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Sample records for adhesive strength

  1. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interfac...

  2. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  3. Regulation of cell adhesion strength by peripheral focal adhesion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D

    2011-12-21

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength.

  4. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  5. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  6. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities.

  7. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  8. Undercoat Roughness Impact on Venetian Plasters Adhesive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Vakor

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The article studies impact of undercoat fractions size on Venetian plasters adhesive strength, describes acrylic and lime plasters adhesive features, offers method for adherence junctions strength evaluation.

  9. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  10. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  11. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  12. The influence of adhesive thickness on the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Prosperi, Gianni Domenico; Di Bussolo, Giulia; De Angelis, Francesco; D'Amario, Maurizio; Caputi, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of multiple adhesive layers of three etch-and-rinse adhesives on both adhesive thickness and microtensile bond strength (microTBS). Midcoronal occlusal dentin of 36 extracted human molars was used. Teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups (EB, XP, PQ) according to the adhesive system to be used: PQ1 (Ultradent) (PQ), EnaBond (Micerium) (EB), or XP Bond (Dentsply/DeTrey) (XP). Specimens from each group were further divided into three subgroups according to the number of adhesive coatings (1, 2, or 3). In all subgroups, each adhesive layer was light cured before application of each additional layer. After bonding procedures, composite crowns were incrementally built up. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce multiple beams, approximately 1 mm2 in area. Beams were tested under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Adhesive thicknesses and failure modes were evaluated with SEM. The microTBS data and mean adhesive thickness were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and multiple-comparison Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The mean bond strength (in MPa (SD)) of group EB gradually increased from 1 to 3 consecutive coatings (27.02 (9.38) to 44.32 (4.93), respectively) (p adhesive coatings. The mean thickness of the adhesive layer (in microm (SD)) significantly increased with the number of coatings (p adhesive failure between adhesive and dentin. The XP3 and PQ3 subgroups showed a greater number of total cohesive failure in adhesive. Multiple adhesive coats significantly affected bond strength to dentin. An excess of adhesive layer thickness can negatively influence the strength and the quality of adhesion.

  13. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Enes Odabaş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive. After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours (. Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength.

  14. Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S(3) Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength.

  15. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength. PMID:24222742

  16. Evaluation of adhesive and compressive strength of glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramashanker; Singh, Raghuwar D; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Km; Tripathi, Shuchi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, compare and evaluate the adhesive strength and compressive strength of different brands of glass ionomer cements to a ceramometal alloy. (A) Glass ionomer cements: GC Fuji II (GC Corporation, Tokyo), Chem Flex (Dentsply DeTrey, Germany), Glass ionomer FX (Shofu-11, Japan), MR dental (MR dental suppliers Pvt Ltd, England). (B) Ceramometal alloy (Ni-Cr: Wiron 99; Bego, Bremen, Germany). (C) Cold cure acrylic resin. (E) Temperature cum humidity control chamber. (F) Instron Universal Testing Machine. Four different types of Glass ionomer cements were used in the study. From each type of the Glass ionomer cements, 15 specimens for each were made to evaluate the compressive strength and adhesive strength, respectively. The 15 specimens were further divided into three subgroups of five specimens. For compressive strength, specimens were tested at 2, 4 and 12 h by using Instron Universal Testing Machine. To evaluate the adhesive strength, specimens were surface treated with diamond bur, silicone carbide bur and sandblasting and tested under Instron Universal Testing Machine. It was concluded from the study that the compressive strength as well as the adhesive bond strength of MR dental glass ionomer cement with a ceramometal alloy was found to be maximum compare to other glass ionomer cements. Sandblasting surface treatment of ceramometal alloy was found to be comparatively more effective for adhesive bond strength between alloy and glass ionomer cement.

  17. THE EFFECT OF DEGREASING ON ADHESIVE JOINT STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudawska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the effect of degreasing, a surface preparation methods in adhesive bonding, on adhesive joint strength. 5 types of degreasing agents were used in the study: acetone, extraction naphtha, Ultramyt, Wiko and Loctite 7061. The degreasing operation was performed by three methods: rubbing, spraying and immersion. Strength tests were performed on single-lap adhesive joints of hot-dip galvanized metal sheets made with Loctite 9466 adhesive according to the above variants of surface preparation. The experimental results demonstrate that adhesive joint strength is significantly affected by the applied degreasing agent. Moreover, the method of application of the degreasing agent is crucial, too. The results of strength testing reveal that the most effective degreasing method for hot-dip galvanized metal sheet adhesive joints is spraying using extraction naphtha. Thereby degreased samples have the highest immediate strength and shear strength. The use of extraction naph-tha is also effective in combination with degreasing by rubbing; however, it is not effective when used in combi-nation with immersion, as reflected in the lowest strength results.

  18. Experimental approach for adhesion strength of ATF cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Hyochan; Yang, Yongsik; In, Wangkee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haksung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The quality of a coating depends on the quality of its adhesion bond strength between the coating and the underlying substrate. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the adhesion properties of the coating. There are many available test methods for the evaluation of coatings adhesion bond strength. Considering these restrictions of the coated cladding, the scratch test is useful for evaluation of adhesion properties compared to other methods. The purpose of the present study is to analyze the possibility of adhesion bond strength evaluation of ATF coated cladding by scratch testing on coatings cross sections. Experimental approach for adhesion strength of ATF coated cladding was investigated in the present study. The scratch testing was chosen as a testing method. Uncoated zircaloy-4 tube was employed as a reference and plasma spray and arc ion coating were selected as a ATF coated claddings for comparison. As a result, adhesion strengths of specimens affect the measured normal and tangential forces. For the future, the test will be conducted for CrAl coated cladding by laser coating, which is the most promising ATF cladding. Computational analysis with finite element method will also be conducted to analyze a stress distribution in the cladding tube.

  19. Shear bond strength of a "solvent-free" adhesive versus contemporary adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Kouros, Pantelis; Koumpia,Effimia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades,Maria

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of a solvent free self-etch adhesive with solvent containing adhesives. METHODS: Forty-five human teeth were sectioned longitudinally to expose superficial dentin and substrates polished with 600-grit SiC paper. The adhesive area was isolated with a cylindrical Teflon mold 3x4 mm. Fifteen specimens were prepared for each material. Were evaluated a solvent free self-etch adhesive (Bond 1 SF), an ethanol self-etch adhesive (Futurabond M), and a wate...

  20. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    OpenAIRE

    Mesut Enes Odabaş; Mehmet Bani; Resmiye Ebru Tirali

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: contro...

  1. ADHESION STRENGTH OF COATING SUBSTRATE AND SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF PRETREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Premature failure of coated tool often results from a poor adhesion of coating-substrate and shortens the lifetime of the tool.The results of increasing the adhesion strength of thin film coatings on cutting tool inserts by pretreating the inserts with sandblasting technique to obtain a desirable surface morphology of the inserts are presented.A geometric model representing the ideal surface morphology is established to enhance the nucleation density and adhesion strength of coating-substrate.Thin film coating experiment is conducted on the substrates of four different sample groups.Indentation and wear tests are performed on coated inserts to evaluate the effect of sandblasting on the adhesion strength of the coatings.A theoretical analysis is provided on the formation and growth of atom clusters in terms of the contact angle and the thermodynamic barrier of a substrate to predict thin film nucleation.

  2. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  3. Adhesive properties and adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudawska, Anna; Stančeková, Dana; Cubonova, Nadezda; Vitenko, Tetiana; Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of experimental research of the adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites and the results of the surface free energy of the composite surfaces. Two types of graphite/epoxy composites with different thickness were tested which are used to aircraft structure. The single-lap adhesive joints of epoxy composites were considered. Adhesive properties were described by surface free energy. Owens-Wendt method was used to determine surface free energy. The epoxy two-component adhesive was used to preparing the adhesive joints. Zwick/Roell 100 strength device were used to determination the shear strength of adhesive joints of epoxy composites. The strength test results showed that the highest value was obtained for adhesive joints of graphite-epoxy composite of smaller material thickness (0.48 mm). Statistical analysis of the results obtained, the study showed statistically significant differences between the values of the strength of the confidence level of 0.95. The statistical analysis of the results also showed that there are no statistical significant differences in average values of surface free energy (0.95 confidence level). It was noted that in each of the results the dispersion component of surface free energy was much greater than polar component of surface free energy.

  4. Dentin bond strengths of simplified adhesives: effect of dentin depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Perdigão, Jorge; Lopes, Mariana de F; Vieira, Luiz Clovis Cardoso; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of 3 simplified adhesive systems applied on shallow vs deep dentin. For superficial dentin, 30 human molars were sectioned with a diamond saw to expose dentin immediately below the dentoenamel junction. For deep dentin, 30 molars were sectioned 3 mm below the dentoenamel junction. The teeth were mounted, polished to 600-grit, and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=10): Single Bonda and OptiBond Solo, total-etch adhesives, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, a self-etching primer adhesive. Adhesives were applied, the restorative material Filtek Z250 inserted in a No. 5 gelatin capsule, and light-cured. After 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C, shear bond strength was measured with an Instron at 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test. The results showed the following shear bond strengths (mean +/- SD in MPa): Single Bond/superficial dentin = 22.1 +/- 2.8; Single Bond/deep dentin = 14.2 +/- 7.0; OptiBond Solo/superficial dentin = 18.9 +/- 4.1; OptiBond Solo/deep dentin = 18.4 +/- 4.8; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/superficial dentin = 21.0 +/- 7.4; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/deep dentin = 17.6 +/- 5.9. There were no significant differences between mean shear bond strength for the factor "adhesive system" (P>.822). The Duncan's test showed that Single Bond resulted in higher shear bond strength on superficial dentin than on deep dentin. The mean shear bond strength for Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and OptiBond Solo were not influenced by dentin depth. When data were pooled for dentin depth, deep dentin resulted in statistically lower bond strengths than superficial dentin (Pcomposition of the dentin adhesive.

  5. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dressing spray enhances the adhesive strength of surgical dressing tapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarifakioglu Evren

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of surgical adhesive tapes after minor surgical and dermatologic operations is widespread. Their use reduces the wound tension and separation and they ultimately improve the postoperative scar. The most commonly used wound adhesives to enhance the adhesiveness of the surgical tapes, are tincture of benzoin and mastisol. Aim: The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the role of adhesive power of dressing spray with the adhesive tape application on the skin, which is widely used in clinics after the skin closure. Methods: Fifteen volunteers who were chosen among the medical personnel of the hospital comprised the study group. The skin of the flexor aspect of the 1/3 middle forearm of the subjects was used as the procedure region. The data is collected in the first, second and eighth days of the study. At the first stage of the study, an adhesive wound closure tape was applied to the skin without any compound of adhesives (group A. In the second and third stages, a thin coat of transparent film dressing spray (group B and an adhesive compound of tincture of benzoin (group C were applied to the skin before the adhesive tape placement, respectively. Different values of weights ranging between 50-900 gm were hanged by hooking into the center of the adhesive tape. The weights that caused complete separations of the tape from the skin after exactly 20 seconds were recorded in all groups. The data was analyzed by using Friedman test in order to calculate statistical significance between groups A, B and C. Results: The difference in adhesive power between control and groups B and C was found to be highly significant ( p < 0.05. Compound tincture of benzoin was observed to have greatest adhesive strength. Transparent film dressing spray was not as efficient as tincture of benzoin, but when compared with the control group, it enhanced the tape adhesion by 2-fold. Conclusion: The results indicated that dressing spray tested has

  7. Evaluation of binding strength depending on the adhesive binding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Pasanec Preprotić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A book with a personal value is worth remembering since it represents specific interests of an individual - author of the book. Therefore the original is the first issue of a book which is always bound manually. Due to cost-effectiveness, adhesive binding is most commonly used in author’s edition in paperback and hardback. Adhesive binding methods differ only if a paper leaf is a binding unit in adhesive binding form. The subject of the research is the quality of book block binding for two binding methods with/without mull fabric. The assumption is that double-fan adhesive binding method shows an extraordinary binding quality as compared to the rough spine method. For the needs of this research book block parameters remained unaltered: paper type, size and book volume. The results related to strength were obtained by using an experimental method of tensile strength for individual paper leaves. The rating of book block quality was conducted in accordance with FOGRA Nr.71006 guidelines for page pull-test. Furthermore, strength results for both methods were compared in order to evaluate the importance of changing the quality of adhesive binding. Statistical method ANOVA analysis of variance and Fisher’s F-test were used to evaluate the quality of book block binding.

  8. High Bonding Temperatures Greatly Improve Soy Adhesive Wet Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soy wood adhesive bond strengths reported in different literature studies are difficult to compare because a variety of temperatures and other conditions have been used for the bonding and testing step. Some reports have indicated bond strengths are sensitive to bonding temperature, but the reason(s for this has not been intensively investigated. Although these prior studies differ in other ways (such as type of soy, wood species, and test method, the effect of bonding temperature has not been clearly examined, which is important for focusing commercial applications. A tensile shear test using two-parallel-ply veneer specimens with smooth maple was used to measure both the dry and wet cohesive strength of soy adhesives. Although the soy adhesives gave very good strengths and dry wood failure, they often have low wood failure and shear strengths under wet conditions when bonded at 120 °C. However, wet strength greatly increased as the bonding temperature increased (120, 150 and 180 °C for these two-ply tests with. This study examined the use of different types of soys (flours, concentrates and isolates and different bonding temperatures and bonding conditions to evacuate several possible mechanisms for this temperature sensitivity, with coalescence being the most likely.

  9. Enhancing the Adhesive Strength of a Plywood Adhesive Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra B. Adhikari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current production of wood composites relies mostly on formaldehyde-based adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF and phenol formaldehyde (PF resins. As these resins are produced from non-renewable resources, and there are some ongoing issues with possible health hazard due to formaldehyde emission from such products, the purpose of this research was to develop a formaldehyde-free plywood adhesive utilizing waste protein as a renewable feedstock. The feedstock for this work was specified risk material (SRM, which is currently being disposed of either by incineration or by landfilling. In this report, we describe a technology for utilization of SRM for the development of an environmentally friendly plywood adhesive. SRM was thermally hydrolyzed using a Canadian government-approved protocol, and the peptides were recovered from the hydrolyzate. The recovered peptides were chemically crosslinked with polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE resin to develop an adhesive system for bonding of plywood specimens. The effects of crosslinking time, peptides/crosslinking agent ratio, and temperature of hot pressing of plywood specimens on the strength of formulated adhesives were investigated. Formulations containing as much as 78% (wt/wt peptides met the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials specifications of minimum dry and soaked shear strength requirement for UF resin type adhesives. Under the optimum conditions tested, the peptides–PAE resin-based formulations resulted in plywood specimens having comparable dry as well as soaked shear strength to that of commercial PF resin.

  10. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  11. Effect of Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... The shear bond strengths of adhesive luting cement were examined. ... and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new ... bond strength of adhesive restorative techniques systems.

  12. Improved Bond Strength of Cyanoacrylate Adhesives Through Nanostructured Chromium Adhesion Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobble, Kyle; Stark, Amelia; Stagon, Stephen P.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of many consumer products suffers due to weak and inconsistent bonds formed to low surface energy polymer materials, such as polyolefin-based high-density polyethylene (HDPE), with adhesives, such as cyanoacrylate. In this letter, we present an industrially relevant means of increasing bond shear strength and consistency through vacuum metallization of chromium thin films and nanorods, using HDPE as a prototype material and cyanoacrylate as a prototype adhesive. For the as received HDPE surfaces, unmodified bond shear strength is shown to be only 0.20 MPa with a standard deviation of 14 %. When Cr metallization layers are added onto the HDPE at thicknesses of 50 nm or less, nanorod-structured coatings outperform continuous films and have a maximum bond shear strength of 0.96 MPa with a standard deviation of 7 %. When the metallization layer is greater than 50 nm thick, continuous films demonstrate greater performance than nanorod coatings and have a maximum shear strength of 1.03 MPa with a standard deviation of 6 %. Further, when the combination of surface roughening with P400 grit sandpaper and metallization is used, 100-nm-thick nanorod coatings show a tenfold increase in shear strength over the baseline, reaching a maximum of 2.03 MPa with a standard deviation of only 3 %. The substantial increase in shear strength through metallization, and the combination of roughening with metallization, may have wide-reaching implications in consumer products which utilize low surface energy plastics.

  13. Regional bond strengths of adhesive resins to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Ozer, F; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    Microleakage of oral microorganisms, which can occur due to the lack of sealing ability of permanent restorative materials, may cause failure of root canal treatments. Although a great deal of research has been done on sealing enamel and coronal dentin with resins, little research has been done on the adhesion of resins to the walls of pulp chambers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional bond strengths of two adhesive systems to the walls of pulp chambers. A section was made horizontally through the middle of the pulp chamber of extracted human third molars to divide the chamber into upper and lower halves. The pulp tissue was removed and the tooth segments were then divided into treatment subgroups. The pulp chambers were bonded with C&B Metabond (Parkell) or One-Step (Bisco), with or without 5% NaOCI pretreatment. The microtensile bond strengths of these resins to four different pulp chamber regions (bottom, wall, roof, and pulp horn areas) were then measured using an Instron machine. The data were expressed in MPa and were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA. Statistically significant differences were found among the test groups (p < 0.001). One-Step produced higher bond strengths to all pulp chamber regions except the floor, compared with C&B Metabond. The results indicated that high bond strengths can be achieved between adhesive resins and the various regions of the pulp chamber. This should permit the use of a thick layer of unfilled resin along the floor of the pulp chamber and over the canal orifices as a secondary protective seal after finishing root canal therapy.

  14. Influence of additional adhesive application on the microtensile bond strength of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, André Luís Faria; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; de Souza, Grace Mendonça Dias; dos Santos, Carlos Tadeu Dias; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated microtensile bond strength (pTBS) when an additional adhesive layer was applied to the dentin surface. Thirty-five human third molars were flattened to expose the occlusal dentin surface. The teeth were randomly assigned to 7 experimental groups: G1-Single Bond (SB); G2-additional layer of SB; G3--a layer of Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SMP) adhesive applied over SB; G4-Clearfil SE Bond (CE); G5-additional layer of CE; G6-Adper Prompt (AP) and G7-additional layer of AP. For the G2, G3, G5 and G7 groups, the first adhesive layer was light-cured before application of the additional layer. After bonding procedures, 5-mm high composite crowns were incrementally built up. The samples were sectioned to obtain 0.9 x 0.9 beams, which were tested under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5-mm/minute until failure. The failure mode and adhesive thickness were evaluated under SEM. The pTBS data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and post-hoc Ducan's Test (a=0.05). Mean adhesive thickness was analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test (a=0.05). The results indicated that G3 presented the highest microTBS and the thickest adhesive layer. G6 and G7 presented the lowest microTBS values. When solvent-free adhesives systems were used, microTBS values were not affected by the thicker layer.

  15. Evaluation of the micro-shear bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin with and without adhesive area limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Niu, Guangliang; Du, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding ability of four representative dentin-adhesive systems by applying the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) test method and to evaluate the influence of adhesive area limitation on the bond strength. Two different adhesive application methods were used in the μ-SBS test (with and without adhesives area limitation), and four representative adhesive systems were used in this study. Each dentin surface was treated with one of the four representative adhesive systems, and with twenty samples per group (n=20), each of the four groups underwent a μ-SBS test. The results showed that the bond strength was significantly influenced by the adhesive application method (padhesive type (padhesive systems, 3-E&R has a much better bond quality compared to the other adhesive systems. Furthermore, the micro-shear bond strength test method of restricting the area of both the adhesive and the resin is more reliable for evaluating the bonding property of adhesives to dentin, and it is also adequate for comparing the different adhesives systems.

  16. Protein Modifiers Generally Provide Limited Improvement in Wood Bond Strength of Soy Flour Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Soy flour adhesives using a polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE) polymeric coreactant are used increasingly as wood adhesives for interior products. Although these adhesives give good performance, higher bond strength under wet conditions is desirable. Wet strength is important for accelerated tests involving the internal forces generated by the swelling of wood and...

  17. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesives to pulp chamber dentin after irrigation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ç Barutcigil

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that EDTA irrigation can affect the bond strength of adhesive systems on pulp chamber lateral walls. Clinically, low EDTA concentrations can be recommended if self-etch adhesives have been selected.

  18. Effect of Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... changes in the crystalline structure of dental hard tissues. Keywords: Bond strength, irradiation, self-adhesive luting cement. Effect of Irradiation on the ..... Self-adhesive resin cements: A literature review. J Adhes Dent. 2008 ...

  19. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  20. Evaluation for Adhesion Strength of Coating and Substrate by Burying Beforehand Specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion strength is an important target in evaluating the quality of coating layers.The traditional way of adhesion strength test is bonding pull-off method for thick layers and scratch test for thin films.The drawbacks of these two methods are discussed in this paper,and an evaluating method for adhesion strength of coating by burying beforehand specimen is proposed.The adhesion strength of samples is measured with two methods.The dispersity of testing data is lower than that in the ASTM-C663-79 Standard.

  1. Interface strength and degradation of adhesively bonded porous aluminum oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Abrahami, Shoshan; M. M. de Kok, John; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy

    2017-01-01

    environmental and health regulations. Replacing this traditional process in a high-demandingand high-risk industry such as aircraft construction requires an in-depth understanding of the underlying adhesion and degradationmechanisms at the oxide/resin interface resulting from alternative processes......, a minimum pore size is pivotal for the formation of a stableinterface, as reflected by the initial peel strengths. Second, the increased surface roughness of the oxide/resin interface caused byextended chemical dissolution at higher temperature and higher phosphoric acid concentration is crucial to assure...... bond durabilityunder water ingress. There is, however, an upper limit to the beneficial amount of anodic dissolution above which bonds are pronefor corrosive degradation. Morphology is, however, not the only prerequisite for good bonding and bond performance alsodepends on the oxides’ chemical...

  2. Application of tung oil to improve adhesion strength and water resistance of cottonseed meal and protein adhesives on maple veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottonseed meal-based products show promise in serving as environment-friendly wood adhesives. However, their practical utilization is currently limited due to low durability and water resistant properties. In this research, we tested the improvement of adhesion strength and water resistance of cott...

  3. Shear bond strength of brackets rebonded with a fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ozoe, Rieko; Shinkai, Koichi; Aoyagi, Makiko; Kurokawa, Hiroomi; Katoh, Yoshiroh; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2009-05-01

    To ascertain the effects of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with a fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system with a self-etching primer in comparison with two other types of adhesive system. A total of 48 premolars were collected and divided equally into three groups of 16. Each group was assigned one of three adhesive systems: Transbond XT, Transbond Plus, or a fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system, Beauty Ortho Bond. Shear bond strength was measured 24 hours after bracket bonding, with the bonding/debonding procedures repeated twice after the first debonding. A universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strengths, and bracket/adhesive failure modes were evaluated with the adhesive remnant index after each debonding. At every debonding sequence, all of these three adhesive systems had a shear bond strength of 6 MPa, which is a minimum requirement for clinical use. Transbond XT and Transbond Plus had significantly higher mean shear bond strengths than did Beauty Ortho Bond at each debonding. No significant differences in mean bond strength were observed between the three debondings in each adhesive system. Bond failure at the enamel/adhesive interface occurred more frequently in Beauty Ortho Bond than in Transbond XT or Transbond Plus. The fluoride-releasing and -recharging adhesive system with the self-etching primer (Beauty Ortho Bond) had clinically sufficient shear bond strength in repeated bracket bonding; this finding can help orthodontists to decrease the risk of damage to enamel at debonding.

  4. Influence of application methods of one-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Choi,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various application methods of one-step self-etch adhesives to microtensile resin-dentin bond strength. Materials and Methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were used. The teeth were assigned randomly to twelve groups (n = 15, according to the three different adhesive systems (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, G-Bond and application methods. The adhesive systems were applied on the dentin as follows: 1 The single coating, 2 The double coating, 3 Manual agitation, 4 Ultrasonic agitation. Following the adhesive application, light-cure composite resin was constructed. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, and prepared 15 specimens per groups. Then microtensile bond strength was measured and the failure mode was examined. Results Manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating and double coating did. Double coating of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating did and there was no significant difference between the manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation group. There was significant difference in microtensile bonding strength among all adhesives and Clearfil Tri-S Bond showed the highest bond strength. Conclusions In one-step self-etching adhesives, there was significant difference according to application methods and type of adhesives. No matter of the material, the manual or ultrasonic agitation of the adhesive showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength.

  5. Evaluation of a sugar based edible adhesive utilizing a tensile strength tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method to evaluate adhesives has been developed and utilized to formulate a recently patented adhesive based on sugar and citric acid. Factors affecting adhesive performance were uncovered, such as reduced strength due to improper heating time, and an optimal curing temperature of 60oC was ac...

  6. Microtensile bond strength of etch and rinse versus self-etch adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; Samra, Nagia R; Badawi, Manal F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive versus one-component or two-component self-etch adhesives. Twelve intact human molar teeth were cleaned and the occlusal enamel of the teeth was removed. The exposed dentin surfaces were polished and rinsed, and the adhesives were applied. A microhybride composite resin was applied to form specimens of 4 mm height and 6 mm diameter. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the adhesive interface to produce dentin-resin composite sticks, with an adhesive area of approximately 1.4 mm(2). The sticks were subjected to tensile loading until failure occurred. The debonded areas were examined with a scanning electron microscope to determine the site of failure. The results showed that the microtensile bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive was higher than that of one-component or two-component self-etch adhesives. The scanning electron microscope examination of the dentin surfaces revealed adhesive and mixed modes of failure. The adhesive mode of failure occurred at the adhesive/dentin interface, while the mixed mode of failure occurred partially in the composite and partially at the adhesive/dentin interface. It was concluded that the etch and rinse adhesive had higher microtensile bond strength when compared to that of the self-etch adhesives.

  7. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent.

  8. Factors influencing the polymer-polymer adhesion- strength during two shot moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    At the present state of two shot moulding, the adhesion strength of the two different polymers is an important issue. Many fascinating applications of two component or multi component polymer parts are restricted due to the weak interfacial adhesion of the polymers. A thorough understanding...... of the factors that influence the adhesion strength of subsequently moulded polymers is necessary for multi component polymer processing. Even when a stronger adhesion is not required the tuning factors should be found out to control the bond strength of two polymers. This paper investigates the effects...... of the process and material parameters on the adhesion strength of two component polymer parts and sorts out the factors which can effectively control the adhesion between two different polymers. The results and discussion presented in this paper could be used as a guide for multi component polymer processing....

  9. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  10. "The effect of an addicional adhesive layer on dentin bond strength : comparison with manufacture protocol"

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Ana Soraia Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    Tese de Mestrado, Medicina Dentária, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, 2014 The aesthetic requirements of today's society led to the development of a new concept of adhesive dentistry, in which manufacturers are challenged to design the simplest, user-friendly and least technique-sensitive-adhesive. Thus, a newly developed class of dental adhesives has appeared on the market the universal adhesives systems. Purpose: To evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength to denti...

  11. Microtensile bond strength of sealant and adhesive systems applied to occlusal primary enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Ramires-Romito, ACD; Reis, A; Loguercio, AD; Hipolito, VD; de Goes, MF; Singer, JD; Grande, RHM

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the microtensile bond strength (mu TBS) of a self-etch adhesive system (OptiBond Solo Self-Etch Adhesive System), two total etch adhesive system (OptiBond FL; OptiBond Solo), and a conventional sealant (Clinpro) applied to the occlusal surface of primary molars under saliva contamination. Methods: Sealant and adhesive systems were applied under manufacturers' specifications with or without previous saliva contamination. After storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for ...

  12. Deposit Shedding in Biomass-Fired Boilers: Shear Adhesion Strength Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    a significant effect under the investigated conditions. Addition of compounds which increase the melt fraction of the ash dposit, typically by forming a eutectic system, increases the adhesion strength, whereas addition of inert compounds with a high melting point decreases the adhesion strength. Furthermore......Ash deposition on boiler surfaces is a major problem encountered in biomass combustion. Timely removal of ash deposits is essentialfor optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the adhesion strength of biomass ash from...... off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The effect of sintering temperature, sintering time, deposit composition, thermal shocks on the deposit, and steel type was investigated. The results reveal that the adhesion strength of ash deposits...

  13. Adhesion strength of sputtered TiAlN-coated WC insert tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budi, Esmar [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jl. Pemuda No. 10, Jakarta 13220 (Indonesia); Razali, M. Mohd.; Nizam, A. R. Md. [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka Karung Berkunci No 1752 Pejabat Pos Durian Tunggal 76109 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2013-09-09

    The adhesion strength of TiAlN coating that deposited by using DC magnetron sputtering on WC insert tool are studied. TiAlN coating are deposited on Tungsten Carbide (WC) insert tool by varying negatively substrate bias from 79 to 221 volt and nitrogen flow rate from 30 to 72 sccm. The adhesion strength are obtained by using Rockwell indentation test method with a Brale diamond at applied load of 60,100 and 150 kgf. The lateral diameter of indentation is plotted on three different applied loads and the adhesion strength of TiAlN coating was obtained from the curved slopes at 100 and 150 kgf. The lower curve slop indicated better adhesion strength. The results shows that the adhesion strength of sputterred TiAlN coating tend to increase as the negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate are increased.

  14. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  15. Effect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epasinghe, D J; Yiu, C K Y; Burrow, M F; Tay, F R; King, N M

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidin (PA) incorporation into experimental dental adhesives on resin-dentine bond strength. Four experimental hydrophilic adhesives containing different PA concentrations were prepared by combining 50wt% resin comonomer mixtures with 50wt% ethanol. Proanthocyanidin was added to the ethanol-solvated resin to yield three adhesives with PA concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0wt%, respectively. A PA-free adhesive served as the control. Flat dentine surfaces from 40 extracted third molars were etched with 32% phosphoric acid. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four adhesive groups. Two layers of one of the four experimental adhesives were applied to the etched dentine and light-cured for 20s. Composite build-ups were performed using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, twenty-four bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm×0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure under tension for bond strength testing. Bond strength data were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Interfacial nanoleakage was examined in the remaining teeth using a field-emission scanning electron microscope and analysed using the Chi-square test (α=0.05). No significant difference in bond strength was found amongst PA-free, 1% and 2% PA adhesives. However, incorporation of 3% PA into the adhesive significantly lowered bond strength as demonstrated by a greater number of adhesive failures and more extensive nanoleakage along the bonded interface. Incorporation of 2% proanthocyanidin into dental adhesives has no adverse effect on dentine bond strength. The addition of proanthocyanidin to an experimental adhesive has no adverse effect on the immediate resin-dentine bond strength when the concentration of proanthocyanidin in the adhesive is less than or equal to 2%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  17. Effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bond strength of adhesive layer can absorb unwanted stresses of polymerization shrinkage in composite resin restorations; increased microshear bond strength can prevent failure of restoration materials, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin. Material and Methods Two different types of adhesive systems: universal adhesive (ExciTE) and newly developed adhesive (Nano-Bond), and one type of light-cured resin restorative material (Nanocomposite resin) were used in this study. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human molar teeth were ground perpendicular to the long axis of each tooth to expose a flat dentin surface. The adhesives were applied on dentin surfaces (single application or double application). Nanocomposite resin was then placed and light cured for 40 seconds. After 24 hours of immersion in water at 37°C, then subjected to thermocycling before testing, a microshear bond test was carried out. The data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA. For comparison between groups, Tukey’s post-hoc test was used. Results The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with a single application were 8.8 and 16.6 MPa, respectively. The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with double application were 13.2 and 21.8MPa, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in microshear bond strengths between the single application of Nano-Bond and the double application of ExciTE adhesives. Conclusions Microshear bond strength increased significantly as the applied adhesive layer was doubled. Key words:Adhesive, microshear, bond, strength, nanocomposite. PMID:28210433

  18. Surface physicochemistry and ionic strength affects eDNA's role in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Modrzynski, Jakub Jan;

    2014-01-01

    DNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised...... ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength...... with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired...

  19. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zhang, Ming-Qiu [Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  20. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  1. Surface physicochemistry and ionic strength affects eDNA's role in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viduthalai R Regina

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent eDNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired adhesion of cells to glass surfaces, but the adhesive properties of S. xylosus were regained within 30 minutes if DNase was not continuously present, implying a continuous release of eDNA in the culture. Removal of eDNA lowered the adhesion of S. xylosus to all surfaces chemistries tested, but not at all ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength. The adhesive properties of eDNA in mediating initial adhesion of S. xylosus is thus highly versatile, but also dependent on the physicochemical properties of the surface and ionic strength of the surrounding medium.

  2. Cell membrane topology analysis by RICM enables marker-free adhesion strength quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katharina; Rommel, Christina E; Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2013-12-01

    Reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) allows the visualization of the cell's adhesion topology on substrates. Here it is applied as a new label-free method to measure adhesion forces between tumor cells and their substrate without any external manipulation, i.e., the application of force or adjustments in the substrate elasticity. Malignant cancer transformation is closely associated with the down-regulation of adhesion proteins and the consequent reduction of adhesion forces. By analyzing the size and distribution of adhesion patches from a benign and a malignant human pancreatic tumor cell line, we established a model for calculating the adhesion strength based on RICM images. Further, we could show that the cell's spread area does not necessarily scale with adhesion strength. Despite the larger projected cell area of the malignant cell line, adhesion strength was clearly reduced. This underscores the importance of adhesion patch analysis. The calculated force values were verified by microfluidic detachment assays. Static and dynamic RICM measurements produce numerous adhesion-related parameters from which characteristic cell signatures can be derived. Such a cellular fingerprint can refine the process of categorizing cell lines according to their grade of differentiation.

  3. The Effect of Diffusion Barrier and Bombardment on Adhesive Strength of CuCr Alloy Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJian-feng; SONGZhong-xiao; XUKe-wei; WANGYuan

    2004-01-01

    A novel co-sputtering method that combined magnetron sputtering (MS) with ion beam sputtering (IBS) was used to fabricate CuCr alloy films without breaking vacuum after depositing diffusion barrier with IBS. Different bombardment energies were used to improve the comprehensive properties of Cu alloy film. The results indicated that the effects of diffusion barriers and bombardment energy on adhesive strength could be evaluated by a rolling contact fatigue adhesion test. Diffusion barrier can enhance the adhesive strength, and the adhesion of CuCr/CrN was higher than that of CuCr/TiN. When bombarding energy was higher, the adhesive strength of CuCr/TiN films was higher due to the broader transition zone.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of adhesion strength measurement devices for ceramic/titanium matrix composite bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlchuck, Bobby; Zeller, Mary V.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesive bond between ceramic cement and a titanium matrix composite substrate to be used in the National Aerospace Plane program is evaluated. Two commercially available adhesion testers, the Sebastian Adherence Tester and the CSEM REVETEST Scratch Tester, are evaluated to determine their suitability for quantitatively measuring adhesion strength. Various thicknesses of cements are applied to several substrates, and bond strengths are determined with both testers. The Sabastian Adherence Tester has provided limited data due to an interference from the sample mounting procedure, and has been shown to be incapable of distinguishing adhesion strength from tensile and shear properties of the cement itself. The data from the scratch tester has been found to be difficult to interpret due to the porosity and hardness of the cement. Recommendations are proposed for a more reliable adhesion test method.

  5. Experimental evaluation of cohesive and adhesive bond strength and fracture energy of bitumen-aggregate systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jizhe; AIREY, Gordon D; Grenfell, James R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of asphalt pavements is an inevitable phenomenon due to the combined effects of high traffic loads and harsh environmental conditions. Deterioration can be in the form of cohesive failure of the bitumen and/or bitumen-filler mastic or by adhesive failure between bitumen and aggregate. This paper presents an experimental investigation to characterise the cohesive and adhesive strength and fracture energy of bitumen-aggregate samples. The pneumatic adhesion tensile testing instrumen...

  6. Influence of Curing Condition on the Adhesive Strength of EVA Modified Mortar to Tile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The reducing water effectiveness of EVA latex and powder was observed. Adhesive strength of EVA modified mortar to tile under different curing condition was studied. And the adhesive strengths of mortars modified by EVA latex and by EVA powder were compared. The results show that the reducing water effectiveness is improved by 36.12% and 21.55%, respectively, when the content of EVA latex and powder are 8% and 4%. EVA latex and powder can improve the adhesive strength of modified mortar to tile under the standard curing, high temperature curing, and freeze-thaw circle curing.EVA latex can improve the water resistance obviously, besides improve the adhesive strengths of standard curing and high temperature curing, comparing with EVA powder.

  7. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    ...) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine...

  8. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  9. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  10. Bond strength of different adhesives to normal and caries-affected dentins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAN Wei; HOU Ben-xiang; L(U) Yalin

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently, several systems of dentin substrate-reacting adhesives are available for use in the restorative treatment against caries. However, the bond effectiveness and property of different adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesives to both normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) and to analyze the dentin/adhesive interracial characteristics.Methods Twenty eight extracted human molars with coronal medium carious lesions were randomly assigned to four groups according to adhesives used. ND and CAD were bonded with etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 (SB2) or self-etching adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Clearfil S~3 Bond (CS3), iBond GI (IB). Rectangular sticks of resin-dentin bonded interfaces 0.9 mm~2 were obtained. The specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean μTBS was statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Interfacial morphologies were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).Results Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 yielded high bond strength when applied to both normal and caries-affected dentin. The two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond generated the highest bond strength to ND among all adhesives tested but a significantly reduced strength when applied to CAD. For the one-step self-etching adhesives, Clearfil S~3 Bond and iBond GI, the bond strength was relatively low regardless of the dentin type. SEM interfacial analysis revealed that hybrid layers were thicker with poorer resin tag formation and less resin-filled lateral branches in the CAD than in the ND for all the adhesives tested.Conclusion The etch-and-rinse adhesive performed more effectively to caries-affected dentin than the self-etching adhesives.

  11. Measurement of single-cell adhesion strength using a microfluidic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Kevin V; Williamson, Kyle B; Masters, Kristyn S; Turner, Kevin T

    2010-06-01

    Despite the importance of cell adhesion in numerous physiological, pathological, and biomaterial-related responses, our understanding of adhesion strength at the cell-substrate interface and its relationship to cell function remains incomplete. One reason for this deficit is a lack of accessible experimental approaches that quantify adhesion strength at the single-cell level and facilitate large numbers of tests. The current work describes the design, fabrication, and use of a microfluidic-based method for single-cell adhesion strength measurements. By applying a monotonically increasing flow rate in a microfluidic channel in combination with video microscopy, the adhesion strength of individual NIH3T3 fibroblasts cultured for 24 h on various surfaces was measured. The small height of the channel allows high shear stresses to be generated under laminar conditions, allowing strength measurements on well-spread, strongly adhered cells that cannot be characterized in most conventional assays. This assay was used to quantify the relationship between morphological characteristics and adhesion strength for individual well-spread cells. Cell adhesion strength was found to be positively correlated with both cell area and circularity. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to examine the role of cell geometry in determining the actual stress applied to the cell. Use of this method to examine adhesion at the single-cell level allows the detachment of strongly-adhered cells under a highly-controllable, uniform loading to be directly observed and will enable the characterization of biological events and relationships that cannot currently be achieved using existing methods.

  12. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  13. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10: SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC; AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem. Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05. The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  14. Binding Strength Between Cell Adhesion Proteoglycans Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammer, Ulrich; Popescu, Octavian; Wagner, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario; Guntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Misevic, Gradimir N.

    1995-02-01

    Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to adhesion molecules is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans from a marine sponge. Under physiological conditions, the adhesive force between two cell adhesion molecules was found to be up to 400 piconewtons. Thus a single pair of molecules could hold the weight of 1600 cells. High intermolecular binding forces are likely to form the basis for the integrity of the multicellular sponge organism.

  15. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Mirzakoucheki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003. Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064. Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant.

  16. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Cécile; Villat, Cyril; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm(2) sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL).

  17. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR. All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles. The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL.

  18. Effect of water storage on ultimate tensile strength and mass changes of universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrololumi, Nazanin; Beglou, Amirreza; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sadr, Alireza; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh-Mahsa; Ghasemi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on micro tensile strength (µTS) and mass changes (MC) of two universal adhesives. 10 disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each adhesive; Scotchbond Universal (SCU) All-Bond Universal (ABU) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2). At the baseline and after 1 day and 28 days of water storage, their mass were measured and compared to estimate water sorption and solubility. For µTS test, 20 dumbbell shaped specimens were also prepared for each adhesive in two subgroups of 1 day and 28 days water storage. MC was significantly lower for SCU and ABU than SB2 (P water; both universal adhesives showed less water sorption and higher values of µTS than the control group. Key words:Absorption, dental adhesives, dentin-bonding agents, solubility, tensile strength.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of thermoplastic elastomer dry adhesives with high strength and low contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Khaled, Walid; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-05-14

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyurethane elastomers have commonly been used to manufacture mushroom shaped gecko-inspired dry adhesives with high normal adhesion strength. However, the thermosetting nature of these two materials severely limits the commercial viability of their manufacturing due to long curing times and high material costs. In this work, we introduce poly(styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene) (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomers as an alternative for the manufacture of mushroom shaped dry adhesives with both directional and nondirectional performance. These materials are attractive for their potential to be less contaminating via oligomer transfer than thermoset elastomers, as well as being more suited to mass manufacturing. Low material transfer properties are attractive for adhesives that could potentially be used in cleanroom environments for microscale assembly and handling in which device contamination is a serious concern. We characterized a thermoplastic elastomer in terms of oligomer transfer using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the SEBS transfers negligible amounts of its own oligomers, during contact with a gold-coated silicon surface, which may be representative of the metallic bond pads found in micro-electro-mechanical systems devices. We also demonstrate the fabrication of mushroom shaped isotropic and anisotropic adhesive fibers with two different SEBS elastomer grades using thermocompression molding and characterize the adhesives in terms of their shear-enhanced normal adhesion strength. The overall adhesion of one of the thermoplastic elastomer adhesives was found to be stronger or comparable to their polyurethane counterparts with identical dimensions.

  20. Relationships Between Process Parameters, Microstructure, and Adhesion Strength of HVOF Sprayed IN718 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyphout, Christophe; Nylén, Per; Östergren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of relationships between process parameters, particle in-flight characteristics, and adhesion strength of HVOF sprayed coatings is important to achieve the high coating adhesion that is needed in aeronautic repair applications. In this study, statistical Design of Experiments (DoE) was used to identify the most important process parameters that influence adhesion strength of IN718 coatings sprayed on IN718 substrates. Special attention was given to the parameters combustion ratio, total gas mass flow, stand-off distance and external cooling, since these parameters were assumed to have a significant influence on particle temperature and velocity. Relationships between these parameters and coating microstructure were evaluated to fundamentally understand the relationships between process parameters and adhesion strength.

  1. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  2. Experimental research and statistic analysis of polymer composite adhesive joints strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudawska, Anna; Miturska, Izabela; Szabelski, Jakub; Skoczylas, Agnieszka; Droździel, Paweł; Bociąga, Elżbieta; Madleňák, Radovan; Kasperek, Dariusz

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effect of arrangement of fibreglass fabric plies in a polymer composite on adhesive joint strength. Based on the experimental results, the real effect of plies arrangement and their most favourable configuration with respect to strength is determined. The experiments were performed on 3 types of composites which had different fibre orientations. The composites had three plies of fabric. The plies arrangement in Composite I was unchanged, in Composite II the central ply had the 45° orientation, while in Composite III the outside ply (tangential to the adhesive layer) was oriented at 45°. Composite plates were first cut into smaller specimens and then adhesive-bonded in different combinations with Epidian 61/Z1/100:10 epoxy adhesive. After stabilizing, the single-lap adhesive joints were subjected to shear strength tests. It was noted that plies arrangement in composite materials affects the strength of adhesive joints made of these composites between the values of the strength of the confidence level of 0.95. The statistical analysis of the results also showed that there are no statistical significant differences in average values of surface free energy (0.95 confidence level).

  3. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  4. Shear bond strength of three adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the shear bond strength of three new adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth using three new etch and rinse and self-etch adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: Sixty intact caries-free third molars were selected and randomly divided into 6 groups. Flat buccal and lingual enamel and dentin surfaces were prepared and mounted in the acrylic resin perpendicular to the plan of the horizon. Adhesives used in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE-One F (Ivoclar/Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein. The adhesives were applied on the surfaces and cured with quartz tungsten halogen curing unit (600 mW/cm2 intensity for 20 s. After attaching composite to the surfaces and thermocycling (500 cycles, 5-55ºC, shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The failure modes were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed using T-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher's exact tests.Results: In enamel, Tetric N-Bond (28.57±4.58 MPa and AdheSE (21.97±7.6 MPa had significantly higher bond strength than AdheSE-One F (7.16±2.09 MPa (P0.05.Conclusion: Shear bond strength to dentin in Tetric N-Bond (etch and rinse system( was higher than self-etch adhesives (AdheSE and AdheSE-One F. The bond strength to enamel and dentin in two-step self-etch (AdheSE was higher than one-step self-etch (AdheSE-One F.

  5. Experimental study about the influence of adhesive stiffness to the bonding strengths of adhesives for ceramic/metal targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. SEIFERT; E. STRASSBURGER; S. GREFEN; S. SCHAARE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigations presented here was to understand how the stiffness of the adhesive affects the failure of ceramic tiles adhered to metallic backings. The working hypothesis was that varying the adhesive stiffness could have the same effect on the ballistic performance as a variation of the adhesive thickness. Two different projectile/target combinations were utilized for ballistic tests in order to generate extremely different loading conditions. With targets consisting of 6 mm aluminum oxide ceramic and 6 mm aluminum backing, complete penetration occurred in each test with 7.62 mm tungsten carbide core AP ammunition at an impact velocity of 940 m/s. In contrast, with ceramic tiles of 20 mm thickness on 13 mm steel backing, no penetration of the ceramic occurred at the impact of a 7.62 mm ball round at 840 m/s. Four different types of adhesive (high-strength till high-flexible) were tested in both configurations. The elongation of the adhesive layer, the deformation of the metallic backing and the failure of the ceramics were observed by means of a high-speed camera during the projectile/target interaction. The results of the ballistic tests showed that a higher fracture strain caused a larger deformation of the backing compared to adhesives, which exhibit a high tensile strength and low fracture strains. The experimental results indicate that the damage behavior of the ceramic/metal composites depends on the absolute elongation of the adhesive layer. This can be controlled either by the thickness or the stiffness of the bonding layer.

  6. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  7. Effects of operating conditions on the adhesive strength of Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms in tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M J; Zhang, Z; Bott, T R

    2005-06-25

    Understanding the mechanical properties of biofilms, especially the force required to disrupt them and remove them from substrata is very important to development of antibiofouling strategies. In this work, a novel micromanipulation technique with a specially designed T-shaped probe has been developed to serve as an experimental means to measure directly the adhesive strength of biofouling deposits on the surface of a glass test stud. The basic principle of this novel technique is to pull away a whole biofilm accumulated on the surface of a glass test stud with T-shaped probe, and to measure simultaneously the force imposed on the biofilm. The adhesive strength between the biofilms and the surface to which they are attached, is defined as the work per unit area required to remove the biofilms from the surface. The biofouling experiments were performed on an elaborate design of a simulated heat exchanger system. A monoculture of Pseudomonas fluorescens was chosen as the fouling microorganism for the laboratory studies. Results indicate that the adhesive strength of the biofilm was affected by the conditions of operation, such as biofilm age, nutrient concentration, suspended cell concentration, pH, surface roughness of the substratum and fluid velocity. As noted, the effect of fluid velocity on the biofilm adhesive strength seemed to overwhelm other factors. At the same operating conditions, the biofilm adhesive strength increased as the fluid velocity increased within the range of 0.6-1.6m/s. In addition, the flow-related biofilm structures were observed that biofilms generally grew as a more compact pattern at the higher fluid velocity. Apparently, the fluid velocity can affect the biofilm structure, which in turn determines the biofilm adhesive strength. The knowledge of the biofilm adhesive strength with associated influences of the operating conditions may be used to define better cleaning procedures.

  8. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strengths of total-etch adhesives and self-etch adhesives with single and multiple consecutive applications: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandava Deepthi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study evaluates the effect of single and multiple consecutive applications of adhesives on the tensile bond strength. The currently available adhesives follow either the total-etch or the self-etch concept. However, in both techniques the uniformity and thickness of the adhesive layer plays a significant role in the development of a good bond. Materials and Methods: Sixty composite-dentin bonded specimens were prepared using a total-etch adhesive (Gluma and another 60 using a self-etch adhesive (AdheSE. Each group was further divided into six subgroups based on the number of applications, i.e., single application and multiple (2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 applications. The tensile bond strength was tested with the Instron universal testing machine. The values were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and multiple range tests by Tukey′s HSD procedure to identify those subgroups that had significantly higher bond strength. Results: The results indicate that with total-etch adhesive the bond strength increases significantly as the number of applications are increased from one to two or from two to three", for self-etch adhesive the bond strength obtained with two applications is significantly higher than that with one application. However, for both adhesive systems, there was a decrease in the tensile bond strength values with further applications. Conclusion: We conclude that, in the clinical setting, the application of multiple coats of total etch adhesive improves bonding.

  9. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-05-02

    With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adhesive resins. Alumina ceramic specimens (Techceram Ltd, Shipley, UK) were assigned to three groups. Three types of commercially available prosthodontic resin composites [BelleGlass®, (BG, Kerr, CA, USA), Sinfony® (SF, 3 M ESPE, Dental Products, Germany), and GC Gradia® (GCG, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan)] were bonded to the alumina substrate using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group (N = 40) were stored dry for 24 hours, the remaining were stored for 30 days in water. The bonding strength, so-called shear bond strengths between composite resin and alumina substrate were measured. Data were analysed statistically and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of prosthodontic resin composites. Shear bond strengths of material combinations varied from 24.17 ± 3.72-10.15 ± 3.69 MPa and 21.20 ± 4.64-7.50 ± 4.22 at 24 h and 30 days, respectively. BG resin composite compared with the other resin composites provided the strongest bond with alumina substrate (p resin composite was found to have a lower bond strength than the other composites. The Weibull moduli were highest for BG, which was bonded by using Optibond Solo Plus adhesive resin at 24 h and 30 days. There was no effect of storage time and adhesive brand on bond strength. Within the limitations of this study, the shear bond strengths of composite resins to alumina substrate are related to the composite

  10. α-Catenin and vinculin cooperate to promote high E-cadherin-based adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William A; Boscher, Cécile; Chu, Yeh-Shiu; Cuvelier, Damien; Martinez-Rico, Clara; Seddiki, Rima; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mege, René-Marc; Dufour, Sylvie

    2013-02-15

    Maintaining cell cohesiveness within tissues requires that intercellular adhesions develop sufficient strength to support traction forces applied by myosin motors and by neighboring cells. Cadherins are transmembrane receptors that mediate intercellular adhesion. The cadherin cytoplasmic domain recruits several partners, including catenins and vinculin, at sites of cell-cell adhesion. Our study used force measurements to address the role of αE-catenin and vinculin in the regulation of the strength of E-cadherin-based adhesion. αE-catenin-deficient cells display only weak aggregation and fail to strengthen intercellular adhesion over time, a process rescued by the expression of αE-catenin or chimeric E-cadherin·αE-catenins, including a chimera lacking the αE-catenin dimerization domain. Interestingly, an αE-catenin mutant lacking the modulation and actin-binding domains restores cadherin-dependent cell-cell contacts but cannot strengthen intercellular adhesion. The expression of αE-catenin mutated in its vinculin-binding site is defective in its ability to rescue cadherin-based adhesion strength in cells lacking αE-catenin. Vinculin depletion or the overexpression of the αE-catenin modulation domain strongly decreases E-cadherin-mediated adhesion strength. This supports the notion that both molecules are required for intercellular contact maturation. Furthermore, stretching of cell doublets increases vinculin recruitment and α18 anti-αE-catenin conformational epitope immunostaining at cell-cell contacts. Taken together, our results indicate that αE-catenin and vinculin cooperatively support intercellular adhesion strengthening, probably via a mechanoresponsive link between the E-cadherin·β-catenin complexes and the underlying actin cytoskeleton.

  11. Microtensile Bond Strength and Micromorphology of Bur-cut Enamel Using Five Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Alexandra; Ramos, João; Messias, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Caramelo, Francisco; Mata, António

    2015-04-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of two etch-and-rinse (ER) (OptiBond FL [OBFL]; Prime & Bond NT [PBNT]) and three self-etching (SE) (Clearfil SE Bond [CSEB]; Xeno III [XIII]; Xeno V+ [XV+]) adhesives systems to bur-prepared human enamel considering active (AA) and passive (PA) application of the self-etching systems. Ninety-six enamel surfaces were prepared with a medium-grit diamond bur and randomly allocated into 8 groups to receive adhesive restorations: G1: OBFL; G2: PBNT; G3: CSEB/PA; G4: CSEB/ AA; G5: XIII/PA; G6: XIII/AA; G7: XV+/PA; G8: XV+/AA. After composite buildup, samples were sectioned to obtain a total of 279 bonded sticks (1 mm2) that were submitted to microtensile testing (μTBS; 0.5 mm/min) after 24-h water storage (37°C). Etching patterns and adhesive interfacial ultramorphology were also evaluated with confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data was analyzed with one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Weibull probabilistic distribution was also determined. Regarding μTBS, both adhesive system and application mode yielded statistically significant differences (p adhesive systems together with CSEB/AA and XIII/PA recorded the highest and statistically similar bond strength results. XV+ presented very low bond strength values, regardless of the application mode. Among self-etching adhesives, CSEB produced significantly higher μTBS values when applied actively. Qualitative evaluation by SEM and CLSM revealed substantial differences between groups both in adhesive interfaces and enamel conditioning patterns. ER and SE adhesive systems presented distinctive bond strengths to bur-cut enamel. The application mode effect was adhesive dependent. Active application improved etching patterns and resin interfaces micromorphology.

  12. Influence of chlorhexidine digluconate on bond strength durability of a self-etching adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synara Santos Herênio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of 2% chlorhexidine on bond strength durability of a self-etching adhesive system (ClearFill SE Bond. Material and methods: Forty bovine incisors’ crowns had their labial surfaces abraded to dentinexposure,inorderthatthestandardadhesion dentin exposure, inorderthatthestandardadhesion in order that the standard adhesion area reached 4 mm in diameter. Subsequently, they were divided into four groups, according to the treatments performed on the surfaces and storage time: G1 – adhesive system without chlorhexidine for 24 hours (control group; G2 – adhesive system without chlorhexidine for 6 months (control group; G3 – adhesive system with chlorhexidine for 24 hours (experimental group; G4 – adhesive system with chlorhexidine for 6 months (experimental group. After dentin surface treatments, cylinders of composite resin (Z350 were constructed. Then, the specimens were stored in distilled water according to each group design and storage time. Following, the four groups were subjected to shear bond strength test, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm / min. The obtained values were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: The results indicated a significant decrease of bond strength in the group treated with chlorhexidine followed by 24-hour storage when compared to control group. However, there was no significant difference in 6-month storage between the experimental and control groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The application of 2% chlorhexidine was deleterious for bond strength after 24-hour storage.

  13. Influence of adhesive bond line thickness on joint strength

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Peter; Sohier, L; Cognard, J. -y.; Bourmaud, A; Choqueuse, Dominique; Rinnert, Emmanuel; Creac' Hcadec, R

    2009-01-01

    While the geometry of aerospace assemblies is carefully controlled, for many industrial applications such as marine structures bond line thickness can vary significantly. In this study epoxy adhesive joints of different thicknesses between aluminium substrates have been characterized using physico-chemical analyses (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; dynamic mechanical analysis, DMA; spectroscopy), nano-indentation and mechanical testing. Thermal analyses indicated no influence of thickn...

  14. Effect of water storage on ultimate tensile strength and mass changes of universal adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrololumi, Nazanin; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sadr, Alireza; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh-Mahsa; Ghasemi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on micro tensile strength (µTS) and mass changes (MC) of two universal adhesives. Material and Methods 10 disk-shaped specimens were prepared for each adhesive; Scotchbond Universal (SCU) All-Bond Universal (ABU) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2). At the baseline and after 1 day and 28 days of water storage, their mass were measured and compared to estimate water sorption and solubility. For µTS test, 20 dumbbell shaped specimens were also prepared for each adhesive in two subgroups of 1 day and 28 days water storage. Results MC was significantly lower for SCU and ABU than SB2 (P adhesives, the MC was significantly lower at 28 days compared to that at 1 day (P adhesives (P adhesives were both material and time dependent when stored in water; both universal adhesives showed less water sorption and higher values of µTS than the control group. Key words:Absorption, dental adhesives, dentin-bonding agents, solubility, tensile strength. PMID:28149468

  15. Improvement in reinforcing bond strength in reinforced concrete with self-repairing chemical adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    1997-05-01

    Self-healing concretes have embedded adhesives which are released from hollow fibers inside the concrete when and where cracking of the matrix and the fibers occurs. It was found that the adhesive improves the strength of the cracked portions of the concrete and increases its ability to deflect under load. Structural materials subjected to dynamic events such as earthquakes and impacts can have improved response by the noise of adhesive type which can impart improved damping, lateral stiffness, or deflection. Testing also assessed the improvement of the bond strength in structures. In laboratory tests the internal adhesive repair system improved the bond between the reinforcing steel and the concrete to prevent pullout failure or debonding at the interface.

  16. Shear adhesion strength of thermoplastic gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive exceeds material limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2011-09-20

    Natural gecko array wearless dynamic friction has recently been reported for 30,000 cycles on a smooth substrate. Following these findings, stiff polymer gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives have been proposed for high-cycle applications such as robot feet. Here we examine the behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) microfiber arrays during repeated cycles of engagement on a glass surface, with a normal preload of less than 40 kPa. We find that fiber arrays maintained 54% of the original shear stress of 300 kPa after 10,000 cycles, despite showing a marked plastic deformation of fiber tips. This deformation could be due to shear-induced plastic creep of the fiber tips from high adhesion forces, adhesive wear, or thermal effects. We hypothesize that a fundamental material limit has been reached for these fiber arrays and that future gecko synthetic adhesive designs must take into account the high adhesive forces generated to avoid damage. Although the synthetic material and natural gecko arrays have a similar elastic modulus, the synthetic material does not show the same wear-free dynamic friction as the gecko.

  17. Strength scaling of adhesive joints in polymer–matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Goutianos, Stergios; Jacobsen, Torben K.

    2009-01-01

    The fracture of adhesive joints between two glass-fibre laminates was studied by testing double cantilever beam test specimens loaded by uneven bending moments. A large-scale fracture process zone, consisting of a crack tip and a fibre bridging zone, developed. The mixed mode fracture resistance...... increased with increasing crack length, eventually reaching a steady-state level (R-curve behaviour). The steady-state fracture resistance level increased with increasing amount of tangential crack opening displacement. Cohesive laws, obtained from fracture resistance data, were used for prediction the load...

  18. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    LIN, JIE; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coat...

  19. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Fatemeh Maleknejad; Moosavi, Horieh; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (µSBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% ...

  20. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesives to pulp chamber dentin after irrigation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ç Barutcigil; Arslan, H.; Özcan, E.; O T Harorli

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different concentrations of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution on adhesion, that is, the bond strength of the different adhesive systems, to the pulp chamber dentin. Materials and Methods: Recently extracted, sound, human, third molars were cut horizontally to expose the pulp horn. The roof of the pulp chamber and pulp tissue was removed. The teeth were then divided into five main groups. The teeth in each group were ...

  1. Effects of Different Hardeners on the Working Properties and Bonding Strength of Urea-formaldehyde Adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The addition of a hardener is necessary for the curing of urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesives in the production of MDF and particleboard. The most commonly used hardener, ammonium chloride, however, is suspected to cause the formation of poisonous dioxin when waste boards are combusted and hence considered as a potential source of pollution. To assess the feasibility of substituting ammonium sulphate for ammonium chloride, working properties and bonding strength were measured for UF adhesives with the two ...

  2. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  3. Bonding performance of different adhesive systems to deproteinized dentin: microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa de Souza, Fábio; Silva, Cláudio Heliomar Vicente; Guenka Palma Dibb, Regina; Sincler Delfino, Carina; Carneiro de Souza Beatrice, Lúcia

    2005-10-01

    Deproteinization has been shown to optimize dentin bonding, but differences in adhesive composition should be considered. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin deproteinization on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of four total-etch adhesive systems (Single Bond/SB, Prime & Bond NT/PB, One Coat Bond/OC, and PQ1/PQ). The ultrastructure of the resin-dentin interfaces was also examined using scanning electron microscopy. Tukey's multiple-comparison tests indicated that PB and PQ produced significantly higher microTBS (padhesive system, as well as the adhesive dentin specificity to the oxidant effect of sodium hypochlorite. Incorporation of fillers in the adhesive, a possible self-etching action, and the presence of a volatile solvent (acetone) were the main factors for a better union between the adhesive system and deproteinized substrate. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2005.

  4. Effect of Curing Direction on Microtensile Bond Strength of Fifth and Sixth Generation Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nadaf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Composite restorative materials and dental adhesives are usually cured with light sources. The light direction may influence the bond strength of dental adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light direction on the microtensile bond strength of fifth and sixth generation dental adhesives.Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT and Clearfil SE bond were used with different light directions.Sixty human incisor teeth were divided into 4 groups (n=15. In groups A and C, Clearfil SE bond with light curing direction from buccal was used for bonding a composite resin to dentin. In groups B and D, Prime & Bond NT with light curing direction from composite was used. After thermocycling the specimens were subjected to tensile force until debonding occurred and values for microtensile bond strength were recorded. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test.Results: The findings showed that the bond strength of Clearfil SE bond was significantly higher than that of Prime&Bond NT (P<0.001. There was no significant difference between light curing directions (P=0.132.Conclusion: Light curing direction did not have significant effect on the bond strength. Sixth generation adhesives was more successful than fifth generation in terms of bond strength to dentin.

  5. Matching Forces Applied in Underwater Hull Cleaning with Adhesion Strength of Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinis Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is detrimental to the hydrodynamic performance of ships. In spite of advances in hull coating technology, a ship must usually undergo underwater hull cleaning to remove biofouling during her in-service time. However, some cleaning practices may also lead to decreased lifetime of the fouling-control coating. Therefore, cleaning forces should be minimized, according to the adhesion strength of marine organisms present on the hull. In this article, values of adhesion strength found in available literature are discussed in the light of current knowledge on hull cleaning technology. Finally, the following knowledge gaps are identified: (1 data on adhesion strength of naturally-occurring biofouling communities are practically absent; (2 shear forces imparted by current cleaning devices on low-form fouling (microfouling and corresponding effects on hull coatings are largely unknown. This knowledge would be valuable for both developers and users of cleaning technology.

  6. The Effect of Primer Application Modifications on the Bond Strength of 4th Generation Adhesive Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    The influence of deviations from the manufacturer’s instructions for the use of six adhesive systems on the bond strengths to enamel and dentin...application of two layers of the self- etching adhesive systems produced significant improvement in bond strength to enamel compared to the passive...2010) evaluated the relationship between the number of adhesive layers and internal adaptation on the microtensile bond strength to enamel and dentin

  7. Effect of phosphoric acid etching on the shear bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    SABATINI, Camila

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of optional phosphoric acid etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two self-etch adhesives to enamel and dentin. Material and Methods Ninety-six bovine mandibular incisors were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates. A two-step self-etch adhesive (FL-Bond II) and a one-step self-etch adhesive (BeautiBond) were applied with and without a preliminary acid etching to both the enamel and dentin. The specimens were equally and randomly assigned t...

  8. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Bernard; Cyril Villat; Hazem Abouelleil; Marie-Paule Gustin; Brigitte Grosgogeat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-et...

  9. Comparison of the retention strengths of three complete denture adhesives: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañes, Jose F; Selva, Eduardo J; De-Barutell, Alfonso; Bouazza, Kheira

    2011-01-01

    One of the main problems posed by complete dentures is retention and stability. In order to solve this problem, dentists and the dental industry for a long time have attempted to improve denture adhesion by developing a range of "glues" of highly varied composition and efficacy. The present in vivo clinical study evaluates whether the adhesives used to improve complete denture retention are truly effective and able to increase denture adhesion to the mucosa covering the edentulous alveolar ridge.of the mandibular dentures. An in vivo clinical study is made of 30 patients with complete mandibular dentures to evaluate the retention afforded by three commercial complete denture adhesives (Benfix®, Fittydent® and Supercorega®). A spring scale was used to measure retention strength (in grams). The purpose was to determine whether the use of complete denture adhesives is effective, and to establish which commercial brands offer the highest retention strengths. The results obtained indicate that retention is enhanced by the use of such adhesives, and that Fittydent® offers the best retention performance, followed by Benfix® and Supercorega® The study of denture adhesives and his efficiency are necessary to improve the edentulous patient satisfaction. More in vivo investigations are necessary in dental literature.

  10. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  11. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  12. INITIAL MICROBIAL ADHESION IS A DETERMINANT FOR THE STRENGTH OF BIOFILM ADHESION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ; VANDERMEI, HC; Bos, R.R.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a hypothesis on the importance of initial microbial adhesion in the overall process of biofilm formation. The hypothesis is based on the realization that dynamic shear conditions exist in many environments, such as in the oral cavity, or on rocks and ship hulls. Recognizing that

  13. INITIAL MICROBIAL ADHESION IS A DETERMINANT FOR THE STRENGTH OF BIOFILM ADHESION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ; VANDERMEI, HC; Bos, R.R.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a hypothesis on the importance of initial microbial adhesion in the overall process of biofilm formation. The hypothesis is based on the realization that dynamic shear conditions exist in many environments, such as in the oral cavity, or on rocks and ship hulls. Recognizing that

  14. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  15. Influence of superconductor film composition on adhesion strength of coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Khatri, Narayan; Liu, Yuhao; Delgado, Louis; Galstyan, Eduard; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2015-11-20

    The effect of high temperature superconductor (HTS) film composition on the adhesion strength of rare- earth barium copper oxide coated conductors (CCs) has been studied. It has been found that the mechanical integrity of the superconductor layer is very susceptible to the defects especially those along the ab plane, probably due to the weak interfaces between the defects and the matrix. Gd and Y in the standard composition were substituted with Sm and the number of in-plane defects was drastically reduced. Consequently, a four-fold increase in adhesion or peeling strength in Sm-based CCs was achieved compared to the standard GdYBCO samples.

  16. Enhancing the adhesion strength of micro electroforming layer by ultrasonic agitation method and the application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhong; Du, Liqun; Tao, Yousheng; Li, Qingfeng; Luo, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Micro electroforming is widely used for fabricating micro metal devices in Micro Electro Mechanism System (MEMS). However, there is the problem of poor adhesion strength between micro electroforming layer and substrate. This dramatically influences the dimensional accuracy of the device. To solve this problem, ultrasonic agitation method is applied during the micro electroforming process. To explore the effect of the ultrasonic agitation on the adhesion strength, micro electroforming experiments were carried out under different ultrasonic power (0W, 100W, 150W, 200W, 250W) and different ultrasonic frequencies (0kHz, 40kHz, 80kHz, 120kHz, 200kHz). The effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency on the micro electroforming process were investigated by polarization method and alternating current (a.c.) impedance method. The adhesion strength between the electroforming layer and the substrate was measured by scratch test. The compressive stress of the electroforming layer was measured by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method. The crystallite size of the electroforming layer was measured by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method. The internal contact surface area of the electroforming layer was measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic agitation can decrease the polarization overpotential and increase the charge transfer process. Generally, the internal contact surface area is increased and the compressive stress is reduced. And then the adhesion strength is enhanced. Due to the different depolarization effects of the ultrasonic power and the ultrasonic frequency, the effects on strengthening the adhesion strength are different. When the ultrasonic agitation is 200W and 40kHz, the effect on strengthening the adhesion strength is the best. In order to prove the effect which the ultrasonic agitation can improve the adhesion strength of the micro devices, micro pillar arrays were fabricated under

  17. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesive systems applied on occlusal primary enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramires-Romito, Ana Cláudia; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; de Góes, Mario Fernando; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength of adhesive systems (OptiBond Solo, Kerr; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) on occlusal surface of primary molars. The adhesives were tested under manufacturers' specifications and after contamination of the bonding site with saliva. Hourglass cylindrical-shaped samples were obtained and subjected to a tensile force. No significant difference was observed among the groups. OptiBond Solo and Prime & Bond NT showed similar values of bond strengths when applied on occlusal enamel of primary molar under either saliva contamination or not.

  18. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (pcomposite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  19. INFLUENCE OF HIGH-STRENGTH REINFORCEMENT WITHOUT ADHESION TO CONCRETE ON STRENGTH OF CAST-IN-SITU BEAMLESS FLOORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipenko Yuri Grigoryevich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence and location of prestressed high-strength reinforcement without adhesion to concrete on the strength of a beamless floor panel is considered. The work is aimed at clarifying the methodology for calculating the strength of cast-in-situ beamless floor with mixed reinforcement, where reinforcement is used in a plastic shell of monostrend type without adhesion to concrete for the most complete use of the strength characteristics of the panel material. The aim of the study is to determine the level of influence and location of prestressed reinforcement without adhesion to concrete on the strength of a panel of cast-in-situ beamless floor, as well as comparison of the results obtained for the stresses of ropes in panels with contour and diagonal arrangement of prestressed reinforcement. The shape of the rope position is represented by a part of the parabola passing through the points of the rope support. On the support, the vertical and horizontal components of the reaction are determined by the longitudinal force in the rope and the exit angle of the guy rope. 9х9m cast-in-situ beamless floor panels in two variants were investigated: with diagonal and contour stressing steel. The values of increment in stresses in the ropes and the resulting values at various prestress and deflection levels, presented in the form of tables and graphs, have been calculated. According to the results of the study, the use of high-strength prestressed ropes without adhesion to concrete, as an additional working reinforcement, reduces deflections of the panels and lowers consumption of common reinforcement. The results indicate a relative decrease in efficiency of using rope strength along with an increase in the initial prestress level. From the point of ensuring load-bearing capacity, the contour positioning of ropes is preferable, due to more complete use of strength of high-tensile reinforcement. To meet the requirements of ultimate limit states, the

  20. The effect of storage and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of three dentinal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino Carracho, A J; Chappell, R P; Glaros, A G; Purk, J H; Eick, J D

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of time of storage and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of three dentinal adhesives. The shear bond strength of Mirage Bond was significantly greater than that of Scotchbond 2, which was significantly greater than that of Scotchbond Dual Cure (P less than or equal to .05). Thermocycling significantly lowered the shear bond strength of Scotchbond Dual Cure and Scotchbond 2, but not that of Mirage Bond (P less than or equal to .05). Time of storage did not affect the shear bond strength of the other adhesives, but Mirage Bond had a significantly greater shear bond strength after 1 month of storage (P less than or equal to .05). Scanning electron microscopic observations showed that the fracture patterns were all at the smear layer-adhesive interface for Scotchbond Dual Cure, the majority of the fractures were at the primer-adhesive interface for Scotchbond 2, and most of the fractures were cohesive in the bonding agent for Mirage Bond.

  1. Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop Adhesives to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alizadeh Oskoee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength to sound and caries-affected dentin using Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesives.Materials and Methods: Sixteen extracted human molars with carious lesions extended halfway through dentin were ground to expose the caries affected and the surrounding normal dentin. The samples were divided into two groups of eight samples each, including Single Bond (two-step etch and rinse and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (one step self-etch. Z-100 (3M was used for composite build-ups. The teeth were then sectioned and prepared for micro tensile bond strength test, at cross head speed of 1.5 mm/min. Data were ana-lyzed by 1- and 2-way ANOVA.Results: Bond strengths of Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesives to sound den-tin were significantly higher than to the caries-affected one (P<0.001, besides, bond strength of Single Bond to dentin was generally found to be higher than Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesive (P<0.001.The interaction effect was not significant (P=0.116Conclusion: Bond strength to caries-affected dentin was compromised when one and two step adhesives were used.

  2. Effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Zheng, J; Zheng, L; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-01

    Salivary pellicle is a biofilm that is formed by the selective adsorption of salivary proteins. Almost all the functions of the salivary pellicle (lubricating properties, anti-caries properties, etc.) are closely associated with its adhesion strength to tooth surface. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel, aiming to understand what act as the determinant of the interfacial adhesion. In this study, human tooth enamel samples were immersed in human whole saliva in vitro to obtain a salivary pellicle on the surface of enamel. Immersion treatments lasting up to 1, 3, 10 and 60 min were conducted, respectively. Nano-scratch tests were conducted on the surface of enamel after different adsorption times. The wettability of enamel surface was measured through water contact angle. Results showed that the shear energy between salivary pellicle and enamel surface increased exponentially with the adsorption time. The adhesion force between salivary pellicle and bare enamel surface was more than twice that between salivary pellicle and salivary pellicle. It was found that both the wettability and zeta potential of enamel increased obviously after 1 min saliva-adsorption treatment, and then they almost kept stable as the adsorption time further increased. In summary, the adhesion strength between initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface was much higher than that between initial salivary pellicle and outer salivary pellicle. It seemed that electrostatic interaction contributed to the adhesion between the initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface, but not to the adhesion between the initial and outer salivary pellicle. The results would be helpful to extend the understanding of the adhesion mechanism of salivary pellicle and then to develop new artificial saliva and dental restorative materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bond strength of universal adhesives: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira da; Piva, Evandro; Silva, Adriana Fernandes da

    2015-07-01

    A systematic review was conducted to determine whether the etch-and-rinse or self-etching mode is the best protocol for dentin and enamel adhesion by universal adhesives. This report followed the PRISMA Statement. A total of 10 articles were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers performed a literature search up to October 2014 in eight databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, BBO, SciELO, LILACS, IBECS and The Cochrane Library. In vitro studies evaluating the bond strength of universal adhesives to dentin and/or enamel by the etch-and-rinse and self-etch strategies were eligible to be selected. Statistical analyses were conducted using RevMan 5.1 (The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). A global comparison was performed with random-effects models at a significance level of padhesives (p≥0.05). However, for the ultra-mild All-Bond Universal adhesive, the etch-and-rinse strategy was significantly different than the self-etch mode in terms of dentin micro-tensile bond strength, as well as in the global analysis of enamel micro-tensile and micro-shear bond strength (p≤0.05). The enamel bond strength of universal adhesives is improved with prior phosphoric acid etching. However, this effect was not evident for dentin with the use of mild universal adhesives with the etch-and-rinse strategy. Selective enamel etching prior to the application of a mild universal adhesive is an advisable strategy for optimizing bonding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on shear strength on single lap joint Al/CFRP using adhesive of epoxy/Al fine powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diharjo, Kuncoro; Anwar, Miftahul; Tarigan, Roy Aries P.; Rivai, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of adhesive thickness and surface treatment on the shear strength and failure type characteristic of single lap joint (SLJ) CFRP/Al using adhesive epoxy/Al-fine-powder. The CFRP was produced by using hand layup method for 30% of woven roving carbon fiber (w/w) and the resin used was bisphenolic. The adhesive was prepared using 12.5% of aluminum fine powder (w/w) in the epoxy adhesive. The powder was mixed by using a mixing machine at 60 rpm for 6 minutes, and then it was used to join the Al plate-2024 and CFRP. The start time to pressure for the joint process was 20 minutes after the application of adhesive on the both of adherends. The variables in this research are adhesive thickness (i.e. 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.8 mm and 1 mm) and surface treatment of adherends (i.e. acetone, chromate sulphuric acid, caustic etch and tucker's reagent). Before shear testing, all specimens were post-cured at 100 °C for 15 minutes. The result shows that the SLJ has the highest shear strength for 0.4 mm of adhesive thickness. When the adhesive thickness is more than 0.4 mm (0.6-1 mm), the shear strength decreases significantly. It might be caused by the property change of adhesive from ductile to brittle. The acetone surface treatment produces the best bonding between the adhesive and adherends (CFRP and Al-plate 2024), and the highest shear strength is 9.31 MPa. The surface treatment give the humidification effect of adherend surfaces by adhesive. The failure characteristic shows that the mixed failure of light-fiber-tear-failure and cohesive-failure are occurred on the high shear strength of SLJ, and the low shear strength commonly has the adhesive-failure type.

  5. Evaluate the effect of different mmps inhibitors on adhesive physical properties of dental adhesives, bond strength and mmp substarte activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pei; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-10

    We have evaluated and compare the effect of different exogenous MMP inhibitors on adhesive physical properties of dental adhesives, bond strength, micro permeability and MMP substrate activity. 180-grit Sic paper was used to obtain the superficial dentin surface from each and every tooth after the wet grinding procedure. Dentin was exposed to four different MMP inhibitors to evaluate the effect on resin adhesive dentin interface. The four groups used in study were: 2% chlorhexidine digluconate, 2% doxycycline solution, 5% Proanthocyanidin (PR), Control Group. We evaluated and compared the four groups at each and every step of etching, bonding and resin application. Then, the immunolabeling was done with the help of the secondary antibodies with the pH of 7 and the dilution of 1:20. Amongst all the etching pretreatment groups, CHE group (Chlorhexidine etching group) revealed highest exposure to collagen fibrils than the other groups of etching. Then after the CHE group, the next group which has the second highest exposure DOE group. MMP inhibitor application for time duration of 1 minute after the etching procedures significantly improves the bond strength, exposure to collagen fibres and uniforms the dense form of dentin hybrid layer.

  6. Influence of adhesion promoters and curing-light sources on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tavares Machado

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The conventional orthodontic adhesive presented higher bond strength than the nanofilled composite, although both materials interacted similarly to the teeth. The curing-light devices tested did not influence on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  7. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, M.; Fu, M.; Irving, M.; Neher, C.; Shi, M.; Tolfa, K.; Tripathi, M.; Vinson, Y.; Wang, R.; Zheng, G.

    2017-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal performance and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported, along with initial radiation damage test results.

  8. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2014-02-01

    Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. COMPOSITE DISCS WERE SUBJECT TO ONE OF SIX DIFFERENT SURFACE PRETREATMENTS: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm(2) diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  9. THE IMPACT OF SELECTED TECHNOLOGICAL AND MATERIAL PARAMETERS ON THE STRENGTH OF ADHESIVE STEEL SHEETS JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudawska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The following paper analyses selected problems regarding the impact of technological parameters and type of adherend material on the strength of adhesive-bonded steel sheet joints. The subject of the test was a single-lap adhesive joint of S235JR steel sheet. Joints were formed on two types of substrates: with or without corrosion products on the surface. The surface of steel sheet adherends was pre-treated with three cleaning solutions: acetone, Wiko industrial degreasing agent and Cortanin F anti-corrosion agent, depend-ing on the state of the surface. Adhesive joints were formed with Epidian 53/ET/100:15 epoxy adhesive. The formed joints were subjected to one of three ageing variants: 14 days, two months and 3 months, which were followed by destructive testing to determine the shear strength of joints. The analysis of results ob-tained in tests indicates that the strength performance of adhesive joints of corrosion-free adherends was characterised by higher values than in corroded steel sheets, regardless of ageing time.

  10. Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Posts to Intraradicular Dentin Using Multimode Adhesive System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Asgary, Saeed; Katebi, Katayoun

    2016-12-01

    Because there is little information about bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a universal adhesive system (UAS) with different resin cements, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of different bonding strategies in the application of UASs on push-out bond strength of fiber posts to intraradicular dentin. Seventy-two single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups: self-adhesive resin cement (SAC), dual-cure resin cement (DCC), UAS in the etch-and-rinse (E&R) mode and SAC (E&R + SAC), UAS in the self-etch (SE) mode and SAC (SE + SAC), UAS in the E&R mode and DCC (E&R + DCC), and UAS in the SE mode and DCC (SE + DCC). The push-out test was conducted at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (P strategies (P  .05). ClearfilSA Luting SAC (Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc, New York, NY) cannot be used alone for fiber post adhesion; it needs an adhesive. Universal adhesive in the SE mode is suggested. When UAS is used for luting fiber posts, the type of cement does not have any effect on bond strength. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  12. Deposit Shedding in Biomass-fired Boilers: Shear Adhesion Strength Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, deposit composition, sintering duration, and steel type...

  13. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infect

  14. Gap measurement and bond strength of five selected adhesive systems bonded to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabzadeh, F; Gage, J P; Young, W G; Shahabi, S; Swenson, S M

    1998-06-01

    The ability of a restorative material to bond and seal the interface with tooth structure is perhaps the most significant factor in determining resistance to marginal caries. Thus, the quality and durability of marginal seal and bond strength are major considerations in the selection of restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strength and marginal discrepancies of five adhesive systems: All-Bond 2, Clearfil Liner Bond, KB 200, ProBond and AELITE Bond. Twenty-five buccal and 25 lingual cavities were prepared in 25 caries-free extracted molar teeth, giving 10 cavities for each of the 5 adhesive systems. All teeth were restored with the resin composite Pertac Hybrid, or PRISMA Total Performance Hybrid with their appropriate adhesive systems. After restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, were stained with a 1.5% aqueous solution of a procion dye (reactive orange 14) and sectioned coronally with a saw microtome. Three sections of 200 microns thickness were prepared from each restoration which were then examined microscopically to measure marginal gap widths using a confocal tandem microscope. Shear bond strength measurements were carried out on the dentine bond using a universal testing machine. The All-Bond 2 adhesive system was found to have higher shear bond strength and to have the least gap width at the cementodentinal margin.

  15. The Effect of CFRP Surface Treatment on the Splat Morphology and Coating Adhesion Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Amirthan; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Metallization of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites aggrandized their application to aircraft, automobile, and wind power industries. Recently, the metallization of CFRP surface using thermal spray technique, especially the cold spray, a solid state deposition technique, is a topic of research. However, a direct cold spray deposition on the CFRP substrate often imposes severe erosion on the surface owing to the high-impact energy of the sprayed particles. This urges the requirement of an interlayer on the CFRP surface. In the present study, the effect of surface treatment on the interlayer adhesion strength is evaluated. The CFRP samples were initially treated mechanically, chemically, and thermally and then an interlayer was developed by atmospheric plasma spray system. The quality of the coating is highly dependent on the splat taxonomy; therefore the present work also devoted to study the splat formation behavior using the splat-collection experiments, where the molten Cu particles impinged on the treated CFRP substrates. These results were correlated with the coating adhesion strength. The coating adhesion strength was measured by pull-out test. The results showed that the surface treatment, particularly the chemical treatment, was fairly successful in improving the adhesion strength.

  16. Effect of Fluoride and Simplified Adhesive Systems on the Bond Strength of Primary Molars and Incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Noleto, Lawanne Ellen Carvalho; Gomes, Isabella Azevedo; Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate in vitro the influence of simplified adhesive systems (etch-and-rinse and self-etching) and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) on the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins on primary molars and incisors. Forty primary molars and forty incisors vestibular enamel was treated with either the self-etching Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray) or etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2, 3M/ESPE) adhesive system. Each group was subdivided based on the prior treatment of the enamel with or without the topical application of 1.23% APF. Thereafter, matrices were positioned and filled with composite resin and light cured. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h, the specimens were submitted to μ-SBS in a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p adhesive exerted no significant influence bond strength. In the inter-group analysis, however, significantly bond strength reduction was found for the incisors when CSE was employed with APF. Adhesive failure was the most common type of fracture. The bond strength was affected by the prior application of 1.23% APF and type of tooth.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  18. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  19. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infect

  20. Influence of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of adhesives on enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Feres Assad-Loss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate shear bond strength of 3 adhesive systems (Single Bond, TransbondTM MIP and TransbondTM XT applied on bovine enamel under saliva contamination condition. METHOD: One hundred and twenty enamel surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 20 according to the adhesive system used (TransbondTM XT, TransbondTM MIP and Single Bond with or without saliva contamination. For each adhesive system, there were two groups defined as no contamination group (NC: 37% H3PO4 conditioning for 30 seconds and two layers of adhesive systems; saliva contamination group (SC: After the first adhesive layer application, the examined areas were contaminated with saliva. Samples were mounted appropriately for testing and stored in deionized water at 37 ºC for 7 days. Samples were then submitted to shear bond strength trials at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was evaluated under stereomicroscopy. Two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to compare mean values (α = 0.05. RESULTS: Groups XT (NC = 26.29 ± 7.23; MIP (NC = 24.47 ± 7.52 and SB (NC = 32.36 ± 4.14 XT (SC = 19.59 ± 6.76; MIP (SC = 18.08 ± 6.39 and SB (SC = 18.18 ± 7.03 MPa. ARI 0 and 1 were the most prevalent scores in all study groups examined. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination significantly decreased bond strength of the three adhesive systems examined (p <0.05. However, the comparison of groups with and without saliva contamination did not reveal any significant differences, and, therefore, the three systems may be considered equivalent.

  1. Tensile bond strength and SEM evaluation of caries-affected dentin using dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, M; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Yoshiyama, M; Ebisu, S; Ciucchi, B; Russell, C M; Pashley, D H

    1995-10-01

    Tensile bond strength measurements are commonly used for the evaluation of dentin adhesive systems. Most tests are performed using extracted non-carious human or bovine dentin. However, the adhesion of resins to caries-affected dentin is still unclear. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that bonding to caries-affected dentin is inferior to bonding to normal dentin, and that the quality of the hybrid layer plays a major role in creating good adhesion. We used a micro-tensile bond strength test to compare test bond strengths made to either caries-affected dentin or normal dentin, using three commercial adhesive systems (All Bond 2, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, and Clearfil Liner Bond II). For scanning electron microscopy, the polished interfaces between the adhesive bond and dentin were subjected to brief exposure to 10% phosphoric acid solution and 5% sodium hypochlorite, so that the quality of the hybrid layers could be observed. Bonding to normal dentin with either All Bond 2 (26.9 +/- 8.8 MPa) or Clearfil Liner Bond II (29.5 +/- 10.9 MPa) showed tensile bond strengths higher than those to caries-affected dentin (13.0 +/- 3.6 MPa and 14.0 +/- 4.3 MPa, respectively). The tensile bond strengths obtained with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose were similar in normal and caries-affected dentin (20.3 +/- 5.5 MPa and 18.5 +/- 4.0 MPa, respectively). The hybrid layers created by All Bond 2 in normal dentin and by Clearfil Liner Bond II in normal or caries-affected dentin showed phosphoric acid and sodium hypochlorite resistance, whereas the hybrid layers created by All Bond 2 in caries-affected dentin and those created by Scotchbond Multi-Purpose to normal and caries-affected dentin showed partial susceptibility to the acid and sodium hypochlorite treatment. The results indicate that the strength of adhesion to dentin depends upon both the adhesive system used and the type of dentin. Moreover, the quality of the hybrid layer may not always contribute

  2. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Alves de Campos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX concentration on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of contemporary adhesive systems. Eighty bovine central incisors were used in this study. The facial enamel surface of the crowns was abraded with 600-grit silicon carbide paper to expose flat, mid-coronal dentin surfaces. The tested materials were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SMP, Single-Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Clearfil Tri S Bond (CTSB. All the materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions and followed by composite application (Z250. The teeth were randomly divided into 16 groups: for the etch-and-rinse adhesives (SMP and SB, 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to or after the acid etching procedure. For the self-etch adhesives (CSEB and CTSB 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to the primer. Control groups for each one of the adhesive systems were also set up. The specimens were immediately submitted to μTBS testing and the data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha = .01. The failure patterns of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of 2% CHX were statistically significant (p < 0.01 for the self-etch adhesives but were not significant for the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Analysis of the data demonstrated no statistical difference between the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. CHX-based cavity disinfectants in concentrations higher than 0.12% should be avoided prior to the self-etch adhesive systems evaluated in this study to diminish the possibilities of reduction in bond strength.

  3. An In Vitro Study of the Bond Strength of Five Adhesives Used for Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials and Tray Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Surender; Gandhi, Udey Vir; Banerjee, Saurav

    2013-01-01

    Although stock trays often provide mechanical retention for elastomeric impression materials, manufacturers typically recommend the use of an adhesive, whether a stock or custom tray is used. The mention of the bond strength on the adhesive packaging is not available, therefore the clinician has no idea whatsoever of the ideal adhesive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of three vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) materials, one with a poly(methyl methacrylate) autopolymerizing (PM...

  4. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Delatorre Bronzato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control; G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl; G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05. Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05. A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05. G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently.

  5. [Bond strength evaluation of four adhesive systems to dentin in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ximei; Xing, Lu; Xu, Haiping; Jiang, Zhe; Su, Qin

    2012-08-01

    To compare the adhesive strength and observe the bonding interface. According to statistic analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the resistance capacity of four adhesive systems is evaluated. Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Tetric N-Bond (TNB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB), G Bond (GB) were bonded to the occlusal surfaces and mesial surfaces of third molars respectively. The mesial resins received shear force experiment and the fracture load were recorded. The tensile bond strength (TBS) of the remaining parts were tested. The interfacial configuration were observed under SEM. In the shear bond strength (SBS) experiment, PBNT and TNB showed the best result, but there was no significant difference between them (P>0.05). The SBS of PBNT was stronger than that of CSEB and GB (P0.05). In accordance with the shear force result, the TBS of PBNT and TNB was larger than CSEB and GB (Psystem, total-etching system could reach better bonding strength. There is some connection between the interfacial configuration of adhesives and bond strength of them.

  6. A room temperature cured low dielectric hyperbranched epoxy adhesive with high mechanical strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bibekananda De; Niranjan Karak

    2014-05-01

    A low dielectric constant hyperbranched epoxy thermoset with excellent adhesive and mechanical strength is the demand for advanced electronics and engineering applications. The present investigation provided a room temperature, curable hyperbranched epoxy, obtained by an A2 + B3 polycondensation reaction. The synthesized hyperbranched epoxy was cured by a combined hardener system consisting of a commercial poly(amido-amine) and a first generation aliphatic poly(amido-amine) dendrimer (PAD) prepared by Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and aliphatic amines. The thermoset exhibited high mechanical strength, excellent adhesive strength, low dielectric constant, good thermal stability and excellent weather resistance along with very good moisture resistance. The results showed the influence of the amount of PAD on the performance of the thermoset. Thus, the study revealed that the combined poly(amido-amine) cured hyperbranched epoxy has high potential in advanced electrical packaging and microelectronic devices.

  7. Evaluation of the adhesion strength of diamond films brazed on K-10 type hard metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Sérgio Ivan dos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The coating of cutting tools with diamond films considerably increases the tool performance due to the combination of the unique tribological properties of diamond with the bulk properties of the substrate (toughness. The tool performance, however, is strongly related to the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate. In this work our main goal was to propose and to test a procedure, based on a tensile strength test, to evaluate the adhesion strength of a diamond wafer brazed on a hard metal substrate, taking into account the effect of the brazing temperature and time. The temperature range studied was from 800 to 980 °C and the brazing time ranged from 3 to 40 min. The obtained results could be used to optimize the costs and time required to the production of high performance cutting tools with brazed diamond wafers.

  8. Enhancement of Adhesive Strength of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene Fibers Prepared by Polar Polymer Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jun-rong; YANG Xin-ge; HU Zu-ming; LIU Zhao-feng

    2007-01-01

    A new technique was proposed to enhance the adhesive strength of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers. Polar polymer was implanted into UHMWPE gel fibers during extracting process and can then be trapped en the surface of the fibers after subsequent ultra-drawing. The physical and chemical changes in the fiber structure were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The mechanical and interfacial adhesion properties of UHMWPE fibers were investigated with tensile testing. The results showed that there wee polar groups on the surface of pretreated UHMWPE fiber. The interracial shear strength of UHMWPE fibers with epoxy resin was greatly improved without socrificing the excellent mechanical properties of fibers. After pretreated with ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA), the shear strength of the interface between fiber and epoxy resin increased from 1.06 to 2.49 MPa, while the integrated mechanical properties of the pretreated UHMWPE fibers ware still optimal.

  9. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Methods Micro-tensile (MT, n=15) and single plane shear (SP, n=8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-BOND (GB) were used according to manufacturers’ instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1-mm diameter and stored in water at 37° C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher’s PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at 100X. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HCl/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at 1000X, 2500X, and 5000X in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8h. Specimens were sectioned (90-nm thick) and observed under TEM. Results Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, p= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher’s PLSD intervals (pbond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were ~0.5 µm for PB, GB and S3 and ~5 µm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within interfaces for all adhesive systems. Clinical significance Simplification of application procedures appears to induce loss of adhesion capabilities. In this in vitro

  10. An in vitro study of the bond strength of five adhesives used for vinyl polysiloxane impression materials and tray materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surender; Gandhi, Udey Vir; Banerjee, Saurav

    2014-03-01

    Although stock trays often provide mechanical retention for elastomeric impression materials, manufacturers typically recommend the use of an adhesive, whether a stock or custom tray is used. The mention of the bond strength on the adhesive packaging is not available, therefore the clinician has no idea whatsoever of the ideal adhesive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of three vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) materials, one with a poly(methyl methacrylate) autopolymerizing (PMMA) specimen and another with a light-polymerizing tray material (VLC), using the adhesive recommended by the manufacturer of the impression material, and two universal adhesives. A total of ninety specimens (15 × 15 × 20 mm) were used, 45 specimens were made in PMMA and rest 45 was made in VLC. Five paint-on adhesives (Coltene, Caulk, 3M, universal Zhermack and universal GC) were applied. Three impression materials, Affinis, Reprosil, and 3M, were mixed and injected into a perforated poly vinyl chloride cylinder. Tray specimens were positioned against the open cylinder end in contact with the VPS material. Tensile strength tests were conducted until adhesive separation failure. Mean values and standard errors of the adhesive strength were recorded in MPa for each material combination. GC paint-on universal adhesive provided significantly higher adhesive strength values.

  11. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adhesive systems, the RMGI samples were cured. Composite layers were applied and shear bond strength was measured. Two samples of each group were evaluated by SEM. Failure mode was determined by streomicroscope. Both curing methods and adhesive systems had significant effect on bond strength (P-value adhesives had significantly higher shear bond strength than the total-etch adhesive (P-value adhesives, but decreased the bond strength in total-etch adhesive (P-valueadhesive systems and co-curing technique can improve the bond strength between the RMGI and composite.

  12. [Influence of different dentin depths on microtensile bond strength of two dentin adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tie-li; Huang, Cui; Zheng, Zhi-xing

    2009-10-01

    To determine the microtensile bond strength of two adhesives systems to either superficial or deep dentin. The crowns extracted human premolars were transversally sectioned next to the occlusal DEJ to expose flat dentin surfaces. The surfaces were bonded with: (1)two-step, total-etch adhesive Prime&Bond NT (PB),(2)wo-step, self-etching adhesive FL-Bond (FB), according to manufacturers' directions. Composite build-ups were constructed incrementally. After storage for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.81mm(2) with a slow-speed diamond saw. The remaining dentin thickness (RDT) was measured to assess the superficial dentin group (RDT> or =3mm) and the deep dentin group (RDT0.05). No cohesive failure was observed in either superficial or deep dentin. Most of the failure was adhesive failure. From this study, it can be concluded that different dentin depths can not influence the microtensile bond strengths of Prime&Bond NT and FL-Bond adhesive systems.

  13. In vitro comparison of the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore, Doris R; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Hall, Dan B; Bahjri, Khaled

    2013-12-01

    With several denture adhesives available, it is important for dentists to make appropriate patient recommendations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture base materials at time intervals of up to 24 hours. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, Effergrip, and SeaBond denture adhesives were tested with 3 denture base materials: 2 heat-polymerized (Lucitone 199 and SR Ivocap) and 1 visible-light-polymerized (shade-stable Eclipse). Artificial saliva with mucin was used as a control. Tensile bond strength was tested in accordance with American Dental Association specifications at 5 minutes, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after applying the adhesive. Maximum forces before failure were recorded in megapascals (MPa), and the data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond had higher tensile bond strength values than Effergrip. All adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength at 5 minutes and the least at 24 hours. The 3 denture bases produced significantly different results with each adhesive (Padhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength, followed by Ivocap and Eclipse. All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control, and all 4 adhesives were strongest at the 5-minute interval. On all 3 types of denture bases, Effergrip produced significantly lower tensile bond strength, and Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond produced significantly higher tensile bond strength. At 24 hours, the adhesive-base combinations with the highest tensile bond strength were Fixodent on Lucitone 199, Fixodent on Eclipse, Fixodent on Ivocap, and Super Poligrip on Ivocap. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between degree of polymerization and enamel bonding strength with self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Endo, Tatsuo; Komatsu, Masashi

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the degree of conversion of double bonds of all-in-one adhesives and their shear bond strength on ground human enamel. Six commercially available systems and one experimental adhesive were tested: Absolute (ABS; Dentsply-Sankin), Clearfil S3 Bond (CSB; Kuraray), G-Bond (GBO; GC), Hybrid Bond (HYB; Sun Medical), iBond (IBO; Heraeus Kulzer), Xeno IV (XEN; Dentsply Caulk), and experimental iBond NG (ING; Heraeus Kulzer). Conventional shear bond strengths (SBS, n=8) of adhesive-coated enamel specimens bonded to Venus composite (Heraeus Kulzer) and degrees of conversion (DC) (FTIR, n=5) were determined after 1 and 10 min, 1, 2, and 24 h of storage. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test (0 adhesives' SBS (MPa) and DC (%) by testing time followed logarithmic regression lines established by the least square method. Mean shear bond strengths after 1 min/24 h were: ABS 9.8/14.9; CSB 14.7/23.4; GBO 14.8/22.0; HYB 9.7/17.0; IBO 11.3/22.3; XEN 9.1/17.3; ING 9.7/25.6. The corresponding mean DC values were: ABS 51.3/66.2; CSB 83.1/90.8; GBO 75.8/87.7; HYB 49.6/67.2; IBO 72.6/93.7; XEN 61.6/74.1; ING 64.9/89.1. Linear regressions for the relationship DC vs. SBS were significant with coefficients of determination (r2) between 0.72 and 0.97. Despite similar acidity, the adhesives showed different SBSs on enamel. Based on the relationships between DC and SBS, the cohesive failure patterns observed, and the composition-property relations discussed, it is concluded that the percentage DC is the main parameter influencing an adhesive's bonding efficacy to ground enamel.

  15. Adhesion to tooth structure: a critical review of "micro" bond strength test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Steve; Geraldeli, Saulo; Maia, Rodrigo; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Carlos José; Yamagawa, Junichiro

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to critically review the literature regarding the mechanics, geometry, load application and other testing parameters of "micro" shear and tensile adhesion tests, and to outline their advantages and limitations. The testing of multiple specimens from a single tooth conserves teeth and allows research designs not possible using conventional 'macro' methods. Specimen fabrication, gripping and load application methods, in addition to material properties of the various components comprising the resin-tooth adhesive bond, will influence the stress distribution and consequently, the nominal bond strength and failure mode. These issues must be understood; as should the limitations inherent to strength-based testing of a complicated adhesive bond joining dissimilar substrates, for proper test selection, conduct and interpretation. Finite element analysis and comprehensive reporting of test conduct and results will further our efforts towards a standardization of test procedures. For the foreseeable future, both "micro" and "macro" bond strength tests will, as well as various morphological and spectroscopic investigative techniques, continue to be important tools for improving resin-tooth adhesion to increase the service life of dental resin-based composite restorations.

  16. Effect of aluminum anodizing in phosphoric acid electrolyte on adhesion strength and thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sulki; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Yonghwan; Jung, Uoochang; Chung, Wonsub

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance of the anodized aluminum 6061 in phosphoric acid electrolyte to improve the adhesive bond strength and thermal performance for use in metal core printed circuit boards (MCPCB). The electrolyte temperature and applied voltage were altered to generate varied pore structures. The thickness, porosity and pore diameter of the anodized layer were measured. The pore morphologies were affected most by temperature, which was the driving force for ion transportation. The mechanism of adhesive bond was penetration of the epoxy into the pores. The optimal anodization conditions for maximum adhesive bond strength, 27 MPa, were 293 K and 100V. The maximum thermal conductivity of the epoxy-treated anodized layer was 1.6 W/m·K at 273 K. Compared with the epoxy-treated Al layer used for conventional MCPCBs, the epoxy-treated anodized layer showed advanced thermal performance due to a low difference of thermal resistance and high heat dissipation.

  17. The difference of tensile bond strength between total and self etch adhesive systems in dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selly Yusalina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Total etch adhesive system has been widely used in teeth conservation area as an adhesive agent before implicating composite resin restoration agent. The aim of this research is to prove the difference of tensile bond strength between total etch (Single Bond and self etch adhesive system (Adper prompt L-Pop on dentin surface in vitro. The extracted and non carries maxillary premolar teeth were used in this research and were divided into 2 groups. The first group comprised 15 specimen teeth etched in phosphoric acid and was applicated with the Single Bond adhesive agent. The second group comprised 15 specimen teeth, applicated with the Adper Prompt-L-Pop. The composite resin (Z 350, 3M was applied incrementally and each of the layers was rayed for 20 seconds. The specimens were stored in physiologic solution before they were tested. Tensile bond strength was measured by LRX Plus Lloyd Instrument, with 1 N load and 1 mm/minute speed, and the measurement result was in Mpa unit. The result was evaluated statistically by the Student t-test with α = 0.05. Single Bond (the 5th generation showed a better bond strength compared to the Adper Prompt-L-Pop (the 6th generation.

  18. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (Padhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  19. Shear Bond Strength of Ormocer-Based Restorative Material Using Specific and Nonspecific Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M.; Shehata, Salah H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of ormocer-based restorative material bonded to tooth structure using specific ormocer and nonspecific resin-based adhesives. Human molars were prepared to obtain flat buccal enamel surfaces and flat occlusal dentin surfaces. Admira bond, and Prime & Bond NT, Excite, AdheSE, and Prompt-L-Pop were applied to the prepared enamel and dentin surfaces. Ormocer restorative material was inserted into a mold fixed onto the prepared tooth s...

  20. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    OpenAIRE

    DI HIPÓLITO, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; Goes, Mario Fernando De

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bon...

  1. Effect of adhesive resin cements and post surface silanization on the bond strengths of adhesively inserted fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Bitter, Kerstin; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strengths and the effect of silanization of fiber posts inserted with different adhesive systems. Sixty DT Light Posts (size 1) were used. Thirty posts were pretreated with silane. The posts were cemented into form-congruent artificial root canals (12 mm) of bovine dentine. Six groups were formed: G1, Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G2, Monobond-S+Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G3, ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G4, Monobond-S+ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G5, RelyX Unicem; and G6, Monobond-S+RelyX Unicem. The mean (standard deviation) tensile bond strengths (megapascals) were 7.69 (0.85) for G1, 7.15 (1.01) for G2, 6.73 (0.85) for G3, 6.78 (0.97) for G4, 4.79 (0.58) for G5, and 4.74 (0.88) for G6. G1 achieved significantly higher bond strengths than G3 and G5; G3 had significantly higher values than G5 (P Silanization had no significant effect (P > .05, one-way analysis of variance). Tensile bond strengths were significantly influenced by the type of resin cement. Silanization of fiber post surfaces seems to have no clinical relevance.

  2. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  3. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  4. Effect of Repeated Container Lid Opening on Dentin Shear Bond Strength of Two Dentin Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hassanzadeh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing the effect of repeated opening of the container lid of two dentin adhesive systems, Prime&Bond NT (P&B NT and iBond (iB, on shear bond strength.Materials and Methods: Intact bovine lower incisors (n=60, fixed in acrylic were ran-domly divided into six groups (n=10. Groups I and II were set as control groups. P&B NT and iB were applied on the samples after five days a week, three times a day for two weeks of use in groups III and VI; and after four weeks of use in groups V and VI. The samples were evaluated by a universal testing-machine (Instron, cross-head speed 1mm/min and stereomicroscope.Results: There was no significant difference between the bond strengths in any of the three P&B NT. The mean amount of the shear bond strength for iB after 60 times of use (15.31 MPa was significantly lowerthan that at the baseline (23.51 MPa. There was no significant difference between iB at the baseline and after 30 times of use (19.26 Mpa, and also between iB after 30 times of use and after 60 times of use. All P&B NT groups showed significantly highershear bond strengths when compared with their similar iB groups in iB.Conclusion: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive container seems to reduce dentin shear bond strength. Therefore, containers with a lower content of the same adhe-sive or a single-dose of the adhesive are preferred.

  5. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  6. Effect of caries infiltrant application on shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to sound and demineralized enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Liuhe; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the influence of caries infiltrant application on the shear bond strength of different adhesives on sound and demineralized enamel. Sound and artificially demineralized (14 days, acidic buffer, pH 5.0) bovine enamel specimens were treated with a caries infiltrant (Icon, DMG), three different commercial adhesives (unfilled etch and- rinse adhesive: Heliobond, Ivoclar Vivadent; filled etch-and-rinse adhesive: Optibond FL, Kerr; or self-etching adhesive: iBOND Self Etch, Heraeus Kulzer) or a combination of caries infiltrant and adhesive. The shear bond strength of a nanohybrid composite was analyzed after thermocycling (5000x, 5° to 55°C) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure mode was inspected under a stereomicroscope at 25X magnification. In both sound and demineralized enamel, the shear bond strength of the caries infiltrant was not significantly different from the etch-and-rinse adhesives, while the self-etching adhesive showed significantly lower values compared to all other groups. Pretreatment with the caries infiltrant significantly increased the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive in both substrates and of the filled etch-and-rinse adhesive in demineralized enamel. While shear bond strength was not significantly different between the two substrates, cohesive failures were more likely to occur in demineralized than sound specimens. The shear bond strength of the caries infiltrant was similar to the etch-and-rinse adhesives. The caries infiltrant did not impair bonding to sound or demineralized enamel, and even increased adhesion of the selfetching agent.

  7. Friction of mixed and single-component aromatic monolayers in contacts of different adhesive strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruths, M

    2006-02-09

    Friction force microscopy has been used to study single-component and mixed self-assembled monolayers of aminothiophenol and thiophenol on gold. The friction forces and transition pressures of mixed monolayers were intermediate to the ones of single-component monolayers, and varied systematically with composition. The strength of the adhesion was altered by working in dry N2 gas or in ethanol. In all systems studied, low adhesion (in ethanol) resulted in a linear dependence of the friction on load already at low loads, whereas high adhesion (in dry N2) gave an apparent area-dependence. However, for a given monolayer composition, similar transition pressures were observed in dry N2 and in ethanol, suggesting that the overall monolayer structure was not strongly altered by the presence of ethanol. Similar observations were made for very close-packed monolayers of octadecanethiol.

  8. Effect of phosphoric acid etching on the shear bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila SABATINI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effect of optional phosphoric acid etching on the shear bond strength (SBS of two self-etch adhesives to enamel and dentin. Material and Methods Ninety-six bovine mandibular incisors were ground flat to obtain enamel and dentin substrates. A two-step self-etch adhesive (FL-Bond II and a one-step self-etch adhesive (BeautiBond were applied with and without a preliminary acid etching to both the enamel and dentin. The specimens were equally and randomly assigned to 4 groups per substrate (n=12 as follows: FL-Bond II etched; FL-Bond II un-etched; BeautiBond etched; BeautiBond un-etched. Composite cylinders (Filtek Z100 were bonded onto the treated tooth structure. The shear bond strength was evaluated after 24 hours of storage (37°C, 100% humidity with a testing machine (Ultra-tester at a speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test with a significance level of p<0.05. A field emission scanning electron microscope was used for the failure mode analysis. Results Both adhesives evidenced a significant decrease in the dentin SBS with the use of an optional phosphoric acid-etching step (p<0.05. Preliminary phosphoric acid etching yielded significantly higher enamel SBS for FL-Bond II (p<0.05 only, but not for BeautiBond. FL-Bond II applied to un-etched dentin demonstrated the highest mean bond strength (37.7±3.2 MPa and BeautiBond applied to etched dentin showed the lowest mean bond strength (18.3±6.7 MPa among all tested groups (p<0.05. Conclusion The use of a preliminary acid-etching step with 37.5% phosphoric acid had a significant adverse effect on the dentin bond strength of the self-etch adhesives evaluated while providing improvement on the enamel bond strength only for FL-Bond II. This suggests that the potential benefit that may be derived from an additional etching step with phosphoric acid does not justify the risk of adversely affecting the bond strength to dentin.

  9. Halloysite nanotube incorporation into adhesive systems—effect on bond strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatheeri, Mohammed S; Palasuk, Jadesada; Eckert, George J; Platt, Jeffrey A; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Halloysite® aluminosilicate clay nanotube (HNT) incorporation into a two-step etch-and-rinse (ER) and a one-step self-etch (SE) adhesive on human dentin shear bond strength (SBS). Ten groups (n = 12) were prepared according to the adhesive system (i.e., ER or SE) and amount of HNT incorporated (5-20%, w/v), as follows: commercial control (i.e., the adhesive was used as purchased, 0% HNT); experimental control (i.e., the adhesive was processed through mixing/stirring and sonication similarly to the HNT-incorporated experimental groups, but without HNT); and 5, 10, and 20% HNT. SBS testing was performed after 24 h of storage in deionized water at 37 °C. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope (×40). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the resin-dentin interface of selected specimens was carried out. Two-way ANOVA revealed that incorporation of HNT up to 20% (w/v) in ER and up to 10% (w/v) in SE demonstrated an increased SBS compared to their experimental controls. Compared to the commercial control, SBS of HNT-modified dentin adhesives was not significantly different for ER adhesives (p > 0.05) but was significantly higher with 5% HNT in the SE adhesive (p adhesive and mixed failures. SEM micrographs of resin-dentin interfaces for ER-commercial control and ER-10% showed a similar morphology. A thicker adhesive layer and the presence of agglomerated HNT on the resin tags were seen in ER-10%. An increased number of short resin tags in SE-5% compared with SE-commercial control were observed. HNT addition up to 20% in ER and up to 10 % in SE showed increased SBS to dentin compared with the experimental control. HNT can be used not only to reinforce adhesive resins but also hold potential for the development of bioactive adhesives by the encapsulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors or anticariogenic agents.

  10. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  11. The effect of collagen removal on shear bond strength of four single bottle adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Achieving adhesion between restorative materials and dentin as a wet and dynamic surface is an important topic in restorative and especially in conservative dentistry. Adhesion of new dentin bonding systems depends on the formation of hybrid layer and micromechanical retention. Nevertheless, an ideal adhesive system has not yet been introduced .Recent studies reveal an increase in bonding stability when the collagen is removed from demineralized dentin surfaces. This study investigates the effect of collagen removal on the shear bond strength of four single bottle dentin bonding systems regarding their structural differences. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed on 56 intact human premolar teeth. Smooth surfaces of dentin were prepared on buccal & lingual aspects of teeth, providing 112 dentin surfaces. The dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and then rinsed. The specimens were divided into 8 groups. Single bottle adhesive systems [Single Bond (3M, One-Step (Bisco, Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply, and Excite (Vivadent] were then applied on the dentin surfaces of 4 groups using the wet bonding technique. In the other 4 groups, the demineralized dentin surfaces were treated with a 5.25% solution of sodium hypochlorite for one minute in order to remove the surface organic components. The adhesive systems mentioned before were applied to these 4 groups with the same wet bonding technique. A cylinder of Z100 (3M dental composite with a 3 mm diameter and 2 mm height was placed on the adhesive covered dentin surface of all groups and light-cured (400 mW/cm2 ,40 sec on each side. The specimens were kept in distilled water at room temperature for one week and then thermocycled for 3000 times (5-55 oc. Shear bond strength of specimens was measured using an Instron (1495 universal mechanical testing machine with cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute and chisel form shearing blade. Data were

  12. A New Testing Method to Evaluate Adhesion Strength of Ceramic Top Coat in TBCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Masakazu; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Masakazu; Fukanuma, Hirotaka

    A new testing method to evaluate adhesion strength of ceramic top coat has been proposed, employing a ring shape of TBC specimen specifically designed. It was shown by the experiments that a delamination behavior of the top coat was successfully reproduced in the proposed method, associating with a buckling mode; a similar mode frequently observed in actual gas turbine components. A method to quantitatively evaluate a resistance to delamination was also introduced, based on an energy release rate criterion. The experiments demonstrated that the testing method provided reasonable adhesion strength in terms of energy criterion, that almost agreed with the values measured by other researchers employing different type of testing method. It was also shown that the present method has many advantages, compared with the traditional methods.

  13. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  14. A new method for measuring ice adhesion strength at an ice-substrate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan-Mashmool, M.; Volat, C.; Farzaneh, M.

    2006-03-01

    This research focuses on the development of a direct technique for measuring atmospheric ice adhesion strength using embedded piezoelectric film sensors at the ice-substrate interface. The substrate is a small aluminium beam on which PVDF piezoelectric sensors are bonded. The composite beam formed by aluminium and an ice layer is submitted to sinusoidal stress at the interface by a shaker on which one end of the beam is clamped. The piezoelectric charge coefficient is used to predict the electric charge density induced on the piezoelectric film, which enables us to develop a macroscopic and direct measurement technique for determining mechanical stresses at the atmospheric-ice-substrate interface. The preliminary results obtained show that adhesive failure was obtained for each test for a frequency close to the natural resonance frequency of the aluminium beam. Within the limitations of the experimental conditions, it was possible using this approach to obtain ice adhesion strengths in accordance with those obtained in the literature. This demonstrates the feasibility of this simple ice adhesion testing method.

  15. Soy Flour Adhesive Strength Compared with That of Purified Soy Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Lorenz; Michael Birkeland; Chera Daurio; Charles R. Frihart

    2015-01-01

    Except for the substitution of soy flour in phenolic resins (Frihart et al. 2013) and the use of soy flour at high pHs (Lambuth 2003), the literature on soy protein properties for adhesives has mainly focused on soy protein isolate and specific protein fractions (Sun 2005b). The assumption is that proteins are the main portion of soy flour giving bond strength and the...

  16. Influence of different tooth types on the bond strength of two orthodontic adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Bora; Koyutürk, Alp Erdin; Çatalbaş, Bülent; Özer, Füsun

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of different tooth types on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two orthodontic resin adhesive systems in vitro. Two hundred extracted sound human teeth were used in the study. Ten teeth of each tooth type were the mounted in acrylic resin leaving the buccal surface of the crowns parallel to the base of the moulds. In each experimental group, the adhesives (Transbond XT™ and Light Bond™) were applied to the etched enamel surfaces. The orthodontic composite resins were then applied to the surface in cylindrical-shaped plastic matrices. For SBS testing, a force transducer (Ultradent™) was applied at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute at the interface between the tooth and composite until failure occurred. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis one-way ANOVA, a Bonferroni adjusted Mann–Whitney U-test, and an independent t-test. Generally, it was found that tooth type had a significant effect on SBS (P < 0.05) with Light Bond™ showing a higher SBS than Transbond XT™ (P < 0.05). The highest bond strengths were observed for the upper central incisor and lower molars with Light Bond™ (P < 0.05) and the lowest mean bond strengths for the upper molars and lower canine with Transbond XT™ (P <0.05). The results demonstrated that enamel SBS was significantly altered by both tooth type and adhesive system. Thus, the findings of this study confirm that enamel bond strength is not uniform for all teeth. These results may also explain the variability in the enamel-bonding efficacy of adhesives. PMID:18678760

  17. DETERMINATION OF ADHESIVE STRENGTH LAYER’S ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE THE METHOD AXIAL EXTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Van Lam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Roller compacted concrete for the construction of hydraulic and hydroelectric buildings is a composite material, which consists of a binder, fine aggregate (sand, coarse aggregate (gravel or crushed stone, water and special additives that provide the desired concrete workability and impart the required concrete performance properties. Concrete mixture is prepared at from concrete mixing plants strictly metered quantities of cement, water, additives and graded aggregates, whereupon they are delivered to the site laying Mixer Truck and sealing layers with each stack layer. The advantages of roller compaction technology should include the reduction of construction time, which allows fast commissioning construction projects, as well as reduce the amount of investment required. One of the main problems encountered in the process of roller compaction of the concrete mix is the need to provide the required adhesion strength between layers of concrete. This paper presents a method for determining the strength of adhesion between the concrete layers of different ages roller compacted concrete using axial tension. This method makes it possible to obtain objective and accurate results with a total thickness of layers of compacted concrete of up to 300…400 mm. Results from this method, studies have shown that the value of strength between the concrete layers in addition to the composition of the concrete and adhesion depends on the quality and the parallel end surfaces of the cylinder-models, which are mounted steel plates for axial tension, as well as the state of the contact surfaces of the concrete layer. The method can be used to determine the strength of interlayer adhesion in roller compacted concrete, which are used in the construction of dams and other hydraulic structures.

  18. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    CERN Document Server

    Chertok, Maxwell; Irving, Michael; Neher, Christian; Shi, Mengyao; Tolfa, Kirk; Tripathi, Mani; Vinson, Yasmeen; Wang, Ruby; Zheng, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal conductivity and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported. Initial radiation damage tests are also presented. These results can inform bonding method choices for future tracking detectors.

  19. Influence of chlorhexidine application on longitudinal adhesive bond strength in deciduous teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castelo Branco Leitune

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of applying 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds after phosphoric acid conditioning of dentin on the immediate and long-term bond strengths in deciduous teeth. The occlusal enamel was removed from 40 human sound deciduous molars, which were exfoliated by natural means, and the dentin was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and washed with running water. The specimens were divided into two groups of 20 teeth. The test group received an application of 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds prior to a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, whereas the control group received only the adhesive system. Three cylindrical restorations were made with a composite resin for each tooth. Ten teeth in each group were submitted to a microshear bond strength test after 24 hours, while the remaining teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 6 months before testing the microshear bond strength. The test group had a higher bond strength than did the control group after 6 months of storage. No statistical differences were found when groups with the same dentin treatment were compared at different times. Short applications of chlorhexidine at low concentrations prevent hybrid layer degradation and positively affect bond strength over time.

  20. Comparative tensile strength study of the adhesion improvement of PTFE by UV photon assisted surface processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, B.; Geretovszky, Zs.; Bertóti, I.; Boyd, I. W.

    2002-01-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) is notable for its non-adhesive and non-reactive properties. A number of technologies can potentially benefit from the application of PTFE, but these characteristics restrict the ability to structuring its surface. In this paper, we present results on two ultraviolet photon assisted treatments of PTFE. The originally poor adhesion was significantly improved by both 172 nm excimer lamp and 193 nm excimer laser assisted surface treatments. While Xe2∗ lamp irradiation, applied in a modest vacuum environment, was sufficient by itself to improve adhesion, the ArF laser process was only effective when the irradiated interface was in contact with 1,2-diaminoethane photoreagent. It was found that the tensile strength of an epoxy resin glued interface created on treated surfaces depended strongly on the applied number of laser pulses and lamp irradiation time. Laser treatment caused fast tensile strength increase during the first 50-500 pulses, while after this it saturates slowly at about 5.5 MPa in the 500-2500 pulse domain. The excimer lamp irradiation resulted in a maximum tensile strength of approximately 10 MPa after 2 min irradiation time which reduced to about 65% of the peak value at longer times.

  1. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

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    Jefferson Ricardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse. Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10 and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05. Results: According to the results, Kruskal-Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001. The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05. Group PSM8 (P90 + SM showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP, PSB2 (P90 + SB, and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE. Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin.

  2. Effects of adhesion promoters on the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets to fluorosed enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adanir, Necdet; Türkkahraman, Hakan; Yalçin Güngör, Ahmet

    2009-06-01

    The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate the effect of enamel fluorosis on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets and to determine whether adhesion promoter, Enhance LC, increases the bond strength of brackets to fluorosed enamel. Forty-five (30 fluorosed and 15 non-fluorosed) non-carious fresh human premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic reasons and without any caries or visible defects, were used in this study. The fluorosed teeth were selected according to the modified Thylstrup and Fejerskov index, which is based on the clinical changes in fluorosed teeth. In groups 1 (fluorosed teeth) and 3 (control), the brackets were bonded with Light Bond composite resin and cured with a halogen light. In group 2, Enhance LC was applied to fluorosed enamel before bonding. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparison tests were used to compare the SBS of the groups. Any adhesive remaining after debonding was assessed and scored according to the modified adhesive remnant index. The results showed that while fluorosis significantly reduced the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets (mean 13.94 +/- 3.24 MPa; P enamel (mean 18.22 +/- 5.97 Mpa; P enamel-composite interface.

  3. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perton, M.; Blouin, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  4. Micro push-out bond strengths of 2 fiber post types luted using different adhesive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ugur; Mumcu, Emre; Topcu, Fulya Toksoy; Yildiz, Esra; Yamanel, Kivanc; Akyol, Mesut

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strengths of carbon and glass fiber posts adhesively luted with Panavia F 2.0 and RelyX Unicem luting cements, as well as a modified application procedure using RelyX Unicem cement in combination with a single-bottle total-etch adhesive in 3 segments of teeth. Sixty single-rooted human maxillary central incisors and canines were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction, and the roots were endodontically treated. The roots were divided into 2 fiber-post groups, and then divided into 3 subgroups of 10 specimens each to test different luting strategies. Bonded specimens were cut (1-mm-thick sections) and push-out tests were performed (crosshead-speed, 0.5 mm/min). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope at original magnification ×40. Micro push-out bond strengths were significantly affected by the type of luting agent and the type of post (P push-out bond strength values of glass fiber posts were significantly higher than that of carbon fiber posts (P push-out bond strengths were measured for Panavia F 2.0 and RelyX Unicem cements. These values were significantly higher than that of modified application procedure in the medium section for both glass- and carbon-fiber posts, and in the apical root sections only for glass-fiber post (P < .05). In each region, the modified application procedure showed the lowest bond strength values. Adhesive failure between dentin and cement was the most frequent type of failure. In all root segments, the glass fiber post provided significantly increased post retention compared with the carbon fiber post, regardless of the luting strategy used. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  6. Drying time of tray adhesive for adequate tensile bond strength between polyvinylsiloxane impression and tray resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myong-Hee; Shim, Joon-Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo; Chung, Moon-Kyu

    2009-07-01

    Use of custom tray and tray adhesive is clinically recommended for elastomeric impression material. However there is not clear mention of drying time of tray adhesive in achieving appropriate bonding strength of tray material and impression material. This study is to investigate an appropriate drying time of tray adhesives by evaluating tensile bonding strength between two types of polyvinylsiloxane impression materials and resin tray, according to various drying time intervals of tray adhesives, and with different manufacturing company combination of impression material and tray adhesive. Adhesives used in this study were Silfix (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and VPS Tray Adhesive (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and impression materials were Aquasil Ultra (monophase regular set, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and Imprint II Garant (regular body, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). They were used combinations from the same manufacture and exchanged combinations of the two. The drying time was designed to air dry, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes, and 25 minutes. Total 240 of test specimens were prepared by auto-polymerizing tray material (Instant Tray Mix, Lang, Wheeling, Il, USA) with 10 specimens in each group. The specimens were placed in the Universal Testing machine (Instron, model 3366, Instron Corp, University avenue, Nowood, MA, USA) to perform the tensile test (cross head speed 5 mm/min). The statistically efficient drying time was evaluated through ANOVA and Scheffe test. All the tests were performed at 95% confidence level. The results revealed that at least 10 minutes is needed for Silfix-Aquasil, and 15 minutes for VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II, to attain an appropriate tensile bonding strength. VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile bonding strength when compared to Silfix-Aquasil over 15 minutes. Silfix-Aquasil had a superior bonding strength to VPS Tray Adhesive-Aquasil, and VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile

  7. Effect of laser preparation on bond strength of a self-adhesive flowable resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Agarwal, Ishita; Campillo-Funollet, Marc; Munoz-Viveros, Carlos; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E; Mang, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser treatment on shear bond strength of a self-adhesive flowable resin composite to human dentin. Eighty extracted sound human molar teeth were used for the study. The teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in acrylic blocks. The dentin surfaces were ground wet with 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper. They were randomly divided into two preparation groups: laser (Er:YAG laser, with 12 Hz, 350 mJ energy) and control (SiC). Each group was then divided into two subgroups according to the flowable resin composite type (n = 20). A self-adhesive flowable (Vertise Flow) and a conventional flowable resin (Premise Flow) were used. Flowable resin composites were applied according to the manufacturer's recommendations using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. The bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 °C for 24 h. Shear bond strength was tested at 1 mm/min. The data were logarithmically transformed and analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keul's test at a significance level of 0.05. The self-adhesive flowable resin showed significantly higher bond strength values to laser-prepared surfaces than to SiC-prepared surfaces (p flowable resin did not show such differences (p = 0.224). While there was a significant difference between the two flowable resin composites in SiC-prepared surfaces (p flowable resin composite differs according to the type of dentin surface preparation. Laser treatment increased the dentin bonding values of the self-adhesive flowable resin.

  8. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  9. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Souza Henkin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM. Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM. The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface.

  10. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Fernanda de Souza; de Macêdo, Érika de Oliveira Dias; Santos, Karoline da Silva; Schwarzbach, Marília; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Mundstock, Karina Santos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM). Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM) to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM). The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface. PMID:28125142

  11. Static Strength of Adhesively-bonded Woven Fabric Kenaf Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Ahmad; Lee, Sim Yee; Supar, Khairi

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibers are potentially used as reinforcing materials and combined with epoxy resin as matrix system to form a superior specific strength (or stiffness) materials known as composite materials. The advantages of implementing natural fibers such as kenaf fibers are renewable, less hazardous during fabrication and handling process; and relatively cheap compared to synthetic fibers. The aim of current work is to conduct a parametric study on static strength of adhesively bonded woven fabric kenaf composite plates. Fabrication of composite panels were conducted using hand lay-up techniques, with variation of stacking sequence, over-lap length, joint types and lay-up types as identified in testing series. Quasi-static testing was carried out using mechanical testing following code of practice. Load-displacement profiles were analyzed to study its structural response prior to ultimate failures. It was found that cross-ply lay-up demonstrates better static strength compared to quasi-isotropic lay-up counterparts due to larger volume of 0° plies exhibited in cross-ply lay-up. Consequently, larger overlap length gives better joining strength, as expected, however this promotes to weight penalty in the joining structure. Most samples showed failures within adhesive region known as cohesive failure modes, however, few sample demonstrated interface failure. Good correlations of parametric study were found and discussed in the respective section.

  12. Effect of Multiple Coatings of One-step Self-etching Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Primary Dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ma; Jian-feng Zhou; Jian-guo Tan; Quan Jing; Ji-zhi Zhao; Kuo Wan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of multiple coatings of the one-step self-etching adhesive on immediate microtensile bond strength to primary dentin.Methods Twelve caries-free human primary molars were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 teeth each. In group 1,each tooth was hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 1,which was bonded with a single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 1 in which the adhesive was applied three times before light curing. In group 2, the teeth were also hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 2, which was bonded with the single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 2 in which three layers of adhesive were applied with light curing each successive layer. Microtensile bond strength was immediately tested after specimen preparation.Results When the adhesive was applied three times before light curing, the bond strength of the experimental subgroup 1 (n=33, 57.49±11.61 MPa) was higher than that of the control subgroup 1 (n=31,49.71±11.43 MPa, P0.05).Conclusion multiple coatings of one-step self-etching adhesive can increase the immediate bond strength to primary dentin when using the technique of light-curing after applying three layers of adhesive.

  13. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  14. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  15. Micro-shear bond strength of adhesive resins to enamel at different relative humidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andaç Barkın; Demir, Erhan; Goktas, Barış; Ozcopur, Betül; Behram, Benin; Eskitascioglu, Gürcan; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    This study tested whether exhaled humid conditions would affect the adhesion of etch-and-rinse, two-step and one-step self-etch adhesive resins to enamel. Enamel surfaces of human maxillary anterior teeth (N=240, n=20) were exposed to four humid conditions (H1: 63-68%, H2: 73-78%, H3: 93-98%, H4: 36-45% RH) during bonding with Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) and Adper Easy Bond (AEB). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 ºC for 24 h and tested to failure using micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (penamel with SB2, CSE and AEB was not significantly affected by humidity parameters. AEB resulted in significantly lower μSBS in all conditions. The frequency of adhesive failures was the highest at H2, H3 for SB2, H3 for CSE and H1-4 for AEB indicating that humidity conditions may decrease adhesion quality to enamel.

  16. The effect of different adhesives and setting times on bond strength between Biodentine and composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Hakan; Tokay, Uğur; Uzgur, Recep; Uzgur, Zeynep; Ercan, Ertuğrul; Hamidi, Mehmet M

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3 different adhesives with different functional monomers, on the shear bond strength (SBS) of Biodentine®. Acrylic blocks (n = 90) were prepared and a 2-mm height x 4-mm diameter hole was opened in each block. Every hole was completely restored with Biodentine®. Before preparation of composite restorations over the Biodentine® (2-mm height x 2-mm diameter), 3 different adhesives (Etch-37 (37%) w/BAC by Bisco & Prime Bond N&T, Clearfil S3 Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop) were applied. SBS was evaluated using a universal testing machine, and failure mode for each sample was recorded. The results were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test. When the megapascal values of all groups were compared, although there was no statistically significant difference in the different setting times (p>0.05), statistically significant differences were observed among all adhesive groups (p<0.05). Moreover, the highest SBS values were observed in the Clearfil S3 Bond group. Clinical performance of Biodentine® may be affected by adhesive procedures and its setting time.

  17. Influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser treatment on microtensile bond strength of adhesives to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; De Munck, Jan; Coutinho, Eduardo; Ermis, R Banu; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; de Carvalho, Rubens Corte Real; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2008-01-01

    The current trend towards minimum-intervention dentistry has introduced laser technology as an alternative technique for cavity preparation. This study assessed the null hypothesis that enamel prepared either by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or conventional diamond bur is equally receptive to adhesive procedures. The buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 sound human molars were prepared with Er,Cr:YSGG laser or a medium-grit diamond bur. One etch&rinse (OptiBond FL) and three self-etch adhesives (Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond) were applied on laser-irradiated and bur-cut enamel, followed by the application of a 5-6 mm build-up of Z100. The micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) was determined after 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C. Prepared enamel surfaces and failure patterns were evaluated using a stereomicroscope and a field-emission-gun scanning electron microscope (Feg-SEM). The pTBS to laser-irradiated enamel was significantly lower than to bur-cut enamel (pOptiBond FL. SEM analysis revealed significant morphological alterations of the laser-irradiated enamel surface, such as areas of melted and recrystalized hydroxyapatite and deep extensive micro-cracks. In conclusion, the bonding effectiveness of adhesives to laser-irradiated enamel depends not only on the structural substrate alterations induced by the laser, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed.

  18. Effect of Nanofiller Addition to an Experimental Dentin Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. Kasraei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of adding nanofiller particles to a dentin bonding agent on resin-dentin bond strength.Materials and Methods: Fifty-four human intact premolar teeth were divided in to 6 groups of nine. The teeth were ground on occlusal surfaces and polished with 320 and then 600 grit silicon carbide papers. An experimental bonding system based on acetone/alcoholsolvent was provided with filler contents of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 weight percent fumed silica nanofiller. After dentin surface etching, rinsing and blot drying, the experimentalbonding agents were applied to dentin surface. A composite resin was, then,bonded to the dentin on the bonding agent. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles and sectioned in stick form. After two week of storage in distilled water, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength of the specimens was measured. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and DunnettT3 tests.Results: Bond strength to dentin was significantly affected by the filler level. Minimum and maximum resin-microtensile bond strength was in the experimental bonding agent with no filler (5.88 MPa and with filler level of 1.0 weight percent (15.15 MPa, respectively,and decreased with the increase of filler content down to 8.95 MPa for the filler level of 10.0 weight percent.Conclusion: Filler content seems to be one of the important factors influencing the bond strength of dental adhesives. Maximum dentin bond strength was obtained with 1% silanized nanofiller silica added to experimental adhesive system.

  19. SHEAR STRENGTH OF HEAT-TREATED TALI (ERYTHROPHLEUM IVORENSE AND IROKO (CHLOROPHORA EXCELSA WOODS, BONDED WITH VARIOUS ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamiyet Sahin Kol

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the shear strength of tali (Erythrophleum ivorense and iroko (Chlorophora excelsa woods, bonded with some structural adhesives. Shear strength of untreated and heat-treated woods bonded with phenol-formaldehyde (PF, melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF, melamine-formaldehyde (MF, and polyurethane (PUR adhesives was studied. An industrial heat treatment method (ThermoWood was used. The timbers were thermally modified for 2 hours at 180 ºC. Laminated samples having two sample sets were prepared from untreated and heat-treated wood for the shear strength test. The results of the tests showed that the heat treatment affected shear strength of laminated wood negatively. Although there was a considerable difference in adhesive bond shear strength between untreated and treated wood, both wood species bonded with the adhesives fulfilled the required value for shear strength of the adhesive bonds. PF, MUF, MF, and PUR adhesives performed in a rather similar way for both wood species.

  20. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  1. Direct molding of dry adhesives with anisotropic peel strength using an offset lift-off photoresist mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate for the first time a wafer scale, directly molded anisotropic dry adhesive made of silicone that can be produced in a two-mask process. We demonstrate that the peel strength of this adhesive is dependent on the amount of overhang of a thin flexible cap on the top of each fiber. By precisely placing the center of this cap offset to the center of the supporting post, the peel strength of the adhesive can be altered when pulled off in different directions.

  2. Effect of moisture and drying time on the bond strength of the one-step self-etching adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To investigate the effect of dentin moisture degree and air-drying time on dentin-bond strength of two different one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Twenty-four human third molars were used for microtensile bond strength testing of G-Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond. The dentin surface was either blot-dried or air-dried before applying these adhesive agents. After application of the adhesive agent, three different air drying times were evaluated: 1, 5, and 10 sec. Composite resin was build up to 4 mm thickness and light cured for 40 sec with 2 separate layers. Then the tooth was sectioned and trimmed to measure the microtensile bond strength using a universal testing machine. The measured bond strengths were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and regression analysis was done (p = 0.05. Results All three factors, materials, dentin wetness and air drying time, showed significant effect on the microtensile bond strength. Clearfil S3 Bond, dry dentin surface and 10 sec air drying time showed higher bond strength. Conclusions Within the limitation of this experiment, air drying time after the application of the one-step self-etching adhesive agent was the most significant factor affecting the bond strength, followed by the material difference and dentin moisture before applying the adhesive agent.

  3. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  4. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes. Sand-blasted CAD/CAM composite blocks were cemented using conventional resin cement, Rely X Ultimate Clicker (RXC, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA with Single Bond Universal (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA for the control group or two self-adhesive resin cements: Rely X U200 (RXU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and G-CEM Cerasmart (GC, GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan. RXU and GC groups included different curing modes (light-curing (L and auto-curing (A. Shear bond strength (SBS analyses were performed on all the specimens. The RXC group revealed the highest SBS and the GC A group revealed the lowest SBS. According to Tukey’s post hoc test, the RXC group showed a significant difference compared to the GC A group (p < 0.05. For the curing mode, RXU A and RXU L did not show any significant difference between groups and GC A and GC L did not show any significant difference either. Most of the groups except RXC and RXU L revealed adhesive failure patterns predominantly. The RXC group showed a predominant cohesive failure pattern in their CAD/CAM composite, LavaTM Ultimate (LU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA. Within the limitations of this study, no significant difference was found regarding curing modes but more mixed fracture patterns were showed when using the light-curing mode than when using the self-curing mode.

  5. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Cornelius Pott; Meike Stiesch; Michael Eisenburger

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim) were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven), Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH), Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH) or Futurabond M+ i...

  6. Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop Adhesives to Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    P. Alizadeh Oskoee; AA. Ajami; S. Savadi Oskoee; F. Pournaghi-Azar

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength to sound and caries-affected dentin using Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesives.Materials and Methods: Sixteen extracted human molars with carious lesions extended halfway through dentin were ground to expose the caries affected and the surrounding normal dentin. The samples were divided into two groups of eight samples each, including Single Bond (two-step etch and rinse) and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (one step s...

  7. Adhesive strength of CVD diamond thin films quantitatively measured by means of the bulge and blister test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daohui Xiang; Ming Chen; Yuping Ma; Fanghong Sun

    2008-01-01

    Large advancement has been made in understanding the nucleation and growth of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, but the adhesion of CVD diamond to substrates is poor and there is no good method for quantitative evaluation of the adhesive strength. The blister test is a potentially powerful tool for characterizing the mechanical properties of diamond films. In this test, pressure was applied on a thin membrane and the out-of-plane deflection of the membrane center was measured. The Young's modulus, residual stress, and adhesive strength were simultaneously determined using the load-deflection behavior of a membrane. The free-standing window sample of diamond thin films was fabricated by means of photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. The research indicates that the adhesive strength of diamond thin films is 4.28±0.37J/m2. This method uses a simple apparatus, and the fabrication of samples is very easy.

  8. Effect of saliva and blood contamination on the bond strength of self-etching adhesive system- An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Madhusudhana; Gogala, Dorasani; Mathew, Vinod B; Thangala, Venugopal; Deepthi, Mandava; Sasidhar, Nalluru

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to determine the effect of saliva and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive to enamel and dentin; and, to compare the difference in bond strength due to contamination beforeand after application of the self-etch adhesive. Materials and Methods: 40 human mandibular molars were wet ground on both buccal and lingual surfaces to prepare flat superficial enamel and dentin surfaces. They were randomly divided into two groups (n = 40) based on the substrate (enamel and dentin). Each group was further divided into five subgroups (n = 8) based on the type of contamination it was subjected to, and the step in the bonding sequence when the contamination occurred (before or after adhesive application). Fresh saliva and fresh human blood were applied either before or after the application of Xeno III® self-etching adhesive system (SES). Composite resin was applied as inverted, truncated cured cones that were subjected to shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test were used. Results: Statistically significant reduction in the bond strength was shown after both saliva and blood contamination before and after Xeno III® application (Pcontamination with blood as compared to saliva. Conclusions: When self-etching adhesive systems are used, saliva and blood contamination significantly decrease the bond strength of the adhesive to enamel and dentin of the tooth. PMID:22876017

  9. The effect of antimicrobial agents on bond strength of orthodontic adhesives: a meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, A S P; Collares, F M; Leitune, V C B; Samuel, S M W

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial orthodontic adhesives aim to reduce white spot lesions' incidence in orthodontic patients, but they should not jeopardizing its properties. Systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the question whether the association of antimicrobial agents with orthodontic adhesives compromises its mechanical properties and whether there is a superior antimicrobial agent. PubMed and Scopus databases. In vitro studies comparing shear bond strength of conventional photo-activated orthodontic adhesives to antimicrobial photo-activated orthodontic adhesives were considered eligible. Search terms included the following: orthodontics, orthodontic, antimicrobial, antibacterial, bactericidal, adhesive, resin, resin composite, bonding agent, bonding system, and bond strength. The searches yielded 494 citations, which turned into 467 after duplicates were discarded. Titles and abstracts were read and 13 publications were selected for full-text reading. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. The global analysis showed no statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups. In the subgroup analysis, only the chlorhexidine subgroup showed a statistically significant difference, where the control groups had higher bond strength than the experimental groups. Many studies on in vitro orthodontic bond strength fail to report test conditions that could affect their outcomes. The pooled in vitro data suggest that adding an antimicrobial agent to an orthodontic adhesive system does not influence bond strength to enamel. It is not possible to state which antimicrobial agent is better to be associated.

  10. An Average Failure Index Method for the Tensile Strength Prediction of Composite Adhesive-bondedJoints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianyu; SHAN Meijuan; ZHAO Libin; FEI Binjun

    2015-01-01

    An average failure index method based on accurate FEA was proposed for the tensile strength prediction of composite out-of-plane adhesive-bondedπjoints. Based on the simple and independent maximum stress failure criterion, the failure index was introduced to characterize the degree of stress components close to their corresponding material strength. With a brief load transfer analysis, the weak fillers were prominent and further detailed discussion was performed. The maximum value among the average failure indices which were related with different stress components was filtrated to represent the failure strength of the critical surface, which is either the two curved upside surfaces or the bottom plane of the fillers for compositeπjoints. The tensile strength of three kinds ofπjoints with different material systems, configurations and lay-ups was predicted by the proposed method and corresponding experiments were conducted. Good agreements between the numerical and experimental results give evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed method. In contrast to the existed time-consuming strength prediction methods, the proposed method provides a capability of quickly assessing the failure of complex out-of-plane joints and is easy and convenient to be widely utilized in engineering.

  11. Tamarindus indica pectin blend film composition for coating tablets with enhanced adhesive force strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Rajneet; Singh, Kuldeep; Sapra, Bharti; Tiwary, A K; Rana, Vikas

    2014-02-15

    Tablet coating is the most useful method to improve tablet texture, odour and mask taste. Thus, the present investigation was aimed at developing an industrially acceptable aqueous tablet coating material. The physico-chemical, electrical and SEM investigations ensures that blending of Tamarindus indica (Linn.) pectin (TP) with chitosan gives water resistant film texture. Therefore, CH-TP (60:40) spray coated tablets were prepared. The evaluation of CH-TP coated tablets showed enhanced adhesive force strength (between tablet surface to coat) and negligible cohesive force strength (between two tablets) both evaluated using texture analyzer. The comparison of CH-TP coated tablets with Eudragit coated tablets further supported superiority of the former material. Thus, the findings pointed towards the potential of CH-TP for use as a tablet coating material in food as well as pharmaceutical industry.

  12. Effect of thrombin concentration on the adhesion strength and clinical application of fibrin glue-soaked sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francia; Fujio, Shingo; Sugata, Sei; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin glue-soaked gelatin sponge (FGGS) has been used for tissue sealing in neurosurgical practice, but too rapid clotting of fibrin glue occasionally prevents good fixation of FGGS. Dilution of thrombin may provide adequate manipulation time between mixing fibrinogen and thrombin on gelatin sponge and application into the tissue defects. The present study characterized the effect of thrombin dilution on the adhesion strength of FGGS and retrospectively assessed the clinical usage of the dilution for filling dead space or sealing arachnoid defect in 255 cases who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for the last 66 months. FGGS was prepared using three different concentrations of thrombin: 250 (standard), 50 (1:5 dilution), and 25 (1:10 dilution) units/ml, and incubated for three different periods (5, 20, and 60 seconds). FGGSs were applied over two adjacently positioned porcine skins placed on two metallic plates. The adhesion strength was evaluated by measuring maximum tensile strength during pulling out the sliding plate at a constant rate of displacement. The maximum adhesion strength was greater for FGGS with 1:10 diluted thrombin solution than for FGGS prepared with higher concentrations (p < 0.05). Adhesion strength did not decay for 20 seconds after the mixture. Only four of 255 cases (1.6%) required second reconstruction of sella floor due to the cerebrospinal fluid leakage. FGGS prepared with diluted thrombin solution can provide adequate adhesion strength for clinical use.

  13. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  14. Composite-Dentin Bond Strength of Two Adhesives in Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Samimi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermo-cycling and curing mode of composites (light and chemical curing on dentin bond strength of one all-in-one and an one-bottle bonding systems.Methods and Materials: Occlusal enamels of eighty caries-free third molars were ground with a model trimmer to create flat surfaces in superficial dentin for bonding, and randomly divided into 4 groups. Teflon molds with 1 mm internal diameter were mounted on the flat surfaces, Prompt L-pop (all-in-one system (3M-ESPE and Single-Bond(one-bottle system (3M-ESPE were used and restored with FiltekZ250 (light-cured composite (3M-RSPE and Concise (chemically cured composite (3M-ESPE composites. Specimens were stored in 37°c distilled water for 24 hours. 10 specimens of each group were thermo-cycled 500 times between 5°c to 55°c. Micro- shear bond strength test was done with 0.5mm/min crosshead speed (Dartec, England. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's tests.Results: The mean shear bond strengths of two adhesive systems with light-cured composite showed no significant differences with and without thermo-cycling (P<0.05. Also, there was no significant difference between bond strength of two adhesive systems with light cured composite (P<0.05. Use of chemically cured composite reduced the bond strength of Single-Bond significantly (P<0.001. There was not any bond between chemically cured composite to dentin, using prompt L-pop.Discussion: Thermal cycles, in the range that we used them, did not have any influence on the bond strengths of two mentioned systems. The effect of increasing cycles should be evaluated. Use of chemically cured composite decreases the bond strength of Single Bond and there was no bond between this kind of composite and Prompt L-pop system. So these systems, especially Prompt L-pop, shouldn't be used with chemically cured composite in routine dental treatments.

  15. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-12-01

    To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Microtensile (MT) (n= 15) and single plane shear (SP) (n= 8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-Bond (GB) were used according to their manufacturers' instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1 mm diameter and stored in water at 370C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher's PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at x100. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HC1/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at x1,000, x2,500, and x5,000 in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9 mm-thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8 hours. Specimens were sectioned (90 nm-thick) and observed under TEM. Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, P= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher's PLSD intervals (P< 0.05) for bond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were -0.5 pm for PB, GB and S3 and approximately 5 microm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within the interfaces for all adhesive systems.

  16. Nitriding of high speed steel by bipolar PBII for improvement in adhesion strength of DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Junho, E-mail: choi@mech.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Soejima, Koji; Kato, Takahisa [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Masahiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute (TIRI), Tokyo (Japan); Lee, Wonsik [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, bipolar plasma based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII) was used for plasma nitriding of high speed steel (SKH2), and the effects of the treatment parameters (positive pulse voltage, negative pulse voltage, treatment pressure, treatment time, and precursor gases) on the nitriding process were investigated. The hardness, roughness, and depth of nitride layer were also measured. The adhesion strength of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films coated on the nitride substrate was evaluated by carrying out Rockwell indentation and microscratch tests. Nitriding by bipolar PBII was achieved in the combining of two effects: nitrogen ion implantation by applying a high negative pulse voltage and thermal diffusion of nitrogen atoms under the application of a high positive pulse voltage. However, a very high voltage negative pulse caused surface roughening of the nitride layer. Application of a high positive pulse voltage during nitriding was found to be effective in promoting the thermal diffusion of the implanted nitrogen atoms. Effective nitriding could be achieved under the following conditions: high positive pulse voltage, low negative pulse voltage, high nitrogen gas pressure, and addition of hydrogen to the precursor gas. The adhesion strength of the DLC films on the SKH2 substrate was well improved after nitriding.

  17. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to different treated indirect composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M Victoria; Ceballos, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-adhesive and a total-etch resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05). A significant influence of the resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-adhesive resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  18. Adhesion determination of dental porcelain to zirconia using the Schwickerath test: strength vs. fracture energy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyfaki, P; Swain, M V

    2014-11-01

    Two approaches to measure the fracture energy to delaminate four different porcelains from zirconia substrates are compared using Schwickerath adhesion strength test specimens. In all instances it was possible to stably extend the crack along or adjacent to the porcelain-zirconia interface. The fracture energy expended to delaminate the porcelain was found by determining the work of fracture upon loading to 12 N and then unloading. Additional tests were undertaken on specimens notched along the interface, which enabled the compliance of the cracked Schwickerath specimens to be calibrated. The strain energy and deflection of the Schwickerath specimen as a function of crack length were derived. On this basis a simple expression was determined for the strain energy release rate or interfacial fracture toughness from the minima in the force-displacement curves. Consequently two measures of the adhesion energy were determined, the work of fracture and the strain energy release rate. It was found that the ranking for the four porcelains bonded to zirconia differed depending upon the approach. The work of fracture was substantially different from the strain energy release rate for three of the porcelain-zirconia systems and appears to be directly related to the residual stresses present in the bonded structures. The relative merits of the strain energy release rate, work of fracture vs. the stress to initiate cracking in the case of the Schwickerath adhesion test, are discussed. The advantage of this test is that it enables three estimates of the adhesion for porcelain veneers bonded to zirconia. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of antibacterial and fluoride-releasing adhesive system on dentin--microtensile bond strength and acid-base challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; Yamauti, Monica; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Giannini, Marcelo; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a fluoride-containing adhesive on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin, as well as analyzed the dentin-adhesive interface after acid-base challenge. Experimental groups were: G1--Clearfil SE Bond control (SE); G2--Clearfil Protect Bond control (PB); G3--Primer[SE]/Adhesive[PB]; G4--Primer[PB]/Adhesive[SE]. For microTBS evaluation, dentin surfaces were ground, bonded, and composite resin crowns were built up to obtain beams to be tested. For interfacial analysis, adhesive system was applied on dentin surface and a low-viscosity resin was placed between two dentin disks. Then, the specimens were subjected to acid-base challenge, sectioned, and polished to be observed by SEM. microTBS data showed no statistical differences among the groups (GI: 51.3, G2: 47.6, G3: 55.0, G4: 53.9; mean in MPa). Through SEM, it was observed that a thick acid-base resistant zone adjacent to the hybrid layer was created only when the fluoride-releasing adhesive was used. In conclusion, the presence of fluoride in an adhesive contributed significantly to preventing secondary caries, and did not interfere with dentin-adhesive bond strength.

  20. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  1. SISTEMAS ADHESIVOS AUTOGRABADORES, RESISTENCIA DE UNIÓN Y NANOFILTRACIÓN : UNA REVISIÓN/SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVE SYSTEMS, BOND STRENGTH AND NANOFILTRATION: A REVIEW

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maritza Parra Lozada; Herney Garzón Rayo

    2012-01-01

    .... As self etching adhesive systems offer lower reliability in relation to bond strength and nanofiltration in comparison to adhesives of fourth and fifth generation, the latter stand as the golden...

  2. Effects of Nanosilver-Impregnation and Heat Treatment on Coating Pulloff Adhesion Strength on Solid Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Taghiyari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of impregnation with a silver nano-suspension, as well as of heat-treatment, on pull-off adhesion strengths of the coating system on three commercial solid wood species were studied. The wood species included beech, poplar, and fi r. The size range of silver nanoparticles was 30 – 80 nm. The specimens were coated with an un-pigmented sealer and a clear fi nish on the basis of an organic solvent. The results showed that the highest and the lowest pull-off strengths were found in beech specimens heat-treated at 145 °C (5.7 MPa and in nanosilver-impregnated poplar specimens heat-treated at 185 °C (2.5 MPa, respectively. Impregnation with nanosilver decreased pull-off strength in the case of all species as a result of formation of micro checks in the cell walls caused by the impregnation under high pressure in vessel. Heat-treatment at the temperature lower than 145 °C increased pull-off strength as to the irreversible hydrogen bonding in the course of water movements within the pore system of the cell walls, resulting in extra bonds among cell wall components and higher mechanical properties. However, heat treatment at the temperature higher than 185 °C significantly decreased the strength as the degradation of hemicellulose and cell wall wood components caused signifi cant decrease in mechanical strength and cell wall thinning. High thermal conductivity coefficient of silver intensified the impact of heat-treatment by rapid absorption of heat on the surface of the specimens.

  3. Shear bond strengths and microleakage of four types of dentin adhesive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyah, Nasrien Z; Elhejazi, Ahmed A

    2004-02-15

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the microleakage of composite resin (Z-100) and shear bond strength to bovine dentin using different types of adhesive systems (Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, One-Step, and Perma Quick) to compare and correlate microleakage to shear bond strength. For the microleakage aspect of the study, 20 class V were prepared (bovine incisors) with 90-degree cavosurface margins and were located at the cemento-enamel junction using a template. Each dentin bonding system was applied to five cavities following the manufacturer's instructions and restored with Z-100 composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye. All teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond saw, and each section was then inspected under a stereomacroscope. For the shear bond strength aspect of the study, 20 bovine incisors were centrally horizontally mounted in Teflon mold with cold cure acrylic resin. Flat labial dentin surfaces were prepared using different grit silicon carbide abrasive wheels. Five specimens were used for each of the bonding agent systems. Each specimen was bonded with restorative composite resin (Z-100) and applied to the treated dentinal surface through a split Teflon mold. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The bonds were stressed using shear forces at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min using an Instron Universal testing machine. Findings indicate none of the systems tested in this study were free from microleakage. Scotch bond multi-purpose achieved the best seal, with One-Step being second best, while All-Bond 2 and Perma Quick had the poorest seal. However, there were significant differences among the shear bond strengths of the four bonding systems tested. Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose has a higher bond strength to composite resin when compared to the other dentin adhesives. The study also concluded

  4. Adhesive strength of medical polymer on anodic oxide nanostructures fabricated on biomedical β-type titanium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieda, Junko; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Mohri, Tomoyoshi; Hanawa, Takao

    2014-03-01

    Anodic oxide nanostructures (nanopores and nanotubes) were fabricated on a biomedical β-type titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ), by anodization in order to improve the adhesive strength of a medical polymer, segmented polyurethane (SPU), to TNTZ. TNTZ was anodized in 1.0M H3PO4 solution with 0.5 mass% NaF using a direct-current power supply at a voltage of 20V. A nanoporous structure is formed on TNTZ in the first stage of anodization, and the formation of a nanotube structure occurs subsequently beneath the nanoporous structure. The nanostructures formed on TNTZ by anodization for less than 3,600s exhibit higher adhesive strengths than those formed at longer anodization times. The adhesive strength of the SPU coating on the nanoporous structure formed on top of TNTZ by anodization for 1,200s improves by 144% compared to that of the SPU coating on as-polished TNTZ with a mirror surface. The adhesive strength of the SPU coating on the nanotube structure formed on TNTZ by anodization for 3,600s increases by 50%. These improvements in the adhesive strength of SPU are the result of an anchor effect introduced by the nanostructures formed by anodization. Fracture occurs at the interface of the nanoporous structure and the SPU coating layer. In contrast, in the case that SPU coating has been performed on the nanotube structure, fracture occurs inside the nanotubes.

  5. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength.

  6. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Boruziniat; Samineh Gharaei

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adh...

  7. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  8. Effect of different gutta-percha solvents on the microtensile bond strength of various adhesive systems to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demırbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kanşad; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Çayabatmaz, Muhammed; Topçuoğlu, Gamze; Uçar, Ebru Nur

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different endodontic solvents on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of various adhesives to pulp chamber dentin. A total of 120 human third molars were selected. Canals were prepared with the ProTaper Universal system and obturated. The access cavities were then restored with resin composite. After 1 week, a retreatment procedure was applied as follows: control, no solvent was applied to the pulp chamber and experimental groups, three different solvents (chloroform, eucalyptol, and orange oil) were applied to the pulp chamber for 2 min. The canal filling was removed and calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) was placed into the canals. After 7 days, the Ca(OH)2 was removed from the canals and the canals were re-obturated. Teeth were then divided into three subgroups according to the adhesive used. The samples were restored with a nanohybrid resin composite using three different adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Adper Easy One (AEO), and Single Bond 2 (SB2). The samples were aged with thermocycling. Teeth were sectioned, and a total of 20 dentin sticks were obtained for each subgroup. μTBS testing was then performed. The debonded surfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. Chloroform showed statistically lower mean μTBS values (14 ± 7.2 MPa) than control group did (19.2 ± 6.1 MPa) (p  0.05). Chloroform showed significantly lower bond strength for all adhesives (p adhesive systems significantly (p > 0.05), eucalyptol reduced the μTBS values of all the groups, but the results were only statistically significant for SB2 (p  0.05). According to the SEM analysis of the debonded surfaces, adhesive failures were the most common type in all the groups, followed by mixed failures. While chloroform reduced the mean bond strength of the adhesive resins, orange oil did not affect the bond strength of the adhesives

  9. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  10. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  11. The effects of two soft drinks on bond strength, bracket microleakage, and adhesive remnant on intact and sealed enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Raúl; Vicente, Ascensión; Ortiz, Antonio J; Bravo, Luis A

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and Schweppes Limón on bond strength, adhesive remnant, and microleakage beneath brackets. One hundred and twenty upper central incisor brackets were bonded to bovine incisors and divided into three groups: (1) Control, (2) Coca-Cola, and (3) Schweppes Limón. The teeth were submerged in the drinks three times a day for 15 minutes over a 15 day period. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured with a universal testing machine, and adhesive remnant evaluated using image analysis equipment. Microleakage at the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces was determined using methylene blue. One hundred and eight teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of the drinks on intact and sealed enamel. SBS and adhesive remnant data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (P 0.05). Microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface for groups 2 and 3 was significantly greater than for group 1 (P Coca-Cola and Schweppes Limón did not affect the SBS of brackets or the adhesive remnant.

  12. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  13. Effect of pretreating technologies on the adhesive strength and anticorrosion property of Zn coated NdFeB specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Earth-Panda Advance Magnetic Material Co. Ltd., Hefei (China); Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials, Hefei (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials (Earth-Panda Advance Magnetic Material Co., Ltd.), Hefei (China); Xu, Guangqing, E-mail: gqxu1979@hfut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Liu, Jiaqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Yi, Xiaofei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Earth-Panda Advance Magnetic Material Co. Ltd., Hefei (China); Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials, Hefei (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials (Earth-Panda Advance Magnetic Material Co., Ltd.), Hefei (China); Wu, Yucheng, E-mail: ycwu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Chen, JingWu [Earth-Panda Advance Magnetic Material Co. Ltd., Hefei (China); Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials, Hefei (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials (Earth-Panda Advance Magnetic Material Co., Ltd.), Hefei (China)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Zn coated NdFeB specimens pretreated with different technologies possess different adhesive strengths and anticorrosion properties. And the combined technology of sandblasting and pickling (5 s) achieves the best comprehensive performance. - Highlights: • Zn coated NdFeB specimens are achieved with different pretreating technologies. • Combined technology possesses the highest adhesive strength. • Combined technology possesses excellent anticorrosion property. - Abstract: Zinc coated NdFeB specimens were prepared with different pretreating technologies, such as polishing, pickling (50 s), sandblasting and combined technology of sandblasting and pickling (5 s). Morphologies of the NdFeB substrates pretreated with different technologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer and an atomic force microscope. The tensile test was performed to measure the adhesive strength between Zn coating and NdFeB substrate. The self-corrosion behavior of the NdFeB specimen was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization curve. The anticorrosion properties of Zn coated NdFeB specimens were characterized by neutral salt spray tests. The pretreating technologies possess obvious impact on the adhesive strength and anticorrosion property of Zn coated NdFeB specimens. Combined pretreating technology of sandblasting and pickling (5 s) achieves the highest adhesive strength (25.56 MPa) and excellent anticorrosion property (average corrosion current density of 21 μA/cm{sup 2}) in the four pretreating technologies. The impacting mechanisms of the pretreating technology on the adhesive strength and anticorrosion properties are deeply discussed.

  14. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p composite resin exhibited the lowest shear bond strength values when used with the same adhesive resins. The adhesive mode of failure was higher than cohesive with all laboratory composite resins bonded to the StickNet substructure at both storage times. Water storage had a tendency to lower the bond strengths of all laboratory composites, although the statistical differences were not significant. Within the limitations of this study, it was found that bonding of the veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Effect of wettability and surface roughness on ice-adhesion strength of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathidasan, T. [Surface Engineering Division, CSIR- National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore 560017 (India); Kumar, S. Vijay; Bobji, M.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560003 (India); Chakradhar, R.P.S. [Surface Engineering Division, CSIR- National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore 560017 (India); Basu, Bharathibai J., E-mail: bharathijbasu@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Division, CSIR- National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Anti-icing property is related to wettability and surface roughness. • Silicone based hydrophobic coating showed excellent ice-adhesion strength. • Superhydrophobic surfaces displayed poor anti-icing property. - Abstract: The anti-icing properties of hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings were evaluated using a custom-built apparatus based on zero-degree cone test method. The ice-adhesion reduction factor (ARF) of these coatings has been evaluated using bare aluminium alloy as a reference. The wettability of the surfaces was evaluated by measuring water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle. It was found that the ice-adhesion strength (τ) on silicone based hydrophobic surfaces was ∼ 43 times lower than compared to bare polished aluminium alloy indicating excellent anti-icing property of these coatings. Superhydrophobic coatings displayed poor anti-icing property in spite of their high water repellence. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope reveal that Silicone based hydrophobic coatings exhibited smooth surface whereas the superhydrophobic coatings had a rough surface consisting of microscale bumps and protrusions superimposed with nanospheres. Both surface roughness and surface energy play a major role on the ice-adhesion strength of the coatings. The 3D surface roughness profiles of the coatings also indicated the same trend of roughness. An attempt is made to correlate the observed ice-adhesion strength of different surfaces with their wettability and surface roughness.

  16. Lap shear strength of selected adhesives (epoxy, varnish, B-stage glass cloth) in liquid nitrogen and at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froelich, K.J.; Fitzpatrick, C.M.

    1976-12-01

    The adhesives included several epoxy resins, a varnish, and a B-stage glass cloth (a partially cured resin in a fiberglass cloth matrix). Several parameters critical to bond strength were varied: adhesive and adherend differences, surface preparation, coupling agents, glass cloth, epoxy thickness, fillers, and bonding pressure and temperature. The highest lap shear strengths were obtained with the B-shear glass cloth at both liquid nitrogen and room temperatures with values of approximately 20 MPa (3000 psi) and approximately 25.5 MPa (3700 psi) respectively.

  17. Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyacrylamide composite hydrogels with high mechanical strengths and cell adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Mi, Wenying; Wang, Huiliang; Su, Yunlan; He, Changcheng

    2014-11-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyacrylamide composite hydrogels were successfully fabricated by physically mixing nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) particles into a peroxidized micelles initiated and cross-linked (pMIC) polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel. The nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited excellent mechanical properties. The fracture tensile stresses of the gels were in the range of 0.21-0.86 MPa and the fracture tensile strains were up to 30 mm/mm, and the compressive strengths were up to 35.8 MPa. Meanwhile the introduction of nHAp endowed the composite hydrogels with good cell adhesion properties. This nHAp/PAAm nanocomposite hydrogel is expected to find potential applications in tissue engineering.

  18. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  19. Effect of different air-drying periods on microtensile bond strength of an adhesive to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Daneshkazemi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Today, use of adhesive systems is the most common materials in restorative dental procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different air-drying periods on the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin using adhesive.   Materials and Methods: 15 sound molar teeth were selected. The an occlusal surfaces of teeth were removed with silicon carbide disks (3M/USA to reach flat surface of dentin. Then according to the air drying of solvent, the teeth were divided to five groups. After 5 sec etching and rinsing for 15 sec , the teeth were air dried for 3 sec . Then Singlebond (3M was used with different air-drying times (0s, 2s, 5s, 10s, 30s and cured. Then after insertion and curing of Saremco (microhybrid low shrinkage/Switzerland composite, the teeth were thermocycled for 500 cycles. Then hour glass slabs with 1 mm2 interface was created. Specimens were then subjected to µTBS force until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni tests.   Results: Statistical tests showed that there were significant differences between bond strength of groups (P=0.002. The mean of µTBS for the 2 Sec and 30 Sec evaporating time was the most and the least vawes, respectively.   Conclusion: An optimum air-drying time for solvent evaporation was the lowest time recommended by the manufacturer. Over and under evaporation time decreased µTBS significantly.

  20. Influence of different intrapulpal pressure simulation liquids on the microtensile bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, Enas H; El-Deeb, Heba A; Yousry, Mai M

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of three different liquids used for intrapulpal pressure (IPP) simulation on the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of three adhesive systems to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of sound human molars were ground flat down to mid-dentin depth. The teeth were bonded under 15 mmHg simulated IPP using distilled water, phosphate buffered saline, or human plasma as a simulating liquid. Three adhesive systems were tested: a single-bottle etch-and-rinse adhesive (SingleBond, 3M ESPE), and two single-step self-etching adhesives (G-Bond, GC) and (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer). Resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent) buildups were made in 2 increments, each 2 mm in height. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva under 20 mmHg IPP at 37°C for 24 h prior to testing. µTBS (n = 15) was tested using a universal testing machine, and failure modes were determined. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc tests at p adhesive, distilled water showed significantly higher µTBS compared to plasma and phosphate buffered saline. With G-Bond, no significant difference was found between distilled water and phosphate buffered saline, whereas plasma showed significantly lower µTBS values. In contrast, no significant difference was encountered between the three IPP liquids for iBond adhesive. Predominant modes of failure were adhesive and mixed. A difference in intrapulpal pressure simulating liquids influences the bonding of adhesives to dentin. Etch-and-rinse adhesives are more sensitive to intrapulpal simulating liquids than are self-etching adhesives. Adhesives containing protein-coagulating components perform better with plasma perfusion than those lacking such components.

  1. Micro-tensile bond strength of self-etching primer adhesive systems to human coronal carious dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strengths of three self-etching primer adhesive systems to normal dentin (ND), caries-affected dentin (CAD) and caries-infected dentin (CID). Human extracted molars with caries were used, and flat dentin surfaces ground by 600-grit SiC paper were prepared. The surfaces were dyed using Caries-Detector solution, treated with Clearfil SE Bond, Mac-Bond II and UniFil Bond, and then covered with resin composites according to manufacturer's instructions. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, the teeth were serially sectioned into multiple slices. Each slice was distinguished into ND, CAD and CID groups by the degree of staining, and the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation was also performed. For statistical analysis, anova and Scheffe's test were used (P bond strengths of the three adhesive systems to CAD and CID were significantly lower than those to ND. There was significant difference in the bond strength to ND between Clearfil SE Bond and UniFil Bond, but no significant differences to CAD and CID among the three adhesive systems. On SEM, the hybrid layers in CAD and CID showed more porous structures compared with ND. The results indicated that the bond strengths to CAD and CID were not affected by a variety of self-etching primer adhesive systems because of the porous hybrid layer formation in carious dentin.

  2. Effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new self-etch adhesive system to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Munaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new two-step self-etch adhesive (P90 system adhesive to dentin and to determine the effect of contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of 40 human premolars were ground to expose dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 is uncontaminated and serves as the control group. Further groups were divided based on the step in the bonding sequence when the contamination had occurred as follows: Group 2 (primer, saliva contamination, rinse and dry, group 3 (after procedure of group 2, reapplication of primer, and group 4 (after procedure like in control group, saliva contamination, rinse and dry. Filtek P90 composite resin cylinders of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm length were fabricated on the surfaces. Shear bond strength testing was done in an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student′s t-test. Results: With P90 system adhesive, group 2 and group 4 showed lower shear bond strength than group 1 (control and group 3 (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Saliva contamination significantly decreased the shear bond strength of the adhesive to dentin.

  3. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

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    Edith eMäder

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test.In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis.The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this

  4. Experimental study about the influence of adhesive stiffness to the bonding strengths of adhesives for ceramic/metal targets

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    W. Seifert

    2016-04-01

    The experimental results indicate that the damage behavior of the ceramic/metal composites depends on the absolute elongation of the adhesive layer. This can be controlled either by the thickness or the stiffness of the bonding layer.

  5. Exposed Dentin: Influence of Cleaning Procedures and Simulated Pulpal Pressure on Bond Strength of a Universal Adhesive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare various pre-treatments serving as cleaning procedures of dentin on the bond strength of resin composite promoted by a universal adhesive system applied either in the absence or presence of simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods Prior to application of the adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) and resin composite (Filtek Z250), ground dentin surfaces were given one of five pre-treatments either without or with simulated pulpal pressure: 1) no pre-treatment, adhesive system in “self-etch” mode, 2) phosphoric acid etching, adhesive system in “total-etch” mode, 3) polishing with pumice on prophylaxis cup, 4) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PLUS powder, 5) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PERIO powder; n = 20/group of pre-treatment. After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), micro shear bond strength was measured and data analyzed with parametric ANOVA including Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing followed by Student’s t tests (significance level: α = 0.05). Results The ANOVA found type of pre-treatment and simulated pulpal pressure to have no significant effect on dentin bond strength. The explorative post-hoc tests showed a negative effect of simulated pulpal pressure for phosphoric acid etching (adhesive system in “total-etch” mode; p = 0.020), but not for the other four pre-treatments (all p = 1.000). Conclusion Air abrasion with powders containing either erythritol and chlorhexidine (AIR-FLOW PLUS) or glycine (AIR-FLOW PERIO) yielded dentin bond strengths similar to no pre-treatment, phosphoric acid etching, or polishing with pumice. Simulated pulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only when the self-etch adhesive system was used in total-etch mode. PMID:28081572

  6. Adhesion strength characterization of PVDF/HA coating on cp Ti surface modified by laser beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.A., E-mail: aantunesr@yahoo.com.br [Department of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, Campinas, SP 13083-970 (Brazil); Vaz, L.G. [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, P.O. Box 331, Araraquara, SP 14801-903 (Brazil); Guastaldi, A.C. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, P.O. Box 331, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Campos, J.S.C. [Department of Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, Campinas, SP 13083-970 (Brazil)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are superficially treated by laser beam irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treated titanium substrates are coated with {alpha}-PVDF and {alpha}-PVDF/HA films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-point bending test is used to assess the adhesion strength of coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coatings show good physical adhesion on treated titanium substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-point bending test appears as an alternative for measuring adhesion strength. - Abstract: Up to the moment, there is no standardized test for measuring the adhesion strength of polymeric coatings on titanium substrate modified by laser beam irradiation. The present work aimed to assess the adhesion strength of polyvinylidene fluoride ({alpha}-PVDF)/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite coating on commercially pure titanium ({alpha}-cp Ti) substrate surface modified by laser beam irradiation, using the three-point bending test. The preparation of coating was carried out by mixing {alpha}-PVDF pellets dissolved in dimethylacetamide (DMA) with HA/DMA emulsion. The mixture was poured onto the {alpha}-cp Ti sample and left to dry in an oven. Commercially pure titanium plates were coated with {alpha}-PVDF/HA composite film, in proportions of 100/00 (PVDF) and 60/40 (PVDF/HA) in weight. The Ti-PVDF/HA samples were subjected to the three-point bending test and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. According to the results, PVDF and PVDF/HA coatings showed a good adhesion strength on {alpha}-cp Ti surface, since no detachment was observed.

  7. [Studies of dental methacrylic resin. (Part 8) Flexural and impact adhesive strength of self-curing methacrylic resin to cross-linked polymethyl methacrylate resins (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, T; Hirabayashi, S; Harashima, I

    1981-10-01

    Heat-curing methacylic resins cross-linked with three kinds of dimethacrylates, i.e. EDMA, tri-EDMA and nona-EDMA, were prepared, and the flexural and the impact adhesive strength of the dough moulding type and the pour type self-curing methacrylic resins to them were examined. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The flexural and the impact adhesive strength of the pour type self-curing resin were higher and more stable than those of the dough moulding type one. (2) The flexural and the impact adhesive strength of self-curing resins to cross-linked adherent resins rised in order of nona-EDMA greater than tri-EDMA greater than EDMA in the range of higher concentration of cross-linking agents. This tendency was marked for the pour type resin. (3) When the dough moulding type resin was used as adhesive resin, to adherent resin cross-linked with EDMA or tri-EDMA which had relatively short chain, the respective adhesive strength of that decreased with increasing the concentration of cross-linking agent. While, to adherent resin cross-linked with nona-EDMA, which had relatively long and more flexible chain, the respective adhesive strength of the dough moulding type resin increased with increasing the concentration of cross-linking agent. (4) When the pour type resin was used as adhesive resin, to adherent resin cross-linked with EDMA or tri-EDMA, the respective adhesive strength of that showed the maximum at the concentration near 2 to 5 mole% and decreased with increasing the concentration. While, to adherent resin cross-linked with nona-EDMA, the flexural adhesive strength of the pour type resin was approximately constant without the effect of the concentration, but the impact adhesive strength of that increased with increasing the concentration. (5) The flexural adhesive strength of the dough moulding and the pour type resin under the wet condition decreased about 30 to 60% compared with under the dry condition, but the percentage of the falling for the impact

  8. Influence of an arginine-containing toothpaste on bond strength of different adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, Ana Cláudia Pietrobom; Bridi, Enrico Coser; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesive systems to eroded dentin following toothbrushing with an arginine-containing toothpaste. Sixty standardized 3 × 3 × 2-mm fragments of root dentin (n = 10) were prepared. After all surfaces except the buccal surfaces were impermeabilized, specimens were subjected to an erosive wear protocol and stored for 24 hours at 37°C. The specimens underwent 1000 toothbrushing cycles with an arginine-containing toothpaste, an arginine-free toothpaste (positive control group), or artificial saliva (negative control group). Following application of a self-etching or an etch-and-rinse adhesive to the buccal surfaces of the specimens, 6-mm-high composite resin blocks were built up in 2-mm increments. After 24 hours' storage in 100% relative humidity, microtensile test specimens with an approximate area of 1 mm² were prepared. The test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until specimen fracture, and the failure patterns were evaluated using a stereoscopic loupe. Two-way analysis of variance revealed no significant difference between the toothpastes, the adhesive systems, or the interactions between toothpaste and adhesive system in terms of the bond strength to eroded dentin (P > 0.05). The predominant failure pattern was adhesive in all groups. It was concluded that a toothpaste containing arginine did not interfere with the bond between either the self-etching or the etch-and-rinse adhesive system and eroded dentin.

  9. Can previous acid etching increase the bond strength of a self-etching primer adhesive to enamel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Morales Cobra Carvalho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Because a greater research effort has been directed to analyzing the adhesive effectiveness of self etch primers to dentin, the aim of this study was to evaluate, by microtensile testing, the bond strength to enamel of a composite resin combined with a conventional adhesive system or with a self-etching primer adhesive, used according to its original prescription or used with previous acid etching. Thirty bovine teeth were divided into 3 groups with 10 teeth each (n= 10. In one of the groups, a self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond - Kuraray was applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and, in the other, it was applied after previous acid etching. In the third group, a conventional adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus - 3M-ESPE was applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The results obtained by analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the adhesive systems (F = 22.31. The self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond presented lower enamel bond strength values than the conventional adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (m = 39.70 ± 7.07 MPa both when used according to the original prescription (m = 27.81 ± 2.64 MPa and with previous acid etching (m = 25.08 ± 4.92 MPa.

  10. Dependence of adhesion strength between GaN LEDs and sapphire substrate on power density of UV laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junsu [Department of Nano-Manufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of); Sin, Young-Gwan [Department of Nano-Mechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hyun [Department of Nano-Mechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaegu, E-mail: gugu99@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano-Manufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental relationship between laser irradiation and adhesion strength, between gallium-nitride light emitted diode and sapphire substrate, is proposed during selective laser lift-off. • Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate. • Ga precipitation caused by thermal decomposition and roughened interface caused by thermal damage lead to the considerable difference of adhesion strength at the interface. - Abstract: Selective laser lift-off (SLLO) is an innovative technology used to manufacture and repair micro-light-emitting diode (LED) displays. In SLLO, laser is irradiated to selectively separate micro-LED devices from a transparent sapphire substrate. The light source used is an ultraviolet (UV) laser with a wavelength of 266 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns, and repetition rate of 30 kHz. Controlled adhesion between a LED and the substrate is key for a SLLO process with high yield and reliability. This study examined the fundamental relationship between adhesion and laser irradiation. Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate: Ga precipitation caused by the thermal decomposition of GaN and roughened interface caused by thermal damage on the sapphire. The competition between these two mechanisms leads to a non-trivial SLLO condition that needs optimization. This study helps understand the SLLO process, and accelerate the development of a process for manufacturing micro-LED displays via SLLO for future applications.

  11. Influence of zinc-oxide eugenol, formocresol, and ferric sulfate on bond strength of dentin adhesives to primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Fouad Saad

    2005-08-15

    This study evaluated in vitro the influence of a temporary filling {zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE)} and two pulpotomy agents {formocresol (FC) and ferric sulfate (FS)} on shear bond strength (SBS) of two dentin adhesives to the dentin of primary molars. A total of 80 dentin surfaces were prepared and randomly allocated into 10 groups of 8 specimens each. Groups were subjected to different treatments, which included covering with a paste of ZOE mixed at different powder:liquid (P:L) ratios, placement on a gauze soaked in FC or FS, or they received no pretreatment and served as a control. XRV Herculite composite cylinders were bonded to dentin surfaces using Prime and Bond NT adhesive resin or Opti Bond Solo Plus adhesive resin. SBSs were determined using the lnstron testing machine running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The use of ZOE mixed at the lower P:L ratio of 10g:2g significantly decreased the values of SBS of the two adhesives. The use of two pulpotomy agents (FC and FS) significantly decreased the SBS of the two adhesives. The bond strength to dentin of primary teeth was influenced by the pulpotomy agents used and the ZOE P:L ratio but not by the adhesive system used.

  12. Effect of nordihydroguaiaretic acid cross-linking on fibrillar collagen: in vitro evaluation of fibroblast adhesion strength and migration

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    Ana Y. Rioja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fixation is required to reinforce reconstituted collagen for orthopedic bioprostheses such as tendon or ligament replacements. Previous studies have demonstrated that collagen fibers cross-linked by the biocompatible dicatechol nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA have mechanical strength comparable to native tendons. This work focuses on investigating fibroblast behavior on fibrillar and NDGA cross-linked type I collagen to determine if NDGA modulates cell adhesion, morphology, and migration. A spinning disk device that applies a range of hydrodynamic forces under uniform chemical conditions was employed to sensitively quantify cell adhesion strength, and a radial barrier removal assay was used to measure cell migration on films suitable for these quantitative in vitro assays. The compaction of collagen films, mediated by the drying and cross-linking fabrication process, suggests a less open organization compared to native fibrillar collagen that likely allowed the collagen to form more inter-chain bonds and chemical links with NDGA polymers. Fibroblasts strongly adhered to and migrated on native and NDGA cross-linked fibrillar collagen; however, NDGA modestly reduced cell spreading, adhesion strength and migration rate. Thus, it is hypothesized that NDGA cross-linking masked some adhesion receptor binding sites either physically, chemically, or both, thereby modulating adhesion and migration. This alteration in the cell-material interface is considered a minimal trade-off for the superior mechanical and compatibility properties of NDGA cross-linked collagen compared to other fixation approaches.

  13. Effect of reactive adhesives on the tensile bond strength of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials to methyl methacrylate tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    The effect of new adhesives on the bond strength of elastomeric impression materials to acrylic trays was evaluated. Two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (Fusion and Imprinsis) with reactive adhesives and one (Examix) with a conventional adhesive were tested. Flat, double-sided plates of auto-polymerizing methyl methacrylate (10 x 10 x 2.5 mm) were prepared with one of the adhesives. Five specimens were prepared by injecting each impression material into a 2-mm gap between the two plates. Tensile tests were conducted until separation failure occurred. The mean bond strengths of Fusion (1.0 MPa) and Imprinsis (0.8 MPa) were significantly greater than that of Examix (0.2 MPa). On the contrary, one of five Fusion showed adhesive failure mode while all the Imprinsis exhibited mixed failure. The conflicting results were presumably attributed to the mean tear strength of Fusion (0.8 N/mm) being higher than that of Imprinsis (0.5 N/mm).

  14. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

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    Philipp Cornelius Pott

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven, Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of three different types of composites – BifixSE (“BS”, BifixQM (“BQ” or GrandioSO (“G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to ten specimens each in every group. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD gave higher SBS than CZ and FBU in combination with all tested composites. In comparison to FBU, FBM gave statistically significant increases in SBS with BifixSE (19.4±5.7 MPa (P

  15. An in vitro comparison of adhesive techniques and rotary instrumentation on shear bond strength of nanocomposite with simulated pulpal pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayshree Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite to tooth using different adhesive techniques and rotary instruments under simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molars were randomly divided into two groups of 30 samples each (group I and II, according to the adhesive technique followed (i.e. total etch and self etch groups. Each group was further divided into two sub-groups (Sub-groups A and B of 15 samples each according to the cutting instrument (diamond abrasive or carbide burs used. Class II cavities were made with diamond abrasive or carbide burs, and restored with nano-composite under positive intra-pulpal pressure. Shear bond strength of the specimens were recorded simultaneously. Results: After statistical evaluation using two-way ANOVA and t-test, the mean shear bond strength values of the groups are as follows: Group IA- 4.69 MPa, Group IB-6.15 MPa, Group IIA-4.3 MPa, and Group IIB-6.24 MPa. It was seen that group IIB showed highest bond strength followed by group IB. Group II A showed the least bond strength. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, diamond abrasive gave better bond strength than carbide bur with both the adhesive techniques.

  16. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  17. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-07

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  18. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  19. Efficacy of microtensile versus microshear bond testing for evaluation of bond strength of dental adhesive systems to enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Zohairy, A.A.; Saber, M.H.; Abdalla, A.I.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the microtensile bond test (μTBS) and the microshear bond test (μSBS) in ranking four dental adhesives according to bond strength to enamel and identify the modes of failure involved. Materials and methods Forty-four caries-free human

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Saliva Contaminated and Re-etched All-in-One Adhesive to Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khoroushi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphoric acid re-etching of an enamel surface treated via a one-bottle adhesive system on shear bond strength between resin composite and the enamelsurface in different stages of adhesive application.Materials and Methods: Extracted intact premolars (n=84 were divided into sevengroups (n=12. In the control group 1, the adhesive i-Bond was used according to the manufacturer's instructions, with nocontamination. In groups 2 to 4, the conditioned and saliva, contaminated enamel was blot dried only, rinsed,and blot dried, rinsed blot dried and re-etched, respectively. In groups 5, 6and 7 cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva and then rinsed and blot-dried, blot dried only and rinsed, blot-dried and re-etched respectively. In groups 3, 4, 6 and 7 the adhesive was reapplied. Afterward, Z100 compos-ite cylinders were bonded to the enamel surfaces. The samples were thermocycled (5°C and 55°C, 30 s, dwelling time: 10 s, 500 cycles. Finally, the samples were sheared using Dartec testing machine and shear bond strength data were subjected to one-way ANOVA analysis and Tukey's HSD test.Results: There were statistically significant differences among groups 1 and 5-7. The samples in groups 1 and 4 demonstrated higher bond strengths than those in the other groups.Conclusion: Using phosphoric acid etching may be effective, only where contamination occurs prior to curing of the adhesive. After curing of the adhesive, none of the methods in this study would be preferred.

  1. Dentin Bond Strength of Two One-Bottle Adhesives after Delayed Activation of Light-Cured Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafiei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adverse surface interactions between one-bottle adhesives and chemical-cured composites may occur with delayed light activation of light-cured composites. The purpose of this study was to assess the Effects of delayed activation of light-cured compositeson shear bond strength of two one-bottle adhesives with different acidity to bovine dentin.Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface was prepared on sixty-six bovine incisors using 600 grit carbide papers. Prime&Bond NT, and One-Step adhesives and resin composite were applied in six groups: 1 immediate curing of the composite, 2 the composite was left 2.5 minutes over the cured adhesive before light activation, 3 prior to delayed activation of the composite, the cured adhesive was covered with a layer of nonacidic hydrophobic porcelain bonding resin (Choice 2 and cured immediately. After thermocycling,shear bond strength (SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed with Friedmans two-way Non-parametric ANOVA.Results: The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond was significantly lower than immediate activated (P<0.05. Decrease in the SBS of One-Step was not statistically significant after delayed activation. The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond and One-Step with an additional resin layer was significantly higher than delayed activation (P<0.001.Conclusion: The bond strength of Prime&Bond might be compromised by the higher acidity of this adhesive during the 2.5 minutes delayed activation of light-cured composite.Addition of a layer of hydrophobic resin compensated the effect of delayed activation andimproved the bond strength.

  2. Role of eDNA on the Adhesion Forces between Streptococcus mutans and Substratum Surfaces : Influence of Ionic Strength and Substratum Hydrophobicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Theerthankar; Sharma, Prashant K.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) on the adhesion strength of Streptococcus mutans LT11 on substrata with different hydrophobicities at high and low ionic strengths. AFM adhesion forces to a hydrophilic and hydrophobic substratum increased with increasing

  3. Effects of Er:YAG laser on bond strength of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Ozmen, Bilal; Cortcu, Murat; Tokay, Ugur; Tosun, Gul; Erhan Sari, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser may be effective the bond strength of adhesive systems on dentine surfaces, the chemical composition and aggressiveness of adhesive systems in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Er:YAG laser system with the bonding ability of two different self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentine in primary molars. Ninety mid-coronal flat dentine surfaces obtained from sound and caries-affected human primary dentine were treated with an Er:YAG laser or a bur. The prepared surfaces were restored with an adhesive system (Xeno V; Clearfil S³) and a compomer (Dyract Extra). The restored teeth were sectioned with a low-speed saw and 162 samples were obtained. The bond strength of the adhesive systems was tested using the micro-tensile test method. The data were statistically analyzed. A restored tooth in each group was processed for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The values of the highest bond strength were obtained from the Clearfil S³-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups. (24.57 ± 7.27 MPa) (P > 0.05). The values of the lowest bond strength were obtained from the Xeno V-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups (11.01 ± 3.89 MPa). It was determined that the Clearfil S³ increased the bond strength on the surface applied with Er:YAG laser according to the Xeno V. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of a re‑wetting agent on bond strength of an adhesive to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... adhesive to primary and permanent teeth dentin after different etching ... be dried without drying dentin to regulate the ideal amount of moisture ..... Swift EJ Jr. Dentin/enamel adhesives: Review of the literature. Pediatr Dent.

  5. Effects of enamel sealing on shear bond strength and the adhesive remnant index : Study of three fluoride-releasing adhesives in combination with metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Elisabeth; Elsner, Laura; Hirschfelder, Ursula; Ebert, Thomas; Hanke, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Selected combinations of materials were used to create tooth-adhesive-bracket complexes to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) with regard to enamel sealing. Four adhesive systems also appropriate for use as enamel sealants were combined with four bracket types, resulting in 16 adhesive-bracket combinations, each of which was tested on 15 permanent bovine incisors. Sealant-adhesives included two recently introduced fluoride-releasing systems (Riva bond LC(®) and go!(®)), one established primer (Opal(®) Seal™), and one commonly used adhesive as control (Transbond™ XT). Brackets included two metal (discovery(®) by Dentaurum and Sprint(®)) and two ceramic (discovery(®) pearl and GLAM(®)) systems. After embedding the bovine teeth, bonding the brackets to their surface, and storing the resultant samples as per DIN 13990-2 with modifications, an SBS test was performed by applying the shear force directly at the bracket base in an incisocervical direction. Then the ARI scores were determined. Discovery(®) + Transbond™ XT yielded the highest (47.2 MPa) and GLAM(®) + go!(®) the lowest (17.0 MPa) mean SBS values. Significant differences (p < 0.0001) were found between metal and ceramic brackets of the same manufacturers (Dentaurum and Forestadent). Our ratings of the failure modes upon debonding predominantly yielded ARI 0 or 1. The high SBS values and low ARI scores observed with discovery(®) + Transbond XT™ were reflected in a high rate of enamel fracture, which occurred on 11 of the 15 tooth specimens in this group. All sealant-bracket combinations were found to yield levels of SBS adequate for clinical application. SBS values and ARI scores varied significantly depending on which sealant-brackets were used.

  6. Surface characteristics and adhesive strengths of metal on O{sub 2} ion beam treated polyimide substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung C. [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: skkscpark@skku.edu; Yoon, Seong S.; Nam, J.D. [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Cheoncheon-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-31

    A polyimide surface was modified by oxygen ion beam bombardment to improve its adhesion to a subsequently deposited NiCr (nickel-chromium alloy) overlayer. The changes in the chemical composition, morphology and adhesion property of the modified polyimide surface were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and the 90{sup o} peel test. The results show that the oxygen ion beam treatment of the polyimide induces the formation of oxygen functional groups and the rearrangement of the imide groups in the polyimide substrate film. An increase in its surface roughness resulted in a substantial improvement in the adhesion strength between the polyimide and NiCr overlayer. The improved adhesion strength, however, was found to be reduced after thermal aging at 150 deg. C for 168 hrs, which was attributed to the thermal oxidative degradation of the polyimide at the interface. We also observed that the ion beam treatment was effective in retarding the adhesion loss caused by the thermal aging.

  7. Bond strength comparison of color-change adhesives for orthodontic bonding using a self-etching primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey GN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Ekhlassi, Jeryl D English, Joe C Ontiveros, John M Powers, Harry I Bussa, Gary N Frey, Clark D Colville, Randy K EllisHouston Department of Orthodontics, The University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two color-change adhesives with a commonly used conventional light-cure adhesive while using a self-etching primer, and to compare any changes in shear bond strengths over time.Methods: One hundred and eighty extracted bovine incisors were randomly divided into nine groups of 20 teeth each. The teeth were prepared with a self-etching primer (Transbond™ Plus Metal lower incisor brackets were bonded directly to each tooth with two different color-change adhesives (TransbondPlus and Grengloo™ and a control (Transbond XT. The teeth were debonded at three different time points (15 minutes, 24 hours, 1 week using an Instron at 1.0 mm/min. The teeth that were to be debonded at 24 hours and 1 week were stored in distilled water at 37°C to simulate the oral environment. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and with Fisher's protected least-significant difference multiple comparisons test at the P < 0.05 level of significance. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were calculated for each debonded tooth.Results: Transbond Plus at 1 week had the highest mean shear bond strength (14.7 mPa. Grengloo tested at 24 hours had the lowest mean shear bond strength (11.3 mPa. The mean shear bond strengths for the remaining seven groups had a range of 12–14.5 mPa. Grengloo had >80% samples presenting with an ARI score of 1 at all times. Interestingly, both Transbond groups had ARI scores of 3 in more than 50% of their samples.Conclusion: Time had no significant effect on the mean shear bond strength of Transbond XT, Grengloo, or Transbond Plus adhesive.Keywords: bond strength, color-change adhesives, self-etching primer, orthodontic bonding 

  8. Longitudinal Evaluation of Bond Strength to Enamel of Dental Adhesive Systems Associated with Nd:YAG Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, D C; Batista, G R; Pucci, C R; Persici, E S; Borges, A B; Torres, C R G; Fonseca, B M; Gonçalves, S E P

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the durability of bond strength to enamel using total-etch (Single Bond/SB) and self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond/CSEB) adhesives associated with neodymium:yttrium-aluminu-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation through the uncured adhesives. Bovine incisors were worn to expose an area of enamel and were divided into four groups: group 1 (control) SB + polymerization; group 2 (control) CSEB + polymerization; group 3 (laser) - SB + Nd:YAG laser (174.16 J/cm(2)) + polymerization; and group 4 (laser) CSEB + Nd:YAG (174.16 J/cm(2)) + polymerization. Blocks of composite were fabricated and stored for 24 hours or 12 months, sectioned into beams, and submitted to microtensile tests. Results were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (adhesive, technique, and storage time) and Tukey tests. ANOVA revealed significant differences for adhesive × technique and technique × storage time (padhesive × technique (standard deviation) were as follows: SB/control = 35.78 (6.04)a; SB/laser = 26.40 (7.25)b, CSEB/control = 26.32 (5.71)b, CSEB/laser = 23.90 (7.49)b. For interaction technique × storage time the mean values were as follows: control/24 hours = 32.58 (6.49)a; control/12 months = 29.52 (8.38)a; laser/24 hours = 29.37 (5.71)a; laser/12 months = 20.92 (6.5)b. Groups with the same letters showed no statistically significant differences. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed evident areas of micromorphological alterations in lased samples after 12 months of water storage. Nd:YAG laser irradiation of enamel through unpolymerized total-etch adhesive significantly reduced bond strength compared with the control. Bond strength decreased when enamel samples irradiated with Nd:YAG laser through unpolymerized adhesives were stored in water for 12 months.

  9. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of class II restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purk, John H.; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Methods Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P .05). Conclusions PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Clinical Implications Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested. PMID:17012721

  10. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs, Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs.

  11. RESEARCH OF ADHESIVE STRENGTH OF NEW CONCRETE LAYER WITH A SURFACE OF OLD CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulgakov Boris Igorevich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a material very commonly used in modern construction, each year over 4 billion m3 of concrete is used around the world. In the recent years high-quality fine grain and other types of concrete allow giving the modern creation city buildings new architectural expressivity, meeting the requirements of the XXI century. The trend of using of these new types of concrete is also applied in the construction of tunnel systems and the subway. The fine-grained high performance concrete obtained by using a mixture of organo-mineral additives and fiber reinforcement, compares fovourably with ordinary fine-grained concrete, namely its bending and tensile strength is higher, it has good resistance to shock impacts and fatigue, as well as crack resistance, water resistance and resistance to erosion. So this type of fine-grained high performance concrete is suitable for the construction of subway tunnels and other special objects. When evaluating the concrete performance in underground rock layers subjected to complex mechanical forces, it is important to take into account the stress of metro upon departure and stopping at the stations. The article presents a new experimental method of determining the adhesion strength of fine-grained high performance concrete layer freshly poured on the surface of old concrete in the process of construction and repair of underground. The result of this method application showed that fine-grained high performance concrete is capable of skid resistance higher than 55 % compared to regular fine-grained concrete without additives.

  12. Shear bond strength and SEM morphology evaluation of different dental adhesives to enamel prepared with ER:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Patrícia T; Ferreira, João C; Oliveira, Sofia A; Azevedo, Alvaro F; Dias, Walter R; Melo, Paulo R

    2013-01-01

    Early observations of enamel surfaces prepared by erbium lasers motivated clinicians to use laser as an alternative to chemical etching. Evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) values of different dental adhesives on Erbium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser prepared enamel and to evaluate possible etching patterns correlations between dental adhesives and SBS values. One hundred bovine incisors were randomly assigned to SBS tests on enamel (n = 15) and to enamel morphology analysis (n = 5) after Er:YAG laser preparation as follows: Group I - 37% phosphoric acid (PA)+ ExciTE(®); Group II - ExciTE(®); Group III - AdheSE(®) self-etching; Group IV - FuturaBond(®) no-rinse. NR; Group V - Xeno(®) V. Teeth were treated with the adhesive systems and subjected to thermal cycling. SBS were performed in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (P adhesive systems yielded significantly different SBSs. Acid etching significantly increased the adhesion in laser treated enamel. No differences in SBS values were obtained between AdheSE(®) and ExciTE(®) without condition with PA. FuturaBond(®) NR and Xeno(®) V showed similar SBS, which was lower in comparison to the others adhesives. No correlation between enamel surface morphology and SBS values was observed, except when PA was used.

  13. Tensile bond strength of veneering resins to PEEK: impact of different adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Keul, Christine; Beuer, Florian; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    This study tested tensile bond strength (TBS) between veneering resins and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) after pre-treatment with adhesive systems. Five-hundred-seventy-six PEEK disks were fabricated, air-abraded and divided into six pre-treatment groups (n=96/group): Z-Prime Plus, Ambarino P60, Monobond Plus, Visio.link, Signum PEEK Bond, and control group without pre-treatment. Each group was divided into three subgroups of different veneering resins (n=32): Sinfony, GC Gradia and VITA VM LC. After specimen preparation with a bond area of 6.6 mm(2), half of each subgroup (n=16) was tested initially, and the other half was thermo-cycled. TBS measurements were analysed by three-way and one-way ANOVA, t-test and Weibull statistics. Groups without pre-treatment and groups pre-treated by Z-Prime Plus and Ambarino P60 showed no TBS. Pre-treatment with Monobond Plus increased the TBS values. The highest TBS before and after thermo-cycling between PEEK and all tested veneering resins was observed for groups pre-treated with Visio.link and Signum PEEK Bond.

  14. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nouri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10. The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was creat-ed by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350 was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05. Results: No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive sys-tem at 25 ̊C and 40 ̊C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ̊C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001. Conclusion: Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond.

  15. Effect of Caries Removal Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin and Glass IonomerAdhesives to Primary Dentin

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    Mohammadi N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is no enough published data about the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer adhesives on caries-affected primary tooth dentin excavated using minimally invasive systems. Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of 2 different adhesives (one resin modified glass ionomer and one resin using two caries removal tech- niques on healthy and caries-affected primary dentin. Materials and Methods: Two caries removal methods including mechanical (handpiece and chemomechanical (Carisolv techniques and two types of ad- hesives including one resin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond; CSEB, Kuraray and one resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive (Riva Bond LC; RBLC, SDI were used in this study. Ten extracted healthy primary teeth were used for the control group. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally in order to obtain four specimens from each tooth. Thirty suitable specimens were selected as the “control” and randomly divided into two groups of “sound dentin” based on the type of the adhesive used. Sixty extracted caries affected teeth were used for the carious group; sectioned as mentioned above and sixty suitable specimens were selected as the “treatment”. Then the specimens were arbitrarily divided into four groups based on caries removal techniques and the type of ad- hesive used (n = 15. After bonding with either CSEB or RBLC, the specimens were restored with a resin composite by means of PVC tubes and subjected to the shear bond strength test. The data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The specimens in Carisolv group bonded with CSEB (11.68 ± 3.1 showed a statistically significant higher mean bond strength followed by those in handpiece group bonded with CSEB (9.4 ± 2.7, which exhibited higher mean values than those groups with RBLC (p < 0.05. Shear bond strength values for Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly higher than Riva Bond LC when used in sound

  16. In vitro analysis of bond strength of self-etching adhesives applied on superficial and deep dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Eugenio J; Gomes, Osnara M M; Gomes, João C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of three adhesive systems to superficial and deep dentine using the microtensile bond strength test (microTBS). The occlusal enamel of thirty human third molars was removed to expose a flat surface of superficial or deep dentin. For each type of surface, the test specimens were randomly divided into three groups which underwent the application of a conventional two-step adhesive system [Single Bond (SB)] as the control group (n=10), a two-bottle self-etching system [One Coat SE Bond (OCSE)] (n=10) and a one bottle one-step system [Clearfil S3 Bond (CFS3)] (n=10). Adhesives were applied, a 5-mm high "crown" as built-up with resin composite Z250 (3M) and the specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.7 +/- 0.1 mm2 were tested in tension (0.5 mm/min). Four fractured sticks from each tooth were randomly selected and the dentin side was gently abraded with a 1200-grit SiC paper etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 s and air dried. SEM micrographs at 70X and 2400X magnification were taken using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to calculate the area of tubular dentin (ATD) and tubular density (TD) with Image Pro Plus 5. Two-way ANOVA (dentin depth-adhesive) showed higher bond strength values for SB. However the values did not depend on dentin depth. Linear regression showed a significant relationship between bond strength and area of intertubular dentin for SB (p = 0.004), and a significant inverse relationship between tubular density and bond strength for CFS3 (p = 0.009). OCSE exhibited a tendency that was similar to SB and opposite to CFS3, but was not statistically significant. The conventional two-step adhesive had higher bond strength values. The use of digital image analysis facilitates the manipulation of data and contributes to the interpretation of the behavior of new adhesive systems.

  17. Adhesion strength of nickel and zinc coatings with copper base electroplated in conditions of external stimulation by laser irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Dudkina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The investigation of laser irradiance influence on the adhesion strength of nickel and zinc coatings with copper base and the research of initial stages of crystallization for nickel and zinc films. Methodology. Electrodeposition of nickel and zinc films from the standard sulphate electrolyte solutions was carried out on the laser-electrolytic installations, built on the basis of gas discharge CO2-laser and solid ruby laser KVANT-12. The adhesion strength of metal coatings with copper base are defined not only qualitatively using the method of meshing and by means of multiple bending, but also quantitatively by means of indention of diamond pyramid into the border line between coating and base of the side section. Spectrum microanalysis of the element composition of the border line “film and base” is carried out using the electronic microscope REMMA-102-02. Findings. Laser irradiance application of the cathode region in the process of electroplating of metal coatings enables the adhesion strength improvement of coating with the base. Experimental results of adhesive strength of the films and the spectrum analysis of the element composition for the border line between film and base showed that during laser-assisted electroplating the diffusion interaction between coating elements and the base metal surface takes place. As a result of this interaction the coating metal diffuses into the base metal, forming transition diffused layer, which enhances the improvement of adhesion strength of the coatings with the base. Originality. It is found out that ion energy increase in the double electric layer during interaction with laser irradiance affects cathode supersaturation at the stage of crystallization. Hence, it also affects the penetration depth of electroplated material ions into the base metal, which leads to the adhesion strength enhancement. Practical value. On the basis of research results obtained during the laser

  18. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  19. Adhesive strength of hydroxyl apatite(HA coating and biomechanics behavior of HA-coated prosthesis:an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-yang ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the influence of adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite(HA coating on the post-implantation stability of HA-coated prosthesis.Methods The adhesive strength and biomechanics behavior of HA coating were studied by histopathological observation,material parameters and biomechanical testing,the titanium(Ti-coated prosthesis was employed as control.Results Scratch test showed that the adhesive strength of HA coating was significantly lower than that of Ti coating(P < 0.01.Histopathological examination and bone morphometry showed that,at the early stage of prosthesis implantation,the bony growth around HA-coated prosthesis was significantly higher than that around Ti-coated prosthesis(P < 0.01,but the ultimate shear strength of HA-coated prosthesis was much lower than that of Ti-coated prosthesis(P < 0.01.After the push-out test with prosthesis,histopathological observation showed that there were accumulations of clump-and strip-like granular residues on the surface of bones that newly grew around the HA-coated prosthesis,and surface energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(EDX analysis also confirmed that the shear stress induced HA decohesion from the substrate of prosthesis.Conclusions Although HA coating showed a satisfactory effect on early bone formation and prosthetic stability,due to the deficiencies of adhesive strength,the early stability of prosthesis may be gradually destroyed by the shear loads of human body and coating degradation.

  20. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Resin Composite Bond Strength to Enamel and Dentin Using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, J D; Catelan, A; Rodrigues-Filho, U; Marchi, G M; Lima, Danl; Aguiar, Fhb

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of composite resin restorations in dental blocks with or without exposure to cigarette smoke. Eighty bovine dental blocks were divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the type of adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA [SBMP]; Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE [SB]; Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical Inc, Okayama, Japan [CSEB]; Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE [SBU]) and exposure to smoke (no exposure; exposure for five days/20 cigarettes per day). The adhesive systems were applied to the tooth structure, and the blocks received a composite restoration made using a matrix of perforated pasta. Data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey test (α<0.05). For enamel, there was no difference between the presence or absence of cigarette smoke (p=0.1397); however, there were differences among the adhesive systems (p<0.001). CSEB showed higher values and did not differ from SBU, but both were statistically different from SB. The SBMP showed intermediate values, while SB demonstrated lower values. For dentin, specimens subjected to cigarette smoke presented bond strength values that were lower when compared with those not exposed to smoke (p<0.001). For the groups without exposure to cigarette smoke, CSEB showed higher values, differing from SBMP. SB and SBU showed intermediary values. For the groups with exposure to cigarette smoke, SBU showed values that were higher and statistically different from SB and CSEB, which presented lower values of bond strength. SBMP demonstrated an intermediate value of bond strength. The exposure of dentin to cigarette smoke influenced the bonding strength of adhesives, but no differences were noted in enamel.

  1. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  2. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  3. Strength and failure analysis of inverse Z joints bonded with Vinylester Atlac 580 and Flexo Tix adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adin, Hamit [Univ. of Batman, Batman (Turkmenistan); Turgut, Aydin [University of Firat, Elazig (Turkmenistan)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, the tensile strength and failure loads of the inverse Z joints were analyzed both experimentally and numerically by using two adhesives with different properties under a tensile load. Vinylester Atlac 580 and Flexo Tix were used as adhesives and the joints were prepared with two different composite materials. Initially, the mechanical properties of the adhesives were specified using bulk specimens. Then, the stress analyses were performed using three dimensional finite element method (3 D FEM) via Ansys (V.10.0.1). The experimental results were compared with the numerical results and they were found quite reasonable. According to the test results, it can be seen that when the adherend thickness is increased, the stress increases as well. The most appropriate value of the adherend thickness is identified as t = 5 mm. Furthermore, it was observed that the lowest failure load was obtained at t = 3 mm the thickness for each specimen.

  4. "No-bottle" vs "multi-bottle" dentin adhesives--a microtensile bond strength and morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, R; Perdigão, J; Rosa, B T; Lopes, M

    2001-09-01

    To compare the adhesive capability of the new adhesive Prompt L-Pop (ESPE) with that of two total-etch adhesive systems-EBS Multi (ESPE) and Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply). Extracted human molars were bonded and prepared for microtensile dentin bond strength (microTBS) testing using Prompt L-Pop, EBS Multi, and Prime&Bond NT combined with Pertac II (composite) or Hytac Aplitip (compomer). Prompt L-Pop was applied using five different protocols: (1) as an "all-in-one" self-conditioning adhesive, as per manufacturer's instructions (LP); (2) as a self-etching primer combined with a separate bonding resin (LP/self-etch 2-step); (3) as a classical primer used upon etching dentin with phosphoric acid, followed by a bonding resin (LP/total-etch 3-step); (4) as a multi-application "all-in-one" self-conditioning adhesive (LP/multi-coat) to leave a visibly glossy dentin surface; and (5) as a filled adhesive, upon adding quartz fillers to its composition (LP/filled). After 24h of storage in water at 37 degrees C the microTBS were measured in an Instron machine. Corresponding interfaces of the same specimens were micromorphologically analyzed using SEM and TEM. When used with a composite resin, LP/filled and LP/multi-coat resulted in significantly higher microTBS than LP. The addition of an extra adhesive bonding resin (LP/self-etch 2-step) had no effect on bond strength. The use of Prompt L-Pop as a primer of a fourth-generation adhesive (LP/total-etch 3-step) replacing the EBS Multi primer, resulted in lower bond strengths than those of the original EBS Multi. LP/multi-coat showed similar microTBS to Prime&Bond NT (P&BNT). When used with a compomer, LP exhibited higher bond strengths than when used with the resin composite and was as effective as the experimental groups LP/filled and LP/multi-coat and the control group P&BNT. The SEM evaluation showed an inconsistent hybrid layer for the LP specimens, whereas in both the LP/filled and LP/multi-coat specimens a hybrid layer was

  5. Bending energy penalty enhances the adhesive strength of functional amyloid curli to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Wang, Ao; DeBenedictis, Elizabeth P; Keten, Sinan

    2017-09-27

    The functional amyloid curli fiber, a major proteinaceous component of biofilm extracellular matrices, plays an important role in biofilm formation and enterobacteriaceae adhesion. Curli nanofibers exhibit exceptional underwater adhesion to various surfaces, have high rigidity and strong tensile mechanical properties, and thus hold great promise in biomaterials. The mechanisms of how curli fibers strongly attach to surfaces and detach under force remain elusive. To investigate curli fiber adhesion to surfaces, we developed a coarse-grained curli fiber model, in which the protein subunit CsgA (curli specific gene A) self-assembles into the fiber. The coarse-grained model yields physiologically relevant and tunable bending rigidity and persistence length. The force-induced desorption of a single curli fiber is examined using coarse-grained modeling and theoretical analysis. We find that the bending energy penalty arising from high persistence length enhances the resistance of the curli fiber against desorption and thus strengthens the adhesion of the curli fiber to surfaces. The CsgA-surface adhesion energy and the curli fiber bending rigidity both play crucial roles in the resistance of curli fiber against desorption from surfaces. To enable the desorption process, the applied peeling force must overcome both the interfacial adhesion energy and the energy barrier for bending the curli fiber at the peeling front. We show that the energy barrier to desorption increases with the interfacial adhesion energy, however, the bending induced failure of a single curli fiber limits the work of adhesion if the proportion of the CsgA-surface adhesion energy to the CsgA-CsgA cohesive energy becomes large. These results illustrate that the optimal adhesion performance of nanofibers is dictated by the interplay between bending, surface energy and cohesive energy. Our model provides timely insight into enterobacteriaceae adhesion mechanisms as well as future designs of engineered

  6. Bond Strength of Methacrylate-Based Composite to Dentin using a Silorane Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    Lambrechts P, Vanherle G. Adhesion to enamel and dentin: current status and future challenges. Oper Dent 2003;28:215-235. Van Meerbeek B...Composite to Dentin using Silorane Adhesive is appropriately acknowledged and , beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner...Based Composite to Dentin Using a Si lorane Adhesive 7. Intended publication/meeting: Presented as a poster at the International Association of

  7. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  8. Influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-09-28

    The influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etch mode was investigated. A two-step self-etch adhesive and two universal adhesives were used to bond to enamel and dentin in self-etch mode. Initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using the adhesive in self-etch mode were determined. Fatigue testing was used with 20 Hz frequency and cycling periods of 50,000, 100,000 and 1,000,000 cycles, or until failure occurred. For each of the cycling periods, there was no significant difference in shear fatigue strength across the cycling periods for the individual adhesives. Differences in shear fatigue strength were found between the adhesives within the cycling periods. Regardless of the adhesive used in self-etch mode for bonding to enamel or dentin, shear fatigue strength was not influenced by the number of cycles used for shear fatigue strength testing.

  9. Effect of repeated use on dentin bond strength of two adhesive systems: All-in-one and one-bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiei Fershteh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare the effects of repeated use of two one-bottle adhesives with that of two all- in- one adhesives (with acetone solvent on bond strength to dentin. Materials and Methods: A flat dentin surface was prepared on 120 bovine incisors using 600- grit abrasive pape. The teeth were randomly assigned into 12 equal groups. The four adhesive systems [Prime and Bond NT (P&B NT, One-Step Plus (OS, iBond (iB, and G-Bond (GB] were used at baseline, after the lid of the container had been opened 30 times, and after it had been opened 60 times. Before each use of the adhesives, the lids of the containers were left open for 1 min. The resin composites were applied on the dentin in a cylindrical split mold. After thermocycling, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min. We used Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for statistical analysis. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among bond strength (MPa of the groups of P&B NT (31.9 ± 4.6, 31.8 ± 6.5, 26.1 ± 6.7 and OS (33.2 ± 5.1, 30.9 ± 7, 29.3 ± 5.9, respectively (P > 0.05. The mean of the bond strength of iB and GB after 60 times (15.3 ± 4.1 and 12.2 ± 3.9, respectively was significantly lower than that of iB and GB at baseline (23.5 ± 4.8 and 22.2 ± 4.5, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive led to a decline in the dentin bond strength. To avoid this problem it would be advisable to have containers with smaller amounts of adhesive or perhaps those with only a singe dose.

  10. Whole cell adhesion strength of morphotypes and isolates of Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bacillariophyceae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanley, Michele S; Callow, James A

    2007-01-01

    .... Phaeodactylum tricornutum provides a model system in which to do this but the quantitative adhesion characteristics of the various morphotypes and isolates of this species are currently unknown...

  11. Optimization of the Adhesion Strength of Arc Ion Plating TiAlN Films by the Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Yul Cho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-level six-factor (arc power, substrate temperature, pre-treatment bias voltage, working pressure, deposition bias voltage and pretreatment time orthogonal experimental array (L18 to optimize the adhesion strength of arc ion plating (AIP TiAlN films was designed using the Taguchi method. An optimized film process, namely substrate temperature 220 °C, arc power 60 A, negative bias voltage -800 V, nitrogen pressure 10-2 Torr, pretreated voltage -450 V and pretreated time 15 minutes was obtained by the Taguchi program for the purpose of obtaining a larger critical load. The critical load of the optimized TiAlN film (53 N was increased by 43% compared to the film with the highest critical load before optimization. The improvement in the adhesion strength of the films was attributed to the enhancement of hardness and the competitive growth of the (111, (200 and (220 orientations in the film.

  12. The shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Nimish; Chaman, Chandrakar; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Singh, Udai Pratap; Sharma, Apoorv

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems- self-adhering flowable composite, etch and rinse adhesive system and self etch adhesive system. MTA specimens (n = 60) were prepared using cylindrical acrylic blocks, having a central cavity with 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. MTA was mixed and placed in the prepared cavity, and was covered with a moist cotton pellet and temporary filling material. The specimens were divided into 3 groups which were further divided into 2 sub-groups (45 Minutes and 24 hours). After the application of bonding agents composite resin was placed over the MTA surface. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength and readings were statically analyzed. After 24 hrs the mean value of etch and rinse group was significantly higher than self etch and the self adhering composite groups. Among the 45 minutes groups there were no significant difference. In single visit after 45 minutes self adhering flowable can be used successfully as a final restorative material in place of conventional flowable composite without using any alternative adhesive system over MTA.

  13. Comparative evaluation of pH, bond strength and washability in four common denture adhesives in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Bahrami

    2015-12-01

    at 0.05. Results: Professional and Corega adhesives had more neutral pH than that of Fittydent and Fixodent which were more acidic. Washability test showed no remaining mass of any adhesive and there was not any statistically significant difference between groups (P>0.05. Fittydent and Corega adhesives showed higher bond strength than that of Professional and Fixodent and this difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion: Professional and Corega adhesives had less acidity. Thus they cause less harmful effects on the oral mucosa than that of Fittydent and Fixodent and should be indicated in patients with little-tolerant oral mucousa such as diabetous, iron-deficiency anemia and hypertention. All the groups had acceptable washability. Fittydent and Corega had higher bond strength than that of Professional and Fixodent. Therefore in complete-denture-wearers who require more retention as a result of severe ridge resorption, macrotruma, and maladaptiivity, Fittydent and Corega seems to be more acceptable.

  14. The shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimish Tyagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems- self-adhering flowable composite, etch and rinse adhesive system and self etch adhesive system. Methodology: MTA specimens (n = 60 were prepared using cylindrical acrylic blocks, having a central cavity with 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. MTA was mixed and placed in the prepared cavity, and was covered with a moist cotton pellet and temporary filling material. The specimens were divided into 3 groups which were further divided into 2 sub-groups (45 Minutes and 24 hours. After the application of bonding agents composite resin was placed over the MTA surface. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength and readings were statically analyzed. Result: After 24 hrs the mean value of etch and rinse group was significantly higher than self etch and the self adhering composite groups. Among the 45 minutes groups there were no significant difference. Conclusion: In single visit after 45 minutes self adhering flowable can be used successfully as a final restorative material in place of conventional flowable composite without using any alternative adhesive system over MTA.

  15. A Fracture-Based Criterion for Debonding Strength of Adhesive-Bonded Double-Strap Steel Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prawit Santisukpotha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the debonding strength of adhesive-bonded double-strap steel joints. A fracture-based criterion was formulated in terms of a stress singularity parameter, i.e., the stress intensity factor, which governs the magnitude of a singular stress field near the joint ends. No existing crack was assumed. A total of 24 steel joint specimens were tested under constant amplitude fatigue loadings at stress ratio of 0.2 and frequency of 2 Hz. The joint stiffness ratio was slightly less than one to control the maximum adhesive stresses at the joint ends. To detect the debonding, a simple and practical technique was developed. The test results showed that the interfacial failure near the steel/adhesive corner was a dominant failure mode. The failure was brittle and the debonding life was governed by the crack initiation stage. The finite element analysis was employed to calculate the stress intensity factors and investigate the effects of the adhesive layer thickness, lap length and joint stiffness ratio on the debonding strength.

  16. Resin-dentin bond strength of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Silvia Terra; Cubas, Gloria Beatriz de Azevedo; Flores, Josiane Barcelos; Montemezzo, Murieli Leonor; Pinto, Marcia Bueno; Piva, Evandro

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resin-dentin bond degradation of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage, 100 bovine incisors were randomly separated into 10 groups and their superficial coronal dentin was exposed. According to manufacturers' instructions, dentin surfaces were bonded with one of seven two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives or one of three three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives. Composite buildups were constructed incrementally. Restored teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks (0.5 mm²). The specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond strength test after storage in distilled water (at 37°C) for one year. Data (MPa) were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey's tests at α = 0.05. Of the adhesives tested, One Step, All Bond 2, and Optibond FL attained the highest bond strength to dentin after one year in water storage, while Magic Bond DE and Master Bond presented a high number of premature debonded flaws.

  17. Comparison of different dentin pretreatment protocols on the bond strength of glass fiber post using self-etching adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Frederico C; Carvalho, Claudio Antonio Talge; Oliveira, Luciane D; de Lacerda, Ana Júlia Farias; Xavier, Ana Cláudia Carvalho; Augusto, Marina Gullo; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the influence of different irrigants with and without ultrasound or laser irradiation on the bond strength of glass fiber posts using a self-etching adhesive in a supplementary dentin pretreatment. Ninety bovine incisor roots were divided into 3 groups according to the irrigant tested: 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) (n = 30); 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (n = 30), and saline solution (control) (n = 30). Each group was randomly divided into 3 subgroups according to the supplementary dentin pretreatment: ultrasound, Nd:YAG laser, and nonsupplemented (control). A self-etching adhesive system (Futurabond DC; VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was used, and the glass fiber posts were cemented with dual-cure epoxy-based luting agent (Bifix QM, VOCO GmbH). All roots were sectioned transversely, and the push-out test was performed. Failure mode analysis was also evaluated. Bond strength decreased significantly after the use of 2.5% NaOCl in all root thirds (P .05). The supplementary dentin pretreatment using the Nd:YAG laser or ultrasound did not improve the bond strength values for both NaOCl and CHX (P > .05). Moreover, the apical third exhibited the lowest mean bond strength values (P irrigant used, the supplementary dentin pretreatment with ultrasound or laser irradiation showed no improvement in bond strength. Also, the use of NaOCl decreased the bond strength of glass fiber posts using a self-etching adhesive system, whereas CHX preserved it. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing m...

  19. Cross-sectional nanoindentation (CSN) studies on the effect of thickness on adhesion strength of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanghias, A.; Khatibi, G.; Pelzer, R.; Steinbrenner, J.; Bernardi, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the cross-sectional nanoindentation (CSN) technique has been employed to investigate the adhesion behavior of Titanium-Tungsten (TiW) thin films in various thicknesses on silicon substrate. Furthermore, the nanoindentation-induced blister (NIB) technique has been implemented on the same samples to evaluate the adhesion energy of the films with a different approach. The adhesion energy release rate of these thin films, derived by these two techniques, revealed a good agreement. Accordingly, the results show that as the thickness of the TiW layer increases, the adhesion toughness of the film decreases. It was suggested that three factors might be responsible for the superior adhesion strength of thin films with lower thicknesses: higher surface energy due to the smaller mean grain size; higher constraint from the substrate, which causes inferior fracture toughness of the coating and facilitates crack deflection from interface to surface; and, energy dissipation due to decohesion. The thickness dependency of the transition between delamination and decohesion mechanism in thin films has also been discussed and modelled.

  20. Polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody prolongs the effective duration time of botulinum toxin in decreasing muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Pan, Lizhen; Liu, Wuchao; Pan, Yougui; Nie, Zhiyu; Jin, Lingjing

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate if the effective duration time of botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) could be prolonged by polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody (P-NCAM-Ab). 175 male SD rats were randomly divided into three major groups: control group (n = 25), Btx-A group (n = 25), and P-NCAM-Ab groups. P-NCAM-Ab groups were composed of five sub-groups, with 25 rats each in the dose-response study. Muscle strength of rat lower limbs was determined using a survey system. The expressions of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blotting (WB). The muscle strength was significantly decreased by Btx-A in Btx-A/P-NCAM-Ab groups compared with normal control group. Besides, the muscle strength of P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly decreased compared with the Btx-A group. The recovery time of muscle strength in P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly longer compared with Btx-A group. RT-PCR and WB assay showed that PNCAM-Ab delayed the increase of MuSK and NCAM after Btx-A injection. P-NCAM-Ab prolongs the effective duration time of Btx-A in decreasing muscle strength, which could provide a novel enhancement in clinical application.

  1. Effect of air-blowing duration on the bond strength of current one-step adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiale; Saikaew, Pipop; Kawano, Shimpei; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Hannig, Matthias; Sano, Hidehiko; Selimovic, Denis

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of different air-blowing durations on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of five current one-step adhesive systems to dentin. One hundred and five caries-free human molars and five current one-step adhesive systems were used: ABU (All Bond Universal, Bisco, Inc.), CUB (CLEARFIL™ Universal Bond, Kuraray), GPB (G-Premio BOND, GC), OBA (OptiBond All-in-one, Kerr) and SBU (Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE). The adhesives were applied to 600 SiC paper-flat dentin surfaces according to each manufacturer's instructions and were air-dried with standard, oil-free air pressure of 0.25MPa for either 0s, 5s, 15s or 30s before light-curing. Bond strength to dentin was determined by using μTBS test after 24h of water storage. The fracture pattern on the dentin surface was analyzed by SEM. The resin-dentin interface of untested specimens was visualized by panoramic SEM image. Data from μTBS were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (adhesive vs. air-blowing time), and Games-Howell (a=0.05). Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect of materials (p=0.000) and air-blowing time (p=0.000) on bond strength to dentin. The interaction between factors was also significantly different (p=0.000). Maximum bond strength for each system were recorded, OBA/15s (76.34±19.15MPa), SBU/15s (75.18±12.83MPa), CUB/15s (68.23±16.36MPa), GPB/30s (55.82±12.99MPa) and ABU/15s (44.75±8.95MPa). The maximum bond strength of OBA and SUB were significantly higher than that of GPB and ABU (psystems is material-dependent (p=0.000), and was influenced by air-blowing duration (p=0.000). For the current one-step adhesive systems, higher bond strengths could be achieved with prolonged air-blowing duration between 15-30s. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adhesion strength and nucleation thermodynamics of four metals (Al, Cu, Ti, Zr) on AlN substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuan; Ke, Genshui; Xie, Yan; Chen, Yigang; Shi, Siqi; Guo, Haibo

    2015-12-01

    Devices based on AlN generally require adherent and strong interfaces between AlN and other materials, whereas most metals are known to be nonwetting to AlN and form relatively weak interfaces with AlN. In this study, we selected four representative metals (Al, Cu, Ti, and Zr) to study the adhesion strength of the AlN/metal interfaces. Mathematical models were constructed between the adhesion strength and enthalpy of formation of Al-metal solid solutions, the surface energies of the metals, and the lattice mismatch between the metals and AlN, based on thermodynamic parameters calculated using density functional theory. It appears that the adhesion strength is mainly determined by the lattice mismatch, and is in no linear correlation with either the Al-metal solution's formation enthalpies or the metals' surface energies. We also investigated the nucleation thermodynamics of the four metals on AlN substrates. It was found that Ti forms the strongest interface with AlN, and has the largest driving force for nucleation on AlN substrates among the four metals.

  3. Shear bond strength of ceramic and metallic orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer and conventional bonding adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Naghipour, Fatemeh; Ravadgar, Mehdi; Karkhah, Ahmad; Barati, Mohammad Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adult patients typically require high-quality orthodontic treatment for ceramic brackets, but some clinicians remain concerned about the bond strength of these brackets. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the shear bond strength and de-bonding characteristics of metallic and ceramic brackets bonded with two types of bonding agents. Methods In an experimental study done in 2013 in Babol, Iran, 120 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows: HM group: metallic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SM group: metallic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer; HC group: ceramic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SC group: ceramic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer. Twenty-four hours after thermocycling (1000 cycle, 5 °C–55 °C), the shear bond strength values were measured. The amount of resin remaining on the tooth surface (adhesive remnant index: ARI) was determined under a stereomicroscope. Enamel detachment index was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. To perform statistical analysis, ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey post-hoc tests were applied. The level of significance was set at p ceramic brackets. In addition, self-etching primer was able to produce fewer bonds compared with the conventional technique. Many samples showed the bracket-adhesive interface failure or failure inside the adhesive. PMID:28243410

  4. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, João Fernando; Pedriali, Maria Beatriz Bergonse Pereira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the bond strength of different translucent fiber posts in the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the fiber post used: Reforpost (opaque [control]), exacto, white post, radix, and Macro-Lock Illusion X-RO. The roots were subjected to chemomechanical preparation and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. The teeth were sectioned into slices of the different root thirds and tested for bond strength (push-out). Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test were used to verify statistical differences between groups (P 0.05). However, the performance of the posts demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). RDX had a lower performance in the apical third (P < 0.05). The other fiber posts had the same performance irrespective of the root third evaluated. The predominant failure pattern was adhesive between resin cement and root dentin. Conclusion: In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated. PMID:27994324

  5. Ultrapure alginate anti-adhesion gel does not impair colon anastomotic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaturvedi, A.A.; Lomme, R.M.L.M.; Hendriks, T.; Goor, H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrapure alginate gel is promising in terms of adhesion prevention. Because anti-adhesive barriers have been shown to disturb healing of bowel anastomoses, the effect of ultrapure alginate gel on the repair of colon anastomoses was studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 102 male Wistar

  6. Ultrapure alginate anti-adhesion gel does not impair colon anastomotic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaturvedi, A.A.; Lomme, R.M.L.M.; Hendriks, T.; Goor, H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrapure alginate gel is promising in terms of adhesion prevention. Because anti-adhesive barriers have been shown to disturb healing of bowel anastomoses, the effect of ultrapure alginate gel on the repair of colon anastomoses was studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 102 male Wistar rats

  7. Influence of ionic strength and substratum hydrophobicity on the co-adhesion of oral microbial pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Co-adhesion between oral microbial pairs (i.e. adhesion of a planktonic micro-organism, University of organism to a sessile organism adhering to a substratum surface) has been described as a highly specific interaction, mediated by stereochemical groups on the interacting microbial cell surfaces, an

  8. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  9. Influence of dentin pretreatment with titanium tetrafluoride and self-etching adhesive systems on microtensile bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridi, Enrico Coser; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2.5% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of one- or two-step self-etching adhesive systems. 24 human sound third molars were used. A flat dentin surface of each tooth was exposed. After planing, teeth were divided into groups so that dentin would be left untreated or treated with a 2.5% TiF4 solution for 1 minute. Specimens were then subdivided into two groups to receive one of the following adhesive systems: one-step self-etching Adper Easy One (ADP) or two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (CLEAR). A block of composite measuring 5.0 mm high and 5.0 mm wide was made incrementally on the tooth. Specimens were taken to a metallographic cutter to fabricate sticks with a bond area of approximately 1 mm2. After 24 hours, specimens were submitted to microTBS testing and the failure mode was recorded by examining specimens under stereomicroscopy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs were obtained of the tooth/restoration interface. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test demonstrated that pretreatment of dentin with a TiF4 solution did not affect the microTBS values of either of the adhesive systems (P = 0.675). CLEAR provided higher bond strength than ADP, regardless of whether dentin was or was not pretreated with the TiF4 solution. Failure mode showed mostly adhesive failures in all groups, except when only ADP was used, causing mostly cohesive fractures in resin.

  10. Effect of Storage Time on Bond Strength Performance of Multimode Adhesives to Indirect Resin Composite and Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishi, P; André, C B; Silva, Jp Lyra E; Bacelar-Sá, R; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Giannini, M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the bond strength performance of multimode adhesives (MMAs) to indirect resin composite and lithium disilicate glass ceramic after 24 hours or one year of water storage. Thirty flat and polished plates of indirect resin composite (Epricord) and thirty lithium disilicate glass ceramic plates (IPS e.max Press) were prepared. Surfaces were pretreated using sandblasting (indirect resin composite) or hydrofluoric acid (glass-based ceramic). Specimens were bonded with one of two MMAs (Scotchbond Universal [SBU] or All-Bond Universal [ABU]) or ceramic primer and hydrophobic bonding (RelyX Ceramic Primer and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Bond) as a control (n=10). Resin cement cylinders (0.75 mm in diameter × 0.5 mm in height) were bonded to both substrate surfaces using the respective adhesives. After 24 hours or one year of water storage, bonding performance was measured by microshear bond strength (MSBS) testing. Results were analyzed using three-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). For indirect resin composite, significantly higher MSBS values were found for ABU after 24 hours (ABU > SBU = control); however, no significant difference among the adhesives was observed after one year (p>0.05). For glass-based ceramic, significantly different bond strengths were observed among the adhesives after 24 hours (control = ABU > SBU) and one year (control > SBU = ABU; presin composite after aging, as they showed similar bond performance to that of the control group. However, separate bottles of silane bonding resin showed higher MSBS values and more durable bonding for etched glass-based ceramic.

  11. Parameters affecting the adhesion strength between a living cell and a colloid probe when measured by the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E; Pyo, Nayoung; Tanaka, Saaya; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kanda, Yoichi; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-03-15

    In this study, we used the colloid probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to investigate the adhesion force between a living cell and a silica colloid particle in a Leibovitz's L-15 medium (L-15). The L-15 liquid maintained the pharmaceutical conditions necessary to keep the cells alive in the outside environment during the AFM experiment. The force curves in such a system showed a steric repulsion in the compression force curve, due to the compression of the cells by the colloid probe, and an adhesion force in the decompression force curve, due to binding events between the cell and the probe. We also investigated for the first time how the position on the cell surface, the strength of the pushing force, and the residence time of the probe at the cell surface individually affected the adhesion force between a living cell and a 6.84 microm diameter silica colloid particle in L-15. The position of measuring the force on the cell surface was seen not to affect the value of the maximum adhesion force. The loading force was also seen not to notably affect the value of the maximum adhesion force, if it was small enough not to pierce and damage the cell. The residence time of the probe at the cell surface, however, clearly affected the adhesion force, where a longer residence time gave a larger maximum force. From these results, we could conclude that the AFM force measurements should be made using a loading force small enough not to damage the cell and a fixed residence time, when comparing results of different systems.

  12. Effect of collagen fibrils removal on shear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishevar L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Sodium hypochlorite can remove the organic phase of the demineralized dentin and it produces direct resin bonding with hydroxyapatite crystals. Therefore, the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils which might affect the bonding durability is removed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen fibrils removal by 10% NaOCl on dentin shear bond strength of two total etch and self etch adhesive systems."nMaterials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were used in this study. Buccal surface of teeth were grounded until dentin was exposed. Then teeth were divided into four groups. According to dentin surface treatment, experimental groups were as follows: Group I: Single Bond (3M according to manufacture instruction, Group II: 10% NaOCl+Single bond (3M, Group III: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray according to manufacture instruction, and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond primer. After that, the specimens were immersed in 50% acetone solution for removing extra monomer. Then the specimens were rinsed and dried. 10% NaOCl was applied and finally adhesive was used. Then composite was bonded to the treated surfaces using a 4 2 mm cylindrical plastic mold. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5-55ºC. A shear load was employed by a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed for statistical significance with One-way ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests."nResults: The mean shear bond strengths of groups were as follows: Single Bond=16.8±4.2, Clearfil SE Bond=23.7±4.07, Single Bond+NaOCl=10.5±4.34, Clearfil SE Bond+NaOCl=23.3±3.65 MPa. Statistical analysis revealed that using 10% NaOCl significantly decreased the shear bond strength in Single Bond group (P=0.00, but caused no significant difference in the shear bond strength in Clearfil SE Bond group (P=0.99."nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, NaOCl treatment did not improve the bond

  13. Shear bond strength of different types of adhesive systems to dentin and enamel of deciduous teeth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, A; Dähne, F; Wagenschwanz, C; Richter, G; Viergutz, G; Hannig, C

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the suitability of self-etch adhesives for restoration of deciduous teeth compared with etch and rinse approaches. One hundred twenty primary teeth were divided into five groups, each being assigned to an adhesive system. Self-etch adhesives XenoV (XV) and Clearfil S(3) Bond (CB), Prime&Bond NT with (PBE)/without preliminary etching (PBN), and Optibond FL (OBFL) as an etch and rinse system were included. Enamel and dentin specimens were prepared (n = 36/group), adhesives applied, and compomer cylinders polymerized. After 24-h storage in 37 °C distilled water and thermo-cycling (1440 cycles, 5/55 °C, 27 s), shear bond tests and fracture mode classification based on SEM investigation were performed. Statistical analysis involved ANOVA and Scheffé procedure with Bonferroni-Holm correction (p ≤ 0.005). High shear bond strengths to primary enamel were determined for PBE (mean [M] = 22.48 ± 7.7 MPa) > OBFL (M = 19.06 ± 5.62 MPa) > CB (M = 17.6 ± 6.55 MPa), and XV (M = 16.85 ± 5.38 MPa) and PBN (M = 8.26 ± 4.46 MPa) formed significantly less reliable enamel-resin interfaces (p ≤ 0.005). PBE generated the highest bond strength on primary dentin (M = 21.97 ± 8.02 MPa); significantly lower values were measured for XV (M = 13.44 ± 5.43 MPa) and OBFL (M = 12.92 ± 4.31 MPa) (p ≤ 0.005). Adhesives requiring preliminary etching ensure optimal bond strength to primary enamel. If separate etching is to be avoided, selected self-etch adhesives obtain acceptable shear bond values on primary enamel and dentin. The treatment of pediatric patients presents a great challenge in dental practice, and optimization of treatment processes is important.

  14. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

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    Susan Hattar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  15. Microshear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Enamel Remineralized Using Casein Phosphopeptide Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, E H; Ali, N; Daifalla, L E

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the difference between bonding to demineralized enamel and remineralized enamel using casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACFP) or without fluoride (CPP-ACP) compared to normal enamel. Another aim was to test if the newly introduced Single Bond Universal adhesive system would show better bonding to any enamel condition in comparison to the other tested adhesive systems. The lingual enamel surfaces of 40 non carious human third molars were divided into four main groups according to the enamel condition (ground normal enamel [negative control]; demineralized enamel [positive control]; and remineralized enamel with CPP-ACP or with CPP-ACFP, respectively). Within each main group, the lingual enamel surface of each tooth was sectioned into three slabs, resulting in 30 slabs that were distributed into three subgroups according to the adhesive system utilized (Clearfil S(3) Bond Plus, Single Bond Universal, or G-aenial Bond). Two resin composite microcylinder buildups were made on each enamel slab using Filtek Z350 XT. The μSBS was evaluated at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Modes of failure were detected using an environmental scanning electron microscope at 300× magnification. The two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures revealed a significant effect for the enamel condition. However, there was no significant effect for the type of adhesive system. The interaction between the enamel condition and the type of adhesive system was also not significant. Modes of failure were mainly adhesive except for the demineralized enamel. It showed a mixed type of failure, in which cohesive failure in enamel was recorded. All single-step self-etch adhesives revealed comparable μSBS values to ground enamel and enamel remineralized with CPP-ACP or CPP-ACFP. Bonding to demineralized enamel was ineffective. With any enamel condition, no tested single-step self-etch adhesive was superior in its bonding.

  16. A scaffold-enhanced light-activated surgical adhesive technique: surface selection for enhanced tensile strength in wound repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Eric C.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    An ex vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of the irregularity of the scaffold surface on the tensile strength of repairs formed using our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA). Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The scaffolds were doped with protein solder composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The tensile strength of repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung, using the smooth and irregular surfaces of the above scaffold-enhanced materials were measured and the time-to-failure was recorded. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were consistently higher than those formed using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. The largest difference was observed on repairs formed on the aorta and small intestine, where the repairs were, on average, 50% stronger using the irregular versus the smooth scaffold surfaces. In addition, the time-to-failure of repairs formed using the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds were between 50% and 100% longer than that achieved using the smooth surfaces of the scaffolds. It has previously been shown that distributing or dispersing the adhesive forces over the increased surface area of the scaffold, either smooth or irregular, produces stronger repairs than albumin solder alone. The increase in the absolute strength and longevity of repairs seen in this new study when the irregular surfaces of the scaffolds are used is thought to be due to the distribution of forces between the many independent micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surfaces.

  17. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  18. Influence of sodium hypochlorite and edta on the microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doglas Cecchin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical substances used during biomechanical preparation of root canals can alter the composition of dentin surface and affect the interaction with restorative materials. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of a self-etching adhesive system to dentin irrigated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty human third molars were sectioned 3 mm below the occlusal surface, polished with 600- to 1200-grit silicon carbide papers, and randomly divided into 3 groups: G1 (control: no irrigating solution; G2: 1% NaOCl; and G3: 1% NaOCl followed by the application of 17% EDTA. The specimens received the self-etching adhesive system (XENO III - Dentsply, restored with microhybrid composite resin (Z250 - 3M ESPE, sectioned and trimmed to create 4 hourglass-shaped slabs of each tooth. The slabs were tested in microtensile strength in a universal testing machine (Emic DL 2000 at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls test. RESULTS: Mean µTBS values and standard deviations in MPa were: G1 = 11.89 ± 4.22; G2 = 19.41 ± 5.32; G3 = 11.34 ± 4.73. 1% NaOCl increased the adhesive resistance significantly (p<0.001/F=22.5763. The application of 1% NaOCl/17% EDTA resulted in statistically similar µTBS to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: None of the irrigants affected negatively the µTBS of XENO III to dentin. The use of 1% NaOCl alone resulted in higher bond strength than the other treatments. The combination of 1% NaOCl and 17% EDTA produced similar bond strength to that of untreated dentin.

  19. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (pCAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  20. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  1. Influence of sodium hypochlorite and edta on the microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Galafassi, Daniel; Barbizam, João Vicente Baroni; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Carlini-Júnior, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Chemical substances used during biomechanical preparation of root canals can alter the composition of dentin surface and affect the interaction with restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of a self-etching adhesive system to dentin irrigated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Thirty human third molars were sectioned 3 mm below the occlusal surface, polished with 600- to 1200-grit silicon carbide papers, and randomly divided into 3 groups: G1 (control): no irrigating solution; G2: 1% NaOCl; and G3: 1% NaOCl followed by the application of 17% EDTA. The specimens received the self-etching adhesive system (XENO III - Dentsply), restored with microhybrid composite resin (Z250 - 3M ESPE), sectioned and trimmed to create 4 hourglass-shaped slabs of each tooth. The slabs were tested in microtensile strength in a universal testing machine (Emic DL 2000) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls test. Mean µTBS values and standard deviations in MPa were: G1 = 11.89 ± 4.22; G2 = 19.41 ± 5.32; G3 = 11.34 ± 4.73. 1% NaOCl increased the adhesive resistance significantly (p<0.001/F=22.5763). The application of 1% NaOCl/17% EDTA resulted in statistically similar µTBS to the control group. None of the irrigants affected negatively the µTBS of XENO III to dentin. The use of 1% NaOCl alone resulted in higher bond strength than the other treatments. The combination of 1% NaOCl and 17% EDTA produced similar bond strength to that of untreated dentin.

  2. The Effects of Surface Roughness on Adhesion Strength of Coated Ash (Fraxinus excelsior L. and Birch (Betula L. Wood

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    Justina VITOSYTĖ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For the evaluation of surface roughness impact on adhesion properties, the samples of dried ash (Fraxinus excelsior L. and birch (Betula L. wood were used. Before wood finishing, the surfaces of the samples were sanded. In order to get different surface roughness the abrasive material of P80, P120, P150, P180, P220 and P240 grit was used. The parameters of surface roughness Ra, Rz and Rmax were measured in three directions: along the wood grain, across the grain and in the angle of 45º. Comparison of the results showed the non-linear dependency of roughness parameters. Afterwards the wood surface was coated with three different acrylic-polyurethane coating systems (1 layer of varnish without primer, 1 layer of primer and 1 layer of varnish, and 1 layer of primer and 2 layers of varnish. The adhesion strength was assessed using the pull-off method. Also the nature of the fracture was evaluated. It was determined that the peculiarities of surface roughness, coating system type and wood species signally results the values of the adhesion strength.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3094

  3. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing

    2017-04-01

    Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  4. Effect of different evaporation periods on microtensile bond strength of an acetone-based adhesive to dentin

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    Abdolrahim Davari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Solvent content of a contemporary dental adhesive affect the bonding process, especially in the case of acetone based adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different air-drying periods on microtensile bond strength (MTBS of a total-etch adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply-USA was used with different air-drying periods (0, 2, 5, 10, 30sec for bonding a composite resin to prepared dentin. The specimens were then subjected to a tensile force until fracture and the MTBSs of the samples were recorded. Failure modes of the fractured samples were also determined using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (P = 0.05. Results: With increasing the air-drying periods, the MTBSs were increased until the 5 second air-blowing; after that, with increasing the air-drying periods, the MTBSs decreased. Both, the most complicated failure and the strongest bond were seen in the 5 sec air-drying group. Conclusion: There is an optimum air-drying time for acetone based adhesives which results in the strongest bond to dentin.

  5. Effects of residual water on microtensile bond strength of one-bottle dentin adhesive systems with different solvent bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-xing; HUANG Cui; ZHENG Tie-li; WANG Sa; CHENG Xiang-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background The wet-bonding technique is recommended for the one-bottle dentin adhesive systems, but the moisture concept varies widely among the instructions of manufacturers as well as among investigators. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dentin surface moisture on the microtensile bond strength(s) of an ethanol/water-based adhesive system and an acetone-based system to dentin. Methods Forty intact human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were used. Superficial occlusal flat dentin surfaces of these premolars were exposed, finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Under four wet and dry conditions (overwet, blot dry, one-second dry and desiccated), resin composite was bonded to dentin by using Single Bond (SB) or Prime & Bond NT (PB) according to the manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded beams with a cross-sectional area of 0.81 mm2 with a slow-speed diamond saw. The bonded specimens were tested in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure of the bonds. Failure modes were observed with a scanning electron microscope. The mean bond strengths were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Turkey's test. Results The bond strength of the overwet/SB, blot dry/SB, one-second dry/SB and desiccated/SB groups was 10.87 Mpa, 22.47 Mpa, 24.91 Mpa and 12.99 Mpa, respectively. The bond strength of the overwet/PB, blot dry/PB, one-second dry/PB and desiccated/PB groups was 10.02 Mpa, 20.67 Mpa, 21.82 Mpa and 10.09 Mpa, respectively. For both SB and PB, the blot dry group and one-second dry group revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the overwet and desiccated groups (P<0.05). Conclusions In order to achieve the highest bond strength to dentin, keeping the dentin surface in an appropriately moist condition is critical for the one-bottle dentin adhesive systems with ethanol/water or acetone solvent.

  6. Experimental dental bio-adhesives for direct restorations: the influence of PMnEDM homologs structure on bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, Tomasz W; Gibas, Mirosław; Dabrowska, Agnieszka; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Malec, Witold

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of PMnEDM dental monomer homologs chemical structure on shear bond strength between polymer-based composite and alloy. Four light-cured experimental universal dental bio-adhesives (group codes: A (PMDM), B (PM2EDM), C (PM3EDM), D (PM4EDM)) were preliminarily evaluated with respect to sensitivity to ambient light, curing time, depth of cure, and uncured film thickness according to standardized procedures. Appropriate tests were performed to measure shear bond strength (SBS) of polymer-based composite to cobalt-based alloy with the use of the adhesives investigated. Variability of results was evaluated by use of the coefficient of variation (CV). Results were estimated with the aid of one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), performed on the logarithmic values, with alpha=0.05 significance level. All materials passed the requirements according to physicochemical properties. Except for formulation D, all results estimating SBS were positive with respect to standardized requirements. The uppermost mean SBS was achieved for the A adhesive (11.45 MPa) and appeared to be significantly different compared to D one (5.07 MPa) (p=0.0495). Also the B adhesive, having slightly lower mean SBS value (10.50 MPa) exhibited a significant difference in respect to D one (p=0.0455). The means for other trial pairs did not differ statistically. The materials here studied might be considered to have a practical use in dental clinics, especially the formulations B and C.

  7. Shear bond strength and SEM morphology evaluation of different dental adhesives to enamel prepared with ER:YAG laser

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    Patrícia T Pires

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Early observations of enamel surfaces prepared by erbium lasers motivated clinicians to use laser as an alternative to chemical etching. Aims: Evaluate shear bond strength (SBS values of different dental adhesives on Erbium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG laser prepared enamel and to evaluate possible etching patterns correlations between dental adhesives and SBS values. Subjects and Methods: One hundred bovine incisors were randomly assigned to SBS tests on enamel (n = 15 and to enamel morphology analysis ( n = 5 after Er:YAG laser preparation as follows: Group I - 37% phosphoric acid (PA+ ExciTE® ; Group II - ExciTE® ; Group III - AdheSE® self-etching; Group IV - FuturaBond® no-rinse. NR; Group V - Xeno® V. Teeth were treated with the adhesive systems and subjected to thermal cycling. SBS were performed in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p < 0.05. For the morphology evaluation, specimens were immersed in Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA and the etching pattern analyzed under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: Mean bond strengths were Group I - 47.17 ± 1.61 MPa (type I etching pattern; Group II - 32.56 ± 1.64 MPa, Group III - 29.10 ± 1.34 MPa, Group IV - 23.32 ± 1.53 MPa (type III etching pattern; Group V - 24.43 MPa ± 1.55 (type II etching pattern. Conclusions: Different adhesive systems yielded significantly different SBSs. Acid etching significantly increased the adhesion in laser treated enamel. No differences in SBS values were obtained between AdheSE® and ExciTE® without condition with PA. FuturaBond® NR and Xeno® V showed similar SBS, which was lower in comparison to the others adhesives. No correlation between enamel surface morphology and SBS values was observed, except when PA was used.

  8. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS of self-adhesive resin (SA cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n=16: (1 negative control (NC without treatment; (2 Single Bond Universal (SBU; (3 RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC. RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40, followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81 and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01 (P0.05. PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling.

  9. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  10. Effect on push-out bond strength of glass-fiber posts functionalized with polydopamine using different adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Cai, Qing; Li, Yan; Wei, Xu-Yi; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Xin-Zhi

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the push-out bond strengths of prefabricated glass-fiber posts (Beijing Oya Biomaterials) with polydopamine functionalized to root dentin using two different resin cements (Paracore and RelyX Unicem) in different root regions (cervical, middle, and apical). Forty extracted human, single-rooted teeth were endodontically treated and a 9-mm post space was prepared in each tooth with post drills provided by the manufacturer. Specimens were then randomly assigned into four groups (n = 10 per group), depending on the adhesive system and post surface treatment used: group IA (Paracore + polydopamine); group IB (Paracore + control); group IIA (RelyX Unicem + polydopamine); group IIB (RelyX Unicem + control). Following post cementation, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The push-out test was performed using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/ min), and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed using twoway ANOVA (p = 0.05). Bond strengths (mean ± SD) were: 7.909 ± 3.166 MPa (group IA), 4.675 ± 2.170 MPa (group IB), 8.186 ± 2.766 MPa (group IIA), 4.723 ± 2.084 MPa (group IIB). The bond strength of polydopamine groups was significantly higher than one of the control groups (p 0.05). Stereomicroscopic analysis showed a higher percentage of adhesive than cohesive failures in all groups. Surface polydopamine functionalization was confirmed to be a reliable method for improving the bond strength of resin luting agents to fiber posts. The bond strength of Paracore to fiber posts was not significantly different from that of RelyX Unicem, and considering its convenient application, Paracore can be recommended.

  11. Influence of drying time of adhesive systems on the bond strength between resin cement and feldspathic ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Feitosa, Sabrina Alves; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Graduate Program in Restorative Dentistry (Prosthetic Dentistry Unit) – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Moura, Isabela Gomes; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Graduate Program in Restorative Dentistry (Operative Dentistry Unit) – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Corazza, Pedro Henrique; Post-graduation Program in Dentistry – Dental School – University of Passo Fundo – Passo Fundo – RS – Brazil.; Bergolli, Cesar Dalmolin; Faculty of Dentistry – Prosthetic Dentistry Unit – Federal University of Pelotas (UFPEL) – RS – Brazil.; Pagani, Clóvis; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Department of Restorative Dentistry – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio A; Department of Restorative Dentistry – Division of Prosthodontics – Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) – Natal – RN – Brazil.; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Rio Grande do Sul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of drying times of two total-etch & rinse adhesives on the resin bond strength to a feldsphatic ceramic, before and after aging. Material and Methods: Feldsphatic-ceramic CAD-CAM bars were cut into blocks (12×10×4 mm) with a cutting machine (N = 32). Impressions were made of each ceramic block with silicone putty material and the negative space was filled with a composite resin. The bonding ceramic surface was etched with hydrofluoric acid, silan...

  12. Comparative study of the bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems with different pHs applied to enamel and dentine

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    Rubens Côrte Real de Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether the pH of the primer is capable of influencing the bond strength of three self-etching adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Methods: Forty enamel surfaces and 40 dentin surfaces were used, divided into eight groups (n=10 according to the adhesive system (Single Bond, ClearfilSE, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop. A 3 mm matrix was used to delimit the area restored with composite resin Z250. The test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and submitted to mechanical shear testing.Results: The ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests showed that there was no statistical difference among the groups in which the adhesivesystems Single Bond (control and Clearfil SE Bond were used and among the groups in which the AdheSE and Adper Prompt L-Pop systemswere used, both with statistical difference when compared with the Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond groups. There was no statisticallysignificant difference between the bond strength values obtained, when the same adhesive systems were compared with regard to thesubstrates (enamel and dentin. The increased acidity of the self-etch adhesive systems was not capable of increasing the bond strengthvalues. Conclusion: The increasing of self-etch acidity of adhesive systems was not capable to increase the band strenght values. In the comparison between the same adhesive system in enamel or dentin, all adhesive presented similar performance, irrespective of the substrate used.

  13. The effect of caries excavation methods on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to caries affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, V; Singla, M; Yadav, S; Yadav, H

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chemomechanical caries removal and conventional caries excavation on the microtensile bond strength of three different dentine adhesive systems. Thirty extracted human mandibular molars with radiographic signs of dental caries extending up to the middle third of dentine were sectioned longitudinally through the centre of the carious lesion in a buccolingual direction to yield two sections. One half of each tooth was excavated by tungsten carbide bur and the other half was chemomechanically treated with Carisolv(®) . Three dentine bonding systems: an etch-and-rinse single bottle adhesive (Single Bond, 3M ESPE); a two bottle, two-step self-etch bonding system (One Coat Self Etching Bond, Coltene Whaledent); and a single-step, single bottle self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive, 3M ESPE) were applied and composite build-up was done. The specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance and pair-wise multiple comparisons were done using the Holm-Sidak method. The etch-and-rinse adhesive and two bottle self-etch system showed significantly higher bond strength than the single bottle self-etch system. Caries excavation method had no influence on bond strength values. Carisolv(®) did not affect the microtensile bond strength values of different adhesive systems tested to the caries affected dentine. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Influence of Nd:YAG laser on the bond strength of self-etching and conventional adhesive systems to dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimoto, A K; Cunha, L A; Yui, K C K; Huhtala, M F R L; Barcellos, D C; Prakki, A; Gonçalves, S E P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin of total and self-etch adhesives when the laser was applied over the adhesives, before they were photopolymerized, in an attempt to create a new bonding layer by dentin-adhesive melting. One-hundred twenty bovine incisors were ground to obtain flat surfaces. Specimens were divided into two substrate groups (n=60): substrate E (enamel) and substrate D (dentin). Each substrate group was subdivided into four groups (n=15), according to the surface treatment accomplished: X (Xeno III self-etching adhesive, control), XL (Xeno III + laser Nd:YAG irradiation at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental), S (acid etching + Single Bond conventional adhesive, Control), and SL (acid etching + Single Bond + laser Nd:YAG at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental). The bonding area was delimited with 3-mm-diameter adhesive tape for the bonding procedures. Cylinders of composite were fabricated on the bonding area using a Teflon matrix. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C/48 h and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; substrate, adhesive, and treatment) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed significant differences for the substrate, adhesive system, and type of treatment: lased or unlased (padhesive showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with Single Bond total-etch adhesive; Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with control (unlased). Nd:YAG laser application prior to photopolymerization of adhesive systems significantly increased the bond strength to dentin.

  15. Effect of Numbers of Load Cycling on the Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Total Etch Adhesives to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today load cycling is used for similarity of invitro and invivo studies, though different results were reported in different studies. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of two total etch adhesives to dentin. Methods: Enamel of 48 molar teeth were removed to expose the superficial dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into two equal groups, and were restored with Single bond (SB, ExciTE and Synergy composite. Then the teeth of each group were divided to 4 equal sub groups. Moreover, load cycling of 0, 50, 100, 200 k load cycle with 50 newton load was used. In each sub group, 12 hour glass slabs with 1mm2 thickness were made. Then the samples were loaded by Dartec testing machine (Model HC/10 with 1 mm/min cross head speed to make the fracture occur. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, t-test, Bonferroni tests. Results: The most micro tensile bond strength belonged to ExciTE without load cycling and lowest refered to SB with 200 k. There was a significant difference between the groups (p ExciTE= 0.0001, p SB = 0.001. Micro tensile bond strength in SB group was significantly lower than ExciTE (p= 0.001. Moreover, load cycling had negative effect on micro tensile bond strength. Conclusion: By increasing load cycling, micro tensile bond strength of both bondings decreased significantly

  16. Effect of double coating of one-step self-etching adhesive on micromorphology and microtensile bond strength to sound vs demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cerida Aurelia Rodrigues; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; do Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate (1) the one-step adhesive system application method (doubling the adhesive coatings) in regard to microtensile bond strength (MTB) and (2) the interfacial morphology of one-step adhesives to sound vs demineralized dentin. Forty dentin fragments were randomly allocated to 2 groups: D. demineralized dentin and S. sound dentin. Specimens were also subdivided into 2 groups (n = 10), according to the one-step adhesive [AEO (Adper Easy One), 3M ESPE] application method: M, According to the manufacturer's instructions, and D, based on the application of two consecutive layers. After adhesive light polymerization, a resin composite block (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was built on the dentin surface. Resin-tooth blocks were sectioned into 0.9 mm thick slabs, and one slab of each block was prepared for adhesive interface analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining slabs were sectioned into 0.8 mm(2) sticks that were subjected to tensile stress (0.5 mm/min). Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The application of two consecutive layers of AEO adhesive system did not Influence MTB values for sound dentin. When two consecutive layers of one-step adhesive system were applied, MTB was statistically greater in demineralized vs sound dentin. SEM analysis demonstrated that the application of two consecutive adhesive layers to sound and demineralized dentin produced longer resin tags. It can be concluded that the application of two consecutive adhesive layers improved bond strength to deminera-lized dentin, but no such effect was observed for sound dentin. Application of double coats of one-step self-etching adhesive improved bond strength to demineralized dentin.

  17. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Bracket Bases to Adhesives Based on Bracket Base Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-13

    in vitro comparison with foil-mesh. European Journal of Orthodontics 1989; 11:144- 153. Retief, DH.; Sadowsky, PL. Clinical experience with the...strength that is clinically acceptable for performing orthodontics (Reynolds 1975). Modern orthodontic shear bond strength studies generally report bond...bases, in addition to their claimed equal or superior bond strengths with traditional mesh bases, become important in both clinical orthodontics and

  19. Impact of cold temperatures on the shear strength of Norway spruce joints glued with different adhesives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2015-01-01

    × 20 mm × 10 mm) were bonded with seven commercially available adhesives: polyurethane (PUR), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), emulsion-polymer-isocyanate (EPI), melamine-formaldehyde (MF), phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF), melamine-urea-formaldehyde1 (MUF1), and melamine-urea-formaldehyde2 (MUF2). Each...

  20. Shear bond strength of a novel silorane adhesive to orthodontic brackets and unprepared bovine enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli, Lorenz; Steineck, Markus; Ball, Judith

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the suitability of a novel epoxy-based resin, Filtek Silorane, for orthodontic bracket bonding on unprepared enamel. Shear forces to bovine enamel were measured for Filtek Silorane and Transbond XT in combination with steel, ceramic, and polymer brackets. For Filtek Silorane, etching was performed with the Silorane self-etching primer alone or an additional previous application of phosphoric acid. Transbond XT (conventional methacrylate) was used for the control group and the enamel was previously etched with 35% phosphoric acid. All samples were thermocycled (1000X, 5°to 55° C). Shear bond testing was done with an Instron 3344 at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. In addition, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were evaluated. The shear forces showed a weak adhesion of Filtek Silorane to unprepared enamel both with the selfetching primer and conventional etching (0.87 to 4.28 MPa). The shear forces of the control group were significantly higher (7.6 to 16.5 MPa). The ARI scores showed a clear failure at the enamel/adhesive interface for all Filtek Silorane samples. For the combination of Transbond XT and different brackets, the failure was found at the adhesive/bracket interface. The novel epoxy-based resin Filtek Silorane is not appropriate for bonding of brackets to unprepared enamel.

  1. Effect of Re-Application of Microbrush on Micro Tensile Bond Strength of an Adhesive to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied Majid Mosavi Nasab

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Re-application of microbrush may affect the micro tensile bond strength of adhesives to dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of re-application of microbrushes on the micro tensile bond strength of an adhesive to dentin.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted molars teeth were collected and enamel of occlusal surface were removed to expose superficial dentin. Then superficial dentin was etched, washed and partially air dried.According to the times of application of microbrush, teeth were divided into two test groups. In group 1, newmicrobrushs were used, but in group 2, the ones that were already used for twice were included. Ambar dentin bonding agent (FGM/Brazil was applied to the etched dentin with microbrushes according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Then the crown of teeth was built up with LLiss (FGM/Brazil composite resin. The teeth were sectioned in buccolingual direction to obtain 1mm slabs. Then 50 hourglass- shape samples were made from 30 teeth (25 Specimens per group. The microtensile bond strength of the specimens was tested using MTD500 (SD Mechatronik, Germany. The data were statistically analyzed by T-test.Results: The mean values for the microtensile bond strength were 30.49±7.18 and 23.61±9.06 MPa±SD for the first and second groups, respectively. There was significant difference between the groups (P=0.005.Conclusion: Microbrushes should not be used for more than one cavity preparation.

  2. Microtensile bond strength test and failure analysis to assess bonding characteristics of different adhesion approaches to ground versus unground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Goes, Mario Fernando de

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the bonding characteristics to ground and unground enamel obtained with different strategies. For this purpose, 24 sound third-molars were bisected mesiodistally to obtain tooth halves. A flat enamel area was delimited in the tooth sections, which were randomly distributed into 8 groups (n=6), according to the enamel condition (ground and unground) and adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2 - SB2; Adper Prompt L-Pop - PLP; Adper Prompt - AD; Clearfil SE Bond - SE). Each system was applied according manufacturers' instructions and a 6-mm-high resin composite "crown" was incrementally built up on bonded surfaces. Hourglass-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm(2) cross-section were produced. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was recorded and the failure patterns were classified. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences among the μTBS values of SB2, PLP and AD (p>0.05). SE values were significantly lower (p0.05). There was prevalence of cohesive failure within enamel, adhesive system and resin composite for SB2. The self-etch systems produced higher incidence of cohesive failures in the adhesive system. Enamel condition did not determine significant differences on bonding characteristics for the same bonding system. In conclusion, the bonding systems evaluated in this study resulted in specific μTBS and failure patterns due to the particular interaction with enamel.

  3. Effect of Nitrogen Flow Rate on Structure and Adhesion Strength of Magnetron Sputtered Ti-Si-N Nanocomposite Films

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    He Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-Si-N nanocomposite films were prepared by co-sputtering Ti and Si targets in Ar/N2 gas atmosphere. The effect of N2 flow rate on the structure, adhesion strength and friction coefficient of the deposited films was studied by using X-ray diffraction, atom force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscopy and multi-functional tester for material surface properties. The Ti-Si-N films had a fine, smooth and compact structure with TiN nanograins embedded in an amorphous Si3N4 matrix. The nanocomposite films exhibited (200, (111, (220 and (222 reflections with a dominant orientation of the (200 reflection. When the N2 flow rate increased, the film structure was refined. It was found that both interfacial adhesion strength and friction coefficient depended on the N2 flow rate, and the best values were exhibited by the nanocomposite film produced at N2 flow rate of 15 sccm, perhaps contributed to a finer and smoother structure of this deposited film.

  4. Adhesive strength and structure of micro-arc oxidation ceramic coatings grown in-situ on LY12 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhen-dong; JIANG Zhao-hua; YAO Zhong-ping

    2006-01-01

    The ceramic coatings containing zirconium dioxide were grown in-situ on LY12 aluminium alloy by micro-arc oxidation in mixed zirconate and phosphate solution. The phase composition and morphology of the coatings were studied by XRD and SEM.The adhesive strength of ceramic coatings was assessed by thermal shock test and tensile test. The results show that the coating is composed of m-ZrO2, t-ZrO2, and a little γ-Al2O3. Along the section of the coating, t-ZrO2 is more onboth sides than that in the middle, while m-ZrO2 is more in the middle than that on both sides. Meantime the coating is also composed of a dense layer and a loose layer. The coating has excellent thermal shock resistance under 550 ℃ and 600 ℃. And tensile tests show the adhesive strength of the dense layer of the coating with the substrate is more than 17.5 MPa.

  5. In vitro evaluation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate effect on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Niloofar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shoul, Maryam Azizi; Sattari, Hasti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is applied for remineralization of early caries lesions or tooth sensitivity conditions and may affect subsequent resin bonding. This in vitro study investigated the effect of CPP-ACP on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molar teeth were selected and randomly divided into three groups and six subgroups. Buccal or lingual surfaces of teeth were prepared to create a flat enamel surface. Adhesives used were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE One F. In three subgroups, before applying adhesives, enamel surfaces were treated with Tooth Mousse CPP-ACP for one hour, rinsed and stored in 37°C temperature with 100% humidity. This procedure was repeated for 5 days and then adhesives were applied and Tetric N-Ceram composite was adhered to the enamel. This procedure was also fulfilled for the other three subgroups without CPP-ACP treatment. After 24 hour water storage, samples were tested for shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance with P 0.05). In non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there were statistically significant differences among all subgroups. Tetric N-Bond had the highest and AdheSE One F had the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusion: CPP-ACP application reduces the shear bond strength of AdheSE and AdheSE One F to enamel but not Tetric N-Bond. PMID:25878683

  6. In vitro evaluation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate effect on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is applied for remineralization of early caries lesions or tooth sensitivity conditions and may affect subsequent resin bonding. This in vitro study investigated the effect of CPP-ACP on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molar teeth were selected and randomly divided into three groups and six subgroups. Buccal or lingual surfaces of teeth were prepared to create a flat enamel surface. Adhesives used were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE One F. In three subgroups, before applying adhesives, enamel surfaces were treated with Tooth Mousse CPP-ACP for one hour, rinsed and stored in 37°C temperature with 100% humidity. This procedure was repeated for 5 days and then adhesives were applied and Tetric N-Ceram composite was adhered to the enamel. This procedure was also fulfilled for the other three subgroups without CPP-ACP treatment. After 24 hour water storage, samples were tested for shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance with P 0.05. In non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there were statistically significant differences among all subgroups. Tetric N-Bond had the highest and AdheSE One F had the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusion: CPP-ACP application reduces the shear bond strength of AdheSE and AdheSE One F to enamel but not Tetric N-Bond.

  7. Acid Neutralizing Ability and Shear Bond Strength Using Orthodontic Adhesives Containing Three Different Types of Bioactive Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Yi Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the acid neutralizing ability and shear bond strength (SBS of three different types of orthodontic adhesives containing bioactive glasses (BAGs. 45S5, 45S5F and S53P4 BAGs were prepared using the melting technique and ground to fine particles. Orthodontic adhesives containing three types of BAGs were prepared as follows: 52.5% 45S5 BAG + 17.5% glass (45S5_A; 61.25% 45S5 BAG + 8.75% glass (45S5_B; 52.5% 45S5F BAG + 17.5% glass (45S5F_A; 61.25% 45S5F BAG + 8.75% glass (45S5F_B; 52.5% S53P4 BAG + 17.5% glass (S53P4_A; 61.25% S53P4 BAG + 8.75% glass (S53P4_B; and 70.0% glass (BAG_0. To evaluate the acid neutralizing properties, specimens were immersed in lactic acid solution, and pH changes were measured. SBS was measured with a universal testing machine. For all of the BAG-containing adhesives, the one with 61.25% of BAG showed a significantly greater increase of pH than the one with 52.5% of BAG (p < 0.05. Groups with 61.25% of BAG showed lower SBS than samples with 52.5% of BAG. 45S5F_A showed no significant difference of SBS compared to BAG_0 (p > 0.05. The adhesive containing 61.25% of 45S5F BAG exhibited clinically acceptable SBS and acid neutralizing properties. Therefore, this composition is a suitable candidate to prevent white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.

  8. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

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    Nujella B.P Suryakumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems - (the V generation at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system - (Adper Single Bond was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated; Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength.

  9. An in vitro comparison of different adhesive strategies on the micro push-out bond strength of a glass fiber post.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ugur; Sar-Sancakli, Hande; Yildiz, Esra; Ozel, Sevda; Batur, Burak

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate in vitro the push-out bond strengths of a glass fiber post adhesively luted with self-etching resin based and self-adhesive luting cements, as well as modified application procedure of self-adhesive luting cements in combination with single step self-etch adhesives. Fifty single-rooted human maxillary central incisor teeth were endodontically treated and divided into five groups (n=10). Glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were cemented with the following materials: group 1: ED Primer II/Panavia F 2.0 (PAN); group 2: RelyX Unicem (RU); group 3: Maxcem (MC); group 4: Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP)/RelyX Unicem; group 5: Optibond all-in-one (OB)/Maxcem. Bonded specimens were cut (1-mm-thick sections) and push-out tests were performed (crosshead-speed, 0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey-HSD test for post hoc comparisons at a = 0.05. The highest bond strength was recorded for groups 4 and 2, with no statistically significant differences among them (p >0.05). Group 4 showed significantly higher bond strength than group 1 (p push-out bond strength than the all other luting strategies except for the group 5. The push-out bond strength values of modified application procedure of self-adhesive luting cements (RU and MC) in combination with single step self-etch dentin adhesives (PLP and OB) did not improve the push-out bond strength of fiber post when compared with those where the conventional use of self-adhesive cements.

  10. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed Kahnemooyi, Mehdi; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghiazar, Fatemeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mhammadi Torkani, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A-D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultra-structural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at Padhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014), withsignificant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (Padhesive system (Padhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems.

  11. Comparative evaluation and influence on shear bond strength of incorporating silver, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles in orthodontic adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aileni Kaladhar; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj B; Patil, Santosh R; Vankhre, Mallikarjun; Khan, Mohammed Yaser Ahmed; Kumar, Thamtam Ramana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of silver (Ag), zinc oxide (ZnO), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on shear bond strength (SBS). Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty extracted premolars divided into four groups with thirty specimens in each group. Group 1 (control): brackets (American Orthodontics) were bonded with Transbond XT primer. Groups 2, 3, and 4: brackets (American Orthodontics) were bonded with adhesives incorporated with Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 nanoparticles in the concentration of 1.0% nanoparticles of Ag, 1.0% TiO2, and 1.0% ZnO weight/weight, respectively. An Instron universal testing machine AGS-10k NG (SHIMADZU) was used to measure the SBS. The data were analyzed by SPSS software and then, the normal distribution of the data was confirmed by Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. One-way ANOVA test and Tukey's multiple post hoc procedures were used to compare between groups. In all statistical tests, the significance level was set at 5% (P < 0.05). Results: A significant difference was observed between control (mean [standard deviation (SD)] 9.43 [3.03], confidence interval [CI]: 8.30–10.56), Ag (mean [SD]: 7.55 [1.29], CI: 7.07–8.03), ZnO (mean [SD]: 6.50 [1.15], CI: 6.07–6.93), and TiO2 (mean [SD]: 6.33 [1.51], CI: 5.77–0.89) with SBS (F = 16.8453, P < 0.05) at 5% level of significance. Conclusion: Incorporation of various nanoparticles into adhesive materials in minimal amounts may decrease SBS and may lead to the failure of bracket or adhesive. The limitation of this study is that it is an in vitro research and these results may not be comparable to what the expected bond strengths observed in vivo. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate biological effects of adding such amounts of nanoparticles and approve such adhesives as clinically sustainable. PMID:27843887

  12. [Effect of a nano hydroxyapatite desensitizing paste application on dentin bond strength of three self-etch adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, D D; Liu, S Y; Yang, H Y; Gan, J; Huang, C

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To evaluate a nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) desensitizing paste application on the bond strength of three self-etch adhesives. Methods: Three dentin specimens of about 1 mm thick were cut from two teeth. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the dentin surfaces without treatment, after citric acid treatment and after nano-HA treatment. Thirty-six intact third molars extracted for surgical reasons were cut to remove the occlusal enamel with isomet, and then were etched with 1% citric acid for 20 s to simulate the sensitive dentin and divided into two groups randomly using a table of random numbers (n=18): the control group (no treatment) and the HA treated group (with nano-HA paste treatment). Each group was divided into three subgroups randomly using a table of random numbers (n=6). Subgroup A, B and C was bonded with G-Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond and FL-Bond Ⅱ according to the manufacture's instruction separately. At 24 h after bonding procedure, and after water storage for 6 months, microtensile bond strength of the specimens was tested and the failure mode was analyzed. Results: SEM obeservation showed that citric acid could open the dentin tubules to set up the sensitive dentin model, and the nano-HA could occlude the dentin tubules effectively. For subgroup A, bonding strength of specimens treated with nano-HA ([41.14±8.91] MPa) was significantly high than that of the control group ([34.27±6.16] MPa) at 24 h after bonding procedure (P0.05). For subgroup B, specimens with nano-HA application showed lower bonding strength ([30.87±6.41] MPa) than that of the control group ([36.73±5.82] MPa) at 24 h after bonding procedure (P0.05). Failure mode analysis showed that more than half of the samples in all groups were adhesive failure. Conclusions: Nano-HA treatment decreased the bond strength of subgroup B, while had no adverse effect on subgroup A and subgroup C.

  13. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Sadat Sajadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro.Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak, and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test.No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552. The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035; but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999.Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  14. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-07-01

    Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  15. Effect of salivary contamination during different bonding stages on shear dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch and total etch adhesive

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    H. Kermanshah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination during bonding procedures without removing saliva on shear dentin bond strength of three adhesive generations when rubber dam isolation is not feasible.Materials and Methods: Flat superficial dentin surfaces of seventy-two extracted human molars were randomly divided into three groups (A: Scotch Bond MP Plus (SBMP, B: Single Bond (SB, C: Prompt L-Pop according to the applied adhesives and twelve subgroups (n=6according to the following saliva contamination applied in different bonding steps. The specimens were contaminated with saliva after etching (A1 and B1, after primer application (A2, after adhesive application before polymerization (A3, B2 and C1, and after adhesivepolymerization (A4, B3 and C2. Three subgroups were not contaminated as controls (A5, B4 and C3. Resin composite was placed on dentin subsequently followed by thermocycling.Shear test was performed by Universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The collected data were statically analyzed using one and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD.Results: In contrast to SBMP and SB, the mean shear bond strength of Promote L-Pop was not significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated subgroups. Mean shear bond strengths of SBMP subgroups contaminated after adhesive polymerization or uncontaminated were significantly higher compared to the other two groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: Unlike Promote L-Pop, saliva contamination could reduce shear bond strength of the total-etch adhesives. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesive contaminated with saliva.

  16. The effect of polyimide imidization conditions on adhesion strength of thin metal films on polyimide substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, S H

    1999-01-01

    The effects of Ar sup + RF plasma precleaning and polyimide curing conditions on the peel strength between Al thin films and polyimides have been studied. The BPDA-PDA polyimide precursor of PI-2611 (Du pont) was spin-coated and cured under various imidization conditions. The cured polyimide substrates were in-situ AR sup + RF plasma cleaned prior to metal deposition. Al-1 % Si-0.5 % Cu thin films were deposited onto the polyimide substrates by using DC magnetron sputtering. The peel strength was enhanced by Ar sup + RF plasma precleaning. The Al/modified PI specimen failed cohesively in the polyimide. The polyimide curing conditions strongly affect the peel strength in the Al/modified PI system.

  17. Bond strength of adhesively luted ceramic discs to different core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozogullari, Nalan; Inan, Ozgur; Usumez, Aslihan

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strengths of resin, glass-ionomer, and ceramic-based core materials to all ceramic discs. Five core materials (Core max, Sankin; Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray; Empress Cosmo, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Photocore, Kuraray; Dyract Extra, Dentsply) were prepared as discs 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height according to the manufacturer's instructions. Ten disc specimens per group were prepared, and dentin served as the control. All resin specimens were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, with one surface facing up. All ceramic discs (IPS Empress I, Ivoclar-Vivadent) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height were prepared and bonded to core specimens with a dual-curing luting resin cement (Variolink II, Vivadent). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured after 24 h using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (alpha = 0.05). Shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the core material used (p strength value while Empress Cosmo provided the lowest (p Core-Max (p > 0.05). And also there were no statistically significant differences between Dyract Extra and the control group (p > 0.05). In vitro shear bond strengths of ceramic discs bonded to resin-based core materials showed higher bond strength values than ceramic-based core material.

  18. Between Amyloids and Aggregation Lies a Connection with Strength and Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N. Lipke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tell of a journey that led to discovery of amyloids formed by yeast cell adhesins and their importance in biofilms and host immunity. We begin with the identification of the adhesin functional amyloid-forming sequences that mediate fiber formation in vitro. Atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy show 2-dimensional amyloid “nanodomains” on the surface of cells that are activated for adhesion. These nanodomains are arrays of adhesin molecules that bind multivalent ligands with high avidity. Nanodomains form when adhesin molecules are stretched in the AFM or under laminar flow. Treatment with anti-amyloid perturbants or mutation of the amyloid sequence prevents adhesion nanodomain formation and activation. We are now discovering biological consequences. Adhesin nanodomains promote formation and maintenance of biofilms, which are microbial communities. Also, in abscesses within candidiasis patients, we find adhesin amyloids on the surface of the fungi. In both human infection and a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, the presence of fungal surface amyloids elicits anti-inflammatory responses. Thus, this is a story of how fungal adhesins respond to extension forces through formation of cell surface amyloid nanodomains, with key consequences for biofilm formation and host responses.

  19. Effects of Reinforcement Geometry on Strength and Stiffness in Adhesively Bonded Steel-Timber Flexural Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Smedley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A finite element model is developed to analyse, as a function of volume fraction, the effects of reinforcement geometry and arrangement within a timber beam. The model is directly validated against experimental equivalents and found to never be mismatched by more than 8% in respect to yield strength predictions. Yield strength increases linearly as a function of increasing reinforcement volume fraction, while the flexural modulus follows more closely a power law regression fit. Reinforcement geometry and location of reinforcement are found to impact both the flexural properties of timber-steel composite beams and the changes due to an increase in volume fraction.

  20. The influence of drug-excipient and drug-polymer interactions on butt adhesive strength of ranitidine hydrochloride film-coated tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarisuta, Narong; Lawanprasert, Pojawon; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Srikummoon, Krisana

    2006-04-01

    The influence of fillers and polymeric films on adhesive strength of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and Eudragit E100 films coated on ranitidine HCl tablets containing either spray-dried rice starch (SDRS) or lactose monohydrate as fillers after storage at 45 degrees C/75% RH for four weeks was investigated by the use of butt adhesion technique. The adhesive strength of film-coated tablets of fillers without drug was found to slightly decrease after storage. In contrast, the adhesive strength of drug-containing film-coated tablets significantly reduced, the degree of which was higher for Eudragit E100 than HPMC. Physicochemical characterization by employing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) revealed that the drug was obviously incompatible with lactose and possibly mild interaction with Eudragit E100 was suggested. The results indicated that the adhesive strength of film-coated tablets would be affected not only by the drug-excipient interaction, but also by the drug-polymeric film interaction.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF EDGE BANDING THICKNESS OF ULUDAG FIR BONDED WITH SOME ADHESIVES ON WITHDRAWAL STRENGTHS OF BEECH DOWEL PINS IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeref Kurt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials and wooden dowels are being used increasingly in the construction of furniture frames and inner decoration. Yet there is little information available concerning the withdrawal strength of various fasteners, and, in particular, dowels in composite materials edged solid wood edge bandings. The aim of this study was to determine the withdrawal strengths of 6, 8, 10 mm diameter dowels produced from beech with respect to edge of a medium-density fiberboard (MDF or particleboard (PB edged with 5, 10 and 15 mm thickness of solid wood edge banding of uludag fir, bonded with different adhesives. According to TS 4539 standard, the effects of edge banding thickness, dimension of dowels, type of composite materials and type of adhesives used for edge banding on the withdrawal strength were determined. The highest (6.37 N/mm² withdrawal strength was obtained in beech dowels with 8 mm diameter for MDF with 5 mm thickness of solid wood edge banding of uludag fir bonded with D-VTKA adhesive. According to results, if the hole wall and the surface of dowel are smooth then the adhesives give better mechanical adhesion with dowels and composite materials.

  2. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Diogo Gurgel-Filho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8 according to the filling material, (1 AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH/Gutta-Percha cone; (2 Epiphany SE (Pentron/Resilon cone; (3 RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p 0.05. Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials.

  3. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  4. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM BOND STRENGTHS OF A GOLD STANDARD TWO-STEP SELF-ETCH ADHESIVE SYSTEM TO DENTIN: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Safa TUNCER; Tekçe, Neslihan; Dial PASHAEV; DEMİRCİ, Mustafa; Canan BAYDEMİR

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the micro tensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system following 1 year storage in water.Materials and Methods: 10 sound human molar teeth were used for micro tensile bond strength test. Two-step self-etch dentin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond®) was applied to the flat dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Composite blocks (Z-250; 3M ESPE) of 5 mm in height have been prepared by using layering technique. Teeth were ...

  5. Enhancement and Prediction of Adhesion Strength of Copper Cold Spray Coatings on Steel Substrates for Nuclear Fuel Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R.; MacDonald, D.; Nastić, A.; Jodoin, B.; Tieu, A.; Vijay, M.

    2016-12-01

    Thick copper coatings have been envisioned as corrosion protection barriers for steel containers used in repositories for nuclear waste fuel bundles. Due to its high deposition rate and low oxidation levels, cold spray is considered as an option to produce these coatings as an alternative to traditional machining processes to create corrosion protective sleeves. Previous investigations on the deposition of thick cold spray copper coatings using only nitrogen as process gas on carbon steel substrates have continuously resulted in coating delamination. The current work demonstrates the possibility of using an innovative surface preparation process, forced pulsed waterjet, to induce a complex substrate surface morphology that serves as anchoring points for the copper particles to mechanically adhere to the substrate. The results of this work show that, through the use of this surface preparation method, adhesion strength can be drastically increased, and thick copper coatings can be deposited using nitrogen. Through finite element analysis, it was shown that it is likely that the bonding created is purely mechanical, explaining the lack of adhesion when conventional substrate preparation methods are used and why helium is usually required as process gas.

  6. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  7. Plasma surface oxidation of 316L stainless steel for improving adhesion strength of silicone rubber coating to metal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latifi, Afrooz, E-mail: afroozlatifi@yahoo.com [Department of Biomaterials, Biomedical Engineering Faculty, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Imani, Mohammad [Novel Drug Delivery Systems Dept., Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, P.O. Box 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi [Biomaterials Dept., Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, P.O. Box 14965/159, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Daliri Joupari, Morteza [Animal and Marine Biotechnology Dept., National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, P.O. Box 14965/161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Stainless steel 316L was surface modified by plasma surface oxidation (PSO) and silicone rubber (SR) coating. • On the PSO substrates, concentration of oxide species was increased ca. 2.5 times comparing to non-PSO substrates. • The surface wettability was improved to 12.5°, in terms of water contact angle, after PSO. • Adhesion strength of SR coating on the PSO substrates was improved by more than two times comparing to non-PSO ones. • After pull-off test, the fractured area patterns for SR coating were dependent on the type of surface modifications received. - Abstract: Stainless steel 316L is one of the most widely used materials for fabricating of biomedical devices hence, improving its surface properties is still of great interest and challenging in biomaterial sciences. Plasma oxidation, in comparison to the conventional chemical or mechanical methods, is one of the most efficient methods recently used for surface treatment of biomaterials. Here, stainless steel specimens were surface oxidized by radio-frequency plasma irradiation operating at 34 MHz under pure oxygen atmosphere. Surface chemical composition of the samples was significantly changed after plasma oxidation by appearance of the chromium and iron oxides on the plasma-oxidized surface. A wettable surface, possessing high surface energy (83.19 mN m{sup −1}), was observed after plasma oxidation. Upon completion of the surface modification process, silicone rubber was spray coated on the plasma-treated stainless steel surface. Morphology of the silicone rubber coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A uniform coating was formed on the oxidized surface with no delamination at polymer–metal interface. Pull-off tests showed the lowest adhesion strength of coating to substrate (0.12 MPa) for untreated specimens and the highest (0.89 MPa) for plasma-oxidized ones.

  8. Surface modification of cotton fabrics by gas plasmas for color strength and adhesion by inkjet ink printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pransilp, Porntapin; Pruettiphap, Meshaya; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan; Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Kiatkamjornwong, Suda

    2016-02-01

    Surface properties of cotton fabric were modified by three types of gas plasma pretreatment, namely, oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), to improve ink absorption of water-based pigmented inkjet inks and color reproduction of the treated surfaces. Effects of gas plasma exposure parameters of power, exposure time and gas pressure on surface physical and chemical properties of the treated fabrics were investigated. XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was used to identify changes in functional groups on the fabric surface while AFM (atomic force microscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) were used to reveal surface topography of the fabric. Color spectroscopic technique was used to investigate changes in color strength caused by different absorptions of the printed fabrics. The O2 plasma treatments produced new functional groups, sbnd Osbnd Csbnd O/Cdbnd O and Osbnd Cdbnd O while N2 plasma treatments produced additionally new functional groups, Csbnd N and Odbnd Csbnd NH, onto the fabric surface which increased hydrophilic properties and surface energy of the fabric. For cotton fabric treated with SF6 plasma, the fluorine functionalization was additionally found on the surface. Color strength values (K/S) increased when compared with those of the untreated fabrics. SF6 plasma-treated fabrics were hydrophobic and caused less ink absorption. Fabric surface roughness caused by plasma etching increased fabric surface areas, captured more ink, and enhanced a larger ink color gamut and ink adhesion. Cotton fabrics exhibited higher ink adhesion and wider color gamut after the O2 plasma treatment comparing with those after N2 plasma treatment.

  9. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index comparing light curing and self-curing composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Gaby Neves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, in vitro, the shear bond strength of self-curing (ConciseTM - 3M and Alpha Plast - DFL and light-curing composites (TransbondTM XT - 3M and Natural Ortho - DFL used in orthodontics bonding, associated to Morelli metal brackets, with further analysis of adhesive remnant index (ARI and enamel condition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM. METHODS: Forty human premolars, just extracted and stored in physiologic solution 0.9 % were used. Randomly, these samples were divided in four groups: G1 group, the brackets were bonded with ConciseTM - 3M composite; in G2 group, Alpha Plast - DFL composite was used; in G3 group, TransbondTM XT - 3M was used; in G4 group, Natural Ortho - DFL composite was used. These groups were submitted to shear strength tests in universal testing machine, at 0.5 mm per minute speed. RESULTS: Statistical difference between G3 and G4 groups was recorded, as G4 showing higher strength resistance than G3. In the other hand, there were no statistical differences between G1, G2 and G3 and G1, G2 and G4 groups. ARI analysis showed that there was no statistical difference between the groups, and low scores were recorded among then. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed the debonding spots and the enamel surface integrity. CONCLUSIONS: Shear bond strength was satisfactory and similar between the composites, however Natural Ortho - DFL revealed best comparing to TransbondTM XT - 3M.

  10. Do different dentin tubular patterns of primary molars affect the bond strength of total-etching and self-etching adhesive systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Castilhos Ruschel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the tensile bond strength of self-etching and total-etching adhesive systems to the different dentin surfaces of primary molars and to analyze the resin-dentin interface. Methodology: In this in vitro study, dentin samples 35 to 65% distant from the pulp (intermediate dentin were obtained from buccal and lingual surfaces at the middle third of the crown of fi rst and second primary molars. Dentin surfaces were prepared with 400 and 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Three adhesive systems (Prime & Bond NT, AdheSE and Clear fi l SE Bond were tested on the fi rst and second primary molar surfaces (n=15; inverted truncated cones of resin composite with a 2.0 mm bonding diameter were built. After 24 hour storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were submitted to the tensile bond strength test. To analyze the resin-dentin interface under scanning electron microscopy, samples were prepared with the same three adhesive systems (n=5. Results: No differences between fi rst and second primary molar dentin substrates could be observed in mean bond strength values (ANOVA; p>0.05. The following mean bond strength values (MPa were obtained: 15.65±3.70 (Prime & Bond NT, 19.47±7.09 (AdheSE and 17.14 ±5.35 (Clear fi l SE Bond. There were no statistically signi fi cant differences between the self-etching adhesive systems. The presence of hybrid a layer and tags were observed in all groups. Conclusions: Contemporary adhesive systems showed similar behaviors on both dentin tubular surfaces of primary molars. Follow-up studies of the clinical performance of these materials are needed.

  11. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail; Jean, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement.

  12. Laboratory Test for Measurement of Adhesion Strength of Spray Ice to Coated Flat Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    became trapped within the ice. After the by test group 612 during icing due to nozzle freezeup sprayer was turned off, the unfrozen water became and the...indicated if and when nozzle freezeup occurred. Short and the push block increased as the block moved for- duration peaks in the nozzle temperature occurred...either nozzle freezeup and conse- bond strength of each sample. Notice, in Figure 2 1. the quent efforts to thaw, the application of more insulation

  13. Surface modification of cotton fabrics by gas plasmas for color strength and adhesion by inkjet ink printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pransilp, Porntapin, E-mail: lookpad_hae@hotmail.com [Program of Petrochemistry and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Pruettiphap, Meshaya, E-mail: pruettiphap_m@hotmail.com [Program of Petrochemistry, Faculty of science, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Bhanthumnavin, Worawan, E-mail: worawan.b@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat, E-mail: paosawat@sc.chula.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Kiatkamjornwong, Suda, E-mail: ksuda@chula.ac.th [Program of Petrochemistry and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Department of Imaging and Printing Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Academy of Science, The Royal Society of Thailand, Sueapa, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Both O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} plasma increased cotton surface wettability and higher K/S. • SF6 plasma gave hydrophobicity on cotton surface and increased contact angle to 138°. • Plasma treatment on cotton fabric produced surface roughness. • XPS confirmed the generation of new functional groups on cotton fabric. • Wettability and surface roughness controlled K/S and good ink adhesion. - Abstract: Surface properties of cotton fabric were modified by three types of gas plasma pretreatment, namely, oxygen (O{sub 2}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), to improve ink absorption of water-based pigmented inkjet inks and color reproduction of the treated surfaces. Effects of gas plasma exposure parameters of power, exposure time and gas pressure on surface physical and chemical properties of the treated fabrics were investigated. XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was used to identify changes in functional groups on the fabric surface while AFM (atomic force microscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) were used to reveal surface topography of the fabric. Color spectroscopic technique was used to investigate changes in color strength caused by different absorptions of the printed fabrics. The O{sub 2} plasma treatments produced new functional groups, −O−C−O/C=O and O−C=O while N{sub 2} plasma treatments produced additionally new functional groups, C−N and O=C−NH, onto the fabric surface which increased hydrophilic properties and surface energy of the fabric. For cotton fabric treated with SF{sub 6} plasma, the fluorine functionalization was additionally found on the surface. Color strength values (K/S) increased when compared with those of the untreated fabrics. SF{sub 6} plasma-treated fabrics were hydrophobic and caused less ink absorption. Fabric surface roughness caused by plasma etching increased fabric surface areas, captured more ink, and enhanced a larger ink color gamut and

  14. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm in 4 groups (n=10 were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2, B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4, C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1, and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2. The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05. Results: The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002, C (p< 0.001, and D (p< 0.001. Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch was significantly different from group D (total-etch (p< 0.001; and C (self-etch with D (p= 0.024. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  15. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  16. 覆冰垂直粘结强度的测试研究%Research on the Test Technology for Vertical Ice Adhesion Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国刚; 穆静静; 周红伟; 苗文华; 刘中良; 刘耀民

    2012-01-01

    本文利用自行设计的新型表面覆冰垂直粘结强度测试装置,测试了不同材料表面的覆冰垂直粘结强度,并探讨了基体表面粗糙度、冻冰时间、冰层厚度、冻冰温度等因素对同一材料表面覆冰垂直粘结强度的影响。结果发现,覆冰垂直粘结强度随着材料表面粗糙度增加而增大,随着冰冻温度的升高而降低。而冻冰时间与冰层厚度对覆冰垂直粘结强度的影响较为复杂。%The vertical ice adhesion strength on different material surface had been measured by the novel designed device, and the influence factors of vertical ice adhesion strength on the surface of same material had been discussed, such as the material surface roughness, freezing time, ice thickness, icing temperature etc. It was found that the vertical ice adhesion strength was increased with increasing the material surface roughness, but decreased with increasing icing temperature. However, it was complicated that the effect of the freezing time and ice thickness on the vertical ice adhesion strength.

  17. The influence of the substrate on the adhesive strength of the micro-arc oxidation coating developed on TiNi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shy-Feng; Ou, Shih-Fu; Chou, Chia-Kai

    2017-01-01

    TiNi shape memory alloys (SMAs), used as long-term implant materials, have a disadvantage. Ni-ion release from the alloys may trigger allergies in the human body. Micro-arc oxidation has been utilized to modify the surface of the TiNi SMA for improving its corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. However, there are very few reports investigating the essential adhesive strength between the micro-arc oxidized film and TiNi SMA. Two primary goals were attained by this study. First, Ti50Ni48.5Mo1.5 SMA having a phase transformation temperature (Af) less than body temperature and good shape recovery were prepared. Next, the Ti50Ni50 and Ti50Ni48.5Mo1.5 SMA surfaces were modified by micro-arc oxidation in phosphoric acid by applying relatively low voltages to maintain the adhesive strength. The results indicated that the pore size, film thickness, and P content increased with applied voltage. The micro-arc oxidized film, comprising Ti oxides, Ni oxide, and phosphate compounds, exhibited a glassy amorphous structure. The outmost surface of the micro-arc oxidized film contained a large amount of P (>12 at%) but only a trace of Ni (<5 at%). The adhesive strengths of all the micro-arc oxidized films exceeded the requirements of ISO 13779. Furthermore, Mo addition into TiNi SMAs was found to be favorable for improving the adhesive strength of the micro-arc oxidized film.

  18. GEP-based method to formulate adhesion strength and hardness of Nb PVD coated on Ti-6Al-7Nb aimed at developing mixed oxide nanotubular arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieerad, A R; Bushroa, A R; Nasiri-Tabrizi, B; Fallahpour, A; Vadivelu, J; Musa, S N; Kaboli, S H A

    2016-08-01

    PVD process as a thin film coating method is highly applicable for both metallic and ceramic materials, which is faced with the necessity of choosing the correct parameters to achieve optimal results. In the present study, a GEP-based model for the first time was proposed as a safe and accurate method to predict the adhesion strength and hardness of the Nb PVD coated aimed at growing the mixed oxide nanotubular arrays on Ti67. Here, the training and testing analysis were executed for both adhesion strength and hardness. The optimum parameter combination for the scratch adhesion strength and micro hardness was determined by the maximum mean S/N ratio, which was 350W, 20 sccm, and a DC bias of 90V. Results showed that the values calculated in the training and testing in GEP model were very close to the actual experiments designed by Taguchi. The as-sputtered Nb coating with highest adhesion strength and microhardness was electrochemically anodized at 20V for 4h. From the FESEM images and EDS results of the annealed sample, a thick layer of bone-like apatite was formed on the sample surface after soaking in SBF for 10 days, which can be connected to the development of a highly ordered nanotube arrays. This novel approach provides an outline for the future design of nanostructured coatings for a wide range of applications.

  19. The effect of formocresol on bond strength of adhesive materials to primary dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, S; Ozalp, N; Ozer, L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of formalin cresol on bonding of two compomers (Prime & Bond and Dyract, Futurabond and Glasiosite to primary dentine. Eighteen non-carious primary mandibular molar teeth were used. The two materials were placed onto the tooth surfaces before being sheared with a knife-edged blade with a crosshead speed of 1 mm min(-1). Two randomly selected teeth from each group were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The statistical analysis (paired t-test and Student's t-test) revealed that shear bond strength was significantly higher in the formocresol-applied group than in the group that was not applied formocresol (P formocresol in primary teeth, dentinal bonding would not be decreased, but on the contrary, increase.

  20. The effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of a total-etch and two self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I; El Eraki, Magda; Feilzer, Albert J

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and two self-etching adhesives. The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive; Admira Bond and two self-etch adhesives; Clearfil SE Bond and Hybrid Bond. Freshly extracted human third molar teeth were used. In each tooth, a Class I cavity (4 x 4 mm) was prepared in the occlusal surface with the pulpal floor extending approximately 1 mm into dentin. The teeth were divided into three groups (n = 12). Each group was restored with the resin composite Clearfil APX using one of the tested adhesives. For each experimental group three test procedures (n = 10) were carried out: Procedure A: the teeth were stored in water for 24 hours, then sectioned longitudinally, buccolingually and mesiodistally to get rectangular slabs of 1.0 - 1.2 mm thickness on which a microtensile test was carried out; Procedure B: the teeth were also sectioned, however the slabs were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 1 year before microtensile testing; Procedure C: the teeth were kept in water at 37 degrees C for 1 year before sectioning and microtensile testing. During microtensile testing the slabs were placed in a universal testing machine and load was applied at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. For the 24-hour water storage groups there was no significant difference in bond strength between the three adhesives. After 1 year of indirect water storage, the bond strength decreased but the reduction was not significantly different from those of 24 hours. After 1 year of direct water storage, the mean bond strengths of Admira Bond and Hybrid Bond were significantly reduced compared to their 24-hour results. In contrast the average value of Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly affected.

  1. Effect of different adhesive strategies on microtensile bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing blocks bonded to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Teich, Sorin; Porto, Thiago Soares

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of ceramic and composite computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks bonded to dentin using different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 crowns of sound freshly extracted human molars were sectioned horizontally 3 mm above the cementoenamel junction to produce flat dentin surfaces. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks, size 14, were sectioned into slices of 3 mm thick. Before bonding, CAD/CAM block surfaces were treated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Groups were created based on the adhesive strategy used: Group 1 (GI) - conventional resin cement + total-etch adhesive system, Group 2 (GII) - conventional resin cement + self-etch adhesive system, and Group 3 (GIII) - self-adhesive resin cement with no adhesive. Bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24h at 37΀C, and then sectioned with a slow-speed diamond saw to obtain 1 mm × 1 mm × 6 mm microsticks. Microtensile testing was then conducted using a microtensile tester. μTBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post hoc (Tukey) test at the 5% significance level. Results: Mean values and standard deviations of μTBS (MPa) were 17.68 (±2.71) for GI/ceramic; 17.62 (±3.99) for GI/composite; 13.61 (±6.92) for GII/composite; 12.22 (±4.24) for GII/ceramic; 7.47 (±2.29) for GIII/composite; and 6.48 (±3.10) for GIII/ceramic; ANOVA indicated significant differences among the adhesive modality and block interaction (P ceramic. Bond strength of GIII was consistently lower (P ceramic, can be significantly affected by different adhesive strategies used. PMID:27076825

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength and microleakage of Scotchbond multi-purpose (MP adhesive system and an experimental dentin bonding agent based on standard of ISOTR 11405

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarzadeh Kashi T.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of bonding agents is important as these properties play main roles in adhesion of composite to dental tissues. Microleakage results in bacterial penetration into dentin tubules and enamel surfaces and causes sensitivity and recurrent caries followed by destruction of composite filling. Insufficient shear bond strength results in early failure of filling in low masticatory forces. The main goal of this study was to compare the microleakage and shear bond strength of an experimental adhesive and Scotchbond multi-purpose (MP adhesive system."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, sixty extracted caries free human molar teeth were randomly assigned into 4 groups of 15 each for shear bond strength. Variables were bonding agents, enamel and dentin. Twenty teeth assigned into 2 groups of 10 each were used for valuation of the microleakage. Microleakage and shear bond strength were performed according to ISO TR 11405. All data were analyzed with parametric and non-parametric tests according to their normality distribution. Also, Weibull distribution performed on data."nResults: Data obtained from both microleakage and shear bond strength tests showed no significant difference between the experimental bonding and Scotchbond MP bonding (P>0.05. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the microleakage of occlusal and gingival parts of both bondings (P>0.05."nConclusion: Experimental adhesive bonding showed acceptable results regarding microleakage and shear bond strength. It may be concluded that the experimental dentin bonding had a comparable performance quality with that of commercial system.

  3. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Soo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n=10. They were treated as follows: untreated (control, Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P<0.05. Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P<0.05. Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements.

  4. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Geeta; Trehan, Mridula; Sharma, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To measure and compare the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of light-cure composite. (Enlight, Ormco.) and dual-cure composite (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho). Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were divided into two groups: group I (blue): conventional light cure composite resin. (Enlight, Ormco.) and group II (green): dual cure composite resin. (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho.) with 30 teeth in each group. These samples were tested on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength. Student t-test showed that the mean shear bond strength of the conventional light cure group (8.54 MPa - 10.42 MPa) was significantly lower than dual cure group (10.45 MPa -12.17 MPa). These findings indicate that the shear bond strength of dual-cure composite resin (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho) is comparatively higher than conventional light-cure composite resin (Enlight, Ormco). In the majority of the samples, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were 4 and 5 in both the groups whereas score 1 is attained by the least number of samples in both the groups. How to cite this article: Verma G, Trehan M, Sharma S. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):166-170.

  5. Microtensile bond strength analysis of adhesive systems to Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Thaysa Monteiro; Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne Monteiro; Moretto, Simone Gonçalves; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments (control, diamond bur, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser, and erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser) on sound dentin surface morphology and on microtensile bond strength (μTBS). Sixteen dentin fragments were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4), and different surface treatments were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Ninety-six third molars were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 12) according to type of surface treatment and adhesive system: G1 = Control + Clearfil SE Bond (SE); G2 = Control + Single Bond (SB); G3 = diamond bur (DB) + SE; G4 = DB + SB, G5 = Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm, 60 mJ, 2 Hz, 0.12 W, 19.3 J/cm(2)) + SE; G6 = Er:YAG + SB, G7 = Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2.78 μm, 50 mJ, 30 Hz, 1.5 W, 4.5 J/cm(2)) + SE; and G8 = Er,Cr:YSGG + SB. Composite blocks were bonded to the samples, and after 24-h storage in distilled/deionized water (37 °C), stick-shaped samples were obtained and submitted to μTBS test. Bond strength values (in megapascal) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). G1 (54.69 ± 7.8 MPa) showed the highest mean, which was statistically significantly higher than all the other groups (p systems did not differ statistically from each other. Based on the irradiation parameters considered in this study, it can be concluded that Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation presented lower values than the control group; however, their association with self-etching adhesive does not have a significantly negative effect on sound dentin (μTBS values of >20 MPa).

  6. Microtensile bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to demineralized dentin after the use of a papain-based chemomechanical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianini, Renato José; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the in vitro microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to demineralized dentin after the use of a papain-based chemomechanical method. 36 demineralized human dentin slabs were randomly distributed into two groups according to the method of caries removal: (1). Mechanical removal with manual excavators; (2) Chemomechanical removal with a papain-based gel (Papacárie). Subsequently, three adhesive systems were applied (n=6): (a) an etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond); (b) a two-step self-etch adhesive system (AdheSE); (c) a one-step self-etch adhesive system (Adper Prompt). The slabs were restored with a microhybrid resin composite and each resin-dentin block was sectioned into 1.0 mm2 thick slabs, which were kept in receptacles containing distilled water at relative humidity, for 24 hours, at 37 degrees C. After that, they were subjected to tensile stress in a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a 0.05 level of significance. The fractured specimens were observed under a stereomicroscope to assess the failure mode. The application of both chemomechanical and mechanical methods on demineralized dentin yielded microTBS values that were statistically similar among them, regardless of the adhesive system used. Caries removal with a chemomechanical papain-based method did not interfere in the adhesion of the tested adhesive systems to demineralized dentin.

  7. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  8. 新老混凝土粘结的剪切强度研究%Study on Adhesive Shear Strength of Young on Old Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁群; 刘健

    2001-01-01

    本文以试验为基础,假定了新老混凝土粘结层的剪切破坏机构。在选用扩展的 Mises屈服条件及库仑剪破条件下,利用塑性极限分析中的上限定理,推出了新老混凝土粘结层剪切强度的理论解,确定了影响粘结层剪切强度的因素。并进一步从破坏机理上深入地分析了各因素的影响,指出适度的老混凝土粘结面粗糙度有利于获得较高的剪切强度。%Based on the test results, the failure mechanism of the adhesive layer of young on old concrete is presented. Under the Mises yield condition and Coulomb shear failure condition, the theoretical solution for shear strength of adhesive layer of young on old concrete is deduced, and the factors, which affect the shear strength of adhesive layer, are also determined with the upper bound theorem of plastic limit analysis. The effect of each factor has been analyzed deeply with the failure mechanism, and it is pointed out that the proper roughness of the adhesive surface of old concrete is beneficial to obtain higher shear strength.

  9. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin.

  10. Silk-fibronectin protein alloy fibres support cell adhesion and viability as a high strength, matrix fibre analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Li, David; Gyune Rim, Nae; Backman, Daniel; Smith, Michael L.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2017-04-01

    Silk is a natural polymer with broad utility in biomedical applications because it exhibits general biocompatibility and high tensile material properties. While mechanical integrity is important for most biomaterial applications, proper function and integration also requires biomaterial incorporation into complex surrounding tissues for many physiologically relevant processes such as wound healing. In this study, we spin silk fibroin into a protein alloy fibre with whole fibronectin using wet spinning approaches in order to synergize their respective strength and cell interaction capabilities. Results demonstrate that silk fibroin alone is a poor adhesive surface for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in the absence of serum. However, significantly improved cell attachment is observed to silk-fibronectin alloy fibres without serum present while not compromising the fibres’ mechanical integrity. Additionally, cell viability is improved up to six fold on alloy fibres when serum is present while migration and spreading generally increase as well. These findings demonstrate the utility of composite protein alloys as inexpensive and effective means to create durable, biologically active biomaterials.

  11. Noteworthy impacts of polyurethane-urea ionomers as the efficient polar coatings on adhesion strength of plasma treated polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashmejahanbin, Mohammad. R.; Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi; Salimi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In present research, polypropylene (PP) was selected as a model nonpolar substrate for chemical modification using plasma. In the first step, the PP samples were treated using oxygen and argon atmospheres, individually. The prepared samples were analyzed using both FTIR and AFM techniques. The output of these techniques revealed that the carbonyl, carboxylic acid and its derivatives have been formed on the surface of PP. Afterward, a series of aqueous polyurethane-urea dispersions were synthesized as the novel polar coating for modified nonpolar polymers and characterized by different techniques including FTIR, DSC, TGA, mechanical properties and contact angle. Finally, the plasma treated samples were coated by prepared polyurethane ionomer. The results of pull-off analysis confirmed the significant role of the polyurethane as an extremely polar coating to create hydrogen bonding with functional groups on the surface of treated PP. The adhesion strength of polypropylenes increased from 0.04 MPa to 0.61 MPa for neat and oxygen-based plasma treated samples, respectively.

  12. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  13. Effect of the pre-treatment and the aggregate content on the adhesion strength of repair mortars on Miocene porous limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2016-04-01

    The adhesion between porous limestone and newly prepared repair mortars are crucial in the preservation of historic stone structures. Besides mechanical compatibility other matches such as chemical composition and porosity are also essential, but the current research focuses on the adhesion strength of repair mortars that are used in the restoration of Hungarian porous limestone. 8 mortars (4 commercial and 4 specially prepared) were selected for the tests. Mortars with different amount of aggregate were prepared and caste to stone surface. The stone substrate was highly porous Miocene limestone. The strength was tested by standardized pull-out tests which method is commonly used for concrete testing. The limestone surfaces were either used in their natural conditions or were pre-treated (pre-wetting). The strength of the stone/mortar bond was tested. The failure mechanism was documented and various failure modes were identified. Strength test results suggest that especially pre-treatment influences strongly the pull-out strength at mortar/stone interface. Increasing aggregate content also reduces pull out strength of tested repair mortars, but at various rates depending on the mortar type. The financial support of OTKA post-doctoral grant to BSZK (reference number is: PD 112-955) and National Research, Development and Innovation (NKFI) Fund to ÁT (ref. no. K 116532) are appreciated.

  14. Sodium Hypochlorite as Fluorotic Dentin Pretreatment of Two-Step Self-Etch Adhesive with Silver Nanoparticle: Atomic Force Microscope and Adhesive Microtensile Bond Strength Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Josefina Monjarás-Ávila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with commercial sodium hypochlorite, 5.25%, with a self-etch adhesive (Optibond Versa in its original formula and with the incorporation of silver nanoparticles (NaAg on fluorotic dentin. 240 human molars were classified according to fluorosis severity with Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI and subdivided into three study subgroups according to the adhesive technique: (1 self-etch (SE control subgroup; (2 NaOCl/SE subgroup; (3 NaOCl/SE + NaAg subgroup. The nanostructural characteristics were observed by AFM, μTBS was tested, and hybrid layer formation was observed by SEM. One-way analyses of variance (ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests were used. No statistically significant differences were found in roughness values in any of the subgroups and subgroups studied. Remnants of smear layer were detected in areas devoid of resin tags in SEM images of samples bonded with subgroup 2, in contrast to subgroup 3. No statistically significant difference between any of the results was found in μTBS and a greater number of adhesive failures were observed. The results show that the pretreatment technique of 5.25% NaOCl and the incorporation of NaAg to the self-adhesive system do not produce a surface more adequate for a better adhesion.

  15. Micromorphology analysis and bond strength of two adhesives to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared vs. bur-prepared fluorosed enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Jowkar, Zahra; Fekrazad, Reza; Khalafi-Nezhad, Abolfazl

    2014-10-01

    Preservation of enamel during composite veneer restorations of fluorosed teeth could be achieved by conservative preparation with Erbium lasers. This study evaluated the effect of fluorosed enamel preparation with Er,Cr:YSGG vs. conventional diamond bur on the micromorphology and bond strength of a self-etch and an etch-and-rinse adhesives. Er,Cr:YSGG laser or diamond bur preparation was performed on the flattened midbuccal surfaces of 70 extracted human premolars with moderate fluorosis (according to Thylstrup and Fejerskov index, TFI = 4-6). Adper Single Bond (SB) with acid etching for 20 or 40 s and Clearfil SE Bond (SEB) alone or with additional etching was applied in four laser groups. The same adhesive procedures were used in three bur groups except for 40 s of etching along with SB. After restoration, microshear bond strength was measured (MPa). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tamhane tests (α = 0.05). Six additional specimens were differently prepared and conditioned for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The highest and lowest bond strengths were obtained for bur-prepared/SB (39.5) and laser-prepared/SEB (16.9), respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.001). The different adhesive procedures used associated to two adhesives exhibited insignificantly lower bonding in laser-prepared groups compared to bur-prepared ones (P > 0.05), with the exception of additional etching/SEB, which bonded significantly higher to bur-prepared (36.4) than to laser-prepared enamel (18.7, P = 0.04). Morphological analyses revealed a delicate etch pattern with exposed enamel prisms on laser-prepared fluorosed enamel after acid etching and less microretentive pattern after self-etching primer. The etch-and-rinse adhesive was preferred in the laser-prepared fluorosed enamel in terms of bonding performance.

  16. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  17. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions.

  18. Shear bond strength evaluation of chemically-cured and light-cured orthodontic adhesives after enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, J. C.; Krisnawati; Purbiati, M.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of enamel deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) before etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of Unite (UN; 3M Unitek) and Xihu-BIOM adhesive (XB). Fifty-two maxillary first premolars were divided into four groups: (1) UN and (2) XB according to manufacturer’s recommendation and (3) UN and (4) XB deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl. Brackets were bonded, and a mechanical test was performed using a universal testing machine. The mean SBS value for groups A1, A2, B1, and B2 was 13.51 ± 2.552, 14.36 ± 2.902, 16.43 ± 2.615, and 13.05 ± 2.348 MPa, respectively. A statistically significant difference in SBSs was observed between chemically cured groups and between group B (p adhesive groups and between group A (p > 0.05). NaOCl enamel deproteinization before acid etching has a significant effect on the SBS of Unite adhesive, but not on that of the Xihu-BIOM adhesive. Furthermore, a significant difference in the SBS of Unite and Xihu-BIOM adhesives within the enamel deproteinization group was observed in this study.

  19. Effect of self-etching primer/adhesive and conventional bonding on the shear bond strength in metallic and ceramic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Hydari, Mahboubeh; Shahrbaf, Shirin; Mirzakouchaki-Boroujeni, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Bracket debonding from the tooth surface is a common problem in fixed orthodontics. The aims of the present study were to assess the bond strength and failure sites in two ways of bonding technique, with metallic and ceramic brackets. Material and Methods: One hundred premolars were assigned to 4 groups of 25 each: Group A, metallic brackets/ conventional procedure; Group B, metallic brackets/Transbond XT; Group C, ceramic brackets/conventional procedure; and Group D, ceramic brackets/Transbond XT. Transbond XT composite paste was used for bracket bonding and cured by conventional light-cure device. Specimens were subjected to thermocycling. One week after bonding shearing force was applied to the bracket-tooth interface. Bonding failure site optically examined using a stereomicroscope under 10 × magnifications and scoring was done using the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Data were subjected to analysis of One-way variance, Tukey post hoc, Chi-square and Spearman’s tests. Results: Mean bond strength (in MPa) were: group A=9.2, group B=8.5, group C=6.2 and group D=5.7. Bond strength differences between groups A and B, and between C and D were not significant, (pceramic ones and the selfetching primer produce fewer bonds than the conventional method (clinically acceptable). A positive correlation found between changes in shearing bond strength and ARI. Key words: Acid etching, adhesive remnant index, orthodontic brackets, self-etching primer, shearing bond strength. PMID:21743430

  20. Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured and Chemically-cured Resin Adhesive%光固化和化学固化树脂粘接剂剪切强度的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张隆祺; 王野平

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare the shear bond strength of light-cured and chemically-cured resin adhesive. Methods Twenty recently extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two groups of 10 each.: Group A, using the chemically-cured resin adhesive (Jing Jinenamel adhesive) and Group B, using the light-cured resin adhesive (Transbond XT,3M Unitek). The brackets were bonded to prepared enamel surfaces and the samples were placed in a water bath at 37℃ for 24 hours, then measured the shear bond strength and assessed the remaining adhesive after debonded. Results The shear bond strength and assessing the remaining adhesive after debonded both had no statistical significanct difference between two adhesives. Conclusion The light-cured and the chemically-cured resin adhesive both have strong bond strength, but the light-cured resin adhesive has the advantage to offer more sufficient time for positioning and bonding the brackets, so it is recommended for using.%-05)。结论光固化和化学固化树脂粘接剂均具有较强的粘接强度,但光固化树脂粘接剂能够为托槽的定位和粘接提供充足的时间,推荐使用。

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Molecular dynamics investigations on the interfacial energy and adhesive strength between C{sub 60}-filled carbon nanotubes and metallic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Jenn-Kun [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 70005, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wei-Te; Hsu, Yi-Cheng [Department of Biomechatronics Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    The mechanical and adhesive properties of C{sub 60}@(10,10) carbon nanopeapods (CNPs) adhering to gold surfaces are investigated by atomistic simulations. The effects of C{sub 60} fill density, tube length, surrounding temperature, and peeling velocity on the adhesion behavior are studied. Results show that the interfacial binding energy of CNPs (which depends on the C{sub 60} fill density and temperature) is 2.0∼4.4% higher than that of (10,10) single-walled CNTs and 3.4∼4.7% lower than that of (5,5)@(10,10) double-walled CNTs (DWCNTs). Despite their lower interfacial binding energy, CNPs have a higher adhesive strength than that of DWCNTs (1.53 nN vs. 1.4 nN). Distinct from the inner tubes of DWCNTs, which have continuum mechanical properties, the discrete C{sub 60} molecules that fill CNPs exhibit unique composite mechanical properties, with high flexibility and bend-buckling resistance. The bend-buckling forces for CNPs filled with a low/medium fill density of C{sub 60} are approximately constant. When the fill density is 1 C{sub 60} molecule per nanometer length, the bend-buckling force dramatically increases. - Highlights: • Adhesion and peeling behaviors of CNPs on metallic substrates are investigated. • Effects of C60 density, CNP length, temperature, and peeling velocity are studied. • CNPs have a higher adhesive strength than that of DWCNTs (1.53 nN vs. 1.4 nN). • Discrete C{sub 60} molecules that fill CNPs exhibit unique composite mechanical properties.

  3. Microshear bond strength and interfacial morphology of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to superficial and deep dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousry, Mai Mahmoud; ElNaga, Abeer Abo; Hafez, Randa M; El-Badrawy, Wafa

    2011-10-01

    To compare microshear bond strength (uSBS) of two pairs of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to superficial and deep dentin. Occlusal surfaces of 40 sound extracted noncarious human molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces (20 superficial and 20 deep dentin). Twenty-four teeth were used for uSBS test and 16 for scanning electron microscopic examination. Each dentin group was randomly assigned into four groups, according to the adhesive system tested. An etch-and-rinse and a self-etch adhesive from the same manufacturer were utilized: Scotchbond-MultiPurpose and Adper-Scotchbond SE and XP Bond and Xeno IV. CeramX was used for composite microcylinder construction (0.9 mm in diameter and 0.7 mm in height). Five composite microcylinders were constructed on each dentin surface (n = 15 per group). A Lloyd universal testing machine was used to test uSBS at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractographic analysis of the failure site was performed using a stereomicroscope and measured by image-analysis software. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan tests. In superficial dentin, Xeno IV showed significantly the highest uSBS, while in deep dentin, XP Bond showed the highest uSBS. The lowest uSBS values in both dentin depths were recorded for Adper-Scotchbond SE. Etch-and-rinse systems bonded better to deep than to superficial dentin, while self-etching systems showed similar performance at both dentin depths. Bond strength to dentin is both adhesive- and substrate-dependent. Contemporary adhesive systems may produce variable bonding results to superficial and deep dentin due to variations in their composition rather than their bonding approach or application technique.

  4. Bond strength of a total-etch and two self-etch adhesives to dentin with and without intermediate flowable liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of flowable resin composite application on the microtensile bond strength of a total-etch and two self-etch adhesive systems to dentin. Occlusal surfaces of 30 human third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces. One of the following adhesive systems was applied to the dentin surface following manufacturers' instructions: Admira Bond, Futurabond DC and Clearfil SE Bond. For each adhesive, half of the specimens received a layer of flowable composite (Amaris Flow) applied into dentin and light-cured (experimental groups). The other teeth received no liner and served as control group. For all teeth, resin composite (Amaris) was applied in 2 mm thickness to form a crown segment 5-6 mm height and each increment was light-cured. The restored teeth were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Each tooth was serially sectioned in a longitudinal direction in order to obtain several bonded slabs (1.0 mm2 in cross-section). Each slab was attached to the set-up by their lateral sides and placed in a universal testing machine. Tensile load was applied at cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Placement of a low-viscosity resin after adhesive application increased the microtensile bond strength for all tested adhesive systems. However, such increase was not significant (P > 0.05). The percentage of cohesive failure was increased in specimens with flowable resin liner.

  5. Effect of collagen cross-linkers on the shear bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system to deep dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakhamuri Srinivasulu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin to deep dentin, bonded using a self-etch adhesive, after treatment with two collagen cross-linkers at varying time intervals. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted human incisors were sectioned longitudinally into equal mesial and distal halves ( n = 60. The proximal deep dentin was exposed and the specimens were divided based on the surface treatment of dentin prior to bonding as follows: Group I ( n = 12, control: No prior dentin surface treatment; group II ( n = 24: Dentin surface pretreated with 10% sodium ascorbate; and group III ( n = 24: Dentin surface pretreated with 6.5% proanthocyanidin. Groups II and III were further divided into two subgroups based on the pre-treatment time of five and 10 min. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested using universal testing machine and the data were statistically analyzed. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength to deep dentin was observed in teeth treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin compared to control group. No significant difference was observed between 5 min and 10 min pre-treatment times. Conclusion: Dentin surface pre-treatment with both 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin resulted in significant improvement in bond strength of self-etch adhesive to deep dentin.

  6. Influence of the LED curing source and selective enamel etching on dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the LED curing unit and selective enamel etching on dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) for self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations. On 96 human molars, box-shaped class I cavities were made maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE - CSE and Clearfil S(3) - S3) were used to bond a microhybrid composite. Before adhesive application, half of the teeth were enamel acid-etched and the other half was not. Adhesives and composites were cured with the following light curing units (LCUs): one polywave (UltraLume 5 - UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401 - FL and Radii Cal - RD) LEDs. The specimens were then submitted to thermomechanical aging and longitudinally sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.9 mm(2)) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The failure mode was then recorded. The μTBS data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's (α = 0.05). For S3, the selective enamel-etching provided lower μTBS values (20.7 ± 2.7) compared to the non-etched specimens (26.7 ± 2.2). UL yielded higher μTBS values (24.1 ± 3.2) in comparison to the photoactivation approach with FL (18.8 ±3.9) and RD (19.9 ±1.8) for CSE. The two-step CSE was not influenced by the enamel etching (p ≥ 0.05). Enamel acid etching in class I composite restorations affects the dentin μTBS of the one-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil S(3), with no alterations for Clearfil SE bond strength. The polywave LED promoted better bond strength for the two-step adhesive compared to the single-peak ones.

  7. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etching fluoride releasing adhesives with and without pumice prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Shobbana Devi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fluoride releasing adhesives combined with antibacterial monomer can play a vital role in reducing white spot lesions by enhancing the cariostatic effect especially in noncompliant\\medically compromised patients.

  8. Adhesion of dental porcelain to cast, milled, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium alloys: shear bond strength and sensitivity to thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Prat, Josep; Cano-Batalla, Jordi; Cabratosa-Termes, Josep; Figueras-Àlvarez, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    New technologies have led to the introduction of new materials, so an evaluation of the adhesion of ceramics to these materials is needed. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of dental porcelain to cast, milled, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium alloys, and to investigate the adhesive bond and failure type after thermocycling, 90 metal cylinders (10 mm diameter and 10 mm height) were prepared from cast (30 specimens), milled (30 specimens), and laser-sintered (30 specimens) alloys. Ceramic cylinders (2.5 mm diameter and 4 mm length) were fused to the alloy cylinders. For each group, 15 specimens were thermocycled 5500 times at temperatures between 4°C and 60°C before testing. After testing, the specimen surfaces were visually examined to determine the failure mode. Differences in adhesion values according to manufacturing method, testing condition (thermocycling or no thermocycling), and interaction between the factors were evaluated with a 2-way ANOVA. The χ(2) test (95% confidence level) was performed to determine whether the failure mode was associated with the testing condition. Adhesion strengths for the nonthermocycled specimens were 42.79 ±14.14 MPa (cast), 37.56 ±9.18 MPa (milled), and 29.09 ±6.95 MPa (laser-sintered), and, for the thermocycled specimens, 16.52 ±8.96 MPa (cast), 22.21 ±13.25 MPa (milled), and 24.28 ±10.13 MPa (laser-sintered). Two-way ANOVA results indicated no statistically significant differences in adhesion among the manufacturing methods (P=.257), but statistically significant differences were observed according to both testing conditions (Padhesion values for all the materials were adequate for clinical applications. No significant adhesion differences were observed between cast, milled, and laser-sintered specimens, or among thermocycled and nonthermocycled laser-sintered specimens. However, significant adhesion differences were observed among the thermocycled and nonthermocycled cast and

  9. Effect of dentin biomodifiers on the immediate and long-term bond strengths of a simplified etch and rinse adhesive to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Singh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This in vitro study evaluated the effect of dentin biomodifiers on the immediate and long-term bond strengths of a simplified etch and rinse adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods Flat coronal dentin surfaces were prepared in 120 extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 24 according to 5 different surface pre-treatments: No pre-treatment (control; 1M carbodiimide (EDC; 0.1% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG; 2% minocycline (MI; 10% sodium ascorbate (SA. After surface pre-treatment, adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], 3M ESPE was applied. Composite was applied into transparent plastic tubes (2.5 mm in diameter, which was placed over the bonded dentin surface. From each group, 10 samples were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS evaluation at 24 hours (immediate and remaining 10 samples were tested after 6 months (delayed. Additionally, 4 samples per group were subjected to scanning electron microscopic analysis for observation of resin-dentin interface. The data were statistically analysed with Shaperio‑Wilk W test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey's test. Results At 24 hours, SBS of all surface pre-treatment groups were comparable with the control group, with significant differences found between EDC and SA groups only (p = 0.009. After 6 months storage, EDC, EGCG, and MI pre-treatments preserved the resin-dentin bond strength with no significant fall. Conclusions Dentin pre-treatment with all the dentin biomodifiers except SA resulted in significant preservation of resin-dentin bond over 6 months storage period, without negatively affecting the immediate bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive tested.

  10. The effect of subject age on the microtensile bond strengths of a resin and a resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, William W; Tay, Franklin R; Looney, Stephen W; Ito, Shuichi; Haisch, Larry D; Pashley, David H

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the microtensile bond strengths of an etch-and-rinse resin adhesive to dentin and enamel and a resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive to dentin were determined on teeth known to have originated from subjects over 60 years of age. The same tests were repeated on teeth originating from young subjects. The resin adhesive was Prime & Bond NT (Caulk/Dentsply), while the resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive was Fuji Bond LC (GC America). Both were paired with the same hybrid resin composite, TPH3 (Caulk/Dentsply). Testing was performed after 48 hours using a "non-trimming" microtensile test at a crosshead speed of 0.6 mm/minute. No significant differences were observed between the young and aged teeth for any comparison (p > 0.05). SEM evaluation of the etched dentinal surfaces demonstrated less depth of decalcification in the intertubular areas of aged dentin, but there was no observable difference within the tubules of young and aged dentin.

  11. Effects of surface treatments and storage times on the tensile bond strength of adhesive cements to noble and base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmann, Paulo Afonso; Santos, Jose Fortunato Ferreira; May, Liliana Gressler; Pereira, Joao Eduardo da Silva; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluated two resin cements and a glass-ionomer cement and their bond strength to gold-palladium (Au-Pd), silver-palladium (Ag-Pd), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloys, utilizing three surface treatments over a period of six months. Eight hundred ten pieces were cast (in a button shape flat surfaces) in one of three alloys. Each alloy group was assigned to three other groups, based on the surface treatment utilized. Specimens were fabricated by bonding similar buttons in using one of three adhesive cements. The 405 pairs were thermocycled and stored in saline solution (0.9% NaCl) at 37 degrees C. The tensile bond strengths were measured in a universal testing machine after storage times of 2, 90, or 180 days. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the base metal alloy (10.9 +/- 8.6 MPa). In terms of surface treatment, oxidation resulted in the highest mean bond strength (13.7 +/- 7.3 MPa), followed by sandblasting (10.3 +/- 5.5 MPa) and polishing (3.0 +/- 6.4 MPa). Panavia Ex (13.2 +/- 9.3 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than the other two cements, although the storage time reduced all bond strengths significantly.

  12. Comparative evaluation of adhesion formation, strength of ingrowth, and textile properties of prosthetic meshes after long-term intra-abdominal implantation in a rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitsky, Yuri W; Harrell, Andrew G; Cristiano, Joseph A; Paton, B Lauren; Norton, H James; Peindl, Richard D; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2007-06-01

    Effective laparoscopic ventral herniorrhaphy usually mandates the use of an intraperitoneal prosthetic. Visceral adhesions and changes in textile characteristics of prosthetics may complicate repairs, especially long-term. The aim of this study was to compare the adhesion formation, tissue ingrowth, and textile characteristics one year after intra-abdominal placement of the commonly used prosthetic meshes. Forty (4 x 4 cm) meshes were sutured using absorbable suture to an intact peritoneum in 20 New Zealand white rabbits. The study groups included: polypropylene (PP) [Marlex; C.R. Bard Inc, Cranston, NJ], expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) [DualMesh; WL Gore, Flagstaff, AZ], ePTFE and PP (ePTFE/PP) [Composix, C.R. Bard Inc], reduced weight PP and oxidized regenerated cellulose (rPP/C) [Proceed; Ethicon, Inc, Somerville, NJ]. The meshes were explanted after one year. Adhesions were scored as a percentage of explanted biomaterials' affected surface area. Prosthetic shrinkage was calculated. The strength of incorporation and mesh compliance were evaluated using differential variable reluctance transducers. Mesh ingrowth was measured as the load necessary to distract the mesh/tissue complex. Mesh compliance was calculated as the change in linear displacement of the sensors due to applied load. The groups were compared using Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. ePTFE had significantly less adhesions (0%) than both ePTFE/PP (40%) and PP (80%) groups (P < 0.001). The mean area of adhesions for the rPP/C (10%) and the ePTFE/PP (14%) groups was less than that for the PP group (40%) (P = 0.02). Prosthetic shrinkage was greatest in the ePTFE (32%) group than in any other group (P = 0.001). There were no differences in mesh incorporation between the groups. At explantation, mesh compliance in the ePTFE group was superior to other meshes (P < 0.0001). The rPP/C mesh induced the smallest change in the compliance of the tissue adjacent to the mesh (P = 0

  13. Effect of ambient humidity on the strength of the adhesion force of single yeast cell inside environmental-SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yajing, E-mail: shen@robo.mein.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nakajima, Masahiro [Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ridzuan Ahmad, Mohd [Department of Mechatronics and Robotics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310 (Malaysia); Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Fukuda, Toshio [Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    A novel method for measuring an adhesion force of single yeast cell is proposed based on a nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The effect of ambient humidity on a single yeast cell adhesion force was studied. Ambient humidity was controlled by adjusting the chamber pressure and temperature inside the ESEM. It has been demonstrated that a thicker water film was formed at a higher humidity condition. The adhesion force between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a tungsten probe which later on known as a substrate was evaluated at various humidity conditions. A micro-puller was fabricated from an AFM cantilever by use of focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The adhesion force of a single yeast cell (W303) to the substrate was measured using the micro-puller at the three humidity conditions: 100%, 70%, and 40%. The results showed that the adhesion force between the single yeast cell and the substrate is much smaller at higher humidity condition. The yeast cells were still alive after being observed and manipulated inside ESEM based on the result obtained from the re-culturing of the single yeast cell. The results from this work would help us to understand the ESEM system better and its potential benefit to the single cell analysis research. -- Research highlights: {yields} A nanorobotic manipulation system was developed inside an ESEM. {yields} A micro-puller was designed for single yeast cell adhesion force measurement. {yields} Yeast cells were still alive after being observed and manipulated inside ESEM. {yields} Yeast cell adhesion force to substrate is smaller at high humidity condition than at low humidity condition.

  14. Effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Gharouni, Mahya

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the probability of chemical and enzymatic reactions between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dentin structure and their specific inhibitors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of MMPs (galardin) on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Material and Methods Forty-eight sound human premolars were mounted in self-cured acrylic resin after removal of the enamel on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The dentin surfaces achieved were polished and prepared with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=16) based on the concentration of galardin used (with no galardin, galardin at a high concentration and galardin at a low concentration). In addition, 96 composite resin blocks, measuring 3 mm in height and diameter, were prepared. The composite resin blocks were bonded to the buccal and lingual surface dentin with Rely-X Unicem (RXC) and Speed CEM (SPC) self-adhesive resin cements, respectively, according to manufacturers’ instructions. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the shear bond strength values were determined in MPa and fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Results The shear bond strength of galardin at high concentration was significantly higher than that in the control group and galardin at a low concentrations (PDental Bonding.

  15. Light-curing efficiency of dental adhesives by gallium nitride violet-laser diode determined in terms of ultimate micro-tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; De Munck, Jan; Hatayama, Hitoshi; Haruyama, Akiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Takase, Yasuaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether violet-laser diode (VLD) can be used as light-curing source. The ultimate (micro-)tensile strength (μTS) of three adhesives was determined when cured by VLD in comparison with curing by two different types of commercial LED light-curing units. One VLD (VLM 500) and two LED units (Curenos and G-Light Prima) were used to cure the adhesive resin of the two-step self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond, Tokuso Mac Bond II, and FL-Bond II. A 0.6-mm thick acrylic mould was filled with adhesive resin and cured for 60 s. After 24-h water storage, specimens were trimmed into an hourglass shape with a width of 1.2 mm at the narrowest part, after which the μTS was determined (n=10). In addition, the light transmittance of each adhesive was characterized using a UV-vis-NIR spectrometer. No significant difference in curing efficiency between VLD and LED were observed for both Tokuso Mac Bond II and FL-Bond II (p>0.05). For Clearfil SE Bond, the μTS of VLD-cured specimens was higher than that of the specimens cured by the LED Curenos unit (p<0.05). Spectrometry revealed that this marked difference must be attributed to a different light transmittance of Clearfil SE Bond for visible blue light versus for the lower area of UV and visible violet light. In conclusion, A GaN-based violet laser diode can be used as light-curing source to initiate polymerization of dental resins.

  16. Preparation of Barium Titanate Films and Its Structural Characterization and Adhesive Strength%钛酸钡膜的制备、结构及结合强度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新华; 赵晓云

    2011-01-01

    The barium titanate films have been grown on the surface of the titanium alloy by the micro-arc oxidation. The effect of the electrolyte composition, oxidation time, and micro-arc voltage on the structure and morphology of the films were discussed,and the adhesive strength of the BaTiO3 films was evaluated. The results showed that with increasing the concentration of electrolyte composition and oxidation time the more barium titanate films were formed. The morphology of the BaTiO3 films was influenced by the concentration of the electrolyte composition and the voltage as well as the oxidation time. With the decreasing of the voltage, the adhesive strength of the film layer tended to increase. At the voltage of 80 V, the adhesive strength can reach 36. 4 MPa, which is much higher than that of the coatings by general plasma spraying technique.%采用微弧氧化在钛合金表面制备BaTiO3膜.讨论电解液组分、反应时间及电压对BaTiO3膜形态和相组成的影响,并评价BaTiO3膜的结合强度.结果表明,BaTiO3的生成量随电解液浓度和氧化时间的增大而增加;其表面形貌也受电解液浓度、电压和氧化时间的影响;电压降低,膜层的结合强度有增大的趋势.电压为80 V时,结合强度可达36.4 Mpa,优于一般等离子喷涂技术获得的膜层结合强度.

  17. Influence of artificial aging on the shear bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces after pretreatment with new 10-MDP adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    p.c pott; Stiesch, M; M Eisenburger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This in-vitro study investigates the bond strength of different zirconia composites  with three different modern adhesive systems after artificial aging using thermocycling and water storage. Methods: A total of 90 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim) were ground using a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were additionally treated with either Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH), or Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH) or Futurabond M+ in combination...

  18. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface of 64 human anterior teeth (32 primary and 32 permanent divided into four groups of 16 each. Groups A and C were treated with Contax (sixth generation, while groups B and D were treated with Clearfil S3 (seventh generation. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-350 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA for multiple group comparison, followed by student′s unpaired ′t′ test for group-wise comparison. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength among the study groups except that primary teeth bonded with Contax exhibited significantly lesser shear bond strength than permanent teeth bonded with Clearfil S3. Conclusion: This study revealed that Clearfil S3 could be of greater advantage in pediatric dentistry than Contax because of its fewer steps and better shear bond strength in dentin of both primary and permanent teeth.

  19. Effect of Water Storage on the Micro-shear Bond Strength of Two Self-etch Adhesives to Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jaberi Ansari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the influence of storage time on micro-shear bond strength of two self-etching materials to enamel and dentin.Materials and Methods: Human third molar teeth were sectioned to 1.5 mm thick beams and randomly divided into 2 groups. In group I, SE Bond and in group II, Tri-S Bond was used to bond a composite rod (AP-X to each treated surface. Specimens were prepared according to manufacturer instructions. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to water storage time; 1 day, 6 and 12 months. Microshear bond strengths were determined under a crosshead speed of 1mm/min using a universal testing machine and expressed in MPa. Data was statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnett post hoc test.Results: Micro-shear bond strength of two adhesives to enamel and dentin showed a slight but not significant decrease over time (P>0.5. After one day, the mean bond strength of enamel in groups I and II were 39.47 and 34.65 MPa and in dentin were 45.20 and 36.0 MPa respectively. There was no statistically significant differencebetween two materials (P=0.190, P=0.082. After six months the bond strength in group I and II was 35.93 and 35.18 MPa for enamel, and 38.27and 35.19 MPa for dentin respectively, these differences was not statistically significant (P=0.520, P=0.179.After one year, the bond strength of enamel in groups I and II, were 34.47and 29.91MPa, and in dentin were 33.86 and 32.53 MPa respectively which was not statistically significant (P=0.609, P=0.991.Conclusion: The micro-shear bond strength of both adhesives to enamel and dentin decreased slightly over time; however these decreases were not statistically significant.

  20. First principles calculation of stable structure and adhesive strength of plated Ni/Fe(100) or Cu/Fe(100) interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryota NAKANISHI; Koji SUEOKA; Seiji SHIBA; Makoto HINO; Koji MURAKAMI; Ken MURAOKA

    2009-01-01

    A study the with first principles calculation of the interfaces of the Ni layer or Cu layer on the Fe(100) surface formed with metal plating was performed. Ni or Cu atoms were shown to adopt the corresponding position to the bcc structure of the Fe(100) substrate. Other calculations showed that the interfaces of Ni (5 atomic layers)/Fe(100) (5 layers) or Cu (5 atomic layers)/Fe(100) (5 layers) had square lattices. The orientation relationship of Ni/Fe(100) interface corresponds to fcc-Ni(100)//bcc-Fe(100), Ni[011]//Fe[010], and Similar results were obtained for Cu/Fe(100) interfaces. This structure was supported by TEM analysis of plated Ni layer on Fe(100) surfaces. The adhesion strength of the Ni/Fe(100) interface evaluated by first principles calculation was higher than that of the Cu/Fe(100) interface. The experimental results of Hull cell iron plated with Ni or Cu supported the results of the calculation. These results indicate that the first principles calculation, which deals with the ideal interface at the atomic scale, has the potential to evaluate the adhesion strength of metallic material interfaces.

  1. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied.

  2. Influence of the inter-layer adhesion on the structural strength of sandwich pipes; Influencia da adesao entre camadas na resistencia estrutural de dutos sanduiche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castello, Xavier; Estefen, Segen [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Oceanica

    2005-07-01

    Sandwich pipes composed of two steel layers separated by a polypropylene annulus can be used for the transport of oil and gas in deep waters, combining high structural resistance with thermal insulation in order to prevent blockage by paraffin and hydrates. In this work, sandwich pipes with typical inner diameters of those employed in the offshore production are analyzed numerically regarding to the influence of the inter-layer adhesion of steel pipes and polymer on the limit strength under external pressure and longitudinal bending as well as the bending and straightening process representative of the reeling installation method. The numerical model incorporates geometric and material non-linearity, which had been based on previous works of the authors. Tests of specimens under tension and segments of sandwich pipes are carried through to evaluate the maximum shear stresses of the interfaces metal-polymer. The adhesion is modeled by contact adopting a maximum shear stress value to allow the relative displacement between the layers. It was observed that the structural resistance of the sandwich pipe is strongly dependent on the shear stress acting at the interface, occurring the collapse of the pipe when the maximum shear stress is reached. The results obtained are analyzed to determine the minimum shear strength at the union which provides adequate structural resistance for the sandwich pipe under representative conditions of the installation and operation loading phases. (author)

  3. Effect of Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid and sodium hypochlorite solution conditioning on microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Azarsina, Mohadese; Khamverdi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Attempts to improve bond strength of self-etch adhesives can enhance the durability of composite restorations. Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of collagen and smear layer removal with sodium hypochlorite solution (NaOCl) and EDTA on micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of self-etch adhesives to dentin. Settings and Design: It was an in-vitro study. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two teeth were divided into eight groups and their crowns were ground perpendicular to their long axis to expose dentin. The teeth were polished with silicon-carbide papers. The groups were treated as follows: No conditioning, 0.5-M EDTA conditioning, 2.5% NaOCl conditioning, NaOCl + EDTA conditioning. The surfaces were rinsed and blot-dried. Clearfil S3 and I-Bond were applied according to manufacturers’ instructions and restored with Z100 composite. After 500 cycles of thermo-cycling between 5°C and 55°C, the samples were sectioned and tested for μTBS. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD test. Results: The highest μTBS was recorded with Clearfil S3 + NaOCl + EDTA, and the lowest was recorded with I-Bond without conditioning. μTBS in EDTA-and EDTA + NaOCl-treated groups was significantly higher than the control and NaOCl-conditioned groups. Conclusions: Application of EDTA or EDTA + NaOCl before one-step self-etch adhesives increased μTBS. PMID:23833459

  4. Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system to caries-affected dentin on the gingival wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengun, Abdulkadir; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Sener, Yagmur; Ozer, Fusun

    2005-01-01

    A self-etching dentin adhesive was evaluated for its ability to bond to caries-affected and sound dentin after applying three desensitizers to the gingival walls. Sixty extracted human molars, with approximal dentin caries, were cut horizontally on the long axis of the tooth through caries-affected gingival walls. Carious dentin was removed with SiC paper by means of a caries detector to expose caries-affected dentin. The molars were randomly assigned to four groups: control and three experimental groups-Micro Prime, Glauma Desentizer and Cervitec. Desensitizers were applied to the dentinal surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. A resin composite was bonded to both the caries-affected and sound dentin of each tooth using a bonding system and plastic rings. The restoration was debonded by shear bond strength. The application of Micro Prime and Gluma Desensitizer to caries-affected dentin did not show any effect on bond strength testing. However, Cervitec caused a decrease in bond strength to caries-affected dentin. The effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of the self-etch bonding agent to caries-affected dentin changed according to the chemical composition of the materials. Desensitizer application on sound dentin is recommended with self-etch bonding systems.

  5. Dependence of adhesion strength between GaN LEDs and sapphire substrate on power density of UV laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junsu; Sin, Young-Gwan; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Jaegu

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser lift-off (SLLO) is an innovative technology used to manufacture and repair micro-light-emitting diode (LED) displays. In SLLO, laser is irradiated to selectively separate micro-LED devices from a transparent sapphire substrate. The light source used is an ultraviolet (UV) laser with a wavelength of 266 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns, and repetition rate of 30 kHz. Controlled adhesion between a LED and the substrate is key for a SLLO process with high yield and reliability. This study examined the fundamental relationship between adhesion and laser irradiation. Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate: Ga precipitation caused by the thermal decomposition of GaN and roughened interface caused by thermal damage on the sapphire. The competition between these two mechanisms leads to a non-trivial SLLO condition that needs optimization. This study helps understand the SLLO process, and accelerate the development of a process for manufacturing micro-LED displays via SLLO for future applications.

  6. Effect of cyclic loading on fracture strength and microleakage of a quartz fiber dowel with different adhesive, cement and resin core material combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissara, P; Ozcan, M; Melilli, D; Valandro, L F

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of different adhesive-cement-core combinations coupled with quartz fiber dowels after cyclic loading and fracture strength tests and assessed the microleakage using dye penetration method. Forty maxillary canines (N=10 per group) were restored with fiber dowels (Quartz fiber DT Light Post) and four adhesive-cement-core material combinations (Group 1: All-Bond 2+C&B [root]/All-Bond 2+Biscore [core]; Group 2: All-Bond 2+Bisfil 2B [root]/All-Bond 2+Bisfil 2B [core]; Group 3: Scotchbond 1+RelyX ARC [root]/Scotchbond 1+Supreme [core]; Group 4: RelyX Unicem [root]/Scotchbond 1+Filtek Supreme [core]). The specimens were initially cyclic loaded (x2,000,000, 8 Hz, 3 to 100 N at 45 °C under 37±3 °C water irrigation) and then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine at 37 °C for 24 hours for dye penetration and interface failure detection. The failure surfaces were observed under the stereomicroscope (x100 magnification). Circumferential and centripetal dye penetration was scored at the buccal and lingual sites. Only three specimens failed macroscopically during cyclic loading. No significant difference was found among the groups for the number of resisted cycles (P=0.9). Mean fracture strength between the groups were also not statistically significant (213±63-245±71 N) (P=0.740) (ANOVA). All four groups showed high values of dye penetration along the restoration interfaces being not significant from each other (P=0.224) (Kruskal-Wallis). The lingual sides of the teeth where the load applied, showed significantly higher incidence of detachment between the core and the dentin (100%, 90%, 100%, 90% for groups 1, 2, 3, 4, respectively) compared to the buccal side (30%, 30%, 60%, 40%) (P=0.032, c2 test). In 13 specimens (32.5%) crack lines at the coronal area were observed. Fracture strength was not significantly correlated with dye penetration (P=0.1803, r=-0.2162, Linear Regression and Correlation test). Different combinations of adhesive

  7. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fernando Bazzo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated.

  8. A morphological and micro-tensile bond strength evaluation of a single-bottle adhesive to caries-affected human dentine after four different caries removal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Zafer C; Yazici, A Rüya; Akca, Taner; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2003-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different caries removal techniques (conventional bur; chemomechanical removal/Carisolv()-MediTeam; a sonic preparation system/SonicsysMicro-Kavo and air abrasion/PrepStar-Danville Engineering) on microtensile bond strength to caries-affected human dentine. Occlusal surfaces of extracted human permanent third molars with coronal dentine caries extending approximately halfway through the dentine was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth to expose a flat surface of normal dentine surrounding the carious lesion with laser fluorescence values of approximately 30 (DIAGNODent), KaVo). Carious lesions were excavated with one of the four techniques until laser fluorescence values decreased to 15 in the center of the lesions. An ethanol-based dentine adhesive (Single Bond, 3M) was used to bond composite resin (P60, 3M) to the substrate. Vertical slices (n=11/group), approximately 0.8 mm thick were made through the caries-affected portions of each tooth, perpendicular to the bonding surface. Specimens were subjected to tensile stress at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. SEM investigation was performed for the qualitative evaluation of resin-dentine hybridization. The microtensile bond strengths were as follows (mean+/-SD in MPa): 6.4+/-5.3 (bur), 8.4+/-3.3 (Carisolv), 8.5+/-5.9 (Sonicsys Micro), and 8.8+/-8.8 (air abrasion). Statistical analysis did not show significant differences between any of the treatment modalities (p=0.160). Tensile fracture was cohesive within caries-affected dentine in all specimens. The four different caries removal techniques used within this study did not influence the bond strength of the tested dentine adhesive to caries-affected human dentine.

  9. The Study of the Grit-blasting Parameters and Their Effects on the Adhesive Strength of the Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M; Heydarzadeh; Sohi; M; Frooghieh; Sh; Khameneh; Asl

    2002-01-01

    Surface Preparation is very important in adhesive b on ding of spray coatings to the surface of a work piece. The common practice is gr it-blasting of the surface before subjecting it to the spray coating process. In this study, grit-blasting of an AISI 4130 steel (of different heat treatmen ts) with Al 2O 3 particles was studied. Various grit-blasting parameters such as blasting particle size, the distance between blasting nozzle and the work pi ece (25, 30 and 40 cm.), blasting pressure (3,4,5,6 and ...

  10. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Moslemi; Faezeh Fotouhi Ardakani; Fatemeh Javadi; Zahra Khalili Sadrabad; Zahra Shadkar; Mohammad Saeid Shadkar

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third m...

  11. Differences in tensile adhesion strength between HEMA and nonHEMA-based dentin bonding applied on superficial and deep dentin surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eresha Melati Kusuma Wurdani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement in dentistry shows some progresses, due to patients awareness on the importance of dental care. Cervical lesion is the most common phenomenon which oftenly found 46.36% in man and 38.13% in woman. Cervical lesions need composite restoration for treatment to stop the process of tissue damage. The process of adhesion of composite restoration material to the structure of the tooth is not easily separated and it needs optimal function in the oral cavity. Application of dentin bonding agents to attach the composite is needed. Selection of HEMA-based bonding material and Hema free-based bonding material which have a different solvent in their composition, as applied to the dentin superficial and deep dentin, affect the results of debonding test. Debonding test is done to measure the adhesion strength of a bonding material. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after application in superficial and deep dentine surfaces. Method: The tooth of the bovine was as samples. A superficial dentine sample was taken from 0.5-1 mm of dentino enamel junction and a deep dentine sample was taken from 0.5 mm culmination of pulp horn. Dentine surface area was equal to p x r2 = (3.14 x 22 = 12.56 mm2. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the dentine superficial. Six samples of HEMAfree based bonding was applied to the superficial dentine. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Six samples of HEMA-free based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Tensile strength was measured using an Autograph AG-10TE. Result: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the application on superficial (p=0.000 and deep dentine surfaces (p=0.000. Conclusion: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the

  12. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  13. Micromorphology and bond strength evaluation of adhesive interface of a self-adhering flowable composite resin-dentin: Effect of surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Saadat, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin surface treatment on the micromorphology and shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-adhering flowable composite, Vertis Flow (VF). Flat dentin surfaces obtained from sixty extracted human molars were divided into six groups (n = 10) according to the following surface treatments: (G1) control, no treatment; (G2) self-etching adhesive, Optibond All-in-One; (G3) phosphoric acid etching for 15 s; (G4) polyacrylic acid for 10 s; (G5) EDTA for 60 s; and G6) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 15 s. After restoration using VF, SBS was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane test (α = 0.05). Six additional specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. SBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (P < 0.001). SBS of six groups from the highest to the lowest were as follows: (G3) 13.5(A); (G5) 8.98(AB); (G2) 8.85(AB); (G4) 8.21(AB); (G1) 7.53(BC); and (G6) 4.49(C) (groups with the same superscript letter were statistically similar). Morphological analysis revealed numerous long resin tags at the adhesive interface for acid-etched group, with a few short resin tags for the control group and small gap formation for NaOCl-treated group. In conclusion, dentin surface treatments tested differently affected bonding performance of VF; only acid-etching effectively improved this.

  14. Experimental Studies on the Bonding Strength and Fracture Behavior of Incompatible Materials Bonded by Mechanical Adhesion in Multilayer Rotational Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löhner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotational molding is a plastic processing method that allows for the production of seamless, hollow parts. Defined shaping of the polymeric material only takes place on the outer surface where contact to the tooling is given. The inner surface forms by surface tension effects. By sequential adding of materials, complex multilayer build-up is possible. Besides pure, single materials, filled, or multiphase systems can be processed as well. In this work, possibilities to generate bonding between supposedly incompatible materials by adding a mix-material interlayer are investigated. Interlock mechanisms on a microscale dimension occur and result in mechanical bonding between the used materials, polyethylene (PE and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPE-U. The bonding strength between the materials was investigated to reveal the correlations between processing parameters, resulting layer build-up, and bonding strength. The failure behavior was analyzed and inferences to the influence of the varied parameters were drawn.

  15. Sand-blasting treatment as a way to improve the adhesion strength of hydroxyapatite coating on titanium implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubova, I.; Priamushko, T.; Surmeneva, M.; Korneva, O.; Epple, M.; Prymak, O.; Surmenev, R.

    2017-05-01

    In the current study, the effect of corundum particle sizes (50 and 250-320 μm) used for sand-blasting on the structure, roughness, wettability, mechanical properties, and adhesion of radio frequency magnetron hydroxyapatite coating deposited on treated titanium substrate is studied. Morphology analysis revealed that pretreatment uniformly deforms the surface and induces the formation of pits, which size depends linearly on the grit size. The deposited coatings (Ca/P was in a range of 1.75-1.79) are homogeneous and repeat the relief of the substrate (mean roughness Ra is 1.9±0.1 (250-320 μm) and 0.8±0.1 μm (50 μm)). Texture coefficient calculations revealed the predominant (002) growth texture of hydroxyapatite coatings. The resistance of the coating to plastic deformation and the surface hardening were significantly higher for coatings formed on sand blasted with particle size of 50 μm. Scratch test have shown the significant improvement of wear resistance and lower friction coefficient of coatings for smoother samples. Dynamic contact angle measurements revealed the hydrophilic properties of the hydroxyapatite coating. Thus, sand-blasting of titanium with corundum powder having the size of 50 μm prior to the deposition of RF magnetron coating is recommended for the medical applications intended to improve the bonding between the substrate and coating.

  16. Bond strength of adhesive systems to human tooth enamel Resistência adesiva de sistemas adesivos ao esmalte dentário humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Cachuté Paradella

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro three adhesive systems: a total etching single-component system (G1 Prime & Bond 2.1, a self-etching primer (G2 Clearfil SE Bond, and a self-etching adhesive (G3 One Up Bond F, through shear bond strength to enamel of human teeth, evaluating the type of fracture through stereomicroscopy, following the ISO guidance on adhesive testing. Thirty sound premolars were bisected mesiodistally and the buccal and lingual surfaces were embedded in acrylic resin, polished up to 600-grit sandpapers, and randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 20. Composite resin cylinders were added to the tested surfaces. The specimens were kept in distilled water (37°C/24 h, thermocycled for 500 cycles (5°C-55°C and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The type of fracture was analyzed under stereomicroscopy and the data were submitted to Anova, Tukey and Chi-squared (5% statistical analyses. The mean adhesive strengths were G1: 18.13 ± 6.49 MPa, (55% of resin cohesive fractures; G2: 17.12 ± 5.80 MPa (90% of adhesive fractures; and G3: 10.47 ± 3.14 MPa (85% of adhesive fractures. In terms of bond strength, there were no significant differences between G1 and G2, and G3 was significantly different from the other groups. G1 presented a different type of fracture from that of G2 and G3. In conclusion, although the total etching and self-etching systems presented similar shear bond strength values, the types of fracture presented by them were different, which can have clinical implications.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar in vitro três sistemas adesivos: um monocomponente com condicionamento ácido total (G1 Prime & Bond 2.1, um "primer" autocondicionante (G2 Clearfil SE Bond e um adesivo autocondicionante (G3 One Up Bond F, através de resistência ao cisalhamento ao esmalte de dentes humanos, avaliando o tipo de fratura por estereomicroscopia, seguindo as normas ISO para testes

  17. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belwalkar, Vaibhavi Ramkrishna; Gade, Jaykumar; Mankar, Nikhil Purushottam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25) using silane as a control (Group A) and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. PMID:27307666

  18. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhavi Ramkrishna Belwalkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25 using silane as a control (Group A and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05. Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface.

  19. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  20. Resistência de união à dentina de quatro sistemas adesivos Bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Rocha de Oliveira Carrilho

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a resistência adesiva de quatro sistemas adesivos, composicionalmente diferentes, aplicados à dentina humana. Doze dentes terceiros molares humanos tiveram o esmalte oclusal removido para exposição de uma superfície plana de dentina, na qual foram realizados os procedimentos de adesão. Os dentes foram aleatoriamente divididos em quatro grupos, considerando-se o sistema adesivo e a resina composta a serem empregados: Grupo 1 - Single Bond + P60 (SB; Grupo 2 - Bond 1 + Surefil (B1; Grupo 3 - Prime & Bond NT + Alert (NT e Grupo 4 - Prime & Bond 2.1 + TPH (2.1. Após 24 h de armazenagem em água destilada a 37ºC, os dentes foram seccionados, longitudinalmente, em cortes perpendiculares entre si, para que fossem obtidos espécimes em formato de um paralelogramo com secção transversal retangular de 0,8 mm² de área e 10 mm de comprimento, em média. Os espécimes foram submetidos ao teste de microtração. A análise de variância (alfa = 0,05 demonstrou não haver diferença significante entre os valores médios de resistência obtidos pelos quatro adesivos, embora a análise dos espécimes que sofreram fratura precoce tenha evidenciado menor sensibilidade para o sistema SB.The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin. Twelve human third molars had their occlusal enamel removed in order to expose a flat dentinal surface, on which the adhesive procedures were carried out. The teeth were divided into four groups, according to the employed adhesive system and composite resin: Group 1 - Single Bond + P60 (SB; Group 2 - Bond 1 + Surefil (B1; Group 3 - Prime & Bond NT + Alert (NT; and Group 4 - Prime & Bond 2.1 + TPH (2.1. After 24 h in distilled water at 37ºC, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned in two perpendicular directions in order to obtain parallelogram-shaped specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm² and 10 mm of length, on the

  1. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Fotouhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  2. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

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    Masoumeh Moslemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding. Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa. The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa. The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038. The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427±1/79 and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85±1/90 were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01. Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  3. Influence of artificial aging on the shear bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces after pretreatment with new 10-MDP adhesive systems

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    p.c pott

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigates the bond strength of different zirconia composites  with three different modern adhesive systems after artificial aging using thermocycling and water storage. Methods: A total of 90 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground using a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were additionally treated with either Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, or Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of the three different types of composites – BifixSE “BS”, BifixQM “BQ” or GrandioSO “G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to the ten specimens of each group. All of the specimens underwent artificial aging using thermocycling between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by water storage for 100 days. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. The type of failure was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The data were compared to existing data without artificial aging. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD had higher SBS than FBU in combination with all tested composites, except BifixSE. In nearly all groups, artificial aging had no effect, with the exception of the combination of FBMD with BifixSE, in which there was a significant decrease in SBS after the aging process (p

  4. Instant acting adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  5. Resistência ao cisalhamento da colagem com compósitos utilizando potencializador de adesão Shear bond strength of composites using an adhesion booster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo de Morais

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento dos compósitos Transbond XT e Concise Ortodôntico utilizando o potencializador de adesão Ortho Primer. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 90 incisivos bovinos divididos em seis grupos (n=15. Todos os dentes receberam profilaxia com pedra-pomes e condicionamento do esmalte com ácido fosfórico. No Grupo I, utilizou-se Transbond XT de maneira convencional. O Grupo II foi semelhante ao I, porém, aplicou-se o Ortho Primer ao invés do XT Primer. No Grupo III, após condicionamento, o esmalte foi contaminado com saliva, aplicou-se o Ortho Primer e colagem com Transbond XT. No Grupo IV, utilizou-se o Concise Ortodôntico de maneira convencional. O Grupo V foi semelhante ao IV, porém, utilizou-se o Ortho Primer ao invés da resina fluida. No Grupo VI, após condicionamento, o esmalte foi contaminado com saliva, aplicou-se o Ortho Primer e colagem com Concise. Os corpos de prova foram armazenados em água destilada em estufa a 37ºC por 24h e submetidos ao ensaio de resistência ao cisalhamento. Os dados foram submetidos à ANOVA e ao teste de Tukey (5%. RESULTADOS: a resistência da colagem no Grupo IV foi estatisticamente superior à dos Grupos II, III e VI (p0,05. O Transbond XT e o Concise utilizados convencionalmente obtiveram os maiores valores adesivos. O Ortho Primer em esmalte seco atuou efetivamente como agente de união dos compósitos avaliados. Em esmalte contaminado, a colagem com Concise obteve baixa resistência adesiva.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of the Transbond XT and Concise Orthodontics composites using the Ortho Primer adhesion booster. METHODS: The sample consisted of 90 bovine incisors divided in 6 groups (n=15. All teeth were submitted to prophylaxes with pumice stone and etching with phosphoric acid. In Group I the Transbond XT was used conventionally. Group II was similar to Group I, however, Ortho Primer was used instead of XT

  6. Self-cleaning properties, mechanical stability, and adhesion strength of transparent photocatalytic TiO(2)-ZnO coatings on polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateh, Razan; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2014-02-26

    Transparent layers containing TiO2 have been intensively studied because of their interesting application potential including photocatalytically active and self-cleaning surfaces. In the present work, transparent TiO2-ZnO thin films on a SiO2 interlayer were successfully deposited on the surface of polycarbonate to provide polymeric sheets with a self-cleaning, superhydrophilic, and photocatalytically active surface layer. To ensure a good adhesion of the SiO2 interlayer, the polycarbonate sheets were first modified by irradiation with UV(C) light. The prepared films were characterized by UV/vis spectrophotometry, SEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and water contact-angle measurements. All prepared films are transparent, have thicknesses in the range between 120 and 250 nm, and possess superhydrophilic properties. Moreover, they exhibit good adhesion qualities as defined quantitatively by cross-cut tests. However, their mechanical strengths, checked by felt-abrasion tests, differ by changing the molar TiO2-ZnO ratio. The photocatalytic activity, expressed as photonic efficiency, of the coated surfaces was estimated from the kinetics of the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and methyl stearate. The combination between superhydrophilic properties and photocatalytic activity was determined by studying the change of water contact angle during the storage of the prepared films in the dark under an ambient atmosphere and under an atmosphere containing either acetone or isopropanol followed by UV(A) irradiation. In addition, self-cleaning properties were examined by determining the changes in the contact angle during the irradiation time after applying oleic acid to the surface. The results show that increasing the molar ratio of ZnO in TiO2 coatings up to 5% yields maximum photonic efficiency values of 0.023%, as assessed by the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the superhydrophilic coating with a molar TiO2-ZnO ratio of 1