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Sample records for adhesive arachnoiditis causing

  1. MR imaging of syringomyelia secondary to arachnoid adhesions

    Mark, A.S.; Andrews, B.; Sanches, J.; Manelfe, C.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Arachnoid adhesions have been recognized as a cause of syringomyelia. Ten patients with surgically proven syringomyelia secondary to arachnoid adhesions (seven postraumatic, two postinfectious, one post-Pantopaque) were examined by MR imaging using sagittal and axial T1-weighted and sagittal T2-weighted sequences. A syrinx with loss of the sharp edge between the cord and the subarachnoid space as compared with the sharp interface seen in syringomyelia associated with Chiari I, was demonstrated on T1-weighted sequences in all patients. Intradural arachnoid cysts were found in nine patients. After surgical fenestration of the cyst, four patients improved and five remained unchanged. In one patient the syrinx decreased after fenestration of the cyst. Early detection and fesestration of these cavities may improve the patients' outcome

  2. Focal adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord: Imaging diagnosis and surgical resolution

    Hiroki Morisako

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord can cause progressive symptoms associated with syringomyelia or myelomalacia, its surgical resolution based on the imaging diagnosis is not well characterized. This study aims to describe the use of imaging for the diagnosis of focal adhesive arachnoiditis of the spinal cord and its surgical resolution using microsurgical arachnoidolysis. Materials and Methods: Four consecutive patients with symptomatic syringomyelia or myelomalacia caused by focal adhesive arachnoiditis underwent microsurgical arachnoidolysis. Comprehensive imaging evaluation using constructive interference in steady-state (CISS magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or myelographic MR imaging using true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP sequences was included before surgery to determine the surgical indication. Results: In all four patients a focal adhesion was identified at the cervical or thoracic level of the spinal cord, a consequence of infection or trauma. Three patients showed modest or minor improvement in neurological function, and one patient was unchanged after surgery. The syringomyelia or myelomalacia resolved after surgery and no recurrence was noted within the follow-up period, which ranged from 5 months to 30 months. Conclusions: MRI diagnosis of focal adhesive arachnoiditis is critical to determine the surgical indication. Microsurgical arachnoidolysis appears to be a straightforward method for stabilizing the progressive symptoms, though the procedure is technically demanding.

  3. arachnoiditis

    2005-09-02

    Sep 2, 2005 ... Society U K. 1978; 98(4): 490-3. 12. McFadzean RM, Hardly DM, McIlwaine GG. Optochiasmal arachnoiditis following muslin wrapping of ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms. J Neurosurg. 1991 Sep; 75 (3):. 393-6. 13. Repka MX, Miller NR, Penix JO, Trant JH 3rd. Optic neuropathy from the.

  4. Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of arachnoidal adhesion and its neuroendoscopic confirmation for trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

    Mami Ishikawa, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of the arachnoidal adhesion around the trigeminal nerve was effective for typical trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

  5. Benign occipital unicameral bone cyst causing lower cranial nerve palsies complicated by iophendylate arachnoiditis

    Bradley, W. G.; Kalbag, R. M.; Ramani, P. S.; Tomlinson, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    A 20 year old girl presented with a history of neck and occipital pain for six weeks, which was found to be due to a unicameral bone cyst of the left occipital condylar region. The differential diagnosis of bone cysts in the skull is discussed. Six months after the operation, the patient again presented with backache due to adhesive arachnoiditis. The latter was believed to have arisen as a result of a combination of spinal infective meningitis and intrathecal ethyl iodophenyl undecylate (iophendylate, Myodil, Pantopaque). The nature of meningeal reactions to iophendylate and the part played by intrathecal corticosteroids in relieving the arachnoiditis in the present case are discussed. Images

  6. Post-traumatic arachnoiditis: an unusual cause of Brown-Sequard syndrome

    Ramli, N.; Merican, A.M.; Lim, A.; Kumar, G.

    2001-01-01

    Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) is a unilateral cord injury characterised by an ipsilateral motor deficit with contralateral pain and temperature hypoaesthesia. Although there are a variety of causes, the majority of cases are generally of neoplastic origin or are traumatic in origin. We describe a rare cause of Brown-Sequard syndrome as a result of post-traumatic arachnoiditis. Magnetic resonance imaging with the use of thin-slice high-resolution constructive interference in steady state (CISS) and T2-weighted spin-echo sequence were used to demonstrate the cause and appearance of the lesion in the spinal canal and was useful in the assessment and management of the patient. This case illustrates the usefulness of the CISS sequence in MRI for elucidating arachnoiditis. (orig.)

  7. Giant posterior fossa arachnoid cyst causing tonsillar herniation and cervical syringomyelia

    Vijay P Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired cerebellar tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia associated with posterior fossa mass lesions is an exception rather than the rule. In the present article, we describe the neuroimaging findings in a case of 28-year-old female patient presented with a history of paraesthesia involving right upper limb of 8-month duration. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant retrocerebellar arachnoid causing tonsillar herniation with cervical syringomyelia. The findings in the present case supports that the one of the primary mechanism for the development of syringomyelia may be the obstruction to the flow of cerebrospinal fluid causing alterations in the passage of extracellular fluid in the spinal cord and leading to syringomyelia.

  8. Clinical Application of 3D-CISS MRI Sequences for Diagnosis and Surgical Planning of Spinal Arachnoid Diverticula and Adhesions in Dogs.

    Tauro, Anna; Jovanovik, Jelena; Driver, Colin John; Rusbridge, Clare

    2018-02-01

     Abnormalities within the spinal arachnoid space are often treated surgically, but they can be challenging to detect with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. 3D-CISS sequences are considered superior in evaluating structures surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to the high signal-to-noise ratio, high contrast-to-noise ratio and intrinsic insensitivity to motion with minimal signal loss due to CSF pulsations. Our objective was to describe findings and advantages in adding 3D-CISS sequences to routine MRI in patients affected by spinal arachnoid diverticula (SAD) or arachnoid adhesions.  This article is a retrospective review of medical records of 19 dogs admitted at Fitzpatrick Referrals between 2013 and 2017 that were diagnosed with SAD and confirmed surgically. Inclusion criterions were the presence of clinical signs compatible with compressive myelopathy and an MRI diagnosis, which included the 3D-CISS sequence. Our database was searched for additional 19 dogs diagnosed with other spinal lesions other than SAD that had the same MR sequences. All MR images were anonymized and evaluated by two assessors.  3D-CISS sequence appears to improve confidence in diagnosing and surgical planning (Mann-Whitney U -test: p  CSF hydrodynamics and providing more anatomical details than conventional MRI sequences. The clinical data in combination with imaging findings would limit over interpretation, when concurrent pathology within the arachnoid space is present. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  9. Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extradural arachnoid cysts (EACs are rare causes of spinal cord compression and cauda equina. These benign lesions appear in the literature mainly as single case reports. In this article, we present the largest series found in literature, with four new cases of spinal extradural arachnoid cysts. The characteristic imaging features, details of surgical steps and strategies to prevent postoperative kyphosis in this cystic pathology will be discussed.

  10. Arachnoid Pit and Extensive Sinus Pnematization as the Cause of Spontaneous Lateral Intrasphenoidal Encephalocele

    Ali AlMontasheri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral sphenoid encephalocele, especially within the lateral aspect of the sphenoid sinus, when the sphenoid sinus has pneumatized extensively into the pterygoid recess, are considered exceedingly rare. We report a rare case of lateral intrasphenoidal encephalocele with spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF rhinorrhea. Computed tomography demonstrated bilateral arachnoid pit, extensive sphenoid sinus pneumatization, and a defect in the superior wall of the left lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated anteromedial temporal lobe herniating through the bony defect.

  11. Diffuse arachnoid ossification and multiple arachnoid cysts presenting with progressive thoracic myelopathy

    Sakai, Toshinori; Sairyo, Koichi; Kashima, Masahiro; Kosaka, Hirofumi; Katoh, Shinsuke; Yasui, Natsuo [The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Health Biosciences, Tokushima (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    An ossified arachnoid membrane combined with cystic formation is rarely reported as a cause of spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented with diffuse ossification of the arachnoid membrane (arachnoid ossification) and multiple cystic changes (arachnoid cyst) at the thoracic and lumbar spine. The lesions were surgically removed and progressive deterioration was prevented, although no marked improvement of neurological symptoms was attained. (orig.)

  12. Spontaneous hygroma in intracranial arachnoid cyst

    Agnoli, A L

    1984-06-01

    Anamnesis and treatment of two cases of arachnoid cysts extending into the subarachnoid space are described. No traumatic incident was discovered in the previous history of these two patients. The causal genesis of neurological signs of deficiency in patients with arachnoid and acquired cysts is discussed. However, the cause of the development of a subdural hygroma in arachnoid cysts remains unclarified. CT findings of arachnoid cysts with a hypodense zone between brain surface and the vault of the cranium always require an investigation into the possibility of a spontaneous emptying of the cyst or of a congenital and not only localised extension of the cyst itself.

  13. Tuberculous radiculomyelitis (arachnoiditis): myelographic (and CT myelographic) appearances

    Phadke, R.V.; Kohli, A.; Jain, V.K.; Gupta, R.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculous radiculomyelitis (arachnoiditis) remains one of the important causes of paraplegia in India. The diagnosis usually rests on clinical history and examination, and on laboratory findings in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF). Few descriptive reports are available of the myelographic appearance, with water-soluble contrast media, in tuberculous radiculomyelitis (arachnoiditis). A retrospective review of 21 myelograms and 10 computed tomographic (CT) myelograms, in 14 patients with tuberculous radiculomyelitis, was carried out, with a view to describing, in detail, the radiographic features. An attempt was made to assess the use of the radiologic procedures in diagnosis and follow up in these patients. Conventional myelographic findings included block (8/14), irregular sub-arachnoid space (9/14), filling defects (8/14), sluggish contrast flow (2/14), root thickening (3/14) and atrophic cord (2/14). Computed tomographic myelography showed reduced contrast density in portions of the opacified CSF ring around the cord in affected region (6/7) and, in addition, demonstrated septa and adhesions. Intravenous contrast CT was not found to be useful (2/2). Follow-up studies showed partial resolution (3/6), deterioration (1/6) and status quo of radiological findings (2/6). Although these changes can be seen in chronic radiculomyelitis (arachnoiditis) from other causes, such as leukaemic infiltration/lymphoma, other chronic central nervous system infections and iatrogenic causes, including repeated intrathecal injections, conventional myelography appeared to be useful for diagnosis and follow up in tuberculous radiculomyelitis (arachnoiditis). 12 refs., 1 tabs., 10 figs

  14. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu; Roh, Sung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our cli...

  15. Giant arachnoid granulation in a patient with benign intracranial hypertension

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Yaqci, Baki; Cirak, Bayram; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2008-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and angiographic imaging of an unusual giant arachnoid granulation in the superior sagittal sinus in a man with headache and vertigo. Intrasinus pressure measurements revealed a significant pressure gradient across the lesion. MR imaging is useful to identify giant arachnoid granulation and dural sinus thrombosis, whereas dural sinus pressure measurement in certain cases of giant arachnoid granulations can be used to evaluate the lesion as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (orig.)

  16. Giant arachnoid granulation in a patient with benign intracranial hypertension

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Yaqci, Baki; Cirak, Bayram; Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Denizli (Turkey)

    2008-10-15

    We report magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and angiographic imaging of an unusual giant arachnoid granulation in the superior sagittal sinus in a man with headache and vertigo. Intrasinus pressure measurements revealed a significant pressure gradient across the lesion. MR imaging is useful to identify giant arachnoid granulation and dural sinus thrombosis, whereas dural sinus pressure measurement in certain cases of giant arachnoid granulations can be used to evaluate the lesion as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (orig.)

  17. Ventriculoscopic surgery for arachnoid cysts in the lateral ventricle: a comparative study of 21 consecutive cases

    Shou, Xuefei; Zhao, Yao; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Yongfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate neuronavigation-guided ventriculoscopic technique in the treatment of arachnoid cysts in the lateral ventricle. Methods: Between January 2008 to November 2011, twenty-one neuronavigationguided ventriculoscopic surgery were performed for the treatment of symptomatic arachnoid cysts in 21 patients (14 male and 7 female patients, mean age 24.1 years [ranged 1.5-61 years]) Clinical presentations varied from headache, vomiting, hemiparesis and seizure. The trajectory of ventriculoscopy was dynamically monitored and guided in real time by neuronavigation system. Cysts fenestrations were performed in fourteen cases, and cysts resection in seven cases, respectively. All patients were prospectively had a regular follow-up. Results: After operation, all patients achieved symptom resolution without surgical mortality and morbidity. Aseptic meningitis was noted in four cases with cyst resection, and all recovered quickly without advanced treatments. However, a later ependymal adhesion, occurred in one case during follow-up period. Conclusion: The combination of ventriculoscopy and neuronavigation is an accurate, effective and safe approach for the treatment of the patients with arachnoid cysts in the lateral ventricle, especially, for overcoming the topographic variation caused by intraventricular pathologies. Cystoventriculostomy is the best choice. PMID:26885002

  18. [Arachnoid cysts: Embriology and pathology].

    García-Conde, Mario; Martín-Viota, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    There is still great controversy surrounding the origin of the arachnoid cyst. The most accepted theory in the case of congenital cysts explains how they are formed from an anomalous development of the arachnoid membrane, which is unfolded allowing the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside and creating a cyst. This theory seems to explain the origin of convexity and sylvian cistern arachnoid cysts, whereas those in other locations might be due to other mechanisms. In the anatomopathological analysis, the arachnoid cyst wall can be seen as having few differences from normal, although thickened due to an increase quantity of collagenous material. A description of the embryological development of the arachnoid layer and cyst formation is presented, describing the main anatomopathological findings. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral Arachnoid Cysts

    Ersin Haciyakupoglu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts can occur through inflammatory, traumatic, chemical irritation, skin tumor and postoperative processes. It is diagnosed and differentiated by magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography from other lesions. Its differential diagnosis includes colloid cyst , craniopharyngioma, prosencephaly, holoprosencephaly , epidermoid cyst, hydatid cyst, low grade glial tumors, infarcts and subdural hygroma. Most of them are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. Treatment methods such as simple cyst aspiration , total excision of the cyst, basal cysternostomy, ventricular fenestration, cysto or ventriculoperitoneal shunt can be performed by various endoscopic surgery and craniotomy. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 259-268

  20. Population study of Pyxis arachnoides brygooi (Vuillemin ...

    The Madagascar spider tortoise (Pyxis arachnoides spp.) is faced with the threat of habitat destruction as well as the international pet trade. Habitat requirements and population structure of this species are largely unknown. Detailed studies have so far concentrated on the subspecies Pyxis arachnoides arachnoides.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of arachnoid cyst

    Korkut Daglar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are rare, usually benign, space-occupying central nervous system lesion. They are the results of an accumulation of cerebrospinal-like fluid between the cerebral meninges and diagnosed prenatally as a unilocular, simple, echolucent area within the fetal head. They may be primary (congenital (maldevelopment of the meninges or secondary (acquired (result of infection trauma, or hemorrhage. The primary ones typically dont communicate with the subarachnoid space whereas acquired forms usually communicate. In recent years, with the development of radiological techniques, the clinical detectability of arachnoid cysts seems to have increased. We report a case of primary arachnoid cyst that were diagnosed prenatally by using ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging . [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 792-795

  2. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  3. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  4. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidural anesthesia as a cause of acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts

    Sklar, E.M.L.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Post, M.J.D.; Montalvo, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Six patients with acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts secondary to epidural anesthesia were evaluated with MR imaging (seven patients) and intraoperative US (three patients). The cysts were located in the lower cervical and thoracic spine. Adhesions and irregularity of the cord surface were frequently noted. Associated intramedullary lesions, including intramedullary cysts and myelomalacia, were seen in two of the patients. Arachnoiditis was unsuspected clinically in three patients, and MR imaging proved to be the diagnostic examination that first suggested the cause of the patients symptoms. The underlying mechanism for the formation of these cysts is a chemically induced arachnoiditis

  6. Arachnoid cyst in cavernous sinus: case report

    Lim, Hyoung Gun; Yoo, Won Jong; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Hae Gui; Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah

    2002-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus is very rare. When present, its anatomic location frequently gives rise to cranial nerve palsy. We report a case of arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus in a 38-year-old man with impaired eyeball movement and diplopia

  7. Arachnoid cyst in cavernous sinus: case report

    Lim, Hyoung Gun; Yoo, Won Jong; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Hae Giu; Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah

    2002-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus is very rare. When present, its anatomic location frequently gives rise to cranial nerve palsy. We report a case of arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus in a 38-year-old man with impeder eyeball movement and diplopia

  8. Arachnoid cyst in cavernous sinus: case report

    Lim, Hyoung Gun; Yoo, Won Jong; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Hae Giu; Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah [The Catholic University of Kore College of Medicine, Puchun (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus is very rare. When present, its anatomic location frequently gives rise to cranial nerve palsy. We report a case of arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus in a 38-year-old man with impeder eyeball movement and diplopia.

  9. Arachnoid granulation affected by subarachnoid hemorrhage

    R.P. Chopard

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate using light microscopy the fibro-cellular components of arachnoid granulations affected by mild and severe subarachnoid hemorrage. The erythrocytes were in the channels delimitated by collagenous and elastic bundles and arachnoid cells, showing their tortuous and intercommunicating row from the pedicle to the fibrous capsule. The core portion of the pedicle and the center represented a principal route to the bulk outflow of cerebrospinal fluid and erythrocytes. In the severe hemorrhage, the fibrocellular components are desorganized, increasing the extracellular channels. We could see arachnoid granulations without erythrocytes, which cells showed big round nucleous suggesting their transformation into phagocytic cells.

  10. Adhesion

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Adhesion URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001493.htm Adhesion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue that form between two ...

  11. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  12. An interesting case of primary spinal arachnoiditis.

    Vaughan, Denis

    2012-02-27

    Spinal arachnoiditis describes inflammation of the meninges, subarachnoid space and, in most cases, also involve the pial layer. The vast majority of cases described are secondary and are preceded by a known event, for example,. trauma, infections or irritative substances. Here, we present the case of primary spinal arachnoiditis. A 35-year-old lady was referred to the neurosurgical services in Dublin, Ireland with a 15-month history of progressive, right lower limb weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic distortion of the lumbar spinal canal extending up to the conus. Initially, an L2-L4 laminectomy was performed revealing thickened and adherent arachnoid with a large cyst in the spinal canal. Four months after initial operation, the patient represented with bilateral lower limb weakness and loss of detrusor function. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which showed the development of a syrinx in the patient\\'s thoracic spine. We then performed a T9-T10 laminectomy, midline myelotomy and insertion of a syringe-arachnoid shunt. Post-operative imaging showed resolution of the syrinx and a vast improvement in lower limb power. The patient also regained bladder control. In conclusion, spinal arachnoiditis is a clearly defined pathological and radiological entity with a highly variable clinical presentation. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as there is no recognised treatment currently, with most interventions aimed at symptomatic relief.

  13. Role of MR imaging in the diagnosis of complicated arachnoid cyst

    Ibarra, R.; Kesava, P.P. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Background. Arachnoid cysts are intra-arachnoidal cerebrospinal fluid collections that are usually asymptomatic, however, they may become acutely symptomatic due to enlargement of the cyst or the presence of hemorrhage. Materials and methods. We report a case of a child presenting with a 3-week history of headaches, nausea, and vision problems. There was no history of trauma. MRI clearly demonstrated a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst with associated subacute intracystic and subdural hematoma that was causing mass effect and required surgery. Results. This lesion was isodense to the brain on CT. Conclusion. We focus on the importance of MR imaging in the differentiation of these subacute/early chronic hemorrhagic collections that may be overlooked with CT. (orig.)

  14. Role of MR imaging in the diagnosis of complicated arachnoid cyst

    Ibarra, R.; Kesava, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Arachnoid cysts are intra-arachnoidal cerebrospinal fluid collections that are usually asymptomatic, however, they may become acutely symptomatic due to enlargement of the cyst or the presence of hemorrhage. Materials and methods. We report a case of a child presenting with a 3-week history of headaches, nausea, and vision problems. There was no history of trauma. MRI clearly demonstrated a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst with associated subacute intracystic and subdural hematoma that was causing mass effect and required surgery. Results. This lesion was isodense to the brain on CT. Conclusion. We focus on the importance of MR imaging in the differentiation of these subacute/early chronic hemorrhagic collections that may be overlooked with CT. (orig.)

  15. Supratentorial arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma: neuroradiologic studies

    Ochi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Morikawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, National Nagasaki Chuo Hospital, Ohmura (Japan); Ogino, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Nagaoki, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Isahaya General Hospital (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    CT and MR images of 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst complicated by subdural hematoma were studied and compared with those of 8 patients who developed nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst. Ot the 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst, CT and MR disclosed temporal bulging and/or thinning of the temporal squama in all 6 patients with middle fossa arachnoid cysts, and the thinning of the calvaria was evident in another patient with a convexity cyst. Calvarial thinning at the site corresponding to interhemispheric arachnoid cyst was clearly depicted on coronal MR images. In contrast, none of the 8 young patients with nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst had abnormal calvaria. Temporal bulging and thinning of the overlying calvaria were identified as diagnostic CT and MR features of arachnoid cyst with complicating intracystic and subdural hermorrhage. Radiologists should be aware of this association and should evaluate the bony structure carefully. (orig.)

  16. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    Anne N. Flynn, MD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated with surgical correction of clitoral phimosis and lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF caused by LS. Patients reported improvement in clitoral sensation and ability to achieve orgasm, as well as decreased dyspareunia. Surgical correction of vulvar scarring is a viable option to restore vulvar anatomy and sexual function in appropriate candidates with anogenital LS. Flynn AN, King M, Rieff M, Krapf J, and Goldstein AT. Patient satisfaction of surgical treatment of clitoral phimosis and labial adhesions caused by lichen sclerosus. Sex Med 2015;3:251–255.

  17. To Investigate the Effect of Colchicine in Prevention of Adhesions Caused by Serosal Damage in Rats

    İhsan Yıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Adhesion formation is a process which starts with an inflammation caused by a number of factors and eventually results in fibrosis. Colchicine prevents adhesion formation which is antifibrous process. The effectivity of colchicine in the prevention of adhesions was investigated. Materials and Methods. A total of 36 rats were equally divided into three groups: (I control group 1 (n=12, (II abrasion group 2 (n=12, and (III abrasion + colchicine group 3 (n=12. Group 1 underwent laparotomy and was orally given physiological serum 2 cc/day for 10 days. In Group 2, injury was created in the cecum serosa following laparotomy and they were orally given physiological serum 2 cc/day for 10 days. In Group 3, injury was created in the cecum serosa following laparotomy and the rats were orally given colchicine 50 mcg kg/day mixed with physiological serum 2 cc/day for 10 days. Laparotomy was performed and adhesions were examined both macroscopically and microscopically. Both macroscopic and microscopic examinations were performed using Zühlke’s score. Results. A significant difference was observed among the adhesion scores of the groups both macroscopically and microscopically. Macroscopic score was lower in group 3 than group 2. Microscopic score was lower in group 3 than group 2. Conclusion. Oral administration of colchicine is effective in the prevention of adhesions.

  18. A case of obstructive colitis caused by rectal stenosis and adhesion due to irradiation

    Tochika, Naoshige; Sugimoto, Takeki; Takano, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Michiya; Matsuura, Kimio; Araki, Keijiro

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of obstructive colitis associated with rectal stenosis and adhesion due to irradiation. A 68-year-old woman who had been suffering from constipation after an episode of irradiation for cervical cancer of the uterus two years previously was admitted to our hospital complaining of the lower abdominal pain. After two days, an operation was performed under a diagnosis or panperitonitis. Stenosis and adhesion of the rectum and necrosis at the oral side of the adhesion was recognized. Histologically, necrosis of the rectum from mucosa to serosa was recognized, and no neoplastic change was seen at the stenotic portion. The most common cause of local stenosis of the colon leading to obstructive colitis is colon cancer. Obstructive colitis caused by a benign stenosis as reported here is rare. (author)

  19. A case of obstructive colitis caused by rectal stenosis and adhesion due to irradiation

    Tochika, Naoshige; Sugimoto, Takeki; Takano, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Michiya; Matsuura, Kimio; Araki, Keijiro [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We report a case of obstructive colitis associated with rectal stenosis and adhesion due to irradiation. A 68-year-old woman who had been suffering from constipation after an episode of irradiation for cervical cancer of the uterus two years previously was admitted to our hospital complaining of the lower abdominal pain. After two days, an operation was performed under a diagnosis or panperitonitis. Stenosis and adhesion of the rectum and necrosis at the oral side of the adhesion was recognized. Histologically, necrosis of the rectum from mucosa to serosa was recognized, and no neoplastic change was seen at the stenotic portion. The most common cause of local stenosis of the colon leading to obstructive colitis is colon cancer. Obstructive colitis caused by a benign stenosis as reported here is rare. (author)

  20. De Novo Intraneural Arachnoid Cyst Presenting with Complete Third Nerve Palsy: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Brewington, Danielle; Petrov, Dmitriy; Whitmore, Robert; Liu, Grant; Wolf, Ronald; Zager, Eric L

    2017-02-01

    Intraneural arachnoid cyst is an extremely rare etiology of isolated cranial nerve palsy. Although seldom encountered in clinical practice, this pathology is amenable to surgical intervention. Correct identification and treatment of the cyst are required to prevent permanent nerve damage and potentially reverse the deficits. We describe a rare case of isolated third nerve palsy caused by an intraneural arachnoid cyst. A 49-year-old woman with a recent history of headaches experienced acute onset of painless left-sided third nerve palsy. According to hospital records ptosis, mydriasis, absence of adduction, elevation, and intorsion were noted in the left eye. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies showed an extra-axial, 1-cm lesion along the left paraclinoid region, causing mild indentation on the uncus. There was dense fluid layering dependently concerning for hemorrhage, but no evidence of aneurysms. A pterional craniotomy was performed, revealing a completely intraneural arachnoid cyst in the third nerve. The cyst was successfully fenestrated. At 7-month follow-up, the left eye had recovered intact intorsion and some adduction, but the left pupil remained dilated and nonreactive. There was still no elevation and no afferent pupillary defect. Double vision persisted with partial improvement in the ptosis, opening up to more than 75% early in the day. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intraneural arachnoid cyst causing isolated third nerve palsy. This rare pathology proves to be both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-communicating extradural arachnoid cyst: a rare case report with review of literature

    Gupta Asheesh Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Extradural arachnoid cysts in the spine are uncommon causes of spinal cord compression in the paediatric population that are thought to arise from congenital defects in the duramater. In most literatures it is describe that such cysts communicating with the intrathecal subarachnoid space through a small defect in the dura. In this case report we describe a case of a child who presented with spinal cord compression caused by a large spinal extradural arachnoid cyst that did not communicate with the intradural subarachnoid space. An 9 year-old girl presented with progressive lower-extremity weakness, myelopathy, and severe gait ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated a large extradural arachnoid cyst extending from T4 to T9. The patient underwent a thoracic laminectomy for en bloc resection of the spinal extradural arachnoid cyst. Intra-operatively, the dura was intact and there was no evidence of communication into the intradural subarachnoid space. Postoperatively, the patient’s motor strength and ambulation improved immediately, and no subsequent cerebrospinal fluid leak occurred.

  2. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    S K Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options.

  3. Bilateral cerebellopontine arachnoid cyst: A rare entity.

    Sharma, Anand; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, Radhey S; Gandhi, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cerebellopontine angle (CPA) arachnoid cysts (ACs) are very rare: only one case is reported in literature. Pathogenesis of those cysts is unknown; they are thought to be congenital. The presenting symptoms of CPA AC are frequently nonspecific or otological. The management of ACs of the CPA is controversial. We are reporting two cases of bilateral CPA AC with their pathophysiology and review of literature.

  4. Giant non traumatic intradiploic arachnoid cyst in a young male

    Sharma, Rajesh [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, ASCOMS Hospital, Sidhra, Jammu (India); Gupta, Puneet; Mahajan, Manik, E-mail: puneetgupta619@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Poonam [Department of Pathology, GMC, Jammu (India); Gupta, Anchal; Khurana, Arti [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, GMC, Jammu (J and K) (India)

    2016-09-15

    Intradiploic arachnoid cysts have scarcely been reported in the literature, most reported cases being secondary to trauma. Non traumatic arachnoid cysts are quite rare and have been reported mostly in adults. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old male presenting with a slowly growing mass in the occipital region and intermittent headaches. On the basis of the findings of X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head, the mass was diagnosed as a giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst. Keywords: Arachnoid cysts; Cerebrospinal fluid; Headache/diagnosis. (author)

  5. THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ARACHNOID CYSTS

    GO, KG

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts have been found in 0.3% of computed tomography (CT) scans and in 0.1% of brain autopsy specimens, more often in children than in adults. Intracranial arachnoid cysts occur prevalently in males, on the left side, and in the temporal fossa. Their occasional association

  6. Aneurysm, arachnoiditis and intrathecal Au (gold)

    Pence, D.M.; Kim, T.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    This report is a 20-year follow-up of 14 patients treated with external beam craniospinal irradiation and intrathecal gold (10-45 mCi) for medulloblastoma. Six of the patients died within 2 years of treatment from persistent disease. No patients are alive without complications. Six of eight surviving patients developed arachnoiditis and cauda equina syndrome within 5 to 10 years of treatment. Seven of eight survivors developed aneurysms and/or cerebrovascular accidents 9 to 20 years after treatment. Four of the cerebrovascular events were fatal. Intrathecal gold pools in the basal cisterns and cauda equina delivering an extremely inhomogeneous dose throughout the neuroaxis. Its use is discouraged

  7. A patient with myasthenia gravis and a large arachnoid cyst - report of a case.

    Bucuk, Mira; Gasparovic, Iva; Sonnenschein, Ivan; Perkovic, Olivio

    2017-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by weakening of voluntary muscles during the day and a marked restitution of function during the night and after rest. The symptoms may worsen over days or weeks, sometimes even in a few hours, and are usually well controlled by appropriate therapy. Arachnoid cysts are congenital or acquired deformities of the arachnoid membrane and are usually too small to cause distinct clinical symptomatology. We describe a case of a 76-year-old myasthenia gravis patient with an arachnoid cyst. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of these two comorbidities together.

  8. A New Classification for Pathologies of Spinal Meninges-Part 2: Primary and Secondary Intradural Arachnoid Cysts.

    Klekamp, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Spinal intradural arachnoid cysts are rare causes of radiculopathy or myelopathy. Treatment options include resection, fenestration, or cyst drainage. To classify intradural spinal arachnoid cysts and present results of their treatment. Among 1519 patients with spinal space occupying lesions, 130 patients demonstrated intradural arachnoid cysts. Neuroradiological and surgical features were reviewed and clinical data analyzed. Twenty-one patients presented arachnoid cysts as a result of an inflammatory leptomeningeal reaction related to meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intrathecal injections, intradural surgery, or trauma, ie, secondary cysts. For the remaining 109 patients, no such history could be elucidated, ie, primary cysts. Forty-six percent of primary and 86% of secondary cysts were associated with syringomyelia. Patients presented after an average history of 53 ± 88 months. There were 122 thoracic and 7 lumbar cysts plus 1 cervical cyst. Fifty-nine patients with primary and 15 patients with secondary cysts underwent laminotomies with complete or partial cyst resection and duraplasty. Mean follow-up was 57 ± 52 months. In the first postoperative year, profound improvements for primary cysts were noted, in contrast to marginal changes for secondary cysts. Progression-free survival for 10 years following surgery was determined as 83% for primary compared to 15% for secondary cysts. Despite differences in clinical presentation, progression-free survival was almost identical for patients with or without syringomyelia. Complete or partial resection leads to favorable short- and long-term results for primary arachnoid cysts. For secondary cysts, surgery can only provide clinical stabilization for a limited time due to the often extensive arachnoiditis. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  9. Characterization of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins expressed by cells cultured from human arachnoid granulation tissue

    Mehta Bhavya C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are projections of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses. They function, along with the extracranial lymphatics, to circulate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to the systemic venous circulation. Disruption of normal CSF dynamics may result in increased intracranial pressures causing many problems including headaches and visual loss, as in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus. To study the role of AGs in CSF egress, we have grown cells from human AG tissue in vitro and have characterized their expression of those cytoskeletal and junctional proteins that may function in the regulation of CSF outflow. Methods Human AG tissue was obtained at autopsy, and explanted to cell culture dishes coated with fibronectin. Typically, cells migrated from the explanted tissue after 7–10 days in vitro. Second or third passage cells were seeded onto fibronectin-coated coverslips at confluent densities and grown to confluency for 7–10 days. Arachnoidal cells were tested using immunocytochemical methods for the expression of several common cytoskeletal and junctional proteins. Second and third passage cultures were also labeled with the common endothelial markers CD-31 or VE-cadherin (CD144 and their expression was quantified using flow cytometry analysis. Results Confluent cultures of arachnoidal cells expressed the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Cytokeratin intermediate filaments were expressed variably in a subpopulation of cells. The cultures also expressed the junctional proteins connexin43, desmoplakin 1 and 2, E-cadherin, and zonula occludens-1. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that second and third passage cultures failed to express the endothelial cell markers CD31 or VE-cadherin in significant quantities, thereby showing that these cultures did not consist of endothelial cells from the venous sinus wall. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of

  10. Spinal Arachnoiditis as a Complication of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in Non-HIV Previously Healthy Adults

    Komori, Mika; Kosa, Peter; Khan, Omar; Hammoud, Dima A.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Browne, Sarah K.; Lin, Yen-Chih; Romm, Elena; Ramaprasad, Charu; Fries, Bettina C.; Bennett, John E.; Bielekova, Bibiana; Williamson, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcus can cause meningoencephalitis (CM) among previously healthy non-HIV adults. Spinal arachnoiditis is under-recognized, since diagnosis is difficult with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) pathology. Methods. We describe 6 cases of spinal arachnoiditis among 26 consecutively recruited CM patients with normal CD4 counts who achieved microbiologic control. We performed detailed neurological exams, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping and biomarker analysis before and after adjunctive immunomodulatory intervention with high dose pulse corticosteroids, affording causal inference into pathophysiology. Results. All 6 exhibited severe lower motor neuron involvement in addition to cognitive changes and gait disturbances from meningoencephalitis. Spinal involvement was associated with asymmetric weakness and urinary retention. Diagnostic specificity was improved by MRI imaging which demonstrated lumbar spinal nerve root enhancement and clumping or lesions. Despite negative fungal cultures, CSF inflammatory biomarkers, sCD27 and sCD21, as well as the neuronal damage biomarker, neurofilament light chain (NFL), were elevated compared to healthy donor (HD) controls. Elevations in these biomarkers were associated with clinical symptoms and showed improvement with adjunctive high dose pulse corticosteroids. Conclusions. These data suggest that a post-infectious spinal arachnoiditis is an important complication of CM in previously healthy individuals, requiring heightened clinician awareness. Despite microbiological control, this syndrome causes significant pathology likely due to increased inflammation and may be amenable to suppressive therapeutics. PMID:28011613

  11. An arachnoid cyst presenting as an intramedullary tumour

    Willems, P. W.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vandertop, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A case of thoracic intradural extramedullary arachnoid cyst is presented in which an intramedullary low grade glioma was suspected preoperatively. The cyst was widely fenestrated and postoperatively, the patient experienced considerable improvement in her symptoms. As postoperative MRI studies also

  12. Giant arachnoid granulation: differential diagnosis of acute headache

    Peters, S.A.; Heyer, C.M.; Frombach, E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We present a case of intense, rapidly evolving headache clinically mimicking meningitis, subarachnoid haemorrhage or venous sinus thrombosis. Clinical examination, standard blood work and central nervous system studies were non-contributory and effectively ruled out these diagnoses. Cranial multidetector CT studies before and after application of intravenous contrast medium performed prior to lumbar tap disclosed a non-enhancing ovoid mass filling the superior sagittal sinus. This lesion posed a differential to venous sinus thrombosis, but ultimately fulfilled the criteria of a giant arachnoid granulation. The imaging characteristics and differential diagnosis of giant arachnoid granulations are discussed

  13. Computer tomographic detection of an intraspinal arachnoidal cyst

    Kuckein, D; Walter, K; Paal, G

    1981-03-01

    A 46 year old female patient who after 3-4 weeks of influenza suffered from strong headaches, vomiting and rotatory vertigo was subjected to a myelograph and then to a computerized tomographic investigation due to suspect cerebrospinal fluid. The computerized tomography is better than the myelography in diagnosing intraspinal arachnoidal cysts, however this should be preceded by most accurate possible segment location.

  14. Magnetic resonance cisternography for preoperative evaluation of arachnoid cysts

    Awaji, M. [Niigata University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Okamoto, K. [Niigata University, Center for Integrated Human Brain Science, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan); Nishiyama, K. [Niigata University, Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    With a high likelihood of clinical improvement and low rates of complications, minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery is becoming the treatment of choice for symptomatic or growing arachnoid cysts. In neuroendoscopic surgery, visualization of anatomical landmarks is essential in achieving successful fenestration without complications. Because of the restricted visual field in neuroendoscopic surgery, preoperative anatomical assessment is very helpful. Magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) with high spatial resolution and contrast, using for example 3-D Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state (CISS) or fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences, is able to detect the arachnoid cyst wall and neighboring anatomical structures as the anatomical landmarks. We retrospectively reviewed T2-weighted (T2-W) fast spin-echo images, and the MRC and intraoperative findings. Axial and coronal T2-W images (6 and 3 mm thickness, respectively) and axial and coronal 0.8 mm thick MRC images with CISS or FIESTA were obtained from four patients with arachnoid cysts treated by neuroendoscopic surgery. Intraoperative findings were reviewed on videotape recorded during the procedures. At the brain surface, the arachnoid cyst wall could be detected clearly in any of the four patients on MRC images, and was only partly seen in the fourth patient T2-W images. Adjacent important anatomical structures including vessels and cranial nerves, and an enough space for cystocisternostomy were identified on MRC images, and the findings were consistent with the findings during neuroendoscopic surgery. Preoperative identification of the arachnoid cyst wall and surrounding anatomical structures by MRC may help avoid complications and allow safer neuroendoscopic surgery. (orig.)

  15. Disruption of the novel gene fad104 causes rapid postnatal death and attenuation of cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

    Nishizuka, Makoto; Kishimoto, Keishi; Kato, Ayumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Sato, Ryuichiro; Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms at the beginning of adipogenesis remain unknown. Previously, we identified a novel gene, fad104 (factor for adipocyte differentiation 104), transiently expressed at the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. Since the knockdown of the expression of fad104 dramatically repressed adipogenesis, it is clear that fad104 plays important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, the physiological roles of fad104 are still unknown. In this study, we generated fad104-deficient mice by gene targeting. Although the mice were born in the expected Mendelian ratios, all died within 1 day of birth, suggesting fad104 to be crucial for survival after birth. Furthermore, analyses of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) prepared from fad104-deficient mice provided new insights into the functions of fad104. Disruption of fad104 inhibited adipocyte differentiation and cell proliferation. In addition, cell adhesion and wound healing assays using fad104-deficient MEFs revealed that loss of fad104 expression caused a reduction in stress fiber formation, and notably delayed cell adhesion, spreading and migration. These results indicate that fad104 is essential for the survival of newborns just after birth and important for cell proliferation, adhesion, spreading and migration

  16. Computer tomographic detection of an intraspinal arachnoidal cyst

    Kuckein, D.; Walter, K.; Paal, G.; Staedtisches Krankenhaus Harlaching, Muenchen

    1981-01-01

    A 46 year old female patient who after 3-4 weeks of influenza suffered from strong headaches, vomiting and rotatory vertigo was subjected to a myelograph and then to a computerized tomographic investigation due to suspect cerebrospinal fluid. The computerized tomography is better than the myelography in diagnosing intraspinal arachnoidal cysts, however this should be preceded by most accurate possible segment location. (MG) [de

  17. Intracranial aneurysm and arachnoid cyst: just a coincidence? A case report.

    Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro de; Santos, Rafael Gomes Dos; Paiva, Aline Lariessy Campos; Silva, João Miguel de Almeida; Silva, Rafael Carlos da; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves

    2017-12-18

    Presence of an arachnoid cyst and a non-ruptured intracystic brain aneurysm is extremely rare. The aim of this paper was to describe a case of a patient with an arachnoid cyst and a non-ruptured aneurysm inside it. Clinical, surgical and radiological data were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. A patient complained of chronic headache. She was diagnosed as having a temporal arachnoid cyst and a non-ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm inside it. Surgery was performed to clip the aneurysm and fenestrate the cyst. This report raises awareness about the importance of intracranial vascular investigation in patients with arachnoid cysts and brain hemorrhage.

  18. Vizantin inhibits bacterial adhesion without affecting bacterial growth and causes Streptococcus mutans biofilm to detach by altering its internal architecture.

    Takenaka, Shoji; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yuki; Ohshima, Hayato; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Terao, Yutaka; Noiri, Yuichiro

    2016-11-11

    An ideal antibiofilm strategy is to control both in the quality and quantity of biofilm while maintaining the benefits derived from resident microflora. Vizantin, a recently developed immunostimulating compound, has also been found to have antibiofilm property. This study evaluated the influence on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of sulfated vizantin and biofilm development following bacterial adhesion on a hydroxyapatite disc coated with sulfated vizantin. Supplementation with sulfated vizantin up to 50 μM did not affect either bacterial growth or biofilm formation, whereas 50 μM sulfated vizantin caused the biofilm to readily detach from the surface. Sulfated vizantin at the concentration of 50 μM upregulated the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes, but downregulated the expression of the gtfD gene, suggesting altered architecture in the biofilm. Biofilm development on the surface coated with sulfated vizantin was inhibited depending on the concentration, suggesting prevention from bacterial adhesion. Among eight genes related to bacterial adherence in S. mutans, expression of gtfB and gtfC was significantly upregulated, whereas the expression of gtfD, GbpA and GbpC was downregulated according to the concentration of vizantin, especially with 50 μM vizantin by 0.8-, 0.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively. These findings suggest that sulfated vizantin may cause structural degradation as a result of changing gene regulation related to bacterial adhesion and glucan production of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Unique Cell Adhesion and Invasion Properties of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3, the Most Frequent Cause of Human Yersiniosis

    Uliczka, Frank; Pisano, Fabio; Schaake, Julia; Stolz, Tatjana; Rohde, Manfred; Fruth, Angelika; Strauch, Eckhard; Skurnik, Mikael; Batzilla, Julia; Rakin, Alexander; Heesemann, Jürgen; Dersch, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Many enteric pathogens are equipped with multiple cell adhesion factors which are important for host tissue colonization and virulence. Y. enterocolitica, a common food-borne pathogen with invasive properties, uses the surface proteins invasin and YadA for host cell binding and entry. In this study, we demonstrate unique cell adhesion and invasion properties of Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 strains, the most frequent cause of human yersiniosis, and show that these differences are mainly attributable to variations affecting the function and expression of invasin in response to temperature. In contrast to other enteric Yersinia strains, invasin production in O:3 strains is constitutive and largely enhanced compared to other Y. enterocolitica serotypes, in which invA expression is temperature-regulated and significantly reduced at 37°C. Increase of invasin levels is caused by (i) an IS1667 insertion into the invA promoter region, which includes an additional promoter and RovA and H-NS binding sites, and (ii) a P98S substitution in the invA activator protein RovA rendering the regulator less susceptible to proteolysis. Both variations were shown to influence bacterial colonization in a murine infection model. Furthermore, we found that co-expression of YadA and down-regulation of the O-antigen at 37°C is required to allow efficient internalization by the InvA protein. We conclude that even small variations in the expression of virulence factors can provoke a major difference in the virulence properties of closely related pathogens which may confer better survival or a higher pathogenic potential in a certain host or host environment. PMID:21750675

  20. The Significance of Arachnoid Granulation in Patients With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Watane, Gaurav Vishwasrao; Patel, Bhumi; Brown, Derek; Taheri, M Reza

    The aim of this article was to study the significance of arachnoid granulations (AGs) in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). In an institutional review board-approved retrospective chart review study, 79 patients with clinical diagnosis of idiopathic increased intracranial pressure were compared with 63 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Inclusion criteria also included available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, older than 18 years, and female sex. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure due to other causes were excluded. The electronic medical records were mined for presence of the following: body mass index, age, headache, vision changes, tinnitus, and vertigo. The MRI of the brain was reviewed for the presence of the following features: empty sella, prominent cerebrospinal fluid space in the optic sheaths, tortuosity of the optic nerves and enlarged Meckel cave. In addition, the number, size, and location of AGs associated with major venous drainage sinuses were documented in all patients. Using statistical analysis, association between various imaging and clinical signs were evaluated. The association between AG and various imaging and clinical signs were evaluated. The percentage of patients with AG were significantly higher in patients with IIH. Patients with IIH tended to have 0 to 3 AG. The most common imaging findings observed in MRI of the brain of patients with IIH were empty sella and prominent cerebrospinal fluid space in the optic sheaths. The prevalence of these MRI findings in patients with IIH was inversely proportional to the number of AG. A similar inverse trend was also noted with the opening pressure of patients with IIH and number of AG. The study establishes that there is a relationship between presence of AG and IIH. Arachnoid granulation seems to act in a compensatory mechanism in patients with IIH.

  1. CT and MRI findings of a spinal arachnoid cyst

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Sadashima, Hiromichi

    1986-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman developed progressive difficulty in walking and urination over one year and 9 months. Her past history included a hystero-oophorectomy because of ''infection;'' the operation had been done under lumbar anesthesia. At the time of admission to our hospital, her legs were markedly spastic, with increased knee and ankle jerks as well as bilateral Babinski signs. Sensation to pain was slightly decreased bilaterally at and below Th4. Myelography through a suboccipital tap and CT myelography demonstrated a block of the CSF space at Th6. The spinal cord was displaced and became thin at and below Th1, secondary to an enlarged CSF space. Horizontal MRI demonstrated similar findings; however, sagittal MRI showed that the cord had been displaced and had collapsed; in addition, an abnormally enlarged CSF space indicated a subdural arachnoid cyst. MRI has thus been shown to be a very useful tool in the diagnosis of a spinal arachnoid cyst as well as other spinal-cord diseases. (author)

  2. Temporo-sylvian arachnoidal cyst and an extreme pneumatization of the cranial sinuses: a case report.

    Zara, Gabriella; Ponza, Isabella; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2010-11-01

    We present a patient who showed MRI evidence of a giant temporo-sylvian arachnoidal cyst of the left hemisphere and an extreme pneumatization of the sphenoid and frontal sinuses. No sign of mass effect or cerebral atrophy was detected. This patient presented a deficit of memory and control functions, but quality of life was not affected. Surgery was not performed. Arachnoidal cyst and anatomic variants of the sinus region have not a common etiology. This is the first report that describes a giant temporo-sylvian arachnoidal cyst with anatomic variants of the paranasal sinuses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  4. Hardness and microstructure analysis of damaged gear caused by adhesive wear

    Mahendra, Rizky Budi; Nugroho, Sri; Ismail, Rifky

    2018-03-01

    This study was a result from research on repairing project of damaged elevator gear box. The objective of this research is to analyze the failure part on elevator gearbox at flourmill factory. The equipment was damaged after one year installed and running on factory. Severe wear was occurred on high speed helical gear. These helical gear was one of main part of elevator gearbox in flour mill manufacture. Visually, plastic deformation didn't occurred and not visible on the failure helical gear shaft. Some test would be performed to check the chemical composition, microstructure and hardness of failure helical gear. The material of failure helical gear shaft was a medium carbon steel alloy. The microstructure was showed a martensitic phase formed on the surface to the center area of gear shaft. Otherwise, the depth of hardness layer slight formed on surface and lack depth of hardness layer was a main trigger of severe wear. It was not enough to resist wear due to friction caused by rolling and sliding on surface between high speed gear and low speed gear. Enhancement of hardness layer on surface and depth of hardness layer will make the component has more long life time. Furthermore, to perform next research is needed to analyze the reliability of enhanced hardness on layer and depth of hardness layer on helical gear shaft.

  5. Dual lumbar bronchogenic and arachnoid cyst presenting with sciatica and left foot drop.

    Candy, Nicholas; Young, Adam; Devadass, Abel; Dean, Andrew; McMillen, Jason; Trivedi, Rikin

    2017-10-01

    Spinal bronchogenic cysts are rare findings, with only four cases of lumbar bronchogenic cysts reported in the literature. All of these bronchogenic cysts involved the conus medullaris. We present the first case of a lumbar bronchogenic cyst and arachnoid cyst arising from the cauda equina in a 68-year-old male. Uniquely, this bronchogenic cyst also contained components of an arachnoid cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a compressive cystic lesion at the level of the L3 vertebra splaying the cauda equina. An L3/L4 laminectomy was performed with marsupialisation of the cyst. Histological examination revealed pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium confirming the diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst, as well as a pleated fibrovascular tissue lined by sparsely spaced small monomorphic arachnoidal cells, indicating an arachnoid cyst. We demonstrate that bronchogenic cysts can be successfully treated with marsupialisation.

  6. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst. Two case histories with pathological observations.

    Takayasu, Takeshi; Harada, Kunyu; Nishimura, Shigeru; Onda, Jun; Nishi, Tohru; Takagaki, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are well known to induce chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head injury. However, histological observations of the arachnoid cyst and hematoma membrane have only been rarely described. An 8-year-old boy and a 3-year-old boy presented with CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst. Surgical removal of the hematoma and biopsy of the hematoma membrane and cyst wall were performed. Clinical courses were good and without recurrence more than 1.5 years after surgery. Histological examination suggested that the cysts did not contribute to hematoma development. Pediatric hematoma membranes, similar to adult hematoma membranes, are key in the growth of CSDH. Therefore, simple hematoma evacuation is adequate as a first operation for CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst.

  7. Large intradural craniospinal arachnoid cyst: A case report and review of literature

    Souvagya Panigrahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of an arachnoid cyst at craniospinal junction is not very common. This is a very rare anatomic site, with only seven other cases reported in the literature. We report a case of large intradural craniospinal arachnoid cyst presenting with obstructive hydrocephalus and cranial nerve palsy. A 39-year-old male presented with 8-month history of neck pain, headache, vomiting, visual disturbances, diminished taste sensation, and numbness of face. He had bilateral papilledema on ophthalmoscopy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst extending down to the lower border of C5 vertebra. Posterior decompression was done through C5 laminectomy. He made a full recovery and was asymptomatic at 6-month follow-up examination. The clinical features, diagnosis, and management of these rare craniospinal arachnoid cysts are discussed.

  8. Contrast-enhanced MRI of intrasellar arachnoid cysts: relationship between the pituitary gland and cyst

    Nomura, M.; Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine; Tachibana, O.; Hasegawa, M.; Kohda, Y.; Nakada, M.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J.; Suzuki, M.

    1996-01-01

    We recently encountered two large intrasellar arachnoid cysts extending to the suprasellar region. The intensity of the cyst contents was identical to that of the cerebrospinal fluid on both T1- and T2-weighted MRI. On contrast-enhanced MRI, the pituitary gland was compressed posteroinferiorly and flattened in the sella turcica. In this report of rare intrasellar arachnoid cysts the discussion is focused on dislocation of the pituitary gland. (orig.)

  9. Wood : adhesives

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  10. Strategic Management of Cerebral Arachnoid Cysts in Children in the Era of Globalisation

    Eva-Maria COJOCARU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arachnoid cysts in children are incidental or symptomatic findings which can have associated neurological pathologies in children. Epileptic seizures and headache are by far the most common symptoms associated to arachnoid cysts but they can also associate cerebral palsy or facial dwarfism. Objectives: In the era of globalisation we want to highlight the importance of modern diagnostic procedures and long term strategic management of children with arachnoid cysts in order to rise their social competence and have a better quality of life. Material and methods: We searched the most important theories in the literature and the new methods in the management of the arachnoid cysts. Results: Even if surgical is necessary just in few cases, medication is needed for epileptic seizures. Many children receive neuroprotective agents while other receive antiepileptic drugs for the concomitant or associated epilepsy. For speech difficulties and movement disorders speech therapy, physical therapy and other further support is needed. Discussions and conclusions: The EEG patterns are not mandatory identic to the site of the cyst. Facial dwarfism and other genetic hallmarks need to be further investigated for rare syndromes associated to cerebral arachnoid cysts. The arachnoid cyst could be a hallmark that children brain can be more sensitive to seizures.

  11. Spontaneous disappearance of two asymptomatic arachnoid cysts in two different locations.

    Cokluk, C; Senel, A; Celik, F; Ergür, H

    2003-04-01

    We report two children with asymptomatic arachnoid cysts which resolved spontaneously without any surgical intervention and history of major head and body trauma. The first child was a 10-year-old boy with an arachnoid cyst in the right sylvian fissure. The second child was a 1-year-old girl with a right cerebral convexity arachnoid cyst. Both of them were asymptomatic. Arachnoid cysts spontaneously disappeared within 2 years following initial diagnosing. There was no major head and body trauma except usual home, school and sports activity. We speculated that the cysts ruptured into cerebrospinal fluid circulation by the mechanical effects of some forced activities to the brain tissue and cyst, such as excessive breathing, coughing and sport activities. These factors may change the balance between intracystic and pericystic pressure and facilitate the rupturing of the cyst into subdural, subarachnoid and intraventricular spaces. These cases demonstrate that neurosurgical intervention of asymptomatic arachnoid cysts is not absolutely indicated in the paediatric age group. Close follow up with computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a treatment option in the patient with arachnoid cysts located in the middle cranial fossa and cerebral convexity.

  12. Arachnoid cysts with spontaneous intracystic hemorrhage and associated subdural hematoma: Report of management and follow-up of 2 cases

    Mehmet Emin Adin, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are one of the most frequently encountered intracranial space-occupying lesions in daily neurosurgery and neuroradiology practice. Majority of arachnoid cysts, particularly those of smaller sizes, have a benign uneventful lifetime course. Certain symptoms may indicate serious complications related to underlying arachnoid cysts. Hemorrhage is one of the most fearsome complications of arachnoid cysts and almost all reported cases in the literature have undergone surgical correction. In this study, we aimed to present clinical and radiologic follow-up findings in two adult cases of intracranial arachnoid cyst with spontaneous intracystic hemorrhage and associated subdural hematoma, one of which was successfully treated conservatively. In addition, we broadly summarized and discussed pertinent studies in the English literature. Keywords: Arachnoid cyst, Subdural hematoma, Intracystic hemorrhage, Headache

  13. Anatomic relationship between arachnoid granulations in the transverse sinus and the termination of the vein of Labbe: an angiographic study

    Gailloud, P.; Muster, M.; Khaw, N.; Martin, J.B.; Murphy, K.J.; Ruefenacht, D.A.; Fasel, J.H.D.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the anatomic relationship between arachnoid granulations in the transverse sinus and the termination of the vein of Labbe in 57 consecutive angiograms. Patients with pathology in intracranial venous structures or with inadequate image quality of the venous system were excluded. Arachnoid granulations were found in 12 of the 57 patients (21.1 %), always at the junction of the vein of Labbe and the transverse sinus; the vein of Labbe was present in 55 patients (96.5 %), most often without associated arachnoid granulations; the latter, however, were not observed in the absence of a vein of Labbe. This study confirms the close, constant anatomic relationship between arachnoid granulations in the transverse sinus and the termination of the vein of Labbe. This observation may help to differentiate arachnoid granulations from pathologic conditions involving the transverse sinus such as dural sinus thrombosis. The constant character of this relationship suggests a developmental role of afferent veins in the formation of arachnoid granulations. (orig.)

  14. Radioisotopic studies of the sub-arachnoid space in cerebral cysticercosis; correlation of scintigraphic with pneumoencephalographic findings

    Oswaldo Loayza, A.

    1976-01-01

    Cerabral cysticercosis is a grave public health problem in Ecuador and is caused by a tapeworm, which is parasite of man. The larvae of this tapeworm lodge in various tissues, notably in the brain, causing blockage of the sub-arachnoid space and leading to epileptic seizures and to mental deterioration. The present investigation on 115 patients has compared clinical and radiological findings with those from radionuclide cisternography, performed with a gamma camera after injection of 15-200μCi 131 I-albumin into the cerebro-spinal fluid. The results from 86 patients have been selected for detailed analysis. Radiological techniques such as pneumoencephalography were in general found to be more precise in determining the site of obstruction than cisternography

  15. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    , which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters...

  16. Supratentorial arachnoid cyst management by cystoperitoneal shunt in a 1-year-old European cat

    Mathieu Taroni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are defined as an accumulation of fluid within the arachnoid membrane. Feline intracranial arachnoid cysts are seldom reported, with only three cases in the veterinary literature. A 1-year-old male neutered European cat with a 24 h history of seizures was presented to the small animal neurology department at Vetagro Sup, Lyon. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a large intracranial arachnoid cyst ventral to the brain in the left temporal area. Cystoperitoneal shunt placement resulted in complete resolution of the cyst without recurrence (follow-up MRIs 3 weeks and 21 months after surgery. Anticonvulsant treatment (phenobarbital 2.5 mg/kg q12h was initiated at presentation and gradually stopped after 17 months. Seizures recurred 4 months after ending treatment, and seizure therapy was therefore restarted at the initial dose. We report a case of an intracranial arachnoid cyst in an unusual location not previously described. A cystoperitoneal shunt resolved the cyst without complications. Maintenance anticonvulsant treatment was required to control symptomatic epilepsy.

  17. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Arachnoid Cyst in Young Adults: A Case Report

    Jun-Yeen Chan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inrracranial arachnoid cysts are believed to be congenital; they can become symptomatic in pediarric patients. Chronic subdural hematomas tend to occur in elderly patients with a history of mild head injury a few months prior to the onset of symptoms. However, these two distinct clinical entities sporadically occur together in relatively young patients. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with headache and dizziness of 2 months' duration. Brain computed tomography revealed a huge chronic subdural hematoma over the left frontoparietal lobe, with an incidental finding of an arachnoid cyst over the left sylvian fissure. In light of a literature review, we discuss arachnoid cysts as a possible risk factor for subdural hematoma, especially in young adults.

  18. Brown-Séquard syndrome following intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced spinal arachnoid cyst

    Yew-Weng Fong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arachnoid cyst associated with spinal arachnoiditis following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a rare complication. Correctly diagnosing this condition and providing an effective treatment are extremely important. Case report: A 60-year-old women had a history of SAH due to an intradural vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm post-coil embolization, without neurologic deficits on discharge from our institution. She experienced left hemiparesis with muscle power graded at 4/5 eight months later due to a right middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Nine months after stroke rehabilitation, there was a progression of left-side weakness and right-side numbness down below the nipple level. On neurological examination, there were right sensory deficits below T6, and left hemiparesis with muscle power of the left upper extremity graded at 4/5 and that of the left lower extremity graded at 3/5. Deep tendon reflex was symmetrically increased at the bilateral lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a cervicothoracic multiseptated arachnoid cyst with a major compression effect at T6. Eight months after T5–6 hemilaminectomy and fenestration of the cyst wall, the neurologic deficits had not improved. The patient then underwent a cysto-peritoneal shunt. A follow-up MRI documented a complete resolution of the arachnoid cyst. The patient's Brown-Séquard syndrome showed clinical improvement. Conclusion: Prompt investigation revealed a spinal arachnoid cyst in a patient with a history of intracranial SAH presenting with unexplained progressive Brown-Séquard syndrome. For cases of multiseptated and long arachnoid cyst, as in our patient, a shunting procedure is a better choice than fenestration alone.

  19. Cauda equina syndrome after spinal anaesthesia in a patient with asymptomatic tubercular arachnoiditis

    Divya Sethi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy underwent emergency debridement surgery of right foot under spinal anaesthesia. Four hours after the surgery, the patient developed symptoms of cauda equina syndrome (CES. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the patient′s spine suggested underlying tubercular arachnoiditis. The boy was started on intravenous methylprednisolone and antitubercular therapy. He responded to the therapy and recovered completely in 2 weeks without any residual neurological deficits. We suggest that underlying pathological changes in the subarachnoid space due to tubercular arachnoiditis contributed to maldistribution of the local anaesthetic drug leading to CES.

  20. SYMPATHETIC ACTIVATION CAUSES FOCAL ADHESION SIGNALING ALTERATION IN EARLY COMPENSATED VOLUME OVERLOAD DUE TO ISOLATED MITRAL REGURGITATION IN THE DOG

    Sabri, Abdelkarim; Rafiq, Khadija; Seqqat, Rachid; Kolpakov, Mikhail A; Dillon, Ray; Dell’italia, Louis J

    2008-01-01

    We reported that left ventricular (LV) dilatation after four weeks of isolated mitral regurgitation (MR) in the dogs is marked by extracellular matrix (ECM) loss and an increase in adrenergic drive. Given that ECM proteins and their receptors integrins influence β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) responses in-vitro, we tested whether β1-AR activation modulates focal adhesion (FA) signaling and LV remodeling in these same dogs with isolated MR. Normal dogs (NL) were compared with dogs with MR of 4-w...

  1. Denture Adhesives

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Wearers Reporting Problems to the FDA Background Denture adhesives are pastes, powders or adhesive pads that may ...

  2. Microsurgery Simulator of Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping with Interactive Cerebral Deformation Featuring a Virtual Arachnoid.

    Shono, Naoyuki; Kin, Taichi; Nomura, Seiji; Miyawaki, Satoru; Saito, Toki; Imai, Hideaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2018-05-01

    A virtual reality simulator for aneurysmal clipping surgery is an attractive research target for neurosurgeons. Brain deformation is one of the most important functionalities necessary for an accurate clipping simulator and is vastly affected by the status of the supporting tissue, such as the arachnoid membrane. However, no virtual reality simulator implementing the supporting tissue of the brain has yet been developed. To develop a virtual reality clipping simulator possessing interactive brain deforming capability closely dependent on arachnoid dissection and apply it to clinical cases. Three-dimensional computer graphics models of cerebral tissue and surrounding structures were extracted from medical images. We developed a new method for modifiable cerebral tissue complex deformation by incorporating a nonmedical image-derived virtual arachnoid/trabecula in a process called multitissue integrated interactive deformation (MTIID). MTIID made it possible for cerebral tissue complexes to selectively deform at the site of dissection. Simulations for 8 cases of actual clipping surgery were performed before surgery and evaluated for their usefulness in surgical approach planning. Preoperatively, each operative field was precisely reproduced and visualized with the virtual brain retraction defined by users. The clear visualization of the optimal approach to treating the aneurysm via an appropriate arachnoid incision was possible with MTIID. A virtual clipping simulator mainly focusing on supporting tissues and less on physical properties seemed to be useful in the surgical simulation of cerebral aneurysm clipping. To our knowledge, this article is the first to report brain deformation based on supporting tissues.

  3. Language localization in cases of left temporal lobe arachnoid cyst : Evidence against interhemispheric reorganization

    Stowe, LA; Go, KG; Pruim, J; den Dunnen, W; Meiners, LC; Paans, AMJ

    2000-01-01

    We investigated whether left-hemisphere arachnoid cysts lead to reorganization of the language function using PET. A group analysis demonstrated that patients showed no more right-hemisphere activation than a matched control group. Several patients had clear language localizations in the left

  4. Relevance and therapy of intracranial arachnoidal cysts; Relevanz und Therapie intrakranieller Arachnoidalzysten

    Eymann, R. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Kiefer, M. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Intracranial arachnoidal cysts (AC) are relevant due to their space-demanding character. The pathophysiological sequelae are dependent on the size and location of the cyst and the patient's age. Direct pressure on surrounding tissue causes headaches (meninges) or rarely seizures (brain tissue). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation disturbances resulting from brain mass displacement with occlusion of, for example, the foramen monroi or the aqueduct cause occlusive hydrocephalus, which can lead to an increase in intracranial pressure. Depending on age, the typical primary clinical symptoms or findings differ. In adults and older children, headaches are usually the first clinical symptom. Children, in whom skull growth is not yet complete, present with a head circumference above the 97th percentile. An abnormal one-sided deflection of the calotte in the region of the underlying AC may also be present. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), the first-line diagnostic tool of choice to demonstrate size and location of the cysts and the surrounding intracranial structures, is of utmost importance for therapy planning. In addition, further malformations can be detected. Moreover, cMRI may also be useful for a rough assessment of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). In most symptomatic AC, surgical treatment is unavoidable. The primarily goal is to establish communication between the CSF and the cysts' content in order to effect pressure equalization. If the CSF reabsorption capacity is insufficient, it may also be necessary to implant a CSF shunt. Asymptomatic arachnoidal cysts should be strictly followed clinically and by cMRI over time. The reasonable frequency for follow-up depends on the size and location of the cyst. (orig.) [German] Die Relevanz intrakranieller Arachnoidalzysten (AC) ergibt sich aus ihrem raumfordernden Charakter. Die pathophysiologischen Folgen ergeben sich aus der Groesse und Lage der Zyste sowie dem Alter des Patienten. Durch den

  5. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-11-12

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature.

  6. The rising root sign: the magnetic resonance appearances of post-operative spinal subdural extra-arachnoid collections

    Bharath, A.; Uhiara, O.; Botchu, Rajesh; Davies, A.M.; James, S.L. [The Royal Orthopedic Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    We present a case series of symptomatic post-operative spinal subdural extra-arachnoid collections that displace the cauda equina roots anteriorly. This is described as the ''rising root sign''. (orig.)

  7. Lianas as a food resource for brown howlers (Alouatta guariba) and southern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) in a forest fragment

    M. M. Martins

    2009-01-01

    Lianas as a food resource for brown howlers (Alouatta guariba) and southern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) in a forest fragment.— Lianas, woody vines, are abundant and diverse in tropical forests, but their relative contribution as a source of food for herbivores has been neglected. I compared feeding rates on lianas and trees of two sympatric primates, A. guariba and B. arachnoides, in Southeastern Brazil. Availability of liana foods was gathered in parallel with primate behavioral data ...

  8. Fruit diet of Alouatta guariba and Brachyteles arachnoides in Southeastern Brazil: comparison of fruit type, color, and seed size.

    Martins, Milene Moura

    2008-01-01

    Fruit is an important food resource for neotropical primates. In this study I compare the fruit diet of sympatric brown howlers (Alouatta guariba) and southern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides). Feeding behavior was studied over 12 months and fruit species consumed were identified and assigned to the categories fruit type, fruit color, and seed size. Observed-fruit feeding records were compared with expected records determined from local availability of the fruit of the tree species. I also determined dietary overlap. Fruit consumption occupied 8 and 12% of the feeding time of A. guariba and B. arachnoides, respectively. Fruit from eight tree species were consumed by the former and fruit from twenty-two species by the latter. Patterns of fruit selection of A. guariba and B. arachnoides varied widely. Although howlers and muriquis converge behaviorally by selecting fruit with common attributes (fleshy/unprotected, violet and brown/black-colored), unlike A. guariba, B. arachnoides fed on immature seeds of fleshy/protected and dry fruit. Large seeds were ingested, and defecated intact, by B. arachnoides only. There was little overlap of fruit diet even within categories that had been selected by both, suggesting that dietary divergence is occurring at the interspecific level. Different resource exploitation probably mediates the coexistence of A. guariba and B. arachnoides in low diversity, semideciduous forests, where the environment imposes narrow limits on primate food choices.

  9. Thoracic intradural arachnoid cyst: Possible pitfalls with myelo-CT and MR

    Dietemann, J.L.; Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M.; Kastler, B.; Warter, J.M.; Buchheit, F.

    1991-01-01

    A thoracic intradural arachnoid cyst presenting as an intradural extramedullary mass highly suggestive of psammoma on myelogram and myelo-CT is reported in a 34-year-old female. High densities of the cyst were related to collection of contrast media within the cyst. However MR examination of the thoracic spinal cord including sagittal T1 (without and with contrast) and T2 studies failed to demonstrate the mass. Lack of MR changes were related on one hand to the small size of the cyst and to the absence of mass effect on the spinal cord, and on the other hand to a CSF-like signal of the contents of the cyst. Only combination of myelography, myelo-CT and MR allows precise diagnosis of small intradual arachnoid cysts; however MR is the method of choice for evaluation of large intradural subarachnoid cysts. (orig.)

  10. Vocal sequential exchanges and intragroup spacing in the Northern Muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus

    Mendes,Francisco D.C.; Ades,César

    2004-01-01

    Sequential exchanges of vocalizations (staccatos and neighs) emitted by Northern Muriquis Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus were recorded at the Biological Station of Caratinga, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Staccatos and neighs containing larger proportion of short elements were preferentially produced during short-range exchanges; neighs, produced by a larger number of participants, were typical of long-range exchanges. Staccatos emitted by animals feeding in a dispersed manner contained a ...

  11. Middle fossa arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma -a case report-

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hyung Sik; Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Kim, Chang Jin [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-12-15

    Cysts overlying the temporal lobes have been well described in literature. These are often associated with agenesis of the temporal lobes, and of major neurosurgical interest due to their frequent association with subdural hematoma, a combination that is rarely seen with cysts in other regions. Full features of plain, angiographic, and CT findings of arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma are presented, being very rare in radiologic literature.

  12. Treatment and diagnosis of middle fossa arachnoid cyst. Ventriculofiberscopy and cine-MRI

    Kamikawa, Shuji; Kuwamura, Keiichi [Hyogo Prefectural Awaji Hospital, Sumoto (Japan); Tamaki, Norihiko

    1998-07-01

    The treatment of intracranial arachnoid cysts is controversial regarding its surgical indication and operative procedures. Conventional surgical approaches such as fenestration, membranectomy, and shunting operation are invasive. Also CT cisternography and/or RI cisternography are invasive, when it has been performed to evaluate the possible CSF communications between the arachnoid cyst and subarachnoid space. Between July 1994 and February 1997, 10 patients with intracranial middle fossa arachnoid cysts were treated with a newly developed ventriculofiberscope which is characterized by splendid mechanical flexibility and high resolution. The cine-MRI, which is a non-invasive diagnostic tool, is used to evaluate the CSF circulation around the cyst fenestration. The patients` ages ranged from 4 months to 10 years, with a mean of 4.46 years. The cyst locations were left middle fossa (9), and right (1). Eight patients presented with macrocrania, 4 with developmental delay, three with seizure, two with headache, and one with subdural hematoma. The patients were preoperatively evaluated by means of MRI and cine-MR images. In all patients ventriculofiberscopic procedures including cyst fenestration, membranous dissection, cyst puncture and shriveling were successfully performed. Postoperative MR and cine-MR studies have shown reduction of the cyst size and appropriate CSF circulation. Neuroendoscopic procedures seem to be the first choice for children with arachnoid cysts and the ventriculofiberscope proved to be very useful not only for cyst fenestration but also for cyst dissection. In addition, the non-invasive cine-MR studies are useful for long follow-up at OPD. (author)

  13. Supraorbital Keyhole Microsurgical Fenestration of Symptomatic Temporal Arachnoid Cysts in Children: Advantages and Limitations.

    Elkheshin, Sherif; Soliman, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of endoscope-assisted microsurgical fenestration on temporal arachnoid cysts, and to determine the advantages and limitations of the technique. Twenty-five children with symptomatic temporal arachnoid cysts were operated via eyebrow supraorbital keyhole microsurgical fenestration targeting the medial cyst wall. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was done for all patients. Preoperative clinical presentation of the patients included headache (80%), nausea & vomiting (64%), drug resistant epilepsy (52%), macrocephaly (12%) papilledema (28%), motor weakness in the form of right-sided hemiparesis (12%) and cranial nerve palsy. Postoperative complete subsidence of headache was noted in 50%, while 20% remained unchanged. Drug resistant epilepsy improved in 69% of the patients. Postoperative MRI showed initial decrease in cyst volume as early as 3 months, only in a range of 5-12% volume reduction, and the late follow-up done at 6 and 18 months continued to show further reduction reported to be significant (p CSF) collection was the most common complication (20%). Only 1 patient experienced CSF leak mandating cysto-peritoneal shunting. Conclusıon: Eyebrow supraorbital keyhole microsurgical fenestration for temporal arachnoid cysts can be performed with a fairly low risk of complications and yields a favorable improvement in clinical and neuroimaging outcomes.

  14. Pile driving into the skull and suspending the bridging veins? An undescribed role of arachnoid granulations.

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Ono, Hideo; Yasumoto, Yukimasa

    2017-05-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AGs) occasionally appear to protrude into the calvarial convexity, lying close to the bridging veins (BVs). This study aims to characterize such AGs and BVs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ninety-five patients were enrolled in this study. Initially, stepwise frontal craniotomy was performed in an injected cadaver head. Next, examinations with contrast MRI were performed involving the whole cranial vault. In cadaveric dissection, the AGs located in the parasagittal regions appeared as outward protrusions through the dura mater and in contact with the diploic veins. Forming tent-shaped sleeves, these AGs and the continuous arachnoid membranes suspended the BVs coursing just below. A total of 237 AGs were identified on contrast MRI that protruded into the skull, lying close to the BVs. Among them, 78 % were located in parasagittal regions as AG-BV pairs. These pairs were most frequently found in the middle third of the calvarial hemisphere, followed by the anterior and posterior thirds. In 34 %, the BV segments were lodged in the AGs. Some AGs located in the parasagittal regions and cerebral convexity pass through the dura mater and pile drive into the skull, which contribute to forming hanging-type arachnoid sleeves suspending the BVs. These structures may underpin the predisposition of BVs to injury following mechanical impacts.

  15. Study of the clinical features and radiological findings for thoracic communicating arachnoid cysts

    Oda, Masashi; Hanakita, Junya; Suwa, Hideyuki

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed retrospectively, the usefulness of the radiological examinations for 15 cases of communicating arachnoid cysts in thoracic lesions experienced by our department over the last 12 years. Severn men and eight women (age range 32-71 years, mean age 53.8 years) were analyzed. Their symptoms on admission were sensory disturbance of the legs (13 cases), leg weakness (4 cases), back pain (4 cases), and truncal abnormal sensations (2 cases), etc. We performed myelography in 12 patients, and an additional 5 patients were diagnosed by this examination. CT-myelography showed deformity of the spinal cord, deviation of the spinal cord and enlargement of the subarachnoid space in all 12 patients. The axial view in 1.0 T weighted MRI showed the same findings as CT-myelography. However, the cine 1.0 T weighted MRI seemed to be insufficient to detect any spinal arachnoid cysts. As the results of their operations, 13 patients improved, 2 patients remained unchanged, and no cases become worse. The clinical and radiological diagnosis for communicating arachnoid cysts is not easy. Neurological examinations and radiological examinations with detailed readings are essential to obtain a correct diagnosis, when considering the possibility of the disease. (author)

  16. Protein adhesives

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  17. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  18. Vocal sequential exchanges and intragroup spacing in the Northern Muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus.

    Mendes, Francisco D C; Ades, César

    2004-06-01

    Sequential exchanges of vocalizations (staccatos and neighs) emitted by Northern Muriquis Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus were recorded at the Biological Station of Caratinga, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Staccatos and neighs containing larger proportion of short elements were preferentially produced during short-range exchanges; neighs, produced by a larger number of participants, were typical of long-range exchanges. Staccatos emitted by animals feeding in a dispersed manner contained a larger proportion of tonal elements than those emitted by muriquis feeding in a cohesive manner. Sequential exchanges seem thus to be constituted by two inter-related subsystems of calls that aid muriquis to coordinate intragroup spacing, despite the poor visibility of the habitat.

  19. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  20. Adhesion science

    Comyn, John

    1997-01-01

    The use of adhesives is widespread and growing, and there are few modern artefacts, from the simple cereal packet, to the jumbo jet, that are without this means of joining. Adhesion Science provides an illuminating account of the science underlying the use of adhesives, a branch of chemical technology which is fundamental to the science of coatings and composite materials and to the performance of all types of bonded structures. This book guides the reader through the essential basic polymer science, and the chemistry of adhesives in use at present. It discusses surface preparation for adhesive bonding, and the use of primers and coupling agents. There is a detailed chapter on contact angles and what can be predicted from them. A simple guide on stress distribution joints and how this relates to testing is included. It also examines the interaction of adhesives and the environment, including an analysis of the resistance of joints to water, oxygen and ultra-violet light. Adhesion Science provides a comprehens...

  1. Lianas as a food resource for brown howlers (Alouatta guariba and southern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides in a forest fragment

    M. M. Martins

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lianas as a food resource for brown howlers (Alouatta guariba and southern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides in a forest fragment.— Lianas, woody vines, are abundant and diverse in tropical forests, but their relative contribution as a source of food for herbivores has been neglected. I compared feeding rates on lianas and trees of two sympatric primates, A. guariba and B. arachnoides, in Southeastern Brazil. Availability of liana foods was gathered in parallel with primate behavioral data collection. Liana represented 33.9% and 27.3% of food sources for A. guariba and B. arachnoides, respectively. Foods coming from trees, rather than from lianas, were significantly more consumed by B. arachnoides. However, both species took advantage of the continuously renewable and ephemeral food resources provided by liana. Availability of liana flowers correlated positively with A. guariba feeding proportions. The nutritional supply provided by lianas is apparently beneficial, or at least unharmful, but experiments comparing primate choices in forests with different liana abundances will help to shed light on their possible negative effect on communities.

  2. Symptomatic Thoracic Nerve Root Herniation into an Extradural Arachnoid Cyst : Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Duyff, Ruurd F.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare and usually asymptomatic. They preferentially are situated in the thoracic extradural space and almost always dorsal. SEACs may present with back pain and/or cord compression symptoms. Needle aspiration, needle fenestration,

  3. Filaggrin 2 deficiency results in abnormal cell-cell adhesion in the cornified cell layers and causes peeling skin syndrome type A.

    Mohamad, Janan; Sarig, Ofer; Godsel, Lisa M; Peled, Alon; Malchin, Natalia; Bochner, Ron; Vodo, Dan; Rabinowitz, Tom; Pavlovsky, Mor; Taiber, Shahar; Fried, Maya; Eskin-Schwartz, Marina; Assi, Siwar; Shomron, Noam; Uitto, Jouni; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Bergman, Reuven; Green, Kathleen J; Sprecher, Eli

    2018-05-11

    Peeling skin syndromes form a large and heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by superficial detachment of the epidermal cornified cell layers, often associated with inflammatory features. Here we report on a consanguineous family featuring non-inflammatory peeling of the skin exacerbated by exposure to heat and mechanical stress. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in FLG2, encoding filaggrin 2, which co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. The mutation was found to result in decreased FLG2 RNA levels as well almost total absence of filaggrin 2 in the patient epidermis. Filaggrin 2 was found to be expressed throughout the cornified cell layers and to co-localize with corneodesmosin which plays a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion in this region of the epidermis. Absence of filaggrin 2 in the patient skin was associated with markedly decreased corneodesmosin expression, which may contribute to the peeling phenotype displayed by the patients. Accordingly, using the dispase dissociation assay, we showed that FLG2 down-regulation interferes with keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion. Of particular interest, this effect was aggravated by temperature elevation, consistent with the clinical phenotype. Restoration of CDSN levels by ectopic expression rescued cell-cell adhesion.Taken together, the present data suggest that filaggrin 2 is essential for normal cell-cell adhesion in the cornified cell layers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diet of a muriqui group (Brachyteles arachnoides) in continuous primary forest.

    de Carvalho, Oswaldo; Ferrari, Stephen F; Strier, Karen B

    2004-07-01

    The feeding behaviour of a group of free-ranging muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) was monitored in the 380 km(2) Carlos Botelho State Park (PECB), between February 1992 and November 1993. Scan sample data indicated that 59.1% of feeding time was devoted to fruit, 33.2% to leaves, 4.1% to flowers, and 3.6% to other items (twigs, stem and bark). Little seasonal variation was recorded. These results contrast with those of all previous studies of Brachyteles, in which the consumption of leaves was generally double that of fruit. One key difference in comparison with previous studies is that the PECB is part of the largest remaining continuous area of primary Atlantic forest, in the Serra do Mar coastal range. Such intraspecific differences in ecology may have important implications for the conservation of the species.

  5. Vocal sequential exchanges and intragroup spacing in the Northern Muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus

    Mendes Francisco D.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential exchanges of vocalizations (staccatos and neighs emitted by Northern Muriquis Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus were recorded at the Biological Station of Caratinga, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Staccatos and neighs containing larger proportion of short elements were preferentially produced during short-range exchanges; neighs, produced by a larger number of participants, were typical of long-range exchanges. Staccatos emitted by animals feeding in a dispersed manner contained a larger proportion of tonal elements than those emitted by muriquis feeding in a cohesive manner. Sequential exchanges seem thus to be constituted by two inter-related subsystems of calls that aid muriquis to coordinate intragroup spacing, despite the poor visibility of the habitat.

  6. Patologia comparada de Brachyteles arachnoides e Brachyteles hypoxantus (E. Geoffroy, 1806, Atelidae - Primates)

    Stéfanie Vanessa Santos

    2011-01-01

    O gênero Brachyteles, endêmico do Brasil, é constituído por duas espécies, B. arachnoides e B. hypoxantus, e estudos recentes demonstraram que suas populações selvagens podem estar seriamente reduzidas. Na tentativa de reverter a situação atual, esforços têm sito realizados visando a conservação dos muriquis, no entanto, dados relativos à condição sanitária de Brachyteles são extremamente escassos. Sabe-se, que o estabelecimento de protocolos adequados de manejo é condição necessária para a m...

  7. Effects of patch size on feeding associations in muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides).

    Strier, K B

    1989-01-01

    Data were collected on one group of muriquis, or woolly spider monkeys (Brachyteles arachnoides) during a 14-month study at Fazenda Montes Claros, Minas Gerais, Brazil to examine the effects of food patch size on muriqui feeding associations. Muriqui food patches were larger than expected from the availability of patch sizes in the forest; fruit patches were significantly larger than leaf patches. Feeding aggregate size, the maximum number of simultaneous occupants, and patch occupancy time were positively related to the size of fruit patches. However, a greater number of individuals fed at leaf sources than expected from the size of these patches. Adult females tended to feed alone in patches more often than males, whereas males tended to feed in single-sexed groups more often than females. Yet in neither case were these differences statistically significant.

  8. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Nikaido, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuaki; Fujimoto, Takatoshi; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Taoka, Toshiaki.

    1996-01-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre-and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space. (author)

  9. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  10. Adhesion molecules

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  11. Fatal toxoplasmosis in a southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides) from São Paulo state, Brazil: Pathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular characterization.

    Santos, Stéfanie Vanessa; Pena, Hilda F J; Talebi, Mauricio G; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Diaz-Delgado, Josué; Gennari, Solange M; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2018-04-01

    We report the pathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of fatal acute systemic toxoplasmosis in an adult, female, free-living southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides) from São Paulo state, Brazil. PCR-RFLP genotyping analysis identified the #21 genotype of Toxoplasma gondii. This represents the first report of acute toxoplasmosis involving this genotype in humans and animals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Tridimensional architecture of the collagen element in the arachnoid granulations in humans: a study on scanning electron microscopy

    Conegero Celso Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The arachnoid granulations of adult individual of both sexes were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The dura mater and arachnoid meninges of individuals were collected at the Service of Death Verification of São Paulo - USP and fixed in Karnovsky solution. After this period the material was prepared for analysis in electron microscope. Our results demonstrated that the arachnoid granulations are formed by a pedicle, body and apex, being surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue, which in turn is composed of, basically, bundles of collagen fibers that line pores of different shapes and sizes. The smaller pores are lined by tiny bundles and are located at the apical region of the granulation and the larger are lined by thicker bundles and are located at the lateral regions. In the body we verified that the bundles of collagen fibers compose a fibrous meshwork and in some regions these bundles have circular orientation, forming pores similar to those found at the region of the capsule.

  13. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  14. Hormonal changes during the mating and conception seasons of wild northern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus).

    Strier, Karen B; Lynch, Jessica W; Ziegler, Toni E

    2003-10-01

    We investigated hormonal and behavioral changes in wild male and female northern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus) at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil, during a 6-mo period that encompassed the onset of the 1998-1999 mating and conception seasons. Individual females resumed mating with the resumption of ovarian cycling, which was not synchronized among them or related to their cortisol levels. Females experienced two to seven cycles prior to conceiving, and the first conception occurred 2 mo after the onset of the group's mating season. There were no differences in female cortisol levels across their premating, mating, and conception conditions. Cortisol levels were significantly higher in females than in males prior to the conception season, consistent with the prediction that energy reserves may be associated with breeding readiness in females, but not males, in this species. The sustained elevation in male cortisol occurred after the peak in their sexual activity, which resulted in the first conception of the year. Male cortisol levels were positively correlated between years that were similar in rainfall, but differed in the timing of sexual and reproductive events. The timing of cortisol elevations in males appears to be generally regulated by environmental cues, but is responsive to fine-tuning by social and behavioral cues related to the unpredictable timing of reproductive opportunities within their extended mating season. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Seasonal and social correlates of fecal testosterone and cortisol levels in wild male muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides).

    Strier, K B; Ziegler, T E; Wittwer, D J

    1999-04-01

    Fecal testosterone and cortisol levels were analyzed from six wild male muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) over a 19-month period at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga in Minas Gerais, Brazil, to investigate the hormonal correlates of seasonal sexual behavior and environmental conditions. Group mean testosterone levels based on weekly samples from the six males did not differ between copulatory and noncopulatory periods or between rainy and dry seasons. Cortisol levels did change with copulatory periods, and were significantly higher during the second dry season, when mating continued following an exceptionally heavy rainy season, than during the first dry season, when mating ceased. Males exhibited individual variation in the timing of their hormone shifts relative to their sexual activity, but neither hormone levels nor sexual activity were related to male age. Despite individual differences in the timing of testosterone fluctuations around the onset and offset of the copulatory season, all males exhibited elevated cortisol concentrations following a slight increase in testosterone at the beginning of the copulatory season. Both the lack of significant changes in testosterone levels with the onset of the rainy and copulatory season and the lack of prebreeding increases in cortisol may be related to the low levels of overt aggression displayed by male muriquis over access to mates. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Steroid excretion during the ovarian cycle in captive and wild muriquis, Brachyteles arachnoides.

    Ziegler, T E; Santos, C V; Pissinatti, A; Strier, K B

    1997-01-01

    Urine, feces, and copulation frequency were collected from two captive muriqui females, Brachyteles arachnoides, at the Centro de Primatologia do Rio de Janeiro following the resumption of postpartum ovarian cycles. Fecal steroid profiles from seven wild muriqui females at the Estação Biologica de Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil, were compared to the captive females to determine the approximate patterns of steroid excretion relative to the urinary LH peak. Hormonal profiles from one of the captive female muriquis revealed a discrete urinary LH peak. For this female, fecal progesterone increased on the same day as the urinary LH peak, while fecal estradiol increased 6 days later and urinary steroids increased 5 days later. For both captive females, the onset of fecal progesterone increase was preceded by the onset of copulations, which occurred during at least a 5-day period. The complete fecal hormonal profiles of the one captive female for which continuos data were available were similar to those found in wild muriqui monkeys, with the onset of an increase in sustained progesterone levels occurring several days prior to the onset of sustained estradiol increase. These patterns suggest that fecal progesterone may be excreted rapidly in this species. The onset of sustained increase in fecal progesterone levels, together with the consistent delay in the onset of the sustained increase in estradiol, may provide the best indicators of the periovulatory period for muriqui females.

  17. Behavioral and endocrine characteristics of the reproductive cycle in wild muriqui monkeys, Brachyteles arachnoides.

    Strier, K B; Ziegler, T E

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of fecal ovarian steroids provides a powerful noninvasive method to obtain insights into ovulatory cycles, gestation length, and the timing of sexual interactions relative to the periovulatory period in wild primates. Techniques developed to collect and assay feces from free-ranging muriqui monkeys (Brachyteles arachnoides) for estradiol and progesterone yield the first explicit reproductive data on this species, and provide the first opportunity to evaluate the timing of observed copulations with muriqui ovarian cycles. Hormonal profiles from seven females indicate average cycle lengths of 21.0 +/- 5.4 days (n = 20). Females conceived after 3-6 ovulatory cycles. Gestation length averaged 216.4 +/- 1.5 days for the five females for which conception cycles were sampled. Discrete copulation periods spanned an average of 2.1 +/- 1.2 days (n = 29), with intervals between these concentrated periods of copulations averaging 15.6 +/- 6.7 days (n = 20). There were no significant differences among females in cycle lengths, copulation period lengths, or copulation interval lengths. Ejaculation was visible following 71.8 +/- 26.7% of copulations during the females preovulatory periods. All females copulated outside the periovulatory period. The proportion of copulation days outside the periovulatory period was slightly greater (p = 0.08) for primiparous females (64.8 +/- 28.3%) than for multiparous females (28.7 +/- 19.7%).

  18. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  19. Abdominal Adhesions

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  20. Sport-related structural brain injury associated with arachnoid cysts: a systematic review and quantitative analysis.

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Prather, Colin T; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K; Bonfield, Christopher M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are congenital lesions bordered by an arachnoid membrane. Researchers have postulated that individuals with an AC demonstrate a higher rate of structural brain injury after trauma. Given the potential neurological consequences of a structural brain injury requiring neurosurgical intervention, the authors sought to perform a systematic review of sport-related structural-brain injury associated with ACs with a corresponding quantitative analysis. METHODS Titles and abstracts were searched systematically across the following databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. The review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Peer-reviewed case reports, case series, or observational studies that reported a structural brain injury due to a sport or recreational activity (hereafter referred to as sport-related) with an associated AC were included. Patients were excluded if they did not have an AC, suffered a concussion without structural brain injury, or sustained the injury during a non-sport-related activity (e.g., fall, motor vehicle collision). Descriptive statistical analysis and time to presentation data were summarized. Univariate logistic regression models to assess predictors of neurological deficit, open craniotomy, and cystoperitoneal shunt were completed. RESULTS After an initial search of 994 original articles, 52 studies were found that reported 65 cases of sport-related structural brain injury associated with an AC. The median age at presentation was 16 years (range 4-75 years). Headache was the most common presenting symptom (98%), followed by nausea and vomiting in 49%. Thirteen patients (21%) presented with a neurological deficit, most commonly hemiparesis. Open craniotomy was the most common form of treatment (49%). Bur holes and cyst fenestration were performed in 29 (45%) and 31 (48%) patients, respectively. Seven patients (11%) received

  1. Anatomic Dissection of Arachnoid Membranes Encircling the Pituitary Stalk on Fresh, Non-Formalin-Fixed Specimens: Anatomoradiologic Correlations and Clinical Applications in Craniopharyngioma Surgery.

    Ciappetta, Pasqualino; Pescatori, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    The anatomy of the arachnoid membranes and cisternal spaces around the pituitary stalk has not been yet exhaustively described and understood. In this study, we performed a detailed anatomic study on fresh, non-formalin-fixed cadavers of the arachnoid membranes encircling the pituitary stalk and correlate our anatomic findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten fresh, non-formalin-fixed, non-silicon-injected adult cadaveric heads were analyzed in this study. The membrane and cisterns that were studied for our study were as follows: 1) the diaphragma sellae and its dural components; 2) the basal arachnoid membrane; 3) the Liliequist membrane with its diencephalic and mesencephalic portion; 4) the medial carotid membrane; 5) the chiasmatic cistern; and 6) the pituitary stalk. MRI examinations of the sellar region were performed in 15 healthy volunteers (9 men, mean age 40 years; and 6 women mean age, 37 years) to visualize the arachnoid membrane encircling the pituitary stalk. MRI examinations were performed with a 3-T unit. A 3-dimensional constructive interference in steady state pulse magnetic resonance sequence was used. All the membranes examined were visualized clearly in all the dissections performed. Their 3-dimensional organization around the pituitary stalk was clarified and confirmed by MRI. Our study gives a detailed description of the pituitary stalk arachnoid sheets on fresh, non-formalin-fixed cadavers. This technique allowed us to clearly identify a funnel-shaped arachnoid collar encircling the pituitary stalk and delimiting a distinct cisternal space belonging to the stalk itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Age at first reproduction in philopatric female muriquis ( Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus).

    Martins, Waldney P; Strier, Karen B

    2004-01-01

    Female northern muriquis ( Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus or B. hypoxanthus) at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga/RPPN-FMA, Minas Gerais, Brazil typically disperse from their natal groups at an average age of 6.1+/-0.6 years (median =6.0 years, range =5.3-7.8 years, n =22), prior to the onset of puberty and sexual activity. Immigrants do not conceive until at least their second mating season, and the minimum interval from immigration to first reproduction has been 2.0 years. Age at first reproduction in dispersing females, previously estimated at 8.9 years, has now been documented at 9.0 and 9.25 years for two females whose birth dates are known. This is older than the 7.5 years at which the only female previously known to have reproduced in her natal group gave birth. Here, we present new data from a second female that reproduced in her natal group. This female (BA) was first observed to copulate at 5.5 years, and gave birth to her first infant at 7.25 years of age. Her 1.75-year cycling-to-first conception delay was only slightly shorter than the minimum recorded for immigrant females, and thus was not responsible for her young age at first reproduction compared to dispersing females. Although our sample size is small, our findings suggest that early puberty may permit females to reproduce in their natal group, implying a possible link between life history trade-offs and dispersal patterns. Because the only two females that have reproduced in their natal group were maternal sisters, it is also possible that maternal effects on age at puberty can impact dispersal patterns, particularly in small populations of primates.

  3. Intra-community coalitionary lethal attack of an adult male southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides).

    Talebi, M G; Beltrão-Mendes, R; Lee, P C

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first evidence of intra-community coalitionary lethal aggression in muriquis (Brachyteles). The event occurred in southern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) during a long-term study (>15 years) of two social groups inhabiting mostly pristine Atlantic forest habitat in the Parque Estadual Carlos Botelho, southern São Paulo State, Brazil. The attack took place deep in the core area of the Group Caetê home range. Tense agonistic behaviors and vocalizations preceded the lethal coalitionary attack, and the tension increased over a 36-48 hr period. One adult female and two unidentified individuals also took part in a coalition led by six adult males. The members of the coalition collectively approached, embraced, immobilized and repeatedly bit the entire body of an adult male, resulting in severe bleeding injuries and the victim's death in less than 1 hr after the attack commenced. Combined ecological, behavioral and spatial data related to the event indicate that this was an intra-community attack and suggest social tensions related to mating competition as the proximate trigger of the coalitionary killing. The attack resembled those reported for chimpanzees, with clear numeric superiority and a low risk of injury to aggressors, resulting in the death of a lone conspecific victim. This observation (n=1) is suggestive of a capacity for escalated aggression in muriquis and reinforces arguments for the potential adaptive significance of intra-community aggression in male philopatric societies, as reported for spider monkeys and chimpanzees. These characteristics challenge the view of the muriquis as a peaceful primate and support the general hypothesis that imbalances of power contribute to intra-specific killing in primates, such as chimpanzees and humans.

  4. Predictors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocephalus following spontaneous aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often associated with unfavorable outcome. This study aimed to determine the potential risk factors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in aneurysmal SAH patients but without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital. Methods One hundred and sixty-eight aneurysmal SAH patients were evaluated. Using functional scores, those without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital were compared to those already with hydrocephalus on admission, those who developed it during hospitalization, and those who did not develop it throughout their hospital stay. The Glasgow Coma Score, modified Fisher SAH grade, and World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade were determined at the emergency room. Therapeutic outcomes immediately after discharge and 18 months after were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Score. Results Hydrocephalus accounted for 61.9% (104/168) of all episodes, including 82 with initial hydrocephalus on admission and 22 with subsequent hydrocephalus. Both the presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage on admission and post-operative intra-cerebral hemorrhage were independently associated with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without hydrocephalus on admission. After a minimum 1.5 years of follow-up, the mean Glasgow outcome score was 3.33 ± 1.40 for patients with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus and 4.21 ± 1.19 for those without. Conclusions The presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage, lower mean Glasgow Coma Scale score, and higher mean scores of the modified Fisher SAH and World Federation of Neurosurgical grading on admission imply risk of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without initial hydrocephalus. These patients have worse short- and long-term outcomes and longer hospitalization. PMID:22765765

  5. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    Vincent Ochieng

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP.

  6. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  7. Adhesion in microelectronics

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  8. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ADHESIVE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    Haricharan; Murali Krishna; Koti Reddy; Nara Hari

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Adhesive intestinal obstruction is an inevitable complication of abdominal surgeries. It has high morbidity with associated poor quality of life and predisposition to repeated hospitalization. Commonest cause of bowel obstruction in developed countries is postoperative adhesions with extrinsic compression of the intestine. Most of them can be managed conservatively. METHODS: A retrospective study of 30 patients admit...

  9. Noninvasive detection and mapping of intraabdominal adhesions

    Zinther, Nellie Bering; Fedder, Jens; Friis-Andersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adhesions are a well-known and very common complication to surgery. Their extent and severity varies according to type and number of surgeries, use of intraabdominal mesh, and presence of peritonitis. Adhesions cause increased morbidity and mortality, with subsequent socioeconomic con...

  10. Reflections about Adhesive Systems

    de Freitas Borges, Marciano; Diesel, Pâmela Gutheil; Corrêa, Fernanda Gomez; Bernardi, Eledana; Fernandes Montagner, Anelise; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Susin, Alexandre Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The adhesive systems are responsible for an efficient union between teeth and resin, resulting in a longevity restoration. They are organic molecules di or multifunctional that contain reactive groups that interact with dentin and with the resin monomer of composite resin. The adhesive systems are characterized by wet adhesion, which is a result of presence of hidrophylics radicals in their compositions, to promote a better bond and the best properties of the adhesion. Adhesive systems may us...

  11. Phylogenetic inferences of Atelinae (Platyrrhini) based on multi-directional chromosome painting in Brachyteles arachnoides, Ateles paniscus paniscus and Ateles b. marginatus

    de Oliveira, EHC; Neusser, M.; Pieczarka, J. C.; Nagamachi, C.; Sbalqueiro, I. J.; Müller, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    We performed multi-directional chromosome painting in a comparative cytogenetic study of the three Atelinae species Brachyteles arachnoides, Ateles paniscus paniscus and Ateles belzebuth marginatus, in order to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within this Platyrrhini subfamily. Comparative chromosome maps between these species were established by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization ( FISH) employing human, Saguinus oedipus and Lagothrix lagothricha chromosome-specific probes....

  12. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in two southern Wooly spider monkeys (Brachyteles arachnoides-Geoffroy, 1806) from the Rio de Janeiro primate center, Brazil.

    Santos, S V; Strefezzi, R F; Pissinatti, A; Kanamura, C T; Takakura, C F H; Duarte, M I S; Catão-Dias, J L

    2014-04-01

    Toxoplasmosis led to the death of two Brachyteles arachnoides, an endangered atelid. The diagnosis was established by necropsy, histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural changes. The analysis confirms the presence of Toxoplasma gondii. This report contributes to the development of protocols for health surveillance on maintenance and conservation of southern muriquis.

  13. Aneurysmal sub-arachnoid haemorrhage in patients with Noonan syndrome: a report of two cases and review of neurovascular presentations in this syndrome

    Dineen, R.A.; Lenthall, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    To date, intracranial aneurysms have been reported in two patients with Noonan syndrome. We report two unrelated patients with Noonan syndrome who presented with sub-arachnoid haemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysms. These cases are discussed and other cerebrovascular abnormalities that have been described in association with Noonan syndrome are reviewed. Ultrastructural and genetic factors contributing to these associations are considered. (orig.)

  14. Aneurysmal sub-arachnoid haemorrhage in patients with Noonan syndrome: a report of two cases and review of neurovascular presentations in this syndrome

    Dineen, R.A.; Lenthall, R.K. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Queen' s Medical Centre, NG7 2UH, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-01

    To date, intracranial aneurysms have been reported in two patients with Noonan syndrome. We report two unrelated patients with Noonan syndrome who presented with sub-arachnoid haemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysms. These cases are discussed and other cerebrovascular abnormalities that have been described in association with Noonan syndrome are reviewed. Ultrastructural and genetic factors contributing to these associations are considered. (orig.)

  15. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY IN ADHESIVE BOWEL OBSTRUCTION

    Gerald Anand Raja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Peritoneal adhesions can be defined as abnormal fibrous bands between organs or tissues or both in the abdominal cavity that are normally separated. Adhesions may be acquired or congenital; however, most are acquired as a result of peritoneal injury, the most common cause of which is abdominopelvic surgery. Less commonly, adhesions may form as the result of inflammatory conditions, intraperitoneal infection or abdominal trauma. The extent of adhesion formation varies from one patient to another and is most dependent on the type and magnitude of surgery performed as well as whether any postoperative complications develop. Fortunately, most patients with adhesions do not experience any overt clinical symptoms. For others, adhesions may lead to any one of a host of problems and can be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study of 50 patients admitted in Government Royapettah Hospital with adhesive bowel obstruction between September 2008 to September 2010. All patients were admitted and managed either conservatively or surgically. RESULTS 1. Adhesive bowel disease is the most common cause for bowel obstruction followed by hernias. 2. Increased incidence is noted in females. 3. Increased incidence of adhesions was documented in gynaecological and colorectal surgeries. 4. Below umbilical incisions have higher propensity for adhesion formation. 5. Laparotomies done for infective aetiology have higher adhesion risks. 6. Most of adhesive obstructions can be managed conservatively. 7. Adhesiolysis preferably laparoscopic can be done. For gangrenous bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy done. 8. Given the above risk factors, adhesive bowel disease can be prevented to a certain extent. CONCLUSION The formation of peritoneal adhesions continues to plague patients, surgeons and society. Although, research in this area is ongoing, there is currently no method that is 100% effective in

  16. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  17. THz Properties of Adhesives

    Stübling, E.; Gomell, L.; Sommer, S.; Winkel, A.; Kahlmeyer, M.; Böhm, S.; Koch, M.

    2018-06-01

    We determined the THz properties of 12 different adhesives which are mainly used for industrial purposes. The adhesives applied can be classified according to their chemical structure: epoxy resins, acrylic resins, and polyurethane based materials. This work represents a basis for future studies, which will concentrate on aging effects, including the absorption of water of adhesive joints. Thus, the dielectric properties of the unaged adhesives are investigated and the results of these measurements are described herein.

  18. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  19. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    . As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  20. Catalase and superoxide dismutase conjugated with platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule antibody distinctly alleviate abnormal endothelial permeability caused by exogenous reactive oxygen species and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2011-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion (O(2)()) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced by activated leukocytes and endothelial cells in sites of inflammation or ischemia cause endothelial barrier dysfunction that may lead to tissue edema. Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) conjugated with antibodies to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) specifically bind to endothelium, quench the corresponding ROS, and alleviate vascular oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present work, we studied the effects of anti-PECAM/catalase and anti-PECAM/SOD conjugates on the abnormal permeability manifested by transendothelial electrical resistance decline, increased fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran influx, and redistribution of vascular endothelial-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers. Anti-PECAM/catalase protected HUVEC monolayers against H(2)O(2)-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase exerted orders of magnitude lower endothelial uptake and no protective effect, similarly to IgG/catalase. Anti-PECAM/catalase, but not anti-PECAM/SOD, alleviated endothelial hyperpermeability caused by exposure to hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, implicating primarily H(2)O(2) in the disruption of the endothelial barrier in this model. Thrombin-induced endothelial permeability was not affected by treatment with anti-PECAM/AOEs or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or overexpression of AOEs, indicating that the endogenous ROS play no key role in thrombin-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction. In contrast, anti-PECAM/SOD, but not anti-PECAM/catalase, inhibited a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced increase in endothelial permeability, identifying a key role of endogenous O(2)() in the VEGF-mediated regulation of endothelial barrier function. Therefore, AOEs targeted to endothelial cells provide versatile molecular tools for testing the roles of

  1. Particle adhesion and removal

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  2. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  3. Motor Speech Apraxia in a 70-Year-Old Man with Left Dorsolateral Frontal Arachnoid Cyst: A [18F]FDG PET-CT Study

    Nicolaas I. Bohnen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor speech apraxia is a speech disorder of impaired syllable sequencing which, when seen with advancing age, is suggestive of a neurodegenerative process affecting cortical structures in the left frontal lobe. Arachnoid cysts can be associated with neurologic symptoms due to compression of underlying brain structures though indications for surgical intervention are unclear. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a two-year history of speech changes along with decreased initiation and talkativeness, shorter utterances, and dysnomia. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG Positron Emission and Computed Tomography (PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed very focal left frontal cortical hypometabolism immediately adjacent to an arachnoid cyst but no specific evidence of a neurodegenerative process.

  4. A new population of the endangered Brachyteles arachnoides (É. Geoffroy, 1806) (Primates: Atelidae) in the state of Paraná, southern Brazil

    Ingberman, Bianca; Kaminski, Nicholas; Fusco-Costa, Roberto; Monteiro-Filho, Emygdio

    2016-01-01

    The endangered southern muriqui or mono [Brachyteles arachnoides (É. Geoffroy, 1806)], is a primate endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. One known extant population is found at the southern limit of its distribution, in the state of Paraná, where it is regionally classified as Critically Endangered. Here, we report on a new population in southern Brazil. Additionally, we express our concern about the conservation status of this species in Paraná, because both populations are in small, is...

  5. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery.

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-05-07

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO₂ pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO₂, N₂O and O₂ seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no

  6. Energetics of bacterial adhesion

    Loosdrecht, M.C.M. van; Zehnder, A.J.B.

    1990-01-01

    For the description of bacterial adhesion phenomena two different physico-chemical approaches are available. The first one, based on a surface Gibbs energy balance, assumes intimate contact between the interacting surfaces. The second approach, based on colloid chemical theories (DLVO theory), allows for two types of adhesion: 1) secondary minimum adhesion, which is often weak and reversible, and 2) irreversible primary minimum adhesion. In the secondary minimum adhesion a thin water film remains present between the interacting surface. The merits of both approaches are discussed in this paper. In addition, the methods available to measure the physico-chemical surface characteristics of bacteria and the influence of adsorbing (in)organic compounds, extracellular polymers and cell surface appendages on adhesion are summarized. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 50 refs

  7. Radiation-curable adhesives

    Woods, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-curable adhesives may be classified into two broad categories. In the first category, adhesive bonding occurs as a direct result of irradiation. The second category includes pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives, which are composed of linear or lightly cross-linked polymers prepared by a radiation-induced polymerization reaction. This chapter is mainly concerned with radiation-curable adhesives of the first category. The various adhesive types are discussed and adhesive performance is examined, particularly in relation to the chemistry and chemical technology which underlies the individual materials. A description of a limited number of representative applications is included as is an outline of recent developments of curing and dispensing equipment. 268 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  8. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  9. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  10. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  11. Human arachnoid granulations Part I: a technique for quantifying area and distribution on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex

    Holman David W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are herniations of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses on the surface of the brain. Previous morphological studies of AGs have been limited in scope and only one has mentioned surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to investigate the topographic distribution of AGs on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex. Methods En face images were taken of the superior surface of 35 formalin-fixed human brains. AGs were manually identified using Adobe Photoshop, with a pixel location containing an AG defined as 'positive'. A set of 25 standard fiducial points was marked on each hemisphere for a total of 50 points on each image. The points were connected on each hemisphere to create a segmented image. A standard template was created for each hemisphere by calculating the average position of the 25 fiducial points from all brains. Each segmented image was mapped to the standard template using a linear transformation. A topographic distribution map was produced by calculating the proportion of AG positive images at each pixel in the standard template. The AG surface area was calculated for each hemisphere and for the total brain superior surface. To adjust for different brain sizes, the proportional involvement of AGs was calculated by dividing the AG area by the total area. Results The total brain average surface area of AGs was 78.53 ± 13.13 mm2 (n = 35 and average AG proportional involvement was 57.71 × 10-4 ± 7.65 × 10-4. Regression analysis confirmed the reproducibility of AG identification between independent researchers with r2 = 0.97. The surface AGs were localized in the parasagittal planes that coincide with the region of the lateral lacunae. Conclusion The data obtained on the spatial distribution and en face surface area of AGs will be used in an in vitro model of CSF outflow. With an increase in the number of samples, this analysis technique can be used

  12. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  13. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O'Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  14. Soy protein adhesives

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  15. Timing of births in sympatric brown howler monkeys (Alouatta fusca clamitans) and northern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus).

    Strier, K B; Mendes, S L; Santos, R R

    2001-10-01

    We monitored the birth patterns of sympatric brown howler monkeys (Alouatta fusca clamitans) and northern muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides hypoxanthus) during a 4-yr period from October 1996 to August 2000 at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Brown howler monkey births (n = 34) occurred throughout the year, and birth frequencies did not differ between rainy and dry season months. The aseasonal birth patterns of the howler monkeys differed significantly from the dry season concentration and dry month peak in muriqui births (n = 23). We found no effects of infant sex or the number of females on interbirth intervals (IBIs) in our 10 howler monkey study troops. IBIs of brown howler monkeys averaged 21.2 +/- 2.5 mo (n = 8, median = 21.0 mo), and were significantly shorter following dry season births than rainy season births. Their IBIs and yearling survivorship (74%) were similar to those reported for other species of howler monkeys, but yearling survivorship was much lower than that of muriquis (94%), whose IBIs were more than 12 mo longer than those of the howler monkeys. Our study extends comparative knowledge of birth patterns in Alouatta to a poorly known species, and provides insights into the different ways in which diet and life history may affect the timing of births in large-bodied platyrrhines under the same seasonal ecological conditions. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Physics of adhesion

    Gerberich, W W; Cordill, M J

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion physics was relegated to the lowest echelons of academic pursuit until the advent of three seemingly disconnected events. The first, atomic force microscopy (AFM), eventually allowed fine-scale measurement of adhesive point contacts. The second, large-scale computational materials science, now permits both hierarchical studies of a few thousand atoms from first principles or of billions of atoms with less precise interatomic potentials. The third is a microelectronics industry push towards the nanoscale which has provided the driving force for requiring a better understanding of adhesion physics. In the present contribution, an attempt is made at conjoining these separate events into an updating of how theoretical and experimental approaches are providing new understanding of adhesion physics. While all material couples are briefly considered, the emphasis is on metal/semiconductor and metal/ceramic interfaces. Here, adhesion energies typically range from 1 to 100 J m -2 where the larger value is considered a practical work of adhesion. Experimental emphasis is on thin-film de-adhesion for 10 to 1000 nm thick films. For comparison, theoretical approaches from first principles quantum mechanics to embedded atom methods used in multi-scale modelling are utilized

  17. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  18. EB curable laminating adhesives

    Matsuyama, Asao; Kobayashi, Masahide; Gotoh, Sakiko

    1992-01-01

    New developed solvent free EB curable laminating adhesives have two liquid components, A with hydroxy and acryloyl group, B with isocyanate and acryloyl group in a molecule. These EB laminating adhesives do not need any aging process, which is a big advantage, and are very suitable for environment, safety, and health because of no heating process and solvent free formulas. And we have made basic research about the relation of peel strength or heat seal strength versus Tg of cured film, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and so on. Basic specifications of the new developed adhesives are shown. (author)

  19. Optical adhesive property study

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  20. Nerve crush but not displacement-induced stretch of the intra-arachnoidal facial nerve promotes facial palsy after cerebellopontine angle surgery.

    Bendella, Habib; Brackmann, Derald E; Goldbrunner, Roland; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the reasons for occurrence of facial nerve palsy after removal of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Since the intra-arachnoidal portion of the facial nerve is considered to be so vulnerable that even the slightest tension or pinch may result in ruptured axons, we tested whether a graded stretch or controlled crush would affect the postoperative motor performance of the facial (vibrissal) muscle in rats. Thirty Wistar rats, divided into five groups (one with intact controls and four with facial nerve lesions), were used. Under inhalation anesthesia, the occipital squama was opened, the cerebellum gently retracted to the left, and the intra-arachnoidal segment of the right facial nerve exposed. A mechanical displacement of the brainstem with 1 or 3 mm toward the midline or an electromagnet-controlled crush of the facial nerve with a tweezers at a closure velocity of 50 and 100 mm/s was applied. On the next day, whisking motor performance was determined by video-based motion analysis. Even the larger (with 3 mm) mechanical displacement of the brainstem had no harmful effect: The amplitude of the vibrissal whisks was in the normal range of 50°-60°. On the other hand, even the light nerve crush (50 mm/s) injured the facial nerve and resulted in paralyzed vibrissal muscles (amplitude of 10°-15°). We conclude that, contrary to the generally acknowledged assumptions, it is the nerve crush but not the displacement-induced stretching of the intra-arachnoidal facial trunk that promotes facial palsy after cerebellopontine angle surgery in rats.

  1. Acute hydrocephalus in a child with a third ventricle arachnoid cyst and coincidental enteroviral meningitis

    Jeltema, Hanne-Rinck; Kuijlen, Jos M. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.

    We present a 2.5-year-old child suffering from acute hydrocephalus. First, the child was diagnosed with aseptic viral meningitis. The PCR of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for enterovirus. Subsequently, MRI revealed that the hydrocephalus was caused by a cyst in the third ventricle.

  2. Low-Cost Interactive Image-Based Virtual Endoscopy for the Diagnosis and Surgical Planning of Suprasellar Arachnoid Cysts.

    Li, Ye; Zhao, Yining; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhang, Zhizhong; Dong, Guojun; Wang, Qun; Liu, Lei; Yu, Xinguang; Xu, Bainan; Chen, Xiaolei

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility and reliability of virtual endoscopy (VE) as a rapid, low-cost, and interactive tool for the diagnosis and surgical planning of suprasellar arachnoid cysts (SACs). Eighteen patients with SACs treated with endoscopic ventriculocystostomy were recruited, and 18 endoscopic patients treated with third ventriculostomy were randomly selected as a VE reconstruction control group. After loading their DICOM data into free 3D Slicer software, VE reconstruction was independently performed by 3 blinded clinicians and the time required for each reconstruction was recorded. Another 3 blinded senior neurosurgeons interactively graded the visibility of VE by watching video recordings of the endoscopic procedures. Based on the visibility scores, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to investigate the reliability of VE to diagnose SACs, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the reliability of VE for surgical planning. In addition, the intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated to estimate the consistency among the results of 3 reconstruction performers. All 3 independent reconstructing performers successfully completed VE simulation for all cases, and the average reconstruction time was 10.2 ± 9.7 minutes. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the cyst visibility score was 0.96, implying its diagnostic value for SACs. The Bland-Altman plot indicated good agreement between VE and intraoperative viewings, suggesting the anatomic accuracy of the VE for surgical planning. In addition, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.81, which revealed excellent interperformer consistency of our simulation method. This study substantiated the feasibility and reliability of VE as a rapid, low-cost, and interactive modality for diagnosis and surgical planning of SACs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  4. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  5. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  6. Área de vida e padroes de deslocamento de Brachyteles arachnoides (E.Geoffroy, 1806) (Primates:Atelinae) em um fragmento florestal no Município de Castro, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

    Pereira, Luiz Cezar Machado

    2013-01-01

    O presente estudo foi realizado na Fazenda Lagoa Alegre, Castro, Estado do Paraná, onde um grupo de Brachyteles arachnoides (E. Geoffroy, 1806), (mono-carvoeiro) composto por 24 indivíduos foi acompanhado entre janeiro de 2002 a outubro de 2005. O uso do habitat por Brachyteles arachnoides foi estudado numa área fragmentada de 370 hectares de Floresta Ombrófila Densa ecótono com a Floresta Ombrófila Mista (área de tensão ecológica). Ao estudo da área de vida, também foi efetivado uma breve de...

  7. Structural Evaluation of the RSRM Nozzle Replacement Adhesive

    Batista-Rodriguez, A.; McLennan, M. L.; Palumbos, A. V.; Richardson, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the structural performance evaluation of a replacement adhesive for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle utilizing finite element analysis. Due to material obsolescence and industrial safety issues, the two current structural adhesives, EA 913 and EA 946 are to be replaced with a new adhesive. TIGA 321. The structural evaluation in support of the adhesive replacement effort includes residual stress, transportation, and flight analyses. Factors of safety are calculated using the stress response from each analysis. The factors of safety are used as the limiting criteria to compare the replacement adhesive against the current adhesives. Included in this paper are the analytical approach, assumptions and modeling techniques as well as the results of the evaluation. An important factor to the evaluation is the similarity in constitutive material properties (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) between TIGA 321 and EA 913. This similarity leads to equivalent material response from the two adhesives. However, TIGA 321 surpasses EA 913's performance due to higher material capabilities. Conversely, the change in stress response from EA 946 to TIGA 321 is more apparent: this is primarily attributed to the difference in the modulii of the two adhesives, which differ by two orders of magnitude. The results of the bondline evaluation indicate that the replacement adhesive provides superior performance than the current adhesives with only minor exceptions. Furthermore, TIGA 321 causes only a minor chance in the response of the phenolic and metal components.

  8. Gastrin-releasing peptide induces monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium by upregulating endothelial adhesion molecules

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Yeon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a neuropeptide that plays roles in various pathophysiological conditions including inflammatory diseases in peripheral tissues; however, little is known about whether GRP can directly regulate endothelial inflammatory processes. In this study, we showed that GRP promotes the adhesion of leukocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the aortic endothelium. GRP increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by activating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in endothelial cells. In addition, GRP activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38MAPK, and AKT, and the inhibition of these signaling pathways significantly reduced GRP-induced monocyte adhesion to the endothelium. Overall, our results suggested that GRP may cause endothelial dysfunction, which could be of particular relevance in the development of vascular inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • GRP induces adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium. • GRP increases the expression of endothelial adhesion molecules through the activation of NF-κB. • ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and Akt pathways are involved in the GRP-induced leukocyte adhesiveness to endothelium.

  9. Spatiotemporal patterns formed by deformed adhesive in peeling

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Toda, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    Dynamical properties of peeling an adhesive tape are investigated experimentally as an analogy of sliding friction. An adhesive tape is peeled by pulling an elastic spring connected to the tape. Controlling its spring constant k and pulling speed V, peel force is measured and spatiotemporal patterns formed on the peeled tape by deformed adhesive are observed. It is found that there exist two kinds of adhesive state in peeling front. The emergence of multiple states is caused by the stability of a characteristic structure (tunnel structure) formed by deformed adhesive. Tunnel structures are distributed spatiotemporally on adhesive tape after peeling. Based on the spatiotemporal distribution, a morphology-dynamical phase diagram is constructed on k-V space and is divided into the four regions: (A) uniform pattern with tunnel structure, (B) uniform pattern without tunnel structure, (C) striped pattern with oscillatory peeling, and (D) spatiotemporally coexistent pattern

  10. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ADHESIVE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    Haricharan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adhesive intestinal obstruction is an inevitable complication of abdominal surgeries. It has high morbidity with associated poor quality of life and predisposition to repeated hospitalization. Commonest cause of bowel obstruction in developed countries is postoperative adhesions with extrinsic compression of the intestine. Most of them can be managed conservatively. METHODS: A retrospective study of 30 patients admitted with the diagnosis of post - operative adhesive partial bowel obstruction was conducted by analyzing their medical records. Demographic data, clinical presentation including duration, previous surgical procedures, treatments received for the condition and successful conservative approach versus requirement of operative intervention were assesse d. RESULTS: The median age was 31yrs, most in their third decade of life. Male predominance was noted. Pelvic surgeries and gynecological surgeries (26% were found to be the most common cause of adhesive bowel obstruction followed by appendectomy (16%. M ore than two third of the patients (76.7% developed symptoms within two years of the initial surgery. Successful conservative treatment was noted in 22 patients (73.3% and discharged on fourth day of admission. Eight patients (26.6% underwent surgery. T hey all underwent adhesiolysis and had good outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The time - honored practice of expectant management of adhesive partial bowel obstruction has equally good outcome, as compared to various interventions practiced

  11. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Krahn, J; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm 2 . (paper)

  12. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  13. Polymerization contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin and enamel

    Hashimoto, M.; de Gee, A.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study on of polymerization contraction stress determinations of adhesives bonded to dentin a continuous decline of stress was observed after the adhesives had been light-cured. The decline was ascribed to stress relief caused by diffusion into the adhesive layer of water

  14. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  15. Tensin stabilizes integrin adhesive contacts in Drosophila.

    Torgler, Catherine N; Narasimha, Maithreyi; Knox, Andrea L; Zervas, Christos G; Vernon, Matthew C; Brown, Nicholas H

    2004-03-01

    We report the functional characterization of the Drosophila ortholog of tensin, a protein implicated in linking integrins to the cytoskeleton and signaling pathways. A tensin null was generated and is viable with wing blisters, a phenotype characteristic of loss of integrin adhesion. In tensin mutants, mechanical abrasion is required during wing expansion to cause wing blisters, suggesting that tensin strengthens integrin adhesion. The localization of tensin requires integrins, talin, and integrin-linked kinase. The N-terminal domain and C-terminal PTB domain of tensin provide essential recruitment signals. The intervening SH2 domain is not localized on its own. We suggest a model where tensin is recruited to sites of integrin adhesion via its PTB and N-terminal domains, localizing the SH2 domain so that it can interact with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins, which stabilize the integrin link to the cytoskeleton.

  16. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Adhesion Molecules

    L. V. Molchanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture presents the materials of foreign studies on the mechanisms responsible for the formation of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The hypotheses accounting for the occurrence of SIRS in emergencies are described. Adhesion molecules (AM and endothelial dysfunction are apparent to be involved in the inflammatory process, no matter what the causes of SIRS are. The current classification of AM and adhesion cascades with altered blood flow is presented. There are two lines in the studies of AM. One line is to measure the concentration of AM in the plasma of patients with emergencies of various etiology. The other is to study the impact of antiadhesion therapy on the alleviation of the severity of terminal state and its outcome. The studies provide evidence for that an adhesive process is a peculiar prelude to a systemic inflammatory response.

  17. Protein profiling reveals inter-individual protein homogeneity of arachnoid cyst fluid and high qualitative similarity to cerebrospinal fluid

    Berle Magnus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms behind formation and filling of intracranial arachnoid cysts (AC are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate AC fluid by proteomics to gain further knowledge about ACs. Two goals were set: 1 Comparison of AC fluid from individual patients to determine whether or not temporal AC is a homogenous condition; and 2 Evaluate the protein content of a pool of AC fluid from several patients and qualitatively compare this with published protein lists of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma. Methods AC fluid from 15 patients with temporal AC was included in this study. In the AC protein comparison experiment, AC fluid from 14 patients was digested, analyzed by LC-MS/MS using a semi-quantitative label-free approach and the data were compared by principal component analysis (PCA to gain knowledge of protein homogeneity of AC. In the AC proteome evaluation experiment, AC fluid from 11 patients was pooled, digested, and fractionated by SCX chromatography prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. Proteins identified were compared to published databases of proteins identified from CSF and plasma. AC fluid proteins not found in these two databases were experimentally searched for in lumbar CSF taken from neurologically-normal patients, by a targeted protein identification approach called MIDAS (Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM initiated detection and sequence analysis. Results We did not identify systematic trends or grouping of data in the AC protein comparison experiment, implying low variability between individual proteomic profiles of AC. In the AC proteome evaluation experiment, we identified 199 proteins. When compared to previously published lists of proteins identified from CSF and plasma, 15 of the AC proteins had not been reported in either of these datasets. By a targeted protein identification approach, we identified 11 of these 15 proteins in pooled CSF from neurologically-normal patients, demonstrating that

  18. A role for the fibrinolytic system in postsurgical adhesion formation

    Hellebrekers, Bart W. J.; Emeis, Jef J.; Kooistra, Teake; Trimbos, J. Baptist; Moore, Norma R.; Zwinderman, Koos H.; Trimbos-Kemper, Trudy C. M.

    2005-01-01

    To look for evidence of a fibrinolytic insufficiency as a cause of adhesion formation. Retrospective and prospective study. University medical center. Retrospective study: 50 patients undergoing laparoscopy, divided into patients with and without endometriosis. Prospective study: 18 patients

  19. Reversible adhesion switching of porous fibrillar adhesive pads by humidity.

    Xue, Longjian; Kovalev, Alexander; Dening, Kirstin; Eichler-Volf, Anna; Eickmeier, Henning; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    We report reversible adhesion switching on porous fibrillar polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) adhesive pads by humidity changes. Adhesion at a relative humidity of 90% was more than nine times higher than at a relative humidity of 2%. On nonporous fibrillar adhesive pads of the same material, adhesion increased only by a factor of ~3.3. The switching performance remained unchanged in at least 10 successive high/low humidity cycles. Main origin of enhanced adhesion at high humidity is the humidity-induced decrease in the elastic modulus of the polar component P2VP rather than capillary force. The presence of spongelike continuous internal pore systems with walls consisting of P2VP significantly leveraged this effect. Fibrillar adhesive pads on which adhesion is switchable by humidity changes may be used for preconcentration of airborne particulates, pollutants, and germs combined with triggered surface cleaning.

  20. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  1. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  2. an Adhesive Patch

    S. Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems  TDDSs containing stimulants, termed as energetic substances, such as caffeine and pantothenic acid, were studied. Caffeine is a white crystalline substance and a stimulant to central nervous system. In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. Pantothenic acid, also recognized as vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin. For many animals, pantothenic acid is an essential nutrient. Animals require pantothenic acid to synthesize and metabolize proteins, carbohydrates and fats. For this purpose caffeine and pantothenic acid were  used  as  drug  components with  6.32%  and  1.12%  loadings,  in  different functional and non-functional acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs of 52.89%, respectively. Ethylene glycol as a chemical enhancer was used in all TDDSs with 39.67%. The effect of PSAs  type on  in vitro  release and adhesion properties  (peel strength and tack values from drug delivery devices were evaluated. It was found that TDDS containing -COOH functional PSA showed  the  lowest steady state fux. The adhesion properties of the samples were improved by addition of functional acrylic PSA in formulations.

  3. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies

    van de Vijver, Edith; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes play a key role in maintaining tissue homeostasis through elimination of pathogens and removal of damaged tissue. Leukocytes migrate to the site of inflammation by crawling over and through the blood vessel wall, into the tissue. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies (ie,

  4. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  5. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  6. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  7. Plasma treatment of polymers for improved adhesion

    Kelber, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of plasma treatments of polymer sufaces for improved adhesion are reviewed: noble and reactive has treatment of fluoropolymers; noble and reactive treatment of polyolefins, and plasma-induced amination of polymer fibers. The plasma induced surface chemical and morphological changer are discussed, as are the mechanisms of adhersion to polymeric adhesives, particularly epoxy. Noble has plasma eching of fluoropolymers produces a partially defluorinated, textured surface. The mechanical interlocking of this textured surface is the primary cause of improved adhsion to epoxy. Reactive has plasma also induce defluorination, but oxygen containing gases cause continual ablation of the fluoropolymer surface. Noble and reactive gas (except for hydrogen) etching of polyolefins results in surface oxidation and imrprove adhesion via hydrogen bonding of these exygen containing groups across the interface. The introduction of amine groups to a polymer surface by ammonia or amine plasma treatment generally results in improved adhesion to epoxy. However, amine-epoxy ring interactions can be severely effected by steric factors due to chemical group surrounding the amine

  8. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Joaquín Palacios-Alquisira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA‑MMA‑EA and (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives.

  9. Multifunctional nanoparticles as a tissue adhesive and an injectable marker for image-guided procedures

    Shin, Kwangsoo; Choi, Jin Woo; Ko, Giho; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Kyoungbun; Cho, Hye Rim; Han, Sang Ihn; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-07-01

    Tissue adhesives have emerged as an alternative to sutures and staples for wound closure and reconnection of injured tissues after surgery or trauma. Owing to their convenience and effectiveness, these adhesives have received growing attention particularly in minimally invasive procedures. For safe and accurate applications, tissue adhesives should be detectable via clinical imaging modalities and be highly biocompatible for intracorporeal procedures. However, few adhesives meet all these requirements. Herein, we show that biocompatible tantalum oxide/silica core/shell nanoparticles (TSNs) exhibit not only high contrast effects for real-time imaging but also strong adhesive properties. Furthermore, the biocompatible TSNs cause much less cellular toxicity and less inflammation than a clinically used, imageable tissue adhesive (that is, a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol). Because of their multifunctional imaging and adhesive property, the TSNs are successfully applied as a hemostatic adhesive for minimally invasive procedures and as an immobilized marker for image-guided procedures.

  10. Postoperative adhesion prevention in gynecologic surgery with hyaluronic acid.

    Carta, G; Cerrone, L; Iovenitti, P

    2004-01-01

    Despite improvements in surgical instrumentation and techniques, adhesions continue to form after most procedures. Peritoneal adhesions develop in 60-90% of women who undergo major gynecological operations. This adhesion formation causes significant postoperative morbidity such as bowel obstruction (65%), infertility (15-20%), and chronic pelvic pain (40%). To demonstrate the efficacy of a hyaluronic acid product (Hyalobarrier Gel) for the prevention of adhesions in gynecological surgery. From October 2000 to July 2002, 18 women from 26 to 41 years old (mean age 33.66) underwent myomectomy via laparotomy as their first abdominal operation. Between August 2001 and May 2003, the patients underwent a second-look laparoscopy (7 women, 38.9%, 15 sites, 42.8%) or a second-look laparotomy (11 women, 61.1%, 20 sites, 57.1%) during which all the 35 sites corresponding to the previous myomectomies were analyzed. During the second-look procedure the presence, localization and severity of adhesions were evaluated using the Operative Laparoscopy Study Group Classification (OLSG) and American Fertility Society Classification (AFSC). All patients underwent a second-look laparoscopy/laparotomy and only five of 18 (27.7%) showed pelvic adhesions in seven sites (20%) of previous myomectomies. No adhesion was found on the previous sites of myomectomies of pedunculated leiomyomas so, excluding those, adhesions were found in seven of 29 sites of myomectomies (24.1%). The present study emphasizes the need for improved treatments to prevent adhesions, as there is no doubt that adhesions represent one of the major causes of female morbidity.

  11. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  12. Phylogenetic inferences of Atelinae (Platyrrhini) based on multi-directional chromosome painting in Brachyteles arachnoides, Ateles paniscus paniscus and Ateles b. marginatus.

    de Oliveira, E H C; Neusser, M; Pieczarka, J C; Nagamachi, C; Sbalqueiro, I J; Müller, S

    2005-01-01

    We performed multi-directional chromosome painting in a comparative cytogenetic study of the three Atelinae species Brachyteles arachnoides, Ateles paniscus paniscus and Ateles belzebuth marginatus, in order to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within this Platyrrhini subfamily. Comparative chromosome maps between these species were established by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing human, Saguinus oedipus and Lagothrix lagothricha chromosome-specific probes. The three species included in this study and four previously analyzed species from all four Atelinae genera were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis on the basis of a data matrix comprised of 82 discrete chromosome characters. The results confirmed that Atelinae represent a monophyletic clade with a putative ancestral karyotype of 2n = 62 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed an evolutionary branching sequence [Alouatta [Brachyteles [Lagothrix and Ateles

  13. Adhesion barriers at cesarean delivery: advertising compared with the evidence.

    Albright, Catherine M; Rouse, Dwight J

    2011-07-01

    Cesarean delivery, the most common surgery performed in the United States, is complicated by adhesion formation in 24-73% of cases. Because adhesions have potential sequelae, different synthetic adhesion barriers are currently heavily marketed as a means of reducing adhesion formation resultant from cesarean delivery. However, their use for this purpose has been studied in only two small, nonblinded and nonrandomized trials, both of which were underpowered and subject to bias. Neither demonstrated improvement in meaningful clinical outcomes. In the only cost-effectiveness analysis of adhesion barriers to date, the use of synthetic adhesion barriers was cost-effective only when the subsequent rate of small bowel obstruction was at least 2.4%, a rate far higher than that associated with cesarean delivery. In fact, intra-abdominal adhesions from prior cesarean delivery rarely cause maternal harm and have not been demonstrated to adversely affect perinatal outcome. Based on our review of the available literature, we think the use of adhesion barriers at the time of cesarean delivery would be ill-advised at the present time.

  14. Adhesion aspects of polyurethane foam sandwich panels.

    Ng, Simon L.

    2016-01-01

    Sandwich panels, polyurethane foam sandwiched between two sheets of steel, form the walls and roofs in the construction of buildings. ArcelorMittal is a manufacturer of the steel as well as these finished panels. For this project they combined with a supplier of the polyurethane foams, Huntsman Polyurethanes, to joint-fund a research project investigating the fundamental mechanisms of adhesion, as well as the causes of failures in the product which manifests primarily in two different ways...

  15. Chitosan adhesive for laser tissue repair

    Lauto, A.; Stoodley, M.; Avolio, A.; Foster, L. J. R.

    2006-02-01

    Background. Laser tissue repair usually relies on haemoderivate solders, based on serum albumin. These solders have intrinsic limitations that impair their widespread use, such as limited repair strength, high solubility, brittleness and viral transmission. Furthermore, the solder activation temperature (65-70 °C) can induce significant damage to tissue. In this study, a new laser-activated biomaterial for tissue repair was developed and tested in vitro and in vivo to overcome some of the shortcomings of traditional solders. Materials and Methods. Flexible and insoluble strips of chitosan adhesive (surface area ~34 mm2, thickness ~20 μm) were developed and bonded on sheep intestine with a laser fluence and irradiance of 52 +/- 2 J/cm2 and ~15 W/cm2 respectively. The temperature between tissue and adhesive was measured using small thermocouples. The strength of repaired tissue was tested by a calibrated tensiometer. The adhesive was also bonded in vivo to the sciatic nerve of rats to assess the thermal damage induced by the laser (fluence = 65 +/- 11 J/cm2, irradiance = 15 W/cm2) four days post-operatively. Results. Chitosan adhesives successfully repaired intestine tissue, achieving a repair strength of 0.50 +/- 0.15 N (shear stress = 14.7 +/- 4.7 KPa, n=30) at a temperature of 60-65 °C. The laser caused demyelination of axons at the operated site; nevertheless, the myelinated axons retained their normal morphology proximally and distally.

  16. The effect of adhesion on survival and growth of microorganisms

    Bar-Or, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Adhesion of microorganisms to solid surfaces or water/air interfaces can significantly influence cellular metabolic activity, development and viability. Attachment is of advantage particularly for organisms growing under oligotrophic or otherwise extreme conditions. However, the ability to detach and migrate is of vital importance when prevailing conditions become too harsh or in situations of population explosion. Adhesion can cause alterations in the physical and chemical properties of substratum surfaces as well, by means of degradation, aggregation, emulsification etc. (author) 48 refs

  17. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  18. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  19. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: MR arthrography

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Han, Tae Il; Lee, Kwang Won; Choi, Youn Seon; Kim, Dae Hong; Han, Hyun Young; Song, Mun Kab; Kwon, Soon Tae

    2001-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a clinical syndrome involving pain and decreased joint motion caused by thickening and contraction of the joint capsule. The purpose of this study is to describe the MR arthrographic findings of this syndrome. Twenty-nine sets of MR arthrographic images were included in the study. Fourteen patients had adhesive capsulitis diagnosed by physical examination and arthrography, and their MR arthrographic findings were compared with those of 15 subjects in the control group. The images were retrospectively reviewed with specific attention to the thickness of the joint capsule, volume of the axillary pouch (length, width, height(depth)), thinkness of the coracohumeral ligament, presence of extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrst filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Mean capsular thickness measured at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch was 4.1 mm in patients with adhesive capsulitis and 1.5 mm in the control group. The mean width of the axillary pouch was 2.5 mm in patients and 9.5 mm in controls. In patients, the capsule was significantly thicker and the axillary pouch significantly narrower than in controls (p<0.05). Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch (sensitivity 93%, specificity 80%) and a pouch narrower than 3.5 mm (sensitivity 93%, specificity 100%) were useful criteria for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. In patients with this condition, extra-articular contrast extravasation was noted in six patients (43%) and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa in three (21%). The MR arthrographic findings of adhesive capsulitis are capsular thickening, a low-volume axillary pouch, extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch and a pouch width of less than 3.5 mm are useful diagnostic imaging characteristics

  20. Adhesive and morphological characteristics of surface chemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene films

    Hopp, B.; Kresz, N.; Kokavecz, J.; Smausz, T.; Schieferdecker, H.; Doering, A.; Marti, O.; Bor, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, we report an experimental determination of adhesive and topographic characteristics of chemically modified surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) films. The surface chemistry was modified by ArF excimer laser irradiation in presence of triethylene-tetramine photoreagent. The applied laser fluence was varied in the range of 0.4-9 mJ/cm 2 , and the number of laser pulses incident on the same area was 1500. To detect the changes in the adhesive features of the treated Teflon samples, we measured receding contact angle for distilled water and adhesion strength, respectively. It was found that the receding contact angle decreased from 96 deg. to 30-37 deg. and the adhesion strength of two-component epoxy glue to the treated sample surface increased from 0.03 to 9 MPa in the applied laser fluence range. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the adhesion of human cells to the modified Teflon samples is far better than to the untreated ones. The contact mode and pulsed force mode atomic force microscopic investigations of the treated samples demonstrated that the measured effective contact area of the irradiated films does not differ significantly from that of the original films, but the derived adhesion force is stronger on the modified samples than on the untreated ones. Hence, the increased adhesion of the treated Teflon films is caused by the higher surface energy

  1. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  2. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Abdullah, A R; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M S Abdul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding

  4. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Joining of rubber substrate with bronze surface by the method of molecular adhesion

    Oravec, J.; Preto, J.; Hronkovic, J.; Melus, P.; Hirahara, H.; Sang, J.

    2017-01-01

    During the adhesion process using the adhesives there are many risks of defects caused by boundary stress, strength and to resolve these traditional adhesive problems a method called molecule adhesion technology, was used. This method can successfully adhere different materials and has the advantages such as material independence and strong adhesion strength without any adhesive agent. The impact of selected coupling agents on the green and final adhesion on the boundary bronze surface - natural rubber based coating blend was studied in the presented work. Wires of bronze (Cu/Sn 96:4) coated steel bead wire were submerged in solutions of coupling agents in ethanol for 30 s at various temperature and dried. The effect of the surface modification was evaluated by measuring of XPS, FT-IR, the morphology of the brass plate surfaces after the treatment was studied by the atomic force microscopy (AFM). (authors)

  6. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  7. Controlling adhesive behavior during recycling

    Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Jihui Guo; XinPing Wang; Steve Severtson; Mark Kroll; Mike Nowak

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives can be formulated to facilitate their removal by typical paper recycling unit operations. The investigations described in this paper are focused on determining fundamental properties that control particle size during pulping. While pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with high elastic moduli tend to survive pulping with larger particles, facestock and...

  8. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  9. Evaluation of adhesion promoters for Parylene C on gold metallization

    Radun V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Delamination of thin film polymeric coatings from metallization layers is a common cause of failure in biomedical implants. To address the problem, different adhesion promotion techniques can be applied which include surface pre-treatment with oxygen and argon plasma and the use of different adhesion promoters. In this paper the applicability of titanium (Ti, silicon oxide (SiOx, diamond-like carbon (DLC, tetramethylsilane (TMS and aluminium oxide (AlOx as adhesion promoters is evaluated. A cross cut, peel and scratch test are used to qualify and quantify the adhesion before and after storage in phosphate buffered saline (PBS for 48 hours at a temperature of 37 °C. Promising results could be achieved by a combination of Ti and DLC as well as by AlOx.

  10. Drug Clearance from Cerebrospinal Fluid Mediated by Organic Anion Transporters 1 (Slc22a6) and 3 (Slc22a8) at Arachnoid Membrane of Rats.

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Tachikawa, Masanori; Uchida, Yasuo; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2018-03-05

    Although arachnoid mater epithelial cells form the blood-arachnoid barrier (BAB), acting as a blood-CSF interface, it has been generally considered that the BAB is impermeable to water-soluble substances and plays a largely passive role. Here, we aimed to clarify the function of transporters at the BAB in regulating CSF clearance of water-soluble organic anion drugs based on quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) and in vivo analyses. Protein expression levels of 61 molecules, including 19 ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporters and 32 solute-carrier (SLC) transporters, were measured in plasma membrane fraction of rat leptomeninges using QTAP. Thirty-three proteins were detected; others were under the quantification limits. Expression levels of multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mdr1a/P-gp/Abcb1a) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2) were 16.6 and 3.27 fmol/μg protein (51.9- and 9.82-fold greater than in choroid plexus, respectively). Among those organic anion transporters detected only at leptomeninges, not choroid plexus, organic anion transporter 1 (oat1/Slc22a6) showed the greatest expression (2.73 fmol/μg protein). On the other hand, the protein expression level of oat3 at leptomeninges was 6.65 fmol/μg protein, and the difference from choroid plexus was within two-fold. To investigate oat1's role, we injected para-aminohippuric acid (PAH) with or without oat1 inhibitors into cisterna magna (to minimize the contribution of choroid plexus function) of rats. A bulk flow marker, FITC-inulin, was not taken up from CSF up to 15 min, whereas uptake clearance of PAH was 26.5 μL/min. PAH uptake was completely blocked by 3 mM cephalothin (inhibits both oat1 and oat3), while 17% of PAH uptake was inhibited by 0.2 mM cephalothin (selectively inhibits oat3). These results indicate that oat1 and oat3 at the BAB provide a distinct clearance pathway of organic anion drugs from CSF independently of choroid plexus.

  11. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  12. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  13. Adhesion and multi-materials

    Schultz, J.

    1997-01-01

    Adhesion is a multidisciplinary science relevant to many practical fields. The main application of adhesion is bonding by adhesives. This technique is widely used in the industrial world and more specifically in the advanced technical domains. Adhesion is also involved in multi-component materials such as coatings, multilayer materials, polymer blends, composite materials... The multidisciplinary aspect of adhesion is well demonstrated by considering the wide variety of concepts, models and theories proposed for its description. An example of the adhesion between a fiber and a matrix in a composite material will lead to a general model relating the molecular properties of the interface to its capacity of stress transfer and hence to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the composite. This relationship is valid whatever the fiber (glass, carbon, polymeric) or the polymer matrix (thermoplastics, thermosetting). Any deviation from this model can be attributed to the existence of an interfacial zone or interphase exhibiting properties, mainly mechanical properties, different from the bulk matrix. Two examples are examined: the first one deals with the creation of a trans crystalline interphase in a semi-crystalline thermoplastic matrix and the second one is concerned with the formation of a pseudo glassy interphase in an elastomer matrix. These examples stress the need for complementary approaches in the understanding of adhesion phenomena at different levels of knowledge, from molecular to macroscopic. They also show how important it is to understand the mechanisms of formation of inter phases in order to be able to master the performance of multicomponent materials. (Author)

  14. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  15. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  16. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  17. Structural adhesives directory and databook

    Wilson, Jo

    1996-01-01

    A worldwide directory of commercially available adhesive products for use in a wide range of engineering disciplines. Along with product names and suppliers, basic property data are tabulated and cross-referenced. The book is subdivided according to class of adhesive, with introductions to each class followed by comparison tables and datasheets for each adhesive. The datasheets contain detailed information, from product codes to environmental properties and are therefore of interest across a broad readership. Standardized data will aid the user in cross-comparison between different manufacturers and in easily identifying the required information.

  18. Medicinal plants in the diet of woolly spider monkeys (Brachyteles arachnoides, E. Geoffroy, 1806 – a bio-rational for the search of new medicines for human use?

    Liége M. Petroni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to compare the plant food diet of woolly spider monkeys (Brachyteles arachnoides inhabiting Intervales State Park in São Paulo, Brazil, with medicinal plant species used by humans in the surrounding areas of the park. The diet of a group of woolly spider monkeys living in an Atlantic forest area was recorded during 43 months of fieldwork. Fifty-three species (87 food items were recorded. Plant specimens were collected and identified at the University of São Paulo and the Botanical Institute of São Paulo State. Using semi-structured interviews, ethnomedicinal data were also collected from four preselected respondents regarding the human therapeutic value of these plants. The study showed that 24.5% (13/53 of these species are used by residents around the park for medicinal purposes. Of these thirteen, seven species also have validated pharmacological properties, and three are utilized by local residents for similar medicinal purposes. Overlap in the plant food/medicinal diet of woolly spider monkey populations elsewhere were also noted, suggesting potential overlap in their medicinal value for humans and primates. The similarities between the ingestion of plants by primates and their medicinal use by humans provide a bio-rational for the search of bioactive plants in the primate diet. Further detailed investigation of their pharmacological and phytochemical value is warranted.

  19. Comparing Soy Flour Wood Adhesives to Purified Soy Protein Adhesives

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    While economics dictate that soy-based wood adhesives be made with soy flour, much of the recent literature on soy-based wood adhesives has involved using soy protein isolate. The obvious assumption is that the additional carbohydrates in the flour but not in the isolate only serve as inert diluents. Our studies have shown that the isolate can provide 10 times the wet...

  20. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  1. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  2. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    . Understanding of the molecular mechanisms of adhesion, that is bioadhesive bond formation and curing, is essential to develop a more rational approach in designing fouling- release coatings. Silicone biofouling release coatings have been shown...

  3. Bio-Inspired Controllable Adhesive

    2008-12-01

    pad of the tarsus – which act as a sort of hydraulic suspension. The lamellae contain rows of thin slender fibers , called setae, approximately 130 µm...in length and 20 µm in diameter (Hildebrand, 1988), Fig.1. The terminus of each seta branches into thousands of smaller fibers , or spatular stalks...ADHESION TESTING The structures were characterized (Northen et al., 2008) using a home-built adhesion test apparatus ( Basalt - II) with C. Greiner

  4. Efficacy and safety of the C-Qur™ Film Adhesion Barrier for the prevention of surgical adhesions (CLIPEUS Trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Stommel, Martijn W J; Strik, Chema; ten Broek, Richard P G; van Goor, Harry

    2014-09-26

    Adhesions develop in over 90% of patients after intra-abdominal surgery. Adhesion barriers are rarely used despite the high morbidity caused by intra-abdominal adhesions. Only one of the currently available adhesion barriers has demonstrated consistent evidence for reducing adhesions in visceral surgery. This agent has limitations through poor handling characteristics because it is sticky on both sides. C-Qur™ Film is a novel thin film adhesion barrier and it is sticky on only one side, resulting in better handling characteristics. The objective of this study is to assess efficacy and safety of C-Qur™ Film to decrease the incidence of adhesions after colorectal surgery. This is a prospective, investigator initiated, randomized, double-blinded, multicenter trial. Eligible patients undergoing colorectal resection requiring temporary loop ileostomy or loop/split colostomy by laparotomy or hand assisted laparoscopy will be included in the trial. Before closure, patients are randomized 1:1 to either the treatment arm (C-Qur™ Film) or control arm (no adhesion barrier). Patients will return 8 to 16 weeks post-colorectal resection for take down of their ostomy. During ostomy takedown, adhesions will be evaluated for incidence, extent, and severity. The primary outcome evaluation will be assessment of adhesions to the incision site. It is hypothesized that the use of C-Qur™ Film underneath the primary incision reduces the incidence of adhesion at the incision by 30%. To demonstrate 30% reduction in the incidence of adhesions, a sample size of 84 patients (32 + 10 per group (25% drop out)) is required (two-sided test, α = 0.05, 80% power). Results of this study add to the evidence on the use of anti-adhesive barriers in open and laparoscopic 'hand-assisted' colorectal surgery. We chose incidence of adhesions to the incision site as primary outcome measure since clinical outcomes such as small bowel obstruction, secondary infertility and adhesiolysis related

  5. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  6. Behavior of an epoxy-polysulfide adhesive in wood joints exposed to moisture content changes

    Gordon P. Krueger

    1965-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a flexible epoxy-resin adhesive system was observed in joints of plywood to lumber. The joints were subjected to internal swelling stresses caused by an increase in moisture content. Previous experimental work at the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory has shown that this adhesive system acts as a strain-absorbing cushion and thus has a...

  7. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  8. Highly durable and unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs for gecko-like dry adhesive

    Im, Hyeon Seong; Kwon, Ki Yoon; Kim, Jong Uk; Kim, Tae-il; Kim, Kwang Su; Yi, Hoon; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Yoo, Pil J; Pang, Changhyun

    2015-01-01

    Gecko-like dry adhesive using high aspect ratio polymeric nanohairs has insuperable limitations, although it has huge potential in many applications. Repeated harsh contacts on a target substrate lead to physical collapse of nanohairs and significant degradation of the adhesion property, because the polymeric nanohairs are quite fragile due to poor mechanical robustness. Herein, we demonstrate a highly robust gecko-like dry adhesive with unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs (diameter 100 nm) with a high aspect ratio (∼9) using an ultrathin metal coating. 100 cycles of repeated adhesion tests with 1 N preloading force did not significantly degrade adhesion or cause collapse of nanohairs. We believe that this approach allows gecko-like dry adhesive to be utilized in many related applications and diverse industry interests. (paper)

  9. Denture adhesives: a systematic review.

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Papadiochos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Denture adhesives have been the objective of scientific research for over half a century. Although they are used by denture wearers worldwide, investigations of their effectiveness and biocompatibility have led to controversial conclusions. The purpose of this study was to review the literature data with regard to the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives as well as the attitudes of both patients and dental professionals toward these materials. An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literature in the Medline database was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives. There was no limitation in publication year, so the search included all the available scientific evidence included in that particular database until March 2014. Specific inclusion criteria were used for the selection of the appropriate articles. A manual search of the citations of the obtained articles followed to extend the electronic search. A full text review was carried out for only 32 articles. Of the 32 articles, 21 examined the efficacy of denture adhesives in terms of retention and stability and masticatory performance, 6 evaluated the issue of the biocompatibility of denture adhesives, and 5 presented the attitudes of either professionals or patients toward these materials. The majority of clinical studies supported the fact that denture adhesives enhance the retention, stability, and masticatory performance of a removable prosthesis. In terms of biocompatibility, long-term in vivo studies to investigate potential harmful effects were lacking. Patients are satisfied with denture adhesives that meet their needs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buf...... from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces...

  11. Intrauterine adhesions at the University of Maiduguri Teaching ...

    Context; Menstrual abnormalities and infertility are leading gynaecological complaints which can be caused by intrauterine adhesion, a preventable condition. Hence, the need to know the common aetiological factors in our environment. Objective; To determine the mode of presentation, aetiological factors and outcome of ...

  12. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  13. Cytokine orchestration in post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation.

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    Peritoneal adhesions are a near inevitable occurrence after laparotomy and a major cause of both patient and physician misery. To date, clinical attempts at their amelioration have concentrated on manipulating the physical factors that affect their development despite a wealth of experimental data elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie their initiation, development and maturation. However, the advent of targeted, specific anti-cytokine agents as directed therapy for inflammatory and neoplastic conditions raises the prospect of a new era for anti-adhesion strategies. To harness this potential will require considerable cross-disciplinary collaboration and that surgeon-scientists propel themselves to the forefront of this emerging field.

  14. Fracture analysis of adhesive joints in wind turbine blades

    Eder, Martin Alexander; Bitsche, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modern wind turbine rotor blades are usually made from fibre-reinforced composite subcomponents. In the final assembly stage, these subcomponents are bonded together by several adhesive joints. One important adhesive joint is situated at the trailing edge, which refers to the downstream edge where...... the air-flow rejoins and leaves the blade. Maintenance inspections of wind turbine rotor blades show that among other forms of damage, local debonding of the shells along the trailing edge is a frequent failure type. The cause of trailing edge failure in wind turbine blades is complex, and detailed...

  15. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  16. Temporary ectropion therapy by adhesive taping: a case study

    Habermann Anke

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Various surgical procedures are available to correct paralytic ectropion, which are applied in irreversible facial paresis. Problems occur when facial paresis has an unclear prognosis, since surgery of the lower eyelid is usually irreversible. We propose a simple method to correct temporary ectropion in facial palsy by applying an adhesive strip. Patients and methods Ten patients with peripheral facial paresis and paralytic ectropion were treated with an adhesive strip to correct paralytic ectropion. We used "Steri-Strips" (45 × 6.0 mm, which were taped on the carefully cleaned skin of the lower eyelid and of the adjacent zygomatic region until the prognosis of the paresis was clarified. In addition to the examiner's evaluation of the lower lacrimal point in the lacrimal lake, subjective improvement of the symptoms was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS, 1–10. Results 9 patients reported a clear improvement of the symptoms after adhesive taping. There was a clear regression of tearing (VAS (median = 8; 1 = no improvement, 10 = very good improvement, the cosmetic impairment of the adhesive tape was low (VAS (median = 2.5; 1 = no impairment, 10 = severe impairment and most of the patients found the use of the adhesive strip helpful. There was slight reddening of the skin in one case and well tolerated by the facial skin in the other cases. Conclusion The cause and location of facial nerve damage are decisive for the type of surgical therapy. In potentially reversible facial paresis, procedures should be used that are easily performed and above all reversible without complications. Until a reliable prognosis of the paresis can be made, adhesive taping is suited for the temporary treatment of paralytic ectropion. Adhesive taping is simple and can be performed by the patient.

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Leukocyte adhesion deficiency is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 beta-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterized by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus, and delayed...... of leukocyte adhesion deficiency who underwent hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the Center for International......, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multilineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell-restricted chimerism in an additional 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation offers long-term benefit in leukocyte adhesion deficiency and should be considered as an early...

  18. Adhesiveness of cold rolled steels for car body parts

    Kleiner Marques Marra

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the adhesiveness of uncoated and zinc-electrogalvanized steel sheets used in the automotive industry. Three types of adhesives, one acrylic and two epoxy resins, were employed to join low carbon cold rolled steels, one uncoated and another electrogalvanized, both previously degreased or chemically pickled. Mechanical strength of the joints was evaluated by the T-peel and tensile strength tests. Steel grade, surface condition and heating below the cure temperatures did not influence the joints' mechanical strength. However, their shear strength decreased drastically as the test temperature increased. The exposure of the joints to an atmosphere with 90% relative humidity at 40 °C caused reduction of their shear strength. Epoxy adhesives showed higher mechanical strength, but exhibited higher degradation by humidity.

  19. Frictional and elastic energy in gecko adhesive detachment.

    Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar

    2008-03-06

    Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1 m s(-1). Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive since it requires both strong attachment and easy, rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). We discovered that the energy required to detach adhering tokay gecko setae (W(d)) is modulated by the angle (theta) of a linear path of detachment. Gecko setae resist detachment when dragged towards the animal during detachment (theta = 30 degrees ) requiring W(d) = 5.0+/-0.86(s.e.) J m(-2) to detach, largely due to frictional losses. This external frictional loss is analogous to viscous internal frictional losses during detachment of pressure-sensitive adhesives. We found that, remarkably, setae possess a built-in release mechanism. Setae acted as springs when loaded in tension during attachment and returned elastic energy when detached along the optimal path (theta=130 degrees ), resulting in W(d) = -0.8+/-0.12 J m(-2). The release of elastic energy from the setal shaft probably causes spontaneous release, suggesting that curved shafts may enable easy detachment in natural, and synthetic, gecko adhesives.

  20. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-operative adhesions after digestive surgery: their incidence and prevention: review of the literature.

    Ouaïssi, M; Gaujoux, S; Veyrie, N; Denève, E; Brigand, C; Castel, B; Duron, J J; Rault, A; Slim, K; Nocca, D

    2012-04-01

    Post-operative adhesions after gastrointestinal surgery are responsible for significant morbidity and constitute an important public health problem. The aim of this study was to review the surgical literature to determine the incidence, consequences and the variety of possible countermeasures to prevent adhesion formation. A systematic review of English and French language surgical literature published between 1995 and 2009 was performed using the keywords "adhesion" and "surgery". Peritoneal adhesions are reported as the cause of 32% of acute intestinal obstruction and 65-75% of all small bowel obstructions. It is estimated that peritoneal adhesions develop after 93-100% of upper abdominal laparotomies and after 67-93% of lower abdominal laparotomies. Nevertheless, only 15-18% of these adhesions require surgical re-intervention. The need for re-intervention for adhesion-related complications varies depending on the initial type of surgery, the postoperative course and the type of incision. The laparoscopic approach appears to decrease the risk of adhesion formation by 45% and the need for adhesion-related re-intervention to 0.8% after appendectomy and to 2.5% after colorectal surgery. At the present time, only one product consisting of hyaluronic acid applied to a layer of carboxymethylcellulose (Seprafilm(®)) has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of postoperative adhesion formation; but this product is also associated with a significant increase in the incidence of anastomotic leakage when the membrane is applied in direct contact with the anastomosis. The use of this product has not been shown to decrease the risk of re-intervention for bowel obstruction. The prevention of postoperative adhesions is an important public health goal, particularly in light of the frequency of this complication. The routine use of anti-adhesion products is not recommended given the lack of studies with a high level of evidence concerning their efficacy and safety of

  2. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria....... The PfEMP1 family of adhesive proteins is responsible for this sequestration by mediating interactions with diverse human ligands. In addition, as the primary targets of acquired, protective immunity, the PfEMP1s are potential vaccine candidates. PfEMP1s contain large extracellular ectodomains made from......, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). We show through small angle x-ray scattering that IT4VAR13 is rigid, elongated, and monomeric. We also show that it interacts with ICAM-1 through the DBLß domain alone, forming a 1:1 complex. These studies provide a first low resolution structural view of a PfEMP1...

  3. Hysteroscopic Management Of Intrauterin Adhesion

    Ayşegül Dikmen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of preoperative and postoperative outcomes of patients that were performed hysterescopic intrauterine adhesiolysis. Material and method: We reviewed 24 patients that underwent hysterescopy with the complaints of amenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, recurrent pregnancy loss between 2004-2008. The most complaints of patients were infertilty amenorrhea. Results: Adhesions occurs mainly as a result of trauma to the gravid uterine cavity in 14 patients. When classifying patients with their intrauterine adhesions, Grade 3 was the most frequently seen. Adhesiolisis was performed with hysteresopic scissors in all patients. In postoperative period following synechiolysis, 10 patients were treated with estrogen and progestogen, 11 of them used intrauterine device with estrogen and progestogen therapy, foley catheter was used in 3 patients. Hysterescopy was performed in 5 patients for second time because of adhesion suspicions. The re-adhesiolysis performed to 3 patients because of determined to mild adhesion. Conclusion: After hysterescopic adhesiolysis, all patients with the complaint of amenorrhea had regular menstruation. Pregnancy after treatment occured in 4 patients but live birth rate was 75%.

  4. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins.

  5. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  6. Bio-inspired reversible underwater adhesive.

    Zhao, Yanhua; Wu, Yang; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Manman; Chen, Xuan; Liu, Minjie; Fan, Jun; Liu, Junqiu; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Zuankai

    2017-12-20

    The design of smart surfaces with switchable adhesive properties in a wet environment has remained a challenge in adhesion science and materials engineering. Despite intense demands in various industrial applications and exciting progress in mimicking the remarkable wet adhesion through the delicate control of catechol chemistry, polyelectrolyte complex, and supramolecular architectures, the full recapitulation of nature's dynamic function is limited. Here, we show a facile approach to synthesize bioinspired adhesive, which entails the reversible, tunable, and fast regulation of the wet adhesion on diverse surfaces. The smart wet adhesive takes advantage of the host-guest molecular interaction and the adhesive nature of catechol chemistry, as well as the responsive polymer, allowing for screening and activation of the interfacial interaction simply by a local temperature trigger in an on-demand manner. Our work opens up an avenue for the rational design of bioinspired adhesives with performances even beyond nature.

  7. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self‑etch approach. Materials and Methods: ... adhesion, the collagen fibers collapse during the. Introduction ..... The failure mode was determined using an optical.

  8. Potential for Biobased Adhesives in Wood Bonding

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest and research on using bio-based materials as wood adhesives; however, they have achieved only limited market acceptance. To better understand this low level of replacement, it is important to understand why adhesives work or fail in moisture durability tests. A holistic model for wood adhesives has been developed that clarifies...

  9. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  10. Strong composition dependence of adhesive properties of ultraviolet curing adhesives with modified acrylates

    Feng, Yefeng; Li, Yandong; Wang, Fupeng; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Zhichao; Hu, Jianbing

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) curable adhesives have been widely researched in fields of health care and electronic components. UV curing systems with modified acrylic ester prepolymers have been frequently employed. In order to clarify composition dependence of adhesive properties of adhesives containing modified acrylates, in this work, several UV curing adhesives bearing urethane and epoxy acrylates were designed and fabricated. The effects of prepolymer, diluent, feed ratio, initiator and assistant on adhesive performances were investigated. This work might offer a facile route to gain promising high-performance UV curable adhesives with desired adhesive traits through regulating their compositions.

  11. Inhibition of Bacterial Adhesion by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Antibiotics

    Vidya K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs due to Escherichia coli is one of the most common diseases encountered in clinical practice. Most common recognised pathogenic factor in E.coli is adhesion. There is accumulating evidence that through subinhibitory concentrations (sub - MICs of many antibiotics do not kill bacteria, they are able to interfere with some important aspects of bacterial cell function. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted to investigate the effect of sub MICs (1/2-1/8 MIC of ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, gentamicin, ampicillin and co - trimoxazole on E. coli adhesiveness to human vaginal epithelial cells using three strains ATCC 25922, MTCC 729 and U 105. Results: The 1/2 MIC of all the antibiotics tested produced the greatest inhibition of bacterial adhesion. Morphological changes were observed with ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and ampicillin at 1/2 MIC and to a lesser extent at 1/4 and 1/8 MIC. Co-trimoxazole caused the greatest suppression of adhesion at 1/2 MIC of E. coli strain MTCC 729 when compared with the controls, followed by ceftazidime. Conclusion: These results suggest that co - trimoxazole is the most effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  12. Rare small intestinal volvulus from entrapment in hepato-diaphragmatic adhesions in a 45-year-old lady.

    Olaoye, Iyiade Olatunde; Adesina, Micheal Dapo

    2016-12-20

    Small intestinal volvulus is rare in adults and rarely caused by string adhesions between the liver and the diaphragm. Similar adhesions were described in Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. We report a 45-year-old lady with small intestinal volvulus from entrapment of a loop in string adhesions between the liver and the diaphragm. Her plain radiographs showed a significant shadow of the trapped loop. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  13. Adhesion of silver/polypyrrole nanocomposite coating to a fluoropolymer substrate

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the adhesive interface between a conducting polymer/metal composite and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate. Strong adhesion was observed from using a Ag/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite on a fluoropolymer substrate, which in most cases has a very low adhesion to different materials. To clarify the adhesion mechanism between the Ag/PPy composite and the PTFE substrate, the interfacial structure was studied by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results show that Ag/PPy composite is absorbed inside the nano-sized pores of PTFE and the composite mechanically interlocks after solidifying, which causes the nanocomposite to stick strongly to the substrate. The use of Ag/PPy coating could be a novel technique for developing electrodes, antennae or other high performance applications as this metal/conductive polymer composite has excellent adhesion properties on various plastics.

  14. Osteopontin adsorption to Gram-positive cells reduces adhesion forces and attachment to surfaces under flow

    Kristensen, M F; Zeng, G; Neu, T R

    2017-01-01

    caries or medical device-related infections. It further investigated if OPN's effect on adhesion is caused by blocking the accessibility of glycoconjugates on bacterial surfaces. Bacterial adhesion was determined in a shear-controlled flow cell system in the presence of different concentrations of OPN......The bovine milk protein osteopontin (OPN) may be an efficient means to prevent bacterial adhesion to dental tissues and control biofilm formation. This study sought to determine to what extent OPN impacts adhesion forces and surface attachment of different bacterial strains involved in dental......, and interaction forces of single bacteria were quantified using single-cell force spectroscopy before and after OPN exposure. Moreover, the study investigated OPN's effect on the accessibility of cell surface glycoconjugates through fluorescence lectin-binding analysis. OPN strongly affected bacterial adhesion...

  15. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  16. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  17. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  18. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob; Zhao, Boxin; Tian Yu; Autumn, Kellar

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  19. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  20. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Bogárová Markéta; Stodůlka Jindřich; Šuhajda Karel

    2017-01-01

    It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is...

  1. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  2. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be incorporated into dental adhesive systems to provide the appropriate environment in which dentin MMP

  3. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  4. From Nano to Micro: Importance of Structure and Architecture in Spider Silk Adhesives

    Sahni, Vasav; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Spiders have developed outstanding adhesives over millions of years of evolution for prey capture and locomotion. We show that the structure and architecture of these adhesives play an important role in the adhesion. The adhesive produced by orb-weaving spiders to capture prey (viscid glue) is laid on a pair of silk fibers as micron-size glue drops composed of salts and glycoproteins. By stretching single drops, we show that viscid glue behaves like a viscoelastic solid and that elasticity is critical in enhancing adhesion caused by specific adhesive ligands by over 100 times. Comparing viscid glue with gumfoot glue, the glue produced by cob-weavers, the evolutionary descendants of orb-weavers, showed that, in spite of being produced in homologous aggregate glands, gumfoot glue behaves like a viscoelastic liquid. Moreover, gumfoot glue is humidity-resistant and viscid glue is humidity-sensitive. We use a synthetic strategy to spin beads-on-a-string (BOAS) architecture to mimic the adhesive properties of spider silk. Using these mimic threads, we show that the BOAS structure adheres more than a cylindrical structure during contact (collision of prey) and during separation (escape attempt of prey). These results inspire design of novel tunable adhesives.

  5. The effects of nitric oxide in settlement and adhesion of zoospores of the green alga Ulva.

    Thompson, Stephanie E M; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that elevated nitric oxide (NO) reduces adhesion in diatom, bacterial and animal cells. This article reports experiments designed to investigate whether elevated NO reduces the adhesion of zoospores of the green alga Ulva, an important fouling species. Surface-normalised values of NO were measured using the fluorescent indicator DAF-FM DA and parallel hydrodynamic measurements of adhesion strength were made. Elevated levels of NO caused by the addition of the exogenous NO donor SNAP reduced spore settlement by 20% and resulted in lower adhesion strength. Addition of the NO scavenger cPTIO abolished the effects of SNAP on adhesion. The strength of attachment and NO production by spores in response to four coatings (Silastic T2; Intersleek 700; Intersleek 900 and polyurethane) shows that reduced adhesion is correlated with an increase in NO production. It is proposed that in spores of Ulva, NO is used as an intracellular signalling molecule to detect how conducive a surface is for settlement and adhesion. The effect of NO on the adhesion of a range of organisms suggests that NO-releasing coatings could have the potential to control fouling.

  6. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  7. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  8. Durability properties for adhesively bonded structural aerospace applications

    Shaffer, D.K.; Davis, G.D.; McNamara, D.K.; Shah, T.K.; Desai, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of good bond durability of adhesively joined aerospace components which has been recognized for many years. Military and civilian aircraft are exposed to harsh environments in addition to severe thermal and stress cycles during their service lives. Moisture is responsible for the majority of bond failures in the field. The presence of surface contaminants (e.g., fluoride, silicones) and the non-neutral pH of poor rinse water are common causes of adhesion problems in production environments. Honeycomb panels, stringer skins, doubler plates and core cowl assemblies are bonded joint structures that are subject to environmental- or contaminant-induced debonding. The identification and characterization of the causes of such bond failures leads to improved production quality, yield and cost reduction

  9. MRI features of growth hormone deficiency in children with short stature caused by pituitary lesions.

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Xinxian; Dong, Lina; Zhu, Bin; Xin, Tao

    2017-06-01

    We verified the advantages of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for improving the diagnostic quality of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in children with short stature caused by pituitary lesions. Clinical data obtained from 577 GHD patients with short stature caused by pituitary lesions were retrospectively analyzed. There were 354 cases (61.3%) with anterior pituitary dysplasia; 45 cases (7.8%) of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS); 15 cases (2.6%) of pituitary hyperplasia due to primary hypothyroidism; 38 cases (6.6%) of Rathke cleft cyst; 68 cases (11.8%) of empty sella syndrome; 16 cases (2.8%) of pituitary invasion from Langerhans cell histiocytosis; 2 cases (0.3%) of sellar regional arachnoid cyst and 39 cases (6.8%) of craniopharyngioma. MRI results showed that the height of anterior pituitary in patients was less than normal. Location, size and signals of posterior pituitary and pituitary stalk were normal in anterior pituitary dysplasia. In all cases pituitary hyperplasia was caused by hypothyroidism. MRI results showed that anterior pituitary was enlarged, and we detected upward apophysis and obvious homogeneous enhancement. There were no pituitary stalk interruption and abnormal signal. We also observed that after hormone replacement therapy the size of pituitary gland was reduced. Anterior pituitary atrophy was observed in Rathke cleft cyst, empty sella syndrome, sellar regional arachnoid cyst and craniopharyngioma. The microstructure of hypophysis and sellar region was studied with MRI. We detected pituitary lesions, and the characteristics of various pituitary diseases of GHD in children with short stature. It was concluded that in children with GHD caused by pituitary lesions, MRI was an excellent method for early diagnosis. This method offers clinical practicability and we believe it can be used for differential diagnosis and to monitor the therapeutic effects.

  10. Study on emission of decomposed chemicals of esters contained in PVC flooring and adhesive

    Chino, Satoko; Ataka, Yuji [R and D Center, Yoshino Gypsum Co., Ltd., 2-1-1 Kohoku, Adachi-ku, Tokyo, 123-0872 (Japan); Kato, Shinsuke; Seo, Janghoo [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    2-Ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) is sometimes detected in indoor air at relatively high concentrations. The emission mechanism for 2E1H is considered to be that moisture with a high pH in concrete slabs and self-leveling sub-flooring material reacts with di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) flooring and compounds containing the 2-ethyl-1-hexyl group in the adhesive. 2E1H is considered to be one of the causes of odor in indoor air and sick building syndrome, so it is important to clarify the 2E1H emission mechanism for IAQ. However, there are few reports on any experimentation into 2E1H emission by chemical reaction involving building materials. In this study, PVC floorings are attached using various adhesives to a self-leveling sub-flooring material that contains water, and their 2E1H emission rates are measured. Furthermore, the components of the adhesives are determined using chemical analysis. It is found that 2E1H emission rates from the floor are affected by the type of adhesive used. On the other hand, some components in the adhesives may suppress the hydrolysis of esters. The hydrolysis of polymers and residual monomers in the adhesive causes 2E1H emission from the adhesive. (author)

  11. Adhesion signaling promotes protease‑driven polyploidization of glioblastoma cells.

    Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2014-11-01

    An increase in ploidy (polyploidization) causes genomic instability in cancer. However, the determinants for the increased DNA content of cancer cells have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether adhesion induces polyploidization in human U87MG glioblastoma cells. For this purpose, we employed expression vectors that reported transcriptional activation by signaling networks implicated in cancer. Signaling activation induced by intercellular integrin binding elicited both extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) and Notch target transcription. Upon the prolonged activation of both ERK and Notch target transcription induced by integrin binding to adhesion protein, cell cultures accumulated polyploid cells, as determined by cell DNA content distribution analysis and the quantification of polynucleated cells. This linked the transcriptional activation induced by integrin adhesion to the increased frequency of polyploidization. Accordingly, the inhibition of signaling decreased the extent of polyploidization mediated by protease‑driven intracellular invasion. Therefore, the findings of this study indicate that integrin adhesion induces polyploidization through the stimulation of glioblastoma cell invasiveness.

  12. D-amino acids inhibit initial bacterial adhesion: thermodynamic evidence.

    Xing, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Fei; Taylor, Alicia A; Walker, Sharon L; Wang, Yi-Fu; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms are structured communities of cells enclosed in a self-produced hydrated polymeric matrix that can adhere to inert or living surfaces. D-Amino acids were previously identified as self-produced compounds that mediate biofilm disassembly by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, whether exogenous D-amino acids could inhibit initial bacterial adhesion is still unknown. Here, the effect of the exogenous amino acid D-tyrosine on initial bacterial adhesion was determined by combined use of chemical analysis, force spectroscopic measurement, and theoretical predictions. The surface thermodynamic theory demonstrated that the total interaction energy increased with more D-tyrosine, and the contribution of Lewis acid-base interactions relative to the change in the total interaction energy was much greater than the overall nonspecific interactions. Finally, atomic force microscopy analysis implied that the hydrogen bond numbers and adhesion forces decreased with the increase in D-tyrosine concentrations. D-Tyrosine contributed to the repulsive nature of the cell and ultimately led to the inhibition of bacterial adhesion. This study provides a new way to regulate biofilm formation by manipulating the contents of D-amino acids in natural or engineered systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Microjet impingement followed by scanning electron microscopy as a qualitative technique to compare cellular adhesion to various biomaterials.

    Richards, R G; ap Gwynn, I; Bundy, K J; Rahn, B A

    1995-12-01

    Adhesion of cells to biomaterial surfaces is one of the major factors which mediates their biocompatibility. Quantitative or qualitative cell adhesion measurements would be useful for screening new implant materials. Microjet impingement has been evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, to determine to what extent it measures cell adhesion. The shear forces of the impingement, on the materials tested here, are seen to be greater than the cohesive strength of the cells in the impinged area, causing their rupture. The cell bodies are removed during impingement, leaving the sites of adhesion and other cellular material behind. Thus the method is shown not to provide quantification of cell adhesion forces for the metals and culture plastic tested. It is suggested that with highly adherent biomaterials, the distribution and patterns of these adhesion sites could be used for qualitative comparisons for screening of implant surfaces.

  14. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    Díaz Téllez, J P; Harirchian-Saei, S; Li, Y; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved. (paper)

  15. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; S?, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder? Scotchbond? Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-s...

  16. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for syn...

  17. Proinflammatory Adhesion Molecules Facilitate Polychlorinated Biphenyl–Mediated Enhancement of Brain Metastasis Formation

    Sipos, Eszter; Chen, Lei; András, Ibolya E.; Wrobel, Jagoda; Zhang, Bei; Pu, Hong; Park, Minseon; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental toxicants that cause vascular inflammation and facilitate the development of brain metastases. The crucial event in metastasis formation is adhesion of blood-borne tumor cells to the vascular endothelium, followed by their transcapillary migration. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanisms of PCB118-induced brain metastasis formation at the blood-brain barrier level with the focus on tumor cell adhesion to the brain endotheli...

  18. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  19. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  20. Measuring Rock-Fluid Adhesion Directly

    Tadmor, R.

    2017-12-01

    We show how to measure directly solid-liquid adhesion. We consider the normal adhesion, the work adhesion, and the lateral adhesion. The technique at the center of the method is Centrifugal Adhesion Balance (CAB) which allows coordinated manipulation of normal and lateral forces. For example: 1. It allows to induce an increase in the normal force which pulls on a liquid drop while keeping zero lateral force. This method mimics a drop that is subjected to a gravitational force that is gradually increasing. 2. It allows to increase the lateral force at zero normal force, mimicking zero gravity. From this one can obtain additional solid-liquid interaction parameters. When performing work of adhesion measurements, the values obtained are independent of drop size and are in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  1. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  2. Adhesive Joints in Wind Turbine Blades

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn

    to be determined in several different ways. The accuracy of different ways of measuring residual stresses in the adhesive was tested by applying five different methods on a single sandwich test specimen (laminate/adhesive/laminate) that was instrumented with strain gauges and fiber Bragg gratings. Quasi...... of the project is to develop new- and to improve the existing design rules for adhesive joints in wind turbine blades. The first scientific studies of adhesive joints were based on stress analysis, which requires that the bond-line is free of defects, but this is rarely the case for a wind turbine blade. Instead...... curing and test temperatures) on the formation of transverse cracks in the adhesive were tested experimentally. It was assumed that the transverse cracks evolved due to a combination of mechanical- and residual stresses in the adhesive. A new approach was developed that allows the residual stress...

  3. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Dongre, Prajakta; Driscoll, Mark; Amidon, Thomas; Bujanovic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ) is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of...

  4. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Mandall, Nicky A; Hickman, Joy; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mattick, Rye Cr; Millett, Declan T; Worthington, Helen V

    2018-04-09

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2003. A new full search was conducted on 26 September 2017 but no new studies were identified. We have only updated the search methods section in this new version. The conclusions of this Cochrane Review remain the same. To evaluate the effects of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 26 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 26 September 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 26 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 26 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in

  5. Factors influencing bacterial adhesion to contact lenses

    Dutta, Debarun; Cole, Nerida; Willcox, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The process of any contact lens related keratitis generally starts with the adhesion of opportunistic pathogens to contact lens surface. This article focuses on identifying the factors which have been reported to affect bacterial adhesion to contact lenses. Adhesion to lenses differs between various genera/species/strains of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the predominant causative organism, adheres in the highest numbers to both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lenses in vitro. The ...

  6. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  7. Herniation of the cerebellar tonsils after suprasellar arachnoid cyst shunt: case report Herniação das tonsilas cerebelares após shunt de cisto aracnóide supra-selar: relato de caso

    Rodrigo Mendonça

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the caudal dislocation of the cerebellar tonsils may occur associated with clinical conditions such as an intracranial mass lesion or Chiari I and II malformation. It may also be acquired after repeated lumbar punctures or lumboperitoneostomy. The occurrence of cerebellar herniation after derivation of intracranial arachnoid cyst is extremely rare, and there are only three cases reported in the medical literature. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy with precocious puberty and suprasellar arachnoid cyst who developed a symptomatic herniation of the cerebellar tonsils three years after a cystoperitoneostomy. The patient underwent a suboccipital craniectomy with duraplasty and partial tonsilectomy, showing afterwards, remission of the symptoms. We discussed the pathogenesis suggested in the literature.Sabe-se que o deslocamento caudal das tonsilas cerebelares pode ocorrer em associação com condições clínicas tais como: lesão expansiva intracraniana ou malformação de Chiari I e II. Pode ainda ser adquirido após repetidas punções lombares ou lomboperitoniostomia. A ocorrência de herniação cerebelar após derivação de cisto aracnóide intracraniano é evento extremamente raro, existindo apenas três casos relatados na literatura médica. O caso de menino de 9 anos de idade, com puberdade precoce e cisto aracnóide supra-selar, que desenvolveu herniação sintomática das tonsilas cerebelares três anos após cistoperitoniostomia. O paciente foi submetido a craniectomia suboccipital com plástica dural e tonsilectomia parcial, apresentando remissão dos sintomas. Discutimos a patogênese sugerida na literatura.

  8. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy.

    Chen, Jiahuan; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mucsi, Ashley D; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Detampel, Pascal; Munro, Fay; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W; Qi, Hai; Shi, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell-DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1-dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin-cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1-dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell-mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. © 2017 Chen et al.

  9. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively.

  10. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively

  11. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    Marot, L.; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength

  12. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    Marot, L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: laurent.marot@unibas.ch; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H. [Laboratoire Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, Pole STIC-SPI-Math 61 rue Albert Camus, Universite de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 - Mulhouse Cedex (France); Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-09-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength.

  13. Structural adhesives for missile external protection material

    Banta, F. L.; Garzolini, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Two basic rubber materials are examined as possible external substrate protection materials (EPM) for missiles. The analysis provided a data base for selection of the optimum adhesives which are compatible with the substrate, loads applied and predicted bondline temperatures. Under the test conditions, EA934/NA was found to be the optimum adhesive to bond VAMAC 2273 and/or NBR/EPDM 9969A to aluminum substrate. The optimum adhesive for composite structures was EA956. Both of these adhesives are two-part epoxy systems with a pot life of approximately two hours. Further research is suggested on field repair criteria, nuclear hardness and survivability effects on bondline, and ageing effects.

  14. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  15. Denture Adhesives in Prosthodontics: An Overview.

    Kumar, P Ranjith; Shajahan, P A; Mathew, Jyothis; Koruthu, Anil; Aravind, Prasad; Ahammed, M Fazeel

    2015-01-01

    The use of denture adhesives is common among denture wearers, and it is also prescribed by many dentists. Prescribing denture adhesives has been viewed by many prosthodontists as a means of compensating for any defects in the fabrication procedures. Denture adhesives add to the retention and thereby improve chewing ability, reduce any instability, provide comfort and eliminate the accumulation of food debris beneath the dentures. Consequently, they increase the patient's sense of security and satisfaction. However, obtaining the advice of the dental practitioner prior to the use of adhesives is a must.

  16. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  17. Adhesive Bonding and Corrosion Performance Investigated as a Function of Aluminum Oxide Chemistry and Adhesives

    Abrahami, S.T.; Hauffman, T.; de Kok, John M.M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The long-term strength and durability of an adhesive bond is dependent on the stability of the oxide-adhesive interface. As such, changes in the chemistry of the oxide and/or the adhesive are expected to modify the interfacial properties and affect the joint performance in practice. The upcoming

  18. Loss of desmoplakin tail causes lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa

    Jonkman, MF; Pasmooij, AMG; Pasmans, SGMA; van den Berg, MP; ter Horst, HJ; Timmer, A; Pas, HH

    2005-01-01

    The cytoplasmic plaque protein desmoplakin (DP), which is located in desmosomes, plays a major role in epithelial and muscle cell adhesion by linking the transmembrane cadherins to the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network. Mutations of DP may cause striate palmoplantar keratoderma,

  19. Competitive endothelial adhesion between Plasmodium falciparum isolates under physiological flow conditions

    Molyneux Malcolm

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequestration of parasitized red blood cells in the microvasculature of major organs involves a sequence of events that is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of severe falciparum malaria. Plasmodium falciparum infections are commonly composed of multiple subpopulations of parasites with varied adhesive properties. A key question is: do these subpopulations compete for adhesion to endothelium? This study investigated whether, in a laboratory model of cytoadherence, there is competition in binding to endothelium between pRBC infected with P. falciparum of variant adhesive phenotypes, particularly under flow conditions. Methods Four different P. falciparum isolates, of known adherence phenotypes, were matched in pairs, mixed in different proportions and allowed to bind to cultured human endothelium. Using in vitro competitive static and flow-based adhesion assays, that allow simultaneous testing of the adhesive properties of two different parasite lines, adherence levels of paired P. falciparum isolates were quantified and analysed using either non-parametric Wilcoxon's paired signed rank test or Student paired test. Results Study findings show that P. falciparum parasite lines show marked differences in the efficiency of adhesion to endothelium. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum variants will compete for adhesion to endothelia and variants can be ranked by their efficiency of binding. These findings suggest that variants from a mixed infection will not show uniform cytoadherence and so may vary in their ability to cause disease.

  20. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    Amber M. Bates

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain, histatin 5 (only one strain, lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis.

  1. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  2. Atomic scale onset of Al adhesion on Mo2BC

    Bolvardi, Hamid; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2015-01-01

    We have explored interfacial interactions between a Mo–C terminated Mo 2 BC(040) surface and an Al cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics. The Al cluster is disrupted and wets the Mo 2 BC(040) surface. This can be understood based on the electronic structure. Across the Al–MoC interface C s–Al s hybridized states are formed. These bonds are stronger than the Al–Al intra-cluster bonds. Hence, the onset of Al adhesion is caused by bond formation across the Al–MoC interface. - Highlights: • Interfacial interactions between Mo 2 BC and an Al cluster were explored. • Al forms bonds to C constituting the onset of Al adhesion on Mo 2 BC. • These data are relevant for other carbide coatings

  3. Glycan-functionalized diamond nanoparticles as potent E. coli anti-adhesives

    Barras, Alexandre; Martin, Fernando Ariel; Bande, Omprakash; Baumann, Jean-Sébastien; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Boukherroub, Rabah; Beloin, Christophe; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with mannose moieties by a ``click'' chemistry approach, are able to efficiently inhibit E. coli type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion to eukaryotic cells with relative inhibitory potency (RIP) of as high as 9259 (bladder cell adhesion assay), which is unprecedented when compared with RIP values previously reported for alternate multivalent mannose-functionalized nanostructures designed to inhibit E. coli adhesion. Also remarkable is that these novel mannose-modified NDs reduce E. coli biofilm formation, a property previously not observed for multivalent glyco-nanoparticles and rarely demonstrated for other multivalent or monovalent mannose glycans. This work sets the stage for the further evaluation of these novel NDs as an anti-adhesive therapeutic strategy against E. coli-derived infections.Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with

  4. Development of biodegradable hyper-branched tissue adhesives for the repair of meniscus tears.

    Bochyńska, A I; Van Tienen, T G; Hannink, G; Buma, P; Grijpma, D W

    2016-03-01

    Meniscus tears are one of the most commonly occurring injuries of the knee joint. Current meniscus repair techniques are challenging and do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are a promising alternative, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. In this study, a series of amphiphilic copolymers based on polyethylene glycol, trimethylene carbonate and citric acid were synthesized and subsequently end-functionalized with hexamethylene diisocyanate to form reactive adhesive materials. The shear adhesive strength of the networks to bovine meniscus tissue measured in a lap-shear adhesion test ranged between 20 and 80 kPa, which was better than for fibrin glue (10 kPa). The elastic modulus of the networks depended on composition and was in the same range as that of human meniscus. Cell compatibility was assessed using Alamar Blue staining after incubation of the bovine meniscus cells with different concentrations of the glues for 7 days. Cell viability was not affected after adding up to 3mg of the adhesive/mL of medium. The proposed materials are suitable candidates to be used as resorbable tissue adhesives for meniscus repair. They have excellent mechanical and adhesive properties that can be adjusted by varying the composition of the copolymers. Meniscal tears often occur and current treatment strategies do not bring fully satisfactory results. Use of biodegradable tissue adhesives would be an interesting option, but currently available adhesives are not suited due to toxicity or poor mechanical properties. Here, we describe the development of novel biodegradable, hyper-branched, adhesive copolymers. These adhesives cure upon contact with water forming flexible networks. Their adhesion to bovine meniscus tissue was significantly better than that of clinically used fibrin glue. The tensile properties of the cured networks were in the same range of values of the human meniscus. When physiologically relevant amounts were added to

  5. Manual Physical Therapy for Non-Surgical Treatment of Adhesion-Related Small Bowel Obstructions: Two Case Reports

    Amanda D. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesion formation is a widely acknowledged risk following abdominal or pelvic surgery. Adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis can cause or contribute to partial or total small bowel obstruction (SBO. These adhesions deter or prevent the passage of nutrients through the digestive tract, and may bind the bowel to the peritoneum, or other organs. Small bowel obstructions can quickly become life-threatening, requiring immediate surgery to resect the bowel, or lyse any adhesions the surgeon can safely access. Bowel repair is an invasive surgery, with risks including bowel rupture, infection, and peritonitis. An additional risk includes the formation of new adhesions during the healing process, creating the potential for subsequent adhesiolysis or SBO surgeries. Objective: Report the use of manual soft tissue physical therapy for the reversal of adhesion-related partial SBOs, and create an initial inquiry into the possibility of nonsurgical lysis of adhesions. Case Reports: Two patients presenting with SBO symptoms due to abdominal adhesions secondary to abdominal and pelvic surgery were treated with manual soft tissue physical therapy focused on decreasing adhesions. Conclusions: Successful treatment with resolution of symptom presentation of partial SBO and sustained results were observed in both patients treated.

  6. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    Objectives: The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups ...

  7. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction ...

    Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country.

  8. Tuneable adhesion through novel binder technologies

    Wouters, M.E.L.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Ingenhut, B.; Timmer, K.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Bots, T.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Fischer, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversible crosslinking mechanism enabling bonding and debonding of adhesives and coatings based on Diels-Alder chemistry is described. The Diels-Alder compounds form a covalently crosslinked network at low temperatures that break at elevated temperatures. As a result, the adhesive exhibits good

  9. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  10. Predicting Failure Initiation in Structural Adhesive Joints

    2012-08-15

    Elastoplástico de Adhesivos – Modeling, characterization and simulation of the elastoplastic behavior of adhesives. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales...adhesive and a 1018 steel”. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales. Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C. May 2012.  Abstract: In the

  11. Chapter 16: Soy Proteins as Wood Adhesives

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Protein adhesives allowed the development of bonded wood products such as plywood and glulam in the early 20th century. Petrochemical-based adhesives replaced proteins in most wood bonding applications because of lower cost, improved production efficiencies, and enhanced durability. However, several technological and environmental factors have led to a resurgence of...

  12. Degradable Adhesives for Surgery and Tissue Engineering.

    Bhagat, Vrushali; Becker, Matthew L

    2017-10-09

    This review highlights the research on degradable polymeric tissue adhesives for surgery and tissue engineering. Included are a comprehensive listing of specific uses, advantages, and disadvantages of different adhesive groups. A critical evaluation of challenges affecting the development of next generation materials is also discussed, and insights into the outlook of the field are explored.

  13. Functional Group Imaging by Adhesion AFM

    Berger, C.E.H.; Berger, C.E.H.; van der Werf, Kees; Kooyman, R.P.H.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed adhesion atomic force microscopy was used as a technique to map the spatial arrangement of chemical functional groups at a surface with a lateral resolution of 20 nm. The ratio of the adhesion forces for different functional groups can be compared with values determined from the

  14. Adhesion of Zinc Hot-dip Coatings

    Michal Černý

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on verification of quality adhesion of zinc coating. It describes elements which affect quality and adhesive solidity within the coating. For assessment itself it will be neccessary to get know the basic elements which can affect adhesion of hot-dip coating which will be essential for choosing suitable samples for verification itself. These elements characterise acoustic responses during delamination coating. They affect elements influencing progress of signal. In research there is also a summary of existing methods for testing adhesion of coatings. As a result a new proposal of a new method comes out for purpose of quality testing of adhesion zinc hot-dip coating. The results of verification of this method are put to scientific analysis and findings lead to assessment of proposed method and its application in technical practise.The goal of this contribution is also include to proposed methodology testing adhesion zinc coating by nondestructive diagnostic method of acoustic emission (AE, which would monitor characterise progress of coating delamination of hot-dip zinc from basic material in way to adhesion tests would be practicable in situ. It can be enabled by analysis and assessment of results acquired by method AE and its application within verification of new method of adhesion anti-corrosive zinc coating.

  15. Switchable adhesion by chemical functionality and topography

    Kamperman, M.M.G.; Synytska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in adhesion technology over the last few decades has led to widespread replacement of mechanical fasteners with adhesive bonds. Despite the advances, it remains challenging to produce materials that are sticky on demand. In this feature article we highlight recent efforts to develop

  16. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  17. Biobased adhesives and non-conventional bonding

    Charles Frihart

    2010-01-01

    Biobased adhesives fall into several major classes based upon their chemical structures. Starches are used in large volume, especially in the paper products industries, but cellulosics generally do not have the strength and water resistance needed for most wood products. Several authors have covered cellulosics adhesives (Baumann and Conner 2002, Pizzi 2006). However...

  18. Adhesion studies by instrumental indentation testing

    Hangen, U.D.; Downs, S.; Kranenburg, J.M.; Hoogenboom, R.; Schubert, U.S.

    2006-01-01

    The miniaturization of devices and the advances in nanotechnol.-enabled products has led to the requirement of an increased understanding of the various interactions present in nanoscale contacts - including adhesion and surface tension. It is well known that adhesion plays an important role in the

  19. Microparticle adhesion studies by atomic force microscopy

    Segeren, L.H.G.J.; Siebum, B.; Karssenberg, F.G.; Berg, van den J.W.A.; Vancso, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most flexible and simple techniques for probing surface interactions. This article reviews AFM studies on particle adhesion. Special attention is paid to the characterization of roughness and its effect on adhesion. This is of importance when comparing the

  20. Scaling Principles for Understanding and Exploiting Adhesion

    Crosby, Alfred

    A grand challenge in the science of adhesion is the development of a general design paradigm for adhesive materials that can sustain large forces across an interface yet be detached with minimal force upon command. Essential to this challenge is the generality of achieving this performance under a wide set of external conditions and across an extensive range of forces. Nature has provided some guidance through various examples, e.g. geckos, for how to meet this challenge; however, a single solution is not evident upon initial investigation. To help provide insight into nature's ability to scale reversible adhesion and adapt to different external constraints, we have developed a general scaling theory that describes the force capacity of an adhesive interface in the context of biological locomotion. We have demonstrated that this scaling theory can be used to understand the relative performance of a wide range of organisms, including numerous gecko species and insects, as well as an extensive library of synthetic adhesive materials. We will present the development and testing of this scaling theory, and how this understanding has helped guide the development of new composite materials for high capacity adhesives. We will also demonstrate how this scaling theory has led to the development of new strategies for transfer printing and adhesive applications in manufacturing processes. Overall, the developed scaling principles provide a framework for guiding the design of adhesives.

  1. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Sato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified. (paper)

  2. THE PROBLEMS OF ENSURE OF SAFE LABOR CONDITIONS ON WORKPLACES FOR ADHESIVE BONDING

    Barbara CIECIŃSKA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the performance a variety of technological operations a human may come into contact with a variety of factors caus-ing deterioration of safety at work. As an example of which is described in article, adhesive bonding operations are re-quiring use of specific chemicals, which are adhesives. They are produced on the basis of a variety of compounds, often hazardous to human health. Furthermore, adhesive bonding requires a series of preparatory operations such as degreas-ing or surface preparation with a specific structure and roughness and auxiliary operations such as measurement of the wettability of surface. In this paper are described examples of risks occurring during adhesive bonding, it is a simple way to estimate the risks associated with the performance of operations. The examples of the determination by the produc-ers of chemicals are described which are used in adhesive bonding and fragment of international chemical safety card (ICSC, as a source of information important to the workplace organization and ensuring safety during adhesive bonding.

  3. Adhesion of silver/polypyrrole nanocomposite coating to a fluoropolymer substrate

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Interfacial structure between Ag/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite and PTFE was revealed. • PPy enters into PTFE substrate as a dispersion with up to 12 nm size Ag nanoparticles. • The nanocomposite is absorbed by PTFE substrate up to 1–2 μm deep. • Ag/PPy interlocks mechanically with PTFE causing strong adhesion. - Abstract: This paper describes the adhesive interface between a conducting polymer/metal composite and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate. Strong adhesion was observed from using a Ag/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite on a fluoropolymer substrate, which in most cases has a very low adhesion to different materials. To clarify the adhesion mechanism between the Ag/PPy composite and the PTFE substrate, the interfacial structure was studied by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results show that Ag/PPy composite is absorbed inside the nano-sized pores of PTFE and the composite mechanically interlocks after solidifying, which causes the nanocomposite to stick strongly to the substrate. The use of Ag/PPy coating could be a novel technique for developing electrodes, antennae or other high performance applications as this metal/conductive polymer composite has excellent adhesion properties on various plastics.

  4. Adhesion of silver/polypyrrole nanocomposite coating to a fluoropolymer substrate

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin, E-mail: KAWAKITA.Jin@nims.go.jp; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Interfacial structure between Ag/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite and PTFE was revealed. • PPy enters into PTFE substrate as a dispersion with up to 12 nm size Ag nanoparticles. • The nanocomposite is absorbed by PTFE substrate up to 1–2 μm deep. • Ag/PPy interlocks mechanically with PTFE causing strong adhesion. - Abstract: This paper describes the adhesive interface between a conducting polymer/metal composite and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate. Strong adhesion was observed from using a Ag/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite on a fluoropolymer substrate, which in most cases has a very low adhesion to different materials. To clarify the adhesion mechanism between the Ag/PPy composite and the PTFE substrate, the interfacial structure was studied by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results show that Ag/PPy composite is absorbed inside the nano-sized pores of PTFE and the composite mechanically interlocks after solidifying, which causes the nanocomposite to stick strongly to the substrate. The use of Ag/PPy coating could be a novel technique for developing electrodes, antennae or other high performance applications as this metal/conductive polymer composite has excellent adhesion properties on various plastics.

  5. Cellular contractility and substrate elasticity: a numerical investigation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion.

    Ronan, William; Deshpande, Vikram S; McMeeking, Robert M; McGarry, J Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Numerous experimental studies have established that cells can sense the stiffness of underlying substrates and have quantified the effect of substrate stiffness on stress fibre formation, focal adhesion area, cell traction, and cell shape. In order to capture such behaviour, the current study couples a mixed mode thermodynamic and mechanical framework that predicts focal adhesion formation and growth with a material model that predicts stress fibre formation, contractility, and dissociation in a fully 3D implementation. Simulations reveal that SF contractility plays a critical role in the substrate-dependent response of cells. Compliant substrates do not provide sufficient tension for stress fibre persistence, causing dissociation of stress fibres and lower focal adhesion formation. In contrast, cells on stiffer substrates are predicted to contain large amounts of dominant stress fibres. Different levels of cellular contractility representative of different cell phenotypes are found to alter the range of substrate stiffness that cause the most significant changes in stress fibre and focal adhesion formation. Furthermore, stress fibre and focal adhesion formation evolve as a cell spreads on a substrate and leading to the formation of bands of fibres leading from the cell periphery over the nucleus. Inhibiting the formation of FAs during cell spreading is found to limit stress fibre formation. The predictions of this mutually dependent material-interface framework are strongly supported by experimental observations of cells adhered to elastic substrates and offer insight into the inter-dependent biomechanical processes regulating stress fibre and focal adhesion formation.

  6. A critical review of the measurement of ice adhesion to solid substrates

    Work, Andrew; Lian, Yongsheng

    2018-04-01

    Ice adhesion is an issue spanning a wide range of technical fields. In the aerospace industry, ice accretion has led to a large number of casualties and costs the industry billions of dollars every year. To design effective anti-/de-icing systems, the adhesion of ice to surfaces must be understood. In this review paper, the authors surveyed for papers providing methods for the measurement of ice adhesion. 113 papers were identified for comparison, with data being extracted from 58 papers with common test surfaces (aluminum, steel, Teflon® (Chemours), and polyurethane). The methods used were categorized and data were compared based on their precision and the trends they demonstrated. Conceptual problems were identified with the tests used in the literature and discussed, and open questions relevant to testing the adhesion of ice were identified. Several key parameters affecting ice adhesion identified from the literature were temperature, surface roughness, strain rate, and impact velocity. Their effects on adhesion strength were discussed. While researching this topic, it was discovered that many papers did not report the strain rate in their tests, and the vast majority of papers did not correct their data for stress concentrations on the surface, either of which has been shown to cause variation in the data by one order of magnitude. Data compared from the literature typically spanned one to three orders of magnitude. The causes of these variations were discussed.

  7. Do uniform tangential interfacial stresses enhance adhesion?

    Menga, Nicola; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical arguments, based on linear elasticity and thermodynamics, to show that interfacial tangential stresses in sliding adhesive soft contacts may lead to a significant increase of the effective energy of adhesion. A sizable expansion of the contact area is predicted in conditions corresponding to such scenario. These results are easily explained and are valid under the assumptions that: (i) sliding at the interface does not lead to any loss of adhesive interaction and (ii) spatial fluctuations of frictional stresses can be considered negligible. Our results are seemingly supported by existing experiments, and show that frictional stresses may lead to an increase of the effective energy of adhesion depending on which conditions are established at the interface of contacting bodies in the presence of adhesive forces.

  8. Designing Hydrogel Adhesives for Corneal Wound Repair

    Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Today, corneal wounds are repaired using nylon sutures. Yet there are a number of complications associated with suturing the cornea, and thus there is interest in an adhesive to replace or supplement sutures in the repair of corneal wounds. We are designing and evaluating corneal adhesives prepared from dendrimers – single molecular weight, highly branched polymers. We have explored two strategies to form these ocular adhesives. The first involves a photocrosslinking reaction and the second uses a peptide ligation reactions to couple the individual dendrimers together to from the adhesive. These adhesives were successfully used to repair corneal perforations, close the flap produced in a LASIK procedure, and secure a corneal transplant. PMID:17889330

  9. Adhesive small bowel obstruction due to pelvic inflammatory disease: A case report

    Razan A Al-Ghassab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a 32-year-old woman with adhesive small bowel obstruction due to pelvic inflammatory disease. She had no history of abdominal surgery, gynecological complaints or constitutional symptoms of chronic illness. The diagnosis was based on the laparoscopic findings of small bowel adhesions, free peritoneal fluid, “violin string” adhesions of Fitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome and left hydrosalpinx. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis was performed successfully, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course. The authors conclude that pelvic inflammatory disease should be included as a cause of adhesive small bowel obstruction in sexually active young women with no history of abdominal surgery or constitutional symptoms of chronic disease. When performed by experienced surgeons, laparoscopy in such patients is feasible and safe.

  10. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  11. MRI of placental adhesive disorder

    Prapaisilp, P; Bangchokdee, S

    2014-01-01

    Placental adhesive disorder (PAD) is a serious pregnancy complication that occurs when the chorionic villi invade the myometrium. Placenta praevia and prior caesarean section are the two important risk factors. PAD is classified on the basis of the depth of myometrial invasion (placenta accreta, placenta increta and placenta percreta). MRI is the preferred image modality for pre-natal diagnosis of PAD and as complementary technique when ultrasonography is inconclusive. Imaging findings that are helpful for the diagnosis include dark intraplacental bands, direct invasion of adjacent structures by placental tissue, interruption of normal trilayered myometrium and uterine bulging. Clinicians should be aware of imaging features of PAD to facilitate optimal patient management. PMID:25060799

  12. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  13. Adverse effects of salivary contamination for adhesives in restorative dentistry. A literature review.

    Nair, Pooja; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2017-06-01

    To review and critically analyze the literature concerning the influence of salivary contamination on the bond quality of adhesives used in restorative materials by comparing and contrasting the different adhesive materials. A detailed search on PUBMED, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and Web of Science was carried out to identify publications on salivary contamination and dental adhesive materials, from 1990-2017 (March) which resulted in a total of 6,202 web-identified publications. After screening titles/abstracts and de-duplicating, 54 publications were selected that matched the requirements for this review. The condition for selection was English literature concerning the effect of salivary contamination on the adhesives used in restorative dentistry. The obtained articles were systematically evaluated. Salivary contamination of adhesives during restorative procedures statistically (64.6%) showed an adverse effect on adhesives, occurring either at one or many stages of restoration. Methodological dissimilarities impeded the direct comparison of the selected studies. Nevertheless, the 2-step etch and rinse adhesives were relatively less vulnerable to salivary contamination than the others. 65% of the evaluated studies for decontamination achieved improved bonding when the contaminated surface was subjected to some kind of decontamination procedure. However, the duration and other specificities were not standard in all the evaluations and need further research to assess the course of action. It is necessary to do long term studies to evaluate the effectiveness of contaminated adhesive over time. Salivary contamination is a potential cause for poor bond quality of adhesive systems during restorative procedures and to provide a successful treatment, proper care must be taken to ensure the operating area is free from contamination. Understanding the properties of the materials and its constituents as well as considering measures to manage the potential

  14. Identifying the rules of engagement enabling leukocyte rolling, activation, and adhesion.

    Jonathan Tang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The LFA-1 integrin plays a pivotal role in sustained leukocyte adhesion to the endothelial surface, which is a precondition for leukocyte recruitment into inflammation sites. Strong correlative evidence implicates LFA-1 clustering as being essential for sustained adhesion, and it may also facilitate rebinding events with its ligand ICAM-1. We cannot challenge those hypotheses directly because it is infeasible to measure either process during leukocyte adhesion following rolling. The alternative approach undertaken was to challenge the hypothesized mechanisms by experimenting on validated, working counterparts: simulations in which diffusible, LFA1 objects on the surfaces of quasi-autonomous leukocytes interact with simulated, diffusible, ICAM1 objects on endothelial surfaces during simulated adhesion following rolling. We used object-oriented, agent-based methods to build and execute multi-level, multi-attribute analogues of leukocytes and endothelial surfaces. Validation was achieved across different experimental conditions, in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo, at both the individual cell and population levels. Because those mechanisms exhibit all of the characteristics of biological mechanisms, they can stand as a concrete, working theory about detailed events occurring at the leukocyte-surface interface during leukocyte rolling and adhesion experiments. We challenged mechanistic hypotheses by conducting experiments in which the consequences of multiple mechanistic events were tracked. We quantified rebinding events between individual components under different conditions, and the role of LFA1 clustering in sustaining leukocyte-surface adhesion and in improving adhesion efficiency. Early during simulations ICAM1 rebinding (to LFA1 but not LFA1 rebinding (to ICAM1 was enhanced by clustering. Later, clustering caused both types of rebinding events to increase. We discovered that clustering was not necessary to achieve adhesion as long as LFA1 and

  15. Preparation and study of new rubber to steel adhesive systems

    Labaj, I.; Ondrusova, D.; Dubec, A.; Pajtasova, M.; Kohutiar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper deals with the preparation of new rubber to steel adhesive systems using the steel surface treatment by applying the adhesive coats based on Co (II) and Cu(II) salts. For demonstration of coats chemical composition EDX analysis was used. The topography and microstructure of prepared adhesive coats were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Finally the efficiency of adhesion between rubber blends and coated metal steel pieces was evaluated according to Test ASTM D429 Rubber to metal adhesion, method A. The adhesive strength resulting values of prepared steel samples with new adhesive coats were compared with samples covered with adhesive systems commonly used in industry. (authors)

  16. Radiation curable adhesive compositions and composite structures

    Brenner, W.

    1984-01-01

    This disclosure relates to novel adhesive compositions and composite structures utilizing the same, wherein said adhesive compositions contain an elastomer, a chemically compatible ethylenically unsaturated monomer, a tackifier, an adhesion promoter, and optionally, pigments, fillers, thickeners and flow control agents which are converted from the liquid to the solid state by exposure to high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam. A particularly useful application for such adhesive compositions comprises the assembly of certain composite structures or laminates consisting of, for example, a fiber flocked rubber sheet and a metal base with the adhesive fulfilling the multiple functions of adhering the flocked fiber to the rubber sheet as well as adhering the rubber sheet to the metal base. Optionally, the rubber sheet itself may also be cured at the same time as the adhesive composition with all operations being carried out at ambient temperatures and in the presence of air, with exposure of said assembly to selected dosages of high energy ionizing radiation. These adhesive compositions contain no solvents thereby almost eliminating air pollution or solvent toxicity problems, and offer substantial savings in energy and labor as they are capable of curing in very short time periods without the use of external heat which might damage the substrate

  17. Shear Adhesion of Tapered Nanopillar Arrays.

    Cho, Younghyun; Minsky, Helen K; Jiang, Yijie; Yin, Kaiyang; Turner, Kevin T; Yang, Shu

    2018-04-04

    Tapered nanopillars with various cross sections, including cone-shaped, stepwise, and pencil-like structures (300 nm in diameter at the base of the pillars and 1.1 μm in height), are prepared from epoxy resin templated by nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The effect of pillar geometry on the shear adhesion behavior of these nanopillar arrays is investigated via sliding experiments in a nanoindentation system. In a previous study of arrays with the same geometry, it was shown that cone-shaped nanopillars exhibit the highest adhesion under normal loading while stepwise and pencil-like nanopillars exhibit lower normal adhesion strength due to significant deformation of the pillars that occurs with increasing indentation depth. Contrary to the previous studies, here, we show that pencil-like nanopillars exhibit the highest shear adhesion strength at all indentation depths among three types of nanopillar arrays and that the shear adhesion increases with greater indentation depth due to the higher bending stiffness and closer packing of the pencil-like nanopillar array. Finite element simulations are used to elucidate the deformation of the pillars during the sliding experiments and agree with the nanoindentation-based sliding measurements. The experiments and finite element simulations together demonstrate that the shape of the nanopillars plays a key role in shear adhesion and that the mechanism is quite different from that of adhesion under normal loading.

  18. Advances in biomaterials for preventing tissue adhesion.

    Wu, Wei; Cheng, Ruoyu; das Neves, José; Tang, Jincheng; Xiao, Junyuan; Ni, Qing; Liu, Xinnong; Pan, Guoqing; Li, Dechun; Cui, Wenguo; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-09-10

    Adhesion is one of the most common postsurgical complications, occurring simultaneously as the damaged tissue heals. Accompanied by symptoms such as inflammation, pain and even dyskinesia in particular circumstances, tissue adhesion has substantially compromised the quality of life of patients. Instead of passive treatment, which involves high cost and prolonged hospital stay, active intervention to prevent the adhesion from happening has been accepted as the optimized strategy against this complication. Herein, this paper will cover not only the mechanism of adhesion forming, but also the biomaterials and medicines used in its prevention. Apart from acting as a direct barrier, biomaterials also show promising anti-adhesive bioactivity though their intrinsic physical and chemical are still not completely unveiled. Considering the diversity of human tissue organization, it is imperative that various biomaterials in combination with specific medicine could be tuned to fit the microenvironment of targeted tissues. With the illustration of different adhesion mechanism and solutions, we hope this review can become a beacon and further inspires the development of anti-adhesion biomedicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  20. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  1. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift (Δf) and dissipation energy shift (ΔD), and the viscoelastic change as ΔD-Δf plot. The Col adsorption showed larger Δf and ΔD values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The ΔD-Δf plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  2. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: tagaya.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift ({Delta}f) and dissipation energy shift ({Delta}D), and the viscoelastic change as {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot. The Col adsorption showed larger {Delta}f and {Delta}D values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  3. Effect of gold nanoparticles on postoperative peritoneal adhesions in rats

    Amir Hooshang Mohammadpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Abdominal adhesions are one of the most important problems, occurring after intra-abdominal surgery in more than 90% of cases. This condition is the leading cause of bowel obstruction, infertility, and abdominal/pelvic pain. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs have been shown to be non-toxic and exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and antioxidant activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of intraperitoneal lavage with GNP solutions on the development of postoperative peritoneal adhesion (PPA. Materials and Methods:In the current experimental study, thirty-five male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups of five rats. After a standardized peritoneal injury, GNP solutions in different concentrations (1, 2.5, 5, 10, 50 and 100 ng/ml were locally administered through nebulization; normal saline (NS was administered to the control group. Two weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and cecum and peritoneal samples were harvested for histopathological assessment. Blood samples were obtained to determine serum concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Results: The rats treated with GNPs had significantly lower microscopic and macroscopic peritoneal adhesion scores, compared to the control group (P

  4. Macroalgal spore dysfunction: ocean acidification delays and weakens adhesion.

    Guenther, Rebecca; Miklasz, Kevin; Carrington, Emily; Martone, Patrick T

    2018-04-01

    Early life stages of marine organisms are predicted to be vulnerable to ocean acidification. For macroalgae, reproduction and population persistence rely on spores to settle, adhere and continue the algal life cycle, yet the effect of ocean acidification on this critical life stage has been largely overlooked. We explicitly tested the biomechanical impact of reduced pH on early spore adhesion. We developed a shear flume to examine the effect of reduced pH on spore attachment time and strength in two intertidal rhodophyte macroalgae, one calcified (Corallina vancouveriensis) and one noncalcified (Polyostea robusta). Reduced pH delayed spore attachment of both species by 40%-52% and weakened attachment strength in C. vancouveriensis, causing spores to dislodge at lower flow-induced shear forces, but had no effect on the attachment strength of P. robusta. Results are consistent with our prediction that reduced pH disrupts proper curing and gel formation of spore adhesives (anionic polysaccharides and glycoproteins) via protonation and cation displacement, although experimental verification is needed. Our results demonstrate that ocean acidification negatively, and differentially, impacts spore adhesion in two macroalgae. If results hold in field conditions, reduced ocean pH has the potential to impact macroalgal communities via spore dysfunction, regardless of the physiological tolerance of mature thalli. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  5. Adhesive capsulitis: role of MR imaging in differential diagnosis

    Connell, David; Padmanabhan, Ravi; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a group of patients who underwent surgery for adhesive capsulitis. Twenty-four MR imaging studies in 24 consecutive patients with clinical evidence of adhesive capsulitis were performed prior to arthroscopic capsulotomy. There were 17 women and 7 men with a mean age of 53.5 years. Images were scrutinised for changes in the synovium particularly in the rotator interval, around the biceps anchor and axillary pouch. Intravenous gadolinium was given routinely. We also examined a control group of 22 patients who underwent the same MR imaging protocol after referral for rotator cuff pathology. Soft tissue density showing variable enhancement after gadolinium administration was visible in the rotator interval in 22 of 24 studies on MR imaging. Seventeen patients showed soft tissue density partially encasing the biceps anchor. Ten patients showed thickening and gadolinium enhancement of the axillary pouch. Three patients from the study cohort had partial tears of the supraspinatus tendon. All the patients subsequently had surgery which confirmed fibrovascular scar tissue in the rotator interval, around the biceps anchor and a variable degree of synovial inflammation of the glenohumeral capsule. Two patients from a control group with suspected rotator cuff pathology showed abnormal intensity in the rotator interval on MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging can identify changes in the shoulder joint that correspond to abnormalities seen at surgery. This may be useful for discriminating adhesive capsulitis from other causes of shoulder pain. (orig.)

  6. Surface charges promote nonspecific nanoparticle adhesion to stiffer membranes

    Sinha, Shayandev; Jing, Haoyuan; Sachar, Harnoor Singh; Das, Siddhartha

    2018-04-01

    This letter establishes the manner in which the electric double layer induced by the surface charges of the plasma membrane (PM) enhances the nonspecific adhesion (NSA) of a metal nanoparticle (NP) to stiffer PMs (i.e., PMs with larger bending moduli). The NSA is characterized by the physical attachment of the NP to the membrane and occurs when the decrease in the surface energy (or any other mechanism) associated with the attachment process provides the energy for bending the membrane. Such an attachment does not involve receptor-ligand interactions that characterize the specific membrane-NP adhesion. Here, we demonstrate that a significant decrease in the electrostatic energy caused by the NP-attachment-induced destruction of the charged-membrane-electrolyte interface is responsible for providing the additional energy needed for bending the membrane during the NP adhesion to stiffer membranes. A smaller salt concentration and a larger membrane charge density augment this effect, which can help to design drug delivery to cells with stiffer membranes due to pathological conditions, fabricate NPs with biomimetic cholesterol-rich lipid bilayer encapsulation, etc.

  7. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  8. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Fathi, Zakaryae; Wei, Jianghua

    1998-01-01

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  9. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash...... deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  10. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel...... strength test and by SEM pictures. The rheology of the double-layered compared to the monolayer films changed in some cases which indicates that the adhesion process needs to be carefully introduced in order not to alter the final properties....

  11. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  12. Bond strength of dental adhesive systems irradiated with ionizing radiation.

    Dibo da Cruz, Adriana; Goncalves, Luciano de Souza; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Correr-Sobrinho, Lorenco; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Boscolo, Frab Norberto

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present paper was to determine the effect of different types of ionizing radiation on the bond strength of three different dentin adhesive systems. One hundred twenty specimens of 60 human teeth (protocol number: 032/2007) sectioned mesiodistally were divided into 3 groups according to the adhesives systems used: SB (Adper Single Bond Plus), CB (Clearfil SE Bond) and AP (Adper Prompt Self-Etch). The adhesives were applied on dentin and photo-activated using LED (Lec 1000, MMoptics, 1000 mW/cm2). Customized elastomer molds (0.5 mm thickness) with three orifices of 1.2 mm diameter were placed onto the bonding areas and filled with composite resin (Filtek Z-250), which was photo-activated for 20 s. Each group was subdivided into 4 subgroups for application of the different types of ionizing radiation: ultraviolet radiation (UV), diagnostic x-ray radiation (DX), therapeutic x-ray radiation (TX) and without irradiation (control group, CG). Microshear tests were carried out (Instron, model 4411), and afterwards the modes of failure were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscope and classified using 5 scores: adhesive failure, mixed failures with 3 significance levels, and cohesive failure. The results of the shear bond strength test were submitted to ANOVA with Tukey's test and Dunnett's test, and the data from the failure pattern evaluation were analyzed with the Mann Whitney test (p = 0.05). No change in bond strength of CB and AP was observed after application of the different radiation types, only SB showed increase in bond strength after UV (p = 0.0267) irradiation. The UV also changed the failure patterns of SB (p = 0.0001). The radio-induced changes did not cause degradation of the restorations, which means that they can be exposed to these types of ionizing radiation without weakening the bond strength.

  13. Microsurgical principles and postoperative adhesions: lessons from the past.

    Gomel, Victor; Koninckx, Philippe R

    2016-10-01

    "Microsurgery" is a set of principles developed to improve fertility surgery outcomes. These principles were developed progressively based on common sense and available evidence, under control of clinical feedback obtained with the use of second-look laparoscopy. Fertility outcome was the end point; significant improvement in fertility rates validated the concept clinically. Postoperative adhesion formation being a major cause of failure in fertility surgery, the concept of microsurgery predominantly addresses prevention of postoperative adhesions. In this concept, magnification with a microscope or laparoscope plays a minor role as technical facilitator. Not surprisingly, the principles to prevent adhesion formation are strikingly similar to our actual understanding: gentle tissue handling, avoiding desiccation, irrigation at room temperature, shielding abdominal contents from ambient air, meticulous hemostasis and lavage, avoiding foreign body contamination and infection, administration of dexamethasone postoperatively, and even the concept of keeping denuded areas separated by temporary adnexal or ovarian suspension. The actual concepts of peritoneal conditioning during surgery and use of dexamethasone and a barrier at the end of surgery thus confirm without exception the tenets of microsurgery. Although recent research helped to clarify the pathophysiology of adhesion formation, refined its prevention and the relative importance of each factor, the clinical end point of improvement of fertility rates remains demonstrated for only the microsurgical tenets as a whole. In conclusion, the principles of microsurgery remain fully valid as the cornerstones of reproductive microsurgery, whether performed by means of open access or laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  15. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  17. Effect of adhesive remnant removal on enamel topography after bracket debonding

    Larissa Adrian Meira Cardoso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: At orthodontic treatment completion, knowledge about the effects of adhesive remnant removal on enamel is paramount.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the effect of different adhesive remnant removal methods on enamel topography (ESI and surface roughness (Ra after bracket debonding and polishing.METHODS: A total of 50 human premolars were selected and divided into five groups according to the method used for adhesive remnant removal: high speed tungsten carbide bur (TCB, Sof-Lex discs (SL, adhesive removing plier (PL, ultrasound (US and Fiberglass burs (FB. Metal brackets were bonded with Transbond XT, stored at 37oC for 24 hours before debonding with adhesive removing plier. Subsequently, removal methods were carried out followed by polishing with pumice paste. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted with pre-bonding, post-debonding and post-polishing analyses. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with F test (ANOVA and Tukey's (Ra as well as with Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests (ESI (P < 0.05.RESULTS: US Ra and ESI were significantly greater than TCB, SL, PL and FB. Polishing minimized Ra and ESI in the SL and FB groups.CONCLUSION: Adhesive remnant removal with SL and FB associated with polishing are recommended due to causing little damage to the enamel.

  18. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L.; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R.; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J.; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca2+ dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27402964

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Adhesive Secretion from Cuvierian Tubules of Sea Cucumber Holothuria forskåli (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea

    Malgorzata Baranowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea cucumber Holothuria forskåli possesses a specialized system called Cuvierian tubules. During mechanical stimulation white filaments (tubules are expelled and become sticky upon contact with any object. We isolated a protein with adhesive properties from protein extracts of Cuvierian tubules from H. forskåli. This protein was identified by antibodies against recombinant precollagen D which is located in the byssal threads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. To find out the optimal procedure for extraction and purification, the identified protein was isolated by several methods, including electroelution, binding to glass beads, immunoprecipitation, and gel filtration. Antibodies raised against the isolated protein were used for localization of the adhesive protein in Cuvierian tubules. Immunostaining and immunogold electron microscopical studies revealed the strongest immunoreactivity in the mesothelium; this tissue layer is involved in adhesion. Adhesion of Cuvierian tubule extracts was measured on the surface of various materials. The extracted protein showed the strongest adhesion to Teflon surface. Increased adhesion was observed in the presence of potassium and EDTA, while cadmium caused a decrease in adhesion. Addition of antibodies and trypsin abolished the adhesive properties of the extract.

  20. The association between soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate and peritoneal injury in peritoneal dialysis.

    Igarashi, Yusuke; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Imai, Reika; Imai, Toshimi; Hirahara, Ichiro; Akimoto, Tetsu; Ookawara, Susumu; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2017-11-01

    Chronic inflammation of the peritoneum causes peritoneal injury in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and its circulating form, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, play pivotal roles in inflammation. However, their role in peritoneal injury is unclear. We measured changes in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the peritoneum of a peritoneal injury model in rats. The associations between soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate and the solute transport rate (D/P-Cr and D/D0-glucose) determined by the peritoneal equilibration test, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 levels in drained dialysate were investigated in 94 peritoneal drained dialysate samples. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in the peritoneum of rats with peritoneal injury. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate were significantly positively correlated with D/P-Cr (r = .51, p molecule-1expression is increased in the peritoneum of a peritoneal injury model in the rat, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in drained dialysate are associated with peritoneal injury in patients on peritoneal dialysis. These results suggest that soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 could be a novel biomarker of peritoneal injury in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  1. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pelvic peritoneal adhesions: What radiologists need to know?

    Ghonge, Nitin P; Ghonge, Sanchita Dube

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic peritoneal adhesions constitute an important cause of concern which affects the life of millions of people worldwide due to complications like abdominal pain, bowel obstruction and infertility along with challenges in surgical exploration. Precise pre-operative diagnosis of the presence and extent of peritoneal adhesions is of great clinical and surgical importance. Diagnostic laparoscopy to detect peritoneal adhesions may itself lead to formation of adhesions. Routine CT and MRI studies are therefore useful non-invasive modalities to achieve this objective. This review article provides a brief background about the causation and patho-physiology of peritoneal adhesions. The article also addresses the range of clinical presentations in these patients, mainly from the gynecologic perspective. This article provides an illustrative review of CT and MRI findings with laparoscopic correlation. A new ‘imaging-based grading system’ for pre-operative quantification of the burden of peritoneal adhesions is also proposed. Despite practical challenges in accurate pre-operative diagnosis of peritoneal adhesions on imaging, detection of peritoneal adhesions is certainly feasible on routine CT and MRI scans and should be an integral part of image interpretation

  2. Bacterial Adhesion on the Titanium and Stainless-Steel Surfaces Undergone Two Different Treatment Methods: Polishing and Ultrafast Laser Treatment

    Chik, N.; Zain, W. S. Wan Md; Mohamad, A. J.; Sidek, M. Z.; Ibrahim, W. H. Wan; Reif, A.; Rakebrandt, J. H.; Pfleging, W.; Liu, X.

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion has become a significant problem in many industries causing billions of dollars for its complicated removal treatment and maintenance. In this study, metal surfaces undergone treatment with ultrafast laser with varies power. The microstructure produced on its original surfaces were expected to prevent the adhesion of Escherichia coli (E. coli) ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) ATCC 6838. The laser treatment was performed at 380 fs pulse duration, 515 µm central wavelength and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Stainless steel AISI 316L was treated with an average laser power of 0.04 W (SS-0.04) and 0.11 W (SS-0.11), while Grade 5 titanium alloy was tested with high laser power 0.11 W (T-0.11). The adhesion was observed after 16 hours and the number of adhering bacteria was counted per cm2. The result achieved shows that, increasing the average laser power is leading to an enhanced S. aureus adhesion while E. coli adhesion is reduced which is due to the hydrophobicity interaction and difference in surface texture. Meanwhile, the laser treatment showed significant reduction of the bacterial adhesion on its surface compared to the polished surfaces. Thus, ultrafast laser texturing can be suggested as a promising method to reduce the bacterial adhesion, which reduced the adhesion of >80% for E. coli and >20% for S. aureus.

  3. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  4. HMAC layer adhesion through tack coat.

    2017-02-01

    Tack coats are the asphaltic emulsions applied between pavement lifts to provide adequate bond between the two surfaces. The adhesive bond between the two layers helps the pavement system to behave as a monolithic structure and improves the structura...

  5. Synthesis of LTA zeolite for bacterial adhesion

    Belaabed, R.; Eabed, S.; Addaou, A.; Laajab, A.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Lahsini, A.

    2016-07-01

    High affinity and adhesion capacity for Gram-positive bacteria on minerals has been widely studied. In this work the adhesion of bacteria on synthesized zeolite has been studied. The Zeolite Linde Type A (LTA) has been synthesized using hydrothermal route using processing parameters to obtain low cost materials. For adhesion studies Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis were used as Gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as Gram-negative bacteria. X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesized zeolite. To evaluate the bacterial adhesion to zeolite LTA the hydrophobicity and surface properties are examined using contact angle measurement. (Author)

  6. Anti-adhesive properties of fish tropomyosins

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Bernbom, Nete; Gram, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We have recently found that preconditioning of stainless steel surfaces with an aqueous fish muscle extract can significantly impede bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the primary components associated with this bacteria-repelling effect. Methods...... to the formation of a proteinaceous conditioning film composed primarily of fish tropomyosins. These fibrous proteins formed a considerable anti-adhesive conditioning layer on and reduced bacterial adhesion to several different materials including polystyrene, vinyl plastic, stainless steel and glass. The protein...... the importance of substratum's physiochemical properties and exposure time with regards to protein adsorption/elution efficiency and subsequent bacterial adhesion. Significance and Impact of the Study: Fish tropomyosin-coatings could potentially offer a nontoxic and relatively inexpensive measure of reducing...

  7. Recent advances in nanostructured biomimetic dry adhesives

    Andras ePattantyus-Abraham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques.

  8. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  9. Hierarchical capillary adhesion of microcantilevers or hairs

    Liu Jianlin; Feng Xiqiao; Xia Re; Zhao Hongping

    2007-01-01

    As a result of capillary forces, animal hairs, carbon nanotubes or nanowires of a periodically or randomly distributed array often assemble into hierarchical structures. In this paper, the energy method is adopted to analyse the capillary adhesion of microsized hairs, which are modelled as clamped microcantilevers wetted by liquids. The critical conditions for capillary adhesion of two hairs, three hairs or two bundles of hairs are derived in terms of Young's contact angle, elastic modulus and geometric sizes of the beams. Then, the hierarchical capillary adhesion of hairs is addressed. It is found that for multiple hairs or microcantilevers, the system tends to take a hierarchical structure as a result of the minimization of the total potential energy of the system. The level number of structural hierarchy increases with the increase in the number of hairs if they are sufficiently long. Additionally, we performed experiments to verify our theoretical solutions for the adhesion of microbeams

  10. Comparison of honey and dextrose solution on post-operative peritoneal adhesion in rat model.

    Rahimi, Vafa Baradaran; Shirazinia, Reza; Fereydouni, Narges; Zamani, Parvin; Darroudi, Sousan; Sahebkar, Amir Hossein; Askari, Vahid Reza

    2017-08-01

    Peritoneal adhesion between abdominal organs is a complication of surgery. It causes major complications like pain, bowel obstruction, infertility and increases risk of death. Honey is known to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties potentially relevant for adhesive protection. Thirty rats were divided into five groups: negative control without any surgical procedure (normal group), control group treated with normal saline, experimental group I treated with 1ml of 10% honey, experimental group II treated with honey at half concentration of group I (honey0.5), and positive control group receiving 1ml of dextrose 5%. Inflammatory, growth and angiogenesis factors (TNF-α, Il-6, IL-1β, TGF-β1 and VEGF) of the adhesion tissue were assessed using ELISA. Antioxidant factors (NO, GSH and MDA) were also assessed using biochemical procedures. The difference between peritoneal adhesion scores, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β1, VEGF, NO, GSH and MDA value of all groups was strongly significant (p<0.001). We showed that honey can decrease peritoneal adhesion (p<0.001), TNF-α (p<0.001), IL-1β (p<0.001), IL-6 (p<0.001), TGF-β1 (p<0.001), VEGF (p<0.001), NO (p<0.001), MDA (p<0.001) and increase GSH (p<0.001) compared with control group. Honey 0.5 also significantly decreased peritoneal adhesion (p<0.001), TNF-α (p<0.001), IL-1β (p<0.01), IL-6 (p<0.001), VEGF (p<0.001), NO (p<0.001), MDA (p<0.01) and increase GSH (p<0.001) compared with control group. We find that honey can decrease inflammatory, growth and angiogenesis factors which can advance peritoneal adhesion and increase antioxidant factors. Honey could serve as a protective agent for peritoneal adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrauterine adhesions as a risk factor for failed first-trimester pregnancy termination.

    Luk, Janelle; Allen, Rebecca H; Schantz-Dunn, Julianna; Goldberg, Alisa B

    2007-10-01

    Risk factors for failed first-trimester surgical abortion include endometrial distortion caused by leiomyomas, uterine anomalies and malposition and cervical stenosis. This report introduces intrauterine adhesions as an additional risk factor. A multiparous woman presented for pregnancy termination at 6 weeks' gestation. Three suction-curettage attempts failed to remove what appeared to be an intrauterine pregnancy. Rising beta-hCG levels and concern for an interstitial ectopic pregnancy prompted a diagnostic laparoscopy and exploratory laparotomy without the identification of an ectopic pregnancy. After methotrexate treatment failed, the patient underwent ultrasound-guided hysteroscopy and suction curettage using a cannula with a whistle-cut aperture for the successful removal of a pregnancy implanted behind intrauterine adhesions. Intrauterine adhesions are a cause of failed surgical abortion. Ultrasound-guided hysteroscopy may be required for diagnosis.

  12. Using the DP-190 glue for adhesive attachment of a large space mirror and its rim

    Vlasenko, Oleg; Zverev, Alexey; Sachkov, Mikhail

    2014-07-01

    The glue DP-190 is widely used for adhesive attachment of astrositall (zerodur) lightweight large-size space astronomical mirrors (diameter of 1.7 m and more) with elements of their frames of invar. Peculiarities of physicalmechanical behavior of the glue DP-190 when exposed to the environment during the ground operation and in orbit cause instability of the reflective surface quality of mirrors. In this report we show that even a small (around 1%-5%) volumetric deformation of a cylindrical adhesive layer with a thickness of 0.8 mm between the mirror and the rim element causes significant mirrors deformation. We propose to use adhesive layer of special form that allows to reduce volumetric deformations of the glue DP-190 up to three times. Here we present results based on primary mirror tests of the WSO-UV project.

  13. Reactive Nanocomposites for Controllable Adhesive Debonding

    2011-08-01

    technologies include shape memory alloy (SMA)-based approach, a chemical foaming agent (CFA) approach, and a reactive nanocomposite (RNC) approach. SMA...anofoil (a) Component 1 Thermoset Adhesive Component 2 Nano-coating (b) Figure 2. Debonding approach where (a) freestanding...J. Controlled Adhesive Debonding of RAH-66 Comanche Chines Using Shape Memory Alloys ; ARL-TR-2937; U.S. Army Research Laboratory: Aberdeen Proving

  14. Adhesive capsulitis: review of imaging and treatment

    Harris, Guy; Bou-Haider, Pascal; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is one of the most common conditions affecting the shoulder; however, early clinical diagnosis can be challenging. Treatment is most effective when commenced prior to the onset of capsular thickening and contracture; consequently, the role of imaging is increasing. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the typical imaging appearances of adhesive capsulitis and to examine some of the evidence regarding each of these imaging modalities. An evaluation of the various management options available to the clinician is also presented.

  15. Adhesion between Polydimethylsiloxane Layers by Crosslinking

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion between two surfaces may be strongly improved by chemical crosslinking of the interfaces. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used polymer that has received considerable attention due to its unique properties, such as relatively low price, biocompatibility, flexibility, high thermal...... investigated by rheology and microscopy. The objective of this work was to create adhesion of two layers without destroying the original viscoelastic properties of the PDMS films....

  16. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  17. Influence of Application Time and Etching Mode of Universal Adhesives on Enamel Adhesion.

    Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the influence of application time and etching mode of universal adhesives on enamel adhesion. Five universal adhesives, Adhese Universal, Bondmer Lightless, Clearfil Universal Bond Quick, G-Premio Bond, and Scotchbond Universal, were used. Bovine incisors were prepared and divided into four groups of ten teeth each. SBS, Ra, and SFE were determined after the following procedures: 1. self-etch mode with immediate air blowing after application (IA); 2. self-etch mode with prolonged application time (PA); 3. etch-and-rinse mode with IA; 4. etch-and-rinse mode with PA. After 24-h water storage, the bonded assemblies were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) tests. For surface roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements, the adhesives were simply applied to the enamel and rinsed with acetone and water before the measurements were carried out. Significantly higher SBS and Ra values were obtained with etch-and-rinse mode than with self-etch mode regardless of the application time or type of adhesive. Although most adhesives showed decreased SFE values with increased application time in self-etch mode, SFE values in etch-and-rinse mode were dependent on the adhesive type and application time. Etching mode, application time, and type of adhesive significantly influenced the SBS, Ra, and SFE values.

  18. Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma

    McBride, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been measured in citrated whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma obtained from normal subjects, splenectomized patients, and from patients in whom the diagnosis of recurrent venous thrombosis had been made. The duration of centrifugation used in the preparation of platelet-rich plasma was found to have a profound effect on the measurement of platelet adhesiveness because the figure for platelet adhesiveness measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation was considerably lower than that found in citrated whole blood. This effect was particularly marked when platelet-rich plasma was obtained from subjects in whom platelet adhesiveness measured in whole blood was increased. PMID:5699080

  19. Elimination of the reactivation process in the adhesion of chlorinated SBS rubber with polychloroprene adhesives

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination treatment of a thermoplastic styrene-butadiene-styrene rubber (SBS with a 3 wt% solution of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCI in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK introduces chlorinated and oxidized moieties on the rubber surface which increase its surface energy and produces surface microroughness. Consequently adhesion properties, evaluated by T-peel strength measurements in chlorinated SBS/solvent based-polyurethane adhesive/leather joints, are enhanced. In this study, two solvent-based polychloroprene adhesives (PCP0 and PCP30R have been considered as an alternative to the commonly used solvent-based polyurethane adhesive (PU. A thermoreactive phenolic resin was added to one of the polychloroprene adhesive formulations (PCP30R. This tackifier resin favors chlorination of the adhesive and reinforces the interface between the chlorinated adhesive and the chlorinated rubber surface. Besides, PCP30R adhesive does not need adhesive reactivation and considerable high T-peel strength value (5.7±0.3 kN/m was obtained. Elimination of the reactivation process implies a considerable improvement of the manufacturing process in the footwear industry.

  20. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive...

  1. Factors influencing bacterial adhesion to contact lenses.

    Dutta, Debarun; Cole, Nerida; Willcox, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The process of any contact lens related keratitis generally starts with the adhesion of opportunistic pathogens to contact lens surface. This article focuses on identifying the factors which have been reported to affect bacterial adhesion to contact lenses. Adhesion to lenses differs between various genera/species/strains of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the predominant causative organism, adheres in the highest numbers to both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lenses in vitro. The adhesion of this strain reaches maximum numbers within 1h in most in vitro studies and a biofilm has generally formed within 24 h of cells adhering to the lens surface. Physical and chemical properties of contact lens material affect bacterial adhesion. The water content of hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA)-based lenses and their iconicity affect the ability of bacteria to adhere. The higher hydrophobicity of silicone hydrogel lenses compared to HEMA-based lenses has been implicated in the higher numbers of bacteria that can adhere to their surfaces. Lens wear has different effects on bacterial adhesion, partly due to differences between wearers, responses of bacterial strains and the ability of certain tear film proteins when bound to a lens surface to kill certain types of bacteria.

  2. Use of Adhesion Promoters in Asphalt Mixtures

    Cihlářová Denisa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of asphalt binder as a significant binder in road constructions is to permanently bind aggregates of different compositions and grain sizes. The asphalt binder itself does not have suitable adhesiveness, so after a period of time, bare grains can appear. This results in a gradual separation of the grains from an asphalt layer and the presence of potholes in a pavement. Adhesion promoters or adhesive agents are important and proven promoters in practice. They are substances mainly based on the fatty acids of polyamides which should increase the reliability of the asphalt’s binder adhesion to the aggregates, thus increasing the lifetime period of the asphalt mixture as well as its resistance to mechanical strain. The amount of a promoter or agent added to the asphalt mixture is negligible and constitutes about 0.3% of the asphalt’s binder weight. Nevertheless, even this quantity significantly increases the adhesive qualities of an asphalt binder. The article was created in cooperatation with the Slovak University of Technology, in Bratislava, Slovakia, and focuses on proving the new AD2 adhesive additive and comparing it with the Addibit and Wetfix BE promoters used on aggregates from the Skuteč - Litická and Bystřec quarries.

  3. Dependence of adhesion strength between GaN LEDs and sapphire substrate on power density of UV laser irradiation

    Park, Junsu [Department of Nano-Manufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of); Sin, Young-Gwan [Department of Nano-Mechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hyun [Department of Nano-Mechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaegu, E-mail: gugu99@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano-Manufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental relationship between laser irradiation and adhesion strength, between gallium-nitride light emitted diode and sapphire substrate, is proposed during selective laser lift-off. • Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate. • Ga precipitation caused by thermal decomposition and roughened interface caused by thermal damage lead to the considerable difference of adhesion strength at the interface. - Abstract: Selective laser lift-off (SLLO) is an innovative technology used to manufacture and repair micro-light-emitting diode (LED) displays. In SLLO, laser is irradiated to selectively separate micro-LED devices from a transparent sapphire substrate. The light source used is an ultraviolet (UV) laser with a wavelength of 266 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns, and repetition rate of 30 kHz. Controlled adhesion between a LED and the substrate is key for a SLLO process with high yield and reliability. This study examined the fundamental relationship between adhesion and laser irradiation. Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate: Ga precipitation caused by the thermal decomposition of GaN and roughened interface caused by thermal damage on the sapphire. The competition between these two mechanisms leads to a non-trivial SLLO condition that needs optimization. This study helps understand the SLLO process, and accelerate the development of a process for manufacturing micro-LED displays via SLLO for future applications.

  4. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  5. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  6. Detection of Intracellular Adhesion (ica and Biofilm Formation Genes in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Clinical Samples

    Khadije Rezaie Keikhaie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infections that result in the formation of biofilms on the surfaces of biomedical implants are a leading cause of sepsis and are often associated with colonization of the implants by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm formation is thought to require two sequential steps: adhesion of cells to a solid substrate followed by cell-cell adhesion, creating multiple layers of cells. Intercellular adhesion requires the polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA, which is composed of linear β-1, 6-linked glucosaminylglycans and can be synthesized in vitro from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine by products of the intercellular adhesion (ica locus. We have investigated a variety of Staphylococcus aureus strains and find that all strains tested contain the ica locus and that several can form biofilms in vitro. Material and Method: A total of 31 clinical S. aureus isolates were collected from Zabol, Iran. In vitro biofilm formation ability was determined by microliter tissue culture plates. All clinical isolates were examined for determination the ica locus by using PCR method. Result: The results of this study showed that 40 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, 12 strains carrying the gene Cocos icaA (30% and 8 strains carrying the gene icaD (20% and the number of five strains (12.5% containing both genes ica A and has been ica D. Conclusions:  S. aureus clinical isolates have different ability to form biofilm. This may be caused by the differences in the expression of biofilm related genes, genetic make-up and physiological conditions.

  7. Tissue adhesives for simple traumatic lacerations.

    Beam, Joel W

    2008-01-01

    Farion K, Osmond MH, Hartling L, et al. Tissue adhesives for traumatic lacerations in children and adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2001(4);CD003326. What is the clinical evidence base for tissue adhesives in the management of simple traumatic lacerations? Studies were identified by searches of the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialized Trials Register (September 2003), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (CDROM 2003, issue 3), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2003, week 1), EMBASE (1988 to 2003, week 36), Web of Science Science Citation Index (1975 to September 13, 2003) and various clinical trials registers (September 2003). Investigators and product manufacturers were contacted to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included wounds and injuries, laceration, face injury, nose injury, tissue adhesives, and acrylates. Each study fulfilled the following criteria: (1) The study was a randomized controlled trial that compared tissue adhesives with standard wound closure (SWC) (sutures, staples, adhesive strips) or tissue adhesive with tissue adhesive. (2) The wounds were acute, linear lacerations less than 12 hours old, resulting from blunt or sharp trauma. (3) The wound length, width, and depth allowed for approximation of the edges with minimal tension after deep sutures were placed, if required. Studies were included with no language or publication status restriction, with participants of any age recruited in an emergency department, outpatient clinic, walk-in clinic, or other primary care setting. Studies were excluded if the wounds were stellate lacerations, puncture wounds, mammalian bites, infected, heavily contaminated or devitalized, crossing joints or mucocutaneous junctions, in hair-bearing areas, or in patients with keloid formation or chronic illness. The characteristics of the study and participants, interventions, outcome measures, and findings were extracted by one author and verified by a second

  8. Adhesive performance of precoated brackets after expiration.

    Cloud, Cayce C; Trojan, Terry M; Suliman, Sam N; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate adhesive performance in terms of debonding forces of precoated metal and ceramic brackets 4 years after expiration. Buccal and lingual surfaces of embedded extracted maxillary premolars were etched with 34% Tooth Conditioner Gel (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del), rinsed, and dried. Transbond MIP (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) was applied prior to placing adhesive precoated brackets (APC II Victory stainless steel and APC Plus Clarity ceramic brackets, 3M Unitek). The preexpiration brackets had 29-35 months before, and the postexpiration brackets were 45-52 months past, their expiration dates. Sample size was 17-21 per group. Debonding forces were determined by subjecting the bonded brackets to a shear force in a universal testing machine. Debonding forces were compared using two-way ANOVA. Debonded surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine failure modes, which were compared using the chi-square test. No statistically significant difference was found in debonding forces (P  =  .8581) or failure modes (P  =  .4538) between expired and unexpired brackets. Metal brackets required statistically significantly higher debonding forces than did ceramic brackets (P  =  .0001). For both expired and unexpired brackets, failure modes were mostly cohesive in the adhesive layer for ceramic brackets, and mixed between adhesive and cohesive failure in the adhesive layer for metal brackets. Adhesive precoated brackets did not have any reduction in enamel-adhesion properties up to 4 years after their expiration date. Extended shelf life testing for precoated dental brackets may be worth considering.

  9. ADSORPTION OF CIPROFLOXACIN TO URINARY CATHETERS AND EFFECT ON SUBSEQUENT BACTERIAL ADHESION AND SURVIVAL

    REID, G; TIESZER, C; FOERCH, R; BUSSCHER, HJ; KHOURY, AE; BRUCE, AW

    1993-01-01

    The preincubation of urinary catheter material with minimum inhibitory and sub-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin caused a significant reduction in the adhesion of viable uropathogenic Escherichia coli subsequently exposed to the surfaces for periods of 1, 12, 24 and 48 h. In addition, the

  10. Nonsuturing or Skin Adhesives versus Suturing of the Perineal Skin After Childbirth: A Systematic Review

    Seijmonsbergen-Schermers, A.E.; Sahami, S.; Lucas, C.; de Jonge, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Suturing of perineal trauma after childbirth can cause problems such as pain, discomfort because of tight sutures, the need for suture removal, and dyspareunia. It is unclear whether leaving the perineal skin unsutured or using skin adhesives might prevent these problems. Methods:

  11. Nonsuturing or Skin Adhesives versus Suturing of the Perineal Skin After Childbirth: A Systematic Review

    Seijmonsbergen-Schermers, Anna E.; Sahami, Saloomeh; Lucas, Cees; Jonge, Ank de

    2015-01-01

    Suturing of perineal trauma after childbirth can cause problems such as pain, discomfort because of tight sutures, the need for suture removal, and dyspareunia. It is unclear whether leaving the perineal skin unsutured or using skin adhesives might prevent these problems. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE,

  12. Development of biodegradable hyper-branched tissue adhesives for the repair of meniscus tears

    Bochynska, A. I.; Van Tienen, T. G.; Hannink, G.; Buma, P.; Grijpma, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus tears are one of the most commonly occurring injuries of the knee joint. Current meniscus repair techniques are challenging and do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are a promising alternative, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. In this study,

  13. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  14. Adhesion and adhesion changes at the copper metal-(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) polymer interface

    Kisin, S.; Varst, van der P.G.T.; With, de G.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the adhesive strength of metallic films on polymer substrates often changes in the course of time. To study this effect in more detail, the adhesion energy of sputtered and galvanically strengthened copper coatings on acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene polymer substrate was determined

  15. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  16. Focal adhesion kinase maintains, but not increases the adhesion of dental pulp cells.

    Qian, Yuyan; Shao, Meiying; Zou, Wenlin; Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Ran; Hu, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as a key enzyme in the integrin-mediated adhesion-signalling pathway. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of FAK on adhesion of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. We transfected lentiviral vectors to silence or overexpress FAK in HDP cells ex vivo. Early cell adhesion, cell survival and focal contacts (FCs)-related proteins (FAK and paxillin) were examined. By using immunofluorescence, the formation of FCs and cytoskeleton was detected, respectively. We found that both adhesion and survival of HDP cells were suppressed by FAK inhibition. However, FAK overexpression slightly inhibited cell adhesion and exhibited no change in cell survival compared with the control. A thick rim of cytoskeleton accumulated and smaller dot-shaped FCs appeared in FAK knockdown cells. Phosphorylation of paxillin (p-paxillin) was inhibited in FAK knockdown cells, verifying that the adhesion was inhibited. Less cytoskeleton and elongated FCs were observed in FAK-overexpressed cells. However, p-paxillin had no significant difference compared with the control. In conclusion, the data suggest that FAK maintains cell adhesion, survival and cytoskeleton formation, but excessive FAK has no positive effects on these aspects.

  17. Oral traditional Chinese medication for adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    Suo, Tao; Gu, Xixi; Andersson, Roland; Ma, Huaixing; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Boheng; Cai, Dingfang; Qin, Xinyu

    2012-05-16

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is one of the most common emergent complications of general surgery. Intra-abdominal adhesions are the leading cause of SBO. Because surgery can induce new adhesions, non-operative management is preferred in the absence of signs of peritonitis or strangulation. Oral traditional Chinese herbal medicine has long been used as a non-operative therapy to treat adhesive SBO in China. Many controlled trials have been conducted to investigate its therapeutic value in resolving adhesive SBO. The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy and safety of oral traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for adhesive small bowel obstruction. We searched the following databases, without regard to language or publishing restrictions: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure/Chinese Academic Journals full-text Database (CNKI), and VIP (a full-text database of Chinese journals). The searches were conducted in November 2011. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing Chinese medicines administered orally, via the gastric canal, or both with a placebo or conventional therapy in participants diagnosed with adhesive SBO were considered. We also considered trials of TCM (oral administration, gastric tube perfusion, or both) plus conventional therapy compared with conventional therapy alone for patients with adhesive SBO. Studies addressing the safety and efficacy of oral traditional Chinese medicinal agents in the treatment of adhesive SBO were also considered. Two authors collected the data independently. We assessed the risk of bias according to the following methodological criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. Dichotomous data are presented as risk ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI

  18. Adhesive pad differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster depends on the Polycomb group gene Su(z)2.

    Hüsken, Mirko; Hufnagel, Kim; Mende, Katharina; Appel, Esther; Meyer, Heiko; Peisker, Henrik; Tögel, Markus; Wang, Shuoshuo; Wolff, Jonas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Paululat, Achim

    2015-04-15

    The ability of many insects to walk on vertical smooth surfaces such as glass or even on the ceiling has fascinated biologists for a long time, and has led to the discovery of highly specialized adhesive organs located at the distal end of the animals' legs. So far, research has primarily focused on structural and ultrastructural investigations leading to a deeper understanding of adhesive organ functionality and to the development of new bioinspired materials. Genetic approaches, e.g. the analysis of mutants, to achieve a better understanding of adhesive organ differentiation have not been used so far. Here, we describe the first Drosophila melanogaster mutant that develops malformed adhesive organs, resulting in a complete loss of climbing ability on vertical smooth surfaces. Interestingly, these mutants fail to make close contact between the setal tips and the smooth surface, a crucial condition for wet adhesion mediated by capillary forces. Instead, these flies walk solely on their claws. Moreover, we were able to show that the mutation is caused by a P-element insertion into the Su(z)2 gene locus. Remobilization of the P-element restores climbing ability. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the P-element insertion results in an artificial Su(z)2 transcript, which most likely causes a gain-of-function mutation. We presume that this transcript causes deregulation of yet unknown target genes involved in pulvilli differentiation. Our results nicely demonstrate that the genetically treatable model organism Drosophila is highly suitable for future investigations on adhesive organ differentiation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Endothelial cell adhesion to ion implanted polymers

    Suzuki, Y; Kusakabe, M [SONY Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Lee, J S; Kaibara, M; Iwaki, M; Sasabe, H [RIKEN (Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research), Saitama (Japan)

    1992-03-01

    The biocompatibility of ion implanted polymers has been studied by means of adhesion measurements of bovine aorta endothelial cells in vitro. The specimens used were polystyrene (PS) and segmented polyurethane (SPU). Na{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +} and Kr{sup +} ion implantations were performed at an energy of 150 keV with fluences ranging from 1x10{sup 15} to 3x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The chemical and physical structures of ion-implanted polymers have been investigated in order to analyze their tissue compatibility such as improvement of endothelial cell adhesion. The ion implanted SPU have been found to exhibit remarkably higher adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells than unimplanted specimens. By contrast, ion implanted PS demonstrated a little improvement of adhesion of cells in this assay. Results of FT-IR-ATR showed that ion implantation broke the original chemical bond to form new radicals such as OH, ....C=O, SiH and condensed rings. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that ion implantation always produced a peak near 1500 cm{sup -1}, which indicated that these ion implanted PS and SPU had the same carbon structure. This structure is considered to bring the dramatic increase in the extent of cell adhesion and spreading to these ion implanted PS and SPU. (orig.).

  20. Dextran and gelatin based photocrosslinkable tissue adhesive.

    Wang, Tao; Nie, Jun; Yang, Dongzhi

    2012-11-06

    A two-component tissue adhesive based on biocompatible and bio-degradable polymers (oxidized urethane dextran (Dex-U-AD) and gelatin) was prepared and photocrosslinked under the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The adhesive could adhere to surface of gelatin, which simulated the human tissue steadily. The structures of above Dex-U-AD were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and XRD. The adhesion property of result products was evaluated by lap-shear test. The maximum adhesion strength could reach to 4.16±0.72 MPa which was significantly higher than that of fibrin glue. The photopolymerization process of Dex-U-AD/gelatin was monitored by real time infrared spectroscopy (RTIR). It took less than 5 min to complete the curing process. The cytotoxicity of Dex-U-AD/gelatin also was evaluated which indicated that Dex-U-AD/gelatin gels were nontoxic to L929 cell. The relationship between all the above-mentioned properties and degree of oxidization of Dex-U-AD was assessed. The obtained products have the potential to serve as tissue adhesive in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Segmental jejunal entrapment, volvulus, and strangulation secondary to intra-abdominal adhesions in a dog.

    Di Cicco, Michael F; Bennett, R Avery; Ragetly, Chantal; Sippel, Kate M

    2011-01-01

    A 4 yr old, castrated male dachshund was presented for lethargy, restlessness, a "hunched" posture, and a painful abdomen. A gastric foreign body had been surgically removed 24 mo previously. Exploratory celiotomy revealed a devitalized segment of jejunum with twisted mesentery. Several adhesions and fibrous bands were present within the abdomen, presumptively from the previous gastric foreign body surgery. Histopathology determined that a fibrous tissue band caused entrapment of the segment of intestine and its mesentery resulting in volvulus and ischemic necrosis of the intestine. This case is unique because it involved a focal area of the jejunum that was incarcerated in fibrous adhesions.

  2. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-06

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial adhesion to unworn and worn silicone hydrogel lenses.

    Vijay, Ajay Kumar; Zhu, Hua; Ozkan, Jerome; Wu, Duojia; Masoudi, Simin; Bandara, Rani; Borazjani, Roya N; Willcox, Mark D P

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the bacterial adhesion to various silicone hydrogel lens materials and to determine whether lens wear modulated adhesion. Bacterial adhesion (total and viable cells) of Staphylococcus aureus (31, 38, and ATCC 6538) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6294, 6206, and GSU-3) to 10 commercially available different unworn and worn silicone hydrogel lenses was measured. Results of adhesion were correlated to polymer and surface properties of contact lenses. S. aureus adhesion to unworn lenses ranged from 2.8 × 10 to 4.4 × 10 colony forming units per lens. The highest adhesion was to lotrafilcon A lenses, and the lowest adhesion was to asmofilcon A lenses. P. aeruginosa adhesion to unworn lenses ranged from 8.9 × 10 to 3.2 × 10 colony forming units per lens. The highest adhesion was to comfilcon A lenses, and the lowest adhesion was to asmofilcon A and balafilcon A lenses. Lens wear altered bacterial adhesion, but the effect was specific to lens and strain type. Adhesion of bacteria, regardless of genera/species or lens wear, was generally correlated with the hydrophobicity of the lens; the less hydrophobic the lens surface, the greater the adhesion. P. aeruginosa adhered in higher numbers to lenses in comparison with S. aureus strains, regardless of the lens type or lens wear. The effect of lens wear was specific to strain and lens. Hydrophobicity of the silicone hydrogel lens surface influenced the adhesion of bacterial cells.

  4. Evaluation of adhesion forces of Staphylococcus aureus along the length of Candida albicans hyphae.

    Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Krom, Bastiaan P; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2012-11-27

    Candida albicans is a human fungal pathogen, able to cause both superficial and serious, systemic diseases and is able to switch from yeast cells to long, tube-like hyphae, depending on the prevailing environmental conditions. Both morphological forms of C. albicans are found in infected tissue, often in combination with Staphylococcus aureus. Although bacterial adhesion to the different morphologies of C. albicans has been amply studied, possible differences in staphylococcal adhesion forces along the length of C. albicans hyphae have never been determined. In this study, we aim to verify the hypothesis that the forces mediating S. aureus NCTC8325-4GFP adhesion to hyphae vary along the length of C. albicans SC5314 and MB1 hyphae, as compared with adhesion to yeast cells. C. albicans hyphae were virtually divided into a "tip" (the growing and therefore youngest part of the hyphae), a "middle" and a so-called "head" region (the yeast cell from which germination started). Adhesion forces between S. aureus NCTC8325-4GFP and the different regions of C. albicans SC5314 hyphae were measured using atomic force microscopy. Strong adhesion forces were found at the tip and middle regions of C. albicans hyphae (-4.1 nN and -4.0 nN, respectively), while much smaller adhesion forces were measured at the head region (-0.3 nN). Adhesion forces exerted by the head region were comparable with the forces arising from budding yeast cells (-0.5 nN). A similar regional dependence of the staphylococcal adhesion forces was found for the clinical isolate involved in this study, C. albicans MB1. This is the first time that differences in adhesion forces between S. aureus and different regions of C. albicans hyphae have been demonstrated on a quantitative basis, supporting the view that the head region is different from the remainder of the hyphae. Notably it can be concluded that the properties of the hyphal head region are similar to those of budding yeast cells. These novel findings

  5. Apparatus for Removing Remaining Adhesives of Filter

    Kang, Il Sik; Kim, Tae Kuk; Hong, Dae Seok; Ji, Young Yong; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2010-01-01

    A Large amount of ventilation filter was used at radiation areas not only in nuclear power plants but also in nuclear facilities. These spent ventilation filters are generated as radioactive waste and composed of a steel frame, glass fiber media and aluminum separator. When treated, the spent filter is separated into filter media for air purification and frame. After separation, while the filter media is collected using steel drum for reducing internal exposure, the filter frame is treated further to remove adhesives for recycling the frame as many as possible in order to reduce waste and cost and improve working conditions. Usually, the adhesives are separated from the filter frame manually. As a result, a lot of time and labor is required. So, the objective of this study is to develop a motor-driven apparatus for removing adhesives efficiently

  6. Prevention of root caries with dentin adhesives.

    Grogono, A L; Mayo, J A

    1994-04-01

    This in vitro investigation determined the feasibility of using dentin adhesives to protect root surfaces against caries. The roots of 22 recently extracted human teeth were all painted with a protective lacquer leaving two unprotected small windows. On each specimen, one window (control) was left untreated and the other window (experimental) was treated using a dentin adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). The roots were then immersed in an in vitro acetate/calcium/phosphate demineralization model at pH 4.3. After 70 days, the samples were removed and sectioned through the windows. The undecalcified ground sections were examined under transmitted and polarized light. Lesions characteristic of natural root caries were seen in the untreated control windows. No such lesions were apparent in the experimental windows. The results of this preliminary study suggest that dentin adhesives may provide protection against root caries.

  7. Melting Can Hinder Impact-Induced Adhesion

    Hassani-Gangaraj, Mostafa; Veysset, David; Nelson, Keith A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2017-10-01

    Melting has long been used to join metallic materials, from welding to selective laser melting in additive manufacturing. In the same school of thought, localized melting has been generally perceived as an advantage, if not the main mechanism, for the adhesion of metallic microparticles to substrates during a supersonic impact. Here, we conduct the first in situ supersonic impact observations of individual metallic microparticles aimed at the explicit study of melting effects. Counterintuitively, we find that under at least some conditions melting is disadvantageous and hinders impact-induced adhesion. In the parameter space explored, i.e., ˜10 μ m particle size and ˜1 km /s particle velocity, we argue that the solidification time is much longer than the residence time of the particle on the substrate, so that resolidification cannot be a significant factor in adhesion.

  8. [Effects of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on the root surfaces and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans].

    Yuanhong, Li; Zhongcheng, Li; Mengqi, Luo; Daonan, Shen; Shu, Zhang; Shu, Meng

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of treatment with different powers of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on root surfaces and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adhesion. Extracted teeth because of severe periodontal disease were divided into the following four groups: control group, laser group 1, laser group 2, and laser group 3. After scaling and root planning, laser group 1, laser group 2, and laser group 3 were separately treated with Nd: YAG laser irradiation (4/6/8 W, 60 s); however, the control group did not receive the treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the morphology. S. mutans were cultured with root slices from each group. Colony forming unit per mL (CFU·mL⁻¹) was used to count and compare the amounts of bacteria adhesion among groups. SEM was used to observe the difference of bacteria adhesion to root surfaces between control group (scaling) and laser group 2 (6 W, 60 s), thereby indicating the different bacteria adhesions because of different treatments. Morphology alterations indicated that root surfaces in control group contain obvious smear layer, debris, and biofilm; whereas the root surfaces in laser group contain more cracks with less smear layer and debris. The bacteria counting indicated that S. mutans adhesion to laser group was weaker than that of control group (P0.05) was observed. Morphology alterations also verified that S. mutans adhesion to laser group 2 (6 W, 60 s) was weaker than that of control group (scaling). This study demonstrated that Nd: YAG laser irradiation treatment after scaling can reduce smear layer, debris, and biofilm on the root surfaces as compared with conventional scaling. The laser treatment reduces the adhesion of S. mutans as well. However, Nd: YAG laser irradiation can cause cracks on the root surfaces. In this experiment, the optimum laser power of 6 W can thoroughly remove the smear layer and debris, as well as relatively improve the control of thermal damagee.

  9. Exploring the elasticity and adhesion behavior of cardiac fibroblasts by atomic force microscopy indentation

    Codan, B.; Del Favero, G. [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy); Martinelli, V. [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy); International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy); Long, C.S.; Mestroni, L. [University of Colorado Cardiovascular Institute, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Sbaizero, O., E-mail: sbaizero@units.it [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    AFM was used to collect the whole force–deformation cell curves. They provide both the elasticity and adhesion behavior of mouse primary cardiac fibroblasts. To confirm the hypothesis that a link exists between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments causing therefore changing in both elasticity and adhesion behavior, actin-destabilizing Cytochalsin D was administrated to the fibroblasts. From immunofluorescence observation and AFM loading/unloading curves, cytoskeletal reorganization as well as a change in the elasticity and adhesion was indeed observed. Elasticity of control fibroblasts is three times higher than that for fibroblasts treated with 0.5 μM Cytochalasin. Moreover, AFM loading–unloading curves clearly show the different mechanical behavior of the two different cells analyzed: (i) for control cells the AFM cantilever rises during the dwell time while cells with Cytochalasin fail to show such an active resistance; (ii) the maximum force to deform control cells is quite higher and as far as adhesion is concern (iii) the maximum separation force, detachment area and the detachment process time are much larger for control compared to the Cytochalasin treated cells. Therefore, alterations in the cytoskeleton suggest that a link must exist between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments beneath the cellular surface and inhibition of actin polymerization has effects on the whole cell mechanical behavior as well as adhesion. - Highlights: • The whole AFM force–deformation cell curves were analyzed. • They provide information on both the elasticity and adhesion behavior. • Actin-destabilizing Cytochalasin D was administrated to the fibroblasts. • Change in elasticity and adhesion was ascribed to cytoskeletal reorganization. • A link exists between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments.

  10. Exploring the elasticity and adhesion behavior of cardiac fibroblasts by atomic force microscopy indentation

    Codan, B.; Del Favero, G.; Martinelli, V.; Long, C.S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2014-01-01

    AFM was used to collect the whole force–deformation cell curves. They provide both the elasticity and adhesion behavior of mouse primary cardiac fibroblasts. To confirm the hypothesis that a link exists between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments causing therefore changing in both elasticity and adhesion behavior, actin-destabilizing Cytochalsin D was administrated to the fibroblasts. From immunofluorescence observation and AFM loading/unloading curves, cytoskeletal reorganization as well as a change in the elasticity and adhesion was indeed observed. Elasticity of control fibroblasts is three times higher than that for fibroblasts treated with 0.5 μM Cytochalasin. Moreover, AFM loading–unloading curves clearly show the different mechanical behavior of the two different cells analyzed: (i) for control cells the AFM cantilever rises during the dwell time while cells with Cytochalasin fail to show such an active resistance; (ii) the maximum force to deform control cells is quite higher and as far as adhesion is concern (iii) the maximum separation force, detachment area and the detachment process time are much larger for control compared to the Cytochalasin treated cells. Therefore, alterations in the cytoskeleton suggest that a link must exist between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments beneath the cellular surface and inhibition of actin polymerization has effects on the whole cell mechanical behavior as well as adhesion. - Highlights: • The whole AFM force–deformation cell curves were analyzed. • They provide information on both the elasticity and adhesion behavior. • Actin-destabilizing Cytochalasin D was administrated to the fibroblasts. • Change in elasticity and adhesion was ascribed to cytoskeletal reorganization. • A link exists between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments

  11. A MAM7 peptide-based inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion does not interfere with in vitro host cell function.

    Catherine Alice Hawley

    Full Text Available Adhesion inhibitors that block the attachment of pathogens to host tissues may be used synergistically with or as an alternative to antibiotics. The wide-spread bacterial adhesin Multivalent Adhesion Molecule (MAM 7 has recently emerged as a candidate molecule for a broad-spectrum adhesion inhibitor which may be used to prevent bacterial colonization of wounds. Here we have tested if the antibacterial properties of a MAM-based inhibitor could be used to competitively inhibit adhesion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to host cells. Additionally, we analyzed its effect on host cellular functions linked to the host receptor fibronectin, such as migration, adhesion and matrix formation in vitro, to evaluate potential side effects prior to advancing our studies to in vivo infection models. As controls, we used inhibitors based on well-characterized bacterial adhesin-derived peptides from F1 and FnBPA, which are known to affect host cellular functions. Inhibitors based on F1 or FnBPA blocked MRSA attachment but at the same time abrogated important cellular functions. A MAM7-based inhibitor did not interfere with host cell function while showing good efficacy against MRSA adhesion in a tissue culture model. These observations provide a possible candidate for a bacterial adhesion inhibitor that does not cause adverse effects on host cells while preventing bacterial infection.

  12. Effect of different air-drying time on the microleakage of single-step self-etch adhesives

    Horieh Moosavi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three different air-drying times on microleakage of three self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Class I cavities were prepared for 108 extracted sound human premolars. The teeth were divided into three main groups based on three different adhesives: Opti Bond All in One (OBAO, Clearfil S3 Bond (CSB, Bond Force (BF. Each main group divided into three subgroups regarding the air-drying time: without application of air stream, following the manufacturer's instruction, for 10 sec more than manufacturer's instruction. After completion of restorations, specimens were thermocycled and then connected to a fluid filtration system to evaluate microleakage. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-test (α = 0.05. Results The microleakage of all adhesives decreased when the air-drying time increased from 0 sec to manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001. The microleakage of BF reached its lowest values after increasing the drying time to 10 sec more than the manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001. Microleakage of OBAO and CSB was significantly lower compared to BF in all three drying time (p < 0.001. Conclusions Increasing in air-drying time of adhesive layer in one-step self-etch adhesives caused reduction of microleakage, but the amount of this reduction may be dependent on the adhesive components of self-etch adhesives.

  13. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of [ 3 H]serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of 125 I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF

  14. Investigation Of Adhesion Formation In New Stainless Steel Trim Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    Gross, Robert E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Bukowski, Julia V. [Villanova University, Villanova, PA (United States); Goble, William M. [exida, Sellersville, PA (United States)

    2013-04-16

    Examination of proof test data for new (not previously installed) stainless steel (SS) trim spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) reveals that adhesions form between the seat and disc in about 46% of all such SOPRV. The forces needed to overcome these adhesions can be sufficiently large to cause the SOPRV to fail its proof test (FPT) prior to installation. Furthermore, a significant percentage of SOPRV which are found to FPT are also found to ''fail to open'' (FTO) meaning they would not relief excess pressure in the event of an overpressure event. The cases where adhesions result in FTO or FPT appear to be confined to SOPRV with diameters < 1 in and set pressures < 150 psig and the FTO are estimated to occur in 0.31% to 2.00% of this subpopulation of SS trim SOPRV. The reliability and safety implications of these finding for end-users who do not perform pre-installation testing of SOPRV are discussed.

  15. The Mechanisms of Adhesion of Enteromorpha Clathrata.

    1982-08-24

    extracellular polymer was responsible for adhesion to a substrate (21,23,26,39,40,42,59,62,63,74,78, 86,91). The adhesion of Chlorella vulgaris may also depend...marine Chlorella vulgaris to glass. Can. J. Microbiol. 21:1025-1031. 88. Van Baalen, C., 1962. Studies on marine blue-green .4 algae. Bot. Mar. 4:129...also been observed with the unicellular green alga, Chlorella (68). Other negatively charged groups that could be present are phosphatidic groups (46

  16. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...... in cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton. If the proteins involved in tethering cells to the extracellular matrix are important in conferring drug resistance, it may be possible to improve chemotherapy by designing drugs that target these proteins....

  17. Bilateral contact problem with adhesion and damage

    Adel Aissaoui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We study a mathematical problem describing the frictionless adhesive contact between a viscoelastic material with damage and a foundation. The adhesion process is modeled by a bonding field on the contact surface. The contact is bilateral and the tangential shear due to the bonding field is included. We establish a variational formulation for the problem and prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution. The existence of a unique weak solution for the problem is established using arguments of nonlinear evolution equations with monotone operators, a classical existence and uniqueness result for parabolic inequalities, and Banach's fixed point theorem.

  18. Reversible low adhesive to high adhesive superhydrophobicity transition on ZnO nanoparticle surfaces

    Li, Jian; Jing, Zhijiao; Yang, Yaoxia; Zha, Fei; Yan, Long; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces with water contact angle of 162° and sliding angle of 2° were fabricated successfully by spraying hydrophobic ZnO nanoparticle suspensions without limitations the shape and size of substrates. The as-prepared superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces are low adhesive and a water droplet easily rolls off with the surface slightly tilted. However, after being irradiated by UV light through a photomask, it becomes highly adhesive, on which a water droplet is firmly pinned without any movement. Further annealing the irradiated film, water droplets can roll off the surface again. Reversible transition between the low adhesive rolling state and high adhesive pinning state can be realized simply by UV illumination and heat treatment alternately. At the same time, the maximum adhesive force between the superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces and the water droplet changes from extreme low (∼5.1 μN) to very high (∼136.1 μN). When irradiated without a photomask, the surface became hydrophilic. Additionally, a water droplet can be transfered from the low adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces to the hydrophilic ZnO surfaces using the high adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces as a mechanical hand.

  19. Adhesive properties and adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites

    Rudawska, Anna; Stančeková, Dana; Cubonova, Nadezda; Vitenko, Tetiana; Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of experimental research of the adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites and the results of the surface free energy of the composite surfaces. Two types of graphite/epoxy composites with different thickness were tested which are used to aircraft structure. The single-lap adhesive joints of epoxy composites were considered. Adhesive properties were described by surface free energy. Owens-Wendt method was used to determine surface free energy. The epoxy two-component adhesive was used to preparing the adhesive joints. Zwick/Roell 100 strength device were used to determination the shear strength of adhesive joints of epoxy composites. The strength test results showed that the highest value was obtained for adhesive joints of graphite-epoxy composite of smaller material thickness (0.48 mm). Statistical analysis of the results obtained, the study showed statistically significant differences between the values of the strength of the confidence level of 0.95. The statistical analysis of the results also showed that there are no statistical significant differences in average values of surface free energy (0.95 confidence level). It was noted that in each of the results the dispersion component of surface free energy was much greater than polar component of surface free energy.

  20. Tuneable nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrate for improved cellular adhesion.

    Nicolini, Ariana M; Toth, Tyler D; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a novel technique using a reverse potential electrospinning mode for fabricating nanoparticle-embedded composites that can be tailored to represent various fiber diameters, surface morphologies, and functional groups necessary for improved cellular adhesion. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun in both traditional positive (PP) and reverse potential (RP) electrical fields. The fibers were incorporated with 300nm polystyrene (PS) fluorescent particles, which contained carboxyl, amine groups, and surfactants. In the unconventional RP, the charged colloidal particles and surfactants were shown to have an exaggerated effect on Taylor cone morphology and fiber diameter caused by the changes in charge density and surface tension of the bulk solution. The RP mode was shown to lead to a decrease in fiber diameter from 1200±100nm (diameter±SE) for the nanofibers made with PCL alone to 440±80nm with the incorporation of colloidal particles, compared to the PP mode ranging from 530±90nm to 350±50nm, respectively. The nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrates were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and evaluated for cellular viability and adhesion for up to 5 days. Adhesion to the nanofibrous substrates was improved by 180±10% with the addition of carboxylated particles and by 480±60% with the functionalization of an RGD ligand compared to the PCL nanofibers. The novel approach of electrospinning in the RP mode with the addition of colloids in order to alter charge density and surface tension could be utilized towards many applications, one being implantable biomaterials and tissue engineered scaffolds as demonstrated in this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Strength and failure analysis of composite-to-composite adhesive bonds with different surface treatments

    Paranjpe, Nikhil; Alamir, Mohammed; Alonayni, Abdullah; Asmatulu, Eylem; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2018-03-01

    Adhesives are widely utilized materials in aviation, automotive, energy, defense, and marine industries. Adhesive joints are gradually supplanting mechanical fasteners because they are lightweight structures, thus making the assembly lighter and easier. They also act as a sealant to prevent a structural joint from galvanic corrosion and leakages. Adhesive bonds provide high joint strength because of the fact that the load is distributed uniformly on the joint surface, while in mechanical joints, the load is concentrated at one point, thus leading to stress at that point and in turn causing joint failures. This research concentrated on the analysis of bond strength and failure loads in adhesive joint of composite-to-composite surfaces. Different durations of plasma along with the detergent cleaning were conducted on the composite surfaces prior to the adhesive applications and curing processes. The joint strength of the composites increased about 34% when the surface was plasma treated for 12 minutes. It is concluded that the combination of different surface preparations, rather than only one type of surface treatment, provides an ideal joint quality for the composites.

  2. A protocadherin-cadherin-FLRT3 complex controls cell adhesion and morphogenesis.

    Xuejun Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC and fibronectin leucine-rich domain transmembrane protein-3 (FLRT3 are induced by TGFbeta signaling in Xenopus embryos and both regulate morphogenesis by inhibiting C-cadherin mediated cell adhesion.We have investigated the functional and physical relationships between PAPC, FLRT3, and C-cadherin. Although neither PAPC nor FLRT3 are required for each other to regulate C-cadherin adhesion, they do interact functionally and physically, and they form a complex with cadherins. By itself PAPC reduces cell adhesion physiologically to induce cell sorting, while FLRT3 disrupts adhesion excessively to cause cell dissociation. However, when expressed together PAPC limits the cell dissociating and tissue disrupting activity of FLRT3 to make it effective in physiological cell sorting. PAPC counteracts FLRT3 function by inhibiting the recruitment of the GTPase RND1 to the FLRT3 cytoplasmic domain.PAPC and FLRT3 form a functional complex with cadherins and PAPC functions as a molecular "governor" to maintain FLRT3 activity at the optimal level for physiological regulation of C-cadherin adhesion, cell sorting, and morphogenesis.

  3. Methylene blue 1% solution on the prevention of intraperitoneal adhesion formation in a dog model

    Marco Augusto Machado Silva

    Full Text Available Intraperitoneal adhesions usually are formed after abdominal surgeries and may cause technical difficulties during surgical intervention, chronic abdominal pain and severe obstructions of the gastrointestinal tract. The current study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of methylene blue (MB 1% solution on the prevention of intraperitoneal postsurgical adhesion formation in a canine surgical trauma model. Twenty bitches were submitted to falciform ligament resection, omentectomy, ovariohysterectomy and scarification of a colonic segment. Prior to abdominal closure, 10 bitches received 1mg kg-1 MB intraperitoneally (MB group and 10 bitches received no treatment (control group, CT. On the 15th postoperative day the bitches were submitted to laparoscopy to assess adhesions. The mean adhesion scores were 13.9 (±5.6 for MB group and 20.5 (±6.4 for the CT group (P=0,043. In conclusion, the 1% MB solution was efficient on the prevention of intraperitoneal postoperative adhesion formation in bitches, especially those involving the colonic serosa.

  4. Effect of aging and adhesive durability on panel plywood of the old living hut built in 1969 at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    Hirotsugu Sekiguchi

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available We herein report on an evaluation of durability of plywood of the old living hut built in 1969 brought back to Japan in terms of adhesiveness as well as adhesive strength between of wooden frame and plywood. Measuring water absorption percentage of test samples taken from wooden panel, we tested on adhesive bonding between veneers and compressed shearing of plywood and wooden frame ,and then measure their adhesive bonding. As a result, we conclude that plywood used for interior obtains high adhesive strength due to low water absorption percentage of the plywood on the other hand, the absorption strength of plywood for exterior is remarkably weakened because of the high water absorption percentage. In addition to that, since adhesive strength between panel plywood and wooden frame is stronger than that of between veneers, epoxy resin is suitable, yet we recognized that adhesion specs on metal panel for exterior should be reviewed in future. After all, weakened adhesive strength of plywood is mainly caused by moisture content in the plywood, and in order to improve panel durability, it is necessary to prevent wooden materials from rising moisture content with countermeasures of incoming of snow melting water, anti-condensation , and anti-rust of steel plate for exterior wall, as well as improve performance of water resisting adhesive.

  5. Aluminum and steel adhesion with polyurethanes from castor oil adhesives submitted to gamma irradiation

    Azevedo, Elaine C.; Assumpcao, Roberto L.; Nascimento, Eduardo M. do; Claro Neto, Salvador; Soboll, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes adhesive from castor oil is used to join aluminum and steel pieces. The effect of gamma radiation on the resistance to tension tests is investigated. The aluminum and steel pieces after being glued with the adhesive were submitted to gamma irradiation in doses of 1 kGy, 25 kGy and 100 kGy. The rupture strength of the joints after irradiation have a slightly increase or remains practically unchanged indicating that the adhesive properties is not affected by the gamma radiation. (author)

  6. Impairment of lymphocyte adhesion to cultured fibroblasts and endothelial cells by γ-irradiation

    Piela-Smith, T.H.; Aneiro, L.; Nuveen, E.; Korn, J.H.; Aune, T.

    1992-01-01

    A critical component of immune responsiveness is the localization of effector cells at sites of inflammatory lesions. Adhesive molecules that may play a role in this process have been described on the surfaces of both lymphocytes and connective tissue cells. Adhesive interactions of T lymphocytes with fibroblasts or endothelial cells can be inhibited by preincubation of the fibroblasts or endothelial cells with antibody to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54) or by preincubation of the T cells with antibody to lymphocyte function-associated Ag 1 (CD11a/CD18), molecules shown to be important in several other cell-cell adhesion interactions. Here the authors show that γ-irradiation of human T lymphocytes impaired their ability to adhere to both fibroblasts and endothelial cells. This impairment was not associated with a loss of cell viability or of cell surface lymphocyte function-associated Ag 1 expression. γ-Irradiation of T cells is known to result in the activation of ADP-ribosyltransferase, an enzyme involved in DNA strand-break repair, causing subsequent depletion of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) pools by increasing NAD consumption for poly(ADP-ribose) formation. Preincubation of T cells with either nicotinamide or 3-aminobenzamide, both known inhibitors of ADP-ribosyltransferase, completely reversed the suppressive effects of γ-irradiation on T cell adhesion. The maintenance of adhesion was accompanied by inhibition of irradiation-induced depletion of cellular NAD. These experiments suggest that the impairment of cellular immune function after irradiation in vivo may be caused, in part, by defective T cell emigration and localization at inflammatory sites. 44 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Evaluation of the Communication Between Arachnoid Cysts and Neighboring Cerebrospinal Fluid Spaces by T2W 3D-SPACE With Variant Flip-Angle Technique at 3 T.

    Algin, Oktay

    2018-05-21

    Phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is a widely used technique for determination of possible communication of arachnoid cysts (ACs). Three-dimensional (3D) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (3D-SPACE) technique is a relatively new method for 3D isotropic scanning of the entire cranium within a short time. In this research, the usage of the 3D-SPACE technique in differentiation of communicating or noncommunicating type ACs was evaluated. Thirty-five ACs in 34 patients were retrospectively examined. The 3D-SPACE, PC-MRI, and contrast material-enhanced cisternography (if present) images of the patients were analyzed. Each cyst was described according to cyst size/location, third ventricle diameter, Evans index, and presence of hydrocephalus. Communication was defined as absent (score 0), suspected (score 1), or present (score 2) on each sequence. Results of PC-MRI or cisternography (if available) examinations were used as criterion standard techniques to categorize all cysts as communicating or noncommunicating type. The results of 3D-SPACE were compared with criterion standard techniques. The comparisons between groups were performed using Mann-Whitney and Fisher exact tests. For demonstration of communication status of the cysts, criterion standard test results and 3D-SPACE findings were almost in perfect harmony (κ[95% confidence interval: 0.94]; P SPACE findings correlated with other final results at a rate of 97%. There is a positive correlation with third ventricular diameters and Evans index for all patients (r = 0.77, P SPACE technique is an easy, useful, and noninvasive alternative for the evaluation of morphology, topographical relationships, and communication status of ACs.

  8. ADHESION OF BIOCOMPATIBLE TiNb COATING

    Tomas Kolegar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of a coating with a high quality requires good adhesion of the film to the substrate. The paper deals with the adhesion of biocompatible TiNb coating with different base materials. Several materials such as titanium CP grade 2, titanium alloys Ti6Al4V and stainless steel AISI 316L were measured. Testing samples were made in the shape of small discs. Those samples were coated with a TiNb layer by using the PVD method (magnetron sputtering. Onto the measured layer of TiNb an assistant cylinder was stuck using a high strength epoxy adhesive E1100S. The sample with the assistant cylinder was fixed into a special fixture and the whole assembly underwent pull-off testing for adhesion. The main result of this experiment was determining the strength needed to peel the layer and morphology and size of the breakaway. As a result, we will be able to determine the best base material and conditions where the coating will be remain intact with the base material.

  9. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    TECS

    Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells. A R M YUSOFF*, M N SYAHRUL and K HENKEL. Malaysia Energy Centre, 8th Floor, North Wing, Sapura @ Mines, 7, Jalan Tasik, The Mines Resort City,. 43300 Seri Kembangan, Selangor Darul Ehsan. MS received 11 April 2007. Abstract. A major issue encountered ...

  10. Antibodies against Shigella flexneri adhesion molecule outer ...

    OMP) as an adhesion factor and examine its ability to cross-react with the OMPs of other Shigella species. Methods: OMP was isolated from the bacterium S. flexneri after shaving the pili using a pili bacterial cutter in a solution of 0.5 ...

  11. Microbial adhesion in flow displacement systems

    Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    Flow displacement systems are superior to many other (static) systems for studying microbial adhesion to surfaces because mass transport and prevailing shear conditions can be adequately controlled and notoriously ill-defined slight rinsing steps to remove so-called "loosely adhering organisms" can

  12. Two Models of Adhesive Debonding of Sylgard

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-14

    This report begins with a brief summary of the range of modeling methods used to simulate adhesive debonding. Then the mechanical simulation of the blister debonding test, and the thermomechanical simulation of the potted hemisphere problem are described. For both simulations, details of the chosen modeling techniques, and the reasons for choosing them (and rejecting alternate modeling approaches) will be discussed.

  13. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...

  14. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  15. Photolithography of polytetrafluoroethylene for tailored adhesion

    Rye, R.R.; Martinez, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Irradiation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Mg (Kα) x-rays is shown to protect the surface against the chemical etching steps used to prepare PTFE for adhesion. Pre-irradiated etched samples of PTFE have adhesions strengths of less than 3% of that for non-irradiated etched samples. The major portion of this decrease in adhesion strength occurs for x-ray exposures of less than 10 min ∼4.8 x10 3 mrads) and failure in every case occurs in PTFE and not in the bonded transition region. XPS measurements (20 angstrom sampling depth) show little difference in F content between irradiated and non-irradiated samples, but thermal desorption shows increasing fluorocarbon desorption with irradiation time. These results are consistent with the known radiation chemistry of PTFE. Irradiation produced free radicals lead to branching and/ or cross-linking, and a surface rich in low molecular weight fluorocarbons. The more rigid cross-linked surface is resistant to deep (10,000 angstrom chemical attack and the bond formed is with a surface rich in short chain flurocarbons. Both a thin boundary region and bonding to short chain species is expected to lead to weak adhesive bonding. Electron irradiation is shown to lead to protection against chemical etching comparable to that obtained with X-rays. With electrons one has the patterns with resolution limited by the beam diameter

  16. Radiation polymerized hot melt pressure sensitive adhesives

    Pastor, S.D.; Skoultchi, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    Hot melt pressure sensitive adhesive compositions formed by copolymerizing at least one 3-(chlorinated aryloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl ester of an alpha, beta unsaturated carboxylic acid with acrylate based copolymerizable monomers, are described. The resultant ethylenically saturated prepolymer is heated to a temperature sufficient to render it fluid and flowable. This composition is coated onto a substrate and exposed to ultraviolet radiation

  17. Underwater Adhesives Retrofit Pipelines with Advanced Sensors

    2015-01-01

    Houston-based Astro Technology Inc. used a partnership with Johnson Space Center to pioneer an advanced fiber-optic monitoring system for offshore oil pipelines. The company's underwater adhesives allow it to retrofit older deepwater systems in order to measure pressure, temperature, strain, and flow properties, giving energy companies crucial data in real time and significantly decreasing the risk of a catastrophe.

  18. Adhesive Bioactive Coatings Inspired by Sea Life.

    Rego, Sónia J; Vale, Ana C; Luz, Gisela M; Mano, João F; Alves, Natália M

    2016-01-19

    Inspired by nature, in particular by the marine mussels adhesive proteins (MAPs) and by the tough brick-and-mortar nacre-like structure, novel multilayered films are prepared in the present work. Organic-inorganic multilayered films, with an architecture similar to nacre based on bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG), chitosan, and hyaluronic acid modified with catechol groups, which are the main components responsible for the outstanding adhesion in MAPs, are developed for the first time. The biomimetic conjugate is prepared by carbodiimide chemistry and analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. The buildup of the multilayered films is monitored with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and their topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy. The mechanical properties reveal that the films containing catechol groups and BG present an enhanced adhesion. Moreover, the bioactivity of the films upon immersion in a simulated body fluid solution is evaluated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the constructed films promote the formation of bonelike apatite in vitro. Such multifunctional mussel inspired LbL films, which combine enhanced adhesion and bioactivity, could be potentially used as coatings of a variety of implants for orthopedic applications.

  19. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    2007-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centrefor Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1/2 page)

  20. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    2006-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1 page)

  1. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  2. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering technique. Cubic phase of TiZrN with uniform surface morphology was observed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were ...

  3. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  4. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Brock, Ryan; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Miller, David C.

    2016-06-16

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  5. Role of flexural stiffness of leukocyte microvilli in adhesion dynamics

    Wu, Tai-Hsien; Qi, Dewei

    2018-03-01

    Previous work reported that microvillus deformation has an important influence on dynamics of cell adhesion. However, the existing studies were limited to the extensional deformation of microvilli and did not consider the effects of their bending deformation on cell adhesion. This Rapid Communication investigates the effects of flexural stiffness of microvilli on the rolling process related to adhesion of leukocytes by using a lattice-Boltzmann lattice-spring method (LLM) combined with adhesive dynamics (AD) simulations. The simulation results reveal that the flexural stiffness of microvilli and their bending deformation have a profound effect on rolling velocity and adhesive forces. As the flexural stiffness of the microvilli decreases, their bending angles increase, resulting in an increase in the number of receptor-ligand bonds and adhesive bonding force and a decrease in the rolling velocity of leukocytes. The effects of flexural stiffness on deformation and adhesion represent crucial factors involved in cell adhesion.

  6. Bacterial adhesion to host tissues : mechanisms and consequences

    Wilson, Michael, 1947

    2002-01-01

    "This book is about the adhesion of bacteria to their human hosts. Although adhesion is essential for maintaining members of the normal microflora in/on their host, it is also the crucial first stage in any infectious disease...

  7. Bacterial adhesion of porphyromonas gingivalis on provisional fixed prosthetic materials

    Mustafa Zortuk

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion : The quantity of bacterial adhesion and surface roughness differed among the assessed provisional fixed prosthodontic materials. The light-polymerized provisional material Revotek LC had rougher surface and more bacterial adhesion compared with the others.

  8. Leakage Testing for Different Adhesive Systems and Composites to ...

    2015-11-16

    Nov 16, 2015 ... resin composite, the fifth group – two‑stage SE adhesive applied and cavities filled with ... KEYWORDS: Adhesives, composite, evaluation, leakage ... the glass ionomers. ... systems are realized in one or two clinical step(s).[5].

  9. A Novel Electrostatic/Microstructured Adhesive with Dust Mitigation Capabilities

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work will develop a novel electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive that will demonstrate an order-of-magnitude improvement of electrostatic adhesion pressure coupled...

  10. Development and In vitro Evaluation of Betahistine Adhesive-Type ...

    Purpose: To develop a transdermal betahistine (BTH) delivery system using different pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) including acrylics, polyisobutylene and styrenic rubber solution. Methods: Formulations were prepared by solvent casting and adhesive transfer method. PSAs - acrylate vinylacetate (AVA), hydrophilic ...

  11. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature stable adhesive systems were evaluated for potential Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) vehicle applications. The program was divided into two major phases: Phase I 'Adhesive Screening' evaluated eleven selected polyimide (PI) and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) adhesive resins using eight different titanium (6Al-4V) adherend surface preparations; Phase II 'Adhesive Optimization and Characterization' extensively evaluated two adhesive systems, selected from Phase I studies, for chemical characterization and environmental durability. The adhesive systems which exhibited superior thermal and environmental bond properties were LARC-TPI polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline both developed at NASA Langley. The latter adhesive system did develop bond failures at extended thermal aging due primarily to incompatibility between the surface preparation and the polymer. However, this study did demonstrate that suitable adhesive systems are available for extended supersonic cruise vehicle design applications.

  12. Bisphosphonates enhance bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on bone hydroxyapatite.

    Kos, Marcin; Junka, Adam; Smutnicka, Danuta; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Gluza, Karolina; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna

    2015-07-01

    Because of the suspicion that bisphosphonates enhance bacterial colonization, this study evaluated adhesion and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans 25175, Staphylococcus aureus 6538, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 14454 reference strains on hydroxyapatite coated with clodronate, pamidronate, or zoledronate. Bacterial strains were cultured on bisphosphonate-coated and noncoated hydroxyapatite discs. After incubation, nonadhered bacteria were removed by centrifugation. Biofilm formation was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Bacterial colonization was estimated using quantitative cultures compared by means with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Modeling of the interactions between bisphosphonates and hydroxyapatite was performed using the Density Functional Theory method. Bacterial colonization of the hydroxyapatite discs was significantly higher for all tested strains in the presence of bisphosphonates vs. Adherence in the presence of pamidronate was higher than with other bisphosphonates. Density Functional Theory analysis showed that the protonated amine group of pamidronate, which are not present in clodronate or zoledronate, forms two additional hydrogen bonds with hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the reactive cationic amino group of pamidronate may attract bacteria by direct electrostatic interaction. Increased bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation can promote osteomyelitis, cause failure of dental implants or bisphosphonate-coated joint prostheses, and complicate bone surgery in patients on bisphosphonates. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A clinical evaluation denture adhesives used by patients with xerostomia.

    Bogucki, Zdzislaw A; Napadlek, Piotr; Dabrowa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of study was to analyze the participants' opinions concerning the effectiveness of 6 denture adhesives (DA). The study group included 60 participants. Criteria for selecting the patients were as follows: reduced retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures and xerostomia. These features were evaluated on basis of clinical examination and standard sialometry tests (u-SFR). Retention of maxillary dentures was scored by modified Kapur index before application of DA. All participants were divided randomly into 6 groups regarding the use of the 6 DA during a 6-month period. After this time, participants completed an HRQL questionnaire. DA noticeably improved retention and stabilization of maxillary complete dentures. DA in the glue form had the best retention effectiveness in participants with xerostomia. These materials are difficult to clean from the denture base. The data are presented in tables and figures. The results of the study collected positive influence of adhesives on retention of dentures in xerostomia patients. The cleaning dentures and denture bearing tissues was difficult. DA help in the use of prostheses, but it is also necessary for the treatment of the causes and symptoms of xerostomia.

  14. Calcium-Mediated Adhesion of Nanomaterials in Reservoir Fluids.

    Eichmann, Shannon L; Burnham, Nancy A

    2017-09-14

    Globally, a small percentage of oil is recovered from reservoirs using primary and secondary recovery mechanisms, and thus a major focus of the oil industry is toward developing new technologies to increase recovery. Many new technologies utilize surfactants, macromolecules, and even nanoparticles, which are difficult to deploy in harsh reservoir conditions and where failures cause material aggregation and sticking to rock surfaces. To combat these issues, typically material properties are adjusted, but recent studies show that adjusting the dispersing fluid chemistry could have significant impact on material survivability. Herein, the effect of injection fluid salinity and composition on nanomaterial fate is explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the calcium content in reservoir fluids affects the interactions of an AFM tip with a calcite surface, as surrogates for nanomaterials interacting with carbonate reservoir rock. The extreme force sensitivity of AFM provides the ability to elucidate small differences in adhesion at the pico-Newton (pN) level and provides direct information about material survivability. Increasing the calcium content mitigates adhesion at the pN-scale, a possible means to increase nanomaterial survivability in oil reservoirs or to control nanomaterial fate in other aqueous environments.

  15. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    Persson, B N J

    2007-01-01

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications

  16. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2007-09-19

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications.

  17. Fatigue aging of adhesive bonds

    DeLollis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    A year long study has been made of the effect of fatigue on the bond between two epoxy encapsulant formulations and a fused alumina disc. The variables studied included isothermal aging at temperatures up to and including the cure temperature and cyclic thermal aging from +74 to -54 0 C. The encapsulants were glass microballoon filled epoxies differing only in curing agents. One was cured with an aromatic amine eutectic (Shell Curing Agent Z). The other was cured with diethanolamine. The Z cured encapsulant bond failed completely at the bond interface with little or no aging; infrared evidence indicated a soluble interlayer as a possible cause of failure. The diethanolamine cured encapsulant survived a year of isothermal aging with little or no evidence of bond degradation. Cyclic thermal aging resulted in gradual bond failure with time. An extrapolation of the cyclic aging data indicates that the stresses induced by thermal cycling would result in complete bond failure in about 1200 days

  18. Evidence for van der Waals adhesion in gecko setae

    Autumn, Kellar; Sitti, Metin; Liang, Yiching A.; Peattie, Anne M.; Hansen, Wendy R.; Sponberg, Simon; Kenny, Thomas W.; Fearing, Ronald; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Full, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Geckos have evolved one of the most versatile and effective adhesives known. The mechanism of dry adhesion in the millions of setae on the toes of geckos has been the focus of scientific study for over a century. We provide the first direct experimental evidence for dry adhesion of gecko setae by van der Waals forces, and reject the use of mechanisms relying on high surface polarity, including capillary adhesion. The toes of live Tokay geckos were highly hydrophobic, and adhered equally well ...

  19. Amperometric Adhesion Signals of Liposomes, Cells and Droplets

    Ivošević DeNardis, N.; Žutić, V.; Svetličić, V.; Frkanec, R.

    2009-01-01

    Individual soft microparticles (liposomes, living cells and organic droplets) in aqueous media are characterized by their adhesion signals using amperometry at the dropping mercury electrode. We confirmed that the general mechanism established for adhesion of hydrocarbon droplets and cells is valid as well for liposome adhesion within a wide range of surface charge densities. Incidents and shape of adhesion signals in liposome suspensions reflect liposome polydispersity, surface charge den...

  20. How do liquids confined at the nanoscale influence adhesion?

    Yang, C; Tartaglino, U; Persson, B N J

    2006-01-01

    Liquids play an important role in adhesion and sliding friction. They behave as lubricants in human bodies, especially in the joints. However, in many biological attachment systems they act like adhesives, e.g. facilitating insects to move on ceilings or vertical walls. Here we use molecular dynamics to study how liquids confined at the nanoscale influence the adhesion between solid bodies with smooth and rough surfaces. We show that a monolayer of liquid may strongly affect the adhesion

  1. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    Weber Michael

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m. This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body.

  2. Effects of solvent evaporation time on immediate adhesive properties of universal adhesives to dentin.

    Luque-Martinez, Issis V; Perdigão, Jorge; Muñoz, Miguel A; Sezinando, Ana; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) of three universal or multi-mode adhesives, applied with increasing solvent evaporation times. One-hundred and forty caries-free extracted third molars were divided into 20 groups for bond strength testing, according to three factors: (1) Adhesive - All-Bond Universal (ABU, Bisco, Inc.), Prime&Bond Elect (PBE, Dentsply), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU, 3M ESPE); (2) Bonding strategy - self-etch (SE) or etch-and-rinse (ER); and (3) Adhesive solvent evaporation time - 5s, 15s, and 25s. Two extra groups were prepared with ABU because the respective manufacturer recommends a solvent evaporation time of 10s. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h). Resin-dentin beams (0.8mm(2)) were tested at 0.5mm/min (μTBS). For NL, forty extracted molars were randomly assigned to each of the 20 groups. Dentin disks were restored, immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate, sectioned and processed for evaluation under a FESEM in backscattered mode. Data from μTBS were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (adhesive vs. drying time) for each strategy, and Tukey's test (α=0.05). NL data were computed with non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, α=0.05). Increasing solvent evaporation time from 5s to 25s resulted in statistically higher mean μTBS for all adhesives when used in ER mode. Regarding NL, ER resulted in greater NL than SE for each of the evaporation times regardless of the adhesive used. A solvent evaporation time of 25s resulted in the lowest NL for SBU-ER. Residual water and/or solvent may compromise the performance of universal adhesives, which may be improved with extended evaporation times. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adhesion of Pharmaceutical Binding Agents I-Adhesion to polymeric materials

    Hossain Orafai

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of three commonly used pharmaceutical binding agents, HPMC , PVP and Gelatin to five different polymeric sheet materials was studied. After conditioning, the bond strength of the specimens were measured by shear testing method using a suitablely designed apparatus. The results were correlated to the surface energies and the solubiiity parameters of the adherends. It is concluded that the thermodynamic properties and the solubility parameters are dominant when the mechanisms of adhesion are by adsorption and diffusion respectively.

  4. Fungus Causing Mycotic Keratitis

    Nagaraja N. Nagre

    2010-01-01

    human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to elicit mitogenic activity. The sugar specificity of the lectin and its interaction with PBMCs to exhibit mitogenic effect indicate its possible role in adhesion and infection process of Cephalosporium.

  5. Geometry- and rate-dependent adhesive failure of micropatterned surfaces

    Bakker, H.; Lindstrom, S.B.; Sprakel, J.H.B.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic nature of adhesive interface failure remains poorly understood, especially when the contact between the two surfaces is localized in microscopic points of adhesion. Here, we explore the dynamic failure of adhesive interfaces composed of a large number of micron-sized pillars against

  6. Adhesion of tissue glues to different biological substrates

    Bochynska, A. I.; Hannink, G.; Buma, P.; Grijpma, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue adhesives are attractive materials with potential to replace the use of sutures and staples in the repair of the injured tissues. The research field of tissue adhesives is dynamically growing, and different methods and tissue models are employed to evaluate the adhesive properties of newly

  7. Adhesion of tissue glues to different biological substrates

    Bochynska, Agnieszka; Hannink, G.; Buma, P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue adhesives are attractive materials with potential to replace the use of sutures and staples in the repair of the injured tissues. The research field of tissue adhesives is dynamically growing, and different methods and tissue models are employed to evaluate the adhesive properties of newly

  8. Anisotropic Adhesion Properties of Triangular-Tip-Shaped Micropillars

    Kwak, Moon Kyu

    2011-06-01

    Directional dry adhesive microstructures consisting of high-density triangular-tip-shaped micropillars are described. The wide-tip structures allow for unique directional shear adhesion properties with respect to the peeling direction, along with relatively high normal adhesion. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A comprehensive toxicological evaluation of three adhesives using experimental cigarettes.

    Coggins, Christopher R E; Jerome, Ann M; Lilly, Patrick D; McKinney, Willie J; Oldham, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Adhesives are used in several different manufacturing operations in the production of cigarettes. The use of new, "high-speed-manufacture" adhesives (e.g. vinyl acetate based) could affect the smoke chemistry and toxicology of cigarettes, compared with older "low-speed-manufacture" adhesives (e.g. starch based). This study was conducted to determine whether the inclusion of different levels of three adhesives (ethylene vinyl acetate, polyvinyl acetate and starch) in experimental cigarettes results in different smoke chemistry and toxicological responses in in vitro and in vivo assays. A battery of tests (analytical chemistry, in vitro and in vivo assays) was used to compare the chemistry and toxicology of smoke from experimental cigarettes made with different combinations of the three adhesives. Varying levels of the different side-seam adhesives, as well as the transfer of adhesives from packaging materials, were tested. There were differences in some mainstream cigarette smoke constituents as a function of the level of adhesive added to experimental cigarettes and between the tested adhesives. None of these differences translated into statistically significant differences in the in vitro or in vivo assays. The use of newer "high-speed-manufacture" vinyl acetate-based adhesives in cigarettes does not produce toxicological profiles that prevent the adhesives from replacing the older "low-speed-manufacture" adhesives (such as starch).

  10. 16 CFR 1500.133 - Extremely flammable contact adhesives; labeling.

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extremely flammable contact adhesives... REGULATIONS § 1500.133 Extremely flammable contact adhesives; labeling. (a) Extremely flammable contact adhesives, also known as contact bonding cements, when distributed in containers intended or suitable for...

  11. Characterizing phenolformaldehyde adhesive cure chemistry within the wood cell wall

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood using phenol-formaldehyde remains the industrial standard in wood product bond durability. Not only does this adhesive infiltrate the cell wall, it also is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers, particularly guaiacyl lignin. However, the mechanism by which phenol-formaldehyde adhesive intergrally interacts and bonds to...

  12. Anisotropic Adhesion Properties of Triangular-Tip-Shaped Micropillars

    Kwak, Moon Kyu; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Bae, Won Gyu; Jung, Ho-Sup; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2011-01-01

    Directional dry adhesive microstructures consisting of high-density triangular-tip-shaped micropillars are described. The wide-tip structures allow for unique directional shear adhesion properties with respect to the peeling direction, along with relatively high normal adhesion. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Leakage testing for different adhesive systems and composites to ...

    The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups of 14 teeth each as follows: The first group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with flowable composite, the second group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with bulk‑fill resin composite, the third group – one‑stage self‑etch (SE) adhesive applied ...

  14. Influence of Conditioning Time of Universal Adhesives on Adhesive Properties and Enamel-Etching Pattern.

    Cardenas, A M; Siqueira, F; Rocha, J; Szesz, A L; Anwar, M; El-Askary, F; Reis, A; Loguercio, A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of application protocol in resin-enamel microshear bond strength (μSBS), in situ degree of conversion, and etching pattern of three universal adhesive systems. Sixty-three extracted third molars were sectioned in four parts (buccal, lingual, and proximals) and divided into nine groups, according to the combination of the main factors-Adhesive (Clearfil Universal, Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc, Tokyo, Japan; Futurabond U, VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany; and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA)-and enamel treatment/application time (etch-and-rinse mode [ER], self-etch [SE] application for 20 seconds [SE20], and SE application for 40 seconds [SE40]). Specimens were stored in water (37°C/24 h) and tested at 1.0 mm/min (μSBS). The degree of conversion of the adhesives at the resin-enamel interfaces was evaluated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). In general, the application of the universal adhesives in the SE40 produced μSBS and degree of conversion that were higher than in the SE20 (puniversal adhesives in the SE mode may be a viable alternative to increase the degree of conversion, etching pattern, and resin-enamel bond strength.

  15. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  16. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-10-23

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  17. Enhancing the Adhesive Strength of a Plywood Adhesive Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials

    Birendra B. Adhikari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current production of wood composites relies mostly on formaldehyde-based adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF and phenol formaldehyde (PF resins. As these resins are produced from non-renewable resources, and there are some ongoing issues with possible health hazard due to formaldehyde emission from such products, the purpose of this research was to develop a formaldehyde-free plywood adhesive utilizing waste protein as a renewable feedstock. The feedstock for this work was specified risk material (SRM, which is currently being disposed of either by incineration or by landfilling. In this report, we describe a technology for utilization of SRM for the development of an environmentally friendly plywood adhesive. SRM was thermally hydrolyzed using a Canadian government-approved protocol, and the peptides were recovered from the hydrolyzate. The recovered peptides were chemically crosslinked with polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE resin to develop an adhesive system for bonding of plywood specimens. The effects of crosslinking time, peptides/crosslinking agent ratio, and temperature of hot pressing of plywood specimens on the strength of formulated adhesives were investigated. Formulations containing as much as 78% (wt/wt peptides met the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials specifications of minimum dry and soaked shear strength requirement for UF resin type adhesives. Under the optimum conditions tested, the peptides–PAE resin-based formulations resulted in plywood specimens having comparable dry as well as soaked shear strength to that of commercial PF resin.

  18. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through homophilic trans-interactions.

    Pizza, Francis X; Martin, Ryan A; Springer, Evan M; Leffler, Maxwell S; Woelmer, Bryce R; Recker, Isaac J; Leaman, Douglas W

    2017-07-11

    The overall objective of the study was to identify mechanisms through which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) augments the adhesive and fusogenic properties of myogenic cells. Hypotheses were tested using cultured myoblasts and fibroblasts, which do not constitutively express ICAM-1, and myoblasts and fibroblasts forced to express full length ICAM-1 or a truncated form lacking the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. ICAM-1 mediated myoblast adhesion and fusion were quantified using novel assays and cell mixing experiments. We report that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion to myoblasts and myotubes through homophilic trans-interactions. Such adhesive interactions enhanced levels of active Rac in adherent and fusing myoblasts, as well as triggered lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts through the signaling function of the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. Rac inhibition negated ICAM-1 mediated lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts. The fusogenic property of ICAM-1-ICAM-1 interactions was restricted to myogenic cells, as forced expression of ICAM-1 by fibroblasts did not augment their fusion to ICAM-1+ myoblasts/myotubes. We conclude that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through its ability to self-associate and initiate Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Rheology and adhesion of poly(acrylic acid)/laponite nanocomposite hydrogels as biocompatible adhesives.

    Shen, Muxian; Li, Li; Sun, Yimin; Xu, Jun; Guo, Xuhong; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2014-02-18

    Biocompatible nanocomposite hydrogels (NC gels) consisting of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and nanosized clay (Laponite) were successfully synthesized by in situ free-radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) in aqueous solutions of Laponite. The obtained NC gels were uniform and transparent. Their viscosity, storage modulus G', and loss modulus G″ increased significantly upon increasing the content of Laponite and the dose of AA, while exhibiting a maximum with increasing the neutralization degree of AA. They showed tunable adhesion by changing the dose of Laponite and monomer as well as the neutralization degree of AA, as determined by 180° peel strength measurement. The maximal adhesion was shown when reaching a balance between cohesion and fluidity. A homemade Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) instrument was employed to study the surface adhesion behavior of the NC gels. The combination of peel strength, rheology, and JKR measurements offers the opportunity of insight into the mechanism of adhesion of hydrogels. The NC gels with tunable adhesion should be ideal candidates for dental adhesive, wound dressing, and tissue engineering.

  20. Primary Adhesion in Enteromorpha. Cue Detection and Surface Selection in the Settlement and Adhesion of Enteromorpha Spores

    Callow, James

    2001-01-01

    .... spore settlement and adhesion. Our results provide the most comprehensive characterisation of the settlement and adhesion processes and the roles of surface-associated cues, of any soft-fouling species to date, We have shown...

  1. Alternative Splicing in Adhesion- and Motility-Related Genes in Breast Cancer

    Rosanna Aversa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common tumor and the second leading cause of cancer death among woman, mainly caused by the metastatic spread. Tumor invasiveness is due to an altered expression of adhesion molecules. Among them, semaphorins are of peculiar interest. Cancer cells can manipulate alternative splicing patterns to modulate the expression of adhesion- and motility-related molecules, also at the isoform level. In this study, combining RNA-Sequencing on MCF-7 to targeted experimental validations—in human breast cell lines and breast tumor biopsies—we identified 12 new alternative splicing transcripts in genes encoding adhesion- and motility-related molecules, including semaphorins, their receptors and co-receptors. Among them, a new SEMA3F transcript is expressed in all breast cell lines and breast cancer biopsies, and is translated into a new semaphorin 3F isoform. In silico analysis predicted that most of the new putative proteins lack functional domains, potentially missing some functions and acquiring new ones. Our findings better describe the extent of alternative splicing in breast cancer and highlight the need to further investigate adhesion- and motility-related molecules to gain insights into breast cancer progression.

  2. The effectiveness of adhesives on the retention of mandibular free end saddle partial dentures: An in vitro study.

    Quiney, Daniel; Nishio Ayre, Wayne; Milward, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Existing in vitro methods for testing denture adhesives do not fully replicate the complex oral geometries and environment; and in vivo methods are qualitative, prone to bias and not easily reproducible. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel, quantitative and more accurate model to test the effect of adhesives on the retentive force of mandibular free end saddle partial dentures. An in vitro model was developed based on an anatomically accurate cast of a clinical case. Experimentally, the amount of adhesive was varied (0.2g-1g) and the tensile force required for displacement was measured. Different commercially available adhesives were then tested at the optimum volume using the in vitro model. A 3D finite element model of the denture was used to assess how the forces to induce denture displacement varied according to the position of the force along the saddle length. The mass of adhesive was found to significantly alter retention forces, with 0.4-0.7g being the optimum range for this particular scenario. Use of adhesives significantly improved mandibular free end saddle partial denture retention with the worst performing adhesive increasing retention nine-fold whilst the best performing adhesive increased retention twenty three-fold. The finite element model revealed that 77% more force was required to displace the denture by positioning forces towards the mesial end of the saddle compared to the distal end. An in vitro denture adhesive model was developed, which demonstrated that mass of adhesive plays a significant role in enhancing denture retention and supported the design principle of placing as few teeth as clinically necessary on the distal end of the free end saddles. Limiting the position of teeth on free end saddles to the mesial and mid portion of the saddle will reduce displacements caused by mastication. The movement of mandibular free end saddle partial dentures can be restricted with the use of denture adhesives. Altering the mass of

  3. Normally Oriented Adhesion versus Friction Forces in Bacterial Adhesion to Polymer-Brush Functionalized Surfaces Under Fluid Flow

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Veeregowda, Deepak H.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is problematic in many diverse applications. Coatings of hydrophilic polymer chains in a brush configuration reduce bacterial adhesion by orders of magnitude, but not to zero. Here, the mechanism by which polymer-brush functionalized surfaces reduce bacterial adhesion from a

  4. Oral candidiasis-adhesion of non-albicans Candida species

    Bokor-Bratić Marija B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection caused primarily by Candida albicans. However, in recent years, species of non-albicans Candida have been implicated more frequently in mucosal infection. Candida species usually reside as commensal organisms and are part of normal oral microflora. Determining exactly how transformation from commensal to pathogen takes place and how it can be prevented is continuous challenge for clinical doctors. Candidal adherence to mucosal surfaces is considered as a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. Acrylic dentures, acting as reservoirs, play an important role in increasing the risk from Candida colonisation. Thus, this review discusses what is currently known about the adhesion of non-albicans Candida species of oral origin to buccal epithelial cells and denture acrylics.

  5. Macrophages adhesion rate on Ti-6Al-4V substrates: polishing and DLC coating effects

    Everton Diniz dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Various works have shown that diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings are able to improve the cells adhesion on prosthesis material and also cause protection against the physical wear. On the other hand there are reports about the effect of substrate polishing, in evidence of that roughness can enhance cell adhesion. In order to compare and quantify the joint effects of both factors, i.e, polishing and DLC coating, a commonly prosthesis material, the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, was used as raw material for substrates in our studies of macrophage cell adhesion rate on rough and polished samples, coated and uncoated with DLC. Methods The films were produced by PECVD technique on Ti-6Al-4V substrates and characterized by optical profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The amount of cells was measured by particle analysis in IMAGE J software. Cytotoxicity tests were also carried out to infer the biocompatibility of the samples. Results The results showed that higher the surface roughness of the alloy, higher are the cells fixing on the samples surface, moreover group of samples with DLC favored the cell adhesion more than their respective uncoated groups. The cytotoxity tests confirmed that all samples were biocompatible independently of being polished or coated with DLC. Conclusion From the observed results, it was found that the rougher substrate coated with DLC showed a higher cell adhesion than the polished samples, either coated or uncoated with the film. It is concluded that the roughness of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy and the DLC coating act complementary to enhance cell adhesion.

  6. Probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) modulates adhesive properties of Candida glabrata.

    Tomičić, Zorica; Zupan, Jure; Matos, Tadeja; Raspor, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Following the widespread use of immunosuppressive therapy together with broad-spectrum antimycotic therapy, the frequency of mucosal and systemic infections caused by the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata has increased in the past decades. Due to the resistance of C. glabrata to existing azole drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (nom. nud.) on C. glabrata adhesion at different temperatures, pH values, and in the presence of fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B. We also studied the adhesion of C. glabrata co-culture with Candida krusei, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two bacterial probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei The method used to assess adhesion was crystal violet staining. Our results showed that despite the nonadhesiveness of S. boulardii cells, this probiotic significantly affected the adherence ability of C. glabrata This effect was highly dependent on C. glabrata strain and was either antagonistic or synergistic. Regarding the extrinsic factors, temperature did not indicate any significant influence on this S. boulardii modulatory effect, while at high pH and at increased concentrations of antimycotics, S. boulardii did not manage to repress the adhesion of C. glabrata strains. The experiments of C. glabrata co-cultures with other species showed that the adhesiveness of two separate cultures could not be used to predict the adhesiveness of their co-culture. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Adhesion of silver films to ion-bombarded alumina

    Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on silver films deposited on alumina substrates using ion bombardment. Adhesion strength was measured as a function of deposition conditions, sputter-cleaning time, and bombarding ion species, using a pull-type adhesion tester. Argon- and argon/oxygen-ion sputtering produced large increases in adhesion strength, with the greatest increases occurring for oxygen-ion bombardment. Adhesion strength increased monotonically as a function of ion sputtering time. At a given deposition rate, further enhancement of adhesion is seen with concurrent ion bombardment

  8. Exchange of adsorbed serum proteins during adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus to an abiotic surface and Candida albicans hyphae--an AFM study.

    Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; van der Mei, Henny C; Krom, Bastiaan P; Busscher, Henk J

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans are the second and third most commonly isolated microorganisms in hospital-related-infections, that are often multi-species in nature causing high morbidity and mortality. Here, adhesion forces between a S. aureus strain and abiotic (tissue-culture-polystyrene, TCPS) or partly biotic (TCPS with adhering hyphae of C. albicans) surfaces were investigated in presence of fetal-bovine-serum or individual serum proteins and related with staphylococcal adhesion. Atomic-force-microscopy was used to measure adhesion forces between S. aureus and the abiotic and biotic surfaces. Adsorption of individual serum proteins like albumin and apo-transferrin to abiotic TCPS surfaces during 60min, impeded development of strong adhesion forces as compared to fibronectin, while 60min adsorption of proteins from fetal-bovine-serum yielded a decrease in adhesion force from -5.7nN in phosphate-buffered-saline to -0.6nN. Adsorption of albumin and apo-transferrin also decreased staphylococcal adhesion forces to hyphae as compared with fibronectin. During 60min exposure to fetal-bovine-serum however, initial (5min protein adsorption) staphylococcal adhesion forces were low (-1.6nN), but strong adhesion forces of around -5.5nN were restored within 60min. This suggests for the first time that in whole fetal-bovine-serum exchange of non-adhesive proteins by fibronectin occurs on biotic C. albicans hyphal surfaces. No evidence was found for such protein exchange on abiotic TCPS surfaces. Staphylococcal adhesion of abiotic and biotic surfaces varied in line with the adhesion forces and was low on TCPS in presence of fetal-bovine-serum. On partly biotic TCPS, staphylococci aggregated in presence of fetal-bovine-serum around adhering C. albicans hyphae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cell adhesion control by ion implantation into extra-cellular matrix

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Masahiro; Kaibara, Makoto; Iwaki, Masaya; Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Nishisaka, Tsuyoshi

    1994-01-01

    Cell adhesion control of polymer surfaces by ion implantation into polymers and extra-cellular matrix has been studied by means of in vitro adhesion measurements of the carcinoma of the cervix (HeLa cell). The specimens used were polystyrene (PS), oxygen plasma treated polystyrene (PS-O), extra-cellular matrix (Collagen: Type I) coated polystyrene (PS-C), and gelatin coated polystyrene (PS-G). Ne + , Na + , and Ar + implantations were performed with a fluence of 1x10 15 ions/cm 2 at energies of 50, 100 and 150 keV. The chemical and physical structures of ion implanted specimens have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR-ATR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Ion implanted PS demonstrated a dramatic improvement of adhesion of HeLa cell. HeLa cell adhered only to ion implanted circular domains of a diameter about 0.1 mm on PS. By contrast, ion implanted PS-C, PS-G and PS-O domains inhibited the cell adhesion. These phenomena were observed on Ne + , Na + , and Ar + implanted specimens at energies of 50, 100, and 150 keV. Ion implantation broke the original chemical bonds to form new radicals such as =C=O, condensed rings, C-C, C-O and OH radical. Ion implanted PS had a large amount of new radicals compared with that of PS-C, PS-G and PS-O. Ion implantation broke NH and NH 3 bonds originating from amino acid in PS-C and PS-G. OH and =C=O caused by oxygen treatment in PS-O were also destroyed by ion implantation. It is concluded that cell adhesion to ion implanted PS was caused by carbon structure and new radicals induced by ion implantation. The inhibition of HeLa cell adhesion on PS-C, PS-G and PS-O was caused by the destruction of cell adhesion properties of amino acid, OH and =C=O by radiation effects. ((orig.))

  10. Adhesion mechanisms of nanoparticle silver to substrate materials: identification

    Joo, Sungchul; Baldwin, Daniel F

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticle silver (NPS) conductors are increasingly being investigated for printed electronics applications. However, the adhesion mechanism of the nanoparticle silver to substrate materials has not been identified yet. In particular, the adhesion of NPS to organic materials such as the widely used polyimide Kapton HN and Kapton FPC dry films is concerned with low adhesion strength because the processed polymer surface is chemically inert. Moreover, its adhesion to substrate materials such as benzocyclobutene (BCB), copper and aluminum was found to be very weak. Therefore, in this paper, the mechanisms of NPS adhesion to organic and inorganic materials are identified as the first step in improving NPS adhesion strength. Improving the adhesion strength of NPS will be the key issue for printed electronics applications. The adhesion of NPS to substrate materials was found to be mainly attributed to van der Waals forces based on particle adhesion mechanisms. This finding provides the initiative of developing an adhesion prediction model of NPS to substrate materials in order to provide guidelines for improving the NPS adhesion strength to the substrate materials used in printed electronics.

  11. Heterogeneity of Focal Adhesions and Focal Contacts in Motile Fibroblasts.

    Gladkikh, Aleena; Kovaleva, Anastasia; Tvorogova, Anna; Vorobjev, Ivan A

    2018-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion is an important property of virtually all cells in multicellular organisms. Cell-ECM adhesion studies, therefore, are very significant both for biology and medicine. Over the last three decades, biomedical studies resulted in a tremendous advance in our understanding of the molecular basis and functions of cell-ECM adhesion. Based on morphological and molecular criteria, several different types of model cell-ECM adhesion structures including focal adhesions, focal complexes, fibrillar adhesions, podosomes, and three-dimensional matrix adhesions have been described. All the subcellular structures that mediate cell-ECM adhesion are quite heterogeneous, often varying in size, shape, distribution, dynamics, and, to a certain extent, molecular constituents. The morphological "plasticity" of cell-ECM adhesion perhaps reflects the needs of cells to sense, adapt, and respond to a variety of extracellular environments. In addition, cell type (e.g., differentiation status, oncogenic transformation, etc.) often exerts marked influence on the structure of cell-ECM adhesions. Although molecular, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies provide important maps or "snapshots" of cell-ECM adhesions, the area of research that is equally valuable is to study the heterogeneity of FA subpopulations within cells. Recently time-lapse observations on the FA dynamics become feasible, and behavior of individual FA gives additional information on cell-ECM interactions. Here we describe a robust method of labeling of FA using plasmids with fluorescent markers for paxillin and vinculin and quantifying the morphological and dynamical parameters of FA.

  12. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules.

  13. Preparation and characterization of UV-curable cationic composite adhesive

    Shen Yan; Yang Wenbin; Li Yintao; Xie Changqiong; Li Yingjun; Cheng Yafei; Zhou Yuanlin; Lu Zhongyuan

    2011-01-01

    UV-curable cationic composite adhesives containing TiO 2 nanostructures were prepared by using 3, 4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3, 4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate(CE) as monomer, triphenylsulfonium hexafluorophosphate salt (PI-432) as photoinitiator and titanium isopropoxide (TIP) as inorganic precursor. The morphology of the composite adhesives was characterized by atom force microscopy (AFM). The effect of TIP content on refractive index and transmittance of adhesives were studied. The results show that TiO 2 nanostructures, the average diameter of which is 20 nm or so, can be uniformly dispersed in polymers of composite adhesives. The refractive index of adhesives can be adjusted from 1.501 9 to 1.544 9 with the change of TIP content. The transmittance of adhesives has a slight reduce with the increase of TIP content. When TIP content is up to 40%, the transmittance of composite adhesives remains around 90% or so. (authors)

  14. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity.

    Ahn, B Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-10-19

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m(-2)) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  15. Adhesion of non-selective CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide

    Woodruff, D.W.; Wilson, R.H.; Sanchez-Martinez, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion of non-selective, CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide is a critical issue in the development of tungsten as a metalization for VLSI circuitry. Without special adhesion promoters, tungsten deposited from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/ has typically failed a standard tape test over all types of silicon oxides and nitrides. The reasons for failure of thin films, and CVD tungsten in particular are explored along with standard techniques for improving adhesion of thin films. Experiments are reported which include a number of sputtered metals as adhesion promoters, as well as chemical and plasma treatment of the oxide surface. Sputtered molybdenum is clearly the superior adhesion promoting layer from these tests. Traditional adhesion layers such as chromium or titanium failed as adhesion layers for CVD tungsten possibly due to chemical reactions between the WF/sub 6/ and Cr or Ti

  16. Design rules for biomolecular adhesion: lessons from force measurements.

    Leckband, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Cell adhesion to matrix, other cells, or pathogens plays a pivotal role in many processes in biomolecular engineering. Early macroscopic methods of quantifying adhesion led to the development of quantitative models of cell adhesion and migration. The more recent use of sensitive probes to quantify the forces that alter or manipulate adhesion proteins has revealed much greater functional diversity than was apparent from population average measurements of cell adhesion. This review highlights theoretical and experimental methods that identified force-dependent molecular properties that are central to the biological activity of adhesion proteins. Experimental and theoretical methods emphasized in this review include the surface force apparatus, atomic force microscopy, and vesicle-based probes. Specific examples given illustrate how these tools have revealed unique properties of adhesion proteins and their structural origins.

  17. Understanding Surface Adhesion in Nature: A Peeling Model.

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Siheng; Zhang, Feilong; Wang, Shutao

    2016-07-01

    Nature often exhibits various interesting and unique adhesive surfaces. The attempt to understand the natural adhesion phenomena can continuously guide the design of artificial adhesive surfaces by proposing simplified models of surface adhesion. Among those models, a peeling model can often effectively reflect the adhesive property between two surfaces during their attachment and detachment processes. In the context, this review summarizes the recent advances about the peeling model in understanding unique adhesive properties on natural and artificial surfaces. It mainly includes four parts: a brief introduction to natural surface adhesion, the theoretical basis and progress of the peeling model, application of the peeling model, and finally, conclusions. It is believed that this review is helpful to various fields, such as surface engineering, biomedicine, microelectronics, and so on.

  18. Indicators for surgery in adhesive bowel obstruction.

    Rajanikmanth, P V; Kate, V; Ananthakrishnan, N

    2001-01-01

    There is lack of data on risk factors, which, if present, would indicate the need for surgery in patients with adhesive bowel obstruction. A Cohort of 100 consecutive patients with adhesive obstruction was studied prospectively to compare clinical and investigative parameters between the operative and conservative group. It was found that female gender, previous obstetric or gynaecological procedures, pulse and BP on admission, nature of nasogastric aspirate, single distended loop on abdominal x-ray as also predominant ileal distension were independent factors indicating a high probability of surgical intervention. Patients with 2 or more risk factors had 12 times higher probability of surgery and in those with 3 or more the relative risk was 30 times. Patients with such risk factors should be monitored closely after admission and should be taken for surgery after an initial short trial of conservative measures.

  19. Cell adhesion on nanotextured slippery superhydrophobic substrates.

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Nardulli, Marina; Milella, Antonella; Favia, Pietro; d'Agostino, Riccardo; Gristina, Roberto

    2011-04-19

    In this work, the response of Saos2 cells to polymeric surfaces with different roughness/density of nanometric dots produced by a tailored plasma-etching process has been studied. Topographical features have been evaluated by atomic force microscopy, while wetting behavior, in terms of water-surface adhesion energy, has been evaluated by measurements of drop sliding angle. Saos2 cytocompatibility has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy, fluorescent microscopy, and optical microscopy. The similarity in outer chemical composition has allowed isolation of the impact of the topographical features on cellular behavior. The results indicate that Saos2 cells respond differently to surfaces with different nanoscale topographical features, clearly showing a certain inhibition in cell adhesion when the nanoscale is particularly small. This effect appears to be attenuated in surfaces with relatively bigger nanofeatures, though these express a more pronounced slippery/dry wetting character. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Engineering emergent multicellular behavior through synthetic adhesion

    Glass, David; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    In over a decade, synthetic biology has developed increasingly robust gene networks within single cells, but constructed very few systems that demonstrate multicellular spatio-temporal dynamics. We are filling this gap in synthetic biology's toolbox by developing an E. coli self-assembly platform based on modular cell-cell adhesion. We developed a system in which adhesive selectivity is provided by a library of outer membrane-displayed peptides with intra-library specificities, while affinity is provided by consistent expression across the entire library. We further provide a biophysical model to help understand the parameter regimes in which this tool can be used to self-assemble into cellular clusters, filaments, or meshes. The combined platform will enable future development of synthetic multicellular systems for use in consortia-based metabolic engineering, in living materials, and in controlled study of minimal multicellular systems. Stanford Bio-X Bowes Fellowship.