmented the engraftment of therapeutically injected ADSCs, which was associated with reductions in skin fibrosis and improved skin function. These findings provide insight into the effects of skin fibrosis on DWAT ADSCs, identify a DC-ADSC survival axis in fibrotic skin, and suggest an approach for improving mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in scleroderma and other diseases. PMID:27721238

  16. Wnt5a Regulates the Assembly of Human Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction-Derived Microvasculatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat M Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (hSVF cells are an easily accessible, heterogeneous cell system that can spontaneously self-assemble into functional microvasculatures in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying vascular self-assembly and maturation are poorly understood, therefore we utilized an in vitro model to identify potential in vivo regulatory mechanisms. We utilized passage one (P1 hSVF because of the rapid UEA1+ endothelium (EC loss at even P2 culture. We exposed hSVF cells to a battery of angiogenesis inhibitors and found that the pan-Wnt inhibitor IWP2 produced the most significant hSVF-EC networking decrease (~25%. To determine which Wnt isoform(s and receptor(s may be involved, hSVF was screened by PCR for isoforms associated with angiogenesis, with only WNT5A and its receptor, FZD4, being expressed for all time points observed. Immunocytochemistry confirmed Wnt5a protein expression by hSVF. To see if Wnt5a alone could restore IWP2-induced EC network inhibition, recombinant human Wnt5a (0-150 ng/ml was added to IWP2-treated cultures. The addition of rhWnt5a significantly increased EC network area and significantly decreased the ratio of total EC network length to EC network area compared to untreated controls. To determine if Wnt5a mediates in vivo microvascular self-assembly, 3D hSVF constructs containing an IgG isotype control, anti-Wnt5a neutralizing antibody or rhWnt5a were implanted subcutaneously for 2w in immune compromised mice. Compared to IgG controls, anti-Wnt5a treatment significantly reduced vessel length density by ~41%, while rhWnt5a significantly increased vessel length density by ~62%. However, anti-Wnt5a or rhWnt5a did not significantly affect the density of segments and nodes, both of which measure vascular complexity. Taken together, this data demonstrates that endogenous Wnt5a produced by hSVF plays a regulatory role in microvascular self-assembly in vivo. These findings also suggest that

  17. Isolation and differentiation of stromal vascular cells to beige/brite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aune, Ulrike Liisberg; Ruiz, Lauren; Kajimura, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipocytes have the ability to uncouple the respiratory chain in mitochondria and dissipate chemical energy as heat. Development of UCP1-positive brown adipocytes in white adipose tissues (so called beige or brite cells) is highly induced by a variety of environmental cues such as chronic...... cold exposure or by PPARγ agonists, therefore, this cell type has potential as a therapeutic target for obesity treatment. Although most immortalized adipocyte lines cannot recapitulate the process of "browning" of white fat in culture, primary adipocytes isolated from stromal vascular fraction...... in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) provide a reliable cellular system to study the molecular control of beige/brite cell development. Here we describe a protocol for effective isolation of primary preadipocytes and for inducing differentiation to beige/brite cells in culture. The browning effect can...

  18. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction Increases Osteogenesis in an Experimental Design Zygomatic Bone Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplu, Gaye; Ozcelik, Derya; Serin, Merdan; Erdem, Havva; Topacoglu, Arzu Turkseven

    2017-11-01

    Facial bone defects are frequently encountered problems in clinical practice. Bone grafts, flaps, and alloplastic materials are often used in their treatment. This leads to donor site morbidity and prolongation of the operation. The authors have planned this study to examine whether adipose tissue derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) has an osteogenic effect in the critical sized membranous bone defect of the zygomatic bone. Twenty male Wistar Albino rats were used. Bilateral zygomatic arches were opened with lateral incisions. A standard 3-mm bone defect was created bilaterally on the zygomatic arches of the rats. In the experiment side, the stem cell-rich SVF that was obtained by applying centrifugal process to the adipose tissue derived from the inguinal fat pad was injected into the site of the right zygomatic arch bone defect. In the control side, left zygomatic arch was left for secondary bone healing without any treatment after a 3-mm critical bone defect was created. In the postoperative 10th (n:5) and 20th weeks (n:13), the healing areas of bone defects were assessed by a 3-dimensional tomography, and then, the rats were sacrificed and bone healing was examined histologically. There were no statistically significant differences on the 10th week results. At the 20th week new bone formation amount calculated from the 3-dimensional computed tomography results was significantly higher in the experiment side (P = 0.033). In the histological examination at the 20th week, there was significantly more callus formation in the experiment side (P = 0.0112). Stem cells can increase the rate of bone healing by differentiating into certain tissues. It is predicted that adipose tissue-derived SVF rich with mesenchymal stem cells can increase bone healing in facial bone defects and this application could replace the use of bone grafts and flaps in clinical practice. As a result, it is concluded that adipose tissue-derived stem cells can potentiate osteogenesis

  19. Transition of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells to endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are heterogeneous. A fraction of these cells constitute multipotent cells that can self-renew and mainly give rise to mesodermal lineage cells such as adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into endothelial

  20. Ischemic flap survival improvement by composition-selective fat grafting with novel adipose tissue derived product - stromal vascular fraction gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Feng, Jingwei; Liao, Yunjun; Cai, Junrong; Zhou, Tao; Sun, Mingliang; Gao, Jianhua; Gao, Kai

    2017-11-30

    Flap necrosis due to insufficient blood supply is a common postoperative complication in random pattern flaps. Stem cell therapies have emerged as promising biologics for tissue ischemia. A novel fat derived product, stromal vascular fraction gel (SVF-gel), can be prepared with lipoaspirate through simple mechanical processing, removing only the lipid content. SVF-gel enriches adipose-derived stem cells and potentially beneficial for flap necrosis. Nude mice ischemic flaps were treated with human SVF-gel, stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cell suspension or saline (n = 10). They were injected to the flap recipient beds, and necrosis and vascularization was assessed on postoperative day 14. We harvested the necrosis-free distal to evaluated skin healthiness and neovasculogenesis by Masson's trichrome stain and immunofluorescence, etc. Pro-angiogenic factors were assessed with tissue qRT-PCR. Finally, we traced the grafted human tissue with immunofluorescence. SVF-gel-treated flaps have the smallest necrotic zones (22.05% ± 0.0438) compared with the saline controls (53.78% ± 0.1412) or SVF-treated ones (35.54% ± 0.0850, p = 0.039). Numerous functional musculocutaneous perforators were developed around SVF-gel grafts. The SVF-gel-treated skin had the best fat restoration (231.3 ± 48.1 μm) among three groups (F = 10.83, p = 0.0102) while saline-treated flap distal appeared fibrotic. SVF-gel-treated flaps also had ∼43% more CD31 + capillaries (p = 0.0152) with ∼3 folds more gene expression of angiogenic cytokines of VEGF and bFGF (p = 0.0310 and 0.0303, respectively) than saline-treated controls. Furthermore, we found hSVF-gel cells (hGolgi+) had directly engrafted as vessel component (α-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA+) to the flap. Adipose cellular matrix enhanced flap neovascularization partly by direct incorporation, improved flap survival and fat restoration. The composition-selective fat grafting with SVF-gel demonstrated efficacy

  1. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have been...... initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs......) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...

  2. Adipose Extracellular Matrix/Stromal Vascular Fraction Gel Secretes Angiogenic Factors and Enhances Skin Wound Healing in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingliang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells are an attractive cell type for cytotherapy in wound healing. The authors recently developed a novel, adipose-tissue-derived, injectable extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel (ECM/SVF-gel for stem cell therapy. This study was designed to assess the therapeutic effects of ECM/SVF-gel on wound healing and potential mechanisms. ECM/SVF-gel was prepared for use in nude mouse excisional wound healing model. An SVF cell suspension and phosphate-buffered saline injection served as the control. The expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 in ECM/SVF-gel were analyzed at different time points. Angiogenesis (tube formation assays of ECM/SVF-gel extracts were evaluated, and vessels density in skin was determined. The ECM/SVF-gel extract promoted tube formation in vitro and increased the expression of the angiogenic factors VEGF and bFGF compared with those in the control. The expression of the inflammatory chemoattractant MCP-1 was high in ECM/SVF-gel at the early stage and decreased sharply during the late stage of wound healing. The potent angiogenic effects exerted by ECM/SVF-gel may contribute to the improvement of wound healing, and these effects could be related to the enhanced inflammatory response in ECM/SVF-gel during the early stage of wound healing.

  3. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells isolated after manual or water jet-assisted liposuction display similar properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eBony

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC are under investigation in many clinical trials for their therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. One of the main sources of MSCs is the adipose tissue, which is mainly obtained by manual liposuction using a cannula linked to a syringe. However, in the last years, a number of devices for fat liposuction intended for clinical use have been commercialized but few papers have compared these procedures in terms of stromal vascular fraction (SVF or adipose stromal cells (ASC. The objective of the present study was to compare and qualify for clinical use the adipose stromal cells (ASC obtained from fat isolated with the manual or the Bodyjet® waterjet-assisted procedure. Although the initial number of cells after collagenase digestion was higher with the manual procedure, both the percentage of dead cells, the number of CFU-F and the phenotype of cells were identical in the SVF at isolation and in the ASC populations at day 14. We also showed that the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials of ASCs were identical between preparations while a slight but significant higher in vitro immunosuppressive effect was observed with ASCs isolated from fat removed with a cannula. The difference in the immunomodulatory effect between ASC populations was however not observed in vivo using the delayed-type hypersensitivity model. Our data therefore indicate that the procedure for fat liposuction does not impact the characteristics or the therapeutic function of ASCs.

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic stroke

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    Zhang Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ye Zhang, Hong Deng, Chao Pan, Yang Hu, Qian Wu, Na Liu, Zhouping Tang Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Stroke is a clinical disease with high incidence, high disability rate, and high mortality. But effective and safe therapy for stroke remains limited. Adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs perform a variety of therapeutic functions. MSC delivery improves neurological outcomes in ischemic stroke models via neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects such as angiogenic effects, promoting endogenous proliferation, and reducing apoptosis and inflammation. MSC secretome also showed powerful therapeutic effects as a cell-based therapy in animal experiments. Several clinical trials on MSC implantation via different routes have now been completed in patients with stroke. Although challenges such as immunogenicity of allo-MSCs and large-scale production strategies need to be overcome, MSCs can be considered as a promising potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Keywords: mesenchymal stromal cell, stroke, therapy, transplantation, exosomes

  5. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Three Devices for the Isolation of the Stromal Vascular Fraction from Adipose Tissue and for ASC Culture: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jonathan; Pratta, Anne-Sophie; Abbassi, Nacira; Fabre, Hugo; Rodriguez, Fanny; Debard, Cyrille; Adobati, Jacqueline; Boucher, Fabien; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Auxenfans, Céline; Damour, Odile; Mojallal, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) reside in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue (AT) and can be easily isolated. However, extraction of the SVF from lipoaspirate is a critical step in generating ASC, and semiautomated devices have been developed to enhance the efficacy and reproducibility of the outcomes and to decrease manipulation and contamination. In this study, we compared the reference method used in our lab for SVF isolation from lipoaspirate, with three medical devices: GID SVF-1™, Puregraft™, and Stem.pras®. Cell yield and their viability were evaluated as well as their phenotype with flow cytometry. Further on, we determined their proliferative potential using population doublings (PD), PD time (PDT), and clonogenicity assay (CFU-F). Finally, we checked their genetic stability using RT-qPCR for TERT mRNA assay and karyotyping as well as their multilineage potential including adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that all the devices allow the production of SVF cells with consistent yield and viability, in less time than the reference method. Expanded cells from the four methods showed no significant differences in terms of phenotype, proliferation capabilities, differentiation abilities, and genetic stability.

  7. Evaluation of Three Devices for the Isolation of the Stromal Vascular Fraction from Adipose Tissue and for ASC Culture: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Rodriguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs reside in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF of adipose tissue (AT and can be easily isolated. However, extraction of the SVF from lipoaspirate is a critical step in generating ASC, and semiautomated devices have been developed to enhance the efficacy and reproducibility of the outcomes and to decrease manipulation and contamination. In this study, we compared the reference method used in our lab for SVF isolation from lipoaspirate, with three medical devices: GID SVF-1™, Puregraft™, and Stem.pras®. Cell yield and their viability were evaluated as well as their phenotype with flow cytometry. Further on, we determined their proliferative potential using population doublings (PD, PD time (PDT, and clonogenicity assay (CFU-F. Finally, we checked their genetic stability using RT-qPCR for TERT mRNA assay and karyotyping as well as their multilineage potential including adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that all the devices allow the production of SVF cells with consistent yield and viability, in less time than the reference method. Expanded cells from the four methods showed no significant differences in terms of phenotype, proliferation capabilities, differentiation abilities, and genetic stability.

  8. Equine Metabolic Syndrome Affects Viability, Senescence, and Stress Factors of Equine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells: New Insight into EqASCs Isolated from EMS Horses in the Context of Their Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Basinska, Katarzyna; Czyrek, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Currently, equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), an endocrine disease linked to insulin resistance, affects an increasing number of horses. However, little is known about the effect of EMS on mesenchymal stem cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASC). Thus it is crucial to evaluate the viability and growth kinetics of these cells, particularly in terms of their application in regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated the proliferative capacity, morphological features, and accumulation of oxidative stress factors in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from healthy animals (ASCN) and horses suffering from EMS (ASCEMS). ASCEMS displayed senescent phenotype associated with β-galactosidase accumulation, enlarged cell bodies and nuclei, increased apoptosis, and reduced heterochromatin architecture. Moreover, we observed increased amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells, accompanied by reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. We also found in ASCEMS an elevated number of impaired mitochondria, characterized by membrane raptures, disarrayed cristae, and vacuole formation. Our results suggest that the toxic compounds, accumulating in the mitochondria under oxidative stress, lead to alternations in their morphology and may be partially responsible for the senescent phenotype and decreased proliferation potential of ASCEMS.

  9. Equine Metabolic Syndrome Affects Viability, Senescence, and Stress Factors of Equine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells: New Insight into EqASCs Isolated from EMS Horses in the Context of Their Aging

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    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, equine metabolic syndrome (EMS, an endocrine disease linked to insulin resistance, affects an increasing number of horses. However, little is known about the effect of EMS on mesenchymal stem cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASC. Thus it is crucial to evaluate the viability and growth kinetics of these cells, particularly in terms of their application in regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated the proliferative capacity, morphological features, and accumulation of oxidative stress factors in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from healthy animals (ASCN and horses suffering from EMS (ASCEMS. ASCEMS displayed senescent phenotype associated with β-galactosidase accumulation, enlarged cell bodies and nuclei, increased apoptosis, and reduced heterochromatin architecture. Moreover, we observed increased amounts of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS in these cells, accompanied by reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD activity. We also found in ASCEMS an elevated number of impaired mitochondria, characterized by membrane raptures, disarrayed cristae, and vacuole formation. Our results suggest that the toxic compounds, accumulating in the mitochondria under oxidative stress, lead to alternations in their morphology and may be partially responsible for the senescent phenotype and decreased proliferation potential of ASCEMS.

  10. Isolation and characterization of canine perivascular stem/stromal cells for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Winters R.; Liang, Pei; Meyers, Carolyn A.; Lobo, Sonja; Lagishetty, Venu; Childers, Martin K.; Asatrian, Greg; Ding, Catherine; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Zou, Erin; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Soo, Chia

    2017-01-01

    For over 15 years, human subcutaneous adipose tissue has been recognized as a rich source of tissue resident mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). The isolation of perivascular progenitor cells from human adipose tissue by a cell sorting strategy was first published in 2008. Since this time, the interest in using pericytes and related perivascular stem/stromal cell (PSC) populations for tissue engineering has significantly increased. Here, we describe a set of experiments identifying, isolating and characterizing PSC from canine tissue (N = 12 canine adipose tissue samples). Results showed that the same antibodies used for human PSC identification and isolation are cross-reactive with canine tissue (CD45, CD146, CD34). Like their human correlate, canine PSC demonstrate characteristics of MSC including cell surface marker expression, colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) inclusion, and osteogenic differentiation potential. As well, canine PSC respond to osteoinductive signals in a similar fashion as do human PSC, such as the secreted differentiation factor NEL-Like Molecule-1 (NELL-1). Nevertheless, important differences exist between human and canine PSC, including differences in baseline osteogenic potential. In summary, canine PSC represent a multipotent mesenchymogenic cell source for future translational efforts in tissue engineering. PMID:28489940

  11. Isolation and characterization of canine perivascular stem/stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W James

    Full Text Available For over 15 years, human subcutaneous adipose tissue has been recognized as a rich source of tissue resident mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC. The isolation of perivascular progenitor cells from human adipose tissue by a cell sorting strategy was first published in 2008. Since this time, the interest in using pericytes and related perivascular stem/stromal cell (PSC populations for tissue engineering has significantly increased. Here, we describe a set of experiments identifying, isolating and characterizing PSC from canine tissue (N = 12 canine adipose tissue samples. Results showed that the same antibodies used for human PSC identification and isolation are cross-reactive with canine tissue (CD45, CD146, CD34. Like their human correlate, canine PSC demonstrate characteristics of MSC including cell surface marker expression, colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F inclusion, and osteogenic differentiation potential. As well, canine PSC respond to osteoinductive signals in a similar fashion as do human PSC, such as the secreted differentiation factor NEL-Like Molecule-1 (NELL-1. Nevertheless, important differences exist between human and canine PSC, including differences in baseline osteogenic potential. In summary, canine PSC represent a multipotent mesenchymogenic cell source for future translational efforts in tissue engineering.

  12. Primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with luteinized stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engohan-Aloghe, Corinne; Buxant, F; Noël, J C

    2009-07-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoid tumors are rare. Distinct histologic patterns have been described in the literature as insular, trabecular, mucinous and mixed types. We describe a case of 71-year-old woman diagnosed with a left ovarian tumor. Frozen section examination identified the mass as a sex-cord stromal tumor. The surgically resected tumor was diagnosed as an insular carcinoid tumor with unusual luteinized stromal cells. Histologic diagnosis complied with results acquired by immunohistochemical with positivity of tumor cells for neuroendocrine markers and positivity of luteinized stromal cells for alpha-inhibin, calretinin and Melan A. Ovarian carcinoid tumor can be extremely heterogeneous. The purpose of our report was to show that the ovarian carcinoid tumor can be associated with stromal luteinization, mimicking a sex-cord stromal tumor.

  13. USE OF AUTOLOGOUS ADIPOSE TISSUE DERIVED STROMAL VASCULAR FRACTION IN TREATMENT OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS AND CHONDRAL LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a joint inflammation that results from cartilage degeneration. It can be caused by aging, heredity and injury from trauma or disease. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, containing large amount of stem cells and other regenerative cells, can be easily obtained from loose connective tissue that is associated with adipose tissue. Here we evaluated safety and clinical efficacy of freshly isolated autologous SVF cells in patients with grade 2 - 4 degenerative osteoarthritis (OA. A total of 31 patients underwent standard liposuction under local anesthesia and SVF cells were isolated and prepared for application into joints. A total of 61 joints, mainly knee and hip joints, were treated with a single dose of SVF cells. 19 patients were fol lowed for minimum 6 weeks for safety and efficacy. Modified KOOS Clinical Score was used to evaluate clinical effect and was based on pain, non - steroid analgesic usage, limping, extent of joint movement, and stiffness evaluation before and at pre - operative , 1 week post - op, 1 month and 6 weeks after the treatment. No serious side effects, systemic infection or cancer was associated with SVF cell therapy. All patients improved after the treatment. Average KOOS score improved from pre - operative 37.5 to post - op erative 6 week average 66.6. All sub scale parameter for pain, symptoms, activity of living & quality of life are also improved. Higher grade of OA were associated with slower healing. In conclusion, here we report a novel and promising treatment approach for patients with degenerative OA that is safe, cost - effective, and relying only on autologous cells, and can be used as one of the minimal invasive treatment modality for osteoarthritis

  14. WNT5A induces osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells via rho-associated kinase Rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, A.; Bakker, A.D.; de Blieck-Hogervorst, J.M.A.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background aims. Human (h) adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASC) constitute an interesting cellular source for bone tissue engineering applications. Wnts, for example Wnt5a, are probably important regulators of osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, but the role of Wnt5a in hASC

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Thomas; Geyh, Stefanie; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by hematopoietic insufficiency. As MDS and AML are considered to originate from genetic and molecular defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), the main focus of research in this field has focused on the characterization of these cells. Recently, the contribution of BM microenvironment to the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies, in particular MDS and AML has gained more interest. This is based on a better understanding of its physiological role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Additionally, it was demonstrated as a 'proof of principle' that genetic disruption of cells of the mesenchymal or osteoblastic lineage can induce MDS, MPS or AML in mice. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of the BM microenvironment, in particular mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to the pathogenesis of AML and MDS. Furthermore, potential models integrating the BM microenvironment into the pathophysiology of these myeloid disorders are discussed. Finally, strategies to therapeutically exploit this knowledge and to interfere with the crosstalk between clonal hematopoietic cells and altered stem cell niches are introduced.

  16. Maintenance of osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation potential with age and osteoporosis in human marrow stromal cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Eriksen, E F

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP) is the ......Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP...... phosphatase (AP+), and adipocytic colonies containing adipocytes (Ad+) were quantitated. In addition, steady state mRNA levels of gene markers of adipocytic and osteoblastic phenotypes were determined using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The adipogenic and osteogenic media induced...

  17. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

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    Valeria Messina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, first found in bone marrow (BM, are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal. In Crohn’s disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn’s disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer.

  18. Influence of patient related factors on number of mesenchymal stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Kaur, Kamal Preet; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2017-01-01

    of autologous stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical therapy. METHODS: Culture expansion data from 111 patients with IHD treated with autologous stromal cells in three clinical trials were used. We correlated the final cell count after two passages of cultivation with different...... correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and number of MSCs was found (r = -0.287, p = .017). CONCLUSIONS: Patient related factors such as BMI, hypertension and gender may influence the number of MSCs reached after in vitro culture expansion....... patient factors. RESULTS: There was a significant relation between body mass index (BMI) and the number of adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) reached after culture expansion and for all patients included into the three studies (r = 0.375, p = .019 and r = 0.200, p = .036, respectively). Moreover...

  19. Stromal cell contribution to human follicular lymphoma pathogenesis

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    Frédéric eMourcin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL is the prototypical model of indolent B-cell lymphoma displaying a strong dependence on a specialized cell microenvironment mimicking normal germinal center. Within malignant cell niches in invaded lymph nodes and bone marrow, external stimuli provided by infiltrating stromal cells make a pivotal contribution to disease development, progression, and drug resistance. The crosstalk between FL B cells and stromal cells is bidirectional, causing activation of both partners. In agreement, FL stromal cells exhibit specific phenotypic, transcriptomic, and functional properties. This review highlights the critical pathways involved in the direct tumor-promoting activity of stromal cells but also their role in the organization of FL cell niche through the recruitment of accessory immune cells and their polarization to a B-cell supportive phenotype. Finally, deciphering the interplay between stromal cells and FL cells provides potential new therapeutic targets with the aim to mobilize malignant cells outside their protective microenvironment and increase their sensitivity to conventional treatment.

  20. Transition of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela

    2013-08-14

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are heterogeneous. A fraction of these cells constitute multipotent cells that can self-renew and mainly give rise to mesodermal lineage cells such as adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into endothelial cells remains controversial. Isolation and in vitro manipulation of MSCs before clinical application are important steps. High numbers of MSCs are needed, requiring the in vitro expansion of these clinically important cells. To this end, a well-controlled procedure for MSC isolation and maintenance in culture is necessary.

  1. Ovarian serous cystadenofibroma with signet ring-stromal cells: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajeev; Shah, Varsha; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2010-09-01

    We report 2 ovarian serous cystadenofibromas with signet ring cells within the stromal component. The signet ring-stromal cells were widespread in 1 case and focal in the other. Immunohistochemically, they were negative with cytokeratin and other epithelial markers and positive with mesenchymal markers. The occurrence of signet ring-stromal cells in ovarian serous cystadenofibromas is an unusual pseudoneoplastic phenomenon, which has not been reported previously, although signet ring cells may occur within a variety of ovarian stromal neoplasms, including fibromas, sclerosing stromal tumors, and signet ring-stromal tumors. In reporting these cases, we review ovarian stromal neoplasms and other lesions with signet ring cells.

  2. Adipose Derived-Mesenchymal Stem Cells Viability and Differentiating Features for Orthopaedic Reparative Applications: Banking of Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Roato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is characterized by loss of articular cartilage also due to reduced chondrogenic activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from patients. Adipose tissue is an attractive source of MSCs (ATD-MSCs, representing an effective tool for reparative medicine, particularly for treatment of osteoarthritis, due to their chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation capability. The treatment of symptomatic knee arthritis with ATD-MSCs proved effective with a single infusion, but multiple infusions could be also more efficacious. Here we studied some crucial aspects of adipose tissue banking procedures, evaluating ATD-MSCs viability, and differentiation capability after cryopreservation, to guarantee the quality of the tissue for multiple infusions. We reported that the presence of local anesthetic during lipoaspiration negatively affects cell viability of cryopreserved adipose tissue and cell growth of ATD-MSCs in culture. We observed that DMSO guarantees a faster growth of ATD-MSCs in culture than trehalose. At last, ATD-MSCs derived from fresh and cryopreserved samples at −80°C and −196°C showed viability and differentiation ability comparable to fresh samples. These data indicate that cryopreservation of adipose tissue at −80°C and −196°C is equivalent and preserves the content of ATD-MSCs in Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF, guaranteeing the differentiation ability of ATD-MSCs.

  3. Identification of Predictive Gene Markers for Multipotent Stromal Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellayr, Ian H; Marklein, Ross A; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2016-06-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are known for their distinctive ability to differentiate into different cell lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They can be isolated from numerous tissue sources, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and others. Because of their differentiation potential and secretion of growth factors, MSCs are believed to have an inherent quality of regeneration and immune suppression. Cellular expansion is necessary to obtain sufficient numbers for use; however, MSCs exhibit a reduced capacity for proliferation and differentiation after several rounds of passaging. In this study, gene markers of MSC proliferation were identified and evaluated for their ability to predict proliferative quality. Microarray data of human bone marrow-derived MSCs were correlated with two proliferation assays. A collection of 24 genes were observed to significantly correlate with both proliferation assays (|r| >0.70) for eight MSC lines at multiple passages. These 24 identified genes were then confirmed using an additional set of MSCs from eight new donors using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The proliferative potential of the second set of MSCs was measured for each donor/passage for confluency fraction, fraction of EdU+ cells, and population doubling time. The second set of MSCs exhibited a greater proliferative potential at passage 4 in comparison to passage 8, which was distinguishable by 15 genes; however, only seven of the genes (BIRC5, CCNA2, CDC20, CDK1, PBK, PLK1, and SPC25) demonstrated significant correlation with MSC proliferation regardless of passage. Our analyses revealed that correlation between gene expression and proliferation was consistently reduced with the inclusion of non-MSC cell lines; therefore, this set of seven genes may be more strongly associated with MSC proliferative quality. Our results pave the way to determine the quality of an MSC population for a

  4. Cell supermarket: Adipose tissue as a source of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adipose tissue is derived from numerous sources, and in recent years has been shown to provide numerous cells from what seemingly was a population of homogeneous adipocytes. Considering the types of cells that adipose tissue-derived cells may form, these cells may be useful in a variety of clinical ...

  5. Hypoxia promotes adipose-derived stem cell proliferation via VEGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a promising mesenchymal stem cell source with therapeutic applications. Recent studies have shown that ADSCs could be expanded in vitro without phenotype changes. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on ADSC proliferation in vitro and to determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in ADSC proliferation. ADSCs were selectively cultured from the stromal vascular fraction obtained from adipose tissue in DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic-antimycotic. ADSCs were cultured under two conditions: hypoxia (5% O2 and normal oxygen (21% O2. The effects of the oxygen concentration on cell proliferation were examined by cell cycle and doubling time. The expression of VEGF was evaluated by the ELISA assay. The role of VEGF in ADSC proliferation was studied by neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies. We found that the ADSC proliferation rate was significantly higher under hypoxia compared with normoxia. In hypoxia, ADSCs also triggered VEGF expression. However, neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation rate. These results suggest that hypoxia stimulated ADSC proliferation in association with VEGF production. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(1.000: 476-482

  6. Concise review: The obesity cancer paradigm: exploration of the interactions and crosstalk with adipose stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Amy L; Burow, Matthew E; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2015-02-01

    With the recognition of obesity as a global health crisis, researchers have devoted greater effort to defining and understanding the pathophysiological molecular pathways regulating the biology of adipose tissue and obesity. Obesity, the excessive accumulation of adipose tissue due to hyperplasia and hypertrophy, has been linked to an increased incidence and aggressiveness of colon, hematological, prostate, and postmenopausal breast cancers. The increased morbidity and mortality of obesity-associated cancers have been attributed to higher levels of hormones, adipokines, and cytokines secreted by the adipose tissue. The increased amount of adipose tissue also results in higher numbers of adipose stromal/stem cells (ASCs). These ASCs have been shown to impact cancer progression directly through several mechanisms, including the increased recruitment of ASCs to the tumor site and increased production of cytokines and growth factors by ASCs and other cells within the tumor stroma. Emerging evidence indicates that obesity induces alterations in the biologic properties of ASCs, subsequently leading to enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis of cancer cells. This review will discuss the links between obesity and cancer tumor progression, including obesity-associated changes in adipose tissue, inflammation, adipokines, and chemokines. Novel topics will include a discussion of the contribution of ASCs to this complex system with an emphasis on their role in the tumor stroma. The reciprocal and circular feedback loop between obesity and ASCs as well as the mechanisms by which ASCs from obese patients alter the biology of cancer cells and enhance tumorigenesis will be discussed. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Effects of granulosa cells on steroidogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis of stromal cells and theca cells derived from the goat ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mingning; Quan, Fusheng; Han, Chengquan; Wu, Bin; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhongcai; Su, Feng; Zhang, Yong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of granulosa cells from small antral follicles on steroidogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis of goat ovarian stromal and theca cells in vitro. Using Transwell co-culture system, we evaluated androgen production, LH responsiveness, cell proliferation and apoptosis and some molecular expression regarding steroidogenic enzyme and apoptosis-related genes in stromal and theca cells. The results indicated that the co-culture with granulosa cells increased steroidogenesis, LH responsiveness and bcl-2 gene expression as well as decreased apoptotic bax and bad expressions in stromal and theca cells. Thus, granulosa cells had a capacity of promoting steroidogenesis in stromal cell and LH responsiveness in cortical stromal cells, maintaining steroidogenesis in theca cells, inhibiting apoptosis of cortical stromal cells and improving anti-apoptotic abilities of stromal and theca cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  9. Expression of tyrosine kinase gene in mouse thymic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Izon, D. J.; Revilla, C.; Oosterwegel, M.; Bakker, A. Q.; van Ewijk, W.; Kruisbeek, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Amongst the most important signal transduction molecules involved in regulating growth and differentiation are the protein tyrosine kinases (PTK). Since T cell development is a consequence of interactions between thymic stromal cells (TSC) and thymocytes, identification of the PTK in both

  10. Endogenous collagen influences differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.; Mentink, A.; Bank, R.; Stoop, R.; Blitterswijk, C. van; Boer, J. de

    2010-01-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  11. Endogenous Collagen Influences Differentiation of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Mentink-Leusink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  12. Endogenous Collagen Influences Differentiation of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Mentink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  13. IL-33 and Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin in mast cell functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Rohit; Zoltowska, Anna; Ketelaar, Maria Elizabeth; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) and Interleukin 33 (IL-33) are two cytokines released by cells that are in proximity to our environment, e.g., keratinocytes of the skin and epithelial cells of the airways. Pathogens, allergens, chemicals and other agents induce the release of TSLP and IL-33,

  14. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  15. Stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dana; Bjørnager, Louise; Langkilde, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Stromal cell-derived factor 1a (SDF-1α), is a chemokine and is able to home hematopoietic progenitor cells to injured areas of heart tissue for structural repair. Previous studies have found increased levels of SDF-1α in several cardiac diseases, but only few studies have investigated...

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  12. Stromal cells in tumor microenvironment and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T; Garfield, David H; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression but also induce therapeutic resistance. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistance. This review summarizes the current understandings of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. In addition, the effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages, and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to categorize patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment.

  13. Human mesenchymal stromal cells : biological characterization and clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of the biological and functional properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from different tissue sources. The differentiation capacity of MSCs from fetal and adult tissues has been tested and compared. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has

  14. In vitro differentiation of human skin-derived multipotent stromal cells into putative endothelial-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnubalaji Radhakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multipotent stem cells have been successfully isolated from various tissues and are currently utilized for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. Among the many sources, skin has recently emerged as an attractive source for multipotent cells because of its abundance. Recent literature showed that skin stromal cells (SSCs possess mesoderm lineage differentiation potential; however, the endothelial differentiation and angiogenic potential of SSC remains elusive. In our study, SSCs were isolated from human neonatal foreskin (hNFSSCs and adult dermal skin (hADSSCs using explants cultures and were compared with bone marrow (hMSC-TERT and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs for their potential differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. Results Concordant with previous studies, both MSCs and SSCs showed similar morphology, surface protein expression, and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Using an endothelial induction culture system combined with an in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay, hNFSSCs and hADSSCs exhibited the highest tube-forming capability, which was similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, with hNFSSCs forming the most tightly packed, longest, and largest diameter tubules among the three cell types. CD146 was highly expressed on hNFSSCs and HUVEC followed by hADSSCs, and hMSC-TERT, while its expression was almost absent on hADMSCs. Similarly, higher vascular density (based on the expression of CD31, CD34, vWF, CD146 and SMA was observed in neonatal skin, followed by adult dermal skin and adipose tissue. Thus, our preliminary data indicated a plausible relationship between vascular densities, and the expression of CD146 on multipotent cells derived from those tissues. Conclusions Our data is the first to demonstrate that human dermal skin stromal cells can be differentiated into endothelial lineage. Hence, SSCs

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  19. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxi...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  20. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxic...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  1. Interleukin 7-engineered stromal cells: a new approach for hastening naive T cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Mauro; Del Papa, Beatrice; De Ioanni, Maria; Terenzi, Adelmo; Sportoletti, Paolo; Moretti, Lorenzo; Falzetti, Franca; Gaozza, Eugenia; Zei, Tiziana; Spinozzi, Fabrizio; Bagnis, Claude; Mannoni, Patrice; Bonifacio, Elisabetta; Falini, Brunangelo; Martelli, Massimo F; Tabilio, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    In this study we determined whether human stromal cells could be engineered with a retroviral vector carrying the interleukin 7 (IL-7) gene and investigated the effects on T cells in vitro and in vivo in a murine model. Transduced mesenchymal cells strongly express CD90 (98.15%), CD105 (87.6%), and STRO-1 (86.7%). IL-7 production was 16.37 (+/-2 SD) pg/ml, which remained stable for 60 days. In vitro-immunoselected naive T cells maintained the CD45RA+ CD45RO- naive phenotype (4.2 times more than controls) after 7 days of culture with IL-7-engineered stromal cells. The apoptosis rate (4.7%) of the naive T cells cultured with transduced stromal cells overlapped with that of freshly isolated cells. Immunohistological analysis detected stromal cells in bone marrow, spleen, and thymus. Cotransplantation of IL-7-engineered stromal cells with CD34+ cells improved engraftment in terms of CD45+ cells and significantly increased the CD3+ cell count in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and spleen. These data demonstrate the following: (1) human stromal cells can be transduced, generating a normal layer; (2) transduced stromal cells in vitro maintain the naive T cell phenotype; and (3) IL-7-transduced stromal cells in vivo home to lymphoid organs and produce sufficient IL-7 in loco, supporting T cell development in a cotransplantation model. Because of their efficient cytokine production and homing, IL-7-engineered stromal cells might be an ideal vehicle to hasten immunological reconstitution in T cell-depleted hosts.

  2. Inflammatory Conditions Dictate the Effect of Mesenchymal Stem or Stromal Cells on B Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Franka; Carreras-Planella, Laura; Korevaar, Sander S.; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Borràs, Francesc E.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.; Franquesa, Marcella

    2017-01-01

    The immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) makes them a promising tool for treatment of immune disease and organ transplantation. The effects of MSC on B cells are characterized by an abrogation of plasmablast formation and induction of regulatory B cells (Bregs). It is, however, unknown how MSC interact with B cells under inflammatory conditions. In this study, adipose tissue-derived MSC were pretreated with 50 ng/ml IFN-γ for 96 h (MSC–IFN-γ) to simulate inflammatory conditions. Mature B cells were obtained from spleens by CD43− selection. B cells were co-cultured with MSC and stimulated with anti-IgM, anti-CD40, and IL-2; and after 7 days, B cell proliferation, phenotype, Immunoglobulin-G (IgG), and IL-10 production were analyzed. MSC did not inhibit B cell proliferation but increased the percentage of CD38high CD24high B cells (Bregs) and IL-10 production, while MSC–IFN-γ significantly reduced B cell proliferation and inhibited IgG production by B cells in a more potent fashion but did not induce Bregs or IL-10 production. Both MSC and MSC–IFN-γ required proximity to target cells and being metabolically active to exert their effects. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase expression was highly induced in MSC–IFN-γ and was responsible of the anti-proliferative and Breg reduction since addition of tryptophan (TRP) restored MSC properties. Immunological conditions dictate the effect of MSC on B cell function. Under immunological quiescent conditions, MSC stimulate Breg induction; whereas, under inflammatory conditions, MSC inhibit B cell proliferation and maturation through depletion of TRP. This knowledge is useful for customizing MSC therapy for specific purposes by appropriate pretreatment of MSC. PMID:28894451

  3. Insufficient stromal support in MDS results from molecular and functional deficits of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, S; Oz, S; Cadeddu, R-P; Fröbel, J; Brückner, B; Kündgen, A; Fenk, R; Bruns, I; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Gattermann, N; Kobbe, G; Germing, U; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2013-09-01

    Ineffective hematopoiesis is a major characteristic of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) causing relevant morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to physiologically support hematopoiesis, but their contribution to the pathogenesis of MDS remains elusive. We show that MSC from patients across all MDS subtypes (n=106) exhibit significantly reduced growth and proliferative capacities accompanied by premature replicative senescence. Osteogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in MDS-derived MSC, indicated by cytochemical stainings and reduced expressions of Osterix and Osteocalcin. This was associated with specific methylation patterns that clearly separated MDS-MSC from healthy controls and showed a strong enrichment for biological processes associated with cellular phenotypes and transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, in MDS-MSC, we detected altered expression of key molecules involved in the interaction with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), in particular Osteopontin, Jagged1, Kit-ligand and Angiopoietin as well as several chemokines. Functionally, this translated into a significantly diminished ability of MDS-derived MSC to support CD34+ HSPC in long-term culture-initiating cell assays associated with a reduced cell cycle activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis shows that MSC from all MDS subtypes are structurally, epigenetically and functionally altered, which leads to impaired stromal support and seems to contribute to deficient hematopoiesis in MDS.

  4. Adipose tissue as a stem cell source for musculo-skeletal regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Grayson, Warren; Guilak, Farshid; Lopez, Mandi J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an abundant, easily accessible, and reproducible cell source for musculo-skeletal regenerative medicine applications. Initial derivation steps yield a heterogeneous population of cells collectively termed the stromal vascular fraction (SVF), which consist of endothelial cells, immune cells, pericytes, and pre-adipocytes. Subsequent selection of an adherent cell subset from the SVF results in a relatively homogeneous population of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs). Mammalian ASCs exhibit the ability to selectively differentiate into chondrogenic, myogenic, and osteogenic lineages in response to inductive stimuli in vitro (when cultured on scaffolds in bioreactors) and in vivo (when implanted in pre-clinical animal models). Unlike hematopoietic cells, ASCs do not elicit a robust lymphocyte reaction and instead generate and release immunosuppressive factors, such as prostaglandin E2. These unique immunomodulatory features suggest that both allogeneic and autologous ASCs will engraft successfully following application for tissue regeneration purposes. The differentiation and expansion potential of ASCs can be modified by growth factors like bone morphogenetic protein 6, bio-inductive scaffolds, and bioreactors providing environmental control and biophysical stimulation. Gene therapy approaches using lentiviral transduction can also be used to direct differentiation of ASCs along particular lineage pathways. We discuss here the utility of ASCs for musculo-skeletal tissue repair and some of the technologies that can be implemented to unlock the full regenerative potential of these highly valuable cells. PMID:21196358

  5. Adipose tissue cells in cold-acclimatised sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, R W; Leat, W M; Chauca, D; Peacock, M A; Bligh, J

    1978-07-01

    The morphology and lipid content of adipose tissue from sheep subjected to cold acclimatisation were examined. In two sheep the perirenal adipose tissue contained virtually no triglyceride (less than 2 mg/100 mg wet tissue) and the appearance on electron microscopy was typical of that of a depleted white fat cell. The morphological, chemical and physiological evidence indicates that, in the sheep, white adipose tissue does not revert to brown adipose tissue during depletion resulting from cold acclimatisation.

  6. Increased death of adipose cells, a path to release cell-free DNA into systemic circulation of obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghiac, Maricela; Vora, Neeta L; Basu, Subhabrata; Johnson, Kirby L; Presley, Larraine; Bianchi, Diana W; Hauguel-de Mouzon, Sylvie

    2012-11-01

    Remodeling of adipose tissue is required to support the expansion of adipose mass. In obesity, an increased death of adipocytes contributes to the accelerated cellular turnover. We have shown that obesity in pregnancy is associated with metabolic and immune alterations in the adipose tissue. In this study, we characterized the mechanisms responsible for increased death of adipose cells of pregnant obese women and its functional consequences. We postulated that a higher turnover of dead cells in white adipose tissue of obese women would translate into release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) into their systemic circulation. Increase in adipose mass of obese compared to lean women results from a lesser number of hypertrophic adipocytes and an accumulation of macrophages in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF). The adipocytes of obese displayed enhanced necrosis with a loss of perilipin staining at the plasma membrane. Apoptosis was prominent in SVF cells with an increased expression of caspase 9 and caspase 3 and a higher rate of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) positive CD68 macrophages in obese vs. lean. Whereas circulating fetal cfDNA concentrations were not changed, there was a twofold increase in circulating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) cfDNA and adipose tissue GAPDH mRNA in obese women. The maternal systemic GAPDH cfDNA was positively correlated with BMI and gestational weight gain. These data suggest that the active remodeling of adipose tissue of obese pregnant women results in an increased release of cfDNA of maternal origin into the circulation.

  7. Invited review: Pre- and postnatal adipose tissue development in farm animals: from stem cells to adipocyte physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveau, I; Perruchot, M-H; Bonnet, M; Gondret, F

    2016-11-01

    Both white and brown adipose tissues are recognized to be differently involved in energy metabolism and are also able to secrete a variety of factors called adipokines that are involved in a wide range of physiological and metabolic functions. Brown adipose tissue is predominant around birth, except in pigs. Irrespective of species, white adipose tissue has a large capacity to expand postnatally and is able to adapt to a variety of factors. The aim of this review is to update the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with pre- and postnatal adipose tissue development with a special focus on pigs and ruminants. In contrast to other tissues, the embryonic origin of adipose cells remains the subject of debate. Adipose cells arise from the recruitment of specific multipotent stem cells/progenitors named adipose tissue-derived stromal cells. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of a variety of those cells being able to differentiate into white, brown or brown-like/beige adipocytes. After commitment to the adipocyte lineage, progenitors undergo large changes in the expression of many genes involved in cell cycle arrest, lipid accumulation and secretory functions. Early nutrition can affect these processes during fetal and perinatal periods and can also influence or pre-determinate later growth of adipose tissue. How these changes may be related to adipose tissue functional maturity around birth and can influence newborn survival is discussed. Altogether, a better knowledge of fetal and postnatal adipose tissue development is important for various aspects of animal production, including neonatal survival, postnatal growth efficiency and health.

  8. Significance of stromal-1 and stromal-2 signatures and biologic prognostic model in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Asaad, Nancy; Kandil, Mona; Shabaan, Mohammed; Shams, Asmaa

    2017-01-01

    Objective : Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous group of tumors with different biological and clinical characteristics that have diverse clinical outcomes and response to therapy. Stromal-1 signature of tumor microenvironment of DLBCL represents extracellular matrix deposition and histiocytic infiltrate, whereas stromal-2 represents angiogenesis that could affect tumor progression. Methods : The aim of the present study is to assess the significance of stromal-1 signature using SPARC-1 and stromal-2 signature using CD31 expression and then finally to construct biologic prognostic model (BPM) in 60 cases of DLBCL via immunohistochemistry. Results : Microvessel density (PBPM showed that 42 cases (70%) were of low biologic score (0–1) and 18 cases (30%) were of high biologic score (2–3). Low BPM cases showed less probability for splenic involvement (P=0.04) and a higher rate of complete response to therapy compared with high score cases (P=0.08). Conclusions : The DLBCL microenvironment could modulate tumor progression behavior since angiogenesis and SPARC positive stromal cells promote dissemination by association with spleen involvement and capsular invasion. Biologic prognostic models, including modified BPM, which considered cell origin of DLBCL and stromal signature pathways, could determine DLBCL progression and response to therapy. PMID:28607806

  9. In vitro osteoinductive effects of hydroxycholesterol on human adipose-derived stem cells are mediated through the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, Anisa; Hokugo, Akishige; Sorice, Sarah; Li, Andrew; Segovia Aguilar, Luis A; Zuk, Patricia; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells have been identified as a potential source of cells for use in bone tissue engineering because of their ready availability, ease of harvest, and susceptibility to osteogenic induction. The authors have previously demonstrated the ability of an osteogenic molecule called hydroxycholesterol, an oxidative derivative of cholesterol, to induce osteogenic differentiation in pluripotent murine and rabbit bone marrow stromal cells. In this study, the authors examine the ability of hydroxycholesterol to induce osteogenesis in human adipose-derived stem cells. Human adipose-derived stem cells were isolated from raw human lipoaspirates through standard isolation and expansion of the stromal vascular fraction. Cells were plated onto tissue culture plates in control medium and harvested between passages 2 and 3, incubated with conventional osteogenic media, and treated with various concentrations (1, 5, and 10 μM) of the 20(S) analogue of hydroxycholesterol. Evaluation of cellular osteogenic activity was performed. The role of the hedgehog signaling pathway in hydroxycholesterol-mediated osteogenesis was evaluated by hedgehog inhibition assays. Alkaline phosphatase activity, bone-related gene expression, and mineralization were all significantly increased in cultures of human adipose-derived stem cells treated with 5 μM of 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol relative to controls. In addition, induction of hydroxycholesterol-mediated osteogenesis was mitigated by the addition of the hedgehog pathway inhibitor to cell cultures, implicating the hedgehog signaling pathway in the osteogenic mechanism on human adipose-derived stem cells by hydroxycholesterol. These in vitro studies demonstrate that hydroxycholesterol exerts an osteoinductive influence on human adipose-derived stem cells and that these effects are mediated at least in part through the hedgehog signaling pathway.

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Updates and Therapeutic Outlook in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jorgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells exhibiting functional properties that have opened the way for cell-based clinical therapies. MSCs have been reported to exhibit immunosuppressive as well as healing properties, improving angiogenesis and preventing apoptosis or fibrosis through the secretion of paracrine mediators. This review summarizes recent progress on the clinical application of stem cells therapy in some inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. To date, most of the available data have been obtained in preclinical models and clinical efficacy needs to be evaluated through controlled randomized double-blind trials.

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoparticle labeling identifies slow cycling human endometrial stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that the human endometrium contains stem or progenitor cells that are responsible for its remarkable regenerative capability. A common property of somatic stem cells is their quiescent state. It remains unclear whether slow-cycling cells exist in the human endometrium. We hypothesized that the human endometrium contains a subset of slow-cycling cells with somatic stem cell properties. Here, we established an in vitro stem cell assay to isolate human endometrial-derived mesenchymal stem-like cells (eMSC). Methods Single-cell stromal cultures were initially labeled with fluorescent nanoparticles and a small population of fluorescent persistent cells (FPC) remained after culture of 21 days. Two populations of stromal cells, namely FPC and non-FPC were sorted. Results Quantitative analysis of functional assays demonstrated that the FPC had higher colony forming ability, underwent more rounds of self-renewal and had greater enrichment of phenotypically defined prospective eMSC markers: CD146+/CD140b+ and W5C5+ than the non-FPC. They also differentiate into multiple mesenchymal lineages and the expression of lineage specific markers was lower than that of non-FPC. The FPC exhibit low proliferation activities. A proliferation dynamics study revealed that more FPC had a prolonged G1 phase. Conclusions With this study we present an efficient method to label and isolate slow-proliferating cells obtained from human endometrial stromal cultures without genetic modifications. The FPC population could be easily maintained in vitro and are of interest for tissue-repair and engineering perspectives. In summary, nanoparticle labeling is a promising tool for the identification of putative somatic stem or progenitor cells when their surface markers are undefined. PMID:24996487

  13. Classification and biology of tumour associated stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaghello, Lizzia; Dazzi, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Stroma is a fundamental component of the tumour microenvironment whereby it supports malignant cell growth and spreading. It consists of different entities including cells of the immune system, vascular structures and fibroblasts. Much attention has recently been paid to fibroblasts since there is compelling evidence that they orchestrate the recruitment of and educate other cells to promote cancer growth. This review proposes to discuss in detail the nomenclature, origin, and biological functions of the different stromal cells residing in tumours. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone marrow concentrated cells and stromal vascular fraction cells injections for osteoarthritis treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadalà, G; Papalia, R; La Verde, L; Russo, F; Denaro, V; Rosa, M A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to examine current clinical evidences supporting the intraarticular injection of bone marrow concentrate cells (BMC) and adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells (SVF) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). The research was performed on PubMed (Medline), EMBASE and Cochrane Library considering the English literature. Only clinical trials have been included. The systematic research identified twelve clinical trials. Articles included in the study, were one of level II, four of level III, six of level IV and one level V. Among clinical trials, none were randomized, four were comparative, seven were case series, and one was a case report. Seven studies were focused on the use of SVF (1332 patients) and five on the use of BMC (963 patients), with preliminary interesting findings in the OA treatment. Despite the growing interest in this biological approach for OA, knowledge on this topic is still preliminary. Randomized controlled trials are needed to support the potential of BMC and SVF injections and to evaluate advantages and disadvantages with respect to the available treatments.

  15. Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis (DSLD in Peruvian Paso Horses Is Characterized by Altered Expression of TGFβ Signaling Components in Adipose-Derived Stromal Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Luo

    Full Text Available Equine degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD in Peruvian Paso horses typically presents at 7-15 years and is characterized by lameness, focal disorganization of collagen fibrils, and chondroid deposition in the body of the ligament. With the aim of developing a test for disease risk (that can be used to screen horses before breeding we have quantified the expression of 76 TGFβ-signaling target genes in adipose-derived stromal fibroblasts (ADSCs from six DSLD-affected and five unaffected Paso horses. Remarkably, 35 of the genes showed lower expression (p<0.05 in cells from DSLD-affected animals and this differential was largely eliminated by addition of exogenous TGFβ1. Moreover, TGFβ1-mediated effects on expression were prevented by the TGFβR1/2 inhibitor LY2109761, showing that the signaling was via a TGFβR1/2 complex. The genes affected by the pathology indicate that it is associated with a generalized metabolic disturbance, since some of those most markedly altered in DSLD cells (ATF3, MAPK14, ACVRL1 (ALK1, SMAD6, FOS, CREBBP, NFKBIA, and TGFBR2 represent master-regulators in a wide range of cellular metabolic responses.

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced expression of periostin in stromal cells: Prognoistic relevance of periostin expression in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Un; Yun, Jeong Sup; Lee, Il Hwan; Heo, Soon Chul; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Eun Su; Choi, Yoon Ji; Suh, Dong-Soo; Yoon, Man-Soo; Kim, Jae Ho

    2011-01-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid crucial for the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. Identification of LPA-induced biomarkers is necessary for predicting prognosis of ovarian cancer patients. Here we report periostin, an extracellular matrix protein, as an LPA-induced protein in stromal cells and as a prognostic marker in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In human EOC tissues, periostin was mainly expressed in cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts, but not in cancer cells. The expression levels of periostin highly correlated with poor survival and tumor recurrence of ovarian cancer patients. Treatment of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells with LPA or conditioned media from human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines, such as SK-OV-3 and OVCAR-3, induced expression of periostin. The periostin expression induced by cancer-conditioned media was abrogated by silencing of the LPA receptor 1 expression using small hairpin RNA lentivirus. Recombinant periostin stimulated adhesion and invasion of SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells and induced expression of matrix metalloprotease-2 in the cancer cells. These results suggest that LPA is associated with the expression of periostin in cancer-associated fibroblasts of EOC. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  17. [Role of chronic inflammation in adipose tissue in the pathophysiology of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganami, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Obesity may be viewed as a chronic low-grade inflammatory disease as well as a metabolic disease. Evidence has accumulated suggesting that chronic inflammation in adipose tissue leads to dramatic changes in number and cell type of stromal cells during the course of obesity, which is referred to as"adipose tissue remodeling". Among stromal cells, macrophages in obese adipose tissue are considered to be crucial for adipose tissue inflammation, which results in dysregulated adipocytokine production and ectopic fat accumulation. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying adipose tissue inflammation would contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat obesity-induced metabolic derangements.

  18. Both immediate and delayed intracavernous injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction enhances recovery of erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Fandel, Thomas M; Ferretti, Ludovic; Albersen, Maarten; Orabi, Hazem; Zhang, Haiyang; Lin, Guiting; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Schroeder, Tania; Lue, Tom F

    2012-10-01

    Intracavernous injection of cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) effectively restores erectile function in cavernous nerve (CN)-injured rats when administered at the time of injury. However, culturing exposes ADSCs to the risk of contamination and dedifferentiation. Explore the effect of uncultured autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) on improving erectile function in a rat model of CN injury when administered at the time of injury or 4 wk after injury. Eighty-nine male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. CN injury or sham surgery was performed at the start of the study, and rats were treated with either SVF or vehicle. Functional testing and histologic analysis were performed 12 wk after CN crush or sham surgery. We used intracavernous injection of saline immediately after CN crush (n=23), intracavernous injection of SVF immediately after CN crush (n=17), intracavernous injection of SVF 4 wk after CN crush (n=23), or sham surgery (n=26). We studied intracavernous pressure (ICP) response to CN electrostimulation and performed histologic examination of midpenile cross-sections. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey-Kramer test. Both immediate and delayed treatment with SVF resulted in a significantly increased ICP-to-mean arterial pressure ratio compared with the vehicle-treated group. Both immediate and delayed treatment with SVF significantly increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and neurofilament in dorsal penile nerves compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, the smooth muscle-to-collagen ratio within the corpus cavernosum was significantly improved in both of the SVF groups compared to vehicle-treated rats. The main limitation of the study is the lack of determination of the SVF components. Uncultured autologous SVF injected immediately or 4 wk after CN crush improved erectile function, promoted nerve regeneration, and prevented fibrosis of the corpus

  19. Both immediate and delayed intracavernous injections of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction enhance recovery of erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Fandel, Thomas M.; Ferretti, Ludovic; Albersen, Maarten; Zhang, Haiyang; Lin, Guiting; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Schroeder, Tania; Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracavernous injection of cultured adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) effectively restores erectile function in cavernous nerve (CN) injured rats when administered at the time of injury. However, culturing exposes ADSCs to risks of contamination and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, the acute treatment paradigm precludes selecting the patient subset benefitting from the treatment the most. Objectives To explore the effect of uncultured autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) on improving erectile function in a rat model of CN injury when administered at the time of injury or four weeks post-injury. Design, setting, and interventions Sixty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: intracavernous injection of saline immediately after CN crush (vehicle), intracavernous injection of SVF immediately after CN crush (immediate-treatment), intracavernous injection of SVF four weeks post-CN crush (delayed-treatment). Twenty-six animals underwent sham surgery (sham). Functional testing and histological analysis were performed 12 weeks post-CN crush or sham surgery. Measurements Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response to CN electrostimulation, histological examination of midpenile cross-sections. Results Intracavernous injection of SVF, either immediately, or four weeks post-CN injury, resulted in significantly increased ICP/mean arterial pressure (MAP) ratios compared with the vehicle-treated group. Both immediate and delayed treatment with SVF significantly increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and neurofilament (NF) in dorsal penile nerves compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, smooth muscle content and smooth muscle/collagen ratio within corpus cavernosum were significantly improved in both SVF treatment groups compared to vehicle-treated rats. Conclusions Uncultured autologous SVF injected immediately or 4 weeks post-CN crush improved erectile function, promoted nerve

  20. Data on HO-1 and CD200 protein secretion during T-cells and mesenchymal stromal cells co-cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fayyad-Kazan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this Data in Brief, we have provided data describing the secretion profile of two main immunoregulatory proteins, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and CD200, from bone marrow (BM, Wharton׳s Jelly (WJ or adipose tissue (AT mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs being cultivated either in the absence or presence of activated T-cells. Whilst HO-1 is a stress-responsive enzyme displaying diverse cytoprotective effects, CD200 is a membrane glycoprotein delivering immunoregulatory signals following interaction with its receptor (CD200R. Using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA techniques, these data are presented to show distinct constitutive secretion of both HO-1 and CD200 depending on MSC types. The data presented also demonstrate that the protein levels of HO-1 and CD200 are differentially modulated during co-culture with activated T-cells. All assays were carried out in triplicates and the mean values are reported. The data presented in this article are complementary to our previously published report entitled “The Immunomodulatory Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Story of a Regulatory Network.” [1].

  1. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  2. Functional inhibition of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, S; Rodríguez-Paredes, M; Jäger, P; Khandanpour, C; Cadeddu, R-P; Gutekunst, J; Wilk, C M; Fenk, R; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Germing, U; Kobbe, G; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic insufficiency is the hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and predisposes patients to life-threatening complications such as bleeding and infections. Addressing the contribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to AML-induced hematopoietic failure we show that MSC from AML patients (n=64) exhibit significant growth deficiency and impaired osteogenic differentiation capacity. This was molecularly reflected by a specific methylation signature affecting pathways involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and skeletal development. In addition, we found distinct alterations of hematopoiesis-regulating factors such as Kit-ligand and Jagged1 accompanied by a significantly diminished ability to support CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) assays. This deficient osteogenic differentiation and insufficient stromal support was reversible and correlated with disease status as indicated by Osteocalcin serum levels and LTC-IC frequencies returning to normal values at remission. In line with this, cultivation of healthy MSC in conditioned medium from four AML cell lines resulted in decreased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, AML-derived MSC are molecularly and functionally altered and contribute to hematopoietic insufficiency. Inverse correlation with disease status and adoption of an AML-like phenotype after exposure to leukemic conditions suggests an instructive role of leukemic cells on bone marrow microenvironment.

  3. Enrichment of IFN-γ producing cells in different murine adipose tissue depots upon infection with an apicomplexan parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Luzia; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Bezerra, Filipa; Melo, Joana; Moreira, João; Pinto, Ana; Correia, Alexandra; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2016-03-22

    Here we report that lean mice infected with the intracellular parasite Neospora caninum show a fast but sustained increase in the frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells noticeable in distinct adipose tissue depots. Moreover, IFN-γ-mediated immune memory could be evoked in vitro in parasite antigen-stimulated adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction cells collected from mice infected one year before. Innate or innate-like cells such as NK, NK T and TCRγδ(+) cells, but also CD4(+) and CD8(+) TCRβ(+) lymphocytes contributed to the IFN-γ production observed since day one of infection. This early cytokine production was largely abrogated in IL-12/IL23 p40-deficient mice. Moreover, production of IFN-γ by stromal vascular fraction cells isolated from these mice was markedly lower than that of wild-type counterparts upon stimulation with parasite antigen. In wild-type mice the increased IFN-γ production was concomitant with up-regulated expression of genes encoding interferon-inducible GTPases and nitric oxide synthase, which are important effector molecules in controlling intracellular parasite growth. This increased gene expression was markedly impaired in the p40-deficient mice. Overall, these results show that NK cells but also diverse T cell populations mediate a prompt and widespread production of IFN-γ in the adipose tissue of N. caninum infected mice.

  4. Metastatic Ovarian Cancer Can Be Efficiently Treated by Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Lenka; Bohovic, Roman; Matuskova, Miroslava; Smolkova, Bozena; Kucerova, Lucia

    2016-08-16

    Due to late diagnosis, often recurrence, formation of metastases and resistance to commonly used chemotherapeutics human ovarian carcinoma represents a serious disease with high mortality. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSC) can serve as vehicles for therapeutic genes and we engineered AT-MSC to express either Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk-MSC), which phosphorylates ganciclovir (GCV) to its toxic metabolites or yeast fused cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT-MSC), which converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to highly toxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Here, we reported different responses of cytotoxicity mediated by CD::UPRT-MSC/5-FC treatment on human ovarian carcinoma cell lines-SKOV-3 and A2780 used in adherent or three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and we proved high potential of 3D model to predict results in our in vivo experiments. Both tumor cell lines showed similarly high chemosensitivity to the used treatment in adherent culture, but 3D model revealed severe discrepancy-only 36% of SKOV-3 cells but even 90% of A2780 cells were eliminated. This result served as a prognostic marker-we were able to achieve significantly decreased tumor volumes of subcutaneous xenografts of A2780 cells in nude mice and we prolonged tumor-free survival in 33% of animals bearing highly metastatic ovarian carcinoma after CD::UPRT-MSC/5-FC treatment.

  5. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    ) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...... is the lethality associated with the cooling and thawing processes. The major objective is to minimize damage to cells during low temperature freezing and storage and the use of a suitable cryoprotectant. The detrimental effects of cellular cryopreservation can be minimized by controlling the cooling rate, using...... better cryoprotective agents, maintaining appropriate storage temperatures, and controlling the cell thawing rate. As is described in this chapter, human MSCs can either be frozen in cryovials or in freezing bags together with cryopreserve solutions containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)....

  6. Insights into the human mesenchymal stromal/stem cell identity through integrative transcriptomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roson-Burgo, Beatriz; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2016-11-21

    Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells (MSCs), isolated under the criteria established by the ISCT, still have a poorly characterized phenotype that is difficult to distinguish from similar cell populations. Although the field of transcriptomics and functional genomics has quickly grown in the last decade, a deep comparative analysis of human MSCs expression profiles in a meaningful cellular context has not been yet performed. There is also a need to find a well-defined MSCs gene-signature because many recent biomedical studies show that key cellular interaction processes (i.e. inmuno-modulation, cellular cross-talk, cellular maintenance, differentiation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition) are dependent on the mesenchymal stem cells within the stromal niche. In this work we define a core mesenchymal lineage signature of 489 genes based on a deep comparative analysis of multiple transcriptomic expression data series that comprise: (i) MSCs of different tissue origins; (ii) MSCs in different states of commitment; (iii) other related non-mesenchymal human cell types. The work integrates several public datasets, as well as de-novo produced microarray and RNA-Seq datasets. The results present tissue-specific signatures for adipose tissue, chorionic placenta, and bone marrow MSCs, as well as for dermal fibroblasts; providing a better definition of the relationship between fibroblasts and MSCs. Finally, novel CD marker patterns and cytokine-receptor profiles are unravelled, especially for BM-MSCs; with MCAM (CD146) revealed as a prevalent marker in this subtype of MSCs. The improved biomolecular characterization and the released genome-wide expression signatures of human MSCs provide a comprehensive new resource that can drive further functional studies and redesigned cell therapy applications.

  7. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  8. The role of stromal cells in inflammatory bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmeyer, C; Pap, T; Buckley, C D; Naylor, A J

    2017-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation, local and systemic bone loss and a lack of compensatory bone repair. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are the most abundant cells of the stroma and a key population in autoimmune diseases such as RA. An increasing body of evidence suggests that these cells play not only an important role in chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, but also impact bone remodelling. Under inflammatory conditions FLS release inflammatory cytokines, regulate bone destruction and formation and communicate with immune cells to control bone homeostasis. Other stromal cells, such as osteoblasts and terminally differentiated osteoblasts, termed osteocytes, are also involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and are dysregulated during inflammation. This review highlights our current understanding of how stromal cells influence the balance between bone formation and bone destruction. Increasing our understanding of these processes is critical to enable the development of novel therapeutic strategies with which to treat bone loss in RA. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Anchored and soluble gangliosides contribute to myelosupportivity of stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziulkoski, Ana L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Biologicas: Bioquimica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Ciencias da Saude, Centro Universitario Feevale, Novo Hamburgo, RS (Brazil); Santos, Aline X.S. dos; Andrade, Claudia M.B.; Trindade, Vera M.T. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Biologicas: Bioquimica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Daniotti, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Faculdad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Borojevic, Radovan [Departamento de Histologia e Embriologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Guma, Fatima C.R., E-mail: fatima.guma@ufrgs.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Biologicas: Bioquimica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquimica, ICBS, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2009-10-09

    Stroma-mediated myelopoiesis depends upon growth factors and an appropriate intercellular microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated that gangliosides, produced by hepatic stromal cell types, are required for optimal myelosupportive function. Here, we compared the mielossuportive functions of a bone marrow stroma (S17) and skin fibroblasts (SF) regarding their ganglioside pattern of synthesis and shedding. The survival and proliferation of a myeloid precursor cell (FDC-P1) were used as reporter. Although the ganglioside synthesis of the two stromal cells was similar, their relative content and shedding were distinct. The ganglioside requirement for mielossuportive function was confirmed by the decreased proliferation of FDC-P1 cells in ganglioside synthesis-inhibited cultures and in presence of an antibody to GM3 ganglioside. The distinct mielossuportive activities of the S17 and SF stromata may be related to differences on plasma membrane ganglioside concentrations or to differences on the gangliosides shed and their subsequent uptake by myeloid cells, specially, GM3 ganglioside.

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Active Regulators of Lymphocyte Recruitment to Blood Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgettrick, Helen M; Ward, Lewis S C; Rainger, George Edward; Nash, Gerard B

    2017-01-01

    Methods are described for analyzing adhesion and migration of isolated lymphocytes on endothelial cell monolayers which have been cocultured with different mesenchymal stromal cells, with or without additional cytokine treatment. The different cells types are grown on opposite sides of 3.0 or 0.4 μm pore filters, depending on whether migration through the whole construct is to be analyzed, or adhesion to the endothelial cells alone. Migration away from the sub-endothelial space and through the stromal layer can also be assessed by culturing mesenchymal stromal cells within a 3-D collagen gel overlaid with endothelial cells. Assays may be "static" or the filter-based constructs can be incorporated into flow chambers so that cell behavior can be directly observed under conditions simulating those in vivo. In general, by choice of method, one can evaluate efficiency of attachment, and ability of cells to migrate across the endothelial monolayer, through the filter and through the stromal cell layer in 2-D or 3-D. Fluorescence microscopic examination of fixed filters can be used, e.g., to ascertain whether lymphocytes are retained by stromal cells. In general, static assays have the higher throughput and greatest ease of use, while the flow-based assays are more physiologically relevant and allow detailed recording of cell behavior in real time.

  11. In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Depends on the Source and the Isolation Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bortolotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation.

  12. Estrogen receptor (ER) beta regulates ERalpha expression in stromal cells derived from ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhacheva, Elena; Lin, Zhihong; Reierstad, Scott; Cheng, You-Hong; Milad, Magdy; Bulun, Serdar E

    2009-02-01

    Estradiol and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ERbeta, play critical roles in endometrium and endometriosis. Levels of ERbeta, due to pathological hypomethylation of its promoter, are significantly higher in endometriotic vs. endometrial tissue and stromal cells, whereas ERalpha levels are lower in endometriosis. Estradiol regulates ERalpha gene expression via its alternatively used promoters A, B, and C. The aim of the study was to determine whether high levels of ERbeta in endometriotic stromal cells from ovarian endometriomas regulate ERalpha gene expression. ERbeta knockdown significantly increased ERalpha mRNA and protein levels in endometriotic stromal cells. Conversely, ERbeta overexpression in endometrial stromal cells decreased ERalpha mRNA and protein levels. ERbeta knockdown significantly decreased proliferation of endometriotic stromal cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that estradiol enhanced ERbeta binding to nonclassical activator protein 1 and specificity protein 1 motifs in the ERalpha gene promoters A and C and a classic estrogen response element in promoter B in endometriotic stromal cells. High levels of ERbeta suppress ERalpha expression and response to estradiol in endometrial and endometriotic stromal cells via binding to classic and nonclassic DNA motifs in alternatively used ERalpha promoters. ERbeta also regulates cell cycle progression and might contribute to proliferation of endometriotic stromal cells. We speculate that a significantly increased ratio of ERbeta:ERalpha in endometriotic tissues may also suppress progesterone receptor expression and contribute to progesterone resistance. Thus, ERbeta may serve as a significant therapeutic target for endometriosis.

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  17. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Flavia; Contador, David; Conget, Paulette; Erranz, Benjamín; Sossa, Claudia L; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs) were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure) and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers) after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  18. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Flavia; Contador, David; Conget, Paulette; Erranz, Benjamín; Sossa, Claudia L.; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs) were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure) and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers) after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion. PMID:27247575

  19. Complete pulp regeneration after pulpectomy by transplantation of CD105+ stem cells with stromal cell-derived factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iohara, Koichiro; Imabayashi, Kiyomi; Ishizaka, Ryo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Nabekura, Junichi; Ito, Masataka; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Misako

    2011-08-01

    Loss of pulp due to caries and pulpitis leads to loss of teeth and reduced quality of life. Thus, there is an unmet need for regeneration of pulp. A promising approach is stem cell therapy. Autologous pulp stem/progenitor (CD105(+)) cells were transplanted into a root canal with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) after pulpectomy in mature teeth with complete apical closure in dogs. The root canal was successfully filled with regenerated pulp including nerves and vasculature by day 14, followed by new dentin formation along the dentinal wall. The newly regenerated tissue was significantly larger in the transplantation of pulp CD105(+) cells with SDF-1 compared with those of adipose CD105(+) cells with SDF-1 or unfractionated total pulp cells with SDF-1. The pulp CD105(+) cells highly expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors compared with other cells and localized in the vicinity of newly formed capillaries after transplantation, demonstrating its potent trophic effects on neovascularization. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analyses and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the qualitative and quantitative protein and mRNA expression patterns of the regenerated pulp were similar to those of normal pulp. Thus, this novel stem cell therapy is the first demonstration of complete pulp regeneration, implying novel treatment to preserve and save teeth.

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  4. Potential of Adipose-derived stem cells in muscular regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eForcales

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative capacity of skeletal muscles resides in satellite cells, a self-renewing population of muscle cells. Several studies are investigating epigenetic mechanisms that control myogenic proliferation and differentiation to find new approaches that could boost regeneration of endogenous myogenic progenitor populations. In recent years, a lot of effort has been applied to purify, expand and manipulate adult stem cells from muscle tissue. However, this population of endogenous myogenic progenitors in adults is limited and their access is difficult and invasive. Therefore, other sources of stem cells with potential to regenerate muscles need to be examined. An excellent candidate could be a population of adult stromal cells within fat characterized by mesenchymal properties, which have been termed adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs. These progenitor adult stem cells have been successfully differentiated in vitro to osteogenic, chondrogenic, neurogenic and myogenic lineages. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells are multipotent and can be harvested with low morbidity; thus, they hold promise for a range of therapeutic applications. This review will discuss the use of ASCs in muscle regenerative approaches.

  5. Stromal p16 Overexpression in Adult Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Kiyong; Sung, Ji-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-05-01

    Adult granulosa cell tumor of the ovary is usually diagnosed at an early stage. However, most patients with advanced or recurrent disease will die of the disease due to limited treatment options. Data on the stromal p16 expression of ovarian adult granulosa cell tumors are limited. The aim of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical p16 expression in the peritumoral stroma of primary and recurrent adult granulosa cell tumors and investigate whether there were significant differences in stromal p16 expression among nonpathological ovaries, benign sex cord-stromal tumors, and adult granulosa cell tumors. This study included 13 and 11 cases of primary and recurrent adult granulosa cell tumors, respectively. Non-pathological ovaries and benign sex cord-stromal tumors showed negative or weak positive expression, whereas most of the adult granulosa cell tumors showed diffuse and moderate-to-strong immunostaining. Primary adult granulosa cell tumors had significantly higher stromal p16 expression levels than nonpathological ovaries and benign sex cord-stromal tumors (padult granulosa cell tumors showed significantly elevated levels of stromal p16 expression compared to primary adult granulosa cell tumors (p=0.032). In contrast, the difference in stromal p16 expression between non-pathological ovaries and benign sex cord-stromal tumors was not statistically significant (p=0.522). Our observations suggest that stromal p16 expression may be involved in the development and progression of ovarian adult granulosa cell tumors. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Prostate stromal cells express the progesterone receptor to control cancer cell mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yu

    Full Text Available Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stroma play vital roles for prostate cancer development and progression. Enhanced secretions of cytokines and growth factors by cancer associated fibroblasts in prostate tumors create a favorable microenvironment for cancer cells to grow and metastasize. Our previous work showed that the progesterone receptor (PR was expressed specifically in prostate stromal fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. However, the expression levels of PR and its impact to tumor microenvironment in prostate tumors are poorly understood.Immunohistochemistry assays are applied to human prostate tissue biopsies. Cell migration, invasion and proliferation assays are performed using human prostate cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA are applied to measure gene expression at molecular levels.Immunohistochemistry assays showed that PR protein levels were decreased in cancer associated stroma when compared with paired normal prostate stroma. Using in vitro prostate stromal cell models, we showed that conditioned media collected from PR positive stromal cells inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion, but had minor suppressive impacts on cancer cell proliferation. PR suppressed the secretion of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and interlukin-6 (IL-6 by stromal cells independent to PR ligands. Blocking PR expression by siRNA or supplementation of exogenous SDF-1 or IL-6 to conditioned media from PR positive stromal cells counteracted the inhibitory effects of PR to cancer cell migration and invasion.Decreased expression of the PR in cancer associated stroma may contribute to the elevated SDF-1 and IL-6 levels in prostate tumors and enhance prostate tumor progression.

  7. Defining the expression of marker genes in equine mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Guest

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deborah J Guest1, Jennifer C Ousey1, Matthew RW Smith21Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU; 2Reynolds House Referrals, Greenwood Ellis and Partners, 166 High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 9WS, UKAbstract: Mesenchymal stromal (MS cells have been derived from multiple sources in the horse including bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord blood. To date these cells have been investigated for their differentiation potential and are currently being used to treat damage to horse musculoskeletal tissues. However, no work has been done in horse MS cells to examine the expression profile of proteins and cell surface antigens that are expressed in human MS cells. The identification of such profiles in the horse will allow the comparison of putative MS cells isolated from different laboratories and different tissues. At present it is difficult to ascertain whether equivalent cells are being used in different reports. Here, we report on the expression of a range of markers used to define human MS cells. Using immunocytochemistry we show that horse MS cells homogenously express collagens, alkaline phosphatase activity, CD44, CD90 and CD29. In contrast, CD14, CD79α and the embryonic stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA (stage specific embryonic antigen -1, -3, -4, TRA (tumor rejection antigen -1–60 and -1–81 are not expressed. The MS cells also express MHC class I antigens but do not express class II antigens, although they are inducible by treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, equine, gene expression

  8. In vivo dedifferentiation of adult adipose cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjun Liao

    Full Text Available Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into fibroblast-like cells in vitro and thereby acquire proliferation and multipotent capacities to participate in the repair of various organs and tissues. Whether dedifferentiation occurs under physiological or pathological conditions in vivo is unknown.A tissue expander was placed under the inguinal fat pads of rats and gradually expanded by injection of water. Samples were collected at various time points, and morphological, histological, cytological, ultrastructural, and gene expression analyses were conducted. In a separate experiment, purified green fluorescent protein+ adipocytes were transplanted into C57 mice and collected at various time points. The transplanted adipocytes were assessed by bioluminescence imaging and whole-mount staining.The expanded fat pad was obviously thinner than the untreated fat pad on the opposite side. It was also tougher in texture and with more blood vessels attached. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy indicated there were fewer monolocular adipocytes in the expanded fat pad and the morphology of these cells was altered, most notably their lipid content was discarded. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expanded fat pad contained an increased number of proliferative cells, which may have been derived from adipocytes. Following removal of the tissue expander, many small adipocytes were observed. Bioluminescence imaging suggested that some adipocytes survived when transplanted into an ischemic-hypoxic environment. Whole-mount staining revealed that surviving adipocytes underwent a process similar to adipocyte dedifferentiation in vitro. Monolocular adipocytes became multilocular adipocytes and then fibroblast-like cells.Mature adipocytes may be able to dedifferentiate in vivo, and this may be an adipose tissue self-repair mechanism. The capacity of adipocytes to dedifferentiate into stem cell-like cells may also have a more general role in the

  9. Role of adipose-derived stem cells in fat grafting and reconstructive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun S Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous fat grafting is commonly utilised to reconstruct soft tissue defects caused by ageing, trauma, chronic wounds and cancer resection. The benefits of fat grafting are minimal donor site morbidity and ease of availability through liposuction or lipectomy. Nonetheless, survival and longevity of fat grafts remain poor post-engraftment. Various methods to enhance fat graft survival are currently under investigation and its stem cell constituents are of particular interest. Cell-assisted lipotransfer refers to the addition of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC rich component of stromal vascular fraction to lipoaspirate, the results of which have proven promising. This article aims to review the role of ASCs in fat grafting and reconstructive surgery.

  10. Single-Cell Phosphospecific Flow Cytometric Analysis of Canine and Murine Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

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    Harumichi Itoh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate single-cell phosphospecific flow cytometric analysis of canine and murine adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs. ADSCs were obtained from clinically healthy laboratory beagles and C57BL/6 mice. Cell differentiation into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes was observed for the cultured canine ADSCs (cADSCs and murine ADSCs (mADSCs to determine their multipotency. We also performed single-cell phosphospecific flow cytometric analysis related to cell differentiation and stemness. Cultured cADSCs and mADSCs exhibited the potential to differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. In addition, single-cell phosphospecific flow cytometric analysis revealed similar β-catenin and Akt phosphorylation between mADSCs and cADSCs. On the other hand, it showed the phosphorylation of different Stat proteins. It was determined that cADSCs and mADSCs show the potential to differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Furthermore, a difference in protein phosphorylation between undifferentiated cADSCs and mADSCs was identified.

  11. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 stimulates cell recruitment, vascularization and osteogenic differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eman, Rhandy M; Oner, F Cumhur; Kruyt, Moyo C; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    The use of growth factors in osteogenic constructs to promote recruitment of bone forming endogenous cells is not clear, while the advantage of circumventing cell seeding techniques before implantation is highly recognized. Therefore, the additive effect of the chemokine stromal cell-derived

  12. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  13. Inflammatory conditions dictate the effect of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells on B cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Luk (Franka); Carreras-Planella, L. (Laura); S.S. Korevaar (Sander); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); F.E. Borràs (Francesc); M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); C.C. Baan (Carla); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); M. Franquesa (Marcella)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) makes them a promising tool for treatment of immune disease and organ transplantation. The effects of MSC on B cells are characterized by an abrogation of plasmablast formation and induction of regulatory B cells

  14. Good manufacturing practices production of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Tarte, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Because of their multi/pluripotency and immunosuppressive properties mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are important tools for treating immune disorders and for tissue repair. The increasing use of MSCs has led to production processes that need to be in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). In cellular therapy, safety remains one of the main concerns and refers to donor validation, choice of starting material, processes, and the controls used, not only at the batch release level but also during the development of processes. The culture processes should be reproducible, robust, and efficient. Moreover, they should be adapted to closed systems that are easy to use. Implementing controls during the manufacturing of clinical-grade MSCs is essential. The controls should ensure microbiological safety but also avoid potential side effects linked to genomic instability driving transformation and senescence or decrease of cell functions (immunoregulation, differentiation potential). In this rapidly evolving field, a new approach to controls is needed.

  15. From bench to bedside: use of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feisst V

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vaughan Feisst,1 Sarah Meidinger,1 Michelle B Locke2 1Dunbar Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: Since the discovery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC in human adipose tissue nearly 15 years ago, significant advances have been made in progressing this promising cell therapy tool from the laboratory bench to bedside usage. Standardization of nomenclature around the different cell types used is finally being adopted, which facilitates comparison of results between research groups. In vitro studies have assessed the ability of ASC to undergo mesenchymal differentiation as well as differentiation along alternate lineages (transdifferentiation. Recently, focus has shifted to the immune modulatory and paracrine effects of transplanted ASC, with growing interest in the ASC secretome as a source of clinical effect. Bedside use of ASC is advancing alongside basic research. An increasing number of safety-focused Phase I and Phase IIb trials have been published without identifying any significant risks or adverse events in the short term. Phase III trials to assess efficacy are currently underway. In many countries, regulatory frameworks are being developed to monitor their use and assure their safety. As many trials rely on ASC injected at a distant site from the area of clinical need, strategies to improve the homing and efficacy of transplanted cells are also being explored. This review highlights each of these aspects of the bench-to-bedside use of ASC and summarizes their clinical utility across a variety of medical specialties. Keywords: standardization, bystander effect, stromal cells, mesenchymal stem cells, stromal vascular fraction

  16. Microarray Analysis on Gene Regulation by Estrogen, Progesterone and Tamoxifen in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-E Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial stromal cells represent a major cellular component of human uterine endometrium that is subject to tight hormonal regulation. Through cell-cell contacts and/or paracrine mechanisms, stromal cells play a significant role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. We isolated stromal cells from normal human endometrium and investigated the morphological and transcriptional changes induced by estrogen, progesterone and tamoxifen. We demonstrated that stromal cells express appreciable levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors and undergo different morphological changes upon hormonal stimulation. Microarray analysis indicated that both estrogen and progesterone induced dramatic alterations in a variety of genes associated with cell structure, transcription, cell cycle, and signaling. However, divergent patterns of changes, and in some genes opposite effects, were observed for the two hormones. A large number of genes are identified as novel targets for hormonal regulation. These hormone-responsive genes may be involved in normal uterine function and the development of endometrial malignancies.

  17. Comparing the immunosuppressive potency of naïve marrow stromal cells and Notch-transfected marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Mo A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SB623 cells are expanded from marrow stromal cells (MSCs transfected with a Notch intracellular domain (NICD-expressing plasmid. In stroke-induced animals, these cells reduce infarct size and promote functional recovery. SB623 cells resemble the parental MSCs with respect to morphology and cell surface markers despite having been in extended culture. MSCs are known to have immunosuppressive properties; whether long-term culture of MSCs impact their immunomodulatory activity has not been addressed. Methods To assess the possible senescent properties of SB623 cells, we performed cell cycle related assays and beta-galactosidase staining. To assess the immunomodulatory activity of these expanded NICD-transfected MSCs, we performed co-cultures of SB623 cells or MSCs with either enriched human T cells or monocytes and assessed cytokine production by flow cytometry. In addition, we monitored the immunosuppressive activity of SB623 cells in both allogenic and xenogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results Compared to MSCs, we showed that a small number of senescent-like cells appear in each lot of SB623 cells. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that these cells suppress human T cell proliferation in both the allogeneic and xenogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR in a manner comparable to MSCs. IL-10 producing T cells were generated and monocyte-dendritic cell differentiation was dampened by co-culture with SB623 cells. Compared to the parental MSCs, SB623 cells appear to exert a greater inhibitory impact on the maturation of dendritic cells as demonstrated by a greater reduction in the surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86. Conclusion The results demonstrated that the immunosuppressive activity of the expanded NICD-transfected MSCs is comparable to the parental MSCs, in spite of the appearance of a small number of senescent-like cells.

  18. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and stromal cells communicate through Galectin-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Fei; Joo, Eun Ji; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Schiffer, Isabelle; Paz, Helicia; Fabbri, Muller; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions between B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) cells and stromal cells in the bone marrow that provide microenvironmentally-mediated protection against therapeutic drugs are not well-defined. Galectin-3 (Lgals3) is a multifunctional galactose-binding lectin with reported location in the nucleus, cytoplasm and extracellular space in different cell types. We previously reported that ALL cells co-cultured with stroma contain high levels of Galectin-3. We here establish that, in contrast to more mature B-lineage cancers, Galectin-3 detected in and on the ALL cells originates from stromal cells, which express it on their surface, secrete it as soluble protein and also in exosomes. Soluble and stromal-bound Galectin-3 is internalized by ALL cells, transported to the nucleus and stimulates transcription of endogenous LGALS3 mRNA. When human and mouse ALL cells develop tolerance to different drugs while in contact with protective stromal cells, Galectin-3 protein levels are consistently increased. This correlates with induction of Galectin-3 transcription in the ALL cells. Thus Galectin-3 sourced from stroma becomes supplemented by endogenous Galectin-3 production in the pre-B ALL cells that are under continuous stress from drug treatment. Our data suggest that stromal Galectin-3 may protect ALL cells through auto-induction of Galectin-3 mRNA and tonic NFκB pathway activation. Since endogenously synthesized Galectin-3 protects pre-B ALL cells against drug treatment, we identify Galectin-3 as one possible target to counteract the protective effects of stroma. PMID:25869099

  19. Elevated expression of stromal palladin predicts poor clinical outcome in renal cell carcinoma.

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    Vivekanand Gupta

    Full Text Available The role that stromal renal cell carcinoma (RCC plays in support of tumor progression is unclear. Here we sought to determine the predictive value on patient survival of several markers of stromal activation and the feasibility of a fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (ECM based three-dimensional (3D culture stemming from clinical specimens to recapitulate stromal behavior in vitro. The clinical relevance of selected stromal markers was assessed using a well annotated tumor microarray where stromal-marker levels of expression were evaluated and compared to patient outcomes. Also, an in vitro 3D system derived from fibroblasts harvested from patient matched normal kidney, primary RCC and metastatic tumors was employed to evaluate levels and localizations of known stromal markers such as the actin binding proteins palladin, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, fibronectin and its spliced form EDA. Results suggested that RCCs exhibiting high levels of stromal palladin correlate with a poor prognosis, as demonstrated by overall survival time. Conversely, cases of RCCs where stroma presents low levels of palladin expression indicate increased survival times and, hence, better outcomes. Fibroblast-derived 3D cultures, which facilitate the categorization of stromal RCCs into discrete progressive stromal stages, also show increased levels of expression and stress fiber localization of α-SMA and palladin, as well as topographical organization of fibronectin and its splice variant EDA. These observations are concordant with expression levels of these markers in vivo. The study proposes that palladin constitutes a useful marker of poor prognosis in non-metastatic RCCs, while in vitro 3D cultures accurately represent the specific patient's tumor-associated stromal compartment. Our observations support the belief that stromal palladin assessments have clinical relevance thus validating the use of these 3D cultures to study both progressive RCC

  20. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells producing TNFα have tumour suppressing effect on human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava; Bohovic, Roman; Polakova, Katarina; Toro, Lenka; Skolekova, Svetlana; Kucerova, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a promising tool for targeted cancer therapy due to their tumour-homing ability. Intrinsic resistance enables the MSC to longer tolerate therapeutic factors, such as prodrug converting enzymes, cytokines and pro-apoptotic proteins. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is known to be cytotoxic to a variety of cancer cells and exert a tumour-destructive capacity. MSC were retrovirally transduced to stable express an exogenous gene encoding the desired therapeutic agent hTNFα. The effect of a TNFα-producing adipose tissue-derived MSC (AT-MSC/hTNFα) was tested on the tumour cell lines of different origins: melanoma (A375), breast carcinoma (SKBR3, MDA-MB-231), colon carcinoma (HT29), ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3) and glioblastoma (U87-MG) cells. The tumour suppressing effect of AT-MSC/hTNFα on A375 melanoma xenografts was monitored in an immunodeficient mouse model in vivo. Engineered AT-MSC are able to constitutively secrete human TNFα protein, induce apoptosis of tumour cell lines via caspase 3/7 activation and inhibit the tumour cell proliferation in vitro. Melanoma A375 and breast carcinoma SKBR3 cells were the most sensitive, and their proliferation in vitro was reduced by conditioned media produced by AT-MSC/hTNFα to 60% and 40%, respectively. The previously reported tumour supportive effect of AT-MSC on subcutaneous A375 melanoma xenograft growth was neutralised and suppressed by engineered AT-MSC stably producing hTNFα. When AT-MSC/hTNFα were coinjected with A375 melanoma cells, the tumour mass inhibition was up to 97.5%. The results of the present study demonstrate that tumour cells respond to hTNFα-based treatment mediated by genetically engineered AT-MSC/hTNFα both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Single cell sequencing reveals heterogeneity within ovarian cancer epithelium and cancer associated stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Boris J; Maile, Makayla; Mitra, Amit Kumar; Sebe, Attila; Bazzaro, Martina; Geller, Melissa A; Abrahante, Juan E; Klein, Molly; Hellweg, Raffaele; Mullany, Sally A; Beckman, Kenneth; Daniel, Jerry; Starr, Timothy K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of heterogeneity in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) by analyzing RNA expression in single epithelial and cancer associated stromal cells. In addition, we explored the possibility of identifying subgroups based on pathway activation and pre-defined signatures from cancer stem cells and chemo-resistant cells. A fresh, HGSOC tumor specimen derived from ovary was enzymatically digested and depleted of immune infiltrating cells. RNA sequencing was performed on 92 single cells and 66 of these single cell datasets passed quality control checks. Sequences were analyzed using multiple bioinformatics tools, including clustering, principle components analysis, and geneset enrichment analysis to identify subgroups and activated pathways. Immunohistochemistry for ovarian cancer, stem cell and stromal markers was performed on adjacent tumor sections. Analysis of the gene expression patterns identified two major subsets of cells characterized by epithelial and stromal gene expression patterns. The epithelial group was characterized by proliferative genes including genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation and MYC activity, while the stromal group was characterized by increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes and genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Neither group expressed a signature correlating with published chemo-resistant gene signatures, but many cells, predominantly in the stromal subgroup, expressed markers associated with cancer stem cells. Single cell sequencing provides a means of identifying subpopulations of cancer cells within a single patient. Single cell sequence analysis may prove to be critical for understanding the etiology, progression and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema with adipose-derived regenerative cells and fat grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a debilitating late complication with a lack of treatment opportunities. Recent studies have suggested that mesenchymal stromal cells can alleviate lymphedema. Herein, we report the results from the first human pilot study with freshly isolated adipose......-derived regenerative cells (ADRC) for treating lymphedema with 6 months follow-up. Ten BCRL patients were included. ADRC was injected directly into the axillary region, which was combined with a scar-releasing fat graft procedure. Primary endpoints were change in arm volume. Secondary endpoints were change in patient...... tolerated and only minor transient adverse events related to liposuction were noted. In this pilot study, a single injection of ADRC improved lymphedema based on patient-reported outcome measures, and there were no serious adverse events in the 6 months follow-up period. In addition, half of the patients...

  3. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  4. Influence of patient related factors on number of mesenchymal stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Kaur, Kamal Preet; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2017-11-01

    Number of stromal cells injected in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may be of importance for the treatment efficacy, which in turn may be influenced by various patient-related factors. In this study, we investigate whether patient-related factors influence the number of autologous stromal cells reached after in vitro culture expansion for clinical therapy. Culture expansion data from 111 patients with IHD treated with autologous stromal cells in three clinical trials were used. We correlated the final cell count after two passages of cultivation with different patient factors. There was a significant relation between body mass index (BMI) and the number of adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) reached after culture expansion and for all patients included into the three studies (r = 0.375, p = .019 and r = 0.200, p = .036, respectively). Moreover, there was a significantly higher number of ASCs reached in patients with hypertension compared to those without hypertension and for all patients overall (68.8 ± 39.6 × 10(6) vs. 39.1 ± 23.6 × 10(6), p = .020 and 62.0 ± 55.0 × 10(6) vs. 29.0 ± 19.3 × 10(6), p < .001, respectively). The same tendency was seen with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in patients with hypertension compared to those without hypertension (58.4 ± 61.8 × 10(6) vs. 22.6 ± 13.3 × 10(6), p < .001) and in males compared to females (56.4 ± 61.5 × 10(6) vs. 30.9 ± 27.9 × 10(6), p = .041). Moreover, a significant negative correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and number of MSCs was found (r = -0.287, p = .017). Patient related factors such as BMI, hypertension and gender may influence the number of MSCs reached after in vitro culture expansion.

  5. Raman spectroscopy uncovers biochemical tissue-related features of extracellular vesicles from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualerzi, Alice; Niada, Stefania; Giannasi, Chiara; Picciolini, Silvia; Morasso, Carlo; Vanna, Renzo; Rossella, Valeria; Masserini, Massimo; Bedoni, Marzia; Ciceri, Fabio; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Brini, Anna Teresa; Gramatica, Furio

    2017-08-29

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are emerging as valuable therapeutic agents for tissue regeneration and immunomodulation, but their clinical applications have so far been limited by the technical restraints of current isolation and characterisation procedures. This study shows for the first time the successful application of Raman spectroscopy as label-free, sensitive and reproducible means of carrying out the routine bulk characterisation of MSC-derived vesicles before their use in vitro or in vivo, thus promoting the translation of EV research to clinical practice. The Raman spectra of the EVs of bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs were compared with human dermal fibroblast EVs in order to demonstrate the ability of the method to distinguish the vesicles of the three cytotypes automatically with an accuracy of 93.7%. Our data attribute a Raman fingerprint to EVs from undifferentiated and differentiated cells of diverse tissue origin, and provide insights into the biochemical characteristics of EVs from different sources and into the differential contribution of sphingomyelin, gangliosides and phosphatidilcholine to the Raman spectra themselves.

  6. A Stromal Cell Niche for Human and Mouse Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation, and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized stromal niche for ILC3 has not been identified. A novel lineage-tracing approach now identifies a subset of murine fetal lymphoid tissue organizer cells that gives rise exclusively to adult marginal reticular cells. Moreover, both cell types are conserved from mice to humans and colocalize with ILC3 in secondary lymphoid tissues throughout life. In sum, we provide evidence that fetal stromal organizers give rise to adult marginal reticular cells and form a dedicated stromal niche for innate ILC3 in adaptive lymphoid organs. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Sea cucumbers with an anti-inflammatory effect on endothelial cells and subcutaneous but not on epicardial adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Bueno, Sara; Atanasova, Miroslava; Fernández-Trasancos, Ángel; Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Bravo, Susana B; Álvarez, Ezequiel; Fernández, Ángel L; Carrera, Iván; González-Juanatey, José R; Eiras, Sonia

    2016-02-01

    epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) contains higher levels of inflammatory proteins and lower adiponectin levels than subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), enhancing the progression of atherosclerosis. Since products from sea cucumber have anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated its effect on EAT, SAT and endothelial cells. stromal cells or explants from EAT and SAT were obtained from patients with cardiovascular disease. Extracts were obtained after hydrolysis by food-grade enzymes at different times. Proteins were identified by LC-MALDI mass spectrometry. Adipogenesis and adiponectin induction were determined on stromal cells in the presence/absence of extracts. The bioavailability of the extracts was tested on a Caco-2 cell culture model in vitro. The bioavailable fraction was probed on endothelial cells and EAT or SAT explants. Vascular cell adhesion protein (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), IL-6 and adiponectin were determined by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). our results showed that H. forskali and P. tremulus extracts contained compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The bioavailable fraction of P. tremulus reduced VCAM-1 (p effect was observed on EAT. these results suggest that sea cucumber extracts might be used for the prevention of endothelial cells and SAT inflammation.

  8. Human omental-derived adipose stem cells increase ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Aleksandra; Marini, Frank C; Solley, Travis N; Elizondo, Paula B; Zhang, Yan; Sharp, Hadley J; Broaddus, Russell; Kolonin, Mikhail; Mok, Samuel C; Thompson, Melissa S; Woodward, Wendy A; Lu, Karen; Salimian, Bahar; Nagrath, Deepak; Klopp, Ann H

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue contains a population of multipotent adipose stem cells (ASCs) that form tumor stroma and can promote tumor progression. Given the high rate of ovarian cancer metastasis to the omental adipose, we hypothesized that omental-derived ASC may contribute to ovarian cancer growth and dissemination. We isolated ASCs from the omentum of three patients with ovarian cancer, with (O-ASC4, O-ASC5) and without (O-ASC1) omental metastasis. BM-MSCs, SQ-ASCs, O-ASCs were characterized with gene expression arrays and metabolic analysis. Stromal cells effects on ovarian cancer cells proliferation, chemoresistance and radiation resistance was evaluated using co-culture assays with luciferase-labeled human ovarian cancer cell lines. Transwell migration assays were performed with conditioned media from O-ASCs and control cell lines. SKOV3 cells were intraperitionally injected with or without O-ASC1 to track in-vivo engraftment. O-ASCs significantly promoted in vitro proliferation, migration chemotherapy and radiation response of ovarian cancer cell lines. O-ASC4 had more marked effects on migration and chemotherapy response on OVCA 429 and OVCA 433 cells than O-ASC1. Analysis of microarray data revealed that O-ASC4 and O-ASC5 have similar gene expression profiles, in contrast to O-ASC1, which was more similar to BM-MSCs and subcutaneous ASCs in hierarchical clustering. Human O-ASCs were detected in the stroma of human ovarian cancer murine xenografts but not uninvolved ovaries. ASCs derived from the human omentum can promote ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, chemoresistance and radiation resistance in-vitro. Furthermore, clinical O-ASCs isolates demonstrate heterogenous effects on ovarian cancer in-vitro.

  9. Human omental-derived adipose stem cells increase ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Nowicka

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue contains a population of multipotent adipose stem cells (ASCs that form tumor stroma and can promote tumor progression. Given the high rate of ovarian cancer metastasis to the omental adipose, we hypothesized that omental-derived ASC may contribute to ovarian cancer growth and dissemination.We isolated ASCs from the omentum of three patients with ovarian cancer, with (O-ASC4, O-ASC5 and without (O-ASC1 omental metastasis. BM-MSCs, SQ-ASCs, O-ASCs were characterized with gene expression arrays and metabolic analysis. Stromal cells effects on ovarian cancer cells proliferation, chemoresistance and radiation resistance was evaluated using co-culture assays with luciferase-labeled human ovarian cancer cell lines. Transwell migration assays were performed with conditioned media from O-ASCs and control cell lines. SKOV3 cells were intraperitionally injected with or without O-ASC1 to track in-vivo engraftment.O-ASCs significantly promoted in vitro proliferation, migration chemotherapy and radiation response of ovarian cancer cell lines. O-ASC4 had more marked effects on migration and chemotherapy response on OVCA 429 and OVCA 433 cells than O-ASC1. Analysis of microarray data revealed that O-ASC4 and O-ASC5 have similar gene expression profiles, in contrast to O-ASC1, which was more similar to BM-MSCs and subcutaneous ASCs in hierarchical clustering. Human O-ASCs were detected in the stroma of human ovarian cancer murine xenografts but not uninvolved ovaries.ASCs derived from the human omentum can promote ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, chemoresistance and radiation resistance in-vitro. Furthermore, clinical O-ASCs isolates demonstrate heterogenous effects on ovarian cancer in-vitro.

  10. Developing a Continuous Bioprocessing Approach to Stromal Cell Manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Martina; Gouveia, Ricardo; Abidin, Fadhilah Zainal; Figueiredo, Francisco; Connon, Che J

    2017-11-29

    To this day, the concept of continuous bioprocessing has been applied mostly to the manufacture of molecular biologics such as proteins, growth factors, and secondary metabolites with biopharmaceutical uses. The present work now sets to explore the potential application of continuous bioprocess methods to source large numbers of human adherent cells with potential therapeutic value. To this purpose, we developed a smart multifunctional surface coating capable of controlling the attachment, proliferation, and subsequent self-detachment of human corneal stromal cells. This system allowed the maintenance of cell cultures under steady-state growth conditions, where self-detaching cells were continuously replenished by the proliferation of those remaining attached. This facilitated a closed, continuous bioprocessing platform with recovery of approximately 1% of the total adherent cells per hour, a yield rate that was maintained for 1 month. Moreover, both attached and self-detached cells were shown to retain their original phenotype. Together, these results represent the proof-of-concept for a new high-throughput, high-standard, and low-cost biomanufacturing strategy with multiple potentials and important downstream applications.

  11. Impaired function of bone marrow stromal cells in systemic mastocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztian Nemeth

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients.

  12. [Xenogeneic protein free cultivation of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlík, D; Pytlík, R; Rychtrmocová, H; Veselá, R; Kopečný, Z; Trč, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the standard laboratory method of cultivation of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells (MSC) and a novel technique of rapid MSC expansion focused on simple clinical use. Bone marrow mononuclear cells of donors were cultured for 14 days by the standard and the new cultivation method. The standard method (STD) was based on an alpha MEM medium supplemented with foetal calf serum (FCS). The new animal protein-free method (CLI) was based on the clinical grade medium CellgroTM, pooled human serum and human recombinant growth factors (EGF, PDGF-BB, M-CSF, FGF-2) supplemented with dexamethasone, insulin and ascorbic acid. The cell product was analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the cell products of STD and CLI methods were differentiated in vitro, and histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, electron microscopy and elemental analysis were performed. Some cells were seeded on biodegradable scaffolds, in vivo implanted into immunodeficient mice for 6 weeks and evaluated by histological methods. Yields of the CLI method after 14 days of cultivation were 40-fold higher than those obtained by the STD technique (psystem cultivation in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. It seems to be easily transferable to good clinical practice compared to other protocols and should extend the possibilities of cell therapy and tissue engineering of cartilage and bone. The new method is protected by Czech patent 301 148 and by Europian patent EP 1999250 according to Czech and international laws.

  13. Both immediate and delayed intracavernous injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction enhances recovery of erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Thomas M Fandel; Ferretti, Ludovic; Albersen, Maarten; Orabi, Hazem; Zhang, Haiyang; Lin, Guiting; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Schroeder, Tania; Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Intracavernous injection of cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) effectively restores erectile function in cavernous nerve (CN)-injured rats when administered at the time of injury. However, culturing exposes ADSCs to the risk of contamination and dedifferentiation.

  14. Relaxin acts on stromal cells to promote epithelial and stromal proliferation and inhibit apoptosis in the mouse cervix and vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, LiJuan; Agoulnik, Alexander I; Cooke, Paul S; Meling, Daryl D; Sherwood, O David

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether stromal and/or epithelial relaxin receptor (LGR7) is required for relaxin to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of stromal and epithelial cells in the mouse cervix and vagina. Tissue recombinants were prepared with stroma (St) and epithelium (Ep) from wild-type (wt) and LGR7 knockout (ko) mice: wt-St+wt-Ep, wt-St+ko-Ep, ko-St+wt-Ep, and ko-St+ko-Ep. Tissue recombinants were grafted under the renal capsule of intact syngeneic female mice. After 3 wk of transplant growth, hosts were ovariectomized and fitted with silicon implants containing progesterone and estradiol-17beta (designated d 1 of treatment). Animals were injected sc with relaxin or relaxin vehicle PBS at 6-h intervals from 0600 h on d 8 through 0600 h on d 10 of treatment. To evaluate cell proliferation, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected sc 10 h before cervices and vaginas were collected at 1000 h on d 10. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling was used to quantify apoptosis. Relaxin markedly increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of epithelial and stromal cells in tissue recombinants containing wt stroma (P vagina, whereas epithelial LGR7 does not affect these processes.

  15. Relaxin Acts on Stromal Cells to Promote Epithelial and Stromal Proliferation and Inhibit Apoptosis in the Mouse Cervix and Vagina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, LiJuan; Agoulnik, Alexander I.; Cooke, Paul S.; Meling, Daryl D.; Sherwood, O. David

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether stromal and/or epithelial relaxin receptor (LGR7) is required for relaxin to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of stromal and epithelial cells in the mouse cervix and vagina. Tissue recombinants were prepared with stroma (St) and epithelium (Ep) from wild-type (wt) and LGR7 knockout (ko) mice: wt-St+wt-Ep, wt-St+ko-Ep, ko-St+wt-Ep, and ko-St+ko-Ep. Tissue recombinants were grafted under the renal capsule of intact syngeneic female mice. After 3 wk of transplant growth, hosts were ovariectomized and fitted with silicon implants containing progesterone and estradiol-17β (designated d 1 of treatment). Animals were injected sc with relaxin or relaxin vehicle PBS at 6-h intervals from 0600 h on d 8 through 0600 h on d 10 of treatment. To evaluate cell proliferation, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine was injected sc 10 h before cervices and vaginas were collected at 1000 h on d 10. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nick end labeling was used to quantify apoptosis. Relaxin markedly increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of epithelial and stromal cells in tissue recombinants containing wt stroma (P vagina, whereas epithelial LGR7 does not affect these processes. PMID:18218691

  16. Risk of tumorigenicity in mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapies--bridging scientific observations and regulatory viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Lisbeth; Flory, Egbert; Jekerle, Veronika; Lucas-Samuel, Sophie; Ahnert, Peter; Bisset, Louise; Büscher, Dirk; Fibbe, Willem; Foussat, Arnaud; Kwa, Marcel; Lantz, Olivier; Mačiulaitis, Romaldas; Palomäki, Tiina; Schneider, Christian K; Sensebé, Luc; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tarte, Karin; Tosca, Lucie; Salmikangas, Paula

    2013-07-01

    In the past decade, the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been studied in various indications, thereby taking advantage of their immunosuppressive properties. Easy procurement from bone marrow, adipose tissue or other sources and conventional in vitro expansion culture have made their clinical use attractive. Bridging the gap between current scientific knowledge and regulatory prospects on the transformation potential and possible tumorigenicity of MSCs, the Cell Products Working Party and the Committee for Advanced Therapies organized a meeting with leading European experts in the field of MSCs. This meeting elucidated the risk of potential tumorigenicity related to MSC-based therapies from two angles: the scientific perspective and the regulatory point of view. The conclusions of this meeting, including the current regulatory thinking on quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects for MSCs, are presented in this review, leading to a clearer way forward for the development of such products. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. All rights reserved.

  17. SAFETY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF INTRAARTICULAR ADMINISTRATION OF ADIPOSE-DERIVED STROMAL VASCULAR FRACTION FOR TREATMENT OF KNEE ARTICULAR CARTILAGE DEGENERATIVE DAMAGE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Smyshlyaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of knee osteoarthritis tends to increase every year and constitutes more than 83% of overall OA morbidity. Moreover, the OA morbidity among younger patients is also increasing. However, currently available treatment methods do not provide quite satisfactory outcomes.Purpose of the study – to evaluate safety and efficacy of intraarticular introduction of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction for treatment of knee osteoarthritis.Material and methods. By the moment of writing the present report, 28 patients were included into the study. All patients underwent tumescent liposuction under local anesthesia. The stromal vascular fraction was isolated from lipoaspirate within 1,5 hours after harvesting and subsequently injected into the articular cavity. Follow-up period was 6 months after injections. The authors report on efficacy data of 10 patients who completed the study according to protocol and safety data of all 28 patients. Efficacy was evaluated basing on laboratory assessments and patient’s subjective assessment by validated questionnaires.Results. Neither adverse reactions no adverse events were observed. Significant decrease of pain severity by VAS was noted in one week after injection and pain score continued decreasing during the whole follow up period. The increase of KOOS score was noted starting on the fifth week after injection. KSS part 1 score increased in 8 weeks, KSS part 2 score — in 6 months after injection. Physical health, assessed with SF-36 questionnaire significantly improved in 2 and 6 months after the procedure. There was a clear trend towards improvement of mental health.Conclusion. Preliminary results of clinical study suggest intraarticular injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction to be a safe and efficient method of the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. 

  18. Infection Programs Sustained Lymphoid Stromal Cell Responses and Shapes Lymph Node Remodeling upon Secondary Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L. Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymph nodes (LNs are constructed of intricate networks of endothelial and mesenchymal stromal cells. How these lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs regulate lymphoid tissue remodeling and contribute to immune responses remains poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive functional and transcriptional analysis of LSC responses to skin viral infection and found that LSC subsets responded robustly, with different kinetics for distinct pathogens. Recruitment of cells to inflamed LNs induced LSC expansion, while B cells sustained stromal responses in an antigen-independent manner. Infection induced rapid transcriptional responses in LSCs. This transcriptional program was transient, returning to homeostasis within 1 month of infection, yet expanded fibroblastic reticular cell networks persisted for more than 3 months after infection, and this altered LN composition reduced the magnitude of LSC responses to subsequent heterologous infection. Our results reveal the complexity of LSC responses during infection and suggest that amplified networks of LN stromal cells support successive immune responses.

  19. Cryopreservation and Revival of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities.The establishment of methods for large-scale expansion of clinical-grade MSCs in vitro has paved the way for their therapeutic use in clinical trials. However, the clinical application of MSCs also requires cryopreservation and banking of the cell products. To preserve autologous or allogeneic MSCs for future clinical applications, a reliable and effective cryopreservation method is required.Developing a successful cryopreservation protocol for clinical stem cell products, cryopreservation media, cryoprotectant agents (CPAs), the freezing container, the freezing temperature, and the cooling and warming rate are all aspects which should be considered.A major challenge is the selection of a suitable cryoprotectant which is able to penetrate the cells and yet has low toxicity.This chapter focuses on recent technological developments relevant for the cryopreservation of MSCs using the most commonly used cryopreservation medium containing DMSO and animal serum or human-derived products for research use and the animal protein-free cryopreservation media CryoStor (BioLife Solutions) for clinical use.

  20. The Stromal Microenvironment Modulates Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

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    Hima V. Vangapandu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cells are replicationally quiescent mature B-cells. In short-term cultures, supporting stromal cells provide a survival advantage to CLL cells by inducing transcription and translation without promoting proliferation. We hypothesized that the stromal microenvironment augments malignant B cells' metabolism to enable the cells to cope with their energy demands for transcription and translation. We used extracellular flux analysis to assess the two major energy-generating pathways, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos and glycolysis, in primary CLL cells in the presence of three different stromal cell lines. OxPhos, measured as the basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR and maximum respiration capacity, was significantly higher in 28 patients' CLL cells cocultured with bone marrow–derived NK.Tert stromal cells than in CLL cells cultured alone (P = .004 and <.0001, respectively. Similar OCR induction was observed in CLL cells cocultured with M2-10B4 and HS-5 stromal lines. In contrast, heterogeneous changes in the extracellular acidification rate (a measure of glycolysis were observed in CLL cells cocultured with stromal cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of CLL cells' metabolomics profile indicated stroma-mediated stimulation of nucleotide synthesis. Quantitation of ribonucleotide pools showed a significant two-fold increase in CLL cells cocultured with stromal cells, indicating that the stroma may induce CLL cellular bioenergy and the RNA building blocks necessary for the transcriptional requirement of a prosurvival phenotype. The stroma did not impact the proliferation index (Ki-67 staining of CLL cells. Collectively, these data suggest that short-term interaction (≤24 hours with stroma increases OxPhos and bioenergy in replicationally quiescent CLL cells.

  1. Novel pathway of adipogenesis through cross-talk between adipose tissue macrophages, adipose stem cells and adipocytes: evidence of cell plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Chazenbalk

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous studies highlight a complex relationship between lineage and phenotype for adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs, adipose stem cells (ASCs, and adipocytes, suggesting a high degree of plasticity of these cells. In the present study, using a novel co-culture system, we further characterized the interaction between ATMs, ASCs and adipocytes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Human adipocytes and the stromal vascular fraction containing ATMs and ASCs were isolated from human adipose tissue and co-cultured for 24 hours. FACS was used to characterize ATMs and ASCs before and after co-culture. Preadipocytes generated after co-culture were characterized by immunostaining for DLK (preadipocytes, CD14 and CD68 (ATMs, CD34 (ASCs, and Nile Red staining for lipid drops. qRT-PCR was used to quantify adipogenic markers such as C/EBPα and PPARγ. A novel fluorescent nanobead lineage tracing method was utilized before co-culture where fluorescent nanobeads were internalized by CD68 (+ ATMs. RESULTS: Co-culture of adipocytes with ATMs and ASCs increased the formation of new preadipocytes, thereby increasing lipid accumulation and C/EBPα and PPARγ gene expression. Preadipocytes originating after co-culture were positive for markers of preadipocytes, ATMs and ASCs. Moreover, fluorescent nanobeads were internalized by ATMs before co-culture and the new preadipocytes formed after co-culture also contained fluorescent nanobeads, suggesting that new preadipocytes originated in part from ATMs. The formation of CD34(+/CD68(+/DLK (+ cell spheres supported the interaction of ATMs, ASCs and preadipocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Cross-talk between adipocytes, ATMs and ASCs promotes preadipocyte formation. The regulation of this novel adipogenic pathway involves differentiation of ATMs to preadipocytes. The presence of CD34(+/CD68(+/DLK(+ cells grouped in spheres suggest that paracrine interactions between these cell types plays an important role in the generation and

  2. Novel pathway of adipogenesis through cross-talk between adipose tissue macrophages, adipose stem cells and adipocytes: evidence of cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Bertolotto, Cristina; Heneidi, Saleh; Jumabay, Medet; Trivax, Bradley; Aronowitz, Joel; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Simmons, Charles F; Dumesic, Daniel A; Azziz, Ricardo

    2011-03-31

    Previous studies highlight a complex relationship between lineage and phenotype for adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), adipose stem cells (ASCs), and adipocytes, suggesting a high degree of plasticity of these cells. In the present study, using a novel co-culture system, we further characterized the interaction between ATMs, ASCs and adipocytes. Human adipocytes and the stromal vascular fraction containing ATMs and ASCs were isolated from human adipose tissue and co-cultured for 24 hours. FACS was used to characterize ATMs and ASCs before and after co-culture. Preadipocytes generated after co-culture were characterized by immunostaining for DLK (preadipocytes), CD14 and CD68 (ATMs), CD34 (ASCs), and Nile Red staining for lipid drops. qRT-PCR was used to quantify adipogenic markers such as C/EBPα and PPARγ. A novel fluorescent nanobead lineage tracing method was utilized before co-culture where fluorescent nanobeads were internalized by CD68 (+) ATMs. Co-culture of adipocytes with ATMs and ASCs increased the formation of new preadipocytes, thereby increasing lipid accumulation and C/EBPα and PPARγ gene expression. Preadipocytes originating after co-culture were positive for markers of preadipocytes, ATMs and ASCs. Moreover, fluorescent nanobeads were internalized by ATMs before co-culture and the new preadipocytes formed after co-culture also contained fluorescent nanobeads, suggesting that new preadipocytes originated in part from ATMs. The formation of CD34(+)/CD68(+)/DLK (+) cell spheres supported the interaction of ATMs, ASCs and preadipocytes. Cross-talk between adipocytes, ATMs and ASCs promotes preadipocyte formation. The regulation of this novel adipogenic pathway involves differentiation of ATMs to preadipocytes. The presence of CD34(+)/CD68(+)/DLK(+) cells grouped in spheres suggest that paracrine interactions between these cell types plays an important role in the generation and proliferation of new preadipocytes. This phenomenon may reflect the in

  3. Novel Pathway of Adipogenesis through Cross-Talk between Adipose Tissue Macrophages, Adipose Stem Cells and Adipocytes: Evidence of Cell Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Bertolotto, Cristina; Heneidi, Saleh; Jumabay, Medet; Trivax, Bradley; Aronowitz, Joel; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Simmons, Charles F.; Dumesic, Daniel A.; Azziz, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies highlight a complex relationship between lineage and phenotype for adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), adipose stem cells (ASCs), and adipocytes, suggesting a high degree of plasticity of these cells. In the present study, using a novel co-culture system, we further characterized the interaction between ATMs, ASCs and adipocytes. Research Design and Methods Human adipocytes and the stromal vascular fraction containing ATMs and ASCs were isolated from human adipose tissue and co-cultured for 24 hours. FACS was used to characterize ATMs and ASCs before and after co-culture. Preadipocytes generated after co-culture were characterized by immunostaining for DLK (preadipocytes), CD14 and CD68 (ATMs), CD34 (ASCs), and Nile Red staining for lipid drops. qRT-PCR was used to quantify adipogenic markers such as C/EBPα and PPARγ. A novel fluorescent nanobead lineage tracing method was utilized before co-culture where fluorescent nanobeads were internalized by CD68 (+) ATMs. Results Co-culture of adipocytes with ATMs and ASCs increased the formation of new preadipocytes, thereby increasing lipid accumulation and C/EBPα and PPARγ gene expression. Preadipocytes originating after co-culture were positive for markers of preadipocytes, ATMs and ASCs. Moreover, fluorescent nanobeads were internalized by ATMs before co-culture and the new preadipocytes formed after co-culture also contained fluorescent nanobeads, suggesting that new preadipocytes originated in part from ATMs. The formation of CD34(+)/CD68(+)/DLK (+) cell spheres supported the interaction of ATMs, ASCs and preadipocytes. Conclusions Cross-talk between adipocytes, ATMs and ASCs promotes preadipocyte formation. The regulation of this novel adipogenic pathway involves differentiation of ATMs to preadipocytes. The presence of CD34(+)/CD68(+)/DLK(+) cells grouped in spheres suggest that paracrine interactions between these cell types plays an important role in the generation and

  4. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana, E-mail: caanei@yahoo.com [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Eloae, Florin Zugun [Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Tavernier, Emmanuelle [Service Hematologie Clinique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, 42270, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Carasevici, Eugen [Department of Immunology, Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania); Guyotat, Denis [Service Hematologie Clinique, Institut de Cancerologie de la Loire, 42270, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); Campos, Lydia [Laboratoire Hematologie, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055, Saint-Etienne (France); CNRS UMR 5239, Universite de Lyon, 42023, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  5. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  6. An unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma with osteoclastic stromal changes mimicking carcinosarcoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Naujokas, Agne; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    A 91-year-old man presented with an ulcerated nodule on his left lower eyelid. The tumor showed an epithelial component composed of basaloid and clear cells and a stroma that contained many osteoclastic giant cells. Strong, diffuse expression for cytokeratin 17 and p63 was noted in the epithelial component, whereas no staining was present in the sarcomatoid stroma, suggesting that the osteoclast-rich stromal component represented an unusual benign stromal reaction to the carcinoma rather than a manifestation of carcinosarcoma. Further supporting this interpretation was the absence of mitotic figures and low Ki-67 proliferation index (of approximately 1%) in the stromal cells. We herein reported a case of unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma, accompanied by a clear cell carcinomatous features and concurrent benign osteoclastic stromal changes.

  7. Evidences of early senescence in multiple myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud André

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In multiple myeloma, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells support myeloma cell growth. Previous studies have suggested that direct and indirect interactions between malignant cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells result in constitutive abnormalities in the bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aims of this study were to investigate the constitutive abnormalities in myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and to evaluate the impact of new treatments. RESULTS: We demonstrated that myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells have an increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, increased cell size, reduced proliferation capacity and characteristic expression of senescence-associated secretory profile members. We also observed a reduction in osteoblastogenic capacity and immunomodulatory activity and an increase in hematopoietic support capacity. Finally, we determined that current treatments were able to partially reduce some abnormalities in secreted factors, proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells have an early senescent profile with profound alterations in their characteristics. This senescent state most likely participates in disease progression and relapse by altering the tumor microenvironment.

  8. The Osteogenic Properties of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Cultures on TiO2 Sol-Gel-Derived Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocompatibility of the bone implants is a crucial factor determining the successful tissue regeneration. The aim of this work was to compare cellular behavior and osteogenic properties of rat adipose-derived multipotent stromal cells (ASCs and bone marrow multipotent stromal cells (BMSCs cultured on metallic substrate covered with TiO2 sol-gel-derived nanolayer. The morphology, proliferation rate, and osteogenic differentiation potential of both ASCs and BMSCs propagated on the biomaterials were examined. The potential for osteogenic differentiation of ASCs and BMSCs was determined based on the presence of specific markers of osteogenesis, that is, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, osteopontin (OPN, and osteocalcin (OCL. Additionally, the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in extracellular matrix was determined using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. Obtained results showed that TiO2 layer influenced proliferation activity of ASCs, which manifested by shortening of population doubling time and increase of OPN secretion. However, characteristic features of cells morphology and growth pattern of cultures prompted us to conclude that ultrathin TiO2 layer might also enhance osteodifferentiation of BMSCs. Therefore in our opinion, both populations of MSCs should be used for biological evaluation of biomaterials compatibility, such results may enhance the area of investigations related to regenerative medicine.

  9. Adipogenic human adenovirus Ad-36 induces commitment, differentiation, and lipid accumulation in human adipose-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasarica, Magdalena; Mashtalir, Nazar; McAllister, Emily J

    2008-01-01

    Human adenovirus Ad-36 is causatively and correlatively linked with animal and human obesity, respectively. Ad-36 enhances differentiation of rodent preadipocytes, but its effect on adipogenesis in humans is unknown. To indirectly assess the role of Ad-36-induced adipogenesis in human obesity......, the effect of the virus on commitment, differentiation, and lipid accumulation was investigated in vitro in primary human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (hASC). Ad-36 infected hASC in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Even in the presence of osteogenic media, Ad-36-infected hASC showed significantly...

  10. Adipose-derived regenerative cells in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perin, Emerson C; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Sánchez, Pedro L

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) can be isolated from liposuction aspirates and prepared as fresh cells for immediate administration in cell therapy. We performed the first randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to examine the safety and feasibility of the transendocar...

  11. The gene expression profile of non-cultured, highly purified human adipose tissue pericytes: Transcriptomic evidence that pericytes are stem cells in human adipose tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo da, E-mail: lindolfomeirelles@gmail.com [Center for Cell-Based Therapy (CEPID/FAPESP), Regional Center for Hemotherapy of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Rua Tenente Catão Roxo 2501, 14051-140 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratory for Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering, PPGBioSaúde, Lutheran University of Brazil, Av. Farroupilha 8001, 92425-900 Canoas, RS (Brazil); Deus Wagatsuma, Virgínia Mara de; Malta, Tathiane Maistro; Bonini Palma, Patrícia Viana [Center for Cell-Based Therapy (CEPID/FAPESP), Regional Center for Hemotherapy of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Rua Tenente Catão Roxo 2501, 14051-140 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Araújo, Amélia Goes; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre [Laboratory of Large-Scale Functional Biology (LLSFBio), Regional Center for Hemotherapy of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Rua Tenente Catão Roxo 2501, 14051-140 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); and others

    2016-12-10

    Pericytes (PCs) are a subset of perivascular cells that can give rise to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) when culture-expanded, and are postulated to give rise to MSC-like cells during tissue repair in vivo. PCs have been suggested to behave as stem cells (SCs) in situ in animal models, although evidence for this role in humans is lacking. Here, we analyzed the transcriptomes of highly purified, non-cultured adipose tissue (AT)-derived PCs (ATPCs) to detect gene expression changes that occur as they acquire MSC characteristics in vitro, and evaluated the hypothesis that human ATPCs exhibit a gene expression profile compatible with an AT SC phenotype. The results showed ATPCs are non-proliferative and express genes characteristic not only of PCs, but also of AT stem/progenitor cells. Additional analyses defined a gene expression signature for ATPCs, and revealed putative novel ATPC markers. Almost all AT stem/progenitor cell genes differentially expressed by ATPCs were not expressed by ATMSCs or culture-expanded ATPCs. Genes expressed by ATMSCs but not by ATPCs were also identified. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that PCs are SCs in vascularized tissues, highlight gene expression changes they undergo as they assume an MSC phenotype, and provide new insights into PC biology. - Highlights: • Non-cultured adipose tissue-derived human pericytes (ncATPCs) exhibit a distinctive gene expression signature. • ncATPCs express key adipose tissue stem cell genes previously described in vivo in mice. • ncATPCs express message for anti-proliferative and antiangiogenic molecules. • Most ncATPC-specific transcripts are absent in culture-expanded pericytes or ATMSCs • Gene expression changes ncATPCs undergo as they acquire a cultured ATMSC phenotype are pointed out.

  12. Markers for Characterization of Bone Marrow Multipotential Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A. Boxall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the observed efficacy of culture-expanded multipotential stromal cells, also termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, in the treatment of graft-versus host and cardiac disease, it remains surprising that purity and potency characterization of manufactured cell batches remains rather basic. In this paper, we will initially discuss surface and molecular markers that were proposed to serve as the indicators of the MSC potency, in terms of their proliferative potential or the ability to differentiate into desired lineages. The second part of this paper will be dedicated to a critical discussion of surface markers of uncultured (i.e., native bone marrow (BM MSCs. Although no formal consensus has yet been reached on which markers may be best suited for prospective BM MSC isolation, markers that cross-react with MSCs of animal models (such as CD271 and W8-B2/MSCA-1 may have the strongest translational value. Whereas small animal models are needed to discover the in vivo function on these markers, large animal models are required for safety and efficacy testing of isolated MSCs, particularly in the field of bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. Chondrogenically differentiated mesenchymal stromal cell pellets stimulate endochondral bone regeneration in critical-sized bone defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Stok (Johan); M.K.E. Koolen; H. Jahr (Holger); N. Kops (Nicole); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); O.P. van der Jagt (Olav)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Grafting bone defects or atrophic non-unions with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-based grafts is not yet successful. MSC-based grafts typically use undifferentiated or osteogenically differentiated MSCs and regenerate bone through intramembranous ossification.

  14. Decidual Stromal Cell Response to Paracrine Signals from the Trophoblast: Amplification of Immune and Angiogenic Modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, AP; Hamilton, AE; Talbi, S

    2007-01-01

    During the invasive phase of implantation, trophoblasts and maternal decidual stromal cells secrete products that regulate trophoblast differentiation and migration into the maternal endometrium. Paracrine interactions between the extravillous trophoblast and the maternal decidua are important fo...

  15. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in

  16. Simvastatin Modulates Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Lorenzi, Julio Cesar Cetrulo; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Palma, Patricia Vianna Bonini; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Prata, Karen Lima; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy) minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR). These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential. PMID:25874574

  17. Radiation rescue: mesenchymal stromal cells protect from lethal irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis

  18. Radiation rescue: mesenchymal stromal cells protect from lethal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Claudia; Brunswig-Spickenheier, Bärbel; Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Eggert, Katharina; Gehling, Ursula M; Rudolph, Cornelia; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cornils, Kerstin; Zustin, Jozef; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai; Zander, Axel R

    2011-01-05

    Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs) were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures) and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i) decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii) boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis thereby serving as fast and effective first-line treatment to

  19. The ferroimmunomodulatory role of ectopic endometriotic stromal cells in ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroharu; Yamashita, Yoriko; Iwase, Akira; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Uno, Nozomi; Akatsuka, Shinya; Takahashi, Takashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2012-08-01

    To understand the role of ectopic endometriotic stromal cells in ovarian endometriosis (OEM) and the associated risks for infertility and carcinogenesis. Analyses of secreted proteins and gene expression using immortalized eutopic/ectopic endometrial(-otic) stromal cells from OEM. University. Women with and without OEM. Samples of endometrial(-otic) tissue from women with or without OEM. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress in OEM, gene expression profiles, and the identification of secreted proteins by mass spectrometry in immortalized endometrial(-otic) stromal cells. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins and carboxymethyllysine were abundant in the stroma, rather than epithelia, of OEM patients, indicating the presence of oxidative stress. Immortalized ectopic endometriotic stromal cells exhibited high IRP1/IRP2/HIF-1β expression and contained lower amounts of iron and copper than their eutopic counterparts. Expression profiles, in combination with protein identification, revealed that complement component 3 (C3) and pentraxin-3 (PTX3) are the major proteins secreted from immortalized ectopic endometriotic stromal cells. Complement-3/PTX3 promoted the secretion of various cytokines by THP1 macrophage cells and thus supported M1 differentiation. Immortalized ectopic endometriotic stromal cells in OEM predominantly secrete C3 and PTX3 and exhibit a differential regulation of iron metabolism. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth and hormonal responsiveness of human endometrial stromal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinka, C F

    1988-06-01

    The present review describes and discusses published results on growth and hormonal responsiveness of human endometrial stromal cells in culture. The proliferative potential of serially subcultured cells, that is, the number of cell doublings before cells enter mitotic senescence and cease to divide, was unusually high in stromal cells from several endometrial specimens, a property that may reflect the unique proliferative capacity of human endometrium when compared to other adult tissues. Fluorescent visualization of microfilaments revealed distinct age-related changes in the distribution of cytoskeletal fibers. Addition of ovarian steroids to the culture medium of stromal cells resulted in significant morphologic changes. From comparative studies using different culture media it became evident that medium components remarkably influenced cell morphology during early culture periods in an irreversible manner. Cultured stromal cells yielded interesting results in experiments designed to define the role of polyamines in growth regulation. Proliferation was greatly inhibited when polyamine levels were reduced by specific inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase, the first and rate limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis which produces putrescine by catalytic conversion from ornithine. The antiproliferative effects were reversed by addition of putrescine to the culture medium. These results clearly establish a causal link between polyamine depletion and growth deficiencies and reveal an essential function of polyamines in stromal cell proliferation. Hormonally regulated parameters in cultured stromal cells include aromatase activity, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, 51K secreted protein, prolactin and laminin. The hormonally regulated production of prolactin and laminin, both considered markers of decidualization, together with morphologic changes of stromal cells to decidual-like cells, strongly suggest that human endometrial stromal cells, when subjected to

  1. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell–promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stroma...

  2. Beneficial effects of Brazilian propolis on type 2 diabetes in ob/ob mice: Possible involvement of immune cells in mesenteric adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Naoe, Yoshinori; Kimura, Shunsuke; Miyamoto, Tomomi; Okamoto, Shiki; Toda, Chitoku; Shimamoto, Yoshinori; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Miyoshi, Ichiro

    2013-10-01

    The anti-diabetic effects of Brazilian propolis were examined using ob/ob mice. Although repeated injection of an ethanol extract of Brazilian propolis (100 mg/kg, ip, twice a week for 12 weeks) did not affect body weight gain and food intake of ob/ob mice, blood glucose and plasma cholesterol levels were significantly attenuated. Moreover, the propolis extract partially restored glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, indicating anti-diabetic properties of the extract. The propolis-treated mice exhibited lower weight gain in mesenteric adipose tissue, while weight gains in inguinal and epididymal adipose tissues were not modulated. Flow cytometric and microscopic analyses suggested that the extract promoted accumulation of eosinophils into mesenteric and epididymal adipose tissues. Alternatively, the ratio of M1-like macrophages to M2-like macrophages in mesenteric adipose tissue was reduced by the propolis injection, coincident with the decrement of the number of interleukin-12A(+) cells. Levels of M1 macrophage markers, such as Itgax and Il12b transcripts, were decreased in the vascular stromal fraction of mesenteric adipose tissue, whereas those of pan-macrophage markers Emr1 and Cd68 were not influenced. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology term analyses suggested that propolis attenuated immune activation in mesenteric adipose tissues. Taken together, this indicates that Brazilian propolis improves diabetes in ob/ob mice, presumably through modification of immune cells in mesenteric adipose tissues.

  3. Non-cultured adipose-derived CD45(-) side population cells are enriched for progenitors that give rise to myofibres in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Schrøder, Henrik D; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2008-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells are highly able to exclude the Hoechst 33342 dye through membrane transporters, a feature associated with cell immaturity and therefore proposed as a marker of stem cells. Herein we demonstrate that the adipose tissue derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) contains...... a novel population of non-haematopoietic "side population" (SPCD45(-)) cells. Simultaneous qRT-PCR of 64 genes revealed that the freshly isolated SPCD45(-) was highly enriched for cells expressing genes related to stem cells, the Notch pathway, and early vascular precursors. Notably, the expression...... with myoblasts. Furthermore, immediate intramuscular engraftment of non-cultured SPCD45(-) cells gave rise to myofibres andcells lining blood vessels, whereas the SVF only provided donor derived mononuclear cells. We therefore conclude that the SPCD45(-) fraction of adipose-derived SVF is enriched for cells...

  4. AKI Recovery Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Carrying MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Incarnato, Danny; Dettori, Daniela; Neri, Francesco; Provero, Paolo; Pomatto, Margherita; Oliviero, Salvatore; Tetta, Ciro; Quesenberry, Peter J; Camussi, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic changes induced by extracellular vesicles have been implicated in mesenchymal stromal cell-promoted recovery of AKI. MicroRNAs are potential candidates for cell reprogramming toward a proregenerative phenotype. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether microRNA deregulation inhibits the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and derived extracellular vesicles in a model of glycerol-induced AKI in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We generated mesenchymal stromal cells depleted of Drosha to alter microRNA expression. Drosha-knockdown cells produced extracellular vesicles that did not differ from those of wild-type cells in quantity, surface molecule expression, and internalization within renal tubular epithelial cells. However, these vesicles showed global downregulation of microRNAs. Whereas wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles administered intravenously induced morphologic and functional recovery in AKI, the Drosha-knockdown counterparts were ineffective. RNA sequencing analysis showed that kidney genes deregulated after injury were restored by treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells and derived vesicles but not with Drosha-knockdown cells and vesicles. Gene ontology analysis showed in AKI an association of downregulated genes with fatty acid metabolism and upregulated genes with inflammation, matrix-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. These alterations reverted after treatment with wild-type mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles but not after treatment with the Drosha-knockdown counterparts. In conclusion, microRNA depletion in mesenchymal stromal cells and extracellular vesicles significantly reduced their intrinsic regenerative potential in AKI, suggesting a critical role of microRNAs in recovery after AKI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Pro-B cells propagated in stromal cell-free cultures reconstitute functional B-cell compartments in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Muenchow, Lilly; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Albertí-Servera, Llucia; Capoferri, Giuseppina; Doelz, Marianne; Rolink, Hannie; Bosco, Nabil; Ceredig, Rhodri; Rolink, Antonius G

    2017-02-01

    Up to now long-term in vitro growth of pro-B cells was thought to require stromal cells. However, here we show that fetal liver (FL) and bone marrow (BM) derived pro-B cells can be propagated long-term in stromal cell-free cultures supplemented with IL-7, stem cell factor and FLT3 ligand. Within a week, most cells expressed surface CD19, CD79A, λ5, and VpreB antigens and had rearranged immunoglobulin D-J heavy chain genes. Both FL and BM pro-B cells reconstituted the B-cell compartments of immuno-incompetent Rag2-deficient mice, with FL pro-B cells generating follicular, marginal zone (MZB) and B1a B cells, and BM pro-B cells giving rise mainly to MZB cells. Reconstituted Rag2-deficient mice generated significant levels of IgM and IgG antibodies to a type II T-independent antigen; mice reconstituted with FL pro-B cells generated surprisingly high IgG1 titers. Finally, we show for the first time that mice reconstituted with mixtures of pro-B and pro-T cells propagated in stromal cell-free in vitro cultures mounted a T-cell-dependent antibody response. This novel stromal cell-free culture system facilitates our understanding of B-cell development and might be applied clinically. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Management of Fibrosis: The Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Breakthrough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Usunier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is the endpoint of many chronic inflammatory diseases and is defined by an abnormal accumulation of extracellular matrix components. Despite its slow progression, it leads to organ malfunction. Fibrosis can affect almost any tissue. Due to its high frequency, in particular in the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys, many studies have been conducted to find satisfactory treatments. Despite these efforts, current fibrosis management therapies either are insufficiently effective or induce severe adverse effects. In the light of these facts, innovative experimental therapies are being investigated. Among these, cell therapy is regarded as one of the best candidates. In particular, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have great potential in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The value of their immunomodulatory effects and their ability to act on profibrotic factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, and the transforming growth factor-β1 pathway has already been highlighted in preclinical and clinical studies. Furthermore, their propensity to act depending on the microenvironment surrounding them enhances their curative properties. In this paper, we review a large range of studies addressing the use of MSCs in the treatment of fibrotic diseases. The results reported here suggest that MSCs have antifibrotic potential for several organs.

  7. Splenectomy enhances the therapeutic effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell infusion on cirrhosis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei-Ping; Akahoshi, Tomohiko; Piao, Jing-Shu; Narahara, Sayoko; Murata, Masaharu; Kawano, Takahito; Hamano, Nobuhito; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Hashizume, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Clinical studies suggest that splenectomy improves liver function in cirrhotic patients, but the influence of splenectomy on stem cell transplantation is poorly understood. This study investigated the effect of splenectomy on stem cell infusion and elucidated its mechanism. Rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were infused into cirrhosis rats with or without splenectomy, followed by the assessment of the in vivo distribution of stem cells and pathological changes. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and hepatocyte growth factor expression were also investigated in splenectomized cirrhosis patients and rats. Splenectomy, prior to cell infusion, improved liver function and suppressed fibrosis progression more efficiently than cell infusion alone in the experimental cirrhosis model. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and hepatocyte growth factor levels after splenectomy were increased in patients and rats. These upregulated cytokines significantly facilitated stem cell motility, migration and proliferation in vitro. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 neutralization weakened the promotion of cell migration by these cytokines. The infused cells integrated into liver fibrosis septa and participated in regeneration more efficiently in splenectomized rats. Direct coculture with stem cells led to inhibition of hepatic stellate cell proliferation. In addition, hepatocyte growth factor induced hepatic stellate cell apoptosis via the c-jun N-terminal kinase-p53 pathway. Splenectomy prior to cell infusion enhanced the therapeutic effect of stem cells on cirrhosis, which involved upregulation of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and hepatocyte growth factor after splenectomy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in COPD: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes MA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mariana A Antunes,1,2 José Roberto Lapa e Silva,3 Patricia RM Rocco1,2 1Laboratory of Pulmonary Investigation, Carlos Chagas Filho Institute of Biophysics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, RJ, Brazil; 2National Institute of Science and Technology for Regenerative Medicine, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 3Institute of Thoracic Medicine, Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Abstract: COPD is the most frequent chronic respiratory disease and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The major risk factor for COPD development is cigarette smoke, and the most efficient treatment for COPD is smoking cessation. However, even after smoking cessation, inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress may persist and continue contributing to disease progression. Although current therapies for COPD (primarily based on anti-inflammatory agents contribute to the reduction of airway obstruction and minimize COPD exacerbations, none can avoid disease progression or reduce mortality. Within this context, recent advances in mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC therapy have made this approach a strong candidate for clinical use in the treatment of several pulmonary diseases. MSCs can be readily harvested from diverse tissues and expanded with high efficiency, and have strong immunosuppressive properties. Preclinical studies have demonstrated encouraging outcomes of MSCs therapy for lung disorders, including emphysema. These findings instigated research groups to assess the impact of MSCs in human COPD/emphysema, but clinical results have fallen short of expectations. However, MSCs have demonstrated a good adjuvant role in the clinical scenario. Trials that used MSCs combined with another, primary treatment (eg, endobronchial valves found that patients derived greater benefit in pulmonary function tests and/or quality of life reports, as well as reductions in systemic

  9. Influence of stromal cells on lymphocyte adhesion and migration on endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettrick, Helen M.; Buckley, Chris D.; Rainger, G. Ed; Nash, Gerard B.

    2011-01-01

    Methods are described for analysing adhesion and migration of isolated lymphocytes on endothelial cell monolayers which have been co-cultured with different stromal cells, with or without additional cytokine treatment. The different cells types are grown on opposite sides of 3.0 or 0.4μm pore filters, depending on whether migration through the whole construct is to be analysed, or adhesion to the endothelial cells alone. Assays may be ‘static’ or filters can be incorporated into flow chambers so that cell behaviour can be directly observed under conditions simulating those in vivo. In general, by choice of method, one can evaluate efficiency of attachment, and ability of cells to migrate across the endothelial monolayer, through the filter and through the stromal cell layer. Fluorescence microscopic examination of fixed filters can be used e.g., to ascertain whether lymphocytes are retained by stromal cells. In general, static assays have the higher throughput and greatest ease of use, while the flow-based assays are more physiologically-relevant and allow detailed recording of cell behaviour in real time. PMID:20379868

  10. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs from Human Adenoid Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Se Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitor cells that originally derived from bone marrow. Clinical use of bone marrow-derived MSC is difficult due to morbidity and low MSC abundance and isolation efficiency. Recently, MSCs have been isolated from various adult tissues. Here we report the isolation of adenoid tissue-derived MSCs (A-MSCs and their characteristics. Methods: We compared the surface markers, morphologies, and differentiation and proliferation capacities of previously established tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs with cells isolated from adenoid tissue. The immunophenotype of A-MSCs was investigated upon interferon (IFN-γ stimulation. Results: A-MSCs, T-MSCs, and BM-MSCs showed negative CD45, CD31 HLA-DR, CD34, CD14, CD19 and positive CD 90, CD44, CD73, CD105 expression. A-MSCs were fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped non-adherent cells, similar to T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Adipogenesis was observed in A-MSCs by the formation of lipid droplets after Oil Red O staining. Osteogenesis was observed by the formation of the matrix mineralization in Alizarin Red staining. Chondrogenesis was observed by the accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan-rich matrix in collagen type II staining. These data were similar to those of T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Expression of marker genes (i.e., adipogenesis; lipoprotein lipase, proliferator-activator receptor-gamma, osteogenesis; osteocalcin, alkaline phasphatase, chondrogenesis; aggrecan, collagen type II α1 in A-MSCs were not different from those in T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Conclusions: A-MSCs possess the characteristics of MSCs in terms of morphology, multipotent differentiation capacity, cell surface markers, and immunogeneity. Therefore, A-MSCs fulfill the definition of MSCs and represent an alternate source of MSCs.

  11. Potency testing of mesenchymal stromal cell growth expanded in human platelet lysate from different human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Fioravanti, D; Bonanno, G; Totta, P; Zizzari, I G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-25

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been largely investigated, in the past decade, as potential therapeutic strategies for various acute and chronic pathological conditions. MSCs isolated from different sources, such as bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord tissue (UCT) and adipose tissue (AT), share many biological features, although they may show some differences on cumulative yield, proliferative ability and differentiation potential. The standardization of MSCs growth and their functional amplification is a mandatory objective of cell therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cumulative yield and the ex vivo amplification potential of MSCs obtained from various sources and different subjects, using defined culture conditions with a standardized platelet lysate (PL) as growth stimulus. MSCs isolated from BM, UCT and AT and expanded in human PL were compared in terms of cumulative yield and growth potential per gram of starting tissue. MSCs morphology, phenotype, differentiation potential, and immunomodulatory properties were also investigated to evaluate their biological characteristics. The use of standardized PL-based culture conditions resulted in a very low variability of MSC growth. Our data showed that AT has the greater capacity to generate MSC per gram of initial tissue, compared to BM and UCT. However, UCT-MSCs replicated faster than AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs, revealing a greater proliferation capacity of this source irrespective of its lower MSC yield. All MSCs exhibited the typical MSC phenotype and the ability to differentiate into all mesodermal lineages, while BM-MSCs showed the most prominent immunosuppressive effect in vitro. The adoption of standardized culture conditions may help researchers and clinicians to reveal particular characteristics and inter-individual variability of MSCs sourced from different tissues. These data will be beneficial to set the standards for tissue collection and MSCs clinical-scale expansion both for cell banking

  12. Oncologic trogocytosis of an original stromal cells induces chemoresistance of ovarian tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Rafii

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The microenvironment plays a major role in the onset and progression of metastasis. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC tends to metastasize to the peritoneal cavity where interactions within the microenvironment might lead to chemoresistance. Mesothelial cells are important actors of the peritoneal homeostasis; we determined their role in the acquisition of chemoresistance of ovarian tumours. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated an original type of stromal cells, referred to as "Hospicells" from ascitis of patients with ovarian carcinosis using limiting dilution. We studied their ability to confer chemoresistance through heterocellular interactions. These stromal cells displayed a new phenotype with positive immunostaining for CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166 and Multi drug resistance protein. They preferentially interacted with epithelial ovarian cancer cells. This interaction induced chemoresistance to platin and taxans with the implication of multi-drug resistance proteins. This contact enabled EOC cells to capture patches of the Hospicells membrane through oncologic trogocytosis, therefore acquiring their functional P-gp proteins and thus developing chemoresistance. Presence of Hospicells on ovarian cancer tissue micro-array from patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy was also significantly associated to chemoresistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of trogocytosis occurring between a cancer cell and an original type of stromal cell. This interaction induced autonomous acquisition of chemoresistance. The presence of stromal cells within patient's tumour might be predictive of chemoresistance. The specific interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells might be targeted during chemotherapy.

  13. Oncologic trogocytosis of an original stromal cells induces chemoresistance of ovarian tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Arash; Mirshahi, Pejman; Poupot, Mary; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Simon, Anne; Ducros, Elodie; Mery, Eliane; Couderc, Bettina; Lis, Raphael; Capdet, Jerome; Bergalet, Julie; Querleu, Denis; Dagonnet, Francoise; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Favre, Gilles; Soria, Jeanine; Mirshahi, Massoud

    2008-01-01

    The microenvironment plays a major role in the onset and progression of metastasis. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tends to metastasize to the peritoneal cavity where interactions within the microenvironment might lead to chemoresistance. Mesothelial cells are important actors of the peritoneal homeostasis; we determined their role in the acquisition of chemoresistance of ovarian tumours. We isolated an original type of stromal cells, referred to as "Hospicells" from ascitis of patients with ovarian carcinosis using limiting dilution. We studied their ability to confer chemoresistance through heterocellular interactions. These stromal cells displayed a new phenotype with positive immunostaining for CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166 and Multi drug resistance protein. They preferentially interacted with epithelial ovarian cancer cells. This interaction induced chemoresistance to platin and taxans with the implication of multi-drug resistance proteins. This contact enabled EOC cells to capture patches of the Hospicells membrane through oncologic trogocytosis, therefore acquiring their functional P-gp proteins and thus developing chemoresistance. Presence of Hospicells on ovarian cancer tissue micro-array from patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy was also significantly associated to chemoresistance. This is the first report of trogocytosis occurring between a cancer cell and an original type of stromal cell. This interaction induced autonomous acquisition of chemoresistance. The presence of stromal cells within patient's tumour might be predictive of chemoresistance. The specific interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells might be targeted during chemotherapy.

  14. Clinical results and second-look arthroscopic findings after treatment with adipose-derived stem cells for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yong-Gon; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kwon, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Yong-Sang; Yeo, Jee-Eun

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the clinical outcomes and second-look arthroscopic findings of intra-articular injection of stem cells with arthroscopic lavage for treatment of elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were evaluated. Stem cell injections combined with arthroscopic lavage were administered to 30 elderly patients (≥65 years) with knee OA. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was harvested from both buttocks by liposuction. After stromal vascular fractions were isolated, a mean of 4.04 × 10(6) stem cells (9.7 % of 4.16 × 10(7) stromal vascular fraction cells) were prepared and injected in the selected knees of patients after arthroscopic lavage. Outcome measures included the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores, visual analog scale, and Lysholm score at preoperative and 3-, 12-, and 2-year follow-up visits. Sixteen patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Almost all patients showed significant improvement in all clinical outcomes at the final follow-up examination. All clinical results significantly improved at 2-year follow-up compared to 12-month follow-up (P 65 years, only five patients demonstrated worsening of Kellgren-Lawrence grade. On second-look arthroscopy, 87.5 % of elderly patients (14/16) improved or maintained cartilage status at least 2 years postoperatively. Moreover, none of the patients underwent total knee arthroplasty during this 2-year period. Adipose-derived stem cell therapy for elderly patients with knee OA was effective in cartilage healing, reducing pain, and improving function. Therefore, adipose-derived stem cell treatment appears to be a good option for OA treatment in elderly patients. Therapeutic case series study, Level IV.

  15. Transcriptional Networks in Single Perivascular Cells Sorted from Human Adipose Tissue Reveal a Hierarchy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, W Reef; Moldovan, Nicanor I; Moldovan, Leni; Livak, Kenneth J; Datta, Krishna; Goswami, Chirayu; Corselli, Mirko; Traktuev, Dmitry O; Murray, Iain R; Péault, Bruno; March, Keith

    2017-05-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of multipotent mesenchymal stem-like cells, located in the perivascular niche. Based on their surface markers, these have been assigned to two main categories: CD31 - /CD45 - /CD34 + /CD146 - cells (adventitial stromal/stem cells [ASCs]) and CD31 - /CD45 - /CD34 - /CD146 + cells (pericytes [PCs]). These populations display heterogeneity of unknown significance. We hypothesized that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a functional marker of primitivity, could help to better define ASC and PC subclasses. To this end, the stromal vascular fraction from a human lipoaspirate was simultaneously stained with fluorescent antibodies to CD31, CD45, CD34, and CD146 antigens and the ALDH substrate Aldefluor, then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Individual ASCs (n = 67) and PCs (n = 73) selected from the extremities of the ALDH-staining spectrum were transcriptionally profiled by Fluidigm single-cell quantitative polymerase chain reaction for a predefined set (n = 429) of marker genes. To these single-cell data, we applied differential expression and principal component and clustering analysis, as well as an original gene coexpression network reconstruction algorithm. Despite the stochasticity at the single-cell level, covariation of gene expression analysis yielded multiple network connectivity parameters suggesting that these perivascular progenitor cell subclasses possess the following order of maturity: (a) ALDH br ASC (most primitive); (b) ALDH dim ASC; (c) ALDH br PC; (d) ALDH dim PC (least primitive). This order was independently supported by specific combinations of class-specific expressed genes and further confirmed by the analysis of associated signaling pathways. In conclusion, single-cell transcriptional analysis of four populations isolated from fat by surface markers and enzyme activity suggests a developmental hierarchy among perivascular mesenchymal stem cells supported by markers and coexpression

  16. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From bench to bedside: use of human adipose-derived stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feisst, Vaughan; Meidinger, Sarah; Locke, Michelle B

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) in human adipose tissue nearly 15 years ago, significant advances have been made in progressing this promising cell therapy tool from the laboratory bench to bedside usage...

  18. A role for ADAM12 in breast tumor progression and stromal cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Frohlich, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2005-01-01

    of stromal fibroblasts in tumor initiation and progression has been elucidated. Here, we show that stromal cell apoptosis occurs in human breast carcinoma but is only rarely seen in nonmalignant breast lesions. Furthermore, we show that ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease up-regulated in human breast...... cancer, accelerates tumor progression in a mouse breast cancer model. ADAM12 does not influence tumor cell proliferation but rather confers both decreased tumor cell apoptosis and increased stromal cell apoptosis. This dual role of ADAM12 in governing cell survival is underscored by the finding that ADAM......12 increases the apoptotic sensitivity of nonneoplastic cells in vitro while rendering tumor cells more resistant to apoptosis. Together, these results show that the ability of ADAM12 to influence apoptosis may contribute to tumor progression....

  19. Intralymphatic Administration of Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces the Severity of Collagen-Induced Experimental Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleuterio Lombardo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stromal cells with immunomodulatory properties. They have emerged as a very promising treatment for autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Previous studies have demonstrated that MSCs, administered systemically, migrate to lymphoid tissues associated with the inflammatory site where functional MSC-induced immune cells with a regulatory phenotype were increased mediating the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs. These results suggest that homing of MSCs to the lymphatic system plays an important role in the mechanism of action of MSCs in vivo. Thus, we hypothesized that direct intralymphatic (IL (also referred as intranodal administration of MSCs could be an alternative and effective route of administration for MSC-based therapy. Here, we report the feasibility and efficacy of the IL administration of human expanded adipose mesenchymal stem cells (eASCs in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA. IL administration of eASCs attenuated the severity and progression of arthritis, reduced bone destruction and increased the levels of regulatory T cells (CD25+Foxp3+CD4+ cells and Tr1 cells (IL10+CD4+, in spleen and draining lymph nodes. Taken together, these results indicate that IL administration of eASCs is very effective in modulating established CIA and may represent an alternative treatment modality for cell therapy with eASCs.

  20. Protection of Brain Injury by Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Secreted Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischiutta, Francesca; Brunelli, Laura; Romele, Pietro; Silini, Antonietta; Sammali, Eliana; Paracchini, Lara; Marchini, Sergio; Talamini, Laura; Bigini, Paolo; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Pastorelli, Roberta; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Parolini, Ornella; Zanier, Elisa R

    2016-11-01

    To define the features of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell secretome and its protective properties in experimental models of acute brain injury. Prospective experimental study. Laboratory research. C57Bl/6 mice. Mice subjected to sham or traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact received human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or phosphate-buffered saline infused intracerebroventricularly or intravenously 24 hours after injury. Organotypic cortical brain slices exposed to ischemic injury by oxygen-glucose deprivation were treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or with their secretome (conditioned medium) in a transwell system. Traumatic brain injured mice receiving human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells intravenously or intracerebroventricularly showed early and lasting functional and anatomical brain protection. cortical slices injured by oxigen-glucose deprivation and treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or conditioned medium showed comparable protective effects (neuronal rescue, promotion of M2 microglia polarization, induction of trophic factors) indicating that the exposure of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells to the injured tissue is not necessary for the release of bioactive factors. Using sequential size-exclusion and gel-filtration chromatography, we identified a conditioned medium subfraction, which specifically displays these highly protective properties and we found that this fraction was rich in bioactive molecules with molecular weight smaller than 700 Da. Quantitative RNA analysis and mass spectrometry-based peptidomics showed that the active factors are not proteins or RNAs. The metabolomic profiling of six metabolic classes identified a list of molecules whose abundance was selectively elevated in the active conditioned medium fraction. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted factors protect the brain after acute injury. Importantly, a fraction rich in metabolites, and

  1. Angiogenesis Following Three-Dimensional Culture of Isolated Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Esfandiari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis is the presence of endometrial tissue outside of the uterine cavity andis the most common gynecologic disorder in women of reproductive age. We have preliminaryevidence that in the presence of a 3-dimensional (3-D fibrin matrix, human endometrial glands,stroma, and neovascularization can develop in vitro, mimicking the earliest stages of endometriosis.The aim of the present study was to determine if angiogenesis can be developed in a 3-D culture ofhuman stromal cells in vitro.Materials and Methods: This was an in vitro study of human endometrial biopsies in 3-D cultureof fibrin matrix and conducted at a university affiliated infertility center. Biopsies were taken fromten normal ovulating women undergoing infertility treatment. The samples obtained from fundusof the uterine cavity were minced, stromal cells isolated and placed in a 3-D fibrin matrix culturesystem. Degree of proliferation of stromal cells, invasion of the fibrin matrix, gland formation, vesselsprouting and immunohistochemical characterization of cellular components were recorded.Results: Three-dimensional culture of human stromal cells formed sheets of cells in the fibrinmatrix. By 3-4 weeks, endothelial cell branching was observed and rudimentary capillary-likestructures formed and endothelial cells confirmed by CD31 immunostaining.Conclusion: These data show that stromal cells from endometrial explants can proliferate andinvade a fibrin matrix in vitro generating new vessels. This procedure represents a controlled,quantifiable model for the study of angiogenesis during the menstrual cycle, and in conditions suchas endometriosis and cancer.

  2. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Braat, A.K.; Gawlitta, D.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Egan, D.A.; Tijssen-Slump, E.; Yuan, Huipin; Coffer, P.J.; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that

  3. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Braat, A.K.; Gawlitta, D.; Dhert, W.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Egan, D.A.; Tijssen-Slump, E.; Yuan, H.; Coffer, P.J; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that

  4. Natural killer cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells: a comparative analysis of heparin- and stromal cell-supported methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dezell, S.A.; Ahn, Y.O.; Spanholtz, J.; Wang, H.; Weeres, M.; Jackson, S.; Cooley, S.; Dolstra, H.; Miller, J.S.; Verneris, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) may have significant clinical benefits over NK cells from adult donors, including the ability to choose alloreactive donors and potentially more robust in vivo expansion. Stromal-based methods have been used to study the

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  4. File list: DNS.Adp.05.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  6. Isolation and identification of epithelial and stromal stem cells from eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T; He, H; Liu, R; Wang, S-X; Pu, D-M

    2014-07-01

    The recent characterization of possible stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium has shed new light on the origins of ectopic endometrial tissue and the mechanism for the pathogenesis of endometriosis, but has raised new questions. Is it possible that abnormal endometrial stem/progenitor cells increase their capacity to implant and establish themselves as ectopic tissue, or that normal stem cells implant in abnormal peritoneum? This study investigated key stem cell properties in cologenic epithelial and stromal cells obtained from eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Single cell suspensions of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells were cultured at densities of 20, 50, 100 and 200cells/cm(2). Cloning efficiency (CE) was determined, and stem cell phenotypic surface markers were detected using Western blotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. CE was significantly higher in cells cultured at a density of 50cells/cm(2) compared with the other groups. After 15 days of culture, small and large colonies were observed. Large-colony-derived epithelial and stromal cells had high proliferative potentials, producing millions of cells in vitro, with strong expression of epithelial and stromal stem cell phenotypic surface markers EMA, CK, CD49f, THY-1(CD90), collagen type I, 5B5 and vimentin. Adult stem cells were found in eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis, and this may play an important role in disease development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The potential role of genetically-modified pig mesenchymal stromal cells in xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are known to have regenerative, anti-inflammatory, and immunodulatory effects. There are extensive indications that pig MSCs function satisfactorily across species barriers. Pig MSCs might have considerable therapeutic potential, particularly in xenotransplantation, where they have several potential advantages. (i) pMSCs can be obtained from the specific organ- or cell-source donor pig or from an identical (cloned) pig. (ii) They are easy to obtain in large numbers, negating the need for prolonged ex vivo expansion. (iii) They can be obtained from genetically-engineered pigs, and the genetic modification can be related to the therapeutic goal of the MSCs. We have reviewed our own studies on MSCs from genetically-engineered pigs, and summarize them here. We have successfully harvested and cultured MSCs from wild-type and genetically-engineered pig bone marrow and adipose tissue. We have identified several pig (p)MSC surface markers (positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD166, and negative for CD31, CD45), have demonstrated their proliferation and differentiation (into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondroblasts), and evaluated their antigenicity and immune suppressive effects on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4(+)T cells. They have identical or very similar characteristics to MSCs from other mammals. Genetically-modified pMSCs are significantly less immunogenic than wild-type pMSCs, and downregulate the human T cell response to pig antigens as efficiently as do human MSCs. We hypothesized that pMSCs can immunomodulate human T cells through induction of apoptosis or anergy, or cause T cell phenotype switching with induction of regulatory T cells, but we could find no evidence for these mechanisms. However, pMSCs upregulated the expression of CD69 on human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, the relevance of which is currently under investigation. We conclude that MSCs from genetically-engineered pigs should continue to be

  8. Inflammatory response of a prostate stromal cell line induced by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, S J; Han, I H; Kim, J H; Gu, N Y; Seo, M Y; Chung, Y H; Ryu, J S

    2016-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis, a cause of sexually transmitted infection, is known as a surface-dwelling protozoa, trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissue from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis by immunoperoxidase assay or PCR. However, the immune response of prostate stromal cells infected with T. vaginalis has not been investigated. Our objective was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce an inflammatory response in prostate stromal cells. Incubation of a human prostate stromal myofibroblast cells (WPMY-1) with live T. vaginalis T016 increased expression of the inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2. In addition, TLR4, ROS, MAPK and NF-κB expression increased, while inhibitors of TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB reduced CXCL8 and CCL2 production. Medium conditioned by incubation of WPMY-1 cells with T. vaginalis stimulated the migration of human neutrophils and monocytes (THP-1 cells). We conclude that T. vaginalis increases CXCL8 and CCL2 production by human prostate stromal cells by activating TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB, and this in turn attracts neutrophils and monocytes and leads to an inflammatory response. This study is the first attempt to demonstrate an inflammatory reaction in prostate stromal cells caused by T. vaginalis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  10. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  11. Vascularization mediated by mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue: a comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Pill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-engineered constructs are promising to overcome shortage of organ donors and to reconstruct at least parts of injured or diseased tissues or organs. However, oxygen and nutrient supply are limiting factors in many tissues, especially after implantation into the host. Therefore, the development of a vascular system prior to implantation appears crucial. To develop a functional vascular system, different cell types that interact with each other need to be co-cultured to simulate a physiological environment in vitro. This review provides an overview and a comparison of the current knowledge of co-cultures of human endothelial cells (ECs with human adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs or bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs in three dimensional (3D hydrogel matrices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, BMSCs or ASCs, have been shown to enhance vascular tube formation of ECs and to provide a stabilizing function in addition to growth factor delivery and permeability control for ECs. Although phenotypically similar, MSCs from different tissues promote tubulogenesis through distinct mechanisms. In this report, we describe differences and similarities regarding molecular interactions in order to investigate which of these two cell types displays more favorable characteristics to be used in clinical applications. Our comparative study shows that ASCs as well as BMSCs are both promising cell types to induce vascularization with ECs in vitro and consequently are promising candidates to support in vivo vascularization.

  12. The Adipose Tissue in Farm Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauerwein, Helga; Bendixen, Emoke; Restelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    and immune cells. The scientific interest in adipose tissue is largely based on the worldwide increasing prevalence of obesity in humans; in contrast, obesity is hardly an issue for farmed animals that are fed according to their well-defined needs. Adipose tissue is nevertheless of major importance...... in these animals, as the adipose percentage of the bodyweight is a major determinant for the efficiency of transferring nutrients from feed into food products and thus for the economic value from meat producing animals. In dairy animals, the importance of adipose tissue is based on its function as stromal...... and metabolic disorders. We herein provide a general overview of adipose tissue functions and its importance in farm animals. This review will summarize recent achievements in farm animal adipose tissue proteomics, mainly in cattle and pigs, but also in poultry, i.e. chicken and in farmed fish. Proteomics...

  13. Influence of stromal cells on lymphocyte adhesion and migration on endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    McGettrick, Helen M.; Buckley, Chris D.; Rainger, G.Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2010-01-01

    Methods are described for analysing adhesion and migration of isolated lymphocytes on endothelial cell monolayers which have been co-cultured with different stromal cells, with or without additional cytokine treatment. The different cells types are grown on opposite sides of 3.0 or 0.4μm pore filters, depending on whether migration through the whole construct is to be analysed, or adhesion to the endothelial cells alone. Assays may be ‘static’ or filters can be incorporated into flow chambers...

  14. Chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha activates basophils by means of CXCR4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Jacobi, H H; Jing, C

    2000-01-01

    The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is predominantly expressed on inactivated naive T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and endothelial cells. CXC chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha) is the only known ligand for CXCR4. To date, the CXCR4 expression and function o...

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Phenotype is not Influenced by Confluence during Culture Expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed; Hansen, Louise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are good candidates for cell therapy. For clinical applications of MSCs extensive in vitro expansion is required to obtain an adequate number of cells. It is evident that the pursuit...

  16. Deletion of Pkd1 in renal stromal cells causes defects in the renal stromal compartment and progressive cystogenesis in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xuguang; Arend, Lois J

    2017-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), caused by PKD1 and PKD2 gene mutations, is one of the most common genetic diseases, affecting up to 1 in 500 people. Mutations of PKD1 account for over 85% of ADPKD cases. However, mechanisms of disease progression and explanations for the wide range in disease phenotype remain to be elucidated. Moreover, functional roles of PKD1 in the renal stromal compartment are poorly understood. In this work, we tested if Pkd1 is essential for development and maintenance of the renal stromal compartment and if this role contributes to pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease using a novel tissue-specific knockout mouse model. We demonstrate that deletion of Pkd1 from renal stromal cells using Foxd1-driven Cre causes a spectrum of defects in the stromal compartment, including excessive apoptosis/proliferation and extracellular matrix deficiency. Renal vasculature was also defective. Further, mutant mice showed epithelial changes and progressive cystogenesis in adulthood modeling human ADPKD. Altogether, we provide robust evidence to support indispensable roles for Pkd1 in development and maintenance of stromal cell derivatives by using a novel ADPKD model. Moreover, stromal compartment defects caused by Pkd1 deletion might serve as an important mechanism for pathogenesis of ADPKD.

  17. Stromal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma improve bone allograft integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Enrico; Fini, Milena; Beccheroni, Amira; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Di Bella, Claudia; Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Guzzardella, Gaetano; Martini, Lucia; Cenacchi, Annarita; Di Maggio, Nunzia; Sangiorgi, Luca; Fornasari, Pier Maria; Mercuri, Mario; Giardino, Roberto; Donati, Davide

    2005-06-01

    Early vascular invasion is a key factor in bone allograft incorporation. It may reduce the complications related to slow and incomplete bone integration. Bone-marrow-derived stromal stem cells associated with platelet-rich plasma are potent angiogenic inducers proven to release vascular endothelial growth factor. Our goal was to test whether the combination of stromal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma is able to increase massive allograft integration in a large animal model with sacrifice at 4 months. A critical defect was made in the mid-diaphysis of the metatarsal bone of 10 sheep; the study group received an allograft plus stromal stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, and collagen (six animals) and the control group received only the allograft (four animals). Investigation was done with radiographs, mechanical tests and histomorphometric analysis, including new vascularization. Results showed substantial new bone formation in the allograft of the study group. Bone formation is correlated with better vascular invasion and remodeling of the graft in the study group. These results confirm the key role played by stromal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma in bone repair. Further studies are needed to better define the role stromal stem cells play when implanted alone.

  18. Twist and Snail expression in tumor and stromal cells of epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyu-Young; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jae-Il; Ahn, Sun-Ha; Hong, Seong-Doo

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate expression of Twist and Snail in tumor and stromal cells of epithelial odontogenic tumors and to analyze relationships between Twist and Snail expression and between tumor and stromal expression. Immunohistochemistry was performed using Twist and Snail antibodies in 60 ameloblastomas (AMs; 20 solid/multicystic, 20 unicystic, and 20 recurrent), six ameloblastic carcinomas (ACs), 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and six calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs). A higher rate of tumor cells strongly positive for Twist was observed in AC compared to the other tumors (P = 0.019). The rate of tumor cells strongly positive for Snail tended to be higher in AC than in AM (P = 0.060). AM and AC showed a higher rate of Twist-positive stromal cells than AOT and CEOT (P Tumor cells of recurrent AM showed stronger expression of Twist (P tumor expression of Twist and Snail (r = 0.376, P = 0.001) and between tumor and stromal expression of Snail (r = 0.334, P = 0.002). Twist and Snail may affect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in AC and be involved in recurrence of AM. Stromal Twist expression may be associated with aggressive clinical behavior of epithelial odontogenic tumors. A Twist-Snail pathway may participate in the development and progression of odontogenic tumors, and tumor-stroma interaction in odontogenic tumors may be mediated by Snail. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Implantation of the human embryo requires Rac1-dependent endometrial stromal cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Seema; Carver, Janet G; Ridley, Anne J; Mardon, Helen J

    2008-10-21

    Failure of the human embryo to implant into the uterine wall during the early stages of pregnancy is a major cause of infertility. Implantation involves embryo apposition and adhesion to the endometrial epithelium followed by penetration through the epithelium and invasion of the embryonic trophoblast through the endometrial stroma. Although gene-knockdown studies have highlighted several molecules that are important for implantation in the mouse, the molecular mechanisms controlling implantation in the human are unknown. Here, we demonstrate in an in vitro model for human implantation that the Rho GTPases Rac1 and RhoA in human endometrial stromal cells modulate invasion of the human embryo through the endometrial stroma. We show that knockdown of Rac1 expression in human endometrial stromal cells inhibits human embryonic trophoblast invasion into stromal cell monolayers, whereas inhibition of RhoA activity promotes embryo invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Rac1 is required for human endometrial stromal cell migration and that the motility of the stromal cells increases at implantation sites. This increased motility correlates with a localized increase in Rac1 activation and a reciprocal decrease in RacGAP1 levels. These results reveal embryo-induced and localized endometrial responses that may govern implantation of the human embryo.

  20. Mast cell deficiency results in the accumulation of preadipocytes in adipose tissue in both obese and non-obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ishijima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells have been suggested to play key roles in adipogenesis. We herein show that the expression of preadipocyte, but not adipocyte, marker genes increases in the white adipose tissue of mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh mice under both obese and non-obese conditions. In vitro culturing with adipogenic factors revealed increased adipocytes differentiated from the KitW-sh/W-sh stromal vascular fraction, suggesting the accumulation of preadipocytes. Moreover, the increased expression of preadipocyte genes was restored by mast cell reconstitution in the KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These results suggest positive effects of mast cells on the preadipocyte to adipocyte transition under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. Gastrointestinal Stromal Cell Tumor (GIST) Presenting as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are rare mesenchymal tumors that may mimic ovarian tumor on presurgical testing. These tumors are usually asymptomatic, often discovered accidentally during endoscopic or radiologic examinations,. Case Presentations: In first case a 50 years old woman presented ...

  2. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells protect chondrocytes from degeneration associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maumus, Marie; Manferdini, Cristina; Toupet, Karine; Peyrafitte, Julie-Anne; Ferreira, Rosanna; Facchini, Andrea; Gabusi, Elena; Bourin, Philippe; Jorgensen, Christian; Lisignoli, Gina; Noël, Danièle

    2013-09-01

    Our work aimed at evaluating the role of adipose stem cells (ASC) on chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) patients and identifying the mediators involved. We used primary chondrocytes, ASCs from different sources and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from OA donors. ASCs or MSCs were co-cultured with chondrocytes in a minimal medium and using cell culture inserts. Under these conditions, ASCs did not affect the proliferation of chondrocytes but significantly decreased camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Both MSCs and ASCs from different sources allowed chondrocytes in the cocultures maintaining a stable expression of markers specific for a mature phenotype, while expression of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers was decreased. A number of factors known to regulate the chondrocyte phenotype (IL-1β, IL-1RA, TNF-α) and matrix remodeling (TIMP-1 and -2, MMP-1 and -9, TSP-1) were not affected. However, a significant decrease of TGF-β1 secretion by chondrocytes and induction of HGF secretion by ASCs was observed. Addition of a neutralizing anti-HGF antibody reversed the anti-fibrotic effect of ASCs whereas hypertrophic markers were not modulated. In summary, ASCs are an interesting source of stem cells for efficiently reducing hypertrophy and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, at least partly via the secretion of HGF. This supports the interest of using these cells in therapies for osteo-articular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. METHODS: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone mar...

  4. CD117 expression in fibroblasts-like stromal cells indicates unfavorable clinical outcomes in ovarian carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixia; Wu, Dan; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xiaoran; Holm, Ruth; Trope, Claes G; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell factor (SCF) receptor CD117 (c-kit), is widely used for identification of hematopoietic stem cells and cancer stem cells. Moreover, CD117 expression in carcinoma cells indicates a poor prognosis in a variety of cancers. However the potential expression in tumor microenvironment and the biological and clinical impact are currently not reported. The expression of CD117 was immunohistochemically evaluated in a serial of 242 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cases. Thirty-eight out of 242 cases were CD117 positive in fibroblast-like stromal cells and 22 cases were positive in EOC cells. Four cases were both positive in fibroblast-like stromal cells and EOC cells for CD117. CD117 expression in fibroblast-like stromal cells in ovarian carcinoma was closely linked to advanced FIGO stage, poor differentiation grade and histological subtype (povarian carcinoma cells was not associated with these clinicopathological variables. The CD117 positive fibroblast-like stromal cells were all positive for mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) marker CD73 but negative for fibroblast markers fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), indicating that the CD117+/CD73+ fibroblast-like stromal cells are a subtype of mesenchymal stem cells in tumor stroma, although further characterization of these cells are needed. It is concluded herewith that the presence of CD117+/CD73+ fibroblast-like stromal cells in ovarian carcinoma is an unfavorable clinical outcome indication.

  5. Frequent gene dosage alterations in stromal cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhkanen, Hanna; Anttila, Maarit; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Heinonen, Seppo; Juhola, Matti; Helisalmi, Seppo; Kataja, Vesa; Mannermaa, Arto

    2006-09-15

    Stromal cells are an active and integral part of epithelial neoplasms. We have previously observed allelic imbalance on chromosome 3p21 in both stromal and epithelial cells of ovarian tumors. This study was designed to explore gene dosage alterations throughout human chromosomes from stromal and epithelial cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Thirteen stromal and 24 epithelial samples, microdissected from epithelial ovarian carcinomas, were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique. Analysis covered 110 cancer related genes. Frequent genetic alterations were detected both in the stroma and epithelium of ovarian carcinomas. The mean number of altered genes per tumor was 10.8 in stroma and 23.6 in epithelium. In the stroma, the mean number of gains was 6.6 and of losses 4.2 and in the epithelium 13.7 and 9.9. The high number of changes associated with advanced tumor stage (p = 0.035) and death due to ovarian cancer (p = 0.032). The most frequent alteration was the deletion of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC) on chromosome 18q21.3 in 62% of samples. Loss of DCC was related to endometrioid subtype (p = 0.033). Large chromosomal aberrations were detected on the basis of alterations in adjacent genes. Most importantly, 38 genes showed similar genetic alterations (gain-gain or loss-loss) in stromal and epithelial compartments of 11 tumor pairs. Thus, frequent genetic alterations in stromal cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas resembled those of malignant epithelial cells and may indicate a common precursor cell type. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition may generate transformed cancer cells and modify the tumor microenvironment with distinct properties.

  6. Doxorubicin and cisplatin induce apoptosis in ovarian stromal cells obtained from cryopreserved human ovarian tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Raffaella; Macciocca, Maria; Vicenti, Rossella; Paradisi, Roberto; Klinger, Francesca Gioia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Spisni, Enzo; Seracchioli, Renato; Papi, Alessio

    2016-07-01

    To investigate mechanisms by which doxorubicin (DOX) and cisplatin (CIS) cause human ovarian stroma injury. Stromal cells from human cryopreserved ovarian tissue were cultured in the presence of 1 µM DOX and 10 µM CIS. Ovarian damage induced by treatments was evaluated by 'Live/Dead' and sulforhodamine-B assays, the expression of different apoptosis markers. Stromal cell growth was inhibited by DOX and CIS, and this effect was accompanied by apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway activation: Bax, cleaved-caspase 9, cleaved-PARP1 induction and Akt1, Bcl2, phospho-44/42-MAPK/ERK1/2 reduction were observed. DOX and CIS induced apoptosis in human ovarian stromal cells. Knowledge of mechanisms by which the drugs act is important to identify possible ways to counteract side effects of chemotherapy on ovaries.

  7. MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS OF ADIPOSE TISSUE: A MODERN VIEW, THE RELEVANCE AND PROSPECTS OF APPLICATION IN PLASTIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Startseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays autotransplantation of adipose tissue is the most popular subject for research in the field of plastic surgery and regenerative medicine. Transplantation of adipose tissue is widely recognized as a common technique to increase the volume of soft tissues or for filling of soft tissue defects caused by trauma or the aging process. Injections of autologous fat are widely used in plastic surgery and regenerative medicine, as performed transplant sometimes gives unpredictable and too short due to partial necrosis or progressive resorption of fat (from 20 to 60% according to various authors. Many scientists who involved in plastic surgery around the world (USA, Europe, China, Japan has revised its Outlook on the problem of transplantation of own fat tissue in connection with the advances in cellular technologies. Currently, the main object of study in this area are growth factors, which can affect the degree of engraftment of the adipose tissue and make it more predictable. This literature review describes the experimental studies focused on the study of the angiogenic properties of SCAT (stem cells of adipose tissue and SVCF (stromal- vascular cell fraction and their use for the stimulation of neovascularization and improving the survival of fat grafts in plastic surgery and regenerative medicine. The results of studies on the survival of fat autografts in animal and clinical studies with the combination of dif ferent methods that improve the vascularization of adipose tiss ue.

  8. Human adipose tissue from normal and tumoral breast regulates the behavior of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone Creydt, Virginia; Fletcher, Sabrina Johanna; Giudice, Jimena; Bruzzone, Ariana; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra; Gonzalez, Eduardo Gustavo; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Stromal-epithelial interactions mediate both breast development and breast cancer progression. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of conditioned media (CMs) of human adipose tissue explants from normal (hATN) and tumor (hATT) breast on proliferation, adhesion, migration and metalloproteases activity on tumor (MCF-7 and IBH-7) and non-tumor (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cell lines. Human adipose tissues were obtained from patients and the conditioned medium from hATN and hATT collected after 24 h of incubation. MCF-10A, MCF-7 and IBH-7 cells were grown and incubated with CMs and proliferation and adhesion, as well as migration ability and metalloprotease activity, of epithelial cells after exposing cell cultures to hATN- or hATT-CMs were quantified. The statistical significance between different experimental conditions was evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post hoc tests were performed. Tumor and non-tumor breast epithelial cells significantly increased their proliferation activity after 24 h of treatment with hATT-CMs compared to control-CMs. Furthermore, cellular adhesion of these two tumor cell lines was significantly lower with hATT-CMs than with hATN-CMs. Therefore, hATT-CMs seem to induce significantly lower expression or less activity of the components involved in cellular adhesion than hATN-CMs. In addition, hATT-CMs induced pro-MMP-9 and MMP-9 activity and increased the migration of MCF-7 and IBH-7 cells compared to hATN-CMs. We conclude that the microenvironment of the tumor interacts in a dynamic way with the mutated epithelium. This evidence leads to the possibility to modify the tumor behavior/phenotype through the regulation or modification of its microenvironment. We developed a model in which we obtained CMs from adipose tissue explants completely, either from normal or tumor breast. In this way, we studied the contribution of soluble factors independently of the possible effects of direct cell contact.

  9. Chemically Defined and Xeno-Free Cryopreservation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Melany; Bollag, Roni J.; Yu, Jack C.; Isales, Carlos M.; Eroglu, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The stromal compartment of adipose tissue harbors multipotent cells known as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). These cells can differentiate into various lineages including osteogenic, chrondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic; this cellular fraction may be easily obtained in large quantities through a clinically safe liposuction procedure. Therefore, ASCs offer exceptional opportunities for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, current practices involving ASCs typically use fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based cryopreservation solutions that are associated with risks of immunological reactions and of transmitting infectious diseases and prions. To realize clinical applications of ASCs, serum- and xeno-free defined cryopreservation methods are needed. To this end, an animal product-free chemically defined cryopreservation medium was formulated by adding two antioxidants (reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid 2-phosphate), two polymers (PVA and ficoll), two permeating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol and dimethylsulfoxide), a disaccharide (trehalose), and a calcium chelator (EGTA) to HEPES-buffered DMEM/F12. To limit the number of experimental groups, the concentration of trehalose, both polymers, and EGTA was fixed while the presence of the permeating CPAs and antioxidants was varied. ASCs suspended either in different versions of the defined medium or in the conventional undefined cryopreservation medium (10% dimethylsulfoxide+10% DMEM/F12+80% serum) were cooled to -70°C at 1°C/min before being plunged into liquid nitrogen. Samples were thawed either in air or in a water bath at 37°C. The presence of antioxidants along with 3.5% concentration of each penetrating cryoprotectant improved the freezing outcome to the level of the undefined cryopreservation medium, but the plating efficiency was still lower than that of unfrozen controls. Subsequently, increasing the concentration of both permeating cryoprotectants to 5% further improved the plating

  10. Isolation, Characterization, and Transduction of Endometrial Decidual Tissue Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Menstrual Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Rossignoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs reveal progenitor cells-like features including proliferation and differentiation capacities. One of the most historically recognized sources of MSC has been the bone marrow, while other sources recently include adipose tissue, teeth, bone, muscle, placenta, liver, pancreas, umbilical cord, and cord blood. Frequently, progenitor isolation requires traumatic procedures that are poorly feasible and associated with patient discomfort. In the attempt to identify a more approachable MSC source, we focused on endometrial decidual tissue (EDT found within menstrual blood. Based also on recent literature findings, we hypothesized that EDT may contain heterogeneous populations including some having MSC-like features. Thus, we here sought to isolate EDT-MSC processing menstrual samples from multiple donors. Cytofluorimetric analyses revealed that resulting adherent cells were expressing mesenchymal surface markers, including CD56, CD73, CD90, CD105 and CD146, and pluripotency markers such as SSEA-4. Moreover, EDT-MSC showed a robust clonogenic potential and could be largely expanded in vitro as fibroblastoid elements. In addition, differentiation assays drove these cells towards osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. Finally, for the first time, we were able to gene modify these progenitors by a retroviral vector carrying the green fluorescent protein. From these data, we suggest that EDT-MSC could represent a new promising tool having potential within cell and gene therapy applications.

  11. Chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from equine bone marrow and umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Lise Charlotte; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Orthopaedic injury is the most common cause of lost training days or premature retirement in the equine athlete. Cell-based therapies are a potential new treatment option in musculo-skeletal diseases. Mesenthymal stromal cells (MSC) have been derived from multiple sources in the horse...

  12. Laminin production by human endometrial stromal cells relates to the cyclic and pathologic state of the endometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, M; Wewer, U M; Berthelsen, J G

    1986-01-01

    The cyclic changes in the presence of the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin in endometrial stromal cells was studied by immunohistochemistry. The interstitial matrix around the stromal cells of the proliferative phase of the normal menstrual cycle was unreactive with antibodies to laminin. H...

  13. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: What Is the Mechanism in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Dunavin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After more than a decade of preclinical and clinical development, therapeutic infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells is now a leading investigational strategy for the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. While their clinical use continues to expand, it is still unknown which of their immunomodulatory properties contributes most to their therapeutic activity. Herein we describe the proposed mechanisms, focusing on the inhibitory activity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs at immunologic checkpoints. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of action will allow us to design more effective treatment strategies.

  14. Corneal stromal cell responses to traumatic wounds and topical treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikovska, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background. The cornea has unique anatomic, cellular, molecular, and functional features that lead to important mechanistic differences in the process of repair in comparison with what occurs in skin and other organs. The first observable stromal response in corneal wound healing is keratocyte apoptosis. Shortly thereafter, remaining keratocytes in adjacent areas obtain a fibroblastic phenotype and begin to proliferate and to migrate, transforming into myofibroblasts, a phenotype associated w...

  15. Efficient Isolation of Cardiac Stem Cells from Brown Adipose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac stem cells represent a logical cell type to exploit in cardiac regeneration. The efficient harvest of cardiac stem cells from a suitable source would turn promising in cardiac stem cell therapy. Brown adipose was recently found to be a new source of cardiac stem cells, instrumental to myocardial regeneration. Unfortunately, an efficient method for the cell isolation is unavailable so far. In our study we have developed a new method for the efficient isolation of cardiac stem cells from brown adipose by combining different enzymes. Results showed that the total cell yield dramatically increased (more than 10 times, P<.01 compared with that by previous method. The content of CD133-positive cells (reported to differentiate into cardiomyocytes with a high frequency was much higher than that in the previous report (22.43% versus 3.5%. Moreover, the isolated cells could be the efficiently differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes in optimized conditions. Thus, the new method we established would be of great use in further exploring cardiac stem cell therapy.

  16. Effects of conditioned medium from LL-37 treated adipose stem cells on human fibroblast migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun-Jung; Bang, Sa-Ik

    2017-07-01

    Adipose stem cell-conditioned medium may promote human dermal fibroblast (HDF) proliferation and migration by activating paracrine peptides during the re-epithelization phase of wound healing. Human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is upregulated in the skin epithelium as part of the normal response to injury. The effects of conditioned medium (CM) from LL-37 treated adipose stem cells (ASCs) on cutaneous wound healing, including the mediation of fibroblast migration, remain to be elucidated, therefore the aim of the present study was to determine how ASCs would react to an LL-37-rich microenvironment and if CM from LL-37 treated ASCs may influence the migration of HDFs. The present study conducted migration assays with HDFs treated with CM from LL-37 treated ASCs. Expression of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), which controls the recruitment of HDFs, was analyzed at the mRNA and protein levels. To further characterize the stimulatory effects of LL-37 on ASCs, the expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a CXC chemokine, was investigated. CM from LL-37-treated ASCs induced migration of HDFs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with a maximum difference in migration observed 24 h following stimulation with LL-37 at a concentration of 10 µg/ml. The HDF migration and the expression of CXCR4 in fibroblasts was markedly increased upon treatment with CM from LL-37-treated ASCs compared with CM from untreated ASCs. SDF-1α expression was markedly increased in CM from LL-37 treated ASCs. It was additionally observed that SDF-1α blockade significantly reduced HDF migration. These findings suggest the feasibility of CM from LL-37-treated ASCs as a potential therapeutic for human dermal fibroblast migration.

  17. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Saponaro, Vittorio [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Martino, Carmela [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Logrieco, Gaetano [Department of Surgery, Hospital ' F. Miulli' 70021 AcquaViva delle Fonti, Bari (Italy); Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Madeddu, Paolo [Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine, Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol BS2 8WH (United Kingdom); Rossi, Giacomo [Department of Pathology, University of Camerino, 63100 Ascoli Piceno (Italy); Ribatti, Domenico [Department of Human Anatomy, University of Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy); Crovace, Antonio [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino [Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute ' Carlo Besta' , 20133 Milan (Italy); Alessandri, Giulio, E-mail: cisiamo2@yahoo.com [Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute ' Carlo Besta' , 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50 x 10{sup 6} of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  18. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa; Saponaro, Vittorio; Martino, Carmela; Logrieco, Gaetano; Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona; Madeddu, Paolo; Rossi, Giacomo; Ribatti, Domenico; Crovace, Antonio; Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Alessandri, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50x10(6) of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  19. Transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reduces liver fibrosis more effectively than Wharton?s jelly?mesenchymal stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rengasamy, Mathiyazhagan; Singh, Gurbind; Fakharuzi, Noor Atiqah; Siddikuzzaman,; Balasubramanian, Sudha; Swamynathan, Priyanka; Thej, Charan; Sasidharan, Gopinath; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Das, Anjan Kumar; Rahman, Ahmad Zuhairi Abd; Fakiruddin, Kamal Shaik; Nian, Lim Moon; Zakaria, Zubaidah; Majumdar, Anish S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from various tissues have shown moderate therapeutic efficacy in reversing liver fibrosis in preclinical models. Here, we compared the relative therapeutic potential of pooled, adult human bone marrow (BM)- and neonatal Wharton?s jelly (WJ)-derived MSCs to treat CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with CCl4 for 8?weeks to induce irreversible liver fibrosis. Ex-vivo expanded, pooled human MSCs obtained from ...

  20. Cross-platform single cell analysis of kidney development shows stromal cells express Gdnf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magella, Bliss; Adam, Mike; Potter, Andrew S; Venkatasubramanian, Meenakshi; Chetal, Kashish; Hay, Stuart B; Salomonis, Nathan; Potter, S Steven

    2018-02-01

    The developing kidney provides a useful model for study of the principles of organogenesis. In this report we use three independent platforms, Drop-Seq, Chromium 10x Genomics and Fluidigm C1, to carry out single cell RNA-Seq (scRNA-Seq) analysis of the E14.5 mouse kidney. Using the software AltAnalyze, in conjunction with the unsupervised approach ICGS, we were unable to identify and confirm the presence of 16 distinct cell populations during this stage of active nephrogenesis. Using a novel integrative supervised computational strategy, we were able to successfully harmonize and compare the cell profiles across all three technological platforms. Analysis of possible cross compartment receptor/ligand interactions identified the nephrogenic zone stroma as a source of GDNF. This was unexpected because the cap mesenchyme nephron progenitors had been thought to be the sole source of GDNF, which is a key driver of branching morphogenesis of the collecting duct system. The expression of Gdnf by stromal cells was validated in several ways, including Gdnf in situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry for SIX2, and marker of nephron progenitors, and MEIS1, a marker of stromal cells. Finally, the single cell gene expression profiles generated in this study confirmed and extended previous work showing the presence of multilineage priming during kidney development. Nephron progenitors showed stochastic expression of genes associated with multiple potential differentiation lineages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular characterisation of stromal populations derived from human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, L.; Twine, N. A.; Abu Dawud, R.

    2015-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal (skeletal) stem cells (BM-hMSC) are being employed in an increasing number of clinical trials for tissue regeneration. A limiting factor for their clinical use is the inability to obtain sufficient cell numbers. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can provide...... an unlimited source of clinical grade cells for therapy. We have generated MSC-like cells from hESC (called here hESC-stromal) that exhibit surface markers and differentiate to osteoblasts and adipocytes, similar to BM-hMSC. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to compare the molecular phenotype...... of hESC-stromal and immortalised BM-hMSC cells (hMSC-TERT). Of the 7379 genes expressed above baseline, only 9.3% of genes were differentially expressed between undifferentiated hESC-stromal and BM-hMSC. Following ex vivo osteoblast induction, 665 and 695 genes exhibited >. 2-fold change (FC) in h...

  2. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ivy Y; Karpus, Olga N; Turner, Jason D; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L; de Hair, Maria J H; Maijer, Karen I; Tak, Paul P; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D; Gerlag, Danielle M; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA), parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA), disease outcome (resolving vs persistent) and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers. We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables. Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  3. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Y Choi

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied.ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA, parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA, disease outcome (resolving vs persistent and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers.We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables.Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  4. Epigenetic programming of adipose-derived stem cells in low birthweight individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Olsson, Anders H; Perfilyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Low birthweight (LBW) is associated with dysfunctions of adipose tissue and metabolic disease in adult life. We hypothesised that altered epigenetic and transcriptional regulation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) could play a role in programming adipose tissue dysfunction...

  5. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h...... and adipocytes on the basis of gene expression and protein production of lineage-specific markers. In vivo, hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cells formed bone and bone marrow organ when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice. Bone was enriched in hMSC-CD146(-) cells (12.6 % versus 8.1 %) and bone......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high...

  6. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Thieme, Sebastian; Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal str...

  7. Immunomagnetic Separation of Fat Depot-Specific Sca1high Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (Ascs)

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Richard H.; Chun, Tae-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) is an important method in the field of adipose tissue biology, adipogenesis, and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. In vivo, ECM-rich environment consisting of fibrillar collagens provides a structural support to adipose tissues during the progression and regression of obesity. Physiological ECM remodeling mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) plays a major role in regulating adipose tissue size and function1, 2. The loss of physio...

  8. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a pre-requisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESC into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human...... stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...... bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106 and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (FACS) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of h...

  9. Cell-type Phylogenetics and the Origin of Endometrial Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koryu Kin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A challenge of genome annotation is the identification of genes performing specific biological functions. Here, we propose a phylogenetic approach that utilizes RNA-seq data to infer the historical relationships among cell types and to trace the pattern of gene-expression changes on the tree. The hypothesis is that gene-expression changes coincidental with the origin of a cell type will be important for the function of the derived cell type. We apply this approach to the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs, which are critical for the initiation and maintenance of pregnancy. Our approach identified well-known regulators of ESCs, PGR and FOXO1, as well as genes not yet implicated in female fertility, including GATA2 and TFAP2C. Knockdown analysis confirmed that they are essential for ESC differentiation. We conclude that phylogenetic analysis of cell transcriptomes is a powerful tool for discovery of genes performing cell-type-specific functions.

  10. Ubiquitin is associated with the survival of ectopic stromal cells in endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bebington Catherine R

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometriosis is a condition that affects women of reproductive age, where the glandular and/or stromal tissues from the eutopic endometrium implant in ectopic locations. It is well established that the survival of ectopic implants is due to lower levels of apoptosis, but no consensus exists as to which pathway/s this is mediated by. The ubiquitin protein shares a similar sequence homology to an anti-apoptotic protein called BAG-1 and is expressed in the normal endometrium. Currently, no studies have been conducted to determine ubiquitin expression and its possible anti-apoptotic effects in endometriosis. Methods Archived endometrial tissues from endometriosis patients and women undergoing laparoscopic diagnosis (controls from January 2000 to July 2003 at Westmead Hospital were examined, where 14 cases of endometriosis and 55 controls were included in the study. Results Both the ubiquitin protein and apoptosis were expressed in both glandular and stromal cells throughout the menstrual cycle of the eutopic endometrium, in which ubiquitin exhibited a cyclic expression, reaching a peak in late proliferative phase. In contrast, ubiquitin was predominantly expressed in cells of stromal origin in endometriosis, was no longer regulated by a cyclic pattern and was associated with an aberrant level of cell survival. Conclusions For the first time, this study shows that ubiquitin is expressed in endometriotic cells and may contribute to a reduced sensitivity of ectopic endometrial tissue to apoptosis. These findings also suggest that stromal cells contribute differentially to the development of ectopic endometrial tissue.

  11. Alterations in the Secretome of Clinically Relevant Preparations of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cocultured with Hyaluronan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Succar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA can be a debilitating degenerative disease and is the most common form of arthritic disease. There is a general consensus that current nonsurgical therapies are insufficient for younger OA sufferers who are not candidates for knee arthroplasties. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs therapy for the treatment of OA can slow disease progression and lead to neocartilage formation. The mechanism of action is secretion driven. Current clinical preparations from adipose tissue for the treatment of OA include autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, SVF plus mature adipocytes, and culture-purified MSCs. Herein we have combined these human adipose-derived preparations with Hyaluronan (Hylan G-F 20: Synvisc in vitro and measured alterations in cytokine profile. SVF plus mature adipocytes showed the greatest decreased in the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ, and VEGF. MCP-1 and MIP-1α decreased substantially in the SVF preparations but not the purified MSCs. The purified MSC preparation was the only one to show increase in MIF. Overall the SVF plus mature adipocytes preparation may be most suited of all the preparations for combination with HA for the treatment of OA, based on the alterations of heavily implicated cytokines in OA disease progression. This will require further validation using in vivo models.

  12. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A., E-mail: scweed@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Program in Cancer Cell Biology, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment.

  13. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. Methods Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146+ and hMSC-CD146− cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high-content analysis...... and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. Results In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts and adipocytes...

  14. Tumor versus stromal cells in culture--survival of the fittest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna M Talasila

    Full Text Available Two of the signature genetic events that occur in human gliomas, EGFR amplification and IDH mutation, are poorly represented in experimental models in vitro. EGFR amplification, for example, occurs in 40 to 50% of GBM, and yet, EGFR amplification is rarely preserved in cell cultures derived from human tumors. To analyze the fate of EGFR amplified and IDH mutated cells in culture, we followed the development over time of cultures derived from human xenografts in nude rats enriched for tumor cells with EGFR amplification and of cultures derived from patient samples with IDH mutations, in serum monolayer and spheroid suspension culture, under serum and serum free conditions. We observed under serum monolayer conditions, that nestin positive or nestin and SMA double positive rat stromal cells outgrew EGFR amplified tumor cells, while serum spheroid cultures preserved tumor cells with EGFR amplification. Serum free suspension culture exhibited a more variable cell composition in that the resultant cell populations were either predominantly nestin/SOX2 co-expressing rat stromal cells or human tumor cells, or a mixture of both. The selection for nestin/SMA positive stromal cells under serum monolayer conditions was also consistently observed in human oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas with IDH mutations. Our results highlight for the first time that serum monolayer conditions can select for stromal cells instead of tumor cells in certain brain tumor subtypes. This result has an important impact on the establishment of new tumor cell cultures from brain tumors and raises the question of the proper conditions for the growth of the tumor cell populations of interest.

  15. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  16. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  17. Dental pulp stem cells: a new cellular resource for corneal stromal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed-Picard, Fatima N; Du, Yiqin; Lathrop, Kira L; Mann, Mary M; Funderburgh, Martha L; Funderburgh, James L

    2015-03-01

    Corneal blindness afflicts millions of individuals worldwide and is currently treated by grafting with cadaveric tissues; however, there are worldwide donor tissue shortages, and many allogeneic grafts are eventually rejected. Autologous stem cells present a prospect for personalized regenerative medicine and an alternative to cadaveric tissue grafts. Dental pulp contains a population of adult stem cells and, similar to corneal stroma, develops embryonically from the cranial neural crest. We report that adult dental pulp cells (DPCs) isolated from third molars have the capability to differentiate into keratocytes, cells of the corneal stoma. After inducing differentiation in vitro, DPCs expressed molecules characteristic of keratocytes, keratocan, and keratan sulfate proteoglycans at both the gene and the protein levels. DPCs cultured on aligned nanofiber substrates generated tissue-engineered, corneal stromal-like constructs, recapitulating the tightly packed, aligned, parallel fibrillar collagen of native stromal tissue. After injection in vivo into mouse corneal stroma, human DPCs produced corneal stromal extracellular matrix containing human type I collagen and keratocan and did not affect corneal transparency or induce immunological rejection. These findings demonstrate a potential for the clinical application of DPCs in cellular or tissue engineering therapies for corneal stromal blindness. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Transplantation of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that human neonatal foreskin stromal cells (hNSSCs) promote angiogenesis in vitro and in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay in vivo. To examine the in vivo relevance of this observation, we examined in the present study the differentiation potential of h...

  19. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles promote human cartilage regeneration in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; van Dooremalen, Sanne F.J.; Liv, Nalan; Klumperman, Judith; Coffer, Paul J.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J.

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a rheumatic disease leading to chronic pain and disability with no effective treatment available. Recently, allogeneic human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) entered clinical trials as a novel therapy for OA. Increasing evidence suggests that therapeutic efficacy of MSC

  20. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwei He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo. Materials and Methods:Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 a were measured. Results:Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 a were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Conclusion:Low frequency (25–50 Hz vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury.

  1. Comparison of cellular functionality of human mesenchymal stromal cells and PBMC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Niemeyer, P; Roesslein, M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and PBMC play significant roles in repair processes following inflammation. Mechanisms of recruitment are still under investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: MIP-1alpha induced the chemotactic migration of MSC but not of PBMC. Correlating with this, 7...

  2. Stimulation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells by hyaluronan, dexamethasone and rhBMP-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng; Chen, Li

    2004-01-01

    In the interest of optimizing osteogenesis in in vitro, the present study sought to determine how porcine bone marrow stromal cell (BMSc) would respond to different concentrations of hyaluronan (HY) and its different combinations with dexamethasone (Dex) and recombinant human bone morphogenic pro...

  3. Elevated circulating stromal-derived factor-1 levels in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landburg, P P; Nur, E; Maria, N; Brandjes, D P M; Biemond, B J; Schnog, J B; Duits, A J

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation and angiogenesis are of importance in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). Recently, the chemokine stromal-d