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Sample records for adipokinetic hormone

  1. Molecular identification of the insect adipokinetic hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staubli, Frank; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    The insect adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) are a large family of peptide hormones that are involved in the mobilization of sugar and lipids from the insect fat body during energy-requiring activities such as flight and locomotion, but that also contribute to hemolymph sugar homeostasis. Here, we have...

  2. Adipokinetic hormone functions that are not associated with insect flight

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2008), s. 171-180 ISSN 0307-6962 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788; GA ČR GA522/05/0151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * anabolic processes * diel changes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2008

  3. Adipokinetic hormone-induced antioxidant response in Spodoptera littoralis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, Josef; Krishnan, N.; Mithöfer, A.; Vogel, H.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 2 (2012), s. 389-395 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * antioxidant response * antioxidant enzymes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.707, year: 2012

  4. Adipokinetic hormones of the two extant apterygotan insect orders, Archaeognatha and Zygentoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Gäde, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, JAN 20 (2014), s. 17-24 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Archaeognatha * Zygentoma * adipokinetic hormone family Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.470, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191013002291#

  5. Cloning and characterization of the adipokinetic hormone receptor from the cockroach Periplaneta americana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina K; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Cockroaches have long been used as insect models to investigate the actions of biologically active neuropeptides. Here, we describe the cloning and functional expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells of an adipokinetic hormone (AKH) G protein-coupled receptor from the cockroach Periplaneta ameri...

  6. Unique translational modification of an invertebrate neuropeptide: a phosphorylated member of the adipokinetic hormone peptide family

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Clark, K. D.; Auerswald, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 3, (2006), s. 705-713 ISSN 0264-6021 Grant - others:National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) 2053806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone (AKH) * arthropod * neuropeptide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.100, year: 2006

  7. The effect of insecticide treatment on adipokinetic hormone titre in insect body

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Socha, Radomír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2005), s. 1077-1082 ISSN 1526-498X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007202; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/03/0016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insecticide * adipokinetic hormone * stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.175, year: 2005

  8. Lipid mobilization and locomotor stimulation in Gryllus bimaculatus by topically applied adipokinetic hormone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lorenz, M. W.; Zemek, Rostislav; Kodrík, Dalibor; Socha, Radomír

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2004), s. 146-151 ISSN 0307-6962 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6007202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Adipokinetic hormone * cricket * Grybi-AKH Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.352, year: 2004

  9. The adipokinetic hormones of Heteroptera: a comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Socha, Radomír; Štys, P.; Gäde, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2010), s. 117-127 ISSN 0307-6962 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Grant - others:National Research Foundation(ZA) FA20070213000002; National Research Foundation(ZA) IFR2008071500048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic peptide * Heteroptera * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.417, year: 2010

  10. Discovery of a novel insect neuropeptide signaling system closely related to the insect adipokinetic hormone and corazonin hormonal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina Kiilerich; Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Schneider, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a central role in the physiology of insects. One large family of insect neuropeptides are the adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), which mobilize lipids and carbohydrates from the insect fat body. Other peptides are the corazonins that are...

  11. The effect of adipokinetic hormone on midgut characteristics in Pyrrhocoris apterus L. (Heteroptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Vinokurov, Konstantin; Tomčala, Aleš; Socha, Radomír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2012), s. 194-204 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215; GA ČR GAP502/10/1734 Grant - others:project MOBITAG(CZ) GA 229518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * AKH * digestion Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2012

  12. Functional characterization of the adipokinetic hormone in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jedlička, Pavel; Steinbauerová, V.; Šimek, Petr; Zahradníčková, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2012), s. 51-58 ISSN 1095-6433 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP522/09/P382 Grant - others:European Union FP7(CZ) MOBITAG, GA 229518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * Acyrthosiphon pisum * neuropeptide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.167, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1095643312000256

  13. Adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) of sphingid Lepidoptera, including the identification of a second M. sexta AKH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weaver, R. J.; Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Audsley, N.; Clark, K. D.; Gäde, G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2012), s. 44-50 ISSN 0196-9781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/10/2401 Grant - others:NRF - Royal Society UK(GB) NRF GUN 63515; National Research Foundation(ZA) FA2007021300002; National Research Foundation(ZA) IFR2008071500048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Insect * Sphingidae * adipokinetic hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.522, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196978112000307

  14. Adipokinetic hormone (Pyrap-AKH) enhances the effect of a pyrethroid insecticide against the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bártů, Iva; Socha, Radomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 4 (2010), s. 425-431 ISSN 1526-498X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insecticide * adipokinetic hormone * stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.313, year: 2010

  15. Stimulatory effects of bioamines norepinephrine and dopamine on locomotion of Pyrrhocoris apterus (L.): Is the adipokinetic hormone involved?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Socha, Radomír; Kodrík, Dalibor; Zemek, Rostislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 3 (2008), s. 305-310 ISSN 1096-4959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * biogenic amine * CNS Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2008

  16. Adipokinetic hormone-induced enhancement of antioxidant capacity of Pyrrhocoris apterus hemolymph in response to oxidative stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, J.; Krishnan, Natraj; Alquicer, Glenda; Kodrík, Dalibor; Socha, Radomír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 146, - (2007), s. 336-342 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * antioxidant activity * oxidative stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.345, year: 2007

  17. Effects of Acute Administration of Adipokinetic Hormone on Depression, Anxiety, Pain, Locomotion and Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Oguz; Ulak, Guner; Akar, Furuzan; Erden, Faruk; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Bektas, Emine; Tanyeri, Pelin; Kaya, Havva

    2017-04-30

    The neurosecretory cells in the corpus cardiacum of insects synthesize a set of hormones that are called adipokinetic, hypertrehalosemic or hyperprolinemic depending on the insect in question. They are the Adipokinetic Hormone/Red Pigment-Concentrating Hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides. The present study investigated the effects of acute administration of Locusta Migratoria (Locmi-AKHII) and Anax Imperator (Anaim-AKH) on depression, anxiety, pain (analgesy), locomotion and memory in mice in forced swimming (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM), hot plate, locomotor activity and passive avoidance tests. Both Locmi-AKH-II (4 mg/kg) and Anaim-AKH (0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg) decreased immobility time (in sec, s) in the FST test. Anaim-AKH (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) increased the percentage of time spent in open arms/total time spent and the percentage of the number of open arm/total arm entries in the EPM test. Anaim-AKH (1 and 2 mg/kg) significantly increased latency (s) (initial time passed) for mice to lick their hind paws or jumping in the hot plate test. Anaim-AKH (4 mg/kg) significantly decreased the total distance (cm) moved, or the speed (cm/s) of movement of the animals in the locomotor activity test. Neither Locmi-AKH-II nor Anaim-AKH altered the retention latency (s) in the passive avoidance test. Both Locmi-AKH-II and Anaim-AKH exerted antidepressant effects, while only Anaim-AKH had anxiolytic and analgesic effects when administered acutely. Anaim-AKH diminished locomotion at higher doses while Locmi-AKH-II had no such effects. Neither Locmi-AKH-II nor Anaim-AKH disturbed learning and memory when acutely administered. Data of our studies suggest clinical potentials of AKH to be used in depression, anxiety and pain without disturbing memory.

  18. Knockdown of adipokinetic hormone synthesis increases susceptibility to oxidative stress in Drosophila – A role for dFoxO?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednářová, Andrea; Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 171, May 01 (2015), s. 8-14 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14047 Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 140/2014/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * Drosophila * hydrogen peroxide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.546, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1532045615000265

  19. Beneficial effect of adipokinetic hormone on neuromuscular paralysis in insect body elicited by braconid wasp venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Haq Abdul; Mishra, Archana; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-06-01

    The effect of Habrobracon hebetor venom and the role of the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) in poisoned adult females of the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus were studied 24 and 48h after treatments. Venom application elicited total neuromuscular paralysis in firebugs, but the co-application of venom and Pyrap-AKH significantly reduced paralysis (up to 3.2 times) compared to the application of venom only. Although the mechanisms of their action are unknown, both agents might affect neuromuscular junctions. Venom application significantly increased the expression of both P. apterus Akh genes (Pyrap-Akh 5.4 times and Peram-Cah-II 3.6 times), as well as the level of AKHs in the central nervous system (2.5 times) and haemolymph (3.0 times). In the haemolymph, increased AKH levels might have led to the mobilization of stored lipids, which increased 1.9 times, while the level of free carbohydrates remained unchanged. Total metabolism, monitored by carbon dioxide production, significantly declined in paralysed P. apterus individuals (1.4 times and 1.9 times, 24 and 48h after the treatment, respectively), probably because of a malfunction of the muscular system. The results suggest an active role of AKH in the defence mechanism against the stress elicited by neuromuscular paralysis, and the possible involvement of this hormone in neuronal/neuromuscular signalling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adipokinetic hormones control amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodláková, Karolina; Jedlička, Pavel; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the biochemical characteristics of α-amylase and hormonal (adipokinetic hormone: AKH) stimulation of α-amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) midgut. We applied two AKHs in vivo and in vitro, then measured resultant amylase activity and gene expression, as well as the expression of AKH receptor (AKHR). The results revealed that optimal amylase activity is characterized by the following: pH: 5.7, temperature: 38.4 °C, K m (Michaelis-Menten constant): 2.54 mg starch/mL, and V max (maximum reaction velocity): 0.185 μmol maltose/mL/min. In vivo application of AKHs resulted in significant increase of amylase activity: by two-fold in the gastric caeca and 4-7 fold in the rest of the midgut. In vitro experiments supported results seen in vivo: a 24-h incubation with the hormones resulted in the increase of amylase activity by 1.4 times in the caeca and 4-9 times in the midgut. Further, gene expression analyses reveal that AKHR is expressed in both the caeca and the rest of the midgut, although expression levels in the former were 23 times higher than levels in the latter. A similar pattern was found for the amylase (AMY) gene. Hormonal treatment did not affect the expression of either gene. This study is the first to provide evidence indicating direct AKH stimulation of digestive enzyme activity in the insect midgut, supported by specific AKHR gene expression in this organ. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Adipokinetic hormone counteracts oxidative stress elicited in insects by hydrogen peroxide: in vivo and in vitro study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednářová, Andrea; Krishnan, N.; Cheng, I. C.; Večeřa, Josef; Lee, H.-J.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2013), s. 54-62 ISSN 0307-6962 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Grant - others:NSF, EPSCOR(US) MSU 012156-014; National Science Council of Taiwan(TW) NSC 95-2313-B-002-084 MY3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * catalase * ELISA Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.434, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/phen.12008/pdf

  2. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The role of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adenosine in the anti-stress response was studied in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults carrying a mutation in the Akh gene (Akh(1)), the adenosine receptor gene (AdoR(1)), or in both of these genes (Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant). Stress was induced by starvation or by the addition of an oxidative stressor paraquat (PQ) to food. Mortality tests revealed that the Akh(1) mutant was the most resistant to starvation, while the AdoR(1) mutant was the most sensitive. Conversely, the Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant was more sensitive to PQ toxicity than either of the single mutants. Administration of PQ significantly increased the Drome-AKH level in w(1118) and AdoR(1) larvae; however, this was not accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Akh gene expression. In contrast, PQ significantly increased the expression of the glutathione S-transferase D1 (GstD1) gene. The presence of both a functional adenosine receptor and AKH seem to be important for the proper control of GstD1 gene expression under oxidative stress, however, the latter appears to play more dominant role. On the other hand, differences in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity among the strains, and between untreated and PQ-treated groups were minimal. In addition, the glutathione level was significantly lower in all untreated AKH- or AdoR-deficient mutant flies as compared with the untreated control w(1118) flies and further declined following treatment with PQ. All oxidative stress characteristics modified by mutations in Akh gene were restored or even improved by 'rescue' mutation in flies which ectopically express Akh. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrate the important roles of AKH and adenosine in the anti-stress response elicited by PQ in a D. melanogaster model, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of adenosine in the anti-oxidative stress response in insects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two novel tyrosine-containing peptides (Tyr(4)) of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the families Coccinellidae and Silphidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-11-01

    Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family of peptides have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of beetles representing two families, the Silphidae and the Coccinellidae. A crude CC extract (0.3 gland equivalents) of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, was active in mobilizing trehalose in a heterologous assay using the cockroach Periplaneta americana, whereas the CC extract (0.5 gland equivalents) of the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, exhibited no hypertrehalosemic activity. Primary sequences of one adipokinetic hormone from each species were elucidated by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data revealed an octapeptide with an unusual tyrosine residue at position 4 for each species: pGlu-Leu-Thr-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for N. vespilloides (code-named Nicve-AKH) and pGlu-Ile-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for H. axyridis (code-named Harax-AKH). Assignment of the correct sequences was confirmed by synthesis of the peptides and co-elution in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection or by LC-MS. Moreover, synthetic peptides were shown to be active in the heterologous cockroach assay system, but Harax-AKH only at a dose of 30 pmol, which explains the negative result with the crude CC extract. It appears that the tyrosine residue at position 4 can be used as a diagnostic feature for certain beetle adipokinetic peptides, because this feature has not been found in another order other than Coleoptera.

  4. Adipokinetic hormone exerts its anti-oxidative effects using a conserved signal-transduction mechanism involving both PKC and cAMP by mobilizing extra- and intracellular Ca2+ stores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednářová, Andrea; Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 3 (2013), s. 142-149 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Grant - others:Mississippi State Univeristy(US) 062/2011/P; NSF, EPSCOR(US) MSU No. 269110-151250 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * calcium channel * cell signaling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.829, year: 2013

  5. The adipokinetic hormone receptor modulates sexual behavior, pheromone perception and pheromone production in a sex-specific and starvation-dependent manner in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eLebreton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Food availability and nutritional status shape the reproductive activity of many animals. In rodents, hormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH, restore energy homeostasis not only through regulating e.g. caloric intake and energy housekeeping, but also through modulating sex drive. We investigated whether the insect homologue of the GnRH receptor, the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR modulates sexual behavior of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster depending on nutritional status. We found that AKHR regulates male, but not female sexual behavior in a starvation-dependent manner. Males lacking AKHR showed a severe decrease in their courtship activity when starved, as well as an increase in mating duration when fed. AKHR expression is particularly strong in the subesophageal zone (SEZ, Ito et al. 2014. We found axonal projections from AKHR-expressing neurons to higher brain centers including specific glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Among the glomeruli that received projections were those dedicated to detecting the male specific pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA. Accordingly, responses to cVA were dependent on the nutritional status of flies. AKHR was also involved in the regulation of the production of cuticular pheromones, 7,11-heptacosadiene and 7-tricosene. This effect was observed only in females and depended on their feeding state. AKHR has therefore a dual role on both pheromone perception and production. For the first time our study shows an effect of AKHR on insect sexual behavior and physiology. Our results support the hypothesis of a conserved role of the GnRH/AKH pathway on a nutritional state-dependent regulation of reproduction in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  6. Predicted versus expressed adipokinetic hormones, and other small peptides from the corpus cardiacum-corpus allatum: A case study with beetles and moths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Audsley, N.; Clark, K. D.; Weaver, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2008), s. 1124-1139 ISSN 0196-9781 Grant - others:National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) 2053806; National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) FA2007021300002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insects * neuropeptides * adipokinetic peptides Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.565, year: 2008

  7. Molecular characterization, tissue distribution, and ultrastructural localization of adipokinetic hormones in the CNS of the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus (Heteroptera, Insecta)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Stašková, Tereza; Jedličková, V.; Weyda, F.; Závodská, Radka; Pflegerová, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 210, Jan 1 (2015), s. 1-11 ISSN 0016-6480 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : AKH * pre-pro-hormone * insect brain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.667, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016648014004158

  8. Oxidative stress elicited by insecticides: A role for the adipokinetic hormnone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velki, M.; Kodrík, Dalibor; Večeřa, Josef; Hackenberger, B. K.; Socha, Radomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 172, č. 1 (2011), s. 77-84 ISSN 0016-6480 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Insect * adipokinetic hormone * oxidative stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.267, year: 2011

  9. Is the titer of adipokinetic peptides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata fed on genetically modified potatoes increased by oxidative stress?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, Natraj; Habuštová, Oxana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5, (2007), s. 974-980 ISSN 0196-9781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/05/0151; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/1591 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * oxidative stress * GMO Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.368, year: 2007

  10. Locust adipokinetic hormone mobilizes diacylglycerols selectively

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomčala, Aleš; Bártů, Iva; Šimek, Petr; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 156, č. 1 (2010), s. 26-32 ISSN 1096-4959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788; GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Grant - others:University of South Bohemia(CZ) 58/2006/P-BF; University of South Bohemia(CZ) 56/2006/P-BF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : AKH * lipid * diacylglycerol Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.989, year: 2010

  11. Adipokinetic hormones provide inference for the phylogeny of Odonata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Fescemyer, H. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2011), s. 174-178 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/2014 Grant - others:University of Cape Town for a Block grant(ZA) IFR 2008071500048; National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) FA 2007021300002; USDA, ARS Specific Cooperative Agreement(US) 58-6402-5-066; US National Science Foundation(US) EF-0412651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : phylogeny of Odonata * Libellulidae * Corduliidae Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.236, year: 2011

  12. Adipokinetic hormone activities in insect body infected by entomopathogenic nematode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ibrahim, Emad; Hejníková, Markéta; Shaik, Haq Abdul; Doležel, David; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, April 01 (2017), s. 347-355 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-03253S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mortality * Akh gene expression * AKH receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191017300082

  13. A novel adipokinetic peptide from the corpus cardiacum of the primitive caeliferan pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata (Caelifera, Tetrigidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-06-01

    The basal caeliferan family Tetrigidae is investigated to identify neuropeptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family. The pygmy grasshopper Tetrix subulata contains in its corpus cardiacum two octapeptides as revealed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The less abundant peptide is the well-known Schgr-AKH-II (pELNFSTGW amide) which is suggested to be the ancestral AKH of Caelifera and Ensifera. The second peptide, Tetsu-AKH (pEFNFTPGW amide), is novel and quite unusual with its third aromatic residue at position 2. It is thought to be autapomorphic for Caelifera. Tetsu-AKH has hyperlipemic activity in T. subulata and in Schistocerca gregaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  15. Hormonal enhancement of insecticide efficacy in Tribolium castaneum: Oxidative stress and metabolic aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plavšin, Ivana; Stašková, Tereza; Šerý, Michal; Smýkal, Vlastimil; Hackenberger, B. K.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 170, APR 07 (2015), s. 19-27 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * insecticide * RNA interference Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.546, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S153204561500006X

  16. Adipokinetic hormones and their G protein-coupled receptors emerged in Lophotrochozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Hauser, Frank; Skadborg, Signe K.

    2016-01-01

    and in Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, we have cloned and deorphanized two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca) that are activated by low nanomolar concentrations of oyster AKH (pQVSFSTNWGSamide). Our discovery of functional AKH receptors in molluscs is especially significant...

  17. Adipokinetic hormones control amylase activity in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana) gut

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodláková, K.; Jedlička, Pavel; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 259-269 ISSN 1672-9609 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : AKH * AKH receptor * amylase * enzyme * gene expression * midgut Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Entomology; Biochemistry and molecular biology (BC-A) Impact factor: 2.026, year: 2016

  18. Beneficial effect of adipokinetic hormone on neuromuscular paralysis in insect body elicited by braconid wasp venom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaik, Haq Abdul; Mishra, Archana; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 196, JUN 01 (2017), s. 11-18 ISSN 1532-0456 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-03253S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : AKH * Akh gene expression * Habrobracon hebetor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1532045617300510

  19. Targated mutagenesis and functional analysis of adipokinetic hormone-encoding gene in Drosophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajwan, Suresh; Sidorov, Roman; Stašková, Tereza; Žaloudíková, Anna; Takasu, Y.; Kodrík, Dalibor; Žurovec, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 61, JUN 01 (2015), s. 79-86 ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S; GA ČR GA14-27816S; GA ČR GAP305/10/2406 EU Projects: European Commission(CZ) FP7/2007-2013 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : neuropeptide * carbohydrate metabolism * drome-Akh Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965174815000181

  20. Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the superfamily Scarabaeoidea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Marco, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 12 (2016), s. 2785-2798 ISSN 0939-4451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18509S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : insects * beetles * Scarabaeidae Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.173, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00726-016-2314-0

  1. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    91-92, AUG 01 (2016), s. 39-47 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : stress * AKH * adenosine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191016301937

  2. Analysis of lipids mobilized by adipokinetic hormones in the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus (Heteroptera: Pyrrhocoridae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártů, Iva; Tomčala, Aleš; Socha, Radomír; Šimek, Petr; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 4 (2010), s. 509-520 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215; GA ČR GAP502/10/1734 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Heteroptera * Pyrrhocoris apterus * AKH Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.945, year: 2010 http://www.eje.cz/scripts/viewabstract.php?abstract=1560

  3. Novel adipokinetic hormones in the kissing bugs Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma infestans, Dipetalogaster maxima and Panstrongylus megistrus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Clark, K. D.; Gäde, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 41, MAR 10 (2013), s. 21-30 ISSN 0196-9781 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11513 Grant - others:National Research Foundation(ZA) IFR 2008071500048; National Research Foundation(ZA) FA 2007021300002 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : insects * kissing bugs * reduviidae Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.614, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196978112004433

  4. Crustacean red pigment-concentrating hormone Panbo-RPCH affects lipid mobilization and walking activity in a flightless bug Pyrrhocoris apterus (Heteroptera) similarly to its own AKH-peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Socha, Radomír; Kodrík, Dalibor; Zemek, Rostislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 4 (2007), s. 685-691 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * Panbo-RPCH * Peram-CAH-II Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.734, year: 2007

  5. Hormonal regulation of response to oxidative stress in insects - an update

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 10 (2015), s. 25788-25816 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07172S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : adipokinetic hormones (AKH) * AKH gene * anti-oxidative mechanisms Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2015 http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/16/10/25788

  6. Genomics, transcriptomics, and peptidomics of Daphnia pulex neuropeptides and protein hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircksen, Heinrich; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    We report 43 novel genes in the water flea Daphnia pulex encoding 73 predicted neuropeptide and protein hormones as partly confirmed by RT-PCR. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identified 40 neuropeptides by mass matches and 30 neuropeptides by fragmentation sequencing. Single genes encode adipokinetic...... hormone, allatostatin-A, allatostatin-B, allatotropin, Ala(7)-CCAP, CCHamide, Arg(7)-corazonin, DENamides, CRF-like (DH52) and calcitonin-like (DH31) diuretic hormones, two ecdysis-triggering hormones, two FIRFamides, one insulin, two alternative splice forms of ion transport peptide (ITP), myosuppressin......, neuroparsin, two neuropeptide-F splice forms, three periviscerokinins (but no pyrokinins), pigment dispersing hormone, proctolin, Met(4)-proctolin, short neuropeptide-F, three RYamides, SIFamide, two sulfakinins, and three tachykinins. There are two genes for a preprohormone containing orcomyotropin...

  7. Water scorpions (Heteroptera, Nepidae) and giant water bugs (Heteroptera, Belostomatidae): Sources of new members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Marco, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 7 (2007), s. 1359-1367 ISSN 0196-9781 Grant - others:Natioanl Research Foundation(ZA) 2053396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Insects * Heteroptera * Water bugs Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.368, year: 2007

  8. The newly discovered insect order mantophasmatodea contains a novel member of the adipokinetic hormone family of peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Marais, E.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 2 (2005), s. 598-603 ISSN 0006-291X Grant - others:National Research Foundation(ZA) 2053806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insects * mantophasmatodea * AKH/RPCH Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.000, year: 2005

  9. Identification of the cockroach neuropeptide Pea-CAH-II as a second adipokinetic hormone in the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Šimek, Petr; Lepša, L.; Socha, Radomír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 23 (2002), s. 585-587 ISSN 0196-9781 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 417; GA ČR GA206/99/0068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : bug * electrospray mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.635, year: 2002

  10. Gustatory perception and fat body energy metabolism are jointly affected by vitellogenin and juvenile hormone in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis mellifera provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg and juvenile hormone (JH. However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1, the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or "foraging gene" Amfor. Our study demonstrates that the Vg-JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH, and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders.

  11. Gustatory perception and fat body energy metabolism are jointly affected by vitellogenin and juvenile hormone in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Brent, Colin S; Fennern, Erin; Amdam, Gro V

    2012-06-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses) usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers) forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg) and juvenile hormone (JH). However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp) and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1), the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR), and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or "foraging gene" Amfor). Our study demonstrates that the Vg-JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders.

  12. The first identified neuropeptide in the insect order Megaloptera: A novel member of the adipokinetic hormone family in the alderfly Sialis lutaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Marco, H. G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2009), s. 477-482 ISSN 0196-9781 Grant - others:National Research Foundation Pretoria(ZA) FA2007021300002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Arthropods * Insects * Megaloptera Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.705, year: 2009

  13. Role of adipokinetic hormone in stimulation of salivary gland activities: the fire bug Pyrrhocoris apterus L. (Heteroptera) as a model species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinokurov, Konstantin; Bednářová, Andrea; Tomčala, Aleš; Stašková, Tereza; Krishnan, N.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, JAN 20 (2014), s. 58-67 ISSN 0022-1910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Grant - others:NSF(US) 269110-151250 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : AKH * salivary glands * digestive enzymes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.470, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022191013002321#

  14. The first decapeptide adipokinetic hormone (AKH) in Heteroptera: A novel AKH from a South African saucer bug, Laccocoris spurcus (Naucoridae, Laccocorinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marco, H. G.; Šimek, Petr; Gäde, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 3 (2011), s. 454-460 ISSN 0196-9781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/2014 Grant - others:National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) FA2007021300002; National Research Foundation, Pretoria(ZA) IFR2008071500048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Insects * Heteroptera * Laccocoris spurcus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.434, year: 2011

  15. Two novel tyrosine-containing peptides (Tyr4) of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the families Coccinellidae and Silphidae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Marco, H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2015), s. 2323-2333 ISSN 0939-4451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18509S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Insects * beetles * Coccinellidae Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.196, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00726-015-2011-4

  16. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  17. Prediction of Scylla olivacea (Crustacea; Brachyura) peptide hormones using publicly accessible transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    The aquaculture of crabs from the genus Scylla is of increasing economic importance for many Southeast Asian countries. Expansion of Scylla farming has led to increased efforts to understand the physiology and behavior of these crabs, and as such, there are growing molecular resources for them. Here, publicly accessible Scylla olivacea transcriptomic data were mined for putative peptide-encoding transcripts; the proteins deduced from the identified sequences were then used to predict the structures of mature peptide hormones. Forty-nine pre/preprohormone-encoding transcripts were identified, allowing for the prediction of 187 distinct mature peptides. The identified peptides included isoforms of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-like peptide, allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, bursicon β, CCHamide, corazonin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/molt-inhibiting hormone, diuretic hormone 31, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide-like peptide, HIGSLYRamide, insulin-like peptide, intocin, leucokinin, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, pyrokinin, red pigment concentrating hormone, RYamide, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide and tachykinin-related peptide, all well-known neuropeptide families. Surprisingly, the tissue used to generate the transcriptome mined here is reported to be testis. Whether or not the testis samples had neural contamination is unknown. However, if the peptides are truly produced by this reproductive organ, it could have far reaching consequences for the study of crustacean endocrinology, particularly in the area of reproductive control. Regardless, this peptidome is the largest thus far predicted for any brachyuran (true crab) species, and will serve as a foundation for future studies of peptidergic control in members of the commercially important genus Scylla. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hormone action. Part I. Peptide hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaumer, L.; O'Malley, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    The major sections of this book on the hormonal action of peptide hormones cover receptor assays, identification of receptor proteins, methods for identification of internalized hormones and hormone receptors, preparation of hormonally responsive cells and cell hybrids, purification of membrane receptors and related techniques, assays of hormonal effects and related functions, and antibodies in hormone action

  19. Hormone Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hormones quantified from marine mammal and sea turtle tissue provide information about the status of each animal sampled, including its sex, reproductive status and...

  20. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  1. Hormone impostors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  2. The neuropeptides and protein hormones of the agricultural pest fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis: What do we learn from the genome sequencing and tissue-specific transcriptomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shun-Hua; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones are very important signaling molecules, and are involved in the regulation and coordination of various physiological processes in invertebrates and vertebrates. Using a bioinformatics approach, we screened the recently sequenced genome and six tissue-specific transcriptome databases (central nervous system, fat body, ovary, testes, male accessory glands, antennae) of the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) that is economically one of the most important pest insects of tropical and subtropical fruit. Thirty-nine candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or protein hormones. These include most of the known insect neuropeptides and protein hormones, with the exception of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-related peptide, allatropin, diuretic hormone 34, diuretic hormone 45, IMFamide, inotocin, and sex peptide. Our results showed the neuropeptides and protein hormones of Diptera insects appear to have a reduced repertoire compared to some other insects. Moreover, there are also differences between B. dorsalis and the super-model of Drosophila melanogaster. Interesting features of the oriental fruit fly are the absence of genes coding for sex peptide and the presence of neuroparsin and two genes coding neuropeptide F. The majority of the identified neuropeptides and protein hormones is present in the central nervous system, with only a limited number of these in the other tissues. Moreover, we predicted their physiological functions via comparing with data of FlyBase and FlyAtlas. Taken together, owing to the large number of identified peptides, this study can be used as a reference about structure, tissue distribution and physiological functions for comparative studies in other model and important pest insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Bioidentical Hormones January 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Howard ... take HT for symptom relief. What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  4. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6663) • Hormone Health Network information about menopause —— www.hormone.org/Menopause —— www.hormone.org/MenopauseMap • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of ... in Spanish at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  5. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  6. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budziszewska, B.; Tolmacheva, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  7. The African froghopper Ptyelus flavescens (suborder: Cicadomorpha) contains two novel and one known peptides of the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family: structure, function and comparison with aphid AKH (suborder: Sternorrhyncha)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gäde, G.; Šimek, Petr; Marco, H. G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2017), s. 1679-1690 ISSN 0939-4451 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-22276S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : ´green´ insecticide * receptor-ligand interaction * insects Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.173, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00726-017-2461-y

  8. Genomic growth hormone, growth hormone receptor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Genomic growth hormone, growth hormone receptor and transforming growth factor β-3 gene polymorphism in breeder hens of Mazandaran native fowls. Babak Enayati and Ghodrat Rahimi-Mianji*. Laboratory for Molecular Genetics and Animal Biotechnology, Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of ...

  9. Growth hormone stimulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003377.htm Growth hormone stimulation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the ...

  10. Menopause and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links ...

  11. Antidiuretic hormone blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003702.htm Antidiuretic hormone blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antidiuretic blood test measures the level of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in ...

  12. Hormone treatment of depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between alterations of various hormonal systems and psychiatric disorders, both in endocrine and psychiatric patients. This has led to clinical and research studies examining the efficacy of the different hormones for treatment of depression. These data will be reviewed with particular regard to the thyroid, gonadal, pineal, and adrenal cortex hormones. The data generally provide limited, but varying evidence for the antidepressant efficacy of these hormones. PMID:21485752

  13. Hormonal Aspects of Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Page B.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The interactions between hormones, epilepsy, and the medications used to treat epilepsy are complex, with tridirectional interactions which affect both men and women in various ways. Abnormalities of baseline endocrine status occur more commonly in people with epilepsy, and are most often described for the sex steroid hormone axis. Common symptoms include sexual dysfunction, decreased fertility, premature menopause, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Antiepileptic drugs and hormones have a bidirectional interaction, with a decrease in the efficacy of hormonal contraceptive agents with some AEDs and a decrease in the concentration and efficacy of other AEDs with hormonal contraceptives. Endogenous hormones can influence seizure severity and frequency, resulting in catamenial patterns of epilepsy. However, this knowledge can be used to develop hormonal strategies to improve seizure control in people with epilepsy. PMID:19853217

  14. Hormone treatment of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Joffe, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between alterations of various hormonal systems and psychiatric disorders, both in endocrine and psychiatric patients. This has led to clinical and research studies examining the efficacy of the different hormones for treatment of depression. These data will be reviewed with particular regard to the thyroid, gonadal, pineal, and adrenal cortex hormones. The data generally provide limited, but varying evidence for the antidepressant efficacy of these ho...

  15. Growth Hormone and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    given to children or Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide containing adolescents as substitution therapy to treat is 191 aminoacids that is secreted by the...thyroid hormones and sexual hormones time on an evident beneficial action of GH together with an appropiate nutrition , therapy has been obtained in...of GH (Tresguerres 1996) reduction in muscular and bone mass together IGFI is a peptide of 70 aminoacids that shows with an increase in body fat

  16. Types of hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both. Sometimes testosterone is also added. Menopause and Hormones Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hormone Replacement Therapy Menopause Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  17. Aging changes in hormone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  18. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Luteinizing hormone - blood. In: Chernecky ... Jeelani R, Bluth MH. Reproductive function and pregnancy. In: ...

  19. Heart, lipids and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter; Winhofer, Yvonne; Krššák, Martin; Krebs, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases. © 2017 The authors.

  20. Heart, lipids and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wolf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases.

  1. Hormonal changes in secondary impotence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, F.M.; El-Shabrawy, N.O.; Nosseir, S.A.; Abo El-Azayem, Naglaa.

    1985-01-01

    Impotence is one of the problems which is still obscure both in its aetiology and treatment. The present study deals with the possible hormonal changes in cases of secondary infertility. The study involved 25 patients diagnosed as secondary impotence. Hormonal assay was performed for the following hormones: 1. Prolaction hormone. 2. Luteinising hormone (L.H.). 3. Testosterone. 4. Follicle stimulating hormone (F.S.H.). The assay was carried out by radioimmunoassay using double antibody technique. Results are discussed

  2. Invertebrate Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Peptides and Their Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Sakai

    2017-09-01

    RHs have biological roles other than the regulation of reproductive functions. Moreover, recent molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that adipokinetic hormone (AKH, corazonin (CRZ, and AKH/CRZ-related peptide (ACP belong to the GnRH superfamily but has led to the different classifications of these peptides and receptors using different datasets including the number of sequences and structural domains. In this review, we provide current knowledge of, and perspectives in, molecular basis and evolutionary aspects of the GnRH, AKH, CRZ, and ACP.

  3. contribution of growth hormone-releasing hormone and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE. AND SOMATOSTATIN TO. DECREASED GROWTH HORMONE. SECRETION IN ELDERLY MEN. Steven G Soule, Peter Macfarlane, Naomi S Levitt,. Robert P Millar. Objective. The pathophysiology of the decline in circulating growth hormone (GH) concentrations that may occur with.

  4. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... THYROID HORMONES? Desiccated ( dried and powdered ) animal thyroid ( Armour ®), now mainly obtained from pigs, was the most ... Information A LISTING OF THE FDA-APPROVED MEDICINES PRODUCT FDA RATING MANUFACTURER Unithroid® AB (Stevens)*+ L-Thyroxin ...

  5. Parathyroid Hormone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood in people with certain types of hypoparathyroidism (condition in which the body does not produce ... are taking this medication.Parathyroid hormone injection controls hypoparathyroidism but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  6. Hormonal effects in newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause an infection under the skin ( abscess ). Hormones from the mother may also cause some fluid to leak from the infant's nipples. This is called witch's milk. It is common and most often goes away ...

  7. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP ... Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Lyme Disease Tests Magnesium Maternal Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury ...

  8. LH (Luteinizing Hormone) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP ... Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Lyme Disease Tests Magnesium Maternal Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury ...

  9. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  10. Hormone therapy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is different from hormone therapy to treat menopause symptoms. Hormones and Breast Cancer The hormones estrogen and progesterone ... other tissues such as fat and skin. After menopause, the ovaries stop producing these hormones. But the body continues to make a small ...

  11. Kinetics of thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Mitsuo; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Naito, Kimikazu; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of thyroid hormones were outlined, and recent progress in metabolism of these hormones was also described. Recently, not only T 4 and T 3 but also rT 3 , 3,3'-T 2 , 3',5'-T 2 , and 3,5-T 2 can be measured by RIA. To clarify metabolic pathways of these hormones, metabolic clearance rate and production rate of these hormones were calculated. As single-compartment analysis was insufficient to clarify disappearance curves of thyroid hormones in blood such as T 3 and T 2 of which metabolic speed was so fast, multi-compartment analysis or non-compartment analysis were also performed. Thyroid hormones seemed to be measured more precisely by constant infusion method. At the first step of T 4 metabolism, T 3 was formed by 5'-monodeiodination of T 4 , and rT 3 was formed by 5-monodeiodination of T 4 . As metabolic pathways of T 3 and rT 3 , conversion of them to 3,3'-T 2 or to 3',5'-T 2 and 3,5-T 2 was supposed. This subject will be an interesting research theme in future. (Tsunoda, M.)

  12. Headache And Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons to suggest a link between headache and hormones. Migraine is three times common in women as compared to men after puberty, cyclic as well as non-cyclic fluctuations in sex hormone levels during the entire reproductive life span of a women are associated with changes in frequency or severity of migraine attack, abnormalities in the hypothalamus and pineal gland have been observed in cluster headache, oestrogens are useful in the treatment of menstrual migraine and the use of melatonin has been reported in various types of primary headaches. Headache associated with various endocrinological disorders may help us in a better understanding of the nociceptive mechanisms involved in headache disorders. Prospective studies using headache diaries to record the attacks of headache and menstrual cycle have clarified some of the myths associated with menstrual migraine. Although no change in the absolute levels of sex hormones have been reported, oestrogen withdrawal is the most likely trigger of the attacks. Prostaglandins, melatonin, opioid and serotonergic mechanisms may also have a role in the pathogenesis of menstrual migraine. Guidelines have been published by the IHS recently regarding the use of oral contraceptives by women with migraine and the risk of ischaemic strokes in migraineurs on hormone replacement therapy. The present review includes menstrual migraine, pregnancy and migraine, oral contraceptives and migraine, menopause and migraine as well as the hormonal changes in chronic migraine.

  13. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  14. [Hormones and hair growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair.

  15. Stress and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Ranabir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern environment one is exposed to various stressful conditions. Stress can lead to changes in the serum level of many hormones including glucocorticoids, catecholamines, growth hormone and prolactin. Some of these changes are necessary for the fight or flight response to protect oneself. Some of these stressful responses can lead to endocrine disorders like Graves′ disease, gonadal dysfunction, psychosexual dwarfism and obesity. Stress can also alter the clinical status of many preexisting endocrine disorders such as precipitation of adrenal crisis and thyroid storm.

  16. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake, i.e. eating and energy expenditure (EE). Severe obesity is more prevalent in women than men worldwide, and obesity pathophysiology and the resultant obesity-related disease risks differ in women and men. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Pre-clinical and clinical research indicate that ovarian hormones may play a major role. We systematically reviewed the clinical and pre-clinical literature on the effects of ovarian hormones on the physiology of adipose tissue (AT) and the regulation of AT mass by energy intake and EE. Articles in English indexed in PubMed through January 2016 were searched using keywords related to: (i) reproductive hormones, (ii) weight regulation and (iii) central nervous system. We sought to identify emerging research foci with clinical translational potential rather than to provide a comprehensive review. We find that estrogens play a leading role in the causes and consequences of female obesity. With respect to adiposity, estrogens synergize with AT genes to increase gluteofemoral subcutaneous AT mass and decrease central AT mass in reproductive-age women, which leads to protective cardiometabolic effects. Loss of estrogens after menopause, independent of aging, increases total AT mass and decreases lean body mass, so that there is little net effect on body weight. Menopause also partially reverses women's protective AT distribution. These effects can be counteracted by estrogen treatment. With respect to eating, increasing estrogen levels progressively decrease eating during the follicular and peri-ovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle. Progestin levels are associated with eating during the luteal phase, but there does not appear to be a causal relationship. Progestins may increase binge eating and eating stimulated by negative emotional states during the luteal phase. Pre-clinical research indicates that one mechanism for the pre-ovulatory decrease in eating is a

  17. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  18. Gastrointestinal hormones and their targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes...... it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization......, or differentiated maturation of the prohormone. By a combination of these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are released from the gut. Gut hormone genes are also widely expressed in cells outside the gut, some only in extraintestinal endocrine cells and neurons but others also in other...

  19. Pflanzliche Hormone als Bioregulatoren

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, J.

    1980-01-01

    The discovery and general nature of phytohormones are described and the chemical nature and physiological modes of action presented of the five groups known at present: cytokinins, abscisins, gibberellins, auxins, and ethylene. These groups of substances interact in hormonal patterns that determine

  20. Radioimmunoassay of steroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tadashi

    1975-01-01

    Low acid pepsin treated gamma-globulin was applied to ammonium sulfate salting out method, which was a method to separate bound fraction from free one in radioimmunoassay of steroid hormone, and the effect of the separation and the standard curve were examined. Pepsin treated gamma-globulin was prepared in pH 1.5 to 5.5 and then the pepsin was completely removed. It had an effect to accelerate the precipitation in radioimmunoassay of steroid hormone labelled with 3 H. The effect of pepsin treated gamma-globulin to adhere free steroid hormone and to slat out bound one was compared with that of human gamma-globulin. Pepsin treated gamma-globulin, which was water soluble, could easier reach its optimal concentration, and the separation effect was better than human gamma-globulin. The standard curve of it was steeper, particularly in a small dose, and the reproducibility was also better. It could be applied not only to aldosterone and DOC, but also to the steroid hormones, such as progesterone and DHEA, and it seemed suitable for routine measurement method. (Kanao, N.)

  1. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption

  2. Hormones and social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buser, T.

    2011-01-01

    We examine whether social preferences are determined by hormones. We do this by investigating whether markers for the strength of prenatal testosterone exposure (finger length ratios) and current exposure to progesterone and oxytocin (the menstrual cycle) are correlated with choices in social

  3. Growth hormone test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children it is called gigantism . Too little growth hormone can cause a slow or flat rate of growth in children . In adults it can cause changes in energy, muscle mass, cholesterol levels, and bone strength. The GH test may also be used ...

  4. Hormonal changes in strength training

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael, Gáll

    2017-01-01

    Title: Hormonal changes in strength training Objectives: Perform a systematic review of literature dealing with hormonal changes in strength training. Based on the informations from aforementioned literature, describe wheather acute hormonal response after a bout of strength training significantly influence the proces of hypertrophy or not. Hormone testosterone and changes of its concentrations is for this thesis the most important. Methods: Method of traditional review was used in this thesi...

  5. Melatonin – apleiotropic hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Brzęczek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, a tryptophan derivative, is synthesised in mammals mainly in the pineal gland. It coordinates the biological clock by regulating the circadian rhythm. Its production is dependent on light and its concentrations change with age. Thanks to its specific chemical structure, melatonin is capable of crossing all biological barriers in the organism and affecting other tissues and cells, both in indirect and direct ways. Its mechanism of action involves binding with membrane receptors, nuclear receptors and intracellular proteins. Melatonin shows antioxidant activity. Moreover, its immunomodulatory and antilipid effects as well as its role in secreting other hormones, such as prolactin, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, somatotropin, thyroliberin, adrenocorticotropin hormone or corticosteroids, are essential. In the recent years, research studies have been mainly focussed on the potential influence of melatonin on the aetiology and development of various disease entities, such as sleep disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, cancers, psychiatric and neurological conditions, cardiovascular diseases or conditions with bone turnover disorders. Indications for melatonin use in paediatrics are being discussed more and more frequently. Among others, authors debate on its use in dyssomnias in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, supportive treatment in febrile seizures and epilepsy as well as potential use in paediatric anaesthesia. The molecular mechanism and broad-spectrum action of melatonin have not been sufficiently researched and its clinical relevance is often underestimated. This hormone is a promising link in achieving alternative therapeutic solutions.

  6. Radioimmunoassay of polypeptide hormones and enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felber, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    General principles of radioimmunoassay are reviewed. Detailed procedures are reviewed for the following hormones: insulin, pituitary hormones, gonadotropins, parathyroid hormone, ACTH, glucagon, gastrin, and peptide hormones. Radioimmunoassay of enzymes is also discussed. (U.S.)

  7. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is huma n gr owth hormone? Human growth hormone (GH) is a substance that controls your body’s growth. ... little GH, they may have health problems. Growth hormone deficiency (too little GH) and some other health problems can be treated ...

  8. Hypermetabolic Conversion of Plant Oil into Water: Endothermic Biochemical Process Stimulated by Juvenile Hormone in the European Firebug, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Sláma

    2016-01-01

    difference between the warm and cold larvae of P. apterus was only some 30% (not a reported 10-fold difference, which was presumably due to their ability to drink. We conclude that a very important, though still largely neglected, epigenetic biochemical role of insect JH depends on switchover between the utilization of dietary lipid (+JH; production of metabolic water and carbohydrate (-JH; lipid storage in the fat body. The hypermetabolic water supply in insects fed on dry food, which is associated with enormous rates of O 2 consumption, liberates endothermic energy that heats the body and potentially influences the insect thermoregulation. A possibility that the JH-dependent lipolytic hormone stimulates the total metabolic breakdown of nutritional lipids may be absolutely different from the currently known adipokinetic peptides that have been emphasized.

  9. Gut hormones and gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens J.

    2016-01-01

    Gut hormone secretion in response to nutrient ingestion appears to depend on membrane proteins expressed by the enteroendocrine cells. These include transporters (glucose and amino acid transporters), and, in this case, hormone secretion depends on metabolic and electrophysiological events elicited...... that determines hormone responses. It follows that operations that change intestinal exposure to and absorption of nutrients, such as gastric bypass operations, also change hormone secretion. This results in exaggerated increases in the secretion of particularly the distal small intestinal hormones, GLP-1, GLP-2......, oxyntomodulin, neurotensin and peptide YY (PYY). However, some proximal hormones also show changes probably reflecting that the distribution of these hormones is not restricted to the bypassed segments of the gut. Thus, cholecystokinin responses are increased, whereas gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses...

  10. Sex Hormones and Tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood....... The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet...... has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens....

  11. Hormonal Control of Lactation

    OpenAIRE

    青野, 敏博; Toshihiro, AONO; 徳島大学; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tokushima, School of Medicine

    1990-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of normal lactation, especially the roles of prolactin (PRL) and oxytocin (OXT) in the initiation of lactation, the lactation in the women complicated with endocrinological disorders, and medical therapies for stimulation and suppression of lactation. The level of serum PRL increases as pregnancy progresses, and reachs to a peak on the day of delivery. Despite high PRL level, milk secretion does not appear during pregnancy, because the sex steroid hormones suppress bi...

  12. Thyroid hormone radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Richmond, M.; Quesada, S.; Lahaman, S.; Ramirez, A.; Herrera, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (AIEA) is carrying out the ARCAL VIII Program 'Thiroid Hormone Readioimmunoassay'. The Immunoassay Laboratory of INCIENSA is in charge of this program, with the participation of four National Hospital System laboratories, which carried out Thyroxine (T4). Triodothyroxine (T3) and Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) assays with NETRIA Reagents (North East Thames Region Immunoassay Unit). The variability was shown to be between 9-20 per cent for T4, 12-22 per cent for TSH and 22-36 per cent for T3. The study also evaluated the quality of a tracer (T3-l125 and T4 l125) produced at INCIENSA. In this case the intrassay variability was 8,4 per cent for T3 and 6,8 per cent for T4 in 32 determinations evaluated during 6 months. It was concluded that the T4 and TSH tests but not the T3 test are valid and reproducible when NETRIA Ragents are used. The tracer made at INCIENSA can be used up to 6 weeks after the radioiodination with l125. A successful thyroid-related hormones quality control was defined in Costa Rica by taking advantage of the support of a prestigious international agency, the IAEA. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs

  13. Hormonal contraception and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Katharine B; Edelman, Alison B

    2016-11-01

    The rising rate of overweight and obesity is a public health crisis in the United States and increasingly around the globe. Rates of contraceptive use are similar among women of all weights, but because contraceptive development studies historically excluded women over 130% of ideal body weight, patients and providers have a gap in understanding of contraceptive efficacy for obese and overweight women. Because of a range of drug metabolism alterations in obesity, there is biologic plausibility for changes in hormonal contraception effectiveness in obese women. However, these pharmacokinetic changes are not linearly related to body mass index or weight, and it is unknown what degree of obesity begins to affect pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics processes. Overall, most studies of higher quality do not demonstrate a difference in oral contraceptive pill effectiveness in obese compared with non-obese women. However, data are scant for women in the highest categories of obesity, and differences by progestin type are incompletely understood. Effectiveness of most non-oral contraceptives does not seem to be compromised in obesity. Exceptions to this include the combined hormonal patch and oral levonorgestrel emergency contraception, which may have lower rates of effectiveness in obese women. The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence on contraceptive use in women with obesity, including differences in steroid hormone metabolism, contraceptive effectiveness, and safety, compared with women of normal weight or body mass index using the same methods. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Dysfunction of thyroid hormone synthesis and thyroid hormone transport

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrugger, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential in processes of growth and development especially in the development of the central nervous system. Malfunction in thyroid hormone synthesis or decrease in the availability of thyroid hormones can lead to diseases as for example congenital hypothyroidism. In this thesis genetic variations (mutations in the thyroid peroxidase gene, mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene) as well as exogenic factors (endocrine disrupters) were examined, leading to d...

  15. A nonpeptidyl growth hormone secretagogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R G; Cheng, K; Schoen, W R; Pong, S S; Hickey, G; Jacks, T; Butler, B; Chan, W W; Chaung, L Y; Judith, F

    1993-06-11

    A nonpeptidyl secretagogue for growth hormone of the structure 3-amino-3-methyl-N-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2-oxo-1-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5 -yl) (1,1'-biphenyl)-4-yl]methyl)-1H-1-benzazepin-3(R)-yl)-butanamid e (L-692,429) has been identified. L-692,429 synergizes with the natural growth hormone secretagogue growth hormone-releasing hormone and acts through an alternative signal transduction pathway. The mechanism of action of L-692,429 and studies with peptidyl and nonpeptidyl antagonists suggest that this molecule is a mimic of the growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2 (GHRP-6). L-692,429 is an example of a nonpeptidyl specific secretagogue for growth hormone.

  16. Missed hormonal contraceptives: new recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Edith; Black, Amanda; Dunn, Sheila; Senikas, Vyta

    2008-11-01

    To provide evidence-based guidance for women and their health care providers on the management of missed or delayed hormonal contraceptive doses in order to prevent unintended pregnancy. Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane Database were searched for articles published in English, from 1974 to 2007, about hormonal contraceptive methods that are available in Canada and that may be missed or delayed. Relevant publications and position papers from appropriate reproductive health and family planning organizations were also reviewed. The quality of evidence is rated using the criteria developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. This committee opinion will help health care providers offer clear information to women who have not been adherent in using hormonal contraception with the purpose of preventing unintended pregnancy. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Instructions for what women should do when they miss hormonal contraception have been complex and women do not understand them correctly. (I) 2. The highest risk of ovulation occurs when the hormone-free interval is prolonged for more than seven days, either by delaying the start of combined hormonal contraceptives or by missing active hormone doses during the first or third weeks of combined oral contraceptives. (II) Ovulation rarely occurs after seven consecutive days of combined oral contraceptive use. (II) RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. Health care providers should give clear, simple instructions, both written and oral, on missed hormonal contraceptive pills as part of contraceptive counselling. (III-A) 2. Health care providers should provide women with telephone/electronic resources for reference in the event of missed or delayed hormonal contraceptives. (III-A) 3. In order to avoid an increased risk of unintended pregnancy, the hormone-free interval should not exceed seven days in combined hormonal contraceptive users. (II-A) 4. Back-up contraception should

  17. Reproductive hormones as psychotropic agents?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    need to understand the role of reproductive hormones in psy- chiatric disorders. There is much research on the interaction between mood and endocrine factors that is impacting on the practice of women's health. Hormone fluctuations are linked to behavioural changes as well as the onset and recurrence of mood disorders.

  18. Hormones and β-Agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van L.A.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Blokland, M.H.; Sterk, S.S.; Smits, N.G.E.; Pleadin, Jelka; Vulić, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides some updated information on contemporary methods for hormone and β-agonist analyses. It deals with the classical approaches for the effective detection and identification of exogenous hormones. The chapter examines specific problems related to control strategies for natural

  19. Hormonal contraception, thrombosis and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper reviews the risk of thrombosis with use of different types of hormonal contraception in women of different ages. AREAS COVERED: Combined hormonal contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, drospirenone or cyproterone acetate (high-risk products) confer a sixfold increased...

  20. Sex hormones and cardiometabolic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we set out to investigate the complex relationship between endogenous sex hormones and cardiometabolic risk in men and women. The first part of this thesis is devoted to studies in women, and the second part describes the association between sex hormones and cardiometabolic risk in

  1. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your body Increase exercise capacity Build stronger bones: Growth hormone spurs bone formation and bone resorption (the breakdown of old ... should have a DXA bone scan to measure bone density before treatment with growth hormone. If it is abnormal, a DXA should be ...

  2. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  3. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy and your heart Are you taking — or considering — hormone therapy to treat bothersome menopausal symptoms? Understand ... you. By Mayo Clinic Staff Long-term hormone replacement therapy used to be routinely prescribed for postmenopausal ...

  4. [Hormonal treatment of transsexual persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkanen, Helena; Das, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The primary investigations and starting the hormonal treatment of transsexual persons takes place in Helsinki and Tampere University hospitals as part of the real life period. The hormones used are estrogen and anti-androgen for MtoF and testosterone for FtoM persons. The medication suppresses the endogenous sex-hormone production and brings about the desired features of the other sex. While the recommended doses result in physiological hormone levels, higher doses do not hasten or increase the desired changes and are a health risk. After the transition period, the follow up is referred to the person's home district. The physical and psychological status and laboratory values are evaluated at the yearly follow-up doctor visits. Although the hormone doses are lowered and percutaneous administration route is favored upon aging, stopping the medication is not recommended.

  5. Hormonal changes during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Palacios, Santiago

    2009-06-20

    Ovarian senescence occurs gradually during the fourth and fifth decades of life, leading to menopause at an average age of about 51 years. This senescence results in a changing hormonal milieu, with decreases in the levels of estrogens and androgens. Similar changes may be induced by surgical menopause (bilateral oophorectomy) or ovarian failure resulting from cancer treatment. The declining levels of estrogens and androgens affect many tissues of the body and can produce a variety of signs and symptoms, including vasomotor symptoms, decreased bone density, changes in mood and energy, loss of pubic hair and changes in the genital tissues, and effects on sexual function. Accurate measurement of testosterone levels in postmenopausal women requires methods that are validated in the lower ranges of testosterone level observed in this population.

  6. Radioimmunoassay of steroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampl, R.; Starka, L.

    1976-01-01

    A list is given of steroids currently determined using the RIA method based on the reversible interaction of labelled and non-labelled steroids within the binding points of specific antibodies. Steroids do not have the properties of antigens, and antibodies are therefore obtained from conjugates of steroid derivatives with macromolecules where the steroid has the function of hapten. The most important synthetic methods of preparing the given derivatives are listed, and questions of the relation of the specificity of the antiserum and the structure of the respective derivative are discussed, the basic data characterizing the antiserum (titre, affinity and specificity) are described and methods are given used for measuring these variables. The technical aspects of RIA and the differences between the RIA determination of steroids and of other substances are given. The Amersham Radiochemical Centre antigens, kits and steroid hormones are recommended for use. (L.O.)

  7. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones un......, but also constitute regulatory systems operating in the whole organism. This overview of gut hormone biology is supplemented with an annotation on some Scandinavian contributions to gastrointestinal hormone research....

  8. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...... = 4615) and women (n = 4724) with measurements of endogenous sex hormones during the 1981-1983 examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark, were followed for up to 29 years for incident IS, with no loss to follow-up. Mediation analyses assessed whether risk of IS was mediated through...

  9. Regulation of ecdysis-triggering hormone release by eclosion hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingan, T G; Gray, W; Zitnan, D; Adams, M E

    1997-12-01

    Ecdysis behavior in the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) is triggered through reciprocal peptide signaling between the central nervous system and the epitracheal endocrine system. Recent evidence indicates that eclosion hormone may initiate endocrine events leading to ecdysis through its action on epitracheal glands to cause the release of ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH). Here, we report that direct exposure of epitracheal glands to eclosion hormone in vitro leads to secretion of ETH. The threshold concentration of eclosion hormone needed to evoke release of ETH is approximately 3 pmol l-1. Eclosion hormone also induces elevation of cyclic GMP, but not cAMP, concentration in epitracheal glands at concentrations similar to those causing release of ETH. Both cGMP and 8-Br-cGMP mimic the secretory action of eclosion hormone. The sensitivity of the secretory response to eclosion hormone occurs during a narrow window of development, beginning approximately 8 h prior to pupal ecdysis. However, eclosion hormone can cause elevation of cGMP levels in epitracheal glands long before they acquire competence to release ETH, showing that the initial portion of the signal transduction cascade is in place early in development, but that the absence of a downstream step in the cascade prevents secretion. Measurements of cGMP levels in epitracheal glands during the ecdysis sequence show a sudden elevation some 30 min after the onset of pre-ecdysis, well after ETH secretion has been initiated. ETH secretion can therefore be viewed as a two-step process, beginning at pre-ecdysis when cGMP levels are relatively low, followed by a massive release resulting from a logarithmic elevation of cGMP levels.

  10. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  11. Hormone Replacement Therapy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Integrative Health) Related Issues Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause (Hormone Health Network) - PDF Also in Spanish Hormone Replacement ... Hormone Therapy Health Risks and Benefits (North American Menopause Society) - PDF ... Specifics Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions ( ...

  12. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal and postmenopau...... therapy each year. CONCLUSION: Regardless of the duration of use, the formulation, estrogen dose, regimen, progestin type, and route of administration, hormone therapy was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.......CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal...... and postmenopausal women receiving different hormone therapies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationwide prospective cohort study including all Danish women aged 50 through 79 years from 1995 through 2005 through individual linkage to Danish national registers. Redeemed prescription data from the National Register...

  13. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Testosterone is the primary male ... processes in the body. The list of potential effects of testosterone loss is long: hot flashes, decreased ...

  14. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parathormone (PTH) intact molecule; Intact PTH; Hyperparathyroidism - PTH blood test; Hypoparathyroidism - PTH blood test ... 28. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) - Blood. ... Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: ...

  15. [Hormonal treatment in West syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, E D; Shulyakova, I V; Ohapkina, T G

    2016-01-01

    West syndrome is one of the most well-known epileptic encephalopathies, a catastrophic epilepsy syndrome with onset in the first year of life. Prognosis of this condition depends on the etiology and adequate treatment. The authors review the hormonal treatment of West syndrome. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) is used in USA and its synthetic analogue tetracosactide is used in Europe. Both of the drugs are not registered in the Russian Federation. The data on the efficacy of corticosteroids, including prednisolone, are contradictory. Recent results have demonstrated the high efficacy of prednisolone in the treatment of West syndrome. The authors discuss different aspects of hormonal treatment of West syndrome: possible mechanisms, choice of medication, hormone doses, its duration, efficacy ant tolerability.

  16. Measurement of the incretin hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob; Hartmann, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    The two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to meals and contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis by increasing insulin secretion. Assessment of plasma concentrat......The two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to meals and contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis by increasing insulin secretion. Assessment of plasma...... concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP is often an important endpoint in both clinical and preclinical studies and, therefore, accurate measurement of these hormones is important. Here, we provide an overview of current approaches for the measurement of the incretin hormones, with particular focus on immunological...

  17. Growth hormone stimulation test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stimulation test is usually performed to identify if hGH (human growth hormone) is deficient. The test is ... amino acid arginine in a vein to raise hGH levels. The test measures the ability of the ...

  18. Anti-Müllerian Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP ... Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Lyme Disease Tests Magnesium Maternal Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury ...

  19. Growth hormone in male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Magon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH is expressed in a variety of tissues, including the testes, and has autocrine and paracrine functions as well. This, along with other factors, exerts autocrine and paracrine control over spermatogenesis. GH, used as an adjuvant therapy, induces spermatogenesis in non-responder patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, who are not responding to gonadotropin or pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH therapy. GH has an important physiological role to play in spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  20. Thyroid hormone receptors in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, A.; Kwakkel, J.; Fliers, E.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play a key role in energy homeostasis throughout life. Thyroid hormone production and secretion by the thyroid gland is regulated via the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT)-axis. Thyroid hormone has to be transported into the cell, where it can bind to the thyroid hormone

  1. Ghrelin: much more than a hunger hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is a multifaceted gut hormone that activates its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin's hallmark functions are its stimulatory effects on growth hormone release, food intake and fat deposition. Ghrelin is famously known as the 'hunger hormone'. However, ample recen...

  2. Hormone therapy and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk.......Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk....

  3. Growth Hormone and Endocrinopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. W.; Choe, K. O.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, H.; Son, H. Y.; Huh, K. B.; Ryu, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    This is an analysis of 39 patients studied at the Yonsei Medical Center from January, 1976 to March 1979. Of these 35 patient were suspected of having hypothalamic insufficiency and subjected to the L-Dopa stimulation test to observe growth hormone secretary function while four acromegaly patient received the glucose loading test and L-Dopa stimulation test. The results are as follows: 1) The basal level of GH in the various disease was as follows: a) The basal level was lower than the control level but was not statistically significant b) In diabetes the mean value tended to higher than the control level but was not significant statistically c) In all four acromegaly patients the GH level was significantly higher than the control level 2) Of 13 patients with diabetes, nine had diabetic retinopathy, and of those nine, six showed increased L-Dopa response. However, of the four non retinopathic DM patients, only one showed increased response to L-Dopa. 3) Two patients out of ten with Sheehan's syndrome responded to L-Dopa stimulation. 4) One Patient of eight with pituitary chromophobe adenoma responded to L-Dopa stimulation. 5) Four acromegaly patients revealed 3 acidophilic adenoma and one chromophobe adenoma histologically. Of patients receiving the L-Dopa stimulation test. Two showed a paradoxical response. Two patients who received the glucose loading test showed suppressed response. 6) Of two craniopharyngioma patients, one showed increased GH response after L-Dopa stimulation. Increased response of GH after L-Dopa stimulation was seen in one two craniopharyngioma patients and also in one of two patients with short structure.

  4. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointi...

  5. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  6. Hormonal Approaches to Male contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Condoms and vasectomy are male controlled family planning methods but suffer from limitations in compliance (condoms) and limited reversibility (vasectomy); thus many couples desire other options. Hormonal male contraceptive methods have undergone extensive clinical trials in healthy men and shown to be efficacious, reversible and appear to be safe. Recent Findings The success rate of male hormonal contraception using injectable testosterone alone is high and comparable to methods for women. Addition of progestins to androgens improved the rate of suppression of spermatogenesis. Supported by government or non-government organizations, current studies aim to find the best combination of testosterone and progestins for effective spermatogenesis suppression and to explore other delivery methods for these hormones. Translation of these advances to widespread use in the developed world will need the manufacturing and marketing skills of the pharmaceutical industry. Availability of male contraceptives to the developing world may require commitments of governmental and non-governmental agencies. In a time when imbalance of basic resources and population needs are obvious, this may prove to be a very wise investment. Summary Male hormonal contraception is efficacious, reversible and safe for the target population of younger men in stable relationships. Suppression of spermatogenesis is achieved with a combination of an androgen and a progestin. Partnership with industry will accelerate the marketing of a male hormonal contraceptive. Research is ongoing on selective androgen and progesterone receptor modulators that suppress spermatogenesis, minimize potential adverse events while retaining the androgenic actions. PMID:20808223

  7. Hormonal approaches to male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2010-11-01

    Condoms and vasectomy are male-controlled family planning methods but suffer from limitations in compliance (condoms) and limited reversibility (vasectomy); thus many couples desire other options. Hormonal male contraceptive methods have undergone extensive clinical trials in healthy men and shown to be efficacious, reversible and appear to be well tolerated. The success rate of male hormonal contraception using injectable testosterone alone is high and comparable to methods for women. Addition of progestins to androgens improved the rate of suppression of spermatogenesis. Supported by government or nongovernment organizations, current studies aim to find the best combination of testosterone and progestins for effective spermatogenesis suppression and to explore other delivery methods for these hormones. Translation of these advances to widespread use in the developed world will need the manufacturing and marketing skills of the pharmaceutical industry. Availability of male contraceptives to the developing world may require commitments of governmental and nongovernmental agencies. In a time when imbalance of basic resources and population needs are obvious, this may prove to be a very wise investment. Male hormonal contraception is efficacious, reversible and well tolerated for the target population of younger men in stable relationships. Suppression of spermatogenesis is achieved with a combination of an androgen and a progestin. Partnership with industry will accelerate the marketing of a male hormonal contraceptive. Research is ongoing on selective androgen and progesterone receptor modulators that suppress spermatogenesis, minimize potential adverse events while retaining the androgenic and gonadotropin suppressive actions.

  8. Nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricketts, M.H.; Groenewald, J. de W.; Wilson, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The thyroid hormones, T 3 and T 4 , modulate a vast number of metabolic processes in mammalian tissues. High affinity, low capacity binding sites for T 3 and T 4 have been demonstrated in cell nuclei of target organs using both in vivo and in vitro labelling techniques. The displacement of [ 125 I]T 3 from nuclear binding sites by thyroid hormone analogues correlates well with the thyromimetic activities of the analogues tested. Dose-response relationships between T 3 occupancy and growth hormone secretion as a function of free T 3 concentration have been established with the GH 1 cell line. The equilibrium dissociation constant of the equation which describes how T 3 binds to the nuclei of intact cells is essentially the same as the free T 3 concentration that elicits the half-maximal biological response of the hormone. It is becoming apparent that these nuclear binding sites represent specific thyroid hormone receptors, whose function may be to regulate gene activity in target tissues. This report concerns the binding of the rat liver nuclear receptor to duplex and random coil DNA as well as to non-mammalian and synthetic DNAs. We postulate that the receptor binds in vivo to native DNA in the minor groove of the DNA helix

  9. Radioimmunological and clinical studies with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LRH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlen, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay for Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone (LRH) has been established, tested and applied. Optimal conditions for the performance with regards to incubation time, incubation temperature, concentration of antiserum and radiolabelled LRH have been established. The specificity of the LRH immunoassay was investigated. Problems with direct measurement of LRH in plasmas of radioimmunoassay are encountered. The LRH distribution in various tissues of the rat are investigated. By means of a system for continuous monitoring of LH and FSH in women the lowest effective dose of LRH causing a significant release of LH and FSH could be established. (Auth.)

  10. Radioimmunoassay of bovine growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, P.; Becka, S.; Krejci, P.; Chrpova, M.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunological method for quantitative determination of bovine growth hormone in blood plasma or serum for routine use was worked out. The antibody is also suitable for radioimmunoassay of bovine growth hormone. The chloramin T and lactoperoxidase methods were used. Standard b-STH isolated by one of the authors was labelled with I-125(Na 125 I, carrier free, Amersham). The I-125-hormone was separated on Sephadex G-50 or G-100 and stored in 0.05M phosphate pH 7.5 with 1% of human serum albumine at 25 deg C. The method was checked on 2500 samples. Rabbit antiserum to b-STH was prepared in sufficient amount to serve also for other laboratories interested in the method. (author)

  11. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress hormones and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Hormone secretion during physical activity of specific duration and intensity is part of the stress response. In a study to investigate the secretion of ß-endorphin, leucine enkephalin and other recognised stress hormones during physical exercise, blood samples were taken from fourteen (14 healthy, male athletes who competed in a 21 km roadrace. Blood samples were collected before and after completion of the race. This study shows that ß-endorphin/ß-lipotropin, leucine enkephalin, prolactin, and melatonin may be classified as stress hormones in physical activity of duration 80 to 120 minutes and intensity exceeding 75%-V0₂max. Widespread intra-individual variation in serum cortisol concentrations prevent definite conclusion. The un­expected increase in serum testosterone levels warrants further research.

  13. Some theoretical aspects of hormone receptor determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluiter, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Suitable antisera for determination of hormone receptors are not available for the majority of hormone receptors. Therefore, the determination of hormone receptors is mostly performed in terms of binding capacity for the appropriate hormone, using radioactive hormone labels. Some theoretical aspects of such a receptor determination are discussed including the length of incubation (total or unoccupied receptor concentration), single point or multiple point (Scatchard) analysis (regarding the influence of other specific binders), the correction procedure for non-specific binding and the influence of the circulating hormone level. (Auth.)

  14. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials.

  15. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials.

  16. Hormonal Changes and Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Eric S; Frederick, Natasha N; Bober, Sharon L

    2017-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common concern for many patients with cancer after treatment. Hormonal changes as a result of cancer-directed therapy can affect both male and female sexual health. This has the potential to significantly impact patients' quality of life, but is underreported and undertreated in the oncology setting. This review discusses commonly reported sexual issues and the role that hormonal changes play in this dysfunction. Although medical and psychosocial intervention strategies exist, there is a clear need for further research to formally develop programming that can assist people whose sexual health has been impacted by cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hormonal interaction in diabetic pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafiez, A.R.A.; Abdel-Hafez, M.A.; Osman, E.A. (Cairo Univ. (Egypt)); Ibrahim, M.S. (Al-Azhar Univ., Cairo (Egypt))

    1984-08-01

    Serum glucose, human placental lactogen (HPL), prolactin (PRL), estradiol (E/sub 2/), progesterone (P), cortisol and human growth hormone (HGH) were determined in nondiabetic (19 cases) and diabetic (19 cases) pregnant women during the 32nd and 36th week of gestation. Significant elevation of HPL, PRL, HGH and cortisol was found in the diabetic pregnant women during the 32nd week while E/sub 2/ and P were not significantly changed from the corresponding levels in the nondiabetic group. One can conclude that the changes in the hormonal pattern during gestation may induce carbohydrate intolerance observed in diabetic pregnancies.

  18. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointing results. In this review we will list the relationship between hormonal anabolic deficiency and frailty and mortality in older population, providing evidence to the notion that multiple hormonal dysregulation rather than change in single anabolic hormone is a powerful marker of poor health status and mortality. (www.actabiomedica.it) PMID:20518188

  19. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointing results. In this review we will list the relationship between hormonal anabolic deficiency and frailty and mortality in older population, providing evidence to the notion that multiple hormonal dysregulation rather than change in single anabolic hormone is a powerful marker of poor health status and mortality.

  20. Quality Management of Steroid Hormone Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle, Jonathan G.

    This chapter describes the principles and practices of quality management of the steroid hormone in clinical laboratory service, and the assessment of the quality of that service by the author's EQA programme (UK NEQAS for Steroid Hormones).

  1. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003710.htm Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test measures the level of FSH in blood. FSH ...

  2. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studied in the WHI trials? Is there an optimal age at which to initiate MHT or an optimal duration of therapy that maximizes benefits and minimizes ... PubMed Abstract] Holmberg L, Anderson H. HABITS (hormonal replacement therapy after breast cancer―is it safe?), a ...

  3. Hormonal crosstalk in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Does, A.

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormones salicylic acid (SA), also known as plant aspirin, and jasmonic acid (JA) play major roles in the regulation of the plant immune system. In general, SA is important for defense against pathogens with a biotrophic lifestyle, whereas JA is essential for defense against insect

  4. Quo vadis plant hormone analysis?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Floková, Kristýna; Tarkowski, P.; Turečková, Veronika; Grúz, Jiří; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 240, č. 1 (2014), s. 55-76 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Plant hormones * Extraction * Mass spectrometr Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2014

  5. Network identification of hormonal regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, D.J.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Roelfsema, F.; Greef, J. van der; Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Smilde, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for

  6. Hormonal contraception: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hormonal contraception has become more effective and more widely used, while the world population has grown from 3000 million in 1960 to 6000 million in 2000. There is a need for improved contraception, because legal abortion is used in a high proportion of pregnancies and illegal abortion continues to be common in some countries. Hormonal contraception now includes different choices of administration and dose regimens. The best selection depends on the benefits and risks of the method and whether there is a medical disability. Medical eligibility for combined oral contraceptives has improved during the past 40 years so that, for most women, all currently available low-dose products are safe. For women with medical conditions, wider eligibility for oral contraceptive use has evolved from better knowledge of the risk factors. The long-term risks of rare cardiovascular and malignant adverse events remain controversial. There are long-term benefits, however, as oral contraceptive use appears to protect against endometrial, ovarian and colorectal cancers. Emergency contraception provides an option that reduces the number of unplanned pregnancies with little or no long-term risk. Endometrial contraception is an option that would ideally have no influence on ovarian function or the bleeding pattern, and cause no significant side-effects. Hormonal male contraception, with indirect suppression of spermatogenesis by decreasing gonadotrophin output, is a further choice. Although hormonal contraception is effective and safe, many research investigations remain to be carried out in order to improve tolerance and achieve wider utilization.

  7. Steroid and sterol hormone action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spelsberg, T.C.; Kumar, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Estrogen control of vitellogenin gene transcription and mRNA stability; Inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor conversion to the DNA-binding state and inhibition of subunit dissociation; Steroid regulation of rRNA synthesis; Messenger RNA-S14 as a model of thyroid hormone action at the hepatocellular level; and The oxysterol receptor.

  8. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy until after age 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have a mother, sister, or daughter who has had breast cancer Did you know? Breast pain alone is not ...

  9. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Szyma?ski, ?ukasz; Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Dose-dependent effects of luteinizing hormone and follicle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dose-dependent effects of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone on in vitro maturation, apoptosis, secretion function and expression of follicle stimulating hormone receptor and luteinizing hormone receptor of sheep oocytes.

  11. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  12. Hubungan Penggunaan Kontrasepsi Hormonal dengan Usia Menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Kudadiri, Liza

    2016-01-01

    Kontrasepsi hormonal merupakan suatu metode untuk mencegah kehamilan dengan cara pemberian hormon steroid. Menopause merupakan suatu fase dalam kehidupan wanita dimana masa kesuburan sudah berakhir yang ditandai dengan berhentinya siklus haid sekurang-kurangnya selama 1 tahun. Penggunaan kontrasepsi hormonal dapat menyebabkan pergeseran usia menopause menjadi lebih tua. Desain penelitian yang digunakan adalah deskriptif korelasi yang bertujuan mengidentifikasi hubungan pengg...

  13. Thyroid hormone signaling in the hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, Anneke; Visser, Theo J.; Fliers, Eric

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Proper thyroid hormone signaling is essential for brain development and adult brain function. Signaling can be disrupted at many levels due to altered thyroid hormone secretion, conversion or thyroid hormone receptor binding. RECENT FINDINGS: Mutated genes involved in thyroid

  14. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... measures the level of a hormone in the blood, called parathyroid hormone-related protein. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed . How ...

  15. Correlations Between Seminal Plasma Hormones and Sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: There is a complex relationship between seminal plasma hormone levels and infertility in men. Previous studies had shown no specific pattern in the serum or seminal plasma hormone profiles of men with infertility and it is debatable whether there is a need to perform routine seminal hormone assays in the ...

  16. Headaches and Hormones: What's the Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headaches and hormones: What's the connection? Being female has some real health advantages, but not when it comes to headaches — particularly ... a relationship between headaches and hormonal changes. The hormones estrogen (ES-truh-jen) and progesterone (pro-JES- ...

  17. Reproductive Hormones and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and breast-feeding periods, as well as in menopausal and post-menopausal periods, the physiological and psychological processes that change according to the hormonal fluctuations influence every women similarly and each one differently. These physiological processes are controlled by neuroendocrine sequences, of which the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis are the most important ones. The hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis affects mood, anxiety, cognition and pain. The interaction of these hormones with mood and behavior is bidirectional. The differences in phenomenology and epidemiology of mood disorders with regards to gender can be explained with the effects of hormones. All of the periods mentioned above are related with mood disorders at terms of risk factors, disease symptoms, progress of disease and response to treatment. Epidemiologic data supports the relationship between the mood disorders and reproductive processes. The prevalence of major depression increases in women with the menarche and ceases in post- menopausal period. Similarly, the initial symptoms of bipolar disorder begins around the menarche period in 50% of the cases. Despite proper treatment, some female patients with major depression experience recurrence during the premenstrual period of their menstrual cycles. The conformity and change in a woman’s brain during pregnancy is controlled dominantly by the neuroendocrine systems, while it is controlled by the external stimuli actively related to the baby during nursing period. The changes that occur are closely related to postpartum mood disorders. Again, all the changes and suspension of medication during this procedure are risk factors for early depressive and dysphoric situations. Variables of a wide range, from follicle stimulating hormone, melatonin, and sleep to body mass index interact with mood disorders in menopausal and post

  18. Would male hormonal contraceptives affect cardiovascular risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zitzmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of hormonal male contraception is to prevent unintended pregnancies by suppressing spermatogenesis. Hormonal male contraception is based on the principle that exogenous administration of androgens and other hormones such as progestins suppress circulating gonadotropin concentrations, decreasing testicular Leydig cell and Sertoli cell activity and spermatogenesis. In order to achieve more complete suppression of circulating gonadotropins and spermatogenesis, a progestin has been added testosterone to the most recent efficacy trials of hormonal male contraceptives. This review focusses on the potential effects of male hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular risk factors, lipids and body composition, mainly in the target group of younger to middle-aged men. Present data suggest that hormonal male contraception can be reasonably regarded as safe in terms of cardiovascular risk. However, as all trials have been relatively short (< 3 years, a final statement regarding the cardiovascular safety of hormonal male contraception, especially in long-term use, cannot be made. Older men with at high risk of cardiovascular event might not be good candidates for hormonal male contraception. The potential adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular risk appear to depend greatly on the choice of the progestin in regimens for hormonal male contraceptives. In the development of prospective hormonal male contraception, data on longer-term cardiovascular safety will be essential.

  19. [Lacrimal secretion in hormonal imbalance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Tălău

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is the alteration of lacrimal secretion on a group of female patients with deregulations of the hormonal balance, by the influence of age factor. We have to mention that our female patients have no ocular pathology. The study was conducted on a group of patients aged between 20-70 years old, which has been kept in observation in the Endocrinology Clinic and Obstetrics-Gynecology Clinics of Emergency Hospital, during March-August 2003. Their lacrimal secretion was monitored by volumetric tests (Schirmer). We studied the alteration of the lacrimal secretion on female patients with deregulations of the hormonal balance, by the influence of age factor. It was recorded the alteration of lacrimal secretion on the female patients with aforementioned dysfunction, the age factor being influential.

  20. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  1. Parathyroid hormone therapy for hypoparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E.; Rubin, Mishaela R.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a disease characterized by hypocalcemia and insufficient parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is a rare disorder that has been given an orphan disease designation in the United States and European Union. Hypoparathyroidism is the only endocrine deficiency disease for which the missing hormone, PTH, is not yet an approved therapy. Conventional therapy includes calcium and active vitamin D supplementation, often in large doses. Although serum calcium can be controlled with conventional therapy, it can be a challenge and, moreover, does not address other aspects of the disease, such as abnormal skeletal features and reduced quality of life. This review focuses on PTH replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism, utilizing the full-length molecule PTH(1–84) as well as the fully active but truncated form PTH(1–34). PTH therapy addresses some aspects of the disease not ameliorated with conventional therapy. PMID:25617172

  2. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia.

  3. Progress of measurement of hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Nakaaki

    1977-01-01

    Description was made as to an outline of the theory of radioreceptor assay (RRA) in which hormone receptor was used as specific binding protein, as same as the theory of RIA, and as to its practical use. Meaning of RRA for measurement of hormones in consideration of the site of immunological and biological activation and meaning of difference in measurement values between this method and in RIA in the same materials, were mentioned, and effectiveness of use of this method together with RIA was described. Detection of receptor site, analysis of binding specificity, and numerical calculation were mentioned as receptor analysis by this method. As practical use of these functions, arrangement mechanism of receptor, and analysis of abnormality were mentioned. Especially, analysis of testicular feminization syndrome, insulinresistenter diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and myasthenia gravis, and relationship between these diseases and autoimmune diseases were described, and clinical meaning of this method in internal medicine and surgery was mentioned. (Kanao, N.)

  4. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  5. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  6. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, pdifference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  7. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, p<.01). There was no significant group difference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  8. Luteinizing hormone in testicular descent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, Jorma; Kaleva, Marko M; Virtanen, Helena E

    2007-01-01

    alone is not sufficient for normal testicular descent. The regulation of androgen production is influenced both by placental human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). There is evidence that the longer pregnancy continues, the more important role pituitary LH may have...... levels with slightly but significantly elevated LH levels as compared to healthy boys. This high gonadotropin drive may compensate for mild Leydig cell dysfunction in cryptorchidism....

  9. Thyroid hormones and cardiac arrhythmias

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tribulová, N.; Knezl, V.; Shainberg, A.; Seki, S.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3-4 (2010), s. 102-112 ISSN 1537-1891 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/0049/09; APVV(SK) 51-059505; APVV(SK) 51-017905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : thyroid hormone * arrhythmias * ion channels * connexin-43 Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2010

  10. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, phormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  11. Hormones, weight change and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K M; Heaney, R P; Recker, R R; Barger-Lux, M J; Lappe, J M

    2001-06-01

    To determine total body weight change occurring in women at mid-life, specifically with respect to occurrence of menopause and use of estrogen. Retrospective analysis of body weight measurements accumulated in two cohorts of healthy women participating in studies of skeletal metabolism. Cohort 1: 191 healthy nuns enrolled in a prospective study of osteoporosis risk, aged 35-45 in 1967; cohort 2: 75 women aged 46 or older and still menstruating, enrolled in 1988 in a study of bone cell dynamics across menopause. Roughly one-third of each group received hormone replacement after menopause. Body weight and height, age, menstrual status and use of estrogen replacement. Cohort 1: 608 measurements at 5 y intervals spanning a period from 17 y before to 22 y after menopause; cohort 2: 1180 measurements at 6-month intervals spanning a period from 5 y prior to 5 y after menopause. In cohort 1 weight rose as a linear function of age (both chronological and menopausal), both before and after cessation of ovarian function, at a rate of approximately 0.43% y(-1). Neither the menopausal transition nor the use of estrogen had an appreciable effect on this rate of gain. In cohort 2 the rate of gain seemed to diminish slightly at menopause. As with cohort 1, hormone replacement (or its absence) had no appreciable effect on weight. The long-term, total body weight trajectory at mid-life is not influenced appreciably by either cessation of ovarian function or by hormone replacement.

  12. Thyroid hormone and seasonal rhythmicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues eDardente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms show seasonality in a wide array of functions such as reproduction, fattening, hibernation and migration. At temperate latitudes, changes in photoperiod maintain the alignment of annual rhythms with predictable changes in the environment. The appropriate physiological response to changing photoperiod in mammals requires retinal detection of light and pineal secretion of melatonin, but extraretinal detection of light occurs in birds. A common mechanism across all vertebrates is that these photoperiod-regulated systems alter hypothalamic thyroid hormone conversion. Here we review the evidence that a circadian clock within the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis links photoperiod decoding to local changes of thyroid hormone signalling within the medio-basal hypothalamus through a conserved thyrotropin/deiodinase axis. We also focus on recent findings which indicate that, beyond the photoperiodic control of its conversion, thyroid hormone might also be involved in longer term timing processes of seasonal programs. Finally, we examine the potential implication of kisspeptin and RFRP3, two RF-amide peptides expressed within the medio-basal hypothalamus, in seasonal rhythmicity.

  13. Hormonal manipulation strategies in the management of menstrual migraine and other hormonally related headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Lynne T; Faubion, Stephanie S; Sood, Richa; Casey, Petra M

    2011-04-01

    Menstrual migraine and other hormonally related headaches are common in women. Falling estrogen levels or estrogen withdrawal after periods of sustained higher levels can trigger migraine. It makes sense to target this trigger for management of hormonally related headaches, particularly when nonhormonal strategies have been unsuccessful. Decision making regarding the use of hormonal contraception and menopausal hormone therapy is complex and commonly driven by other factors, but hormonal manipulation can potentially improve the course of migraine. Providers caring for migraineurs are appropriately concerned about stroke risk. Estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives are relatively contraindicated for women who have migraine with aura. Postmenopausal hormone therapy is acceptable for women with a history of migraine. For these women, transdermal estradiol is recommended. Estrogen replacement is important for women who undergo an early menopause, whether natural or induced. Practical strategies for hormonal manipulation in the management of migraine and other hormonally related headaches are presented.

  14. Plants altering hormonal milieu: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tiwari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review article is to investigate the herbs which can alter the levels of hormones like Follicle stimulating hormone, Prolactin, Growth hormone, Insulin, Thyroxine, Estrogen, Progesterone, Testosterone, and Relaxin etc. Hormones are chemical signal agents produced by different endocrine glands for regulating our biological functions. The glands like pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, ovaries in women and testes in men all secrete a number of hormones with different actions. However, when these hormones are perfectly balanced then people become healthy and fit. But several factors like pathophysiological as well as biochemical changes, disease conditions, changes in the atmosphere, changes in the body, diet changes etc. may result in imbalance of various hormones that produce undesirable symptoms and disorders. As medicinal plants have their importance since ancient time, people have been using it in various ways as a source of medicine for regulation of hormonal imbalance. Moreover, it is observed that certain herbs have a balancing effect on hormones and have great impact on well-being of the people. So, considering these facts we expect that the article provides an overview on medicinal plants with potential of altering hormone level.

  15. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization or differentiated posttranslational maturation of the prohormone. By a combination of these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are released from the gut. Gut hormone genes are also widely expressed outside the gut, some only in extraintestinal endocrine cells and cerebral or peripheral neurons but others also in other cell types. The extraintestinal cells may release different bioactive fragments of the same prohormone due to cell-specific processing pathways. Moreover, endocrine cells, neurons, cancer cells and, for instance, spermatozoa secrete gut peptides in different ways, so the same peptide may act as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor or a fertility factor. The targets of gastrointestinal hormones are specific G-protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in the cell membranes also outside the digestive tract. Thus, gut hormones not only regulate digestive functions, but also constitute regulatory systems operating in the whole organism. This overview of gut hormone biology is supplemented with an annotation on some Scandinavian contributions to gastrointestinal hormone research.

  17. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes.......We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  18. Thyroid hormone metabolism in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darras V.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH receptors preferentially bind 3.5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3. Therefore the metabolism of thyroxine (T4 secreted by the thyroid gland in peripheral tissues, resulting in the production and degradation of receptor-active T3, plays a major role in thyroid function. The most important metabolic pathway for THs is deiodination. Another important pathway is sulfation, which is a reversible pathway that has been shown to interact with TH deiodination efficiency. The enzymes catalysing TH deiodination consist of three types. Type 1 deiodinase (D1 catalyses both outer ring (ORD and inner ring deiodinalion (IRD. Type II deiodinase (D2 only catalyses ORD while type III (D3 only catalyses IRD. The three chicken deiodinase cDNAs have been cloned recently. These enzymes all belong to the family of selenoproteins. Ontogenetic studies show that the availability of deiodinases is regulated in a tissue specific and developmental stage dependent way. Characteristic for the chicken is the presence of very high levels off, inactivating D3 enzyme in the embryonic liver. Hepatic D3 is subject to acute regulation in a number of situations. Both growth hormone and glucocorticoid injection rapidly decrease hepatic D3 levels, hereby increasing plasma T3 without affecting hepatic D1 levels. The inhibition of D3 seems to be regulated mainly at the level of D3 gene transcription. The effect of growth hormone on D3 expression persists throughout life, while glucocorticoids start to inhibit hepatic D1 expression in posthatch chickens. Food restriction in growing chickens increases hepatic D3 levels. This contributes to the decrease in plasma T3 necessary to reduce energy loss. Refeeding restores hepatic D3 and plasma T3 to control levels within a few hours. It can be concluded that the tissue and time dependent regulation of the balance between TH activating and inactivating enzymes plays an essential role in the control of local T3 availability and hence in

  19. Anticoncepción hormonal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Lugones Botell

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión de los anticonceptivos hormonales con énfasis en aspectos que van desde su descubrimiento, el mecanismo de acción, los diferentes tipos y formas de utilización, así como el esquema de administración terapéutica en algunas entidades, sus indicaciones, ventajas y contraindicaciones: A review of the hormonal contraceptives was carried out, emphasizing on features from their discovery, trigger mechanism, different kinds, and ways to use them, as well as the scheme of the therapeutical administration in some entities, its indications, advantages, and contraindications.

  20. Inhibitors of plant hormone transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, Petr; Laňková, Martina; Zažímalová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 6 (2016), s. 1391-1404 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15088 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : polar auxin transport * acid-binding protein * gnom arf-gef * equilibrative nucleoside transporter * efflux carrier polarity * plasma-membrane-protein * cultured tobacco cells * arabidopsis-thaliana * gravitropic response * brefeldin-a * Plant hormones * Transport * Inhibitors * Auxin * Cytokinins * Strigolactones * Abscisic acid * Cell biology Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  1. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Curr?, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that...

  2. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  3. Gastric emptying, glucose metabolism and gut hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Richir, Milan C; Garretsen, Martijn K

    2011-01-01

    To study the gastric-emptying rate and gut hormonal response of two carbohydrate-rich beverages. A specifically designed carbohydrate-rich beverage is currently used to support the surgical patient metabolically. Fruit-based beverages may also promote recovery, due to natural antioxidant and carb...... and carbohydrate content. However, gastric emptying of fluids is influenced by its nutrient composition; hence, safety of preoperative carbohydrate loading should be confirmed. Because gut hormones link carbohydrate metabolism and gastric emptying, hormonal responses were studied....

  4. Simultaneous radioimmunoassay for luteinizing hormone and prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, M.K.; Deschepper, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A combined radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of the anterior pituitary proteins luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin (PRL) is described and compared with individual RIAs for these hormones. The standard curves and the sample values for LH and PRL were identical when determined in a combined or in an individual RIA. This technique may prove useful to a number of laboratories where it is desirable to determine levels of more than one hormone in limited sample volumes

  5. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    OpenAIRE

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the ...

  6. Hormonal contraception: recent advances and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    This Educational Bulletin outlines delivery systems and contraceptive formulations, summarizes advances in emergency contraception and reviews the effects of hormonal contraception on cancer risks, cardiovascular disease, and bone.

  7. Determinants of Growth Hormone Resistance in Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    States of under-nutrition are characterized by growth hormone resistance. Decreased total energy intake, as well as isolated protein-calorie malnutrition and isolated nutrient deficiencies result in elevated growth hormone levels and low levels of IGF-I. We review various states of malnutrition and a disease state characterized by chronic under-nutrition -- anorexia nervosa -- and discuss possible mechanisms contributing to the state of growth hormone resistance, including FGF-21 and SIRT1. We conclude by examining the hypothesis that growth hormone resistance is an adaptive response to states of under-nutrition, in order to maintain euglycemia and preserve energy. PMID:24363451

  8. Gastrointestinal Hormones Induced the Birth of Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabitsch, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The physiological studies by British physiologists William Maddock Bayliss and Ernest Henry Starling, at the beginning of the last century, demonstrated the existence of specific messenger molecules (hormones) circulating in the blood that regulate the organ function and physiological mechanisms. These findings led to the concept of endocrinology. The first 2 hormones were secretin, discovered in 1902, and gastrin, discovered in 1905. Both hormones that have been described are produced in the gut. This chapter summarizes the history around the discovery of these 2 hormones, which is perceived as the birth of endocrinology. It is noteworthy that after the discovery of these 2 gastrointestinal hormones, many other hormones were detected outside the gut, and thereafter gut hormones faded from both the clinical and scientific spotlight. Only recently, the clinical importance of the gut as the body's largest endocrine organ producing a large variety of hormones has been realized. Gastrointestinal hormones are essential regulators of metabolism, growth, development and behavior and are therefore the focus of a modern pediatric endocrinologist. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Hormones and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, Richard; Bičíková, Marie; Sosvorová, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain, and brain cells are also hormonally active. To reach their targets in brain structures, hormones must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a unique device selecting desired/undesired molecules to reach or leave the brain, and it is composed of endothelial cells forming the brain vasculature. These cells differ from other endothelial cells in their almost impermeable tight junctions and in possessing several membrane structures such as receptors, transporters, and metabolically active molecules, ensuring their selection function. The main ways how compounds pass through the BBB are briefly outlined in this review. The main part concerns the transport of major classes of hormones: steroids, including neurosteroids, thyroid hormones, insulin, and other peptide hormones regulating energy homeostasis, growth hormone, and also various cytokines. Peptide transporters mediating the saturable transport of individual classes of hormones are reviewed. The last paragraph provides examples of how hormones affect the permeability and function of the BBB either at the level of tight junctions or by various transporters.

  10. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  11. Hormones in Infection. Chapter 8. Alterations in Hormone Production and Utilization during Infection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-28

    regarding reprints not available at this time. C This was in invited manuscript (Chapter 8) for inclusion in the volume Host Metabolism and Physiology...Continue on reveree aide if neceary and identify by block number) u., Infectious Disease Pancreatic Hormones Endotoxemia Adrenal Hormones Thyroid Hormones...biochemical, metabolic , and hormonal activities. As host-initiated components in the pathogenic progression of an infectious disease, these

  12. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol.......To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  13. Hormesis and Female Sex Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvar Theodorsson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement after menopause has in recent years been the subject of intense scientific debate and public interest and has sparked intense research efforts into the biological effects of estrogens and progestagens. However, there are reasons to believe that the doses used and plasma concentrations produced in a large number of studies casts doubt on important aspects of their validity. The concept of hormesis states that a substance can have diametrically different effects depending on the concentration. Even though estrogens and progestagens have proven prone to this kind of dose-response relation in a multitude of studies, the phenomenon remains clearly underappreciated as exemplified by the fact that it is common practice to only use one hormone dose in animal experiments. If care is not taken to adjust the concentrations of estrogens and progestagens to relevant biological conditions, the significance of the results may be questionable. Our aim is to review examples of female sexual steroids demonstrating bidirectional dose-response relations and to discuss this in the perspective of hormesis. Some examples are highlighted in detail, including the effects on cerebral ischemia, inflammation, cardiovascular diseases and anxiety. Hopefully, better understanding of the hormesis phenomenon may result in improved future designs of studies of female sexual steroids.

  14. Glucoregulatory hormones in hepatic cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, J S; Pruthi, H S; Naqvi, S; Karnani, I; Shetty, K J

    1992-07-01

    In the present study hormonal responses to 75 gm oral glucose were studied in 34 biopsy proven cases of hepatic cirrhosis and 15 normal subjects. Though fasting blood glucose was similar in both controls and cirrhotics the latter showed higher glucose values throughout the study. The peak of glucose level in cirrhotics was delayed to 60 minutes. Two of 34 (5.8%) cirrhotics showed marginal fasting hyperglycaemia and 44% had (impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in blood glucose levels in patients with and without varices. The fasting serum insulin was significantly raised in cirrhotics (24.9 +/- 2.2 vs 8.4 +/- 1.2 mu/ml, p > 0.05). Hyperinsulinaemia was significantly marked in cirrhotics with abnormal Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as compared to those who had normal OGTT. The mean fasting serum insulin concentration in patients with and without varices was similar showing thereby that portasystemic shunt in cirrhotics is not the cause for peripheral hyper-insulinaemia. Basal cortisol was similar in cirrhotics and controls though expected fall in cirrhotics like control was absent. Twelve percent cirrhotics had basal human growth hormone (hGH) more than 10 ng/ml. Forty four percent showed paradoxical rise of hGH. hGH has significantly high (p < 0.01) in cirrhotics with abnormal OGTT as compared to those with normal OGTT.

  15. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, Anita; Kwakkel, Joan; Chassande, Olivier; Fliers, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during

  16. Sweat secretion rates in growth hormone disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Main, K M; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome.......While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome....

  17. Menstrual cycle hormones, food intake, and cravings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Food craving and intake are affected by steroid hormones during the menstrual cycle, especially in the luteal phase, when craving for certain foods has been reported to increase. However, satiety hormones such as leptin have also been shown to affect taste sensitivity, and therefore food ...

  18. Thyroid stimulating hormone and subclinical thyroid dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yongtie

    2008-01-01

    Subclinical thyroid dysfunction has mild clinical symptoms. It is nonspecific and not so noticeable. It performs only for thyroid stimulating hormone rise and decline. The value of early diagnosis and treatment of thyroid stimulating hormone in subclinical thyroid dysfunction were reviewed. (authors)

  19. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy. This re......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy....... This review is based on the English-language literature on the effect of estrogen therapy and estrogen plus progestin therapy on postmenopausal women. The advantages of hormone replacement therapy are regulation of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, relief of hot flushes, and prevention of atrophic changes...... in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin...

  20. Aging-Related Hormone Changes in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reproductive hormone plunge that occurs in women during menopause, however, sex hormone changes in men occur gradually. Here's what to expect, ... best way to refer to so-called male menopause? Many doctors use the term ... changes in men. Other terms include testosterone deficiency syndrome, ...

  1. Maintaining euthyroidism: fundamentals of thyroid hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thyroid-related pathologies, especially subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, are commonly described in clinical practice. While illnesses related to aberrant thyroid hormone homeostasis are the most prevalent endocrinological conditions diagnosed, important aspects related to thyroid hormone physiology are often ...

  2. Estrogen and Progestin (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... report any lumps immediately.If you are taking hormone replacement therapy to treat symptoms of menopause, your doctor will check every 3 to 6 months to see if you still need this medication. If you are taking this ... hormone replacement therapy, because this medication may interfere with ...

  3. An alternative look at insects hormones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sláma, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2015), s. 188-204 ISSN 2325-081X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : juvenile hormone * ecdysteroidal vitamin D6 * corpus allatum hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://blaypublishers.com/2015/10/31/leb-33-2015/

  4. Incretin hormones and the satiation signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that appetite-regulating hormones from the gut may have therapeutic potential. The incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), appears to be involved in both peripheral and central pathways mediating satiation. Several studies have also indicated that GLP-1 le...

  5. Maintaining Euthyroidism: Fundamentals of Thyroid Hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In fact, while thyroid hormones, i.e. triiodothyronine. (T3) and thyroxine (T4), play a ... hormone regulation, iodine metabolism, and the clinical management of thyroid related pathology, the current paper provides a physiological and clinical overview of ...... Surks MI, Goswami G, Daniels GH. The thyrotropin reference range ...

  6. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that peptide hormones from the gastrointestinal tract have significant impact on the regulation of nutrient metabolism. Among these hormones, incretins have been found to increase insulin secretion, and thus incretin-based therapies have emerged as new modalities...

  7. The barrier within: endothelial transport of hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M; Bergman, Richard N

    2012-08-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease.

  8. Measuring Steroid Hormones in Avian Eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  9. Incretin hormones as a target for therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    Incretin hormones are responsible for the incretin effect, which is the amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are taken in orally, as opposed to intravenously.......Incretin hormones are responsible for the incretin effect, which is the amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are taken in orally, as opposed to intravenously....

  10. Measuring steroid hormones in avian eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Bauchinger, U; Goymann, W; JenniEiermann, S

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  11. The Barrier Within: Endothelial Transport of Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease. PMID:22875454

  12. Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These medications can be given during or after menopause. Hormone Therapy to Prevent Chronic Conditions Many women take ... a recommendation. Click Here to Learn More About Menopause and Hormone Therapy Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Information for the Public ( ...

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy: Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/expert-answers/hormone-replacement-therapy/FAQ-20058499 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  14. Hormonal contraception and postmenopausal hormone therapy in Spain: time trends and patterns of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, Laura; Sequera, Víctor-Guillermo; Quesada, Paloma; Altzibar, Jone M; Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Benavente, Yolanda; Martín, Vicente; Casabonne, Delphine; Robles, Claudia; Llorca, Javier; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Fernandez-Tardón, Guillermo; Moreno, Victor; Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Salas, Dolores; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Amiano, Pilar; Molina, Antonio Jose; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Aragonés, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pollán, Marina; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to describe time trends in and patterns of use of hormonal contraception and postmenopausal hormone therapy and to identify factors associated with their use among Spanish women. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from 1,954 population controls (aged 24-85 y) in 12 provinces of Spain who were enrolled in the Multi Case-Control Spain study (2007-2013). Data were collected from a questionnaire conducted face-to-face by trained personnel. We collected information on sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, sleep patterns, reproductive history, and occupational history. Overall, 48.5% of Spanish women reported ever use of hormonal contraception, and 9.8% of women in the postmenopausal group reported use of postmenopausal hormone therapy. Younger cohorts used hormonal contraception for a longer period, whereas postmenopausal hormone therapy use dramatically dropped in the 2000s. Women with higher education levels (including education of partners) and smoking history were the most probable users of hormonal contraception, whereas inverse associations were observed among housewives, obese women, and nulliparous women. Postmenopausal hormone therapy use was associated with a surgical or therapeutic cause of menopause and with occupational history of rotating shifts. In this Spanish population, several demographic, lifestyle, occupational, and reproductive factors are associated with use of hormonal compounds. Characterizing hormonal users and monitoring trends in the use of these hormonal compounds are essential from a public health perspective.

  15. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  16. Radioimmunological determination of parathyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudczak, R.; Waldhaeusl, E.; Wolner, E.; Czembirek, H.

    1979-01-01

    Angiographic or scintigraphic localization of parathyroid adenomas is successful in only a small number of patients with hypercalcaemic hyperparathyroidism. This report is concerned with the preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas by regional catheterization of the thyroid veins in patients with hypercalcaemic hyperparathyroidism ( n = 7). PTH was determined radioimmunologically, using an antiserum specific for PTHsub(1-84) and the carboxyl-terminal fragment of the hormone. Determination of regional differences in the plasma concentration of PTH permitted the preoperative localization of PTH secreting adenomas. The preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas was confirmed in each instance by surgery. Thus, the regional determination of plasma PTH represents a tool to improve the preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas in patients with hypercalcaemic hyperparathyroidism and, hence, to reduce the risk of an unsuccessful operation. (author)

  17. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-01-01

    , no pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial...... in the treatment of fractures and could thus be a potentially new treatment option for induction of fracture healing in humans. Furthermore, fractures in animals with experimental conditions of impaired healing such as aging, estrogen withdrawal, and malnutrition can heal in an expedited manner after PTH treatment....... Interestingly, fractures occurring at both cancellous and cortical sites can be treated successfully, indicating that both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic fractures can be the target of PTH-induced healing. Finally, the data suggest that PTH partly prevents the delay in fracture healing caused by aging...

  18. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  19. Receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and thyroid hormones in the macaque uterus: effects of long-term sex hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulchiy, Mariana; Zhang, Hua; Cline, J Mark; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén; Sahlin, Lena

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid gland dysfunction is associated with menstrual cycle disturbances, infertility, and increased risk of miscarriage, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. However, little is known about the regulation of these receptors in the uterus. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term treatment with steroid hormones on the expression, distribution, and regulation of the receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRHR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHR), thyroid hormone receptor α1/α2 (THRα1/α2), and THRβ1 in the uterus of surgically menopausal monkeys. Eighty-eight cynomolgus macaques were ovariectomized and treated orally with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE; n = 20), a combination of CEE and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; n = 20), or tibolone (n = 28) for 2 years. The control group (OvxC; n = 20) received no treatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the protein expression and distribution of the receptors in luminal epithelium, glands, stroma, and myometrium of the uterus. Immunostaining of TRHR, TSHR, and THRs was detected in all uterine compartments. Epithelial immunostaining of TRHR was down-regulated in the CEE + MPA group, whereas in stroma, both TRHR and TSHR were increased by CEE + MPA treatment as compared with OvxC. TRHR immunoreactivity was up-regulated, but THRα and THRβ were down-regulated, in the myometrium of the CEE and CEE + MPA groups. The thyroid-stimulating hormone level was higher in the CEE and tibolone groups as compared with OvxC, but the level of free thyroxin did not differ between groups. All receptors involved in thyroid hormone function are expressed in monkey uterus, and they are all regulated by long-term steroid hormone treatment. These findings suggest that there is a possibility of direct actions of thyroid hormones, thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone on uterine function.

  20. Hormone changes associated with the menopausal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H. Irene; Freeman, Ellen W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Menopausal Transition (MT) is the time in each woman’s reproductive life that precedes the final menstrual period (FMP). MT is associated with changes in bleeding pattern and hormone profiles. In recent years, research efforts have characterized changes in reproductive hormones over MT in order to elucidate the process of late reproductive aging and potentially identify predictors of time to menopause. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), inhibin B and estradiol represent the four primary hormone measures of these investigations. Current data show an increase in FSH and decreases in AMH, inhibin B and estradiol over MT (Table 1). AMH appears to be the first marker to change, followed by FSH and inhibin B. Estradiol declines in late MT. To date, there are no validated hormone cutpoints that predict the length of MT or FMP. There are very preliminary data on AMH as a predictor of menopause. Until further evidence identifies clinically useful hormone levels for predicting MT or FMP, diagnosis of MT and FMP should be based on clinical signs and symptoms only. PMID:19942836

  1. Association between asthma and female sex hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Prudente de Carvalho Baldaçara

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The relationship between sex hormones and asthma has been evaluated in several studies. The aim of this review article was to investigate the association between asthma and female sex hormones, under different conditions (premenstrual asthma, use of oral contraceptives, menopause, hormone replacement therapy and pregnancy. DESIGN AND SETTING: Narrative review of the medical literature, Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT and Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp. METHODS: We searched the CAPES journal portal, a Brazilian platform that provides access to articles in the MEDLINE, PubMed, SciELO, and LILACS databases. The following keywords were used based on Medical Subject Headings: asthma, sex hormones, women and use of oral contraceptives. RESULTS: The associations between sex hormones and asthma remain obscure. In adults, asthma is more common in women than in men. In addition, mortality due to asthma is significantly higher among females. The immune system is influenced by sex hormones: either because progesterone stimulates progesterone-induced blocking factor and Th2 cytokines or because contraceptives derived from progesterone and estrogen stimulate the transcription factor GATA-3. CONCLUSIONS: The associations between asthma and female sex hormones remain obscure. We speculate that estrogen fluctuations are responsible for asthma exacerbations that occur in women. Because of the anti-inflammatory action of estrogen, it decreases TNF-α production, interferon-γ expression and NK cell activity. We suggest that further studies that highlight the underlying physiopathological mechanisms contributing towards these interactions should be conducted.

  2. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  3. Gene regulation by steroid hormones III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, A.K.; Clark, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, the authors discuss the latest advances in molecular endocrinology: - steroid receptor binding to DNA sequences of hormonally controlled genes, - structure of genes controlled by steroid hormones, - heterogeneity of steroid receptors, - immunochemical approaches to receptor studies, and - the most recent approaches to steroid hormone action and biological response. The Contents discussed are: Biochemical Evidence for the Exclusive Nuclear Localization of the Estrogen Receptor. - Structure, Dynamics, and Cloning of the Estrogen Receptor. - Structure, Dynamics, and Cloning of the Estrogen Receptor - Physical and Functional Parameters of Isolated Estrogen Receptor - Type II Binding Sites: Cellular Origin and an Endogeneous Ligand. - The Two Phosphorylation Reactions of the Progesterone Receptor. - Receptor Mediated Action of the Vitamin D Hormone. - Characterization of the Nuclear Binding Sites (Acceptor Sites) for a Steroid Receptor. Antibodies in Estrogen, Progesterone, Glucocorticoid, Vitamin D Receptors and Autoantibodies to Antrogene Receptor. - Isolation and Characterization of cDNA probes for Human CBG and Rat ABP. Ornithine Decarboxy lase mRNAs in Murine Kidney: Structure and Regulation by Androgens - Glucocorticoid Receptors and the Control of Gene Expression. - Activation and Regulation of the Vitellogenin Gene Family. - Intra- and Intercellular Aspects of the Hormonal Regulation of the ..cap alpha..2..mu.. Globulin Gene Expression. - Hormonal Regulation of Sexually Differentiated Isozymes of Cytochrome P-450 in Rat Liver. - Interaction of Thyroid Hormone and Carbohydrates on Hepatic Gene Expression.

  4. Hormonal Factors and Disturbances in Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Kristen M; Racine, Sarah E; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of the literature regarding hormonal correlates of, and etiologic influences on, eating pathology. Several hormones (e.g., ghrelin, CCK, GLP-1, PYY, leptin, oxytocin, cortisol) are disrupted during the ill state of eating disorders and likely contribute to the maintenance of core symptoms (e.g., dietary restriction, binge eating) and/or co-occurring features (e.g., mood symptoms, attentional biases). Some of these hormones (e.g., ghrelin, cortisol) may also be related to eating pathology via links with psychological stress. Despite these effects, the role of hormonal factors in the etiology of eating disorders remains unknown. The strongest evidence for etiologic effects has emerged for ovarian hormones, as changes in ovarian hormones predict changes in phenotypic and genetic influences on disordered eating. Future studies would benefit from utilizing etiologically informative designs (e.g., high risk, behavioral genetic) and continuing to explore factors (e.g., psychological, neural responsivity) that may impact hormonal influences on eating pathology.

  5. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  6. Steroid hormone sulphation in lead workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Apostoli, P; Romeo, L; Peroni, E; Ferioli, A; Ferrari, S; Pasini, F; Aprili, F

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of steroid hormones has been investigated in 10 workers exposed to lead and in 10 non-exposed subjects to determine whether lead interferes with the first or second phase reactions of steroid hormone biotransformation, or both. In the exposed workers blood lead concentrations (PbB) ranged from 45 to 69 micrograms/100 ml; in the controls PbB was less than 25 micrograms/100 ml. No statistical differences were found for the total amount of the urinary hormone metabolites, but a dr...

  7. Menopausia y terapia hormonal de reemplazo

    OpenAIRE

    Cobo, Edgard; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1996-01-01

    La terapia hormonal en la menopausia/ menopausia y terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR)/¿Qué es la menopausia?/ ¿Porqué hay tanto “ruido” acerca de la menopausia, si es un evento natural en la vida de toda mujer?/ ¿Qué significa terapia hormonal de reemplazo?(THR)/ ¿Cuáles son las ventajas de recibir la THR?/ Mejoraría en la calidad de vida/ Prevención de enfermedad/ ¿Quiere esto decir que absolutamente todas las mujeres deber recibir una THR?/ ¿Cuáles son las molestias más frecuentes a las qu...

  8. Parathyroid hormone binding to cultured avian osteoclasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teti, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Zambonin Zallone, A. (Univ. of Bari (Italy))

    1991-02-14

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases serum calcium concentration via a controversial cellular mechanism. We investigated whether PTH binds avian osteoclasts. Isolated hypocalcaemic hen osteoclasts were incubated with ({sup 125}I)--bovine PTH (1-84). Specific binding of the hormone to the cells, which reached the equilibrium within 60 min, was observed. Half maximal binding was reached by 10 min. Binding was competitively inhibited by increasing doses of unlabeled PTH, and was about 55% displaced by adding, at the equilibrium, 10(-6) M unlabeled PTH. Autoradiography demonstrated specific label on the osteoclast. The cellular mechanism activated by the hormone remains to be elucidated.

  9. Oxytocin is a cardiovascular hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutkowska J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OT, a nonapeptide, was the first hormone to have its biological activities established and chemical structure determined. It was believed that OT is released from hypothalamic nerve terminals of the posterior hypophysis into the circulation where it stimulates uterine contractions during parturition, and milk ejection during lactation. However, equivalent concentrations of OT were found in the male hypophysis, and similar stimuli of OT release were determined for both sexes, suggesting other physiological functions. Indeed, recent studies indicate that OT is involved in cognition, tolerance, adaptation and complex sexual and maternal behaviour, as well as in the regulation of cardiovascular functions. It has long been known that OT induces natriuresis and causes a fall in mean arterial pressure, both after acute and chronic treatment, but the mechanism was not clear. The discovery of the natriuretic family shed new light on this matter. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, a potent natriuretic and vasorelaxant hormone, originally isolated from rat atria, has been found at other sites, including the brain. Blood volume expansion causes ANP release that is believed to be important in the induction of natriuresis and diuresis, which in turn act to reduce the increase in blood volume. Neurohypophysectomy totally abolishes the ANP response to volume expansion. This indicates that one of the major hypophyseal peptides is responsible for ANP release. The role of ANP in OT-induced natriuresis was evaluated, and we hypothesized that the cardio-renal effects of OT are mediated by the release of ANP from the heart. To support this hypothesis, we have demonstrated the presence and synthesis of OT receptors in all heart compartments and the vasculature. The functionality of these receptors has been established by the ability of OT to induce ANP release from perfused heart or atrial slices. Furthermore, we have shown that the heart and large vessels

  10. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Mutations in Cancer and Resistance to Thyroid Hormone: Perspective and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan D. Rosen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone, operating through its receptors, plays crucial roles in the control of normal human physiology and development; deviations from the norm can give rise to disease. Clinical endocrinologists often must confront and correct the consequences of inappropriately high or low thyroid hormone synthesis. Although more rare, disruptions in thyroid hormone endocrinology due to aberrations in the receptor also have severe medical consequences. This review will focus on the afflictions that are caused by, or are closely associated with, mutated thyroid hormone receptors. These include Resistance to Thyroid Hormone Syndrome, erythroleukemia, hepatocellular carcinoma, renal clear cell carcinoma, and thyroid cancer. We will describe current views on the molecular bases of these diseases, and what distinguishes the neoplastic from the non-neoplastic. We will also touch on studies that implicate alterations in receptor expression, and thyroid hormone levels, in certain oncogenic processes.

  11. Chemosignals, hormones, and amphibian reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". Amphibians are often thought of as relatively simple animals especially when compared to mammals. Yet the chemosignaling systems used by amphibians are varied and complex. Amphibian chemosignals are particularly important in reproduction, in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Chemosignaling is most evident in salamanders and newts, but increasing evidence indicates that chemical communication facilitates reproduction in frogs and toads as well. Reproductive hormones shape the production, dissemination, detection, and responsiveness to chemosignals. A large variety of chemosignals have been identified, ranging from simple, invariant chemosignals to complex, variable blends of chemosignals. Although some chemosignals elicit straightforward responses, others have relatively subtle effects. Review of amphibian chemosignaling reveals a number of issues to be resolved, including: 1) the significance of the complex, individually variable blends of courtship chemosignals found in some salamanders, 2) the behavioral and/or physiological functions of chemosignals found in anuran "breeding glands", 3) the ligands for amphibian V2Rs, especially V2Rs expressed in the main olfactory epithelium, and 4) the mechanism whereby transdermal delivery of chemosignals influences behavior. To date, only a handful of the more than 7000 species of amphibians has been examined. Further study of amphibians should provide additional insight to the role of chemosignals in reproduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Menopause, hormone therapy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuenkel, C A

    2017-02-01

    Over the past three decades, the prevalence of diabetes has increased four-fold. Coupled with the global obesity epidemic and aging of the world's population, a perfect metabolic storm is brewing. The influence of menopause and exogenous estrogen and progestogens must be included in this equation. In this review, criteria for diagnosing diabetes and recommendations for screening are described. The reported effects of menopause on diabetes risk in healthy women are reviewed as well as the relationship between established diabetes and the timing of menopause. The effects of menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) on glucose control in women with diabetes and the effect of MHT on diabetes risk in menopausal women without diabetes are described. Evidence-based strategies to prevent diabetes in midlife women are highlighted. The augmenting effect of diabetes on chronic health concerns of aging women, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cancer, along with current recommendations for screening and prevention are presented. Given the current demographics of today's world, the content of this review may apply to as many as one-third of the average practitioner's postmenopausal patient population.

  13. Radioimmunoassay of canine growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eigenmann, J.E.; Eigenmann, R.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) for canine growth hormone (GH) was developed. Antibodies were elicited in rhesus monkeys. One antiserum exhibited a working titer at a dilution of 1:500 000. Radioiodination was performed enzymatically employing lactoperoxidase. Logit-log transformation and least squares fitting resulted in straight line fitting of the standard curve between 0.39 and 50 ng/ml. Formation of large-molecular [ 125 I]GH during storage caused diminished assay sensitivity. Therefore [ 125 I]GH was re-purified by gel chromatography. Using this procedure, high and reproducible assay sensitivity was obtained. Tracer preparations were used for as long as 3 months after iodination. Diluted plasma from normal and acromegalic dogs resulted in a dose-response curve parallel to the standard curve. Canine prolactin exhibited a cross-reactivity of 2%. The within-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.8 and the between-assay CV was 7.2%. Mean plasma GH concentration in normal dogs was 1.92 +- 0.14 ng/ml (mean +- SEM.) GH levels in acromegalic dogs were appreciably higher. Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, arginine and ornithine administration resulted in inconsistent and sluggish GH increment. A better response was obtained by injecting a low dose of clonidine. Clonidine administration to hypopituitary dogs resulted in absent or poor GH increment. (author)

  14. Hormonal profiles in buffalo bulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwaraknath, P.K.; Agarwal, S.P.; Agarwal, V.K.; Dixit, N.K.; Sharma, I.J.

    1984-01-01

    Serum samples from male buffaloes were radioimmunoassayed for steroid and thyroid hormones to investigate circadian rhythms, the effect of growth and season. An evaluation of RIA of serum testosterone with and without extraction yielded unacceptably low recoveries in unextracted serum samples. Studies on temporal variations during the day revealed three peaks for testosterone, four peaks for cortisol and one peak each for T 4 and T 3 . In growing calves the testosterone levels were low (0.1 ng/mL) up to 15 months of age but exhibited peaks at puberty (0.4 ng/mL) and maturity (0.8 ng/mL). Cortisol, T 4 and T 3 also exhibited peaks at puberty and maturity. Progesterone and oestradiol remained at basal levels throughout growth and development. Breeding buffalo bulls exhibited significant seasonal variations in testosterone, progesterone and oestradiol but not in T 4 and T 3 . Semen quality and sexual behaviour did not vary between seasons. (author)

  15. [Neuroendocrine effect of sex hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, V N

    2005-01-01

    The paper provides a generalization of data and the results of own experiments on influence ovarian steroids on the hypothalamus and other brain areas related to reproduction. Ovarian hormones have widespread effects throughout the brain: on catecholaminergic neurons and serotonergic pathways and the basal forebrain cholinergic system, as well as the hipocampus, spinal cord, nigrostriatal and mesolimbic system, in addition to glial cells and blood-brain barrier. The widespread influences of these various neuronal systems ovarian steroids have measurable effects on mood and affect as well as on cognition, with implications for dementia. There are developmentally programmed sex differenced in hippocampal structure that may help to explain differences in the strategies which male and female rats use to solve spatial navigation problems. The multiple sites and mechanisms of estrogen action in brain underlie a variety of importants effects on cognitive and other brain functions--coordination of movement, pain, affective state, as well as possible protection in Alzheimer's disease. Estrogen withdrawal after natural or surgical menopause can lead to a host of changes in brain function and behavior.

  16. MULTIPLE STABLE PERIODIC SOLUTIONS IN A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACTThe pituitary hormones, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and the ovarian hormones, estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and inhibin (Ih), are five hormones important for the regulation and maintenance of the human menstrual cycle. The...

  17. Pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas develop in old mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both growth hormone and prolactin, by 8 months of age. We now report for the first time that old GRH......-transgenic mice, 16 to 24 months of age, develop pituitary mammosomatotroph adenomas. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted stimulation of secretory activity can cause proliferation, hyperplasia and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells....

  18. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Mutations in Cancer and Resistance to Thyroid Hormone: Perspective and Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Meghan D. Rosen; Martin L. Privalsky

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone, operating through its receptors, plays crucial roles in the control of normal human physiology and development; deviations from the norm can give rise to disease. Clinical endocrinologists often must confront and correct the consequences of inappropriately high or low thyroid hormone synthesis. Although more rare, disruptions in thyroid hormone endocrinology due to aberrations in the receptor also have severe medical consequences. This review will focus on the afflictions tha...

  19. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy......, but the contribution of progestins for about 10 days every month excludes this risk. Breast cancer in relation to estrogen-progestogen therapy has been given much concern, and the problem is still not fully solved. If there is a risk, it is small, and only after prolonged use of estrogen (15-20 years). The decision...

  20. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from.......8). Similar increased risks of serous and endometrioid tumors were found with estrogen/progestin therapy, whereas no association was found with mucinous tumors. Consistent with results from recent cohort studies, the authors found that ovarian cancer risk varied according to tumor histology. The types...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers...

  1. Innovations in classical hormonal targets for endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, Nicola; Freschi, Letizia; Wenger, Jean-Marie; Streuli, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic disease of unknown etiology that affects approximately 10% of women in reproductive age. Several evidences show that endometriosis lesions are associated to hormonal imbalance, including estrogen synthesis, metabolism and responsiveness and progesterone resistance. These hormonal alterations influence the ability of endometrial cells to proliferate, migrate and to infiltrate the mesothelium, causing inflammation, pain and infertility. Hormonal imbalance in endometriosis represents also a target for treatment. We provide an overview on therapeutic strategies based on innovations of classical hormonal mechanisms involved in the development of endometriosis lesions. The development phase of new molecules targeting these pathways is also discussed. Endometriosis is a chronic disease involving young women and additional biological targets of estrogen and progesterone pharmacological manipulation (brain, bone and cardiovascular tissue) need to be carefully considered in order to improve and overcome current limits of long-term medical management of endometriosis.

  2. Abiraterone for Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog post on results from two clinical trials that showed adding abiraterone to androgen-deprivation therapy improved survival for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

  3. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  4. Growth hormone and selective attention : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quik, Elise H.; van Dam, P. Sytze; Kenemans, J. Leon

    Introduction: The relation between growth hormone (GH) secretion and general cognitive function has been established. General cognitive functioning depends on core functions including selective attention, which have not been addressed specifically in relation to GH. The present review addresses

  5. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells that help protect the body against infection (agammaglobulinemia). Related Information What does it mean if a ... deficiency type 1B Genetic Testing Registry: X-linked agammaglobulinemia with growth hormone deficiency Other Diagnosis and Management ...

  6. Pathology of sleep, hormones and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.; Kluge, M.; Schussler, P.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with depression, characteristic changes of sleep electroencephalogram and nocturnal hormone secretion occur including rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disinhibition, reduced non-REM sleep and impaired sleep continuity. Neuropeptides are common regulators of the sleep electroencephalogram

  7. Hormones, Nicotine and Cocaine: Clinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Nancy K.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine and cocaine each stimulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axis hormones, and there is increasing evidence that the hormonal milieu may modulate the abuse-related effects of these drugs. This review summarizes some clinical studies of the acute effects of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine on plasma drug and hormone levels, and subjective effects ratings. The temporal covariance between these dependent measures was assessed with a rapid (two min) sampling procedure in nicotine-dependent volunteers or current cocaine users. Cigarette smoking and IV cocaine each stimulated a rapid increase in LH and ACTH, followed by gradual increases in cortisol and DHEA. Positive subjective effects ratings increased immediately after initiation of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine administration. However, in contrast to cocaine’s sustained positive effects (hormones on nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse, and implications for treatment of these addictive disorders is discussed. PMID:19835877

  8. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. It ... test, as exercise or increased activity can alter hGH levels. Inform your health-care provider if you ...

  9. Hormonal therapy in female pattern hair loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Brough

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Female pattern hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss in women and one of the most common problems seen by dermatologists. This hair loss is a nonscarring alopecia in which loss occurs on the vertex scalp, generally sparing the frontal hairline. Hair loss can have significant psychosocial effects on patients, and treatment can be long and difficult. The influence of hormones on the pathogenesis of female pattern hair loss is not entirely known. The purpose of this paper is to review physiology and potential hormonal mechanisms for the pathogenesis of female pattern hair loss. We also discuss the current hormonal and hormone-modifying therapies that are available to providers as they partner with patients to treat this frustrating issue.

  10. FSH (Follicle-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) BNP and NT-proBNP ... Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Lyme Disease Tests Magnesium Maternal Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury ...

  11. Unexpected Elevated Free Thyroid Hormones in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teti, Claudia; Nazzari, Elena; Galletti, Marina Raffaella; Mandolfino, Mattia Grazia; Pupo, Francesca; Pesce, Giampaola; Lillo, Flavia; Bagnasco, Marcello; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2016-11-01

    The use of thyrotropin and free thyroid hormone assays to evaluate thyroid function is widespread, but in some situations the results are inconsistent with the patient's thyroid status. A 35-year-old woman with a known diagnosis of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis was referred to the authors' clinic at week 26 of her second pregnancy. The patient was clinically euthyroid. Consistent with this, her serum thyrotropin (TSH) was normal (0.79 mIU/L), but she had elevated free thyroid hormones-free triiodothyronine (fT3) and free thyroxine (fT4)-as determined by a one-step chemiluminescent assay. The patient was taking levothyroxine replacement therapy (125 μg/day), and the dose was confirmed. Previous blood tests showed concordance between TSH and free thyroid hormone values. The patient was followed up throughout gestation and at 12 months postpartum. During gestation, her free thyroid hormones remained high using one-step methods, while the total thyroid hormone concentration values were within the reference range, in agreement with the TSH values. Postpartum fT4 and fT3 values returned progressively to normality, in agreement with the TSH values. The presence of circulating thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAb) was hypothesized, which are known to interfere, although to a variable extent, with thyroid hormone one-step assays. Using stored frozen sera, this hypothesis was confirmed indirectly by measuring normal levels of fT3 and fT4 with a two-step method, and directly by demonstrating THAb against the two hormones. Despite their relative rarity, circulating THAb may be suspected when laboratory data are not consistent and contrast with the clinical picture. To the authors' knowledge, no previous case of transient appearance of THAb in pregnancy has been described.

  12. The menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nuttall, Dilyse

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy can ease the symptoms of the menopause. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is developing guidelines on the diagnosis and management of menopause, which are due for release in October 2015. This welcome development acknowledges the impact that menopause-related symptoms can have on an individual. NICE (2013) identify menopause as the ending of menstruation resulting from a failure in ovarian follicular activity. Changes in hormone levels can...

  13. Thyroid hormone resistance misdiagnosed as Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH syndrome is a very rare disorder characterized by mutations of the thyroid hormone receptor beta and is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Patients with RTH are usually euthyroid but rarely may present with signs and symptoms consistent with hyperthyroidism. Here, we describe the case of a young girl with goiter who was previously misdiagnosed to have hyperthyroidism and was subsequently diagnosed to be suffering from RTH.

  14. Characterisation of monoclonal antibodies for human luteinising hormone, and mapping of antigenic determinants on the hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soos, M.; Siddle, K.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve mouse monoclonal antibodies for human luteinising hormone were produced. The affinities varied from 4 X 10 7 to 1 X 10 10 l/mol. The specificity of each antibody was assessed by determining the relative reactivities with luteinising hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotrophin. Six antibodies bound to the α-subunit as shown by similar reactivity with all hormones, and the remainder to the β-subunit as shown by specificity for luteinising hormone. This latter group of antibodies cross-reacted only weakly with thyroid stimulating hormone (approximately 10%) and follicle stimulating hormone (approximately 3%). Three of these antibodies also showed low reactivity towards chorionic gonadotrophin (<10%), though the others did not (80-300%). The ability of different antibodies to bind simultaneously to luteinising hormone was examined and it was shown that several distinct antigenic determinants existed on both subunits. The characterisation of monoclonal binding sites is discussed in relation to the use of antibodies in two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  15. Overnight Levels of Luteinizing Hormone, Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and Growth Hormone before and during Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analogue Treatment in Short Boys Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaay, Danielle C. M.; de Jong, Frank H.; Rose, Susan R.; Odink, Roelof J. H.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; Sulkers, Eric J.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate if 3 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) treatment results in sufficient suppression of pubertal luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) profile patterns in short pubertal small for gestational age (SGA) boys. To compare growth hormone

  16. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known as...

  17. Regulation of Thyroid Hormone Bioactivity in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Peeters (Robin)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTThyroid hormone plays an essential role in a variety of metabolic processes in the human body. Examples are the effects of thyroid hormone on metabolism and on the heart. The production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid is regulated by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) via the TSH

  18. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma. Measurements...

  19. Thyroid Hormones and Glycaemic Indices in Types 1 and 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies comparing the relationship between thyroid hormones and the glycaemic indices in Types 1 and 2 diabetics are scanty. This study compared the relationship between thyroid hormones and glycaemic indices in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics on various therapies. The thyroid hormones, thyroid stimulating hormone ...

  20. The role of releasing hormones in the diagnosis of hypopituitarism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Luteinising hormone-releasing factor and thyrotrophinreleasing factor were used in conjunction with the insulin tolerance test in 9 patients with known or suspected panhypopituitarism. It appears that growth hormone and luteinising hormone fail early in panhypopituitarism. Cortisol and thyroid-stimulating hormone ...

  1. Effects of hormone therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Zeinab; Seely, Ellen W; Rahme, Maya; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2015-04-01

    Although hormone therapy remains the most efficacious option for the management of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, its effects on blood pressure remain unclear. This review scrutinizes evidence of the mechanisms of action of hormone therapy on signaling pathways affecting blood pressure and evidence from clinical studies. Comprehensive Ovid MEDLINE searches were conducted for the terms "hypertension" and either of the following "hormone therapy and menopause" or "selective estrogen receptor modulator" from year 2000 to November 2013. In vitro and physiologic studies did not reveal a clear deleterious effect of hormone therapy on blood pressure. The effect of oral therapy was essentially neutral in large trials conducted in normotensive women with blood pressure as primary outcome. Results from all other trials had several limitations. Oral therapy had a neutral effect on blood pressure in hypertensive women. Transdermal estrogen and micronized progesterone had a beneficial effect on blood pressure in normotensive women and, at most, a neutral effect on hypertensive women. In general, tibolone and raloxifene had a neutral effect on blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive women. Large randomized trials are needed to assess the effect of oral hormone therapy on blood pressure as a primary outcome in hypertensive women and the effect of transdermal preparations on both normotensive and hypertensive women. Transdermal preparations would be the preferred mode of therapy for hypertensive women, in view of their favorable physiologic and clinical profiles. The decision regarding the use of hormone therapy should be individualized, and blood pressure should be monitored during the course of treatment.

  2. Incretin hormone secretion over the day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahren, B; Carr, RD; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    The two incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are key factors in the regulation of islet function and glucose metabolism, and incretin-based therapy for type 2 diabetes has gained considerable interest during recent years. Regulat......The two incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are key factors in the regulation of islet function and glucose metabolism, and incretin-based therapy for type 2 diabetes has gained considerable interest during recent years....... Regulation of incretin hormone secretion is less well characterized. The main stimulus for incretin hormone secretion is presence of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, and carbohydrate, fat as well as protein all have the capacity to stimulate GIP and GLP-1 secretion. More recently, it has been established...... that a diurnal regulation exists with incretin hormone secretion to an identical meal being greater when the meal is served in the morning compared to in the afternoon. Finally, whether incretin hormone secretion is altered in disease states is an area with, so far, controversial results in different studies...

  3. [Human growth hormone and Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marco, Silvia Beatriz; de Arriba Muñoz, Antonio; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José Ignacio; Garagorri Otero, Jesús María

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of clinical and analytical parameters as predictors of the final growth response in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone. A retrospective study was performed on 25 girls with Turner syndrome (17 treated with growth hormone), followed-up until adult height. Auxological, analytical, genetic and pharmacological parameters were collected. A descriptive and analytical study was conducted to evaluate short (12 months) and long term response to treatment with growth hormone. A favourable treatment response was shown during the first year of treatment in terms of height velocity gain in 66.6% of cases (height-gain velocity >3cm/year). A favourable long-term treatment response was also observed in terms of adult height, which increased by 42.82±21.23cm (1.25±0.76 SDS), with an adult height gain of 9.59±5.39cm (1.68±1.51 SDS). Predictors of good response to growth hormone treatment are: A) initial growth hormone dose, B) time on growth hormone treatment until starting oestrogen therapy, C) increased IGF1 and IGFBP-3 levels in the first year of treatment, and D) height gain velocity in the first year of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Hormonal Regulation in Shade Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanwei Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available At high vegetation density, shade-intolerant plants sense a reduction in the red (660 nm to far-red (730 nm light ratio (R/FR in addition to a general reduction in light intensity. These light signals trigger a spectrum of morphological changes manifested by growth of stem-like tissue (hypocotyl, petiole, etc. instead of harvestable organs (leaves, fruits, seeds, etc.—namely, shade avoidance syndrome (SAS. Common phenotypical changes related to SAS are changes in leaf hyponasty, an increase in hypocotyl and internode elongation and extended petioles. Prolonged shade exposure leads to early flowering, less branching, increased susceptibility to insect herbivory, and decreased seed yield. Thus, shade avoidance significantly impacts on agronomic traits. Many genetic and molecular studies have revealed that phytochromes, cryptochromes and UVR8 (UV-B photoreceptor protein monitor the changes in light intensity under shade and regulate the stability or activity of phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs. PIF-governed modulation of the expression of auxin biosynthesis, transporter and signaling genes is the major driver for shade-induced hypocotyl elongation. Besides auxin, gibberellins, brassinosteroids, and ethylene are also required for shade-induced hypocotyl or petiole elongation growth. In leaves, accumulated auxin stimulates cytokinin oxidase expression to break down cytokinins and inhibit leaf growth. In the young buds, shade light promotes the accumulation of abscisic acid to repress branching. Shade light also represses jasmonate- and salicylic acid-induced defense responses to balance resource allocation between growth and defense. Here we will summarize recent findings relating to such hormonal regulation in SAS in Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica rapa, and certain crops.

  5. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  6. Estrogen and Growth Hormone and their Roles in Reproductive Function

    OpenAIRE

    Hüseyin Baki ÇİFTCİ

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the effect of estrogen on growth hormone secretion and the roles of estrogen and growth hormone in reproductive function. Estrogen is the main hormone affecting growth, development, maturation and functioning of reproductive tract as well as the sexual differentiation and the behavior. Growth hormone is also important factor in sexual maturation and attainment of puberty. The impact of estrogen on growth hormone secretion has been reported in rodents and pr...

  7. Gonadal Hormones and Retinal Disorders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Nuzzi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AimGonadal hormones are essential for reproductive function, but can act on neural and other organ systems, and are probably the cause of the large majority of known sex differences in function and disease. The aim of this review is to provide evidence for this hypothesis in relation to eye disorders and to retinopathies in particular.MethodsEpidemiological studies and research articles were reviewed.ResultsAnalysis of the biological basis for a relationship between eye diseases and hormones showed that estrogen, androgen, and progesterone receptors are present throughout the eye and that these steroids are locally produced in ocular tissues. Sex hormones can have a neuroprotective action on the retina and modulate ocular blood flow. There are differences between the male and the female retina; moreover, sex hormones can influence the development (or not of certain disorders. For example, exposure to endogenous estrogens, depending on age at menarche and menopause and number of pregnancies, and exposure to exogenous estrogens, as in hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives, appear to protect against age-related macular degeneration (both drusenoid and neurovascular types, whereas exogenous testosterone therapy is a risk factor for central serous chorioretinopathy. Macular hole is more common among women than men, particularly in postmenopausal women probably owing to the sudden drop in estrogen production in later middle age. Progestin therapy appears to ameliorate the course of retinitis pigmentosa. Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes, may be more common among men than women.ConclusionWe observed a correlation between many retinopathies and sex, probably as a result of the protective effect some gonadal hormones may exert against the development of certain disorders. This may have ramifications for the use of hormone therapy in the treatment of eye disease and of retinal disorders in particular.

  8. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Yan; Yang, Jie; Li, Yukun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochr...

  9. Growth Hormone Research Society perspective on the development of long-acting growth hormone preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Growth Hormone (GH) Research Society (GRS) convened a workshop to address important issues regarding trial design, efficacy, and safety of long-acting growth hormone preparations (LAGH). A closed meeting of 55 international scientists with expertise in GH, including pediatric and adult endocrino...

  10. Interactions between somatometric parameters and endogenous hormone levels as well as hormonal induced events in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, S

    1998-09-01

    The present paper contains the results of a five year research project focusing on the complex interaction between body build and endogenous hormone levels as well as on hormonal induced events in 1095 healthy adult females from Austria. It could be demonstrated that even long after termination of the pubertal growth phase significant associations exist between body dimensions as well as body composition compartments and endogenous hormone levels. Beside positive associations between length and height dimensions as well as traits of robustness and those hormonal parameters which are essential for an undisturbed linear growth, i.e. growth hormone, thyroid hormones and testosterone, the complex interaction between body fat development and the sex hormones as well as the lipolytic active growth could be proved. These association patterns were observed independently of the menopausal status. Furthermore marked associations between female body build, above all body fat development, and hormonal induced events such as menarche, menstrual cycle patterns, fertility and menopause were observed. A more feminine type of body build combined with moderate development of body fat was associated with earlier menarche, more regular menstrual cycles, higher reproductive success and a delayed menopause. Moderate fatness and a gynoid kind of fat distribution may be stated as indicators of potential female reproductive success.

  11. Thyroid hormone resistance syndrome due to mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor alpha gene (THRA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tylki-Szymanska, A.; Acuna Hidalgo, R.; Krajewska-Walasek, M.; Lecka-Ambroziak, A.; Steehouwer, M.; Gilissen, C.F.; Brunner, H.G.; Jurecka, A.; Rozdzynska-Swiatkowska, A.; Hoischen, A.; Chrzanowska, K.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to thyroid hormone is characterised by a lack of response of peripheral tissues to the active form of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3). In about 85% of cases, a mutation in THRB, the gene coding for thyroid receptor beta (TRbeta), is the cause of this disorder. Recently,

  12. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  13. Sex hormone-binding globulin as a marker for the thrombotic risk of hormonal contraceptives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raps, M.; Helmerhorst, F.; Fleischer, K.; Thomassen, S.; Rosendaal, F.; Rosing, J.; Ballieux, B.; Vliet, H. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It takes many years to obtain reliable values for the risk of venous thrombosis of hormonal contraceptive users from clinical data. Measurement of activated protein C (APC) resistance via thrombin generation is a validated test for determining the thrombogenicity of hormonal

  14. Efficacy of chemotherapy after hormone therapy for hormone receptor–positive metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Mori

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: According to the guidelines for metastatic breast cancer, hormone therapy for hormone receptor–positive metastatic breast cancer without life-threatening metastasis should be received prior to chemotherapy. Previous trials have investigated the sensitivity of chemotherapy for preoperative breast cancer based on the efficacy of neoadjuvant hormone therapy. In this retrospective study, we investigated the efficacy of chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer in hormone therapy–effective and hormone therapy–ineffective cases. Methods: Patients who received chemotherapy after hormone therapy for metastatic breast cancer between 2006 and 2013 at our institution were investigated. Results: A total of 32 patients received chemotherapy after hormone therapy for metastatic breast cancer. The median patient age was 59 years, and most of the primary tumors exhibited a T2 status. A total of 26 patients had an N(+ status, while 7 patients had human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–positive tumors. A total of 13 patients received clinical benefits from hormone therapy, with a rate of clinical benefit of subsequent chemotherapy of 30.8%, which was not significantly different from that observed in the hormone therapy–ineffective patients (52.6%. A total of 13 patients were able to continue the hormone therapy for more than 1 year, with a rate of clinical benefit of chemotherapy of 38.5%, which was not significantly different from that observed in the short-term hormone therapy patients (47.4%. The luminal A patients were able to continue hormone therapy for a significantly longer period than the non-luminal A patients (median survival time: 17.8 months vs 6.35 months, p = 0.0085. However, there were no significant differences in the response to or duration of chemotherapy. Conclusion: The efficacy of chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer cannot be predicted based on the efficacy of prior hormone therapy or tumor subtype

  15. Growth hormone receptor gene expression in puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, S; Meazza, C; Gertosio, C; Bozzola, E; Bozzola, M

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms regulating the synergic effect of growth hormone and other hormones during pubertal spurt are not completely clarified. We enrolled 64 females of Caucasian origin and normal height including 22 prepubertal girls, 26 pubertal girls, and 16 adults to evaluate the role of Growth Hormone/Insulin-like growth factor-I axis (GH/IGF-I) during the pubertal period. In these subjects both serum IGF-I and growth hormone binding protein levels, as well as quantitative growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene expression were evaluated in peripheral lymphocytes of all individuals by real-time PCR. Our results showed significantly lower IGF-I levels in women (148±10 ng/ml) and prepubertal girls (166.34±18.85 ng/ml) compared to pubertal girls (441.95±29.42 ng/ml; p<0.0001). Serum GHBP levels were significantly higher in prepubertal (127.02±20.76 ng/ml) compared to pubertal girls (16.63±2.97 ng/ml; p=0.0001) and adult women (19.95±6.65 ng/ml; p=0.0003). We also found higher GHR gene expression levels in pubertal girls [174.73±80.22 ag (growth hormone receptor)/5×10(5) ag (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] compared with other groups of subjects [women: 42.52±7.66 ag (growth hormone receptor)/5×10(5) ag (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase); prepubertal girls: 58.45±0.18.12 ag (growth hormone receptor)/5×10(5) ag (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)], but the difference did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that sexual hormones could positively influence GHR action, during the pubertal period, in a dual mode, that is, increasing GHR mRNA production and reducing GHR cleavage leading to GHBP variations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Extended cycle hormonal contraception in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucato, Gina S; Gerschultz, Kelly L

    2005-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of extended cycles of hormonal contraception to manage menstrual cycle-related complaints in adolescents and to accommodate the menstrual preferences of patients using hormonal contraception. This review summarizes recent findings related to the use of extended cycles and highlights their relevance to adolescents. Many adolescents would prefer to menstruate less frequently. Among health care providers who prescribe hormonal contraceptives, the majority believe suppressing withdrawal bleeding is well tolerated and prescribe extended cycling regimens to their patients. Shortening or eliminating the hormone-free interval results in greater ovarian suppression and thus may increase contraceptive efficacy. Studies in adult women have not identified changes in metabolic parameters beyond what would be expected from traditional cyclic use. New endometrial biopsy data have found no pathologic changes; most women using an extended cycle had atrophic endometriums. Extended cycling is frequently associated with breakthrough bleeding. In some women, this can be managed with a brief hormone-free interval. Recent findings demonstrate high levels of interest in extended cycling among adolescents and providers, and continue to add to the growing body of literature supporting the safety and improved contraceptive efficacy of extended regimens. Further research is warranted to focus on issues including cancer, thrombotic disease and fertility, and should enroll a sufficient adolescent sample.

  17. Sex Hormone Receptor Repertoire in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald M. Higa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of breast cancer as endocrine sensitive, hormone dependent, or estrogen receptor (ER positive refers singularly to ERα. One of the oldest recognized tumor targets, disruption of ERα-mediated signaling, is believed to be the mechanistic mode of action for all hormonal interventions used in treating this disease. Whereas ERα is widely accepted as the single most important predictive factor (for response to endocrine therapy, the presence of the receptor in tumor cells is also of prognostic value. Even though the clinical relevance of the two other sex hormone receptors, namely, ERβ and the androgen receptor remains unclear, two discordant phenomena observed in hormone-dependent breast cancers could be causally related to ERβ-mediated effects and androgenic actions. Nonetheless, our understanding of regulatory molecules and resistance mechanisms remains incomplete, further compromising our ability to develop novel therapeutic strategies that could improve disease outcomes. This review focuses on the receptor-mediated actions of the sex hormones in breast cancer.

  18. Growth hormone secretagogues: out of competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyot, Armand; Nikolovski, Zoran; Bosch, Jaume; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Kageyama, Shinji; Segura, Jordi; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) constitute a new GH deficiency treatment increasing exponentially in number and improved potency and bioavailability over the last decade. The growth hormone releasing activity makes these compounds attractive for the artificial improvement of the human sports skills, now that recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administration is effectively detected. The GHS family is extremely diverse both in number and chemical heterogeneity and keeps growing continuously. In this paper, a general screening test is proposed. To develop a universal method, the single common property of growth hormone secretagogues has been targeted: their capacity to bind to the GHS receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Pretreated urine samples have been tested in a competition assay where eventually the GHS presence detached a radiolabelled ligand from the receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Blank urine samples were processed to determine potential age, gender and exercise effects, and to define a threshold beyond which a specimen is considered positive. Samples from a growth hormone releasing peptide 2 (GHRP-2) excretion study corroborated the screening assay applicability with a detection window of approximately 4.5 h, and results were confirmed by comparison with a dedicated LC-MS quantification of the intact compound.

  19. Steroid hormone receptors and human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szamel, I.

    1985-02-01

    Steroid hormone receptor (SR) binding capacity can be measured both in the cytosol and in the nuclear fraction of the cancerous cells. Approximately 30-40% of breast cancers are hormone dependent. SR-positive tumors can be treated by endocrine therapy resulting in a favourable clinical response in 60-70% of the cases. At the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary, estradiol (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor assays are performed by a multipoint saturation analysis using Scatchard plot. Dextran coated charcoal technique is used for the separation of free and receptor protein-bound labelled hormones. Data obtained from 400 breast cancer patients show a correlation between the SR content of the tumor and the hormonal status of the patients. The ER binding capacity is higher after menopause compared to the premenopausal values. Specific correlation between the PR content of the tumor and the hormonal status of the patients cound not be observed. The PR binding capacity is the highest over 20 years. The highest clinical response rate, 80%, could be found in the group of patients with both ER and PR in their tumor tissues. (author).

  20. The physiological role of hormones in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschl, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The assessment of hormones in saliva has gained wide acceptance in clinical endocrinology. To date, there is no hypothesis as to why some hormones can be found in saliva, while others cannot, and whether there is a physiological consequence of this fact. A number of carefully performed studies give examples of important physiological hormonal activity in saliva. Steroids, such as androgens, act as pheromones in olfactory communication of various mammalian species, such as facilitating mating behavior in swine or serving as odor cues for rodent nestlings. Salivary peptide hormones, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), and amines such as melatonin, are involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and in the promotion of cell proliferation, and contribute to a rapid wound healing in the oropharyngeal epithelia. Current data provide evidence of the involvement of salivary cytokines, such as interleukin-8 and leptin, in tumorgenesis in the oral cavity and the salivary glands. The tumor tissues express and release significantly more of these cytokines than healthy glands. Consequently, the assessment of salivary hormone profiles may provide promising targets for diagnostic tumor markers.

  1. Hormonal responses during early embryogenesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Lausser, Andreas; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Plant hormones have been shown to regulate key processes during embryogenesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but the mechanisms that determine the peculiar embryo pattern formation of monocots are largely unknown. Using the auxin and cytokinin response markers DR5 and TCSv2 (two-component system, cytokinin-responsive promoter version #2), as well as the auxin efflux carrier protein PIN1a (PINFORMED1a), we have studied the hormonal response during early embryogenesis (zygote towards transition stage) in the model and crop plant maize. Compared with the hormonal response in Arabidopsis, we found that detectable hormone activities inside the developing maize embryo appeared much later. Our observations indicate further an important role of auxin, PIN1a and cytokinin in endosperm formation shortly after fertilization. Apparent auxin signals within adaxial endosperm cells and cytokinin responses in the basal endosperm transfer layer as well as chalazal endosperm are characteristic for early seed development in maize. Moreover, auxin signalling in endosperm cells is likely to be involved in exogenous embryo patterning as auxin responses in the endosperm located around the embryo proper correlate with adaxial embryo differentiation and outgrowth. Overall, the comparison between Arabidopsis and maize hormone response and flux suggests intriguing mechanisms in monocots that are used to direct their embryo patterning, which is significantly different from that of eudicots.

  2. How to use and interpret hormone ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollberger, Silja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Hormone ratios have become increasingly popular throughout the neuroendocrine literature since they offer a straightforward way to simultaneously analyze the effects of two interdependent hormones. However, the analysis of ratios is associated with statistical and interpretational concerns which have not been sufficiently considered in the context of endocrine research. The aim of this article, therefore, is to demonstrate and discuss these issues, and to suggest suitable ways to address them. In a first step, we use exemplary testosterone and cortisol data to illustrate that one major concern of ratios lies in their distribution and inherent asymmetry. As a consequence, results of parametric statistical analyses are affected by the ultimately arbitrary decision of which way around the ratio is computed (i.e., A/B or B/A). We suggest the use of non-parametric methods as well as the log-transformation of hormone ratios as appropriate methods to deal with these statistical problems. However, in a second step, we also discuss the complicated interpretation of ratios, and propose moderation analysis as an alternative and oftentimes more insightful approach to ratio analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that researchers carefully consider which statistical approach is best suited to investigate reciprocal hormone effects. With regard to the hormone ratio method, further research is needed to specify what exactly this index reflects on the biological level and in which cases it is a meaningful variable to analyze. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bulimia from a gynecological view: hormonal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, M; Szendei, G; Haász, P

    2004-11-01

    Gynecological problems are one of the most frequent somatic complications of eating disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess the role of improper eating habits in the aetiology of menstrual disturbances, anovulation and hormonal related changes. Bulimia nervosa is the focus of attention since amenorrhea is considered a diagnostic criterium in anorexia nervosa. Subjects of the BITE (Bulimia Investigation Test, Edinburgh) test who were infertile were studied (n = 58) In the studied population there were 6 cases of clinical and 8 cases of subclinical bulimia nervosa. Symptoms and severity subscales of the BITE test significantly correlated with body mass index (p = 0.003). All 14 patients suffering from clinical and subclinical bulimia nervosa had pathologically low FSH and LH hormone levels. In those with clinical bulimia nervosa (n = 6) we diagnosed 4 cases of multicystic ovary (MCO) and in the eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) group (n = 22) there were 2 cases of MCO and 5 cases of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The results suggest that unsatisfactory nutrition (binges and "crash diet") in bulimia nervosa results in hormonal dysfunction, menstrual disturbances and infertility. The authors question the necessity for immediately estrogen replacement: they consider the reversibility of the hormonal status by early treatment of eating disorders is more appropriate. Excessive use of hormonal contraceptives in therapy has to be questioned.

  4. Progress and prospects in male hormonal contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Testosterone functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Low concentrations of these hormones deprive the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis and results in markedly decreased sperm concentrations and effective contraception in a majority of men. Male hormonal contraception is well tolerated and acceptable to most men. Unfortunately, testosterone-alone regimens fail to completely suppress spermatogenesis in all men, meaning that in some the potential for fertility remains. Recent findings Because of this, novel combinations of testosterone and progestins, which synergistically suppress gonadotropins, have been studied. Two recently published testosterone/progestin trials are particularly noteworthy. In the first, a long-acting injectable testosterone ester, testosterone decanoate, was combined with etonogestrel implants and resulted in 80–90% of subjects achieving a fewer than 1 million sperm per milliliter. In the second, a daily testosterone gel was combined with 3-monthly injections of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate producing similar results. Summary Testosterone-based hormone combinations are able to reversibly suppress human spermatogenesis; however, a uniformly effective regimen has remained elusive. Nevertheless, improvements, such as the use of injectable testosterone undecanoate, may lead to a safe, reversible and effective male contraceptive. PMID:18438174

  5. Effect of rejuvenation hormones on spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jared L; Crosnoe, Lindsey E; Kim, Edward D

    2013-06-01

    To review the current literature for the effect of hormones used in rejuvenation clinics on the maintenance of spermatogenesis. Review of published literature. Not applicable. Men who have undergone exogenous testosterone (T) and/or anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) therapies. None. Semen analysis, pregnancy outcomes, and time to recovery of spermatogenesis. Exogenous testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids suppress intratesticular testosterone production, which may lead to azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. Therapies that protect spermatogenesis involve human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) therapy and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). The studies examining the effect of human growth hormone (HGH) on infertile men are uncontrolled and unconvincing, but they do not appear to negatively impact spermatogenesis. At present, routine use of aromatase inhibitors is not recommended based on a lack of long-term data. The use of hormones for rejuvenation is increasing with the aging of the Baby Boomer population. Men desiring children at a later age may be unaware of the side-effect profile of hormones used at rejuvenation centers. Testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids have well-established detrimental effects on spermatogenesis, but recovery may be possible with cessation. Clomiphene citrate, human growth hormone (HGH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and aromatase inhibitors do not appear to have significant negative effects on sperm production, but quality data are lacking. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preventing leaf identity theft with hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumba, Shelley; McCourt, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Genetic analysis of plant development has begun to demonstrate the importance of hormone synthesis and transport in regulating morphogenesis. In the case of leaf development, for example, auxin pooling determines where a primordium will emerge and leads to the activation of transcription factors, which determine leaf identities by modulating abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) concentrations. Signal transduction studies suggest that negative regulation of transcription factors through protein turnover is commonly used as a mechanism of hormone action. Together, these findings suggest that auxin might degrade a repressor that allows the activation of genes that modulate ABA/GA ratios in emerging leaves. With our increased understanding of the molecular basis of hormone signaling, it is becoming possible to overlay important regulators onto signaling modules that determine morphological outputs.

  7. Interlaboratory comparison of radioimmunological parathyroid hormone determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    An inter-laboratory study of serum immunoreactive PTH (iPTH) determination using standardized sera has been performed in order to check the value of the assays for the diagnosis of hyperparathyroid states. The results demonstrate: (1) that most of the cooperating laboratories (eleven of twelve) were able to discriminate between normal and grossly elevated PTH-values; (2) that direct comparison of values from different laboratories indicates very poor agreement; (3) that PTH values cannot be interpreted without a description of the characteristics of the assay used; (4) that the introduction of standard sera is advantageous and should be undertaken; (5) that determination of iPTH in serum samples is far from being a routine method when compared with radioimmunoassays for hormones like insulin, growth hormone, etc.; the difficulties being due to lack of standradized reagents and peculiarities in the metabolism of the hormone. (orig.) [de

  8. Hormonal anticonception anno 2013: a clinician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, M; Verhaeghe, V

    2013-01-01

    Hormonal contraception has recently drawn the attention of both national and international Health Organizations mainly because of new data on the risk of venous and arterial thrombosis. This has, fortunately, not led to a 'pill scare' as happened in 1996 when controversy arose with respect to the thrombotic risk of third versus second -generation pills. This time, evidence on the thrombotic risk of pills with the newer progestogens is gathering, -leading to a re-evaluation of guidelines. In this paper, we summarize this evidence and try to present a clinician's view of the indications and contraindications of hormonal contraception and situate them in the perspective of the numerous non-contraceptive health benefits of hormonal contraception.

  9. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4 to triiodothyronine (T3 in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  10. Longitudinal reproductive hormone profiles in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Toppari, J; Haavisto, A M

    1998-01-01

    The gonads are usually considered quiescent organs in infancy and childhood. However, during the first few postnatal months of life, levels of gonadotropins and sex hormones are elevated in humans. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that environmental factors operating perinatally may...... influence male reproductive health in adulthood. The early postnatal activity of the Sertoli cell, a testicular cell type that is supposed to play a major role in sperm production in adulthood is largely unknown. Recently, the peptide hormone inhibin B was shown to be a marker of Sertoli cell function......, and testosterone. Thus, although levels of FSH, LH, and testosterone decreased into the range observed later in childhood by the age of 6-9 months, serum inhibin B levels remained elevated up to at least the age of 15 months. In girls, the hormonal pattern was generally more complex, with a high interindividual...

  11. The Gut Hormones in Appetite Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has received much attention worldwide in association with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. At present, bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for obesity in which long-term weight loss is achieved in patients. By contrast, pharmacological interventions for obesity are usually followed by weight regain. Although the exact mechanisms of long-term weight loss following bariatric surgery are yet to be fully elucidated, several gut hormones have been implicated. Gut hormones play a critical role in relaying signals of nutritional and energy status from the gut to the central nervous system, in order to regulate food intake. Cholecystokinin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide-1, and oxyntomodulin act through distinct yet synergistic mechanisms to suppress appetite, whereas ghrelin stimulates food intake. Here, we discuss the role of gut hormones in the regulation of food intake and body weight.

  12. Steroid hormone sulphation in lead workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, P; Romeo, L; Peroni, E; Ferioli, A; Ferrari, S; Pasini, F; Aprili, F

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of steroid hormones has been investigated in 10 workers exposed to lead and in 10 non-exposed subjects to determine whether lead interferes with the first or second phase reactions of steroid hormone biotransformation, or both. In the exposed workers blood lead concentrations (PbB) ranged from 45 to 69 micrograms/100 ml; in the controls PbB was less than 25 micrograms/100 ml. No statistical differences were found for the total amount of the urinary hormone metabolites, but a drop of about 50% was observed for the sulphated portion. It is suggested that lead interferes with the mechanisms of sulphoconjugation through an effect on the cytosol enzymes sulphotransferase and sulphokinase. PMID:2930732

  13. HORMONAL REGULATION OF SELENIUM ACCUMULATION BY PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Golubkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal regulation is considered to be a unique mechanism controlling growth and development of living organism. The review discusses the correlations between pant hormonal status of non-accumulators and hyper-accumulators of Se with the accumulation levels of this microelement. The phenomenon of stimulation and redistribution of selenium as a result of phytohormone treatment, the peculiarities of phytohormones effect among different species and cultivars, and influence of plant sexualization on selenium accumulation are described in article. Data of hormonal regulation of selenium level for spinach, garlic, perennial onion, Brassica chinenesis and Valeriana officialis are presented in the review.

  14. Non-health Care Facility Medication Errors Associated with Hormones and Hormone Antagonists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magal, Pranav; Spiller, Henry A; Casavant, Marcel J; Chounthirath, Thitphalak; Hodges, Nichole L; Smith, Gary A

    2017-12-01

    Hormones and hormone antagonists are frequently associated with medication errors and may result in important adverse outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate non-health care facility (non-HCF) medication errors associated with hormones and hormone antagonists in the United States (US). A retrospective analysis of National Poison Data System data was conducted to identify characteristics and trends of unintentional non-HCF therapeutic errors involving hormones and hormone antagonists among individuals of all ages from 2000 to 2012. From 2000 to 2012, US poison control centers received 169,695 calls regarding unintentional non-HCF therapeutic errors associated with hormone therapies, averaging 13,053 medication error calls annually. The rate of reported errors increased significantly by 162.6% (p hormones and hormone antagonists in the US. While most errors did not result in adverse outcomes, their increasing frequency places a greater burden on the health care system.

  15. Clinical trials in male hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions between hormonal contraception and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Arne; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Sabers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraceptives may affect each other's metabolism and clinical efficacy. Loss of seizure control and unplanned pregnancy may occur when these compounds are used concomitantly. Although a large number of available preparations yield a plethora of possible drug...... combinations, most of these drug interactions are predictable and, thus, avoidable. Unfortunately, there is a substantial lack of data regarding the newer AEDs. Detailed understanding of these issues is necessary for those who prescribe AEDs and/or hormonal contraception to women with epilepsy, as well...

  17. Hormonal and nonhormonal treatment of vasomotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Miriam S; Nakajima, Steven T

    2015-03-01

    This article focuses on the cause, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis of, and treatment options for vasomotor symptoms. In addition, it summarizes important points for health care providers caring for perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with regard to health maintenance, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and vaginal atrophy. Treatment options for hot flashes with variable effectiveness include systemic hormone therapy (estrogen/progestogen), nonhormonal pharmacologic therapies (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, clonidine, gabapentin), and nonpharmacologic therapy options (behavioral changes, acupuncture). Risks and benefits as well as contraindications for hormone therapy are further discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Market Diffusion of Extended Cycle Hormonal Contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megen Leeds Schumacher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended cycle hormonal contraceptives (e.g. Seasonale, Seasonique when introduced in 2003 were considered a very novel approach to contraception. The idea of manipulating the menstrual cycle so that women would experience just four menstruations a year was radical and was assumed to be responsible for the slow acceptance rate among the general public. Objective: This report analyzes two different aspects of the acceptance of this unique idea in the population. The first was the level of usage of extended cycle hormonal contraceptives in the general population, which was measured by a review of sales figures over time in the United States. The second was an examination of market diffusion as it relates to consumer perceptions regarding the characteristics of these products. Methods: To determine the degree of usage of extended cycle hormonal contraceptives the yearly sales, in terms of units sold, were compared with that of other leading methods of hormonal contraception. Along with the data, survey answers were obtained from 65 women who volunteered to participate in the study. Participants were selected randomly to represent the target population to assess the level of awareness about the benefits, risks, and any other concerns regarding the use of extended cycle hormonal contraceptives. Results: The yearly sales data of units sold showed a definitive increase in the sales of extended cycle hormonal contraceptives since their release on the market. The survey results showed an overwhelming awareness in the study population about the extended regimen. However, only about half of the women in the survey group were aware of its benefits. The main concern reported was the perceived significant side effect profile. Conclusion: Though awareness about the extended cycle hormonal contraception regimen was widespread, the survey population was not well informed about the advantages and the disadvantages regarding the degree of severity of

  19. Synthesis of plant hormones labelled by tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, G.V.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Reaction of solid-phase catalytic hydrogenation, isotopic exchange with enriched tritium water, catalytic heterogenous isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium, hydrogenolysis as applied to synthesis of plants labelled by tritium were studied. Auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, fusicoccins - representatives of the basic hormones of plants - were objects of investigations. In dependence on synthesis method compounds labelled by tritium were prepared with molar radioactivity from 5 up to 155 Ci/mmol. Order of universal approaches to synthesis of plant hormones labelled by tritium was formulated [ru

  20. Oral manifestations in growth hormone disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Atreja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone is of vital importance for normal growth and development. Individuals with growth hormone deficiency develop pituitary dwarfism with disproportionate delayed growth of skull and facial skeleton giving them a small facial appearance for their age. Both hyper and hypopituitarism have a marked effect on development of oro-facial structures including eruption and shedding patterns of teeth, thus giving an opportunity to treating dental professionals to first see the signs and symptoms of these growth disorders and correctly diagnose the serious underlying disease.

  1. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. → Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. → Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor α, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  2. Sex, hormones and neurogenesis in the hippocampus: hormonal modulation of neurogenesis and potential functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, L A M; Wainwright, S R; Roes, M M; Duarte-Guterman, P; Chow, C; Hamson, D K

    2013-11-01

    The hippocampus is an area of the brain that undergoes dramatic plasticity in response to experience and hormone exposure. The hippocampus retains the ability to produce new neurones in most mammalian species and is a structure that is targeted in a number of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, many of which are influenced by both sex and sex hormone exposure. Intriguingly, gonadal and adrenal hormones affect the structure and function of the hippocampus differently in males and females. Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is regulated by both gonadal and adrenal hormones in a sex- and experience-dependent way. Sex differences in the effects of steroid hormones to modulate hippocampal plasticity should not be completely unexpected because the physiology of males and females is different, with the most notable difference being that females gestate and nurse the offspring. Furthermore, reproductive experience (i.e. pregnancy and mothering) results in permanent changes to the maternal brain, including the hippocampus. This review outlines the ability of gonadal and stress hormones to modulate multiple aspects of neurogenesis (cell proliferation and cell survival) in both male and female rodents. The function of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is linked to spatial memory and depression, and the present review provides early evidence of the functional links between the hormonal modulation of neurogenesis that may contribute to the regulation of cognition and stress. © 2013 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  3. Steroid Sex Hormones, Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin, and Diabetes Incidence in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, K J; Kim, C; Christophi, C A; Aroda, V R; Knowler, W C; Edelstein, S E; Florez, J C; Labrie, F; Kahn, S E; Goldberg, R B; Barrett-Connor, E

    2015-10-01

    Steroid sex hormones and SHBG may modify metabolism and diabetes risk, with implications for sex-specific diabetes risk and effects of prevention interventions. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships of steroid sex hormones, SHBG and SHBG single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with diabetes risk factors and with progression to diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). This was a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized clinical trial involving 27 U.S. academic institutions. The study included 2898 DPP participants: 969 men, 948 premenopausal women not taking exogenous sex hormones, 550 postmenopausal women not taking exogenous sex hormones, and 431 postmenopausal women taking exogenous sex hormones. Participants were randomized to receive intensive lifestyle intervention, metformin, or placebo. Associations of steroid sex hormones, SHBG, and SHBG SNPs with glycemia and diabetes risk factors, and with incident diabetes over median 3.0 years (maximum, 5.0 y). T and DHT were inversely associated with fasting glucose in men, and estrone sulfate was directly associated with 2-hour post-challenge glucose in men and premenopausal women. SHBG was associated with fasting glucose in premenopausal women not taking exogenous sex hormones, and in postmenopausal women taking exogenous sex hormones, but not in the other groups. Diabetes incidence was directly associated with estrone and estradiol and inversely with T in men; the association with T was lost after adjustment for waist circumference. Sex steroids were not associated with diabetes outcomes in women. SHBG and SHBG SNPs did not predict incident diabetes in the DPP population. Estrogens and T predicted diabetes risk in men but not in women. SHBG and its polymorphisms did not predict risk in men or women. Diabetes risk is more potently determined by obesity and glycemia than by sex hormones.

  4. The role of reproductive hormones in postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Crystal Edler; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Rubinow, David R

    2015-02-01

    Despite decades of research aimed at identifying the causes of postpartum depression (PPD), PPD remains common, and the causes are poorly understood. Many have attributed the onset of PPD to the rapid perinatal change in reproductive hormones. Although a number of human and nonhuman animal studies support the role of reproductive hormones in PPD, several studies have failed to detect an association between hormone concentrations and PPD. The purpose of this review is to examine the hypothesis that fluctuations in reproductive hormone levels during pregnancy and the postpartum period trigger PPD in susceptible women. We discuss and integrate the literature on animal models of PPD and human studies of reproductive hormones and PPD. We also discuss alternative biological models of PPD to demonstrate the potential for multiple PPD phenotypes and to describe the complex interplay of changing reproductive hormones and alterations in thyroid function, immune function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, lactogenic hormones, and genetic expression that may contribute to affective dysfunction. There are 3 primary lines of inquiry that have addressed the role of reproductive hormones in PPD: nonhuman animal studies, correlational studies of postpartum hormone levels and mood symptoms, and hormone manipulation studies. Reproductive hormones influence virtually every biological system implicated in PPD, and a subgroup of women seem to be particularly sensitive to the effects of perinatal changes in hormone levels. We propose that these women constitute a "hormone-sensitive" PPD phenotype, which should be studied independent of other PPD phenotypes to identify underlying pathophysiology and develop novel treatment targets.

  5. Gene Linked to Excess Male Hormones in Female Infertility Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... April 15, 2014 Gene linked to excess male hormones in female infertility disorder Discovery by NIH-supported ... may lead to the overproduction of androgens — male hormones similar to testosterone — occurring in women with polycystic ...

  6. Hormonal Regulation of Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xian, Wa; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2004-01-01

    Our laboratory is interested in studying the mechanisms by which lactogenic hormones regulate Beta-casein gene expression and how alterations in the levels of these hormones may function in the growth...

  7. Hormonal and haematological responses of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... C. gariepinus were collected at each exposure hour and evaluated for primary and secondary stress indicators. Data obtained were ... Key words: Hormonal, Haematology, Clarias gariepinus, ammonia, toxicity. INTRODUCTION. Stress has been ..... Solbe JF, De LG (1995). Freshwater Fish. In: P. Calow (ed ...

  8. Emerging hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, Andrea R; Komm, Barry S; Pickar, James H

    2015-03-01

    The majority of women experience bothersome symptoms postmenopause (e.g., hot flushes, vaginal symptoms). Estrogen receptor agonists remain the most effective options for ameliorating menopausal symptoms. However, use of hormonal therapies has declined in the wake of issues raised by the Women's Health Initiative trials. As a result, there is a need for new safe and effective alternatives to estrogen-progestogen hormone therapy. We review the efficacy and safety profile of hormonal menopausal therapies that are in Phase III clinical trials or recently approved. Investigational treatments discussed include two new vaginal estrogen products (TX-004HR, WC-3011); the first combination of estradiol and progesterone, and a novel combination of dehydroepiandrosterone and acolbifene. We also review a new selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), ospemifene, recently approved for treatment of dyspareunia related to menopause, and conjugated estrogens plus bazedoxifene, an estrogens/SERM combination, recently approved for moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis. New and emerging hormonal treatments for managing menopausal symptoms may have improved safety and efficacy profiles compared with traditional estrogen-progestogen therapy; however, long-term safety data will be needed.

  9. Homeorhetic hormones, metabolites and accelerated growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These samples were assayed for glucose, free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine, lysine, growth hormone, insulin and thyroxine. It was found that during the period of accelerated growth, glucose concentrations decreased after feeding while free fatty acids and glycerol concentrations increased after feeding. This is the inverse of ...

  10. Pituitary and mammary growth hormone in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatti, Sofie Fatima Mareyam

    2006-01-01

    Several pathological (e.g. obesity and chronic hypercortisolism) and non-pathological (e.g. ageing) states in humans are characterized by a reduction in pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion. Chronic hypercortisolism in humans is also associated with an impaired GH response to various stimuli.

  11. [Male hormonal contraception: past, present, future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Norbert; Hegyi, Borbála Eszter; Badó, Attila; Németh, Gábor

    2017-11-01

    In certain regions of the world the enormous rate of population growth raises economic and public health concerns and widely accessible contraceptive methods would be desired. In contrast, in other countries the use of effective contraception is a question of individual preferences. Today, most of the reliable contraceptive methods are applied by women, while the options for male methods are quite limited. It is well known that significant portion of pregnancies are still unplanned and several data revealed men's willingness to take part in family planning. Based on these needs, remarkable efforts have been made to develop a suitable hormonal contraceptive agent for men. With the exogenous suppression of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion, the inhibition of the testicular testosterone production and the spermatogenesis can be achieved. In the beginning, testosterone-derivatives, or testosterone-progestin combinations were administered, later synthetic androgen agents were developed. Despite of these efforts, unfortunately, there is no safe, widely feasible male hormonal contraception to date, but in the future this goal can be achieved by solving the key hurdles. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(46): 1819-1830.

  12. Prolactin and growth hormone in fish osmoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; McCormick, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    Prolactin is an important regulator of multiple biological functions in vertebrates, and has been viewed as essential to ion uptake as well as reduction in ion and water permeability of osmoregulatory surfaces in freshwater and euryhaline fish. Prolactin-releasing peptide seems to stimulate prolactin expression in the pituitary and peripheral organs during freshwater adaptation. Growth hormone, a member of the same family of hormones as prolactin, promotes acclimation to seawater in several teleost fish, at least in part through the action of insulin-like growth factor I. In branchial epithelia, development and differentiation of the seawater-type chloride cell (and their underlying biochemistry) is regulated by GH, IGF-I, and cortisol, whereas the freshwater-type chloride cell is regulated by prolactin and cortisol. In the epithelia of gastrointestinal tract, prolactin induces cell proliferation during freshwater adaptation, whereas cortisol stimulates both cell proliferation and apoptosis. We propose that control of salinity acclimation in teleosts by prolactin and growth hormone primarily involves regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation (the latter including upregulation of specific ion transporters), and that there is an important interaction of these hormones with corticosteroids. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be associated with a deficiency of the hormone cortisol . Cortisol deficiency can impair the body's immune system, causing ... proteins called transcription factors, which help control the activity of many ... play a role in sexual development and the ability to have children (fertility); ...

  14. Molecular Medicine II: Hormone Dependent Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    family, member 4 deiodinase, iodothyronine, -3.1 Dio2 thyroid hormone catabolism type II serne (cysteine) -4.3 Serpina3n proteinas inhibitor, clade A...ElO, and the anti- p44/42 teins and recruit various proteinases , including matrix metal- MAPK rabbit polyclonal antibody were from Cell Signaling Tech

  15. Urinary growth hormone excretion in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Lindholm, J; Vandeweghe, M

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical assessment of disease activity in acromegaly still presents a problem, especially in treated patients with mild clinical symptoms. We therefore examined the diagnostic value of the measurement of urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion in seventy unselected patients with acromegaly...

  16. Sexual behavioural pattern of orchidectomised and hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The persistence or cessation of sexual behaviour after abrupt testosterone withdrawal i.e. castration depends among other things on the age of the animal at castration. The aim of this work is to ascertain the effect of early orchidectomy and subsequent hormone replacement to 24 weeks of age on restoration of sexual ...

  17. Asprosin is a centrally acting orexigenic hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asprosin is a recently discovered fasting-induced hormone that promotes hepatic glucose production. Here we demonstrate that asprosin in the circulation crosses the blood–brain barrier and directly activates orexigenic AgRP+ neurons via a cAMPdependent pathway. This signaling results in inhibition o...

  18. Relationship between Thyroid Hormone levels and Hyperthyroid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assessment of thyrotoxic patients often involves laboratory and clinical evaluation. We have therefore investigated the relationship between the magnitude of hyperthyroid symptoms and thyroid hormone levels in a set of newly diagnosed thyrotoxic patients. Methods: Fifteen subjects with untreated, newly ...

  19. LEARNING HORMONE ACTION MECHANISMS WITH BIOINFORMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Sousa

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to manage the constantly growing information in genetics availableon the internet is becoming crucial in biochemical education and medicalpractice. Therefore, developing students skills in working with bioinformaticstools is a challenge to undergraduate courses in the molecular life sciences.The regulation of gene transcription by hormones and vitamins is a complextopic that influences all body systems. We describe a student centered activityused in a multidisciplinary “Functional Organ System“ course on the EndocrineSystem. By receiving, as teams, a nucleotide sequence of a hormone orvitamin-response element, students navigate through internet databases to findthe gene to which it belongs. Subsequently, student’s search how thecorresponding hormone/vitamin influences the expression of that particulargene and how a dysfunctional interaction might cause disease. This activity,proposed for 4 consecutive years to cohorts of 50-60 students/year enrolled inthe 2nd year our undergraduate medical degree, revealed that 90% of thestudents developed a better understanding of the usefulness of bioinformaticsand that 98% intend to use them in the future. Since hormones and vitaminsregulate genes of all body organ systems, this web-based activity successfullyintegrates the whole body physiology of the medical curriculum and can be ofrelevance to other courses on molecular life sciences.

  20. Homeorhetic hormones, metabolites and accelerated growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Homeorhetic hormones, metabolites and accelerated growth. A.L. Marais and J.G. van der Walt. Rumen Biochemistry, Animal and Dairy Science Research Institute,. Irene 1675, Republic of South Africa. Six newly weaned karakul ewes, three with fat tails and three without tails, were used to investigate the metabolic and hor ...

  1. Hormonal and haematological responses of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed hormonal and haematological responses of Clarias gariepinus to ammonia toxicity. Laboratory study of haematological responses of adult C. gariepinus to sub-lethal level of ammonia (2.2 g/l) at different exposure hours (0, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 h) were carried out. Blood samples of C. gariepinus were ...

  2. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  3. Sex hormone replacement in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Hjerrild, Britta; Cleemann, Line Hartvig

    2012-01-01

    syndrome. Recent research emphasizes the need for proper sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during the entire lifespan of females with TS and new hypotheses concerning estrogen receptors, genetics and the timing of HRT offers valuable new information. In this review, we will discuss the effects...

  4. Hormones in pregnancy | Kumar | Nigerian Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The endocrinology of human pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes that result from physiological alterations at the boundary between mother and fetus. Progesterone and oestrogen have a great role along with other hormones. The controversies of use of progestogen and others are discussed in this ...

  5. Determination of hormonal combination for increased multiplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    tested using a completely randomized design with three replicates in the tissue culture laboratory. Ten shoot tips from in-vitro raised .... Hormonal combination for increased multiplication of tissue culture potato plantlets trimmed off and the nodal explants ..... Comparison of hydroponic and aeroponics cultivation systems for ...

  6. Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V; Gaitskell, K; Hermon, C

    2015-01-01

    . Adjusted Poisson regressions yielded relative risks (RRs) versus never-use. FINDINGS: During prospective follow-up, 12 110 postmenopausal women, 55% (6601) of whom had used hormone therapy, developed ovarian cancer. Among women last recorded as current users, risk was increased even with

  7. Genetic features of thyroid hormone receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are prototypes of nuclear transcription factors that regulate the expression of target genes. These receptors play an important role in many physiological processes. Moreover, a dysfunction of these proteins is often implicated in several human diseases and malignancies. Here we ...

  8. Immunoprecipitation of the parathyroid hormone receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.S.; Tyler, G.A.; O'Brien, R.; Caporale, L.H.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1987-01-01

    An 125 I-labeled synthetic analog of bovine parathyroid hormone, [8-norleucine,18-norleucine,34-tyrosine]PTH-(1-34) amide ([Nle]PTH-(1-34)-NH 2 ), purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), was employed to label the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor in cell lines derived from PTH target tissues: the ROS 17/2.8 rat osteosarcoma of bone and the CV1 and COS monkey kidney lines. After incubation of the radioligand with intact cultured cells, the hormone was covalently attached to receptors by using either a photoaffinity technique or chemical (affinity) crosslinking. In each case, covalent labeling was specific, as evidenced by a reduction of labeling when excess competing nonradioactive ligand was present. After covalent attachment of radioligand, membranes were prepared form the cells and solubilized in the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 or octyl glucoside. Analysis of the immunoprecipitate on NaDod-SO 4 /polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography revealed the presence of a doublet of apparent molecular mass 69-70 kDa. Specifically labeled bands of approximate molecular mass 95 and 28 kDa were also observed. The anti-PTH IgG was affinity purified by passage over a PTH-Sepharose column and used to made an immunoaffinity column. These studies suggest that the use of an anti-PTH antiserum that binds receptor-bound hormone is likely to be a useful step in the further physicochemical characterization and purification of the PTH receptor

  9. Genetic features of thyroid hormone receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1995) and coronary heart disease (Goumidi et al. 2011b), and with response to drugs (Duan et al. 2012). The ... TRα1 is primarily expressed in heart, bone and brain, while TRβ1 is more abundant in liver, kidney and thy- ... stimulating hormone (TSH) level in healthy subjects (Lopez et al. 2008) and with Alzheimer's disease ...

  10. Expression and sequence characterization of growth hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... growth hormone (bGH) which demonstrated active conformation of BbGHBP. These results demonstrate high expression and sequence characterization of BbGHBP in Nili-Ravi buffaloes and provide the basis for the assessment of BbGHBP in other breeds of buffalo. Keywords: Liver, Nili-Ravi buffalo, GHBP, MALDI-TOF ...

  11. Lymphocyte GH-axis hormones in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    The production and utilization of common ligands and their receptors by cells of the immune and neuroendocrine systems constitutes a biochemical information circuit between and within the immune and neuroendocrine systems. The sharing of ligands and receptors allows the immune system to serve as the sixth sense notifying the nervous system of the presence of foreign entities. Within this framework, it is also clear that immune cell functions can be altered by neuroendocrine hormones and that cells of the immune system have the ability to produce neuroendocrine hormones. This review summarizes a part of this knowledge with particular emphasis on growth hormone (GH). The past two decades have uncovered a lot of detail about the actions of GH, acting through its receptor, at the molecular and cellular level and its influence on the immune system. The production and action of immune cell-derived GH is less well developed although its important role in immunity is also slowly emerging. Here we discuss the production of GH, GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their cognate receptors on cells of the immune system and their influence via endocrine/autocrine/paracrine and intracrine pathways on immune function. The intracellular mechanisms of action of immune cell-derived GH are still largely unexplored, and it is anticipated that further work in this particular area will establish an important role for this source of GH in normal physiology and in pathologic situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gut satiety hormones and hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köşüş, Aydin; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğullari, Betül; Hizli, Deniz; Namuslu, Mehmet; Ayyildiz, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is described as unexplained excessive nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Some gut hormones that regulate appetite may have important role in etiopathogenesis of HG and weight changes during pregnancy. In this study, levels of gut satiety hormones were evaluated in pregnant women with HG. This prospective case-control study was conducted in 30 women with HG and 30 healthy pregnant women without symptoms of HG. Fasting venous blood samples were taken from all subjects for measurement of plasma gut hormone levels; obestatin (pg/mL), peptide YY (PYY), pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and cholecystokinin (CCK). Plasma PYY and PP levels were significantly higher in HG group. The most important parameter in diagnosis of HG was plasma PP level. Simple use of PP level led to the diagnosis 91.1 % of HG cases correctly. The single most important parameter in the prediction of HG was also PP level. Anorexigenic gut hormones might have important role in etiopathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum and weight changes during pregnancy.

  13. Polyphenism in insects and the juvenile hormone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    During the past four decades or so, there has been a growing realization that juvenile hormone (JH) is widely involved in the development of polyphenism in insects. Recently, a significant paper on an experimental study on polyphenism in an insect has been published (Suzuki and Nijhout. 2006), and it carried the thesis ...

  14. Nuclear translocation and retention of growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertani, Hichem C; Raccurt, Mireille; Abbate, Aude

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that GH is subject to rapid receptor-dependent nuclear translocation. Here, we examine the importance of ligand activation of the GH-receptor (GHR)-associated Janus kinase (JAK) 2 and receptor dimerization for hormone internalization and nuclear translocation by us...

  15. How Early Hormones Shape Gender Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenbaum, Sheri A; Beltz, Adriene M

    2016-02-01

    Many important psychological characteristics show sex differences, and are influenced by sex hormones at different developmental periods. We focus on the role of sex hormones in early development, particularly the differential effects of prenatal androgens on aspects of gender development. Increasing evidence confirms that prenatal androgens have facilitative effects on male-typed activity interests and engagement (including child toy preferences and adult careers), and spatial abilities, but relatively minimal effects on gender identity. Recent emphasis has been directed to the psychological mechanisms underlying these effects (including sex differences in propulsive movement, and androgen effects on interest in people versus things), and neural substrates of androgen effects (including regional brain volumes, and neural responses to mental rotation, sexually arousing stimuli, emotion, and reward). Ongoing and planned work is focused on understanding the ways in which hormones act jointly with the social environment across time to produce varying trajectories of gender development, and clarifying mechanisms by which androgens affect behaviors. Such work will be facilitated by applying lessons from other species, and by expanding methodology. Understanding hormonal influences on gender development enhances knowledge of psychological development generally, and has important implications for basic and applied questions, including sex differences in psychopathology, women's underrepresentation in science and math, and clinical care of individuals with variations in gender expression.

  16. Reproductive hormones as psychotropic agents? | Berk | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The female preponderance in unipolar mood and anxiety disorders is well documented, with a double to triple lifetime prevalence compared to males. Much of this increased vulnerability is in the childbearing years. Hormones are a tempting explanation, although other biochemical factors such as cytokines may also be ...

  17. Hormone Therapy in Clinical Equine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Patrick M

    2016-12-01

    A wide variety of hormone therapies are used in clinical practice in the reproductive management of horses. The goal of this article is to review therapeutic options for a variety of clinical indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in endogenous hormone concentrations during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-14

    Sep 14, 2011 ... This study investigated the changes of five endogenous hormones in the shoot apex and the white bases of D-leaf during the inflorescence induction and development of 'Smooth Cayenne' pineapple, using 14-month-old pot-grown plants as material and ethephon as flower forcing agent. Results showed.

  19. Tissue thyroid hormone levels in critical illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Peeters (Robin); S.D. van Geyten (Serge Der); P.J. Wouters (Pieter); V.M. Darras (Veerle); H. van Toor (Hans); E. Kaptein (Ellen); T.J. Visser (Theo); G. van den Berghe (Greet)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractContext: Pronounced alterations in serum thyroid hormone levels occur during critical illness. T3 decreases and rT3 increases, the magnitudes of which are related to the severity of disease. It is unclear whether these changes are associated with decreased tissue T3 concentrations and,

  20. Molecular basis of juvenile hormone signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindra, Marek; Bellés, X.; Shinoda, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, Oct 09 (2015), s. 39-46 ISSN 2214-5745 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-23681S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : juvenile hormone * JH receptor * Drosophila melanogaster Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.719, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214574515001297

  1. Contraception and Hormones within Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homewood, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    investigating the implications of the new form of contraception from an interaction design perspective before introducing my current research area; hormones within interaction design and describes how this research is relevant to the workshop Hacking Women’s Health. Finally, this paper describes my personal...

  2. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor sequence from fish. G KUMARESAN, T VENUGOPAL, A VIKAS, T J PANDIAN andS MATHAVAN*. Department of Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, India. *Corresponding author (Fax, 91-452-859134; Email, ...

  3. Polyphenism in insects and the juvenile hormone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    insect evolutionary history may be hypothesized. 4. Possible interaction of JH and ecdysteroids in polyphenism development. Though this review is mainly on the role of JH in the development of polyphenism, it would not be out of place to mention briefly here the role of another family of developmental hormones, the ...

  4. Parathyroid hormone secretion in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q; Ladefoged, S D

    1996-01-01

    The aim of study was to introduce and evaluate a method for quantifying the parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion during hemodialysis in secondary hyperparathyroidism due to end-stage renal failure. We developed a method suitable for inducing sequential hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia during...

  5. Hormones and tendinopathies: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Berardi, Anna C; Frizziero, Antonio; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Tendinopathies negatively affect the quality of life of millions of people, but we still do not know the factors involved in the development of tendon conditions. Published articles in English in PubMed and Google Scholar up to June 2015 about hormonal influence on tendinopathies onset. One hundred and two papers were included following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. In vitro and in vivo, tenocytes showed changes in their morphology and in their functional properties according to hormonal imbalances. Genetic pattern, sex, age and comorbidities can influence the hormonal effect on tendons. The increasing prevalence of metabolic disorders prompts to investigate the possible connection between metabolic problems and musculoskeletal diseases. The influence of hormones on tendon structure and metabolism needs to be further investigated. If found to be significant, multidisciplinary preventive and therapeutic strategies should then be developed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-28

    Jul 28, 2011 ... cancer, with special reference to estrogen receptors, as well as mechanisms of receptor-ligand interactions, response or resistance to hormonal ... chromosome 17, while BRCA2 is located on the long arm of chromosome 13. ... of the two estrogen receptors, while B demonstrates percentage homology of ...

  7. Spermatogenesis Abnormalities following Hormonal Therapy in Transwomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirachai Jindarak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To measure spermatogenesis abnormalities in transwomen at the time of sex reassignment surgery (SRS and to analyze the association between hormonal therapy duration and infertility severity. Design. Retrospective study. Setting. University hospital. Patients. One-hundred seventy-three transwomen who underwent SRS from January 2000 to December 2015. Interventions. All orchidectomy specimens were retrospectively reviewed and classified. History of hormonal therapy duration was retrieved from medical records. Main Outcome Measures. Histological examinations of orchidectomy specimens were performed to assess spermatogenesis. Results. One-hundred seventy-three orchidectomy specimens were evaluated. Histological examinations showed maturation arrest in 36.4%, hypospermatogenesis in 26%, Sertoli cell-only syndrome in 20.2%, normal spermatogenesis in 11%, and seminiferous tubule hyalinization in 6.4% of the specimens. Spermatogenesis abnormality severity was not associated with the total therapy duration (P=0.81 or patient age at the time of surgery (P=0.88. Testicular volumes and sizes were associated with spermatogenesis abnormality severity (P=0.001 and P=0.026, right testicle and left testicle, resp.. Conclusion(s. Feminizing hormonal treatment leads to reductions in testicular germ cell levels. All transwomen should be warned about this consequence, and gamete preservation should be offered before starting hormonal treatment.

  8. Long-acting reversible hormonal contraception

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is crucial to reduce unsustainable population growth and the resulting negative impacts on ... Long-acting reversible hormonal contraceptives are effective methods of birth control that provide contraception for an extended period without requiring ... temporary reduction in bone mineral density as DMPA reduces the ovarian ...

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 23 - et fosfatregulerende hormon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Signe; Pedersen, Susanne Møller; Kassem, Moustapha

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) er et nyligt identificeret fosfatonin. FGF23's fysiologiske hovedfunktion er at opretholde normalt serumfosfat og at virke som et D-vitaminmodregulatorisk hormon. Sygdomme, der er koblet til forhøjet serum FGF23, er hypofosfatæmisk rakitis, fibrøs dysplasi og...

  10. Homeorhetic hormones, metabolites and accelerated growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were drawn from surgically implanted catheters in the caudal aorta and vena cava during normal growth, maintenance (zero) growth and accelerated growth.These samples were assayed for glucose, free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine, lysine, growth hormone, insulin and thyroxine. It was found that during the ...

  11. Naturally occurring menopause in cynomolgus monkeys: changes in hormone, lipid, and carbohydrate measures with hormonal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Koudy Williams, J; Wagner, Janice D

    2005-08-01

    Naturally occurring post-menopausal (PM) female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were identified. Their sex hormone profile was characterized and compared with younger pre-menopausal females before and after ovariectomy (OVX). PM females had lower estrogens and increased follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations. Two PM females had diabetes mellitus and elevated androgens (androstenodione and dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate). Non-diabetic PM females were given parenteral E(2) which normalized FSH, and caused improvements in body weight, plasma lipids and lipoprotein cholesterol. Androgens remained lower with E(2) treatment. OVX induced comparable increases in FSH seen with the PM monkeys, however they had lower body weights, and had higher estrone and androstenodione concentrations. Natural menopause occurs in cynomolgus monkeys and hormone changes with OVX are similar however, differences in sex hormones that can relate to body mass and age may be important. E(2) treatment restored estrogen levels and induced improvements in the lipid profile of PM females.

  12. Hormonal changes in hemodialysis patients: Novel risk factors for mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kocyigit, Ismail; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Yılmaz, Mahmut Ilker

    2017-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis commonly experience derangements in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis together with alterations at the level of synthesis and clearance of many hormones. This hormonal imbalance, even if asymptomatic, has recently been associated with increased mortality in these patients. In this review, we summarize observational and mechanistic evidence linking hormonal alterations at the level of the thyroid and sex-hormone systems with this mortality risks. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Does breastfeeding influence future sperm quality and reproductive hormones?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, J M; Jensen, M S; Thulstrup, Ane Marie

    2011-01-01

    was not statistically significantly associated with sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm motility or morphology, oligozoospermia, follicle-stimulating hormone, inhibin B, luteinizing hormone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), the calculated level of free testosterone, free oestradiol, the free testosterone...... testosterone nor free oestradiol was different between the two groups. This study shows no association between breastfeeding and sperm quality or reproductive hormones and a strong association is unlikely. A larger study would be needed to detect more subtle effects....

  14. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed.

  15. SnapShot: Hormones of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coate, Katie C; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-12-04

    Specialized endocrine cells secrete a variety of peptide hormones all along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, making it one of the largest endocrine organs in the body. Nutrients and developmental and neural cues trigger the secretion of gastrointestinal (GI) hormones from specialized endocrine cells along the GI tract. These hormones act in target tissues to facilitate digestion and regulate energy homeostasis. This SnapShot summarizes the production and functions of GI hormones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  17. Effect of a glycine residue insertion into crustacean hyperglycemic hormone on hormonal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2004-01-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) have similar amino acid sequences and therefore comprise a peptide family referred to as the CHH family. All MIHs unexceptionally have an additional glycine residue at position 12, which is lacking in all CHHs. In order to understand the relevance of the absence of the glycine residue for hyperglycemic activity, a mutant CHH having a glycine residue insertion was prepared, and its hyperglycemic activity was assessed. Thi...

  18. Effect of a Glycine Residue Insertion into Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone on Hormonal Activity(Endocrinology)

    OpenAIRE

    Hidekazu, Katayama; Hiromichi, Nagasawa; Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo; Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo

    2004-01-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) have similar amino acid sequences and therefore comprise a peptide family referred to as the CHH family. All MIHs unexceptionally have an additional glycine residue at position 12, which is lacking in all CHHs. In order to understand the relevance of the absence of the glycine residue for hyperglycemic activity, a mutant CHH having a glycine residue insertion was prepared, and its hyperglycemic activity was assessed. Thi...

  19. Increasing Goat Productivity Through the Improvement of Endogenous Secretion of Pregnant Hormones Using Follicle Stimulating Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriyanto Andriyanto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Previous studies reported that the improvement of endogenous estrogen and progesterone secretions during gestation improved fetal prenatal growth, birth weight, mammary gland growth and development, milk production, litter size, pre- and post-weaning growths. An experiment was conducted to apply the improvement of endogenous secretion of pregnant hormones during pregnancy to increase goat productivity. Thirty-six female ettawah-cross does were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 (control: 18 does included does without improvement of endogenous secretion of pregnant hormones and Group 2 (treatment: 18 does included does with improvement of endogenous secretion of pregnant hormones using follicle stimulating hormones to stimulate super ovulation. The application of this technology increased total offspring born (control: 25 offspring; treatment: 42 offspring, average litter size (control: 1.88; treatment: 2.33, offspring birth weight (control: 2.85±0.50 kg; treatment: 3.82±0.40 kg, and does milk production (control: 1.36±0.34 L/does/day; treatment: 2.10±0.21 L/does/day. Offspring born to does with improved endogenous secretion of pregnant hormones had better weaning weight (control: 11.17±1.99 kg/offspring; treatment: 14.5±1.11 kg/offspring. At weaning period, does with improved endogenous secretion of pregnant hormones produced offspring with total weaning weight twice as heavy as control does (control: 189.9 kg; treatment: 403.6 kg. By a simple calculation of economic analysis, this technology application could increase gross revenue per does until weaning by Rp. 432.888,89. It was concluded that this technology is economically feasible to be applied in small-scale farm. Key Words: follicle stimulating hormone, pregnant hormones, endogenous secretion, super ovulation, ettawah-cross does

  20. The importance of thyroid hormone sulfation during fetal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractNormal fetal development requires the presence of thyroid hormone. Disruption of any of the processes regulating the bioavailability of thyroid hormone may contribute to congenital anomalies. This thesis is focussed a) on the importance of thyroid hormone sulfation during

  1. Evaluation of some reproductive hormonal profile following the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study is aimed at determining the effect of nicotine on male fertility by evaluating some reproductive hormone parameters of male Wistar rat such as serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Methodology: A total of 20 adult male rats were randomly ...

  2. Growing up with short stature : Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-van Balen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Growing up with short stature. Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment To enhance height in children with short stature, growth hormone (GH) can be used. In short children without a detectable pathology underlying their short stature, there is no medical rationale for growth hormone

  3. Effect of physical and flexibility exercise on certain hormones and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A total of 16 subjects (ten males and six females) participated in the study which involved physical and flexibility exercise. Assays for hormones, including follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, progesterone, estradiol, testosterone and insulin in the subjects were carried out.

  4. Overnight levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and growth hormone before and during gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment in short boys born small for gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C.M. van der Kaay (Danielle); F.H. de Jong (Frank); S.R. Rose (Susan); R.J.H. Odink (Roelof); W.M. Bakker-Van Waarde (Willie); E.J. Sulkers (Eric); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAims: To evaluate if 3 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) treatment results in sufficient suppression of pubertal luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) profile patterns in short pubertal small for gestational age (SGA) boys. To compare

  5. H9c2 cardiomyoblasts produce thyroid hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meischl, Christof; Buermans, Henk P.; Hazes, Thierry; Zuidwijk, Marian J.; Musters, René J. P.; Boer, Christa; van Lingen, Arthur; Simonides, Warner S.; Blankenstein, Marinus A.; Dupuy, Corrine; Paulus, Walter J.; Hack, C. Erik; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Roos, Dirk; Niessen, Hans W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid hormone acts on a wide range of tissues. In the cardiovascular system, thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cardiac function and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Although some early reports in the literature suggested an unknown extrathyroidal source of thyroid hormone, it is currently

  6. Radiation and neuroregulatory control of growth hormone secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvy-Stuart, A.L.; Wallace, W.H.B.; Shalet, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Cranial irradiation frequently results in growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Patients with radiation-induced GH deficiency usually remain responsive to exogenous growth hormone releasing hormone, implying radiation damages the hypothalamus rather than the pituitary. Little is known about the effect of cranial irradiation on the neuroendocrine control of GH secretion. This study was to determine the effect of cranial irradiation on somatostatin tone. (Author)

  7. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone that plays vital roles in cell growth and metabolism. Aim: The study investigates the effect of GH on carbohydrate metabolism using Indian bird, Acridotheres tristis. Methods: Three different doses (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8mg/100g body weight) of human growth hormone ...

  8. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... [1] The roles of growth hormone (GH) in regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in Indian birds have scantly been studied. GH is a polypeptide hormone ..... growth hormones. Endocrinology 1974;95:1560-1565. 24. Higgs D.A,. Sutton J.N, Kim H, Oakes J.D, Smith J, Biagi. C, Devlin R.H. Influence of dietary.

  9. Mammalian Prolactin – An Ancient But Still A Mysterious Hormone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Mammalian Prolactin – An Ancient But Still A Mysterious Hormone · Prolactin inhibits LHRH action during lactational ammenorrhoea · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · REDUCTIONIST VIEW OF HORMONES · CONCERN · PURIFICATION PROTOCOLS · CHARACTERIZATION OF HORMONES · Slide 9 · Slide 10.

  10. The impact of female sex hormones on competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buser, T.

    2009-01-01

    We use fluctuations of female sex hormones occurring naturally over the menstrual cycle or induced by hormonal contraceptives to determine the importance of sex hormones in explaining gender differences in competitiveness. Participants in a laboratory experiment solve a simple arithmetics task first

  11. Effects of growth hormone deficiency and recombinant growth hormone therapy on postprandial gallbladder motility and cholecystokinin release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; Twickler, M.; Rehfeld, J.F.; Ooteghem, N.A. van; Castro Cabezas, M.; Portincasa, P.; Berge-Henegouwen, G.P. van; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2004-01-01

    In addition to cholecystokinin, other hormones have been suggested to be involved in regulation of postprandial gallbladder contraction. We aimed to evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) on gallbladder contractility and cholecystokinin release. Gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound) and

  12. Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eBarth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sex hormones have been implicated in neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, dendritic branching, myelination and other important mechanisms of neural plasticity. Here we review the evidence from animal experiments and human studies reporting interactions between sex hormones and the dominant neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and glutamate. We provide an overview of accumulating data during physiological and pathological conditions and discuss currently conceptualized theories on how sex hormones potentially trigger neuroplasticity changes through these four neurochemical systems. Many brain regions have been demonstrated to express high densities for estrogen- and progesterone receptors, such as the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the hippocampus. As the hippocampus is of particular relevance in the context of mediating structural plasticity in the adult brain, we put particular emphasis on what evidence could be gathered thus far that links differences in behavior, neurochemical patterns and hippocampal structure to a changing hormonal environment. Finally, we discuss how physiologically occurring hormonal transition periods in humans can be used to model how changes in sex hormones influence functional connectivity, neurotransmission and brain structure in vivo.

  13. Structural Basis for Antibody Discrimination between Two Hormones That Recognize the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Ho, Patricia W.M.; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Parker, Michael W.; (SVIMR-A); (Chugai); (Melbourne)

    2009-08-18

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a vital role in the embryonic development of the skeleton and other tissues. When it is produced in excess by cancers it can cause hypercalcemia, and its local production by breast cancer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis formation in that disease. Antibodies have been developed that neutralize the action of PTHrP through its receptor, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, without influencing parathyroid hormone action through the same receptor. Such neutralizing antibodies against PTHrP are therapeutically effective in animal models of the humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy and of bone metastasis formation. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex between PTHrP (residues 1-108) and a neutralizing monoclonal anti-PTHrP antibody that reveals the only point of contact is an {alpha}-helical structure extending from residues 14-29. Another striking feature is that the same residues that interact with the antibody also interact with parathyroid hormone receptor 1, showing that the antibody and the receptor binding site on the hormone closely overlap. The structure explains how the antibody discriminates between the two hormones and provides information that could be used in the development of novel agonists and antagonists of their common receptor.

  14. Association of Hormonal Contraception With Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2016-11-01

    Millions of women worldwide use hormonal contraception. Despite the clinical evidence of an influence of hormonal contraception on some women's mood, associations between the use of hormonal contraception and mood disturbances remain inadequately addressed. To investigate whether the use of hormonal contraception is positively associated with subsequent use of antidepressants and a diagnosis of depression at a psychiatric hospital. This nationwide prospective cohort study combined data from the National Prescription Register and the Psychiatric Central Research Register in Denmark. All women and adolescents aged 15 to 34 years who were living in Denmark were followed up from January 1, 2000, to December 2013, if they had no prior depression diagnosis, redeemed prescription for antidepressants, other major psychiatric diagnosis, cancer, venous thrombosis, or infertility treatment. Data were collected from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2013, and analyzed from January 1, 2015, through April 1, 2016. Use of different types of hormonal contraception. With time-varying covariates, adjusted incidence rate ratios (RRs) were calculated for first use of an antidepressant and first diagnosis of depression at a psychiatric hospital. A total of 1 061 997 women (mean [SD] age, 24.4 [0.001] years; mean [SD] follow-up, 6.4 [0.004] years) were included in the analysis. Compared with nonusers, users of combined oral contraceptives had an RR of first use of an antidepressant of 1.23 (95% CI, 1.22-1.25). Users of progestogen-only pills had an RR for first use of an antidepressant of 1.34 (95% CI, 1.27-1.40); users of a patch (norgestrolmin), 2.0 (95% CI, 1.76-2.18); users of a vaginal ring (etonogestrel), 1.6 (95% CI, 1.55-1.69); and users of a levonorgestrel intrauterine system, 1.4 (95% CI, 1.31-1.42). For depression diagnoses, similar or slightly lower estimates were found. The relative risks generally decreased with increasing age. Adolescents (age range, 15-19 years) using

  15. Thyroid hormone receptor binds to a site in the rat growth hormone promoter required for induction by thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.J.; Brent, G.A.; Warne, R.L.; Larsen, P.R.; Moore, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. The authors have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. They show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor

  16. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonists are Superior to Subcapsular Orchiectomy in Lowering Testosterone Levels of Men with Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergren, Peter Busch; Kistorp, Caroline; Fode, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    levels between patients undergoing subcapsular orchiectomy and patients treated with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist triptorelin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial we included 58 consecutive hormone naïve men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer at Herlev...

  17. Investigation of sexual dimorphisms through mouse models and hormone/hormone-disruptor treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipulan, Lerrie Ann; Raga, Dennis; Suzuki, Kentaro; Murashima, Aki; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Cunha, Gerald; Yamada, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in mouse reproductive tissues is observable in adult, post-natal, and embryonic stages. The development of sexually dimorphic tissues starts with an ambisexual structure. It is followed by sex-specific organogenesis as guided by different signaling pathways that occur from late embryonic stages. The measurement of the anogenital distance (AGD), and the observation of the external genitalia are practical ways to distinguish male and female pups at birth and thereafter. Careful observation of the morphological or histological features and the molecular signatures of the external genitalia and perineum enable identification of sex or feminization/masculinization of embryos. Aberrations in hormone signaling via castration or treatment with hormones or hormone disruptors result in dysmorphogenesis of reproductive tissues. Several hormone disruptors have been used to modulate different aspects of hormone action through competitive inhibition and exogenous hormone treatment. Concomitantly, the vast advancement of conditional mutant mouse analysis leads to the frequent utilization of Cre recombination technology in the study of reproductive/urogenital tissue development. Mouse Cre-lines that are tissue-specific and cell-specific are also effective tools in identifying the molecular mechanisms during sexually dimorphic development. Cre-lines applicable to different cell populations in the prostate, seminal vesicles, testis and ovaries, and mammary glands are currently being utilized. In the external genitalia and perineum, Cre lines that examine the signaling pathways of cells of endodermal, ectodermal, and mesenchymal origin reveal the roles of these tissues in the development of the external genitalia. The interaction of hormones and growth factors can be examined further through a variety of techniques available for researchers. Such cumulative information about various technologies is summarized. Copyright © 2015 International Society of

  18. The hormonal sensitivity hypothesis: A review and new findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Carley J; Oinonen, Kirsten; Mazmanian, Dwight; Stone, Suzanne

    2017-05-01

    Previous women's health practitioners and researchers have postulated that some women are particularly sensitive to hormonal changes occurring during reproductive events. We hypothesize that some women are particularly sensitive to hormonal changes occurring across their reproductive lifespan. To evaluate this hypothesis, we reviewed findings from the existing literature and findings from our own lab. Taken together, the evidence we present shows a recurring pattern of hormonal sensitivity at predictable but different times across the lifespan of some women (i.e., menarche, the premenstrual phase, hormonal contraceptive use, pregnancy, the postpartum period, and menopause). These findings provide support for the hypothesis that there is a subgroup of women who are more susceptible to physical, psychological, and sexual symptoms related to hormonal shifts or abrupt hormonal fluctuations that occur throughout the reproductive lifespan. We propose that this pattern reflects a Hormonal Sensitivity Syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Growth hormone-mediated breakdown of body fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T.; Malmlöf, K.; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2003-01-01

    Lipid storage and breakdown is mainly controlled by lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. The aim of this work was to elucidate whether growth hormone mediated loss of adipose tissue involves a concerted action on tissue lipases, and to what degree such events are modulated by dietary...... regimen. Twelve-month-old rats fed first a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet for 14 weeks were injected with saline or growth hormone (4 mg/kg/d) for four days or three weeks in different combinations with either high- or low-fat diets. In adipose tissue, growth hormone generally inhibited lipoprotein...... lipase and also attenuated the inhibiting effect of insulin on hormone-sensitive lipase activity. Growth hormone treatment combined with restricted high-fat feeding reduced the activity of both lipases in adipose tissue and stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase in muscle. Generally, plasma levels of free...

  20. Mortality and reduced growth hormone secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Christiansen, Jens; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data regarding the mortality rates of patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), whether or not treated with growth hormone (GH), are limited, but an increased mortality rate among hypopituitary patients compared with the general population has been documented. Cardiovascular...... disease has been suggested as a primary cause of death, whereas cancer statistics might be influenced by the number of malignancies causing the pituitary disease. Furthermore, differences in mortality rates in females and males have been reported. METHODS: Epidemiological studies of mortality...... in hypopituitary and GHD patients were identified and reviewed. RESULTS: Most studies showed an increased mortality rate in hypopituitary and GHD patients and an increased mortality among female compared with male patients. There is a possibility that differences between patients with adult-onset and childhood...

  1. Psychopathology and hormonal disturbances in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola D’Arista

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Our aim was to study the relationship between hormonal disturbances and psychopathology in Eating Disorders (ED.

    Methods: Forty-nine women diagnosed as Eating Disorders according to DSM-IV were subjected to control plasma levels of TSH, FT3, FT4, LH, FSH, 17beta-estradiol, prolactin, cortisol, DHEAS, GH and IGF-1. They were also administered by SCL-90R, BAT, DES II questionnaires. We applied multivariate regression models.

    Results: Our results highlight a statistically significant relation between LH, FSH and prolactin decreased levels, mood and thought disturbances (subscales 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9 of SCL-90r which are associated to Body Attitude ( BAT total scale and Dissociative Experiences (DES II total scale.

    Conclusions: Decreased sexual hormones levels could have a role in ED psychological disturbances, not inquired yet

  2. Pneumosinus dilatans multiplex associated with hormonal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushas, P; Ravi, V; Painatt, Jaeson Mohanan; Nair, Preeti P

    2013-08-26

    Pneumosinus dilatans describes an abnormal dilation of one or more paranasal sinuses without radiological evidence of localised bone destruction, hyperostosis or mucous membrane thickening. Dilation of mastoid air cells also occurs rarely along with involvement of paranasal sinuses. This rare combination of unknown aetiology was reported in two cases in the literature and termed 'Pneumosinus Dilatans Multiplex' (PSDM). It is usually asymptomatic, and is detected incidentally on plain radiography, CT or MRI. If left untreated, it can further erode the bone leading to complications such as facial asymmetry, neurological disorders and pathological fractures. The aetiology of the condition remains obscure. Various hypotheses proposed are the presence of gas-forming microorganisms, spontaneous drainage of a mucocele, the presence of a one-way valve, dysregulation of hormonal levels leading to a disturbance of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity. This paper describes a case of PSDM possibly secondary to hormonal disturbance.

  3. Parathyroid hormone secretion in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q; Ladefoged, S D

    1996-01-01

    The aim of study was to introduce and evaluate a method for quantifying the parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion during hemodialysis in secondary hyperparathyroidism due to end-stage renal failure. We developed a method suitable for inducing sequential hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia during....../ionized calcium curves were constructed, and a mean calcium set-point of 1.16 mmol/liter was estimated compared to the normal mean of about 1.13 mmol/liter. In conclusion, we demonstrate that it is important to use a standardized method to evaluate parathyroid hormone dynamics in chronic renal failure. By the use...... of a standardized method we show that the calcium set-point is normal or slightly elevated, indicating normal parathyroid reactivity to calcium in chronic renal failure....

  4. Cross-gender hormone therapy in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, John

    2014-06-01

    Many transgender youth experience significant amounts of emotional distress regarding the incongruence between their internal gender identity and their physical body. Cross-gender hormonal medical treatments, as managed by a multidisciplinary medical/mental health team, assist patients in transitioning to their desired gender by aligning the physical body to match the gender identity. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health Standards of Care and the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines provide a basic road map for practitioners. Expectations of the youth and the concerns of the family must be addressed and the youth psychologically supported during the transition period. Issues around future fertility should be explored as well. The goal of this article is to introduce the general pediatrician to cross-gender hormone treatments, their management, monitoring laboratory tests and clinical effects, and the issues surrounding their use in adolescents. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Longitudinal reproductive hormone profiles in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Toppari, J; Haavisto, A M

    1998-01-01

    influence male reproductive health in adulthood. The early postnatal activity of the Sertoli cell, a testicular cell type that is supposed to play a major role in sperm production in adulthood is largely unknown. Recently, the peptide hormone inhibin B was shown to be a marker of Sertoli cell function......The gonads are usually considered quiescent organs in infancy and childhood. However, during the first few postnatal months of life, levels of gonadotropins and sex hormones are elevated in humans. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that environmental factors operating perinatally may...... in the adult male. In the adult woman, inhibin B is secreted by the granulosa cells. Longitudinal serum levels of inhibin B were measured in healthy boys (n = 15) and girls (n = 15), in cord blood, and every third month during the first 2 yr of life. In addition, serum levels of FSH, LH, and testosterone (boys...

  6. The hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, D; Im, M J; Pfeuffer, T; Hekman, M; Helmreich, E J; Levitzki, A

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of adenylate cyclase by hormones and by GTP regulatory proteins was investigated in native membrane systems and in systems reconstituted from purified components. These studies can be summarized as follows. The stimulatory beta 1-adrenoceptor catalyses the activation of a complex between the GTP stimulatory protein GS and the catalytic unit C. The agonist-receptor complex can activate a few cyclase units in native membrane systems as well as in reconstituted systems. GS from turkey erythrocytes is functionally different from rabbit liver GS, the latter being more amenable to activation by guanyl nucleotides in the absence of hormone. The coupling between the beta 1-adrenoceptor GS and C is efficient when compared with the coupling obtained in native membrane systems. GTP/GDP exchange at the alpha S subunit requires the presence of the beta gamma subunits. A mechanism for the inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the inhibitory GTP regulatory protein Gi is suggested.

  7. NUREBASE: database of nuclear hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Jorge; Perrière, Guy; Laudet, Vincent; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are an abundant class of ligand activated transcriptional regulators, found in varying numbers in all animals. Based on our experience of managing the official nomenclature of nuclear receptors, we have developed NUREBASE, a database containing protein and DNA sequences, reviewed protein alignments and phylogenies, taxonomy and annotations for all nuclear receptors. The reviewed NUREBASE is completed by NUREBASE_DAILY, automatically updated every 24 h. Both databases...

  8. [Menopausal hormonal therapy and cancer risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Fournier, A

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-progestagen menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) is recognized as carcinogenic to humans. The article presents the associations between MHT and breast, ovary and endometrial cancer risks, in particular according to treatment modalities. If MHT must be prescribed, it is recommended to use the lowest dose for the shortest possible duration. Discussing with the patient the benefits but also the risks and making regular gynecological follow-up are strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Sex Hormones and Mood in the Perimenopause

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Peter J.; Rubinow, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is the relationship between the onset of depression in women and the reproductive events of the menopause transition. Epidemiologic studies have documented that the majority of women do not become depressed during the menopause transition. However, recent longitudinal studies suggest that in some women, the reproductive events related to the menopause transition could play a role in the onset of depression. No abnormality of ovarian hormones has been identified that ...

  10. Effects of thyroid hormones on the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Uricoechea, Hernando; Bonelo-Perdomo, Anilsa; Sierra-Torres, Carlos Hernán

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on heart function, mediated by genomic and non-genomic effects. Consequently, thyroid hormone deficiencies, as well as excesses, are expected to result in profound changes in cardiac function regulation and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Thyroid hormones upregulate the expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-activated ATPase and downregulate the expression of phospholamban. Overall, hyperthyroidism is characterized by an increase in resting heart rate, blood volume, stroke volume, myocardial contractility, and ejection fraction. The development of "high-output heart failure" in hyperthyroidism may be due to "tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy". On the other hand, in a hypothyroid state, thyroid hormone deficiency results in lower heart rate and weakening of myocardial contraction and relaxation, with prolonged systolic and early diastolic times. Cardiac preload is decreased due to impaired diastolic function. Cardiac afterload is increased, and chronotropic and inotropic functions are reduced. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is relatively common in patients over 65 years of age. In general, subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and CHD events, but not of total mortality. The risk of CHD mortality and atrial fibrillation (but not other outcomes) in subclinical hyperthyroidism is higher among patients with very low levels of thyrotropin. Finally, medications such as amiodarone may induce hypothyroidism (mediated by the Wolff-Chaikoff), as well as hyperthyroidism (mediated by the Jod-Basedow effect). In both instances, the underlying cause is the high concentration of iodine in this medication. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute hormonal responses in elite junior weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, W J; Fry, A C; Warren, B J; Stone, M H; Fleck, S J; Kearney, J T; Conroy, B P; Maresh, C M; Weseman, C A; Triplett, N T

    1992-02-01

    To date, no published studies have demonstrated resistance exercise-induced increases in serum testosterone in adolescent males. Furthermore, few data are available on the effects of training experience and lifting performance on acute hormonal responses to weightlifting in young males. Twenty-eight junior elite male Olympic-style weightlifters (17.3 +/- 1.4 yrs) volunteered for the study. An acute weightlifting exercise protocol using moderate to high intensity loads and low volume, characteristic of many weightlifting training sessions, was examined. The exercise protocol was directed toward the training associated with the snatch lift weightlifting exercise. Blood samples were obtained from a superficial arm vein at 7 a.m. (for baseline measurements), and again at pre-exercise, 5 min post-, and 15 min post-exercise time points for determination of serum testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, plasma beta-endorphin, and whole blood lactate. The exercise protocol elicited significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) increases in each of the hormones and whole blood lactate compared to pre-exercise measures. While not being significantly older, subsequent analysis revealed that subjects with greater than 2 years training experience exhibited significant exercise-induced increases in serum testosterone from pre-exercise to 5 min post-exercise (16.2 +/- 6.2 to 21.4 +/- 7.9 nmol.l-1), while those with less than or equal to 2 years training showed no significant serum testosterone differences. None of the other hormones or whole blood lactate appear to be influenced by training experience.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Parathyroid hormone and the hypercalcemia of immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, S; Canterbury, J M; Reiss, E

    1977-09-01

    Serial measurements of serum calcium and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH) were performed in two young patients with hypercalcemia of immobilization. Serum PTH was elevated in both patients. With mobilization, both serum PTH and serum calcium returned to normal levels and remained so during six months of follow-up. The hyperparathyroidism of immobilization is an unexplained, reversible disorder that should be treated by medical measures and aggresive attempts at early mobilization.

  13. Thyroid hormone action on rat calvarial sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, S; Nakamura, T; Hirano, A; Fujii, T; Yamashita, S

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the effect of thyroid hormone on the calvarial sutures, the morphology, histology, and bone mineral density were analyzed in thyroid hormone-injected rats. A total of 80 female Wistar rats at the age of 10 days were divided into 2 groups; the triiodothyronine (T3)-treated rats (n = 40, T3 100 micrograms/kg body weight/day) were maintained under the same conditions as controls (n = 40, saline-vehicle only), and both were sacrificed at 50, 80, and 200 experimental days, respectively. T3-treated animals showed smaller values of lambda-asterion and pterion-bregma distances at the various periods of examination, resulting in smaller sizes in right-left direction of the skull. The sagittal suture distance in the skull specimens observed by Goldner's staining (fibrous tissue content) appeared smaller and the osseous margin widths greatly increased in the T3-treated rats. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the tetracycline-calcein double labelings were not interrupted from the periosteal to the endosteal areas in any specimens indicating the scantiness of osteoclastic activity in the suture areas. Mineral apposition rates at the osseous edges of the suture were significantly increased in the T3-treated rats (p < 0.01 at the age of 90 days). The distance between the second labels and the distance between the first labels were significantly larger in the T3-treated rats. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurement showed that the T3 administration decreased only the calvarial BMD at the age of 210 days (p < 0.01), but did not decrease lumbar or femur BMD. This experiment demonstrated clear evidence of excess thyroid hormone action on the early narrowing of the sagittal suture in infantile hyperthyroid rats, probably due to the enhanced osteogenic activity caused by the hormone.

  14. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Mouse Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Arbogast

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone is a crucial regulator of gene expression in the developing and adult retina. Here we sought to map sites of thyroid hormone signaling at the cellular level using the transgenic FINDT3 reporter mouse model in which neurons express β-galactosidase (β-gal under the control of a hybrid Gal4-TRα receptor when triiodothyronine (T3 and cofactors of thyroid receptor signaling are present. In the adult retina, nearly all neurons of the ganglion cell layer (GCL, ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells showed strong β-gal labeling. In the inner nuclear layer (INL, a minority of glycineric and GABAergic amacrine cells showed β-gal labeling, whereas the majority of amacrine cells were unlabeled. At the level of amacrine types, β-gal labeling was found in a large proportion of the glycinergic AII amacrines, but only in a small proportion of the cholinergic/GABAergic 'starburst' amacrines. At postnatal day 10, there also was a high density of strongly β-gal-labeled neurons in the GCL, but only few amacrine cells were labeled in the INL. There was no labeling of bipolar cells, horizontal cells and Müller glia cells at both stages. Most surprisingly, the photoreceptor somata in the outer nuclear layer also showed no β-gal label, although thyroid hormone is known to control cone opsin expression. This is the first record of thyroid hormone signaling in the inner retina of an adult mammal. We hypothesize that T3 levels in photoreceptors are below the detection threshold of the reporter system. The topographical distribution of β-gal-positive cells in the GCL follows the overall neuron distribution in that layer, with more T3-signaling cells in the ventral than the dorsal half-retina.

  15. Radioimmunoassay of parathyroid hormone: past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalow, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    In this report on radioimmunoassay of parathyroid hormone (iPTH) it was shown that the rate of disappearance of iPTH from plasma differed markedly in patients with primary hyperthyroidism or those with uremia and secondary hyperparathyroidism and that for each patient the rate of disappearance depended on the antiserum used for assay. The heterogeneity of iPTH in plasma was soon rapidly confirmed in many laboratories. (Auth.)

  16. Transport of thyroid hormone in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva K Wirth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH transport into the brain is not only pivotal for development and differentiation, but also for maintenance and regulation of adult central nervous system (CNS function. In this review, we highlight some key factors and structures regulating thyroid hormone uptake and distribution. Serum TH binding proteins play a major role for the availability of TH since only free hormone concentrations may dictate cellular uptake. One of these proteins, transthyretin is also present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF after being secreted by the choroid plexus. Entry routes into the brain like the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and the blood-CSF-barrier will be explicated regarding fetal and adult status. Recently identified TH transmembrane transporters (THTT like monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8 play a major role in uptake of TH across the BBB but as well in transport between cells like astrocytes and neurons within the brain. Species differences in transporter expression will be presented and interference of TH transport by endogenous and exogenous compounds including endocrine disruptors and drugs will be discussed.

  17. Growth hormone therapy for people with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngim, Chin Fang; Lai, Nai Ming; Hong, Janet Yh; Tan, Shir Ley; Ramadas, Amutha; Muthukumarasamy, Premala; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-09-18

    Thalassaemia is a recessively-inherited blood disorder that leads to anaemia of varying severity. In those affected by the more severe forms, regular blood transfusions are required which may lead to iron overload. Accumulated iron from blood transfusions may be deposited in vital organs including the heart, liver and endocrine organs such as the pituitary glands which can affect growth hormone production. Growth hormone deficiency is one of the factors that can lead to short stature, a common complication in people with thalassaemia. Growth hormone replacement therapy has been used in children with thalassaemia who have short stature and growth hormone deficiency. To assess the benefits and safety of growth hormone therapy in people with thalassaemia. We searched the Cochrane Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, reviews and clinical trial registries. Our database and trial registry searches are current to 10 August 2017 and 08 August 2017, respectively. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of growth hormone therapy to placebo or standard care in people with thalassaemia of any type or severity. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were also conducted independently by two authors. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria. One parallel trial conducted in Turkey was included. The trial recruited 20 children with homozygous beta thalassaemia who had short stature; 10 children received growth hormone therapy administered subcutaneously on a daily basis at a dose of 0.7 IU/kg per week and 10 children received standard care. The overall risk of bias in this trial was low except for the selection criteria and attrition bias which were unclear. The quality of the evidence for all major outcomes

  18. Growth hormone in sport: beyond Beijing 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Jordi; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Ventura, Rosa; Pascual, Josep A; Bosch, Jaume; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Nikolovski, Zoran; Pinyot, Armand; Pichini, Simona

    2009-02-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a protein endogenously produced predominantly by the anterior pituitary gland. Native hGH and, especially, its recombinant analogue (rhGH), used to treat patients with hormone deficiency, are supposed to be abused by athletes searching its anabolic and lipolytic effects. Hence, hGH use has been prohibited for a long time by the sport authorities, but until recently, hGH abuse could not be detected. Two approaches have been followed when trying to develop methods for GH abuse detection. The direct method identifies an abnormal ratio between GH isoforms--a result of hGH exogenous administration. The time window to find a cheating athlete by this approach is limited by the excretion time of the hormone. The indirect approach measures serum biomarkers directly affected by GH intake (eg, markers of released liver growth factors and of bone and collagen turnover). In this approach, the retrospective power extends further. Alternative possibilities for cheating related to hGH could be the administration of recombinant growth factors themselves, the administration of hGH metabolic precursors such as ghrelin-like GH secretagogues, or the genetic manipulation of muscle growth-related genes (gene doping). In parallel with the new types of abuse, which will surely emerge in the near future, the research and development for the improvement of the analytical detection of GH itself will continue.

  19. Hormonal control of reproduction in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecia, J A; Forcada, F; González-Bulnes, A

    2012-02-01

    Reproduction of small ruminants can be controlled by several methods developed in recent decades. Some of these involve administration of hormones that modify the physiological chain of events involved in the sexual cycle. Methods which utilise progesterone or its analogues are based on their effects in the luteal phase of the cycle, simulating the action of natural progesterone produced by the corpus luteum after ovulation, which is responsible for controlling LH secretion from the pituitary. Use of prostaglandins is an alternative method for controlling reproduction by eliminating the corpus luteum and inducing a subsequent follicular phase with ovulation. Finally, the discovery of the properties of melatonin in photoperiod-dependent breeding animals opened up a new methodology to control reproduction in these species, inducing changes in the perception of photoperiod and the annual pattern of reproduction. Use of hormones to induce oestrus has allowed increased use of artificial insemination in small ruminants, a very useful management tool, considering the difficulty of detecting oestrus in these species. At commercial level, synchronisation of oestrus allows control of lambing and kidding, with subsequent synchronisation of weaning of young animals for slaughter. Also, it allows more efficient use of labour and animal facilities. Multiple ovulation and embryo transfer programmes are also possible with the use of oestrus synchronisation and artificial insemination. Finally, hormonal treatments have also been used to induce puberty in ewe-lambs and doelings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors: Utopia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioli, Roberto; Luvero, Daniela; Armento, Grazia; Capriglione, Stella; Plotti, Francesco; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Lopez, Salvatore; Montera, Roberto; Gatti, Alessandra; Serra, Giovan Battista; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Terranova, Corrado

    2018-04-01

    As growing of old women population, menopausal women will also increase: an accurate estimation of postmenopausal population is an essential information for health care providers considering that with aging, the incidence of all cancers is expected to increase. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has proven to be highly effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, dyspareunia, sexual disorders, and insomnia and in preventing osteoporosis. According to preclinical data, estrogen and progesterone are supposed to be involved in the induction and progression of breast and endometrial cancers. Similarly, in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the pathogenesis seems to be at least partly hormonally influenced. Is HRT in gynecological cancer survivors possible? The literature data are controversial. Many clinicians remain reluctant to prescribe HRT for these patients due to the fear of relapse and the risk to develop coronary heart disease or breast cancer. Before the decision to use HRT an accurate counselling should be mandatory in order to individualizing on the basis of potential risks and benefits, including a close follow-up. Nevertheless, we do believe that with strong informed consent doctors may individually consider to prescribe some course of HRT in order to minimize menopausal symptoms and disease related to hormonal reduction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid hormone and leptin in the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Fonte Ramos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is primarily expressed in white adipose tissue; however, it is expressed in the hypothalamus and reproductive tissues as well. Leptin acts by activating the leptin receptors (Ob-Rs. Additionally, the regulation of several neuroendocrine and reproductive functions, including the inhibition of glucocorticoids and enhancement of thyroxine and sex hormone concentrations in humans and mice are leptin functions. It has been suggested that thyroid hormones (TH could directly regulate leptin expression. Additionally, hypothyroidism compromises the intracellular integration of leptin signaling specifically in the arcuate nucleus. Two TH receptor isoforms are expressed in the testis, TRa and TRb, with TRa being the predominant one that is present in all stages of development. The effects of TH involve the proliferation and differentiation of Sertoli and Leydig cells during development, spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. In this context, TH disorders are associated with sexual dysfunction. An endocrine and/or direct paracrine effect of leptin on the gonads inhibits testosterone production in Leydig cells. Further studies are necessary to clarify the effects of both hormones in the testis during hypothyroidism. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge regarding leptin and TH in the testis.

  2. Biochemical endpoints of glucocorticoid hormone action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.A.; Nicholson, M.L.; Guyette, W.A.; Giddings, S.J.; Mendelsohn, S.L.; Nordeen, S.K.; Lyons, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Both the rapidly evolving metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and the more slowly developing lethal actions appear to be initiated via the synthesis of new mRNAs and proteins. The chronic suppression of cell growth may be the consequence of suppression of overall rates of protein synthesis (and probably RNA and DNA synthesis as well) that in turn may represent the cellular response to the small changes in ratios of adenine nucleotides that result from the suppression of oxidative ATP production. The inhibition of glucose transport may also play a role here to prevent a compensatory increase in glycolytic ATP production. Some other hormone actions, the decrease in the ability of cells to concentrate AIB and the increase in nuclear fragility are unrelated to, and evolve separately from, the hormonal inhibitions on energy production. Cell killing is not the result of suppression of protein synthesis, nor of hormone-induced increases in calcium uptake. While the mechanisms are unknown, the increase in nuclear fragility appears to be the earliest measure of their operation. In tumor cells resistance to lethal actions of glucocorticoids may emerge via the selection of cells with hardier membranes, that are better able to withstand the intracellular destructive events set in motion by high levels of glucocorticoids.

  3. Growth hormone perturbations in fibromyalgia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kim D; Deodhar, Parimal; Lorentzen, Ashley; Bennett, Robert M; Deodhar, Atul A

    2007-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain, fatigue, disrupted sleep, depression, and physical deconditioning. In this article, we review the literature on the normal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (HP-GH-IGF-1) axis and its perturbations in FM subjects. Studies included in this review were accessed through an English language search of Cochrane Collaboration Reviews. Keyword MeSH terms included "fibromyalgia," "growth hormone" (GH), or "insulin-like growth factor-1" (IGF-1). Twenty-six studies enrolling 2006 subjects were reviewed. Overall, low levels of IGF-1 were found in a subgroup of subjects. Growth hormone stimulation tests often revealed a suboptimal response, which did not always correlate with IGF-1 levels. No consistent defects in pituitary function were found. Of the 3 randomized placebo controlled studies, only 9 months of daily injectable recombinant GH reduced FM symptoms and normalized IGF-1. These studies suggest that pituitary function is normal in FM and that reported changes in the HP-GH-IGF-1 axis are most likely hypothalamic in origin. The therapeutic efficacy of supplemental GH therapy in FM requires further study before any solid recommendations can be made.

  4. Sex disparity in colonic adenomagenesis involves promotion by male hormones, not protection by female hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos-Landgraf, James M; Heijmans, Jarom; Wielenga, Mattheus C B; Dunkin, Elisa; Krentz, Kathy J; Clipson, Linda; Ederveen, Antwan G; Groothuis, Patrick G; Mosselman, Sietse; Muncan, Vanesa; Hommes, Daniel W; Shedlovsky, Alexandra; Dove, William F; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2014-11-18

    It recently has been recognized that men develop colonic adenomas and carcinomas at an earlier age and at a higher rate than women. In the Apc(Pirc/+) (Pirc) rat model of early colonic cancer, this sex susceptibility was recapitulated, with male Pirc rats developing twice as many adenomas as females. Analysis of large datasets revealed that the Apc(Min/+) mouse also shows enhanced male susceptibility to adenomagenesis, but only in the colon. In addition, WT mice treated with injections of the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) showed increased numbers of colonic adenomas in males. The mechanism underlying these observations was investigated by manipulation of hormonal status. The preponderance of colonic adenomas in the Pirc rat model allowed a statistically significant investigation in vivo of the mechanism of sex hormone action on the development of colonic adenomas. Females depleted of endogenous hormones by ovariectomy did not exhibit a change in prevalence of adenomas, nor was any effect observed with replacement of one or a combination of female hormones. In contrast, depletion of male hormones by orchidectomy (castration) markedly protected the Pirc rat from adenoma development, whereas supplementation with testosterone reversed that effect. These observations were recapitulated in the AOM mouse model. Androgen receptor was undetectable in the colon or adenomas, making it likely that testosterone acts indirectly on the tumor lineage. Our findings suggest that indirect tumor-promoting effects of testosterone likely explain the disparity between the sexes in the development of colonic adenomas.

  5. Hormonal profile in children with enteroviral meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. U. Sabitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation of hormones in maintaining immune homeostasis is a complicated process as the hormones can have both immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive effect. Changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis in diseases may appear low triiodothyronine, and is currently being discussed the issue of the state of development, characterized by a decrease in blood levels of thyroid hormone in the absence of pathology of the thyroid gland. In the literature there is the term - (nonthyroidal illness syndrome «netireoidnyh disease syndrome.» One of the most debated issues related to the pathogenesis of diseases netireoidnyh syndrome - this is the role of proinflammatory cytokines in violation of the secretory activity of the thyroid gland and the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in general. However, the exact mechanisms for reducing serum triiodothyronine remain poorly studied, including thyroid status and relationship with objective criteria systemic inflammation in children, especially during viral infection. The paper presents the materials and the results of an open prospective study conducted in the city of Yekaterinburg in 2009-2012. We observed 71 children with enteroviral meningitis at the age of three to fourteen. We studied the levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine and intracellular cytokine synthesis in blood lymphocytes. The nature of changes in hormonal status in children with enteroviral meningitis can be treated as a syndrome netireoidnyh diseases. Low level of triiodothyronine correlates with the time of CSF readjustment and control pleocytosis indicators, more long-term liquor rehabilitation is mentioned in children with low initial level of triiodothyronine, the odds ratio (OR = 7,3, 95% CI 0,9: 6,7. This syndrome is secondary and occurs as the result of cytokine system on the thyroid gland exposure.

  6. Effect of hypothyroidism on female reproductive hormones

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    Sanjay Saran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective was to evaluate reproductive hormones levels in hypothyroid women and impact of treatment on their levels. Materials and Methods: A total of 59 women with untreated primary hypothyroidism were included in this prospective study. Venous blood was taken at baseline and after euthyroidism was achieved for measuring serum free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine (FT3, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, prolactin (PRL, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, and thyroid peroxidase antibody. Thirty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles without any hormonal disturbances served as controls. The statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 20 ([SPSS] IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: On an average at diagnosis cases have more serum TSH (mean[M] = 77.85; standard error [SE] = 11.72, PRL (M = 39.65; SE = 4.13 and less serum E2(M = 50.00; SE = 2.25 and T (M = 35.40; SE = 2.31 than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 1.74; SE = 0.73, (M = 16.04; SE = 0.84, (M = 76.25; SE = 2.60, and (M = 40.29; SE = 2.27, respectively. This difference was statistically significant t(58 = 6.48, P <0.05; t(58 = 6.49, P < 0.05; t(58 = 12.47; P <0.05; and t(58 = 2.04, P <0.05; respectively. Although average serum FSH(M = 12.14; SE = 0.40 and LH (M = 5.89; SE = 0.27 were lower in cases at diagnosis than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 12.70; SE = 0.40,(M = 6.22; SE = 0.25, respectively, but these differences were statistically insignificant t(58 = 1.61, P = 0.11; t(58 = 1.11, P = 0.27, respectively. Conclusion: The study has demonstrated low E2 and T levels in hypothyroid women which were increased after achieving euthyroidism. Although average serum FSH and LH were increased in hypothyroid women after achieving euthyroidism but this difference was statistically insignificant.

  7. The endocrine involvement in lipid metabolism differences in long- and short-winged males of a flightless bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus (L.) (Heteroptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Socha, Radomír; Šula, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 2005, č. 4 (2005), s. 117-123 ISSN 0208-8703 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6007301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : lipid * adipokinetic hormone * fat body Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. Activation of insect anti-oxidative mechanism by mammalian glucagon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alquicer, Glenda; Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, N.; Večeřa, Josef; Socha, Radomír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 152, č. 3 (2009), s. 226-233 ISSN 1096-4959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0788 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * antioxidant capacity * glucagon Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.607, year: 2009

  9. Pituitary adenomas in mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human GH-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs, lactotrophs, and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both GH and PRL, by 8 months of age. We now report that GRH transgenic mice 10-24 months of age develop pituita...... somatotrophs or mammosomatotrophs to cells with features of the glycoprotein hormone cell line. These findings provide conclusive evidence that protracted GRH stimulation of secretory activity can result in proliferation, hyperplasia, and adenoma of adenohypophysial cells.......It has been shown that mice transgenic for human GH-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs, lactotrophs, and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both GH and PRL, by 8 months of age. We now report that GRH transgenic mice 10-24 months of age develop pituitary...

  10. Emergence of plant vascular system: roles of hormonal and non-hormonal regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunwoo; Dang, Tuong Vi T; Hwang, Ildoo

    2017-02-01

    The divergence of land plants followed by vascular plants has entirely changed the terrestrial ecology. The vascular system is a prerequisite for this evolutionary event, providing upright stature and communication for sink demand-source capacity and facilitating the development of plants and colonization over a wide range of environmental habitats. Various hormonal and non-hormonal regulatory networks have been identified and reviewed as key processes for vascular formation; however, how these factors have evolutionarily emerged and interconnected to trigger the emergence of the vascular system still remains elusive. Here, to understand the intricacy of cross-talks among these factors, we highlight how core hormonal signaling and transcriptional networks are coalesced into the appearance of vascular plants during evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    Information on the course and outcome of pregnancies in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients is sparse, and GH treatment during pregnancy in such women has not been described previously. We have studied fetal growth and serum levels of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF binding...... protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...... became pregnant after donor insemination. The GH treatment was continued until variant GH production from the placenta was evident. Serum levels of GH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured monthly during pregnancy after 3 days off GH therapy. Abdominal ultrasound was performed five times. Hormonal levels were...

  12. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone causes an increase in cortisol, but not parathyroid hormone, in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Scott; Gow, Adam G; Evans, Helen; Mellanby, Richard J

    2015-02-01

    Dogs with spontaneous disorders of glucocorticoid production often have marked disturbances in calcium homeostasis. For example, hypercalcaemia is frequently observed in dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common feature of canine hyperadrenocorticism. The mechanism(s) by which glucocorticoids modulate calcium homeostasis in dogs remains ill-defined. The hypothesis of this study is that a marked increase in serum cortisol concentrations would lead to an immediate negative calcium balance state which would drive a compensatory increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations. This hypothesis was investigated by measuring serum cortisol and plasma PTH concentration in 19 dogs before and after administration of adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH) hormone. Post ACTH administration, there was a significant increase in serum cortisol, but not PTH, concentrations. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that an increase in endogenous glucocorticoids influences calcium balance sufficiently to cause an immediate, compensatory increase in parathyroid hormone concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple Effects of Growth Hormone in the Body: Is it Really the Hormone for Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Almengló, Cristina; Devesa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we analyze the effects of growth hormone on a number of tissues and organs and its putative role in the longitudinal growth of an organism. We conclude that the hormone plays a very important role in maintaining the homogeneity of tissues and organs during the normal development of the human body or after an injury. Its effects on growth do not seem to take place during the fetal period or during the early infancy and are mediated by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during childhood and puberty. In turn, IGF-I transcription is dependent on an adequate GH secretion, and in many tissues, it occurs independent of GH. We propose that GH may be a prohormone, rather than a hormone, since in many tissues and organs, it is proteolytically cleaved in a tissue-specific manner giving origin to shorter GH forms whose activity is still unknown. PMID:27773998

  14. Assessment of hormonal activity in patients with premature ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfi Canat

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose Premature ejaculation is considered the most common type of male sexual dysfunction. Hormonal controls of ejaculation have not been exactly elucidated. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of hormonal factors in patients with premature ejaculation. Materials and Methods Sixty-three participants who consulted our outpatient clinics with complaints of premature ejaculation and 39 healthy men as a control group selected from volunteers were included in the study. A total of 102 sexual active men aged between 21 and 76 years were included. Premature ejaculation diagnostic tool questionnaires were used to assessment of premature ejaculation. Serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, total and free testosterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine and thyroxine were measured. Results Thyroid-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and prolactin levels were significantly lower in men with premature ejaculation according to premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (p=0.017, 0.007 and 0.007, respectively. Luteinizing hormone level (OR, 1.293; p=0.014 was found to be an independent risk factor for premature ejaculation. Conclusions Luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are associated with premature ejaculation which was diagnosed by premature ejaculation diagnostic tool questionnaires. The relationship between these findings have to be determined by more extensive studies.

  15. Annual Change of Reproductive Hormones in Female Angora Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Pehlivan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, annual changes of melatonin, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estrogen, testosterone and progesterone were studied on 6 heads of 1.5 years old female Angora goat. To determine hormones concentrations, blood samples were taken from jugular vein of each goat in every month for a year. The blood samples were centrifuged at 4000xg for 5 min. and serum was stored at -20°C until analyses time. Hormones analyses in the serum were performed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA method. Monthly climatic values and photoperiod were obtained from the Turkish State Meteorological Service and temperature-humidity index was calculated with climatic values. In the study, in order to determine any possible differences in the observed hormones concentrations with respect to months, repeated measures ANOVA analysis was performed. As a result of statistical analysis, there were no significant differences among the months for gonadotropin-releasing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone concentration, while significant differences were found among the months for melatonin, luteinizing hormone and progesterone, and estrogen concentration in female Angora goats. According the results of this study, could be concluded that the releases of reproductive hormones examined in female Angora goats was seasonally dependent.

  16. Differential action of glycoprotein hormones: significance in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Arya, Swathy V; Rao, A J

    2014-02-01

    Growth of multicellular organisms depends on maintenance of proper balance between proliferation and differentiation. Any disturbance in this balance in animal cells can lead to cancer. Experimental evidence is provided to conclude with special reference to the action of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on Sertoli cells, and luteinizing hormone (LH) on Leydig cells that these hormones exert a differential action on their target cells, i.e., stimulate proliferation when the cells are in an undifferentiated state which is the situation with cancer cells and promote only functional parameters when the cell are fully differentiated. Hormones and growth factors play a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. There is a growing body of evidence that various tumors express some hormones at high levels as well as their cognate receptors indicating the possibility of a role in progression of cancer. Hormones such as LH, FSH, and thyroid-stimulating hormone have been reported to stimulate cell proliferation and act as tumor promoter in a variety of hormone-dependent cancers including gonads, lung, thyroid, uterus, breast, prostate, etc. This review summarizes evidence to conclude that these hormones are produced by some cancer tissues to promote their own growth. Also an attempt is made to explain the significance of the differential action of hormones in progression of cancer with special reference to prostate cancer.

  17. Sex hormones, sex hormone binding globulin, and vertebral fractures in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Schousboe, John T; Harrison, Stephanie L; Ensrud, Kristine E; Black, Dennis; Cauley, Jane A; Cummings, Steven R; LeBlanc, Erin S; Laughlin, Gail A; Nielson, Carrie M; Broughton, Augusta; Kado, Deborah M; Hoffman, Andrew R; Jamal, Sophie A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Orwoll, Eric S

    2016-03-01

    The association between sex hormones and sex hormone binding globin (SHBG) with vertebral fractures in men is not well studied. In these analyses, we determined whether sex hormones and SHBG were associated with greater likelihood of vertebral fractures in a prospective cohort study of community dwelling older men. We included data from participants in MrOS who had been randomly selected for hormone measurement (N=1463, including 1054 with follow-up data 4.6years later). Major outcomes included prevalent vertebral fracture (semi-quantitative grade≥2, N=140, 9.6%) and new or worsening vertebral fracture (change in SQ grade≥1, N=55, 5.2%). Odds ratios per SD decrease in sex hormones and per SD increase in SHBG were estimated with logistic regression adjusted for potentially confounding factors, including age, bone mineral density, and other sex hormones. Higher SHBG was associated with a greater likelihood of prevalent vertebral fractures (OR: 1.38 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.72). Total estradiol analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures (OR per SD decrease: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.10). Men with total estradiol values ≤17pg/ml had a borderline higher likelihood of prevalent fracture than men with higher values (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.99, 2.16). There was no association between total testosterone and prevalent fracture. In longitudinal analyses, SHBG (OR: 1.42 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.95) was associated with new or worsening vertebral fracture, but there was no association with total estradiol or total testosterone. In conclusion, higher SHBG (but not testosterone or estradiol) is an independent risk factor for vertebral fractures in older men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thyroid hormone receptor β mediates acute illness-induced alterations in central thyroid hormone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, A; Kwakkel, J; Chassande, O; Fliers, E

    2009-05-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-β is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced illness in TRβ(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We administered a sublethal dose of LPS or saline to TRβ(-/-) and WT mice. TRβ(-/-) mice displayed higher basal levels of serum triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4)) compared to WT, reflecting thyroid hormone resistance. In the periventricular area of the hypothalamus, we observed a marked decrease in thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) mRNA expression in TRβ(-/-) and WT mice at t = 4 h, coinciding with the peak in plasma corticosterone. The decrease in TRH mRNA persisted in WT, but not in TRβ(-/-) mice at t = 24 h. By contrast, the increase of type 2 deiodinase (D2) mRNA already present at 4 h after LPS remained significant at 24 h in TRβ(-/-), but not in WT mice. LPS decreased pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone β mRNA expression in WT at 24 h but not in TRβ(-/-) mice. The peak in pituitary D2 expression at t = 4 h in WT was absent in TRβ(-/-) mice. The relative decrease in plasma T(3) and T(4) upon LPS treatment was similar in both strains, although, at t = 24 h, plasma T(3) tended to be restored in TRβ(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that TRβ is involved in suppression of the central component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis in acute illness.

  19. Divergence between growth hormone responses to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia and growth hormone-releasing hormone in patients with non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas and hyperprolactinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The GH responses to the insulin tolerance test (ITT) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) may yield different results in patients with pituitary lesions. The GH responses to these stimuli were compared in patients with untreated non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas, who represent

  20. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  1. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de células). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types.

  2. Association of Hormonal Contraception With Suicide Attempts and Suicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the relative risk of suicide attempt and suicide in users of hormonal contraception. METHOD: The authors assessed associations between hormonal contraceptive use and suicide attempt and suicide in a nationwide prospective cohort study of all women...... in Denmark who had no psychiatric diagnoses, antidepressant use, or hormonal contraceptive use before age 15 and who turned 15 during the study period, which extended from 1996 through 2013. Nationwide registers provided individually updated information about use of hormonal contraception, suicide attempt......, suicide, and potential confounding variables. Psychiatric diagnoses or antidepressant use during the study period were considered potential mediators between hormonal contraceptive use and risk of suicide attempt. Adjusted hazard ratios for suicide attempt and suicide were estimated for users of hormonal...

  3. Global hormone profiling of murine placenta reveals Secretin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, K.; Leuenberger, D.; Penn, A.A.; Baker, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To elucidate and categorize the murine placental hormones expressed across gestation, including the expression of hormones with previously undescribed roles. Study design Expression levels of all genes with known or predicted hormone activity expressed in two separate tissues, the placenta and maternal decidua, were assessed across a timecourse spanning the full lifetime of the placenta. Novel expression patterns were confirmed by in situ hybridization and protein level measurements. Results A combination of temporal and spatial information defines five groups that can accurately predict the patterns of uncharacterized hormones. Our analysis identified Secretin, a novel placental hormone that is expressed specifically by the trophoblast at levels many times greater than in any other tissue. Conclusions The characteristics of Secretin fit the paradigm of known placental hormones and suggest that it may play an important role during pregnancy. PMID:21944867

  4. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  5. Canonical and Noncanonical Mechanisms of Glucocorticoid Stress Hormones Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Hormones of stress, glucocorticoids, regulate numerous physiological processes and functions. These hormonal effects involve diverse mechanisms of action. Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are transcription factors which regulate gene expression by canonical mechanism of the hormone action through interaction with specific nucleotide sequence (GRE) in the regulatory region of the gene. The effects of the canonical mechanism develop for several hours. Non-genomic rapid effects of the hormone emerged in seconds- minuets and supposed to be associated with yet not identified receptor in the plasma membrane. In addition to these slow and rapid hormonal actions, one more slow non-canonical mechanism of glucocorticoid action become increasingly evident. This mechanism is based on protein-protein interactions of GRs with other transcription factors. The main modern concepts of canonical, non-canonical and membrane mechanisms of hormone action are discussed in the review.

  6. Role of sex steroid hormones in bacterial-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Elizabeth; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones play important physiological roles in reproductive and nonreproductive tissues, including immune cells. These hormones exert their functions by binding to either specific intracellular receptors that act as ligand-dependent transcription factors or membrane receptors that stimulate several signal transduction pathways. The elevated susceptibility of males to bacterial infections can be related to the usually lower immune responses presented in males as compared to females. This dimorphic sex difference is mainly due to the differential modulation of the immune system by sex steroid hormones through the control of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines expression, as well as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expression and antibody production. Besides, sex hormones can also affect the metabolism, growth, or virulence of pathogenic bacteria. In turn, pathogenic, microbiota, and environmental bacteria are able to metabolize and degrade steroid hormones and their related compounds. All these data suggest that sex steroid hormones play a key role in the modulation of bacterial-host interactions.

  7. Hormonal and metabolic evaluation of adrenal incidentalomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagnerova, H; Dudasova, D; Lazurova, I

    2009-01-01

    The biochemical and hormonal data in patients with adrenal incidentalomas were evaluated to compare the differences between adrenal adenomas and other benign lesions and to find the relationship between metabolic parameters and adrenal hormones. Ninety two patients (29men, age 20-90 years) with incidentally discovered unilateral or bilateral adrenal masses detected on CT were included in this study for the reasons others than adrenal pathology. Glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, hormonal evaluation including plasma ACTH, plasma aldosterone, plasma renin acitivity, overnight dexametasone test, ACTH test, free plasma metanephrines, urinary catecholamines were determined. In the group of patients with adrenal masses the prevalence of arterial hypertension was three fold higher, the prevalence of DM was approximately five fold higher and the prevalence of the overweight and obesity two fold higher than is reported in the general population. The most frequent adrenal masses were nonfunctional masses, the occurence of functional lesions was as follows: steroid enzymopathies (an exaggerated response of 17-OHP indicating a possible 21-hydroxylase deficiency), subclinical Cushing syndrome, primary aldosteronism and pheochromocytoma (5%, 2%, 2% and 1% respectively). There were no significant differences in evaluated data between patients with adenomas and hyperplasia and also no significant difference in evaluated data between lesions smaller than 3 cm and lesions greater than 3 cm. We did not find any correlations between plasma cortisol and lipid values. In this study we confirmed a higher prevalence of symptoms characteristic for different metabolic syndromes in these patients with adrenal incidentalomas, which indicate systematic screening for the metabolic syndrome including evaluation of the insuline resistance in this patients.

  8. [Sex hormones: inexpensive pills to poor women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, N

    1988-03-16

    The medical community in India is engaged in a strident debate on wither the sale of pills containing a high dose of the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone should be forbidden by law. During the '50s and '60s pills with a high dose of estrogen and progesterone were used in the industrial nations as a means of pregnancy tests. The failure of a woman with delayed menses to respond to administration of a high dose of these hormones in a few days was an indication of pregnancy. Eventually evidence accumulated that use of these pills during the early stages of pregnancy caused malformations of the fetus, particularly hydrocephalus. In most countries sale of these pills was forbidden or at least subjected to strong controls. Today, however, sales continue in a large part of the Third World, which accounts for 87% of all estrogen and progesterone preparations in the world. Studies in southern India show that among women who have delivered malformed children, 31% had taken hormone pills during the first 3 months of pregnancy. In 1982 the Indian department of health forbade the sale of high dose combinations of estrogen and progesterone but gave manufacturers a half year to cease production and a year to cease sales. The manufacturers appealed the ruling to the Indian supreme court and sales have continued as hearings proceeded through the legal system. The deciding factor, however, is one of price. A urine pregnancy test is quicker and completely harmless but a urine tests costs $4-$5 while the pills cost less than $1.

  9. Reproductive Hormones and the Menopause Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nanette; Randolph, John F

    2011-01-01

    The hormonal correlates of reproductive aging and the menopause transition reflect an initial loss of the follicle cohort, while a responsive ovary remains, and an eventual complete loss of follicle response, with persistent hypergonadotropic amenorrhea. The physiology of the process is described, along with key findings of relevant studies, with an emphasis on SWAN, the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. A clinical framework is provided to help clinicians forecast the major milestones of the menopausal transition and to predict potential symptoms or disease. PMID:21961713

  10. Sex hormones and skeletal muscle weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    in fast muscle function (power), and accumulation of fat in skeletal muscle. Further HRT raises the protein synthesis rate in skeletal muscle after resistance training, and has an anabolic effect upon connective tissue in both skeletal muscle and tendon, which influences matrix structure and mechanical...... properties. HRT influences gene expression in e.g. cytoskeletal and cell-matrix proteins, has a stimulating effect upon IGF-I, and a role in IL-6 and adipokine regulation. Despite low circulating steroid-hormone level, postmenopausal women have a high local concentration of steroidogenic enzymes in skeletal...

  11. Growth hormone insensitivity: Mexican case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Castilla-Cortazar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a 14-year-old patient with short stature (134 cm referred from Paediatrics to our department for complementary evaluation since growth hormone (GH treatment failed to show any improvement. He was born premature and small for gestational age. Genital examination classified the patient as Tanner I–II with small penis and testicular size for his age. Biochemical analyses revealed normal GH levels with low serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. Molecular diagnosis confirmed several mutations in IGF1R and IGFALS, and so he was diagnosed with Laron Syndrome or GH insensibility and treated with IGF-1 substitutive therapy.

  12. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    , including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women.......8). Similar increased risks of serous and endometrioid tumors were found with estrogen/progestin therapy, whereas no association was found with mucinous tumors. Consistent with results from recent cohort studies, the authors found that ovarian cancer risk varied according to tumor histology. The types...... of ovarian tumors should be given attention in future studies....

  13. Male Hormonal Contraception: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Mara Y.; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contrace...

  14. Hormone replacement therapy in Denmark, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Møller, Lisbeth Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...... female population, with the focus on a detailed evaluation of specific hormone regimens and factors associated with systemic hormone replacement therapy (HRT)....

  15. Benefits and risks of hormonal contraception for women

    OpenAIRE

    Gorenoi, Vitali; Schönermark, Matthias P.; Hagen, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Scientific background: A large proportion of women of reproductive age in Germany use various methods of pregnancy prevention (contraception), among them various hormone-based methods. Hormonal contraceptives may be divided into combined estrogen-progestogen contraceptives (pills, skin patches, vaginal rings), progestogen-only contraceptives (pills, injections, implants, hormone spirals) and emergency contraceptives. Research questions: The evaluation addressed the question of benefits and ri...

  16. Male Hormonal Contraception: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mara Y.; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men. PMID:26453296

  17. New Approaches to Thyroid Hormones and Purinergic Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Gabriel Fernandes; Buffon, Andréia; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar

    2013-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormones influence a wide variety of events at the molecular, cellular, and functional levels. Thyroid hormones (TH) play pivotal roles in growth, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, development, and metabolic homeostasis via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) by controlling the expression of TR target genes. Most of these effects result in pathological and physiological events and are already well described in the literature. Even so, many recent studies hav...

  18. Parathyroid hormone – possible future drug for orthopedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksynienė, Ramūnė; Hvid, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone naturally secreted by the parathyroid glands is a potent anabolic agent for bone. Parathyroid hormone is primarily thought of as a catabolic protein involved in the physiologic release of calcium from bone. Whereas during recent years, a number of animal studies and clinical trials have demonstrated that intermittent parathyroid hormone administration induces anabolic effects on both cancellous and cortical bone, enhances bone mass and increases mechanical strength of the ...

  19. Concordance of self-reported hormonal contraceptive use and presence of exogenous hormones in serum among African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyra, Maria; Lingappa, Jairam R; Heffron, Renee; Erikson, David W; Blue, Steven W; Patel, Rena C; Nanda, Kavita; Rees, Helen; Mugo, Nelly R; Davis, Nicole L; Kourtis, Athena P; Baeten, Jared M

    2018-04-01

    Studies that rely on self-report to investigate the relationship between hormonal contraceptive use and HIV acquisition and transmission, as well as other health outcomes, could have compromised results due to misreporting. We determined the frequency of misreported hormonal contraceptive use among African women with and at risk for HIV. We tested 1102 archived serum samples from 664 African women who had participated in prospective HIV prevention studies. Using a novel high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay, we quantified exogenous hormones for injectables (medroxyprogesterone acetate or norethisterone), oral contraceptives (OC) (levonorgestrel or ethinyl estradiol) and implants (levonorgestrel or etonogestrel) and compared them to self-reported use. Among women reporting hormonal contraceptive use, 258/358 (72%) of samples were fully concordant with self-report, as were 642/744 (86%) of samples from women reporting no hormonal contraceptive use. However, 42/253 (17%) of samples from women reporting injectable use, 41/66 (62%) of samples from self-reported OC users and 3/39 (8%) of samples from self-reported implant users had no quantifiable hormones. Among self-reported nonusers, 102/744 (14%) had ≥1 hormone present. Concordance between self-reported method and exogenous hormones did not differ by HIV status. Among African women with and at risk for HIV, testing of exogenous hormones revealed agreement with self-reported contraceptive use for most women. However, unexpected exogenous hormones were identified among self-reported hormonal contraceptive users and nonusers, and an important fraction of women reporting hormonal contraceptive use had no hormones detected; absence of oral contraceptive hormones could be due, at least in part, to samples taken during the hormone-free interval. Misreporting of hormonal contraceptive use could lead to biased results in observational studies of the relationship between contraceptive use and health

  20. Correlations between endogen amylin hormone and some hormonal, biochemical and bone parameters in pullets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Guzel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the correlations of amylin (a pancreatic polypeptide hormone with some hormonal, biochemical and bone parameters in pullets. Forty 18-week-old pullets were used. Plasma amylin, CT (calcitonin, 1,25 (OH2 vitamin D (1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol , serum osteocalcin, glucose, ALP (alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, and triglycerides, as well as weight, length and total volume of tibiotarsi were measured. Plasma amylin concentration was negatively correlated with serum cholesterol (p<0.05 and triglycerides (p<0.05 concentrations. Plasma amylin concentration was significantly and positively correlated with plasma calcitonin concentrations (p<0.001. Serum ALP and plasma amylin concentrations were positively correlated (p<0.01. There were no correlations between amylin hormone and other parameters. Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that endogen amylin may effect cholesterol, triglycerides, calcitonin, and ALP levels in pullets without changing some other hormonal, biochemical and bone parameters related to calcium and lipid metabolism.

  1. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of growth hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Guerra, Borja; Díaz-Chico, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to estrogens and growth hormone (GH) which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk...

  2. Pituitary adenomas in mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human GH-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs, lactotrophs, and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both GH and PRL, by 8 months of age. We now report that GRH transgenic mice 10-24 months of age develop pituitary...

  3. Growth hormone (GH-1) gene deletions in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Meena P; Mithbawkar, Shilpa M; Upadhye, Pradnya S; Shalia, Kavita K

    2012-07-01

    To detect growth hormone GH-1 gene deletions (6.7 kb, 7.6 kb, 7 kb) in familial/nonfamilial isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) and note their clinical and investigative profile. Thirty (M16,F14) prepubertal IGHD patients aged 0.25 to 14 y, from 25 families were screened. Duration of growth failure, relevant history, clinical phenotype, and height SDS were recorded. Peak GH response to Clonidine (0.15 mg/m(2)), IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and pituitary/target gland hormones were studied. Genomic DNA of patients and family was analysed by PCR and DNA fragments were visualized on agarose gel electrophoresis. This series was divided into deletion +ve, Group I (n=12,40%) inclusive of six familial/six nonfamilial patients, and deletion -ve Group II (n=18,60%), 5 familial/13 nonfamilial cases; in total 11/30 were familial. Onset of growth failure was earlier in Group I (pGH hormones were normal and MRI showed hypoplastic adenohypophysis. 40% had GH-1 gene deletion (6.7 kb deletion in 83%, 7.6 kb and a compound heterozygote in 8% each). In this series of 30 IGHD patients, frequency of GH-1 gene deletions (12/30) was 40%, and 54% among familial patients, and 31% with height SDS>-4. 83% had 6.7 kb deletion. Height SDS>-4, clinical phenotype, peak GH<1 ng/ml and hypoglycemia characterised IGHD Type IA.

  4. Treatment with Growth Hormone for Adults with Growth Hormone Deficiency Syndrome: Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J.; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Cordido, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults began in clinical practice more than 20 years ago. Since then, a great volume of experience has been accumulated on its effects on the symptoms and biochemical alterations that characterize this hormonal deficiency. The effects on body composition, muscle mass and strength, exercise capacity, glucose and lipid profile, bone metabolism, and quality of life have been fully demonstrated. The advance of knowledge has also taken place in the biological and molecular aspects of the action of this hormone in patients who have completed longitudinal growth. In recent years, several epidemiological studies have reported interesting information about the long-term effects of GH replacement therapy in regard to the possible induction of neoplasms and the potential development of diabetes. In addition, GH hormone receptor polymorphism could potentially influence GH therapy. Long-acting GH are under development to create a more convenient GH dosing profile, while retaining the excellent safety, efficacy, and tolerability of daily GH. In this article we compile the most recent data of GH replacement therapy in adults, as well as the molecular aspects that may condition a different sensitivity to this treatment. PMID:29562611

  5. Diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency after pituitary surgery : the combined acipimox/GH-releasing hormone test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieguez, C; Cordido, F; de Vries, WR; Veldhuyzen, BFE; van Thiel, E; Casanueva, FF; Koppeschaar, HPF

    OBJECTIVE Reduction of plasma free fatty acids leads to enhanced GH response after stimulation by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH). We studied the clinical usefulness of combined administration of acipimox and GHRH for the diagnosis of GH deficiency. DESIGN We evaluated 35 patients [mean age 53.0 years;

  6. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...

  7. Pulsatile luteinising hormone releasing hormone for ovulation induction in subfertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayram, N.; van Wely, M.; Vandekerckhove, P.; Lilford, R.; van der Veen, F.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In normal menstrual cycles, gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion is pulsatile, with intervals of 60-120 minutes in the follicular phase. Treatment with pulsatile GnRH infusion by the intra-venous or subcutaneous route using a portable pump has been used successfully in

  8. Maternal hormones meet environmental variability : Context-dependent effects of maternal hormones in avian egg yolks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Bin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, maternal effects have been widely recognized as an important way through which mothers can modify offspring phenotypes above and over direct genetic effects. As a wide variety of animals are prenatal exposed to maternal hormones, accumulating evidences also suggest that

  9. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...

  10. Psychomotor retardation in a girl with complete growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Devi; Malhi, Prabhjot; Kumar Bhalla, Anil; Sachdeva, Naresh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Infants with complete growth hormone deficiency may suffer from psychomotor retardation in addition to severe growth failure. Without replacement therapy, they may have a compromised intellectual potential manifesting as learning disabilities and attention-deficit disorders in later life. In this communication, we discuss an infant who showed improvement in physical growth after growth hormone therapy but her psychomotor skills did not improve probably due to late start of treatment. There is a need to start growth hormone therapy as early as possible in infants with complete growth hormone deficiency to avoid adverse effects on psychomotor and brain development.

  11. Hormonal Regulation of Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xian, Wa

    2003-01-01

    ... become altered in breast cancer. Specific emphasis has been placed upon studying the mechanisms by which the lactogenic hormones, prolactin, hydrocortisone and insulin, regulate milk protein gene expression...

  12. Physiological effects of ovarian hormones: clinical aspects and compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, B; Pedersen, A T

    1996-01-01

    Menopause is marked by the permanent cessation of menstrual bleeding. Deprivation of ovarian hormones due to decreasing ovarian activity causes widespread physiological effects. Disturbances in menstrual pattern and hot flashes are major reasons for hormone replacement therapy (HRT), but prevention...... of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease are other considerations. Despite the large number of different hormone treatment regimens available, such problems as continued bleeding and concern about side effects engenders low compliance. To enhance compliance, it is important to ensure that post-menopausal women...... and their physicians are aware of the probable risks and benefits of hormone therapy before deciding whether or not to use preventive HRT....

  13. Growth hormone-mediated breakdown of body fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T.; Malmlöf, K.; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2003-01-01

    Lipid storage and breakdown is mainly controlled by lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. The aim of this work was to elucidate whether growth hormone mediated loss of adipose tissue involves a concerted action on tissue lipases, and to what degree such events are modulated by dietary...... regimen. Twelve-month-old rats fed first a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet for 14 weeks were injected with saline or growth hormone (4 mg/kg/d) for four days or three weeks in different combinations with either high- or low-fat diets. In adipose tissue, growth hormone generally inhibited lipoprotein...

  14. Hormonal alterations in PCOS and its influence on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Abhaya; Muthusami, Sridhar

    2017-02-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) occurs in 4-8% of women worldwide. The prevalence of PCOS in Indian adolescents is 12.2% according to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR). The National Institute of Health has documented that it affects approximately 5 million women of reproductive age in the United States. Hormonal imbalance is the characteristic of many women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). The influence of various endocrine changes in PCOS women and their relevance to bone remains to be documented. Hormones, which include gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), insulin, the leutinizing/follicle-stimulating hormone (LH/FSH) ratio, androgens, estrogens, growth hormones (GH), cortisol, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitonin are disturbed in PCOS women. These hormones influence bone metabolism in human subjects directly as well as indirectly. The imbalance in these hormones results in increased prevalence of osteoporosis in PCOS women. Limited evidence suggests that the drugs taken during the treatment of PCOS increase the risk of bone fracture in PCOS patients through endocrine disruption. This review is aimed at the identification of the relationship between bone mineral density and hormonal changes in PCOS subjects and identifies potential areas to study bone-related disorders in PCOS women. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights...... into the complex hormonal crosstalk of classical growth stimulating plant hormones within the naturally occurring biotic and abiotic multistress environment of higher plants. The MAPK- and phytohormone-cascades which comprise a multitude of single molecules on different signalling levels, as well as interactions...

  16. Radioimmunological determination of plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone, folliculostimulating hormone and prolactin levels in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkov, V.; Maleeva, A.; Tsvetkov, M.; Visheva, N.

    1986-01-01

    The hormone levels were measured before and after hormonal therapy. Statistically significant changes in the levels of the hormones in this study were recognized (p<0,001) as a result of treatment with estrogen preparations. Plasma prolactin was raised before estrogen therapy (statistically significant rise, p<0,001), as compared to the levels in a control group of normal subjects. A mild tendency was observed toward its increase, depending on the duration of treatment. The results of this study show that control of the hormonal status of patients with prostate cancer may serve as reliable criterion in evaluating the effectiveness of hormonal therapy. The changes in prolactin levels are evidence of hormonal disbalance, which may be observed in these patients

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues inhibit leiomyoma extracellular matrix despite presence of gonadal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Minnie; Britten, Joy; Cox, Jeris; Patel, Amrita; Catherino, William H

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of GnRH analogues (GnRH-a) leuprolide acetate (LA) and cetrorelix acetate on gonadal hormone-regulated expression of extracellular matrix in uterine leiomyoma three-dimensional (3D) cultures. Laboratory study. University research laboratory. Women undergoing hysterectomy for symptomatic leiomyomas. The 3D cell cultures, protein analysis, Western blot, immunohistochemistry. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins, collagen 1, fibronectin, and versican in leiomyoma cells 3D cultures exposed to E2, P, LA, cetrorelix acetate, and combinations for 24- and 72-hour time points. The 3D leiomyoma cultures exposed to E2 for 24 hours demonstrated an increased expression of collagen-1 and fibronectin, which was maintained for up to 72 hours, a time point at which versican was up-regulated significantly. Although P up-regulated collagen-1 protein (1.29 ± 0.04) within 24 hours of exposure, significant increase in all extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins was observed when the gonadal hormones were used concomitantly. Significant decrease in the amount of ECM proteins was observed on use of GnRH-a, LA and cetrorelix, with 24-hour exposure. Both the compounds also significantly decreased ECM protein concentration despite the presence of E2 or both gonadal hormones. This study demonstrates that GnRH-a directly affect the gonadal hormone-regulated collagen-1, fibronectin, and versican production in their presence. These findings suggest that localized therapy with GnRH-a may inhibit leiomyoma growth even in the presence of endogenous gonadal hormone exposure, thereby providing a mechanism to eliminate the hypoestrogenic side effects associated with GnRH-a therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Transport of thyroid hormones via the choroid plexus into the brain: the roles of transthyretin and thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Samantha J.; Wijayagunaratne, Roshen C.; D'Souza, Damian G.; Darras, Veerle M.; Van Herck, Stijn L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key players in regulating brain development. Thus, transfer of appropriate quantities of thyroid hormones from the blood into the brain at specific stages of development is critical. The choroid plexus forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In reptiles, birds and mammals, the main protein synthesized and secreted by the choroid plexus is a thyroid hormone distributor protein: transthyretin. This transthyretin is secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid and moves thyroi...

  19. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84 as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34 have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy.

  20. Hormone therapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebelameli P

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Only orchiectomy is still commonly used today either as a single therapy or in combination regimens. Hypophysectomy & adrenalectomy showed such devastating effects on the endocrine equilibrium as to be inconsistent with an acceptable quality of life or even with survival. Chemical adrenalectomy was also tried with drugs (eg. aminoglutethmide, spironolactone leading to consequences superimposable to those of surgical adrenalectomy. Along with orchiectomy, three groups of substances are commonly used today for the hormonal therapy of prostate cancer: estrogens, LHRH agonists & anti androgens. Bilateral orchiectomy removes 90-95% of circulating testosterone. Clinical studies document 60-80% of positive responders to castration, on continued evaluation, relapse occurs usually within 6-24 months in responders, with a death rate of 50% within 6 months. The androgenic activity still remaining after castration may explain the partial & progressively decreasing effectiveness of this & other testosterone reducing therapies. Antiandrogens define substances that act directly at the target site, where interacting with steroid hormone receptors, they impede the binding of androgens. A trend towards the combination of testosterone-reducing & androgen-blocking treatment is developing in modern therapy of prostate cancer. This is due to the complementary characteristics of the two different pharmacological mechanisms that are involved. In this study castration+antiandrogen is compared to castration alone. The results demonstrate a significantly greater percentage of positive objective & subjective responses with antiandrogen than with placebo. In addition survival time was increased in patients treated with castration+antiandrogen than castration+placebo.

  1. Degradation of parathyroid hormone in macrophage endosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diment, S.; Martin, K.J.; Stahl, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted as an 84 amino acid protein that is rapidly cleaved between amino acids 34 and 35 by Kupffer cells in liver. The resulting amino terminal peptide (1-34) is active at PTH target organs (kidney and bone). Cathepsin D can process PTH to 1-34 in vitro, and a cathepsin D-like protease, which may rapidly process proteins, is present in endosomes of alveolar macrophages. The authors set out to determine whether PTH is degraded to 1-34 in endosomes, and to elucidate the mechanism of hormone processing in vivo. Intracellular transport of 125 I-PTH was assessed by binding to alveolar macrophages at 4 0 C, followed by internalization at 37 0 C. Distribution of PTH among plasma membranes, endosomes and lysosomes was determined by subcellular fractionation. Degradation of the ligand to TCA-soluble fragments in each compartment was assayed at neutral and acid pH. 1-34 in supernatants was separated from undergraded PTH by gel filtration and detected by bioassay on kidney membranes. The authors data suggest that: 1) macrophages rapidly degrade PTH to TCA-soluble fragments. 2) macrophages do not secrete proteases that degrade extracellular PTH. 3) PTH is internalized into endocytic vesicles after 5 mins, but not delivered to lysosomes within 30 mins. 4) A bioactive peptide is released into the extracellular medium after 20 mins. 5) PTH is degraded in endosomes at acid pH by a pepstatin-sensitive protease

  2. Growth Hormone (GH) and Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Diego; Díaz, Oscar; Devesa, Pablo; Devesa, Jesús

    2018-01-18

    This review describes the positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on the cardiovascular system. We analyze why the vascular endothelium is a real internal secretion gland, whose inflammation is the first step for developing atherosclerosis, as well as the mechanisms by which GH acts on vessels improving oxidative stress imbalance and endothelial dysfunction. We also report how GH acts on coronary arterial disease and heart failure, and on peripheral arterial disease, inducing a neovascularization process that finally increases flow in ischemic tissues. We include some preliminary data from a trial in which GH or placebo is given to elderly people suffering from critical limb ischemia, showing some of the benefits of the hormone on plasma markers of inflammation, and the safety of GH administration during short periods of time, even in diabetic patients. We also analyze how Klotho is strongly related to GH, inducing, after being released from the damaged vascular endothelium, the pituitary secretion of GH, most likely to repair the injury in the ischemic tissues. We also show how GH can help during wound healing by increasing the blood flow and some neurotrophic and growth factors. In summary, we postulate that short-term GH administration could be useful to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  3. ``Sex Hormones'' in Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehm, Ross H.; Young, Rebecca

    2008-11-01

    This study explores the extent to which the term “sex hormone” is used in science textbooks, and whether the use of the term “sex hormone” is associated with pre-empirical concepts of sex dualism, in particular the misconceptions that these so-called “sex hormones” are sex specific and restricted to sex-related physiological functioning. We found that: (1) all the texts employed the term “sex hormone”; (2) in all texts estrogen is characterized as restricted to females and testosterone is characterized as restricted to males; and (3) in all texts testosterone and estrogen are discussed as exclusively involved in sex-related physiological roles. We conclude that (1) contemporary science textbooks preserve sex-dualistic models of steroid hormones (one sex, one “sex hormone”) that were rejected by medical science in the early 20th century and (2) use of the term “sex hormone” is associated with misconceptions regarding the presence and functions of steroid hormones in male and female bodies.

  4. Growth Hormone (GH) and Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Oscar; Devesa, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    This review describes the positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on the cardiovascular system. We analyze why the vascular endothelium is a real internal secretion gland, whose inflammation is the first step for developing atherosclerosis, as well as the mechanisms by which GH acts on vessels improving oxidative stress imbalance and endothelial dysfunction. We also report how GH acts on coronary arterial disease and heart failure, and on peripheral arterial disease, inducing a neovascularization process that finally increases flow in ischemic tissues. We include some preliminary data from a trial in which GH or placebo is given to elderly people suffering from critical limb ischemia, showing some of the benefits of the hormone on plasma markers of inflammation, and the safety of GH administration during short periods of time, even in diabetic patients. We also analyze how Klotho is strongly related to GH, inducing, after being released from the damaged vascular endothelium, the pituitary secretion of GH, most likely to repair the injury in the ischemic tissues. We also show how GH can help during wound healing by increasing the blood flow and some neurotrophic and growth factors. In summary, we postulate that short-term GH administration could be useful to treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:29346331

  5. Thyroid hormone action: Astrocyte-neuron communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz eMorte

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone action is exerted mainly through regulation of gene expression by binding of T3 to the nuclear receptors. T4 plays an important role as a source of intracellular T3 in the central nervous system via the action of the type 2 deiodinase, expressed in the astrocytes. A model of T3 availability to neural cells has been proposed and validated. The model contemplates that brain T3 has a double origin: a fraction is available directly from the circulation, and another is produced locally from T4 in the astrocytes by type 2 deiodinase. The fetal brain depends almost entirely on the T3 generated locally. The contribution of systemic T3 increases subsequently during development to account for approximately 50% of total brain T3 in the late postnatal and adult stages. In this article we review the experimental data in support of this model, and how the factors affecting T3 availability in the brain, such as deiodinases and transporters, play a decisive role in modulating local thyroid hormone action during development.

  6. Effect of Growth Hormone Deficiency on Brain Structure, Motor Function and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Emma A.; O'Reilly, Michelle A.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Seunarine, Kiran K.; Chong, Wui K.; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis plays a role in normal brain growth but little is known of the effect of growth hormone deficiency on brain structure. Children with isolated growth hormone deficiency (peak growth hormone less than 6.7 [micro]g/l) and idiopathic short stature (peak growth hormone greater than 10 [micro]g/l)…

  7. DEHP reduces thyroid hormones via interacting with hormone synthesis-related proteins, deiodinases, transthyretin, receptors, and hepatic enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changjiang; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing

    2015-08-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread nonoccupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. Limited studies suggest that exposure to DEHP may be associated with altered thyroid function, but detailed mechanisms are unclear. In order to elucidate potential mechanisms by which DEHP disturbs thyroid hormone homeostasis, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage at 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg/day for 30 days and sacrificed within 24 h after the last dose. Gene expressions of thyroid hormone receptors, deiodinases, transthyretin, and hepatic enzymes were measured by RT-PCR; protein levels of transthyretin were also analyzed by Western blot. Results showed that DEHP caused histological changes in the thyroid and follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were observed. DEHP significantly reduced thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) levels, whereas thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was not affected. After exposure to DEHP, biosynthesis of thyroid hormones was suppressed, and sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) levels were significantly reduced. Additionally, levels of deiodinases and transthyretin were also affected. TSH receptor (TSHr) level was downregulated, while TRH receptor (TRHr) level was upregulated. Metabolism of thyroid hormones was accelerated due to elevated gene expression of hepatic enzymes (UDPGTs and CYP2B1) by DEHP. Taken together, observed findings indicate that DEHP could reduce thyroid hormones through influencing biosynthesis, biotransformation, biotransport, receptor levels, and metabolism of thyroid hormones.

  8. Relationship between initial treatment effect of recombinant human growth hormone and exon 3 polymorphism of growth hormone receptor in Chinese children with growth hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhangqian; Cao, Lingfeng; Pei, Zhou; Zhi, Dijing; Zhao, Zhuhui; Xi, Li; Cheng, Ruoqian; Luo, Feihong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency distribution of exon 3 deleted (d3-GHR) genetic polymorphism of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in growth hormone deficient (GHD) Chinese children and to explore the correlation between the growth promoting effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and exon 3 genetic polymorphism of GHR in GHD children. In this study, 111 GHD (excluded small for gestational age) children were treated with rhGH (0.20 mg/kg/week) for six months. The b...

  9. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation

  10. Asp330 and Tyr331 in the C-terminal cysteine-rich region of the luteinizing hormone receptor are key residues in hormone-induced receptor activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.P. Bruysters (Martijn); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor plays an essential role in male and female gonadal function. Together with the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors, the LH receptor forms the family of glycoprotein hormone receptors. All glycoprotein

  11. Suppression of Thyroid Hormone Receptor-Mediated Transcription ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We therefore examined the effect of methamidophos on thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated gene expression using transient transfection-based reporter gene assay. Our results shows that methamidophos (10-6 M) suppressed thyroid hormone (TH)-induced TR-mediated transcription. We further examined the effects ...

  12. Empiric medical therapy with hormonal agents for idiopathic male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas N Tadros

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Gonadotropins, SERMs, and aromatase inhibitors may improve semen parameters and hormone levels in men with idiopathic infertility with the best results from SERMs. Testosterone should never be used to treat infertility. Large multicenter randomized controlled studies are needed to better determine the success of empiric use of hormonal therapy on pregnancy rates.

  13. Maternal thyroid hormone trajectories during pregnancy and child behavioral problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endendijk, Joyce|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330190865; Wijnen, Hennie A.a.; Pop, Victor J.m.; van Baar, Anneloes|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08504749X

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence demonstrating the importance of maternal thyroid hormones, assessed at single trimesters in pregnancy, for child cognition. Less is known, however, about the course of maternal thyroid hormone concentrations during pregnancy in relation to child behavioral development. Child

  14. Thyroid hormone resistance may course hypotonia in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivkovska, Julijana; Born, Alfred Peter; Nielsen, Claus Thøger

    2014-01-01

    Allan Herndon Dudley's syndrome (AHDS) is X-linked mental retardation and hypotonia caused by mutations in a thyroid hormone transporter gene - MCT8. The typical thyreoidea AHDS profile is elevated T3, low-normal T4 and normal or elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Neonatal screening...

  15. Parathyroid hormone in pediatric patients with β-thalassemia major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study is to estimate the level of serum parathyroid hormone and its relation to bone mineral density in transfusion dependent beta-thalassemia major children. Subjects and methods: We measured serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid hormone in a sample of pediatric patients with thalassemia, ...

  16. Asprosin, a fasting-induced glucogenic protein hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic glucose release into the circulation is vital for brain function and survival during periods of fasting and is modulated by an array of hormones that precisely regulate plasma glucose levels. We have identified a fasting-induced protein hormone that modulates hepatic glucose release. It is t...

  17. Sex Hormonal Pattern of the Female African Giant Rat ( Cricetomys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymeimmunoassay (EIA) system was used to measure the serum concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), estrogen, progesterone and prolactin in a total of thirty-five sexually matured female African giant rats (cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse) at different stages of the oestrous ...

  18. hormone levels in peripheral plasma of the afrikaner cow i ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I. PROGESTERONE AND LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS DURING THE OESTROUS CYCLE. Receipt of MS ... Concentrations of progesterone and luteinizing hormone were determined in peripheral blood plasma during the oestrus cycle of ..... The use of milk progesterone radioimmunoassay in the diagnosis and treat-.

  19. Tear secretion and tear stability of women on hormonal contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustina Kemdinum Idu

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Injectable hormonal contraceptives had no significant effects on tear secretion and tear stability of healthy women of childbearing age. Further studies may be required to determine the effects of hormonal contraceptives on tear volume and stability of women with dry eyes.

  20. Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting.......Although several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting....