WorldWideScience

Sample records for adhesion molecule-modified biomaterials

  1. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanoscale investigation of pathogenic microbial adhesion to a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Ray J; Camesano, Terri A

    2004-10-01

    Microbial infections of medical implants occur in more than 2 million surgical cases each year in the United States alone. These increase patient morbidity and mortality, as well as patient cost and recovery time. Many treatments are available, but none are guaranteed to remove the infection. In many cases, the device infections are caused by the adhesion of microbes to the implant, ensuing growth, pathogenesis, and dissemination. The purpose of this work is to examine the initial events in microbial adhesion by simulating the approach and contact between a planktonic cell, immobilized on an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, and a biomaterial or biofilm substrate. The two model microbes used in this study, Candida parapsilosis (ATCC 90018) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 10145), were chosen for both their clinical relevance and their ease of acquisition and handling in the laboratory setting. Attractive interactions exist between C. parapsilosis and both unmodified silicone rubber and P. aeruginosa biofilms. Using C. parapsilosis cells immobilized on AFM cantilevers with a silicone substrate, we have measured attractive forces of 4.3 +/- 0.25 nN in the approach portion of the force cycle. On P. aeruginosa biofilms, the magnitude of the attractive force decreases to 2.0 +/- 0.40 nN and is preceded by a 2.0-nN repulsion at approximately 75 nm from the cell surface. These data suggest that C. parapsilosis may adhere to both silicone rubber and P. aeruginosa biofilms, possibly contributing to patient morbidity and mortality. Characterization of cell-biomaterial and cell-cell interactions allows for a quantitative link between the physicomechanical and physicochemical properties of implant materials and the nanoscale interactions leading to microbial colonization and infection.

  3. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Patel,Mitesh Ramanlal; Shukla,Jignesh Markandray; Patel,Natvarbhai Khodidas; Patel,Ketan Haribhai

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl grou...

  4. Update on biomaterials for prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huailan Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Lumbar laminectomy often results in failed back surgery syndrome. Most scholars support the three-dimensional theory of adhesion: Fibrosis surrounding the epidural tissues is based on the injured sacrospinalis behind, fibrous rings and posterior longitudinal ligaments. Approaches including using the minimally invasive technique, drugs, biomaterial and nonbiomaterial barriers to prevent the postoperative epidural adhesion were intensively investigated. Nevertheless, the results are far from satisfactory. Our review is based on various implant biomaterials that are used in clinical applications or are under study. We show the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The summary will help us to figure out ideas towards new techniques.The translational potential of this article: This review summarises recent biomaterials-related clinical and basic research that focuses on prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy. We also propose a novel possible translational method where a soft scaffold acts as a physical barrier in the early stage, engineered adipose tissue acts as a biobarrier in the later stage in the application of biomaterials and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are used for prevention of epidural adhesion. Keywords: Adhesion, Biomaterials, Fibrosis, Implant, Laminectomy

  5. Biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mourik, P.; Van Dam, J.; Picken, S.J.; Ursem, B.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of living organisms produce biomaterials. Hence, in principle biomaterials are fully sustainable. This does not mean that their processing and application have no impact on the environment, e.g. the recycling of natural rubber remains a problem. Biomaterials are applied in a

  6. Biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Migonney , Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Discovered in the 20th century, biomaterials have contributed to many of the incredible scientific and technological advancements made in recent decades. This book introduces and details the tenets of biomaterials, their relevance in a various fields, practical applications of their products, and potential advancements of the years to come. A comprehensive resource, the text covers the reasons that certain properties of biomaterials contribute to specific applications, and students and researchers will appreciate this exhaustive textbook.

  7. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitesh Ramanlal Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl group yields new modified or activated polyols, which can be utilized for polyurethane adhesive formulation. In view of this, we have synthesized polyurethane adhesives from polyester polyols, castor oil based polyols and epoxy based polyols with Isocyanate adducts based on castor oil and trimethylolpropane. To study the effects of polyurethane adhesive strength (i.e. lap shear strength on wood-to-wood and metal-to-metal bonding through various types of polyols, cross-linking density, isocyanate adducts and also to compare adhesive strength between wood to wood and metal to metal surface. These polyols and polyurethanes were characterized through GPC, NMR and IR-spectroscopy, gel and surface drying time. Thermal stability of PU adhesives was determined under the effect of cross-linking density (NCO/OH ratio. The NCO/OH ratio (1.5 was optimized for adhesives as the higher NCO/OH ratio (2.0 increasing cross-linking density and decreases adhesion. Lower NCO/OH ratio (1.0 provideslow cross-linking density and low strength of adhesives.

  8. Hysteresis of a biomaterial: influence of sutures and biological adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Páez, J M; Carrera, A; Jorge, E; Millán, I; Cordón, A; Rocha, A; Maestro, M; Castillo-Olivares, J L

    2007-05-01

    We studied the changes in energy consumption of samples of calf pericardium, when joined or not joined by sutures and adhesives, by means of hysteretic cycles. Sixty-four samples were subsequently subjected to tensile stress until rupture. An overlapping suture sewn in the form of a rectangle presented an acceptable mean resistance to rupture of over 10 MPa, although lower than the mean values in an unsutured control series where the mean resistance surpassed 15 MPa. The contribution of an acrylic adhesive to the resistance to rupture was negligible. The sutured samples that were reinforced with adhesives and had not been subjected to hysteretic cycles prior to rupture showed an anisotropic behavior. This behavior appeared to be lost in all the samples that underwent hysteretic cycles. We found an inflection point in the stress/strain curve following the stepwise increase in the load, with a value greater than and proximate to the final load applied. This inflection should be analyzed by means of microscopy. Finally, the mathematical relationship between the energy consumed and the stress applied, the strain or deformation produced and the number of cycles of hysteresis to which the samples were subjected was established as the ultimate objective of this study. The bonding systems provoked a greater consumption of energy, with the greatest consumption corresponding to the first cycle in all the series assayed. An equation relating the energy consumption in a sample to the number of hysteretic cycles to which it was subjected was obtained. Its asymptote on the x-axis indicates the energy consumption for a theoretical number of cycles, making it possible to estimate the durability of the sample.

  9. Silk-based biomaterials functionalized with fibronectin type II promotes cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Margarida; Machado, Raul; da Costa, André; Ribeiro, Artur; Collins, Tony; Gomes, Andreia C; Leonor, Isabel B; Kaplan, David L; Reis, Rui L; Casal, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to exploit the fibronectin type II (FNII) module from human matrix metalloproteinase-2 as a functional domain for the development of silk-based biopolymer blends that display enhanced cell adhesion properties. The DNA sequence of spider dragline silk protein (6mer) was genetically fused with the FNII coding sequence and expressed in Escherichia coli. The chimeric protein 6mer+FNII was purified by non-chromatographic methods. Films prepared from 6mer+FNII by solvent casting promoted only limited cell adhesion of human skin fibroblasts. However, the performance of the material in terms of cell adhesion was significantly improved when 6mer+FNII was combined with a silk-elastin-like protein in a concentration-dependent behavior. With this work we describe a novel class of biopolymer that promote cell adhesion and potentially useful as biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This work reports the development of biocompatible silk-based composites with enhanced cell adhesion properties suitable for biomedical applications in regenerative medicine. The biocomposites were produced by combining a genetically engineered silk-elastin-like protein with a genetically engineered spider-silk-based polypeptide carrying the three domains of the fibronectin type II module from human metalloproteinase-2. These composites were processed into free-standing films by solvent casting and characterized for their biological behavior. To our knowledge this is the first report of the exploitation of all three FNII domains as a functional domain for the development of bioinspired materials with improved biological performance. The present study highlights the potential of using genetically engineered protein-based composites as a platform for the development of new bioinspired biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surfactant functionalization induces robust, differential adhesion of tumor cells and blood cells to charged nanotube-coated biomaterials under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    The metastatic spread of cancer cells from the primary tumor to distant sites leads to a poor prognosis in cancers originating from multiple organs. Increasing evidence has linked selectin-based adhesion between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells of the microvasculature to metastatic dissemination, in a manner similar to leukocyte adhesion during inflammation. Functionalized biomaterial surfaces hold promise as a diagnostic tool to separate CTCs and potentially treat metastasis, utilizing antibody and selectin-mediated interactions for cell capture under flow. However, capture at high purity levels is challenged by the fact that CTCs and leukocytes both possess selectin ligands. Here, a straightforward technique to functionalize and alter the charge of naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes using surfactants is reported to induce robust, differential adhesion of tumor cells and blood cells to nanotube-coated surfaces under flow. Negatively charged sodium dodecanoate-functionalized nanotubes simultaneously enhanced tumor cell capture while negating leukocyte adhesion, both in the presence and absence of adhesion proteins, and can be utilized to isolate circulating tumor cells regardless of biomarker expression. Conversely, diminishing nanotube charge via functionalization with decyltrimethylammonium bromide both abolished tumor cell capture while promoting leukocyte adhesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The measurement temperature: an important factor relating physicochemical and adhesive properties of yeast cells to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Moreno, A M; González-Martín, M L; Pérez-Giraldo, C; Bruque, J M; Gómez-García, A C

    2004-03-15

    Flow chambers applied to the study of the initial adhesion process of Candida parapsilosis are rarely found in the literature. The ability of these microorganisms to proliferate and form biofilms in environments at temperatures around 22 or 37 degrees C is reflected in the contamination of laboratory instruments and material or in human implant infections, respectively. The initial interaction between yeasts and substrata is mediated by physicochemical forces, which in turn originate from the physicochemical surface properties of both interacting phases. In this context, this work aims to relate the initial rates of adhesion rates to glass and silicone of Candida parapsilosis, strains 294 and 289, grown at 22 and 37 degrees C with the theoretical predictions of the adhesion process, expressed by the interaction free energies and calculated through the physicochemical parameters, which are also measured at 22 and 37 degrees C. The results indicate that physicochemical parameters of yeasts are changed not only by the culture temperature but also by the measurement temperature; only when the measurement temperature is equal to the growth temperature a coherent relation between in vitro adhesion data and interaction free energies can be established. In this sense, the adhesion to glass is mediated by long-range forces or, what amounts to the same thing, by Lifshitz-van der Waals interaction free energy. On the other hand, the adhesion to silicone rubber seems to be moderated by acid-base interaction free energy, which involves the presence of short-range forces. Based on these results, it can be assumed that the substratum surface properties are directly related to the kind of force acting on the initial microbial adhesion process, while cell surface properties dictate the changes in the strength of the force between different samples.

  14. Adhesion of resin composites to biomaterials in dentistry : an evaluation of surface conditioning methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    Since previous investigations revealed that most clinical failures in adhesively luted ceramic restorations initiate from the cementation or internal surfaces, the study presented in Chapter II evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA

  15. Single-step immobilization of cell adhesive peptides on a variety of biomaterial substrates via tyrosine oxidation with copper catalyst and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2015-04-15

    Immobilization of biologically active peptides which were isolated from extracellular matrix proteins is a powerful strategy for the design and functionalization of biomaterial substrates. However, the method of peptide immobilization was restricted, that is, peptide is often immobilized through the reactive groups inherent in substrates with multistep reactions. Here, we report a single-step immobilization of fibronectin-derived cell adhesive peptide (Arg-Glu-Asp-Val; REDV) onto polymer materials by use of tyrosine oxidation with copper catalyst and hydrogen peroxide. REDV peptide was successfully immobilized on tissue culture polystyrene, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(vinyl chloride), expanded-poly(tetrafluoroethylene), and poly(l-lactic acid), resulting in enhanced adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This method is a single-step reaction under very mild conditions and is available for the biological functionalization of various medical devices.

  16. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Oscar E. Pecho; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  17. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  18. Smart biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Narain, Ravin; Idota, Naokazu; Kim, Young-Jin; Hoffman, John M; Uto, Koichiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This book surveys smart biomaterials, exploring the properties, mechanics and characterization of hydrogels, particles, assemblies, surfaces, fibers and conjugates. Reviews applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, bioseparation and more.

  19. Electrical activity of ferroelectric biomaterials and its effects on the adhesion, growth and enzymatic activity of human osteoblast-like cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, Přemysl; Kolská, Z.; Luxbacher, T.; García, J.A.L.; Lehocký, M.; Vandrovcová, Marta; Bačáková, Lucie; Petzelt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 17 (2016), 1-12, č. článku 175403. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01558S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : biomaterials * ferroelectric * zeta potential * osteoblast-like cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016

  20. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  1. Engineering of biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    dos Santos, Venina; Savaris, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on biomaterials of different forms used for medical implants. The authors introduce the characteristics and properties of biomaterials and then dedicate special chapters to metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite biomaterials. Case studies on sterilization methods by biomaterials are also presented. Finally, the authors describe the degradation and effects of biomaterials in living tissue.

  2. Current Strategies in Cardiovascular Biomaterial Functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lehle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of the coagulation cascade and platelet activation is the foremost demand for biomaterials in contact with blood. In this review we describe the underlying mechanisms of these processes and offer the current state of antithrombotic strategies. We give an overview of methods to prevent protein and platelet adhesion, as well as techniques to immobilize biochemically active molecules on biomaterial surfaces. Finally, recent strategies in biofunctionalization by endothelial cell seeding as well as their possible clinical applications are discussed.

  3. [Orthopedic biomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedel, L; Nizard, R; Meunier, A

    1995-03-01

    It is very challenging to insure long term security and effectiveness for joint arthroplasties, artificial ligaments, extensive bone replacement and some other orthopaedic biomaterials. How can we predict the long term security and efficacy of such an implant? Only an interdisciplinary approach can provide a satisfactory answer. The surgeon must define the needs, he must find the appropriate surgical techniques and conduct the clinical trial. The material scientist must elaborate safe and secure materials with regards to their biotolerance and mechanical resistance. This has to be performed in close connection with the biomechanics lab. Biomechanic Science must predict the expected stresses. It has to design special simulator to quantify in vitro material toughness, wear characteristics, lubrication, behaviour and surface deformation. Biological and mechanical standardized tests have to be carried on. Then it is possible to conduct a clinical trial, prospectively in comparison to another already developed material. Clinical studies could serve to measure efficacy and radiological modification. After failure, it is possible to analyse retrieved specimen, to measure the material degradation in real environment, to perform biological studies on retrieved tissues i.e. : macrophagic activities, tissue response, bone ingrowth, inflammatory or immunological reaction. For more than twenty years we worked on alumina against alumina total hips. The idea was to develop a low debris system to enhance long term longevity of the prosthesis. The Charnley design has proven its effectiveness for more than fifteen years, but polyethylene wear is responsible for late failures. This is specially crucial for young patients, male sex and high activity level patients. At the beginning, biological studies and mechanical tests were performed, it appeared that the biological tolerance of alumina ceramic was excellent, the fracture toughness was adequate, but there were some problems related

  4. Antibacterial Efficiency of Hydroxyapatite Biomaterials with Biodegradable Polylactic Acid and Polycaprolactone Polymers Saturated with Antibiotics / Bionoārdāmu Polimēru Saturošu Un Ar Antibiotiskajām Vielām Piesūcinātu Biomateriālu Antibakteriālās Efektivitātes Noteikšana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroiča Juta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections continue to spread in all fields of medicine, and especially in the field of implant biomaterial surgery, and not only during the surgery, but also after surgery. Reducing the adhesion of bacteria could decrease the possibility of biomaterial-associated infections. Bacterial adhesion could be reduced by local antibiotic release from the biomaterial. In this in vitro study, hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics and biodegradable polymers were tested for their ability to reduce bacteria adhesion and biofilm development. This study examined the antibacterial efficiency of hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics and biodegradable polymers against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The study found that hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics and biodegradable polymers show longer antibacterial properties than hydroxyapatite biomaterials with antibiotics against both bacterial cultures. Therefore, the results of this study demonstrated that biomaterials that are coated with biodegradable polymers release antibiotics from biomaterial samples for a longer period of time and may be useful for reducing bacterial adhesion on orthopedic implants.

  5. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  6. Biomaterials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reza Rezaie, Hamid; Öchsner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This short book presents an overview of different types of biomaterial such as bio ceramics, bio polymers, metals and bio composites, while especially focusing on nano biomaterials and their applications in different tissues. It provides a compact introduction to nano materials for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering and implants, while also reviewing essential trends in the biomaterial field over the last few decades and the latest developments.

  7. Biomaterials for MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Mu

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a guide for practicing engineers, researchers, and students interested in MEMS devices that use biomaterials and biomedical applications. It is also suitable for engineers and researchers interested in MEMS and its applications but who do not have the necessary background in biomaterials.Biomaterials for MEMS highlights important features and issues of biomaterials that have been used in MEMS and biomedical areas. Hence this book is an essential guide for MEMS engineers or researchers who are trained in engineering institutes that do not provide the background or knowledge

  8. An introduction to biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2011-01-01

    Consensus Definitions, Fundamental Concepts, and a Standardized Approach to Applied Biomaterials Sciences, J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Wound Healing BiologyCutaneous Wound Pathobiology: Raison d'etre for Tissue Engineering, L.K. Macri and R.A.F. ClarkOsseous Wound Healing, A. Nawab, M. Wong, D. Kwak, L. Schutte, A. Sharma, and J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Cellular MechanicsCell and Tissue Mechanobiology, W. Guo, P. Alvarez, and Y. WangBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Materials-Host InteractionsCell-Material In

  9. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Polyacrylamide brush coatings preventing microbial adhesion to silicone rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fundeanu, Irina; van der Mei, Henny C.; Schouten, Arend J.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    Silicone rubber is a frequently used biomaterial in biomedical devices and implants, yet highly prone to microbial adhesion and the development of a biomaterial-centered infection. Effective coating of silicone rubber to discourage microbial adhesion has thus far been impossible due to the

  11. Researching in biomaterials optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María. M.; Ionescu, Ana; Yebra, Ana; Cardona, Juan C.; Herrera, Luis J.; Rivas, María. José; Pecho, Óscar E.; Ghinea, Razvan

    2017-08-01

    The optical properties of a tissue or a biomaterial can be described in terms of the absorption coefficient (μa), the scattering coefficient (μs), the scattering function p(θ,ψ) and the real refractive index of the biomaterial. The Inverse Adding-Doubling, IAD, Method and relationship between the Kubelka- Munk parameters and the transport coefficients are used to describe optical properties at different wavelengths for a large variety of tissues and tissue like biomaterials, such as native cornea, tissue engineered cornea, tissue engineered oral mucosa, natural dentin and dental resin nanocomposites, among others

  12. Effect of biomaterial properties on bone healing in a rabbit tooth extraction socket model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, J.P.; Lalani, Z.; Bossano, C.M.; Brey, E.M.; Demian, N.; Johnston, C.M.; Dean, D.; Jansen, J.A.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we sought to understand the effect of biomaterial properties upon healing bone tissue. We hypothesized that a hydrophilic polymer gel implanted into a bone tissue defect would impede the healing process owing to the biomaterial's prevention of protein adsorption and thus cell adhesion.

  13. Functional Peptides from Laminin-1 Improve the Cell Adhesion Capacity of Recombinant Mussel Adhesive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ji, Lina; Hua, Zichun

    2017-01-01

    Since cell adhesion is important for cell processes such as migration and proliferation, it is a crucial consideration in biomaterial design and development. Based on the fusion of mussel adhesive protein fp151 with laminin-1-originated functional peptides we designed fusion proteins (fLA4, fLG6 and fAG73) and explored their cell adhesion properties. In our study, cell adhesion analysis showed that protein fLG6 and fLA4 had a significantly higher cell adhesion property for A549 than fp151. Moreover, protein fAG73 also displayed a strong adhesion capacity for Hela cells. In conclusion, the incorporation of functional peptides with integrin and heparin/heparan sulphate binding capacity into mussel adhesive protein will promote the application of mussel adhesive protein as cell adhesion biomaterial. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Designer biomaterials for mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher S.

    2017-12-01

    Biomaterials engineered with specific bioactive ligands, tunable mechanical properties and complex architecture have emerged as powerful tools to probe cell sensing and response to physical properties of their material surroundings, and ultimately provide designer approaches to control cell function.

  15. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  16. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  17. Biomaterials a basic introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    Part IBiomaterials ScienceBiomaterials Science and EngineeringLearning ObjectivesMaterials Science and EngineeringMultilevels of Structure and Categorization of MaterialsFour Categories of MaterialsDefinitions of Biomaterials, Biomedical Materials, and Biological MaterialsBiocompatibilityChapter HighlightsActivitiesSimple Questions in ClassProblems and ExercisesBibliographyToxicity and CorrosionLearning ObjectivesElements in the BodyBiological Roles and Toxicities of Trace ElementsSelection of Metallic Elements in Medical-Grade AlloysCorrosion of MetalsEnvironment inside the BodyMinimization of Toxicity of Metal ImplantsChapter HighlightsLaboratory Practice 1Simple Questions in ClassProblems and ExercisesAdvanced Topic: Biological Roles of Alloying ElementsBibliographyMechanical Properties of BiomaterialsLearning ObjectivesRole of Implant BiomaterialsMechanical Properties of General ImportanceHardnessElasticity: Resilience and StrechabilityMechanical Properties Terms Used in the Medical CommunityFailureEssent...

  18. Designing Smart Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdous Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of human tissues to cure diseases is an interdisciplinary and a very attractive field of research both in academia and the biotechnology industrial sector. Three-dimensional (3D biomaterial scaffolds can play a critical role in the development of new tissue morphogenesis via interacting with human cells. Although simple polymeric biomaterials can provide mechanical and physical properties required for tissue development, insufficient biomimetic property and lack of interactions with human progenitor cells remain problematic for the promotion of functional tissue formation. Therefore, the developments of advanced functional biomaterials that respond to stimulus could be the next choice to generate smart 3D biomimetic scaffolds, actively interacting with human stem cells and progenitors along with structural integrity to form functional tissue within a short period. To date, smart biomaterials are designed to interact with biological systems for a wide range of biomedical applications, from the delivery of bioactive molecules and cell adhesion mediators to cellular functioning for the engineering of functional tissues to treat diseases.

  19. Evolving the use of peptides as biomaterials components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Joel H.; Segura, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript is part of a debate on the statement that “the use of short synthetic adhesion peptides, like RGD, is the best approach in the design of biomaterials that guide cell behavior for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering”. We take the position that although there are some acknowledged disadvantages of using short peptide ligands within biomaterials, it is not necessary to discard the notion of using peptides within biomaterials entirely, but rather to reinvent and evolve their use. Peptides possess advantageous chemical definition, access to non-native chemistries, amenability to de novo design, and applicability within parallel approaches. Biomaterials development programs that require such aspects may benefit from a peptide-based strategy. PMID:21515167

  20. Mechanistic investigation of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmany, Maria Bahawdory

    Traumatic injury leads to more productive years lost than heart disease, cancer and stroke combined. Trauma is often accompanied and complicated by uncontrolled bleeding. Human hair keratin biomaterials have demonstrated efficacy in controlling hemorrhage in both small and large animal models; however little is known about the mechanism by which these proteins aid in blood clotting. Inspection of the amino acid sequence of known keratins shows the presence of several cellular binding motifs, suggesting a possible mechanism and potentially eliminating the need to functionalize the material's surface for cellular interaction. In addition to small animal studies, the hemostatic activity of keratin hydrogels was explored through porcine hemorrhage models representing both a high flow and low flow bleed. In both studies, keratin hydrogels appeared to lead to a significant reduction in blood loss. The promising results from these in vivo studies provided the motivation for this project. The objective of this dissertation work was to assess the mechanism of action of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial, and more broadly assess the biomaterial-cellular interaction(s). It is our hypothesis that keratin biomaterials have the capacity to specifically interact with cells and lead to propagation of intracellular signaling pathway, specifically contributing to hemostasis. Through application of biochemical and molecular tools, we demonstrate here that keratin biomaterials contribute to hemostasis through two probable mechanisms; integrin mediated platelet adhesion and increased fibrin polymerization. Platelets are the major cell type involved in coagulation both by acting as a catalytic surface for the clotting cascade and adhering to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins providing a soft platelet plug. Because keratin biomaterials have structural and biochemical characteristics similar to ECM proteins, we utilized several adhesion assays to investigate platelet adhesion to keratin

  1. Cell adhesion to textured silicone surfaces : The influence of time of adhesion and texture on focal contact and fibronectin fibril formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; von Recum, AF

    Cell adhesion and spreading on biomaterials is a key issue in the study of cell-biomaterial interactions. With the development of new disciplines within biomaterials research such as tissue engineering and cellular therapy, information at molecular and structural levels is needed in order to

  2. Use of radiation in biomaterials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Roberto S. E-mail: rbenson1@utk.edu

    2002-05-01

    Radiation is widely used in the biomaterials science for surface modification, sterilization and to improve bulk properties. Radiation is also used to design of biochips, and in situ photopolymerizable of bioadhesives. The energy sources most commonly used in the irradiation of biomaterials are high-energy electrons, gamma radiation, ultraviolet (UV) and visible light. Surface modification involves placement of selective chemical moieties on the surface of a material by chemical reactions to improve biointeraction for cell adhesion and proliferation, hemocompatibility and water absorption. The exposure of a polymer to radiation, especially ionizing radiation, can lead to chain scission or crosslinking with changes in bulk and surface properties. Sterilization by irradiation is designed to inactivate most pathogens from the surface of biomedical devices. An overview of the use of gamma and UV radiation to improve surface tissue compatibility, bulk properties and surface properties for wear resistance, formation of hydrogels and curing dental sealants and bone adhesives is presented. Gamma and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiated ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) exhibit improvement in surface modulus and hardness. The surface modulus and hardness of UHMWPE showed a dependence on type of radiation, dosage and processing. VUV surface modified e-PTFE vascular grafts exhibit increases in hydrophilicity and improvement towards adhesion of fibrin glue.

  3. Advanced biomaterials and biodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are the fastest-growing emerging field of  biodevices. Design and development of biomaterials play a significant role in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Recently, a variety of scaffolds/carriers have been evaluated for tissue regeneration, drug delivery, sensing and imaging.  Liposomes and microspheres have been developed for sustained delivery. Several anti-cancer drugs have been successfully formulated using biomaterial. The targeting of drugs to certain physiological sites has emerged as a promising tool in the treatment with improved drug bioavailability and reduction of dosing frequency. Biodevices-based targeting of drugs may improve the therapeutic success by limiting the adverse drug effects and resulting in more patient compliance and attaining a higher adherence level. Advanced biodevices hold merit as a drug carrier with high carrier capacity, feasibility of incorporation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, high stability, as well as the feasibility...

  4. Bone substitute biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone substitute biomaterials are fundamental to the biomedical sector, and have recently benefitted from extensive research and technological advances aimed at minimizing failure rates and reducing the need for further surgery. This book reviews these developments, with a particular focus on the desirable properties for bone substitute materials and their potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration. Part I covers the principles of bone substitute biomaterials for medical applications. One chapter reviews the quantification of bone mechanics at the whole-bone, micro-scale, and non-scale levels, while others discuss biomineralization, osteoductivization, materials to fill bone defects, and bioresorbable materials. Part II focuses on biomaterials as scaffolds and implants, including multi-functional scaffolds, bioceramics, and titanium-based foams. Finally, Part III reviews further materials with the potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration, including cartilage grafts, chitosan, inorganic poly...

  5. Biomaterials and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    A number of organic and inorganic, synthetic or natural derived materials have been classified as not harmful for the human body and are appropriate for medical applications. These materials are usually named biomaterials since they are suitable for introduction into living human tissues of prosthesis, as well as for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapies, tissue regeneration and many other clinical applications. Recently, nanomaterials and bioabsorbable polymers have greatly enlarged the fields of application of biomaterials attracting much more the attention of the biomedical community. In this review paper I am going to discuss the most recent advances in the use of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable materials as new biomedical tools.

  6. Bacterial adhesion to orthopaedic implant materials and a novel oxygen plasma modified PEEK surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochford, E. T. J.; Poulsson, A. H. C.; Salavarrieta Varela, J.; Lezuo, P.; Richards, R. G.; Moriarty, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in biomedical applications, information about bacterial adhesion to this biomaterial is limited. This study investigated Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to injection moulded and machined PEEK OPTIMA (R) using a

  7. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  8. Biomaterials and magnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetite (Fe34) is biocompatible and therefore is one of the most extensively used biomaterials for different applications ranging from cell separation and drug delivery to hyperthermia. Other than this, a large number of magnetic materials in bulk as well as in the form of nano particles have been exploited for a variety of ...

  9. Update on Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul A; Giori, Nicholas J; Lavernia, Carlos J; Villa, Jesus M; Greenwald, A Seth

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are essential to the use and development of successful treatments for orthopaedic patients. Orthopaedic surgeons need to understand the expected clinical performance and the effects of implants in patients. Recent attempts to improve implant durability have resulted in adverse effects related to biomaterials and their relationship to patients. Examples of these adverse effects in hip arthroplasty include wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal bearings, trunnions, and tapered modular neck junctions. Conversely, polymers and ceramics have shown substantial improvements in durability. Improved implant compositions and manufacturing processes have resulted in ceramic head and acetabular liners with improved material properties and the avoidance of voids, which have, in the past, caused catastrophic fractures. Cross-linking of polyethylene with radiation and doping with antioxidants has substantially increased implant durability and is increasingly being used in joint prostheses other than the hip. Additive manufacturing is potentially a transformative process; it can lead to custom and patient-specific implants and to improvements in material properties, which can be optimized to achieve desired bone responses. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the material properties and the biologic effects of new or altered biomaterials and manufacturing processes before use. In addition, a clear benefit to the patient must be proven based on superior preclinical results and high-quality clinical investigations before orthopaedic surgeons use new or altered biomaterials.

  10. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  11. Hot topics in biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, Eric W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2014-01-01

    The expert coverage of the eight chapters in this book reflects the diverse nature of the field of biomaterials science and encompasses contributions from a wide range of fields, highlighting key classes of novel materials and exploring the underlying science and potential applications.

  12. Bacterial adhesion and growth on a polymer brush-coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nejadnik, M.R.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials-related infections pose serious problems in implant surgery, despite the development of non-adhesive coatings. Non-adhesive coatings, like polymer brush-coatings, have so far only been investigated with respect to preventing initial bacterial adhesion, but never with respect to effects

  13. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  14. Biomaterials surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Taubert, Andreas; Rodriguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an overview of the highly interdisciplinary field of surface science in the context of biological and biomedical applications. The covered topics range from micro- and nanostructuring for imparting functionality in a top-down manner to the bottom-up fabrication of gradient surfaces by self-assembly, from interfaces between biomaterials and living matter to smart, stimuli-responsive surfaces, and from cell and surface mechanics to the elucidation of cell-chip interactions in biomedical devices.

  15. Biomaterials in light amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Cyprych, Konrad; Sznitko, Lech; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    Biologically produced or inspired materials can serve as optical gain media, i.e. they can exhibit the phenomenon of light amplification. Some of these materials, under suitable dye-doping and optical pumping conditions, show lasing phenomena. The emerging branch of research focused on obtaining lasing action in highly disordered and highly light scattering materials, i.e. research on random lasing, is perfectly suited for biological materials. The use of biomaterials in light amplification has been extensively reported in the literature. In this review we attempt to report on progress in the development of biologically derived systems able to show the phenomena of light amplification and random lasing together with the contribution of our group to this field. The rich world of biopolymers modified with molecular aggregates and nanocrystals, and self-organized at the nanoscale, offers a multitude of possibilities for tailoring luminescent and light scattering properties that are not easily replicated in conventional organic or inorganic materials. Of particular importance and interest are light amplification and lasing, or random lasing studies in biological cells and tissues. In this review we will describe nucleic acids and their complexes employed as gain media due to their favorable optical properties and ease of manipulation. We will report on research conducted on various biomaterials showing structural analogy to nucleic acids such as fluorescent proteins, gelatins in which the first distributed feedback laser was realized, and also amyloids or silks, which, due to their dye-doped fiber-like structure, allow for light amplification. Other materials that were investigated in that respect include polysaccharides, like starch exhibiting favorable photostability in comparison to other biomaterials, and chitosan, which forms photonic crystals or cellulose. Light amplification and random lasing was not only observed in processed biomaterials but also in living

  16. An electrochemical impedance sensor based on a small molecule modified Au electrode for the recognition of a trinucleotide repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Chang, Gang; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2014-11-07

    A small molecule modified sensor was developed for the detection of XGG trinucleotide repeats (X = C, T) by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The sensor (NCD/MPA/Au) was fabricated by immobilizing the nucleic acid recognition molecule (NCD) on the surface of a gold electrode through a condensation reaction between the amino-terminal end of the NCD linker and carboxylic groups in 3-mercaptopropionic acid that were self-assembled on the electrode surface. After the sensor was incubated with trinucleotide repeats, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was performed using [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as redox marker ions. XGG repeats (X = C, T) could be selectively detected based on the differences in charge transfer resistance (ΔRct) even in the presence of other trinucleotide repeats. The relationship between ΔRct and lg [concentration of CGG repeats] for the sensor was linear from 1 nM to 1 μM, enabling the quantification of the number of repeats. The electrochemical impedance sensor provides a simple and rapid method to detect trinucleotide repeats without requiring labelling and immobilizations of DNA, making it promising for the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases; the sensor may be further extended to the detection of other special sequences of DNA.

  17. Integrin-directed modulation of macrophage responses to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Toral D; Lewis, Jamal S; Dolgova, Natalia V; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Keselowsky, Benjamin G

    2014-04-01

    Macrophages are the primary mediator of chronic inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials, in cases when the material is either in particulate or bulk form. Chronic inflammation limits the performance and functional life of numerous implanted medical devices, and modulating macrophage interactions with biomaterials to mitigate this response would be beneficial. The integrin family of cell surface receptors mediates cell adhesion through binding to adhesive proteins nonspecifically adsorbed onto biomaterial surfaces. In this work, the roles of integrin Mac-1 (αMβ2) and RGD-binding integrins were investigated using model systems for both particulate and bulk biomaterials. Specifically, the macrophage functions of phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to a model particulate material, polystyrene microparticles were investigated. Opsonizing proteins modulated microparticle uptake, and integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins were found to control microparticle uptake in an opsonin-dependent manner. The presence of adsorbed endotoxin did not affect microparticle uptake levels, but was required for the production of inflammatory cytokines in response to microparticles. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins influence the in vivo foreign body response to a bulk biomaterial, subcutaneously implanted polyethylene terephthalate. A thinner foreign body capsule was formed when integrin Mac-1 was absent (~30% thinner) or when RGD-binding integrins were blocked by controlled release of a blocking peptide (~45% thinner). These findings indicate integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins are involved and may serve as therapeutic targets to mitigate macrophage inflammatory responses to both particulate and bulk biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of Elastomeric Polypeptide BIomaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urry, Dan

    1998-01-01

    To design elastic polypeptide biomaterials in order to achieve diverse forms of free energy transduction by these water-miscible hydrophobic folding and assembling macromolecules, thereby to elucidate...

  19. In vitro evaluation of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for canine mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduvaldo Câmara Marques Pereira-Junior

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro ability the of three different biomaterials - purified hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix and castor oil-based polyurethane - as biocompatible 3D scaffolds for canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC intending bone tissue engineering. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow, characterized and cultivated for seven days with the biomaterials. Cell proliferation and adhesion to the biomaterial surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy while differentiation into osteogenic lineage was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and Sp7/Osterix surface antibody marker. RESULTS: The biomaterials allowed cellular growth, attachment and proliferation. Osteogenic differentiation occurred in the presence of hydroxyapatite, and matrix deposition commenced in the presence of the castor oil-based polyurethane. CONCLUSION: All the tested biomaterials may be used as mesenchymal stem cell scaffolds in cell-based orthopedic reconstructive therapy.

  20. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Costa; Isabel F Carvalho; Ronald C Montelaro; Gomes, P; Cristina C L Martins

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPS) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to over-come biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activi...

  1. Biomaterials and mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Nina; Schulze, Margit; Tobiasch, Edda

    2010-01-01

    The reconstruction of hard and soft tissues is a major challenge in regenerative medicine, since diseases or traumas are causing increasing numbers of tissue defects due to the aging of the population. Modern tissue engineering is increasingly using three-dimensional structured biomaterials in combination with stem cells as cell source, since mature cells are often not available in sufficient amounts or quality. Biomaterial scaffolds are developed that not only serve as cell carriers providing mechanical support, but actively influence cellular responses including cell attachment and proliferation. Chemical modifications such as the incorporation of chemotactic factors or cell adhesion molecules are examined for their ability to enhance tissue development successfully. E.g. growth factors have been investigated extensively as substances able to support cell growth, differentiation and angiogenesis. Thus, continuously new patents and studies are published, which are investigating the advantages and disadvantages of different biomaterials or cell types for the regeneration of specific tissues. This review focuses on biomaterials, including natural and synthetic polymers, ceramics and corresponding composites used as scaffold materials to support cell proliferation and differentiation for hard and soft tissues regeneration. In addition, the local delivery of drugs by scaffold biomaterials is discussed.

  2. Mechanically-competent and cytocompatible polycaprolactone-borophosphosilicate hybrid biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Dibakar; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2017-11-01

    Organic-inorganic class II hybrid materials have domain sizes at the molecular level and chemical bonding between the organic and inorganic phases. We have previously reported the synthesis of class II hybrid biomaterials from alkoxysilane-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) and borophosphosilicate (B 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 -SiO 2 ) glass (BPSG) through a non-aqueous sol-gel process. In the present study, the mechanical properties and degradability of these PCL/BPSG hybrid biomaterials were studied and compared to those of their conventional composite counterparts. The compressive strength, modulus and toughness of the hybrid biomaterials were significantly greater compared to the conventional composites, likely due to the covalent bonding between the organic and inorganic phases. A hybrid biomaterial (50wt% PCL and 50wt% BPSG) exhibited compressive strength, modulus and toughness values of 32.2 ± 3.5MPa, 573 ± 85MPa and 1.54 ± 0.03MPa, respectively; whereas the values for composite of similar composition were 18.8 ± 1.6MPa, 275 ± 28MPa and 0.76 ± 0.03MPa, respectively. Degradation in phosphate-buffered saline was slower for hybrid biomaterials compared to their composite counterparts. Thus, these hybrid materials possess superior mechanical properties and more controlled degradation characteristics compared to their corresponding conventional composites. To assess in vitro cytocompatibility, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells were seeded onto the surfaces of hybrid biomaterials and polycaprolactone (control). Compared to polycaprolactone, cells on the hybrid material displayed enhanced spreading, focal adhesion formation, and cell number, consistent with excellent cytocompatibility. Thus, based on their mechanical properties, degradability and cytocompatibility, these novel biomaterials have potential for use as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering and related applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J; Rochford, Edward T J

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of toll-like-receptors (TLRs). Presence of heat-sacrificed Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced dose and cell-type dependent responses. Stem-cells were most sensitive to bacterial presence, demonstrating decreased adhesion number yet increased adhesion effort with a relatively large focal adhesion contact area. Blocking TLRs had no effect on stem-cell adhesion in presence of S. aureus, but blocking both TLR2 and TLR4 induced an increased adhesion effort in presence of E. coli. Neither lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, nor bacterial DNA provoked the same cell response as did whole bacteria. Herewith we suggest a new mechanism as to how biomaterials are integrated by cells despite the unavoidable presence of bacterial contamination. Stimulation of host cell integration of implant surfaces may open a new window to design new biomaterials with enhanced healing, thereby reducing the risk of biomaterial-associated infection of both "hardware-based" implants as well as of tissue-engineered constructs, known to suffer from similarly high infection risks as currently prevailing in "hardware-based" implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Biomaterials: An Introduction for Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Renee B.

    1996-01-01

    Contains an overview of biomaterials, an interdisciplinary field in which research combines medicine, biological sciences, physical sciences, and engineering. Biomaterials are substances which improve quality of life by augmenting or replacing bodily tissues or functions. Highlights problems associated with collection development and literature…

  5. Adhesive Bond Stiffness of Staphylococcus aureus with and without Proteins That Bind to an Adsorbed Fibronectin Film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsson, Adam L. J.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause biomaterial-associated infections of implants and devices once it has breached the skin and mucosal barriers. Adhesion is the initial step in the development of a biomaterial-associated infection, and strategies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and thus

  6. Polyacrylamide brush coatings preventing microbial adhesion to silicone rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundeanu, Irina; van der Mei, Henny C; Schouten, Arend J; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-07-15

    Silicone rubber is a frequently used biomaterial in biomedical devices and implants, yet highly prone to microbial adhesion and the development of a biomaterial-centered infection. Effective coating of silicone rubber to discourage microbial adhesion has thus far been impossible due to the hydrophobic character of its surface, surface deterioration upon treatment and instability of coatings under physiological conditions. Here we present a method to successfully grow polyacrylamide (PAAm) brushes from silicone rubber surfaces after removal of low molecular weight organic molecules (LMWOM), such as silane oligomers. PAAm brush coating did not cause any surface deterioration and discouraged microbial adhesion, even after 1-month exposure to physiological fluids. The method presented opens many new avenues for the use of silicone rubber as a biomaterial, without the risk of developing a biomaterial-centered infection.

  7. SURFACE ENERGETIC CHARACTERISTICS OF ACRYLIC BIOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Papusa Vasiliu (Diaconu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface energetic characteristics of biomaterials influence their adherence to cells and bacteria, surface adsobtion of plasmatic proteins, as well as the capacity of such surfaces of immobilizing some biological species extremely important in medicine. Materials and method: Acrylic surfaces with an area of approximately 2 cm² were employed for the experiments: Duracryl® Plus (Spofa/Dental Product, Czechia, Duracryl® Plus covered with Palaseal (Heraeus Kulzer GmbH, Wehrheim, Germany; artificial saliva AFNOR S90-701 (pH 8.01 was used as a working solution. Results and discussion: Drops of distilled water and artificial saliva, deposited on the working materials: Duracryl and Duracryl covered with Palaseal, were photographed with an optical device, after which each drop was computer-processed, and the contact angle for each liquid surface on the surfaces of the biomaterials here under investigation was determined. On the basis of the determinations made for each material in part, the arihtmetic mean was established. Conclusions: The wettability of dental materials is wholly characterized by the values of the contact angle between the drop of biological liquid and the surface. Low values of the contact angles indicate a good wettability. The results obtained support the conclusion that the surface energy of the solid and rugosity are essential for controlling the adhesive properties of saliva unto dental materials.

  8. Trends in biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Kothiyal, G P

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials research requires the union of materials scientists, engineers, biologists, biomedical doctors, and surgeons. Societal implications have invoked tremendous interest in this area of research in recent years. What started as a search for strong and durable implant materials has now led to path-breaking developments in tissue engineering, targeted drug delivery, and tissue scaffolds. Viable applications of mesoporous structures, polymer biocomposites, and fibers (synthetic and natural) in the areas of clinical orthopedics, controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, orthodontics, etc., have emerged as relatively recent concepts. This book presents recent results related to both materials aspects and implant issues. The focus is on structural, magnetic, antibacterial, bioactivity/compatibility, mechanical, and other related properties and the implication of these results on biomedical applications. The book discusses technical problems faced by the surgeon during implant fixation in total hip repla...

  9. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  10. Cell-Biomaterial Mechanical Interaction in the Framework of Tissue Engineering: Insights, Computational Modeling and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Herrera, Jose A.; Reina-Romo, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of research which combines the use of cell-seeded biomaterials both in vitro and/or in vivo with the aim of promoting new tissue formation or regeneration. In this context, how cells colonize and interact with the biomaterial is critical in order to get a functional tissue engineering product. Cell-biomaterial interaction is referred to here as the phenomenon involved in adherent cells attachment to the biomaterial surface, and their related cell functions such as growth, differentiation, migration or apoptosis. This process is inherently complex in nature involving many physico-chemical events which take place at different scales ranging from molecular to cell body (organelle) levels. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the mechanical environment at the cell-biomaterial location may play an important role in the subsequent cell function, which remains to be elucidated. In this paper, the state-of-the-art research in the physics and mechanics of cell-biomaterial interaction is reviewed with an emphasis on focal adhesions. The paper is focused on the different models developed at different scales available to simulate certain features of cell-biomaterial interaction. A proper understanding of cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the development of predictive models in this sense, may add some light in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields. PMID:22174660

  11. Mechanics of additively manufactured biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir A

    2017-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) has found many applications in healthcare including fabrication of biomaterials as well as bioprinting of tissues and organs. Additively manufactured (AM) biomaterials may possess arbitrarily complex micro-architectures that give rise to novel mechanical, physical, and biological properties. The mechanical behavior of such porous biomaterials including their quasi-static mechanical properties and fatigue resistance is not yet well understood. It is particularly important to understand the relationship between the designed micro-architecture (topology) and the resulting mechanical properties. The current special issue is dedicated to understanding the mechanical behavior of AM biomaterials. Although various types of AM biomaterials are represented in the special issue, the primary focus is on AM porous metallic biomaterials. As a prelude to this special issue, this editorial reviews some of the latest findings in the mechanical behavior of AM porous metallic biomaterials so as to describe the current state-of-the-art and set the stage for the other studies appearing in the issue. Some areas that are important for future research are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microgel mechanics in biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shalini; Hansen, Caroline E; Lyon, L Andrew

    2014-08-19

    The field of polymeric biomaterials has received much attention in recent years due to its potential for enhancing the biocompatibility of systems and devices applied to drug delivery and tissue engineering. Such applications continually push the definition of biocompatibility from relatively straightforward issues such as cytotoxicity to significantly more complex processes such as reducing foreign body responses or even promoting/recapitulating natural body functions. Hydrogels and their colloidal analogues, microgels, have been and continue to be heavily investigated as viable materials for biological applications because they offer numerous, facile avenues in tailoring chemical and physical properties to approach biologically harmonious integration. Mechanical properties in particular are recently coming into focus as an important manner in which biological responses can be altered. In this Account, we trace how mechanical properties of microgels have moved into the spotlight of research efforts with the realization of their potential impact in biologically integrative systems. We discuss early experiments in our lab and in others focused on synthetic modulation of particle structure at a rudimentary level for fundamental drug delivery studies. These experiments elucidated that microgel mechanics are a consequence of polymer network distribution, which can be controlled by chemical composition or particle architecture. The degree of deformability designed into the microgel allows for a defined response to an imposed external force. We have studied deformation in packed colloidal phases and in translocation events through confined pores; in all circumstances, microgels exhibit impressive deformability in response to their environmental constraints. Microgels further translate their mechanical properties when assembled in films to the properties of the bulk material. In particular, microgel films have been a large focus in our lab as building blocks for self

  13. Macrophages, Foreign Body Giant Cells and Their Response to Implantable Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All biomaterials, when implanted in vivo, elicit cellular and tissue responses. These responses include the inflammatory and wound healing responses, foreign body reactions, and fibrous encapsulation of the implanted materials. Macrophages are myeloid immune cells that are tactically situated throughout the tissues, where they ingest and degrade dead cells and foreign materials in addition to orchestrating inflammatory processes. Macrophages and their fused morphologic variants, the multinucleated giant cells, which include the foreign body giant cells (FBGCs are the dominant early responders to biomaterial implantation and remain at biomaterial-tissue interfaces for the lifetime of the device. An essential aspect of macrophage function in the body is to mediate degradation of bio-resorbable materials including bone through extracellular degradation and phagocytosis. Biomaterial surface properties play a crucial role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first couple of weeks following implantation. The foreign body reaction may impact biocompatibility of implantation devices and may considerably impact short- and long-term success in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, necessitating a clear understanding of the foreign body reaction to different implantation materials. The focus of this review article is on the interactions of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with biomaterial surfaces, and the physical, chemical and morphological characteristics of biomaterial surfaces that play a role in regulating the foreign body response. Events in the foreign body response include protein adsorption, adhesion of monocytes/macrophages, fusion to form FBGCs, and the consequent modification of the biomaterial surface. The effect of physico-chemical cues on macrophages is not well known and there is a complex interplay between biomaterial properties and those that result from interactions with the local environment. By having a

  14. Host response to biomaterials the impact of host response on biomaterial selection

    CERN Document Server

    Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Host Response to Biomaterials: The Impact of Host Response on Biomaterial Selection explains the various categories of biomaterials and their significance for clinical applications, focusing on the host response to each biomaterial. It is one of the first books to connect immunology and biomaterials with regard to host response. The text also explores the role of the immune system in host response, and covers the regulatory environment for biomaterials, along with the benefits of synthetic versus natural biomaterials, and the transition from simple to complex biomaterial solutions. Fiel

  15. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C.; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J.; Rochford, Edward T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of

  16. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  17. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Swaminathan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  18. Radiation produced biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Medical advances that have prolonged the average life span have generated increased need for new materials that can be used as tissue and organ replacements, drug delivery systems and/or components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis. The first man-made plastic used as surgical implant was celluloid, applied for cranial defect repair. However, the first users applied commercial materials with no regard for their purity, biostability and post-operative interaction with the organism. Thus, these materials evoked a strong tissue reaction and were unacceptable. The first polymer which gained acceptance for man-made plastic was poly(methyl methacrylate). But the first polymer of choice, precursor of the broad class of materials known today as hydrogels, was poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) synthesized in the fifties by Wichterle and Lim. HEMA and its various combinations with other, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, polymers are till now the most often used hydrogels for medical purposes. In the early fifties, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking, also with hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of phenomena associated with mechanism of reactions, topology of network, and relations between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by Charlesby (1960) and Chapiro (1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in application of radiation to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents published by Japanese and American scientists. Among others, the team of the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment headed by Kaetsu as well as Hoffman and his colleagues from the Center of Bioengineering, University of Washington have created the base for spreading interest in the field of biomaterials formed by means of

  19. Length-Scale Mediated Differential Adhesion of Mammalian Cells and Microbes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yi; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Swartjes, Jan; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Libera, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces of implantable biomedical devices are increasingly engineered to promote their interactions with tissue. However, surfaces that stimulate desirable mammalian cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation also enable microbial colonization. The biomaterials-associated infection that can result

  20. Chitin fulfilling a biomaterials promise

    CERN Document Server

    Khor, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The second edition of Chitin underscores the important factors for standardizing chitin processing and characterization. It captures the essential interplay between chitin's assets and limitations as a biomaterial, placing the past promises of chitin in perspective, addressing its present realities and offering insight into what is required to realize chitin's destiny (including its derivative, chitosan) as a biomaterial of the twenty-first century. This book is an ideal guide for both industrialists and researchers with a vested interest in commercializing chitin.An upd

  1. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...

  2. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  3. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  4. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation onto biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Cláudia

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Staphylococcus epidermidis is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) that often colonizes the skin and mucous membranes of the human body, as part of its normal microflora. However, when a rupture of the cutaneous surface occurs, by any type of trauma or insertion of a medical device, staphylococci can enter the host and become pathogenic. Therefore, S. epidermidis has emerged in recent years as a major nosocomial pathogen associate...

  5. Adherence ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis on prosthetic biomaterials: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shida T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Shida,1 Hironobu Koseki,1 Itaru Yoda,1 Hidehiko Horiuchi,1 Hideyuki Sakoda,2 Makoto Osaki11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan; 2Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Bacterial adhesion to the surface of biomaterials is an essential step in the pathogenesis of implant-related infections. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to adhere to the surface of solid biomaterials, including oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy (Oxinium, cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, titanium alloy, commercially pure titanium, and stainless steel, and performed a biomaterial-to-biomaterial comparison. The test specimens were physically analyzed to quantitatively determine the viable adherent density of the S. epidermidis strain RP62A (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 35984. Field emission scanning electron microscope and laser microscope examination revealed a featureless, smooth surface in all specimens (average roughness <10 nm. The amounts of S. epidermidis that adhered to the biomaterial were significantly lower for Oxinium and the cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy than for commercially pure titanium. These results suggest that Oxinium and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy are less susceptible to bacterial adherence and are less inclined to infection than other materials of a similar degree of smoothness.Keyword: bacterial adhesion, implant, infection, surface character

  6. LCA of Biofuels and Biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Susanne Vedel; Hansen, Sune Balle

    2017-01-01

    Biofuels and biomaterials can today substitute many commodities produced from fossil resources, and the bio-based production is increasing worldwide. As fossil resources are limited, and the use of such resources is a major contributor to global warming and other environmental impacts, the potent...

  7. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  8. Predoctoral Curriculum Guidelines for Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' predoctoral guidelines for biomaterials curricula includes notes on interrelationships between this and other fields, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives for each content area, and information on sequencing, faculty and…

  9. Integrated Biomaterials for Biomedical Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi

    2012-01-01

    This cutting edge book provides all the important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in materials in biomedical technology, especially structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, as well as the applications. The volume consists of 12 chapters written by acknowledged experts of the biomaterials field and covers a wide range of topics and applications.

  10. Inorganic biomaterials structure, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiang C

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a practical guide to the use and applications of inorganic biomaterials. It begins by introducing the concept of inorganic biomaterials, which includes bioceramics and bioglass. This concept is further extended to hybrid biomaterials consisting of inorganic and organic materials to mimic natural biomaterials. The book goes on to provide the reader with information on biocompatibility, bioactivity and bioresorbability. The concept of the latter is important because of the increasing role resorbable biomaterials are playing in implant applications. The book also introduces a n

  11. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  12. An injectable shear-thinning biomaterial for endovascular embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Reginald K; Albadawi, Hassan; Akbari, Mohsen; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Duggan, Michael J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Olsen, Bradley D; Khademhosseini, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-11-16

    Improved endovascular embolization of vascular conditions can generate better patient outcomes and minimize the need for repeat procedures. However, many embolic materials, such as metallic coils or liquid embolic agents, are associated with limitations and complications such as breakthrough bleeding, coil migration, coil compaction, recanalization, adhesion of the catheter to the embolic agent, or toxicity. Here, we engineered a shear-thinning biomaterial (STB), a nanocomposite hydrogel containing gelatin and silicate nanoplatelets, to function as an embolic agent for endovascular embolization procedures. STBs are injectable through clinical catheters and needles and have hemostatic activity comparable to metallic coils, the current gold standard. In addition, STBs withstand physiological pressures without fragmentation or displacement in elastomeric channels in vitro and in explant vessels ex vivo. In vitro experiments also indicated that STB embolization did not rely on intrinsic thrombosis as coils did for occlusion, suggesting that the biomaterial may be suitable for use in patients on anticoagulation therapy or those with coagulopathy. Using computed tomography imaging, the biomaterial was shown to fully occlude murine and porcine vasculature in vivo and remain at the site of injection without fragmentation or nontarget embolization. Given the advantages of rapid delivery, in vivo stability, and independent occlusion that does not rely on intrinsic thrombosis, STBs offer an alternative gel-based embolic agent with translational potential for endovascular embolization. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Albumin grafting on biomaterial surfaces using gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface modification has been used extensively in various fields to introduce desirable surface properties without affecting the bulk properties of the material. In the area of biomaterials, the approach of surface modification offers an effective alternative to the synthesis of new biomaterials. The specific objective of this study was to modify different biomaterial surfaces by albumin grafting to improve their blood compatibility. The modified surfaces were characterized for surface-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation. This behavior was correlated with the conditions used for grafting. In particular, albumin was functionalized to introduce pendant double bonds into the molecule. The functionalized albumin was covalently attached to various surfaces, such as dimethyldichlorosilane-coated glass, polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly(vinyl chloride), and polyethylene by gamma-irradiation. Platelet adhesion and activation on these surfaces was examined using video microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The extent of grafting was found to be dependent on the albumin concentration used for adsorption and the gamma-irradiation time. Release of the grafted albumin during exposure to blood was minimal. The albumin-grafted fibers maintained their thromboresistant properties even after storage at elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods. Finally, the approach was used to graft albumin on the PLEXUS Adult Hollow Fiber Oxygenators (Shiley). The blood compatibility of the grafted oxygenators improved significantly when compared to controls.

  14. Application of ion beams for polymeric carbon based biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, A. L.

    2001-07-01

    Ion beams have been shown to be quite suitable for the modification and analysis of carbon based biomaterials. Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), made from cured phenolic resins, has a high chemical inertness that makes it useful as a biomaterial in medicine for drug delivery systems and for the manufacture of heart valves and other prosthetic devices. Low and high-energy ion beams have been used, with both partially and fully cured phenolic resins, to enhance biological cell/tissue growth on, and to increase tissue adhesion to GPC surfaces. Samples bombarded with energetic ion beams in the keV to MeV range exhibited increased surface roughness, measured using optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Ion beams were also used to perform nuclear reaction analyses of GPC encapsulated drugs for use in internal drug delivery systems. The results from the high energy bombardment were more dramatic and are shown in this paper. The interaction of energetic ions has demonstrated the useful application of ion beams to enhance the properties of carbon-based biomaterials.

  15. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  16. Macrophage response to staphylococcal biofilms on crosslinked poly(ethylene) glycol polymer coatings and common biomaterials in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga Fernández, Isabel C; Da Silva Domingues, Joana F; van Kooten, Theo G; Metzger, Steve; Grainger, David W; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2011-01-14

    Biomaterial-associated-infections (BAI) are serious clinical complications that threaten the longevity of implanted devices and lead to high morbidity and mortality. Poly(ethylene)glycol (PEG) coatings have been studied as a strategy to reduce the incidence of BAI by reducing protein deposition that promotes pathogen adhesion and growth on device surfaces. Despite their effectiveness to reduce protein adsorption and a hundred-fold reduction in bacterial adhesion, PEG-based coatings still facilitate weak bacterial adhesion that can form an initial basis for biofilms. Here, we describe a methodology enabling direct, quantitative and detailed qualitative in situ observation of macrophage morphology, migration and phagocytosis of bacteria. In vitro interaction of macrophages with Staphylococcus epidermidis 3399 adhering to commercial, crosslinked PEG-based coatings (OptiChem®) was compared with fluorinated ethylene propylene, silicone rubber and glass. Adhesion, phagocytosis and migration were studied real-time in a parallel-plate-flow-chamber. Macrophages cultured on OptiChem® coatings showed enhanced migration and phagocytosis of bacteria compared to common biomaterials. Bacterial clearance per macrophage on both inert and reactive OptiChem® coatings were about three times higher than on the common biomaterials studied, corresponding with up to 70% reduction in bacterial numbers on OptiChem®, whereas on the biomaterials less than 40% bacterial reduction was obtained. These findings show that bacterial clearance from cross-linked PEG-based coatings by macrophages is more effective than from common biomaterials, possibly resulting from weak adhesion of bacteria on Optichem®. Moreover, macrophages exhibit higher mobility on Optichem® retaining an improved capability to clear bacteria from larger areas than from other common biomaterials, where they appear more immobilized.

  17. Osteoconductivity of Complex Biomaterials Assayed by Fluorescent-Engineered Osteoblast-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrini, Marco; Mazzoni, Elisa; Barbanti-Brodano, Giovanni; Nocini, Pierfrancesco; D'agostino, Antonio; Trombelli, Leonardo; Tognon, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Biomaterials employed for the bone regeneration can be assayed for specific features such as osteoconductivity and gene expression. In this study, the composite HA/collagen/chondroitin-sulfate biomaterial was investigated using an engineered human cell line, named Saos-eGFP. This cell line, a green fluorescent engineered human osteoblast-like cell, was employed as a cellular model for the in vitro study of biomaterial characteristics. The cytotoxicity was indirectly evaluated by fluorescence detection, osteoconductivity was assayed both by fluorescence and electron microscope analysis as well as cell morphology, whereas the RT-PCR technique was employed to assay gene expression. Saos-eGFP cells viability detection after 24 and 96 h of incubation showed that biomaterial enables the adhesion and proliferation of seeded cells as well as that of the plastic surface, the control. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses indicated that Saos-eGFP cells were homogeneously distributed on the HA granule surfaces, exhibiting cytoplasmic bridges, and were localized on the collagen-chondroitin sulfate extra-cellular matrix. An expression analysis of specific genes encoding for differentiation markers, showed that biomaterial assayed did not alter the osteogenic pathway of the Saos-eGFP cell line. Our assays confirm the cytocompatibility of this biomaterial, suggesting an osteoconductive capacity mediated by its chemical contents. We showed that the Saos-eGFP cellular model is suitable for in vitro biomaterial assays, and more specifically for assessing osteoconductivity. This result suggests that the cytocompatibility and osteoconductive features of the biomaterial assayed as bone substitute, could have a positive downstream effect on implant osteo-integration.

  18. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; Cruz, Adriana Dibo da; Poiate, EdgardJr.; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects re...

  19. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  20. Adhesion and viability of two enterococcal strains on covalently grafted chitosan and chitosan/kappa-carrageenan multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bratskaya, S.; Marinin, D.; Simon, F.; Synytska, A.; Zschoche, S.; Busscher, H. J.; Jager, D.; van der Mei, H. C.

    Chitosans are natural aminopolysaccharides, whose low cytotoxicity suggests their potential use for nonadhesive, antibacterial coatings on biomaterials implant surfaces. Here, the antiadhesive behavior and ability to kill bacteria upon adhesion ("contact killing") of chitosan coatings were evaluated

  1. Multifunctional Biomaterial Coating Based on Bio-Inspired Polyphosphate and Lysozyme Supramolecular Nanofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyuan; Zhang, Dongyue; Gao, Shangwei; Shiba, Toshikazu; Yuan, Quan; Cheng, Kai; Tan, Hong; Li, Jianshu

    2018-02-19

    Current implant materials have widespread clinical applications together with some disadvantages, the majority of which are the ease with which infections are induced and difficulty in exhibiting biocompatibility. For the efficient improvement of their properties, the development of interface multifunctional modification in a simple, universal, and environmently benign approach becomes a critical challenge and has acquired the attention of numerous scientists. In this study, a lysozyme-polyphosphate composite coating was fabricated for titanium(Ti)-based biomaterial to obtain a multifunctional surface. This coating was easily formed by sequentially soaking the substrate in reduced-lysozyme and polyphosphate solution. Such a composite coating has shown predominant antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and improved cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation, which are much better than those of the pure substrate. This facile modification endows the biomaterial with anti-infective and potential bone-regenerative performance for clinical applications of biomaterial implants.

  2. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  3. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...

  4. Evaluation of cell interaction with polymeric biomaterials based on hyaluronic acid and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Mônica Helena Monteiro; Ferreira, Mariselma; Malmonge, Sônia Maria; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2017-05-01

    Tissue engineering involves the development of new materials or devices capable of specific interactions with biological tissues, searching the use of biocompatible materials as scaffolds for in vitro cell growth, and functional tissue development, that is subsequently implanted into patient. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the initial aspects of cell interaction with the polymeric biomaterials blends based on hyaluronic acid with chitosan. The hypothesis approach involves synthesis and analysis of swelling and thermal degradation (thermal gravimetric analysis) of the polymer blend; and Vero cell interaction with the biomaterial, through analysis of cytotoxicity, adhesion and cell morphology. The blend resulted in a biomaterial with a high swelling ratio that can allow nutrient distribution and absorption. The thermal gravimetric analysis results showed that the blend had two stages of degradation at temperatures very close to those observed for pure polymers, confirming that the physical mixing of hydrogels occurred, resulting in the presence of both hyaluronic acid and chitosan in the blend. The evaluation of indirect cytotoxicity showed that the blend was non cytotoxic for Vero cells, and the quantitative analysis performed with the MTT could verify a cell viability of 98%. The cells cultured on the blend showed adhesion, spreading and proliferation on this biomaterial, distinguished from the pattern of the control cells. These results showed that the blends produced from hyaluronic acid and chitosan hydrogels are promising for applications in tissue engineering, aiming at future cartilaginous tissue.

  5. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  6. Nanotechnology in medicine: nanofilm biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassel, Paul R

    2013-12-13

    By interrogating nature at the length scale of important biological molecules (proteins, DNA), nanotechnology offers great promise to biomedicine. We review here our recent work on nanofilm biomaterials: "nanoscopically" thin, functional, polymer-based films serving as biocompatible interfaces. In one thrust, films containing carbon nanotubes are shown to be highly antimicrobial and, thus, to be promising as biomedical device materials inherently resistive to microbial infection. In another thrust, strategies are developed toward films of independently controllable bioactivity and mechanical rigidity - two key variables governing typical biological responses.

  7. Incorporation of Biomaterials in Multicellular Aggregates Modulates Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M.; Carpenedo, Richard L.; Ungrin, Mark; Zandstra, Peter W.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials are increasingly being used to engineer the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular stem cell microenvironment in order to tailor niche characteristics and direct cell phenotype. To date, stem cell-biomaterial interactions have largely been studied by introducing stem cells into artificial environments, such as 2D cell culture on biomaterial surfaces, encapsulation of cell suspensions within hydrogel materials, or cell seeding on 3D polymeric scaffolds. In this study, microparticles fabricated from different materials, such as agarose, PLGA and gelatin, were stably integrated, in a dose-dependent manner, within aggregates of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) prior to differentiation as a means to directly examine stem cell-biomaterial interactions in 3D. Interestingly, the presence of the materials within the stem cell aggregates differentially modulated the gene and protein expression patterns of several differentiation markers without adversely affecting cell viability. Microparticle incorporation within 3D stem cell aggregates can control the spatial presentation of extracellular environmental cues (i.e. soluble factors, extracellular matrix and intercellular adhesion molecules) as a means to direct the differentiation of stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In addition, these results suggest that the physical presence of microparticles within stem cell aggregates does not compromise PSC differentiation, but in fact the choice of biomaterials can impact the propensity of stem cells to adopt particular differentiated cell phenotypes. PMID:20864164

  8. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent overuse if zinc is an ingredient. (Some companies include graphics of the amount of adhesive to ... and adequate directions for use or a clear definition of an unsafe dosage or methods or duration ...

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of Biodegradable Reactive Isocyanate-Terminated Three-Armed- and Hyperbranched Block Copolymeric Tissue Adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochynska, Agnieszka I.; Hannink, Gerjon; Rongen, Jan J.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Buma, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Tissue adhesives are an attractive class of biomaterials, which can serve as a treatment for meniscus tears. In this study, physicochemical and adhesive properties of novel biodegradable three-armed- and hyperbranched block copolymeric adhesives are evaluated. Additionally, their degradation in

  10. Keratoconus: Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karamichos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a bilateral, asymmetric, corneal disorder that is characterized by progressive thinning, steepening, and potential scarring. The prevalence of KC is stated to be 1 in 2000 persons worldwide; however, numbers vary depending on size of the study and regions. KC appears more often in South Asian, Eastern Mediterranean, and North African populations. The cause remains unknown, although a variety of factors have been considered. Genetics, cellular, and mechanical changes have all been reported; however, most of these studies have proven inconclusive. Clearly, the major problem here, like with any other ocular disease, is quality of life and the threat of vision loss. While most KC cases progress until the third or fourth decade, it varies between individuals. Patients may experience periods of several months with significant changes followed by months or years of no change, followed by another period of rapid changes. Despite the major advancements, it is still uncertain how to treat KC at early stages and prevent vision impairment. There are currently limited tissue engineering techniques and/or “smart” biomaterials that can help arrest the progression of KC. This review will focus on current treatments and how biomaterials may hold promise for the future.

  11. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  12. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  13. Properties and clinical relevance of osteoinductive biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibovic, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    This thesis had two main goals: (¿) to investigate parameters influencing osteoinductive potential of biomaterials in order to unravel the mechanism underlying osteoinduction and (¿¿) to investigate performance of osteoinductive biomaterials orthotopically in order to get insight into their clinical

  14. Leveraging advances in biology to design biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Max; Mooney, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Biomaterials have dramatically increased in functionality and complexity, allowing unprecedented control over the cells that interact with them. From these engineering advances arises the prospect of improved biomaterial-based therapies, yet practical constraints favour simplicity. Tools from the biology community are enabling high-resolution and high-throughput bioassays that, if incorporated into a biomaterial design framework, could help achieve unprecedented functionality while minimizing the complexity of designs by identifying the most important material parameters and biological outputs. However, to avoid data explosions and to effectively match the information content of an assay with the goal of the experiment, material screens and bioassays must be arranged in specific ways. By borrowing methods to design experiments and workflows from the bioprocess engineering community, we outline a framework for the incorporation of next-generation bioassays into biomaterials design to effectively optimize function while minimizing complexity. This framework can inspire biomaterials designs that maximize functionality and translatability.

  15. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fabíola; Carvalho, Isabel F; Montelaro, Ronald C; Gomes, P; Martins, M Cristina L

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to overcome biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activity, high efficacy at very low concentrations, target specificity, anti-endotoxin activity, synergistic action with classical antibiotics, and low propensity for developing resistance. Therefore, the development of an antimicrobial coating with such properties would be worthwhile. The immobilization of AMPs onto a biomaterial surface has further advantages as it also helps to circumvent AMPs' potential limitations, such as short half-life and cytotoxicity associated with higher concentrations of soluble peptides. The studies discussed in the current review report on the impact of covalent immobilization of AMPs onto surfaces through different chemical coupling strategies, length of spacers, and peptide orientation and concentration. The overall results suggest that immobilized AMPs may be effective in the prevention of biofilm formation by reduction of microorganism survival post-contact with the coated biomaterial. Minimal cytotoxicity and long-term stability profiles were obtained by optimizing immobilization parameters, indicating a promising potential for the use of immobilized AMPs in clinical applications. On the other hand, the effects of tethering on mechanisms of action of AMPs have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, further studies are recommended to explore the real potential of immobilized AMPs in health applications as antimicrobial coatings of medical devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biofunctionalized Plants as Diverse Biomaterials for Human Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Gianluca; Gershlak, Joshua; Adamski, Michal; Lee, Jae-Sung; Matsumoto, Shion; Le, Hau D; Binder, Bernard; Wirth, John; Gaudette, Glenn; Murphy, William L

    2017-04-01

    The commercial success of tissue engineering products requires efficacy, cost effectiveness, and the possibility of scaleup. Advances in tissue engineering require increased sophistication in the design of biomaterials, often challenging the current manufacturing techniques. Interestingly, several of the properties that are desirable for biomaterial design are embodied in the structure and function of plants. This study demonstrates that decellularized plant tissues can be used as adaptable scaffolds for culture of human cells. With simple biofunctionalization technique, it is possible to enable adhesion of human cells on a diverse set of plant tissues. The elevated hydrophilicity and excellent water transport abilities of plant tissues allow cell expansion over prolonged periods of culture. Moreover, cells are able to conform to the microstructure of the plant frameworks, resulting in cell alignment and pattern registration. In conclusion, the current study shows that it is feasible to use plant tissues as an alternative feedstock of scaffolds for mammalian cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Ion release from metallic biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Morais, Liliane Siqueira de; Guimarães, Glaucio Serra; Elias, Carlos Nelson

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: todo biomaterial metálico implantado possui alguma interação com os tecidos em contato, havendo liberação de íons por dissolução, desgaste ou corrosão. O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a liberação de íons metálicos por alguns tipos de biomateriais metálicos, descrevendo a interação íon/tecido e os possíveis efeitos adversos. CONCLUSÃO: os tratamentos de jateamento e ataque ácido propiciam aumento na dissolução e liberação de íons metálicos, mas o recobrimento destas superfície...

  18. Bioresorption and degradation of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debarun; Zhang, Ziyang; Winkler, Thomas; Mour, Meenakshi; Gunter, Christina; Morlock, Michael; Machens, Hans-Gunther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2012-01-01

    The human body is a composite structure, completely constructed of biodegradable materials. This allows the cells of the body to remove and replace old or defective tissue with new material. Consequently, artificial resorbable biomaterials have been developed for application in regenerative medicine. We discuss here advantages and disadvantages of these bioresorbable materials for medical applications and give an overview of typically used metals, ceramics and polymers. Methods for the quantification of bioresorption in vitro and in vivo are described. The next challenge will be to better understand the interface between cell and material and to use this knowledge for the design of “intelligent” materials that can instruct the cells to build specific tissue geometries and degrade in the process.

  19. Biomaterial science meets computational biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Little, J Paige; Pettet, Graeme J; Loessner, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    There is a pressing need for a predictive tool capable of revealing a holistic understanding of fundamental elements in the normal and pathological cell physiology of organoids in order to decipher the mechanoresponse of cells. Therefore, the integration of a systems bioengineering approach into a validated mathematical model is necessary to develop a new simulation tool. This tool can only be innovative by combining biomaterials science with computational biology. Systems-level and multi-scale experimental data are incorporated into a single framework, thus representing both single cells and collective cell behaviour. Such a computational platform needs to be validated in order to discover key mechano-biological factors associated with cell-cell and cell-niche interactions.

  20. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  1. Metallic Biomaterials: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthika Prasad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials are engineered systems designed to provide internal support to biological tissues and they are being used largely in joint replacements, dental implants, orthopaedic fixations and stents. Higher biomaterial usage is associated with an increased incidence of implant-related complications due to poor implant integration, inflammation, mechanical instability, necrosis and infections, and associated prolonged patient care, pain and loss of function. In this review, we will briefly explore major representatives of metallic biomaterials along with the key existing and emerging strategies for surface and bulk modification used to improve biointegration, mechanical strength and flexibility of biometals, and discuss their compatibility with the concept of 3D printing.

  2. Biomaterial stiffness determines stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Wang, Heping; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Wang; Liu, Wenbin; Li, Yulin; Li, Lisha

    2017-06-01

    Stem cells have potential to develop into numerous cell types, thus they are good cell source for tissue engineering. As an external physical signal, material stiffness is capable of regulating stem cell fate. Biomaterial stiffness is an important parameter in tissue engineering. We summarize main measurements of material stiffness under different condition, then list and compare three main methods of controlling stiffness (material amount, crosslinking density and photopolymeriztion time) which interplay with one another and correlate with stiffness positively, and current advances in effects of biomaterial stiffness on stem cell fate. We discuss the unsolved problems and future directions of biomaterial stiffness in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Creating biomaterials with spatially organized functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lesley W; Fischer, Jacob F

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials for tissue engineering provide scaffolds to support cells and guide tissue regeneration. Despite significant advances in biomaterials design and fabrication techniques, engineered tissue constructs remain functionally inferior to native tissues. This is largely due to the inability to recreate the complex and dynamic hierarchical organization of the extracellular matrix components, which is intimately linked to a tissue's biological function. This review discusses current state-of-the-art strategies to control the spatial presentation of physical and biochemical cues within a biomaterial to recapitulate native tissue organization and function. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  4. Polymeric biomaterials structure and function, v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitriu, Severian

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials have had a major impact on the practice of contemporary medicine and patient care. Growing into a major interdisciplinary effort involving chemists, biologists, engineers, and physicians, biomaterials development has enabled the creation of high-quality devices, implants, and drug carriers with greater biocompatibility and biofunctionality. The fast-paced research and increasing interest in finding new and improved biocompatible or biodegradable polymers has provided a wealth of new information, transforming this edition of Polymeric Biomaterials into a two-volume set. This volume

  5. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  6. Use of protein-engineered fabrics to identify design rules for integrin ligand clustering in biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Patrick L; Mascharak, Shamik; Proctor, Amy C; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    While ligand clustering is known to enhance integrin activation, this insight has been difficult to apply to the design of implantable biomaterials because the local and global ligand densities that enable clustering-enhanced integrin signaling were unpredictable. Here, two general design principles for biomaterial ligand clustering are elucidated. First, clustering ligands enhances integrin-dependent signals when the global ligand density, i.e., the ligand density across the cellular length scale, is near the ligand's effective dissociation constant (KD,eff). Second, clustering ligands enhances integrin activation when the local ligand density, i.e., the ligand density across the length scale of individual focal adhesions, is less than an overcrowding threshold. To identify these principles, we fabricated a series of elastin-like, electrospun fabrics with independent control over the local (0 to 122 000 ligands μm(-2)) and global (0 to 71 000 ligand μm(-2)) densities of an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) ligand. Antibody blocking studies confirmed that human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion to these protein-engineered biomaterials was primarily due to αVβ3 integrin binding. Clustering ligands enhanced cell proliferation, focal adhesion number, and focal adhesion kinase expression near the ligand's KD,eff of 12 000 RGD μm(-2). Near this global ligand density, cells on ligand-clustered fabrics behaved similarly to cells grown on fabrics with significantly larger global ligand densities but without clustering. However, this enhanced ligand-clustering effect was not observed above a threshold cut-off concentration. At a local ligand density of 122 000 RGD μm(-2), cell division, focal adhesion number, and focal adhesion kinase expression were significantly reduced relative to fabrics with identical global ligand density and lesser local ligand densities. Thus, when clustering results in overcrowding of ligands, integrin receptors are no longer

  7. Plant Products for Innovative Biomaterials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena M. Varoni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental biomaterials and natural products represent two of the main growing research fields, revealing plant-derived compounds may play a role not only as nutraceuticals in affecting oral health, but also in improving physico-chemical properties of biomaterials used in dentistry. Therefore, our aim was to collect all available data concerning the utilization of plant polysaccharides, proteins and extracts rich in bioactive phytochemicals in enhancing performance of dental biomaterials. Although compelling evidences are suggestive of a great potential of plant products in promoting material-tissue/cell interface, to date, only few authors have investigated their use in development of innovative dental biomaterials. A small number of studies have reported plant extract-based titanium implant coatings and periodontal regenerative materials. To the best of our knowledge, this review is the first to deal with this topic, highlighting a general lack of research findings in an interesting field which still needs to be investigated.

  8. Biomaterials in the repair of sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducheyne, Paul; Mauck, Robert L.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal stimulation of tissue regeneration in bone, cartilage and spinal cord injuries involves a judicious selection of biomaterials with tailored chemical compositions, micro- and nanostructures, porosities and kinetic release properties for the delivery of relevant biologically active molecules.

  9. The recent progress of tribological biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. E

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tribological phenomena abundantly exist in living beings, especially in human beings, such as in teeth, eyes, bones, skins, heart valves and so on, and it is meaningful to reveal the mechanism of tribology in human body and fabricate artificial biomaterials to replace the damaged tissues to release the pain of patients. Alloys, ceramics and polymers are three uppermost materials used in engineering and some of them play a crucial role in biomedicine. In the paper, we provide an overview of the tribological behaviors of artificial biomaterials including alloys, ceramics and polymers. We aim to provide fundamental mechanistic and applications of tribological biomaterials, while emphasizing the advantages and disadvantages of various kinds of tribological biomaterials. Finally, some challenges and the potential promising breakthroughs are also succinctly highlighted in this field.

  10. Applications of biomaterials to liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugai, Urara; Seki, Yasutaka; Furue, Hirokazu; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2013-04-19

    Nowadays, chemically synthesized proteins and peptides are attractive building blocks and have potential in many important applications as biomaterials. In this review, applications of biomaterials to thermotropic liquid crystals are discussed. The review covers the improvement of the performance of liquid crystal displays using liquid crystal physical gels consisting of a liquid crystal and amino acid-based gelators, and also new functionalization of liquid crystals. Moreover, the influence of DNA, which is one of the more attractive biomaterials, dispersed in thermotropic liquid crystals and its potential use in the liquid crystal industry is described. In addition, we found interesting results during electrooptical measurements of liquid crystals doped with DNA, and explain them from the point of view of biological applications. These recent approaches suggest that these biomaterials may be applicable in the electronic device industry and should be considered as an interesting material with their physical properties having the potential to create or refine an industrial product.

  11. Applications of Biomaterials to Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Sakaguchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, chemically synthesized proteins and peptides are attractive building blocks and have potential in many important applications as biomaterials. In this review, applications of biomaterials to thermotropic liquid crystals are discussed. The review covers the improvement of the performance of liquid crystal displays using liquid crystal physical gels consisting of a liquid crystal and amino acid-based gelators, and also new functionalization of liquid crystals. Moreover, the influence of DNA, which is one of the more attractive biomaterials, dispersed in thermotropic liquid crystals and its potential use in the liquid crystal industry is described. In addition, we found interesting results during electrooptical measurements of liquid crystals doped with DNA, and explain them from the point of view of biological applications. These recent approaches suggest that these biomaterials may be applicable in the electronic device industry and should be considered as an interesting material with their physical properties having the potential to create or refine an industrial product.

  12. Designing Biomaterials for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvendiren, Murat; Molde, Joseph; Soares, Rosane M D; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-10-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming an increasingly common technique to fabricate scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering applications. This is due to the potential of 3D printing to provide patient-specific designs, high structural complexity, rapid on-demand fabrication at a low-cost. One of the major bottlenecks that limits the widespread acceptance of 3D printing in biomanufacturing is the lack of diversity in "biomaterial inks". Printability of a biomaterial is determined by the printing technique. Although a wide range of biomaterial inks including polymers, ceramics, hydrogels and composites have been developed, the field is still struggling with processing of these materials into self-supporting devices with tunable mechanics, degradation, and bioactivity. This review aims to highlight the past and recent advances in biomaterial ink development and design considerations moving forward. A brief overview of 3D printing technologies focusing on ink design parameters is also included.

  13. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis in Biomaterials Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Yanling

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive preventative efforts, the problem of controlling infections associated with biomedical materials persists. Bacteria tend to colonize on biocompatible materials and form biofilms; thus, novel biomaterials with antibacterial properties are of great interest. In this thesis, titanium dioxide (TiO2)-associated photocatalysis under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was investigated as a strategy for developing bioactivity and antibacterial properties on biomaterials. Although much of ...

  14. Biomaterials innovation bundling technologies and life

    CERN Document Server

    Styhre, A

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in the life sciences means that there is now a far more detailed understanding of biological systems on the cellular, molecular and genetic levels. Sited at the intersection between the life sciences, the engineering sciences and the design sciences, innovations in the biomaterials industry are expected to garner increasing attention and play a key role in future development. This book examines the biomaterials innovations taking place in corporations and in academic research settings today.

  15. Medical applications for biomaterials in Bolivia

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the potential medical benefits natural biomaterials can offer in developing countries by analyzing the case of Bolivia. The book explores the medical and health related applications of Bolivian commodities: quinoa, barley, sugarcane, corn, sorghum and sunflower seeds. This book helps readers better understand some of the key health concerns facing countries like Bolivia and how naturally derived biomaterials and therapeutics could help substantially alleviate many of their problems.

  16. Special Issue “Biomaterials and Bioprinting”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kai Chua

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of bioprinting in recent years represents a marvellous advancement in 3D printing technology. It expands the range of 3D printable materials from the world of non-living materials into the world of living materials. Biomaterials play an important role in this paradigm shift. This Special Issue focuses on biomaterials and bioprinting and contains eight articles covering a number of recent topics in this emerging area.

  17. Glycoconjugates and Glycomimetics as Microbial Anti-Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Sara; Bernardi, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Microbial adhesion is an essential step in infection and is mediated primarily by protein-carbohydrate interactions. Antagonists of such interactions have become a promising target for anti-adhesive therapy in several infective diseases. Monovalent protein-sugar interactions are often weak, and most successful anti-adhesive materials consist of multivalent glycoconjugates. Although often very effective in hampering microbial adhesion, natural epitopes often show limited resistance to enzymatic degradation. The use of carbohydrate mimics (glycomimetics) as a replacement for natural sugars potentially allows higher metabolic stability and also higher selectivity towards the desired protein target. In this review we describe the state of the art in the design and synthesis of glycoconjugates and glycomimetics employed for the construction of anti-adhesive biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Nano biomaterials 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Lee, S.Ch.; Zhang, Sh.; Akasaka, T.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that nano materials have developed rapidly over the past few decades. Based on their unique physicochemical properties and special mechanical properties, nano materials have provided application possibility in many different fields. Currently, as nano biomaterials, they are widely used in various biomedical applications, such as drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, dental/bone implant, and biosensors. For example, nano biomaterials have been used in tissue engineering because of their satisfactory bioactivity, high mechanical properties, and large surface area to adsorb specific proteins. Many kinds of nano biomaterials are used to prepare composite scaffolds to get better biocompatibility and higher ability in repairing specific tissues. Several antibacterial metallic nano biomaterials are used to coat implant surfaces to improve the speed of healing fractures. In addition, lots of nano biomaterials have the potential to break the limitations of the traditional delivery systems. They can load larger amount of drugs and provide stable drug release for long time at the targeted sites, such as tumors. Moreover, they can combine with polymers to furnish simultaneous drug delivery systems with the controllable release rate. Besides these applications, more and more nano biomaterials show great potential to be applied as highly sensitive biosensors because they have higher ability in loading firmly or interacting completely with recognition aptamers.

  19. 2010 Panel on the Biomaterials Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, William “Monty”; Ratner, Buddy D.; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Tirrell, David

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies—Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell—were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities. PMID:21171147

  20. Development of a hybrid scaffold with synthetic biomaterials and hydrogel using solid freeform fabrication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Min; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Dong-Woo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Young, E-mail: dwcho@postech.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Natural biomaterials such as hyaluronic acid, gelatin and collagen provide excellent environments for tissue regeneration. Furthermore, gel-state natural biomaterials are advantageous for encapsulating cells and growth factors. In cell printing technology, hydrogel which contains cells was printed directly to form three-dimensional (3D) structures for tissue or organ regeneration using various types of printers. However, maintaining the 3D shape of the printed structure, which is made only of the hydrogel, is very difficult due to its weak mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a hybrid scaffold consisting of synthetic biomaterials and natural hydrogel using a multi-head deposition system, which is useful in solid freeform fabrication technology. The hydrogel was intentionally infused into the space between the lines of a synthetic biomaterial-based scaffold. The cellular efficacy of the hybrid scaffold was validated using rat primary hepatocytes and a mouse pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell line. In addition, the collagen hydrogel, which encapsulates cells, was dispensed and the viability of the cells observed. We demonstrated superior effects of the hybrid scaffold on cell adhesion and proliferation and showed the high viability of dispensed cells.

  1. Development of a hybrid scaffold with synthetic biomaterials and hydrogel using solid freeform fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Min; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kim, Jong Young

    2011-01-01

    Natural biomaterials such as hyaluronic acid, gelatin and collagen provide excellent environments for tissue regeneration. Furthermore, gel-state natural biomaterials are advantageous for encapsulating cells and growth factors. In cell printing technology, hydrogel which contains cells was printed directly to form three-dimensional (3D) structures for tissue or organ regeneration using various types of printers. However, maintaining the 3D shape of the printed structure, which is made only of the hydrogel, is very difficult due to its weak mechanical properties. In this study, we developed a hybrid scaffold consisting of synthetic biomaterials and natural hydrogel using a multi-head deposition system, which is useful in solid freeform fabrication technology. The hydrogel was intentionally infused into the space between the lines of a synthetic biomaterial-based scaffold. The cellular efficacy of the hybrid scaffold was validated using rat primary hepatocytes and a mouse pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell line. In addition, the collagen hydrogel, which encapsulates cells, was dispensed and the viability of the cells observed. We demonstrated superior effects of the hybrid scaffold on cell adhesion and proliferation and showed the high viability of dispensed cells.

  2. Activated charcoal composite biomaterial promotes human embryonic stem cell differentiation toward neuronal lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric Y T; Wang, Yung-Chen; Mintz, Alexander; Richards, Alan; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Lu, David; Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Transplantation of biomaterial scaffolds encasing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has been proposed as a clinical therapy for various neurological lesions and disorders. In light of recent developments, artificially synthesized carbon-based biomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have demonstrated feasibility in supporting stem cell attachment and differentiation. However, the applicability is significantly hampered by evidence of nanotoxic effects on multiple cell types. Thus, an emergent drive for an innovative carbonaceous biomaterial calls for a safer platform with comparable advantageous characteristics. Here, we showed for the first time, a natural coal-based activated charcoal (AC) composite biosubstrate can support and promote neuronal differentiation in hESCs. The bio-friendly AC composite biomatrices resulted in more matured neuron-like cells. Both of axonal length and density were at least twice as long and abundant, respectively, when compared with control groups. A functional assay demonstrated that the derived neuron-like cells responded to depolarization-dependent synaptic recycling and may contain active synapses. In addition, the AC composite substrate can serve to concentrate growth factors and cell adhesion proteins, further encouraging attachment and hESC differentiation. Moreover, the AC composite biomaterial can potentially be economically manufactured as implantable three-dimensional bioscaffolds, facilitating the regeneration of damaged neural and other tissues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tracking of Drug Release and Material Fate for Naturally Derived Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Keith M; Artzi, Natalie; Beck, Moshe; Beckerman, Rita; Moodie, Geoff; Albergo, Theresa; Conroy, Suzanne; Dale, Alicia; Corbeil, Scott; Martakos, Paul; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted on omega-3 fatty acid-derived biomaterials to determine their utility as an implantable material for adhesion prevention following soft tissue hernia repair and as a means to allow for the local delivery of antimicrobial or antibiofilm agents. Naturally derived biomaterials offer several advantages over synthetic materials in the field of medical device development. These advantages include enhanced biocompatibility, elimination of risks posed by the presence of toxic catalysts and chemical crosslinking agents, and derivation from renewable resources. Omega-3 fatty acids are readily available from fish and plant sources and can be used to create implantable biomaterials either as a stand-alone device or as a device coating that can be utilized in local drug delivery applications. In-depth characterization of material erosion degradation over time using non-destructive imaging and chemical characterization techniques provided mechanistic insight into material structure: function relationship. This in turn guided rational tailoring of the material based on varying fatty acid composition to control material residence time and hence drug release. These studies demonstrate the utility of omega-3 fatty acid derived biomaterials as an absorbable material for soft tissue hernia repair and drug delivery applications.

  4. Biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, R; McArdle, A; Atashroo, D; Walmsley, G G; Senarath-Yapa, K; Zielins, E R; Paik, K J; Longaker, M T; Wan, D C

    2014-12-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell-based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  5. Lysine-Grafted MCM-41 Silica as an Antibacterial Biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, María F.; Garcia-Uriostegui, Lorena; Rodríguez, Ofelia; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Salinas, Antonio J.; Toriz, Guillermo; Vallet-Regí, María; Delgado, Ezequiel

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a facile strategy for the zwitterionization of bioceramics that is based on the direct incorporation of l-lysine amino acid via the ε-amino group onto mesoporous MCM-41 materials. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies of lysine-grafted MCM-41 (MCM-LYS) simultaneously showed bands at 3080 and 1540 cm−1 and bands at 1625 and 1415 cm−1 corresponding to -NH3+/COO− pairs, which demonstrate the incorporation of the amino acid on the material surface keeping its zwitterionic character. Both elemental and thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of grafted lysine was 8 wt. % based on the bioceramic total weight. Moreover, MCM-LYS exhibited a reduction of adhesion of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria in 33% and 50%, respectively at physiological pH, as compared with pristine MCM-41. Biofilm studies onto surfaces showed that lysine functionalization elicited a reduction of the area covered by S. aureus biofilm from 42% to only 5% (88%). This research shows a simple and effective approach to chemically modify bioceramics using single amino acids that provides zwitterionic functionality, which is useful to develop new biomaterials that are able to resist bacterial adhesion. PMID:28952559

  6. In vitro biocompatiblity of modified polycarbonate as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, Kohila; Thomas, Susha; Prabhawathi, V; Boobalan, T; Sawant, Shilpa N; Doble, Mukesh

    2013-08-01

    Nitrated and aminated polycarbonates were prepared chemically, characterized and tested in vitro as a possible biomaterial. Adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 5021, Escherichia coli NCIM 2931 and Proteus vulgaris NCIM 2813 and the presence of carbohydrate, protein, CFU and ATP on these surfaces were examined. Cytotoxicity of these surfaces was investigated by growing L929 mouse fibroblast cells. NO2-PC was more hydrophilic than un-PC and reduced adhesion of bacterial protein and carbohydrate. NH2-PC was the most hydrophilic surface biofilm prevention and increased proliferation of the fibroblast cells. The motility of all the three organisms decreased on aminated surface when compared to that on the other two. This study indicated that reducing the surface hydrophobicity alone was not sufficient to develop a biocompatible material, but providing favorable surface functional groups was also a necessary criterion. A strong correlation was observed between the hydrophobicity of the polymer surface and the zeta potential of the organism with bacterial attachment (CFU/ml). A multi-linear regression model with these two parameters was able to fit the observed bacterial attachment data well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lysine-Grafted MCM-41 Silica as an Antibacterial Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Villegas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a facile strategy for the zwitterionization of bioceramics that is based on the direct incorporation of l-lysine amino acid via the ε-amino group onto mesoporous MCM-41 materials. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR studies of lysine-grafted MCM-41 (MCM-LYS simultaneously showed bands at 3080 and 1540 cm−1 and bands at 1625 and 1415 cm−1 corresponding to -NH3+/COO− pairs, which demonstrate the incorporation of the amino acid on the material surface keeping its zwitterionic character. Both elemental and thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of grafted lysine was 8 wt. % based on the bioceramic total weight. Moreover, MCM-LYS exhibited a reduction of adhesion of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria in 33% and 50%, respectively at physiological pH, as compared with pristine MCM-41. Biofilm studies onto surfaces showed that lysine functionalization elicited a reduction of the area covered by S. aureus biofilm from 42% to only 5% (88%. This research shows a simple and effective approach to chemically modify bioceramics using single amino acids that provides zwitterionic functionality, which is useful to develop new biomaterials that are able to resist bacterial adhesion.

  8. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  9. A Review of Structure Construction of Silk Fibroin Biomaterials from Single Structures to Multi-Level Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The biological performance of artificial biomaterials is closely related to their structure characteristics. Cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation are all strongly affected by the different scale structures of biomaterials. Silk fibroin (SF, extracted mainly from silkworms, has become a popular biomaterial due to its excellent biocompatibility, exceptional mechanical properties, tunable degradation, ease of processing, and sufficient supply. As a material with excellent processability, SF can be processed into various forms with different structures, including particulate, fiber, film, and three-dimensional (3D porous scaffolds. This review discusses and summarizes the various constructions of SF-based materials, from single structures to multi-level structures, and their applications. In combination with single structures, new techniques for creating special multi-level structures of SF-based materials, such as micropatterning and 3D-printing, are also briefly addressed.

  10. A Review of Injectable and Implantable Biomaterials for Treatment and Repair of Soft Tissues in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Feng Chou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The two major topics concerning the development of nanomedicine are drug delivery and tissue engineering. With the advance in nanotechnology, scientists and engineers now have the ability to fabricate functional drug carriers and/or biomaterials that deliver and release drugs locally as well as promote tissue regeneration. In this short review, we address the use of nanotechnology in the fabrication of biomaterials (i.e., nanoparticles and nanofibers and their therapeutic function in wound healing as dressing materials. Furthermore, we discuss the use of surface nanofeatures to regulate cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation, which is a crucial step in wound healing associated with tissue regeneration. Given that nanotechnology-based biomaterials exhibit superior pharmaceutical performance as compared to the traditional medicine, this short review provides current status and future directions of how nanotechnology is and will be used in biomedical field, especially in wound healing.

  11. Biomaterials and medical devices a perspective from an emerging country

    CERN Document Server

    Hermawan, Hendra

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to biomaterials with the focus on the current development and future direction of biomaterials and medical devices research and development in Indonesia. It is the first biomaterials book written by selected academic and clinical experts experts on biomaterials and medical devices from various institutions and industries in Indonesia. It serves as a reference source for researchers starting new projects, for companies developing and marketing products and for governments setting new policies. Chapter one covers the fundamentals of biomaterials, types of biomaterials, their structures and properties and the relationship between them. Chapter two discusses unconventional processing of biomaterials including nano-hybrid organic-inorganic biomaterials. Chapter three addresses biocompatibility issues including in vitro cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, in vitro cell models, biocompatibility data and its related failure. Chapter four describes degradable biomaterial for medical implants...

  12. Marine Structural Biomaterials in Medical Biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    Marine biomaterials display properties, behaviors, and functions that have not been artificially matched in relation to their hierarchical construction, crack-stopping properties, growth adaptation, and energy efficiency. The discovery and understanding of such features that are characteristic of natural biomaterials can be used to manufacture more energy-efficient and lightweight materials. However, a more detailed understanding of the design of natural biomaterials with good performance and the mechanism of their design is required. Far-reaching biomolecular characterization of biomaterials and biostructures from the ocean world is possible with sophisticated analytical methods, such as whole-genome RNA-seq, and de novo transcriptome sequencing and mass spectrophotometry-based sequencing. In combination with detailed material characterization, the elements in newly discovered biomaterials and their properties can be reconstituted into biomimetic or bio-inspired materials. A major aim of harnessing marine biomaterials is their translation into biomimetic counterparts. To achieve full translation, the genome, proteome, and hierarchical material characteristics, and their profiles in space and time, have to be associated to allow for smooth biomimetic translation. In this article, we highlight the novel science of marine biomimicry from a materials perspective. We focus on areas of material design and fabrication that have excelled in marine biological models, such as embedded interfaces, chiral organization, and the use of specialized composite material-on-material designs. Our emphasis is primarily on key materials with high value in healthcare in which we evaluate their future prospects. Marine biomaterials are among the most exquisite and powerful aspects in materials science today.

  13. Enzyme-mimicking polymer brush-functionalized surface for combating biomaterial-associated infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rujian; Xin, Zhirong; Xu, Shiai; Shi, Hengchong; Yang, Huawei; Song, Lingjie; Yan, Shunjie; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua; Khan, Ather Farooq; Li, Yonggang

    2017-11-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections critically compromise the functionality and performance of the medical devices, and pose a serious threat to human healthcare. Recently, natural DNase enzyme has been recognized as a potent material to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. However, the vulnerability of DNase dramatically limits its long-term performance in antibacterial applications. In this work, DNase-mimicking polymer brushes were constructed to mimic the DNA-cleavage activity as well as the macromolecular scaffold of the natural DNase. The bacteria repellent efficacy of DNase-mimicking polymer brush-functionalized surface was comparable to that of the DNase-functionalized surface. More importantly, due to their inherent stability, DNase-mimicking polymer brushes presented the much better performance in inhibiting bacterial biofilm development for prolonged periods of time, as compared to the natural DNase. The as-developed DNase-mimicking polymer brush-functionalized surface presents a promising approach to combat biomaterial-associated infections.

  14. Heterogeneity of Scaffold Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Edgar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering (TE offers a potential solution for the shortage of transplantable organs and the need for novel methods of tissue repair. Methods of TE have advanced significantly in recent years, but there are challenges to using engineered tissues and organs including but not limited to: biocompatibility, immunogenicity, biodegradation, and toxicity. Analysis of biomaterials used as scaffolds may, however, elucidate how TE can be enhanced. Ideally, biomaterials should closely mimic the characteristics of desired organ, their function and their in vivo environments. A review of biomaterials used in TE highlighted natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized organs as sources of scaffolding. Studies of discarded organs supported that decellularization offers a remedy to reducing waste of donor organs, but does not yet provide an effective solution to organ demand because it has shown varied success in vivo depending on organ complexity and physiological requirements. Review of polymer-based scaffolds revealed that a composite scaffold formed by copolymerization is more effective than single polymer scaffolds because it allows copolymers to offset disadvantages a single polymer may possess. Selection of biomaterials for use in TE is essential for transplant success. There is not, however, a singular biomaterial that is universally optimal.

  15. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Hussein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  16. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  17. Correlation of visual in vitro cytotoxicity ratings of biomaterials with quantitative in vitro cell viability measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sujata K; Yetter, Ann B

    2008-08-01

    Medical devices and implanted biomaterials are often assessed for biological reactivity using visual scores of cell-material interactions. In such testing, biomaterials are assigned cytotoxicity ratings based on visual evidence of morphological cellular changes, including cell lysis, rounding, spreading, and proliferation. For example, ISO 10993 cytotoxicity testing of medical devices allows the use of a visual grading scale. The present study compared visual in vitro cytotoxicity ratings to quantitative in vitro cytotoxicity measurements for biomaterials to determine the level of correlation between visual scoring and a quantitative cell viability assay. Biomaterials representing a spectrum of biological reactivity levels were evaluated, including organo-tin polyvinylchloride (PVC; a known cytotoxic material), ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (a known non-cytotoxic material), and implantable tissue adhesives. Each material was incubated in direct contact with mouse 3T3 fibroblast cell cultures for 24 h. Visual scores were assigned to the materials using a 5-point rating scale; the scorer was blinded to the material identities. Quantitative measurements of cell viability were performed using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay; again, the assay operator was blinded to material identities. The investigation revealed a high degree of correlation between visual cytotoxicity ratings and quantitative cell viability measurements; a Pearson's correlation gave a correlation coefficient of 0.90 between the visual cytotoxicity score and the percent viable cells. An equation relating the visual cytotoxicity score and the percent viable cells was derived. The results of this study are significant for the design and interpretation of in vitro cytotoxicity studies of novel biomaterials.

  18. A Biodesigned Nanocomposite Biomaterial for Auricular Cartilage Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyer, Leila; Jell, Gavin; Esmaeili, Ali; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-05-01

    Current biomaterials for auricular replacement are associated with high rates of infection and extrusion. The development of new auricular biomaterials that mimic the mechanical properties of native tissue and promote desirable cellular interactions may prevent implant failure. A porous 3D nanocomposite scaffold (NS) based on POSS-PCU (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocage into polycarbonate based urea-urethane) is developed with an elastic modulus similar to native ear. In vitro biological interactions on this NS reveal greater protein adsorption, increased fibroblast adhesion, proliferation, and collagen production compared with Medpor (the current synthetic auricular implant). In vivo, the POSS-PCU with larger pores (NS2; 150-250 μm) have greater tissue ingrowth (≈5.8× and ≈1.4 × increase) than the POSS-PCU with smaller pores (NS1; 100-50 μm) and when compared to Medpor (>100 μm). The NS2 with the larger pores demonstrates a reduced fibrotic encapsulation compared with NS1 and Medpor (≈4.1× and ≈1.6×, respectively; P < 0.05). Porosity also influences the amount of neovascularization within the implants, with no blood vessel observed in NS1 (12 weeks postimplantation). The lack of chronic inflammatory response for all materials may indicate that the elastic modulus and pore size of the implant scaffold could be important design considerations for influencing fibrotic responses to auricular and other soft tissue implants. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Radiation processing for the preparation of biomaterials and polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Junhwa; Lim, Younmook; Kang, Phil Hyun; Choi, Jaehak; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    It is known that a radiation processing of polymeric materials has some unique advantages over other chemical and physical processing. For example, the use of toxic chemicals and strict temperature/moisture controls may not be needed during a radiation processing. Furthermore, the shape distortion of a product can be minimized during a radiation curing process. Since sterilization can also be incorporated in the process, a radiation processing could be efficient to manufacture bio material and medical products. In this presentation, our recent research outcomes in the fields of a radiation processing for biomaterials and polymer electrolytes carried out at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are presented. In the field of a bio material production, two radiation sources, Co-60 gamma ray and electron beam are generally utilized to induce a crosslinking of natural or biocompatible synthetic polymers for the preparation of biomaterials, more specifically hydrogels. In this process, an extra process such as a removal process of toxic chemicals and a sterilization process are not necessary. Hydrogels for a wound treatment, ato pic dermatitis treatment, tissue scaffolds, and post-surgical anti-adhesion barriers have been developed or being developed by our research institute. The preparation of polymer electrolytes such as fuel cell membranes and lithium battery separators are also very attractive research fields using a radiation processing. Commercial polymer membranes such as fluoropolymer and polyethylene can be modified by a radiation induced grafting and/or crosslinking process to introduce desired functionalities onto the membranes for a specific purpose. In our research institute, these radiation-treated membranes for a specific purpose. In our research institute, these radiation-treated membranes have been successfully utilized to prepare fuel cell membranes and lithium battery separators with higher ion conductivities and desired mechanical

  20. Applications of biomaterials in corneal wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lun Tsai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disease affecting the cornea is a common cause of blindness worldwide. To date, the amniotic membrane (AM is the most widely used clinical method for cornea regeneration. However, donor-dependent differences in the AM may result in variable clinical outcomes. To overcome this issue, biomaterials are currently under investigation for corneal regeneration in vitro and in vivo. In this article, we highlight the recent advances in hydrogels, bioengineered prosthetic devices, contact lenses, and drug delivery systems for corneal regeneration. In clinical studies, the therapeutic effects of biomaterials, including fibrin and collagen-based hydrogels and silicone contact lenses, have been demonstrated in damaged cornea. The combination of cells and biomaterials may provide potential treatment in corneal wound healing in the future.

  1. Human Endothelial Cell Models in Biomaterial Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Sandra; Jung, Friedrich; Pietzsch, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) models have evolved as important tools in biomaterial research due to ubiquitously occurring interactions between implanted materials and the endothelium. However, screening the available literature has revealed a gap between material scientists and physiologists in terms of their understanding of these biomaterial-endothelium interactions and their relative importance. Consequently, EC models are often applied in nonphysiological experimental setups, or too extensive conclusions are drawn from their results. The question arises whether this might be one reason why, among the many potential biomaterials, only a few have found their way into the clinic. In this review, we provide an overview of established EC models and possible selection criteria to enable researchers to determine the most reliable and relevant EC model to use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Manufacturing Cell Therapies Using Engineered Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Amr A; Saha, Krishanu

    2017-10-01

    Emerging manufacturing processes to generate regenerative advanced therapies can involve extensive genomic and/or epigenomic manipulation of autologous or allogeneic cells. These cell engineering processes need to be carefully controlled and standardized to maximize safety and efficacy in clinical trials. Engineered biomaterials with smart and tunable properties offer an intriguing tool to provide or deliver cues to retain stemness, direct differentiation, promote reprogramming, manipulate the genome, or select functional phenotypes. This review discusses the use of engineered biomaterials to control human cell manufacturing. Future work exploiting engineered biomaterials has the potential to generate manufacturing processes that produce standardized cells with well-defined critical quality attributes appropriate for clinical testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Facile design of biomaterials by 'click' chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the so‐called ‘click chemistry’ a decade ago has significantly improved the chemical toolbox for producing novel biomaterials. This review focuses primarily on the application of Cu(I)‐catalysed azide–alkyne 1,3‐cycloadditon in the preparation of numerous, diverse biomaterials...... chemistry is elaborated. The present state of creating functional and biologically active surfaces by click chemistry is presented. Finally, conducting surfaces based on an azide‐functionalized polymer with prospective biological sensor potential are introduced. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry...

  4. Regulatory affairs for biomaterials and medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Stephen F; Amato, B

    2015-01-01

    All biomaterials and medical devices are subject to a long list of regulatory practises and policies which must be adhered to in order to receive clearance. This book provides readers with information on the systems in place in the USA and the rest of the world. Chapters focus on a series of procedures and policies including topics such as commercialization, clinical development, general good practise manufacturing and post market surveillance.Addresses global regulations and regulatory issues surrounding biomaterials and medical devicesEspecially useful for smaller co

  5. Sustainable Biomaterials: Current Trends, Challenges and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Kumar Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials and sustainable resources are two complementary terms supporting the development of new sustainable emerging processes. In this context, many interdisciplinary approaches including biomass waste valorization and proper usage of green technologies, etc., were brought forward to tackle future challenges pertaining to declining fossil resources, energy conservation, and related environmental issues. The implementation of these approaches impels its potential effect on the economy of particular countries and also reduces unnecessary overburden on the environment. This contribution aims to provide an overview of some of the most recent trends, challenges, and applications in the field of biomaterials derived from sustainable resources.

  6. Materiomics - High-Throughput Screening of Biomaterial Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    This complete, yet concise, guide introduces you to the rapidly developing field of high throughput screening of biomaterials: materiomics. Bringing together the key concepts and methodologies used to determine biomaterial properties, you will understand the adaptation and application of materomics

  7. Efficient functionalization of alginate biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Vanacker, Julie; Najmi, Maryam A; Aachmann, Finn L; Strand, Berit L; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2016-02-01

    Peptide coupled alginates obtained by chemical functionalization of alginates are commonly used as scaffold materials for cells in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. We here present an alternative to the commonly used carbodiimide chemistry, using partial periodate oxidation followed by reductive amination. High and precise degrees of substitution were obtained with high reproducibility, and without formation of by-products. A protocol was established using l-Tyrosine methyl ester as a model compound and the non-toxic pic-BH3 as the reducing agent. DOSY was used to indirectly verify covalent binding and the structure of the product was further elucidated using NMR spectroscopy. The coupling efficiency was to some extent dependent on alginate composition, being most efficient on mannuronan. Three different bioactive peptide sequences (GRGDYP, GRGDSP and KHIFSDDSSE) were coupled to 8% periodate oxidized alginate resulting in degrees of substitution between 3.9 and 6.9%. Cell adhesion studies of mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human dental stem cells (RP89) to gels containing various amounts of GRGDSP coupled alginate demonstrated the bioactivity of the material where RP89 cells needed higher peptide concentrations to adhere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Focus of Research on the Collagen-based Biomaterials in CLRI: Patient care and pain reduction · People at CLRI: for Whom Collagen matters as a Biomaterial · Skin as an organ: Is it smart? Collagen: Emerging Role as a Smart ... Wound Care Products from CLRI in the market place · Logic of Biomaterial devices from CLRI ...

  9. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Focus of Research on the Collagen-based Biomaterials in CLRI: Patient care and pain reduction · People at CLRI: for Whom Collagen matters as a Biomaterial · Skin as an organ: Is it smart? Collagen: Emerging Role as a Smart material · Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices · Collagen: its Organizational ...

  10. Osteoinduction by biomaterials - Physicochemical and structural influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibovic, Pamela; Sees, Tara M.; van den Doel, Mirella; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.

    2006-01-01

    Osteoinduction by biomaterials has been shown to be a real phenomenon by many investigators in the last decade. The exact mechanism of this phenomenon is, however, still largely unknown. This in vivo study in goats was performed to get insight into processes governing the phenomenon of

  11. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, Alina M.; Campelo, Juan M.; Luque, Rafael; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Romero, Antonio A.

    2010-01-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  12. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper provides an account of the rationale for the development of implantable medical devices over the last half-century and explains the criteria that have controlled the selection of biomaterials for these critical applications. In spite of some good successes and excellent materials, there are still serious limitations to ...

  13. Hydroxyapatite, a biomaterial: Its chemical synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydroxyapatite, a biomaterial: Its chemical synthesis, characterization and study of biocompatibility prepared from shell of garden snail,. Helix aspersa. ANJUVAN SINGH. Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 411, India. MS received 10 February 2010; revised 20 July ...

  14. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices. Collagen as a protein. Collagen in tissues and organs. Stabilizing and cross linking agents. Immunogenicity. Hosts (drugs). Controlled release mechanisms of hosts. Biodegradability, workability into devices ...

  15. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  16. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  17. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  18. New biomaterials obtained with ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.

    1982-01-01

    In present-day surgery and medicine use is increasingly made of materials foreign to the organism in order to remedy a physiological defect either temporarily or permanently. These materials, known as ''biomaterials'', take widely varying forms: plastics, metals, cements, ceramics, etc. Biomaterials can be classified in accordance with their function: (a) Devices designed to be fully implanted in the human body in order to replace an anatomical structure, either temporarily or permanently, such as articular, vascular, mammary and osteosynthetic prostheses, etc.; (b) Devices having prolonged contact with mucous tissues, such as intra-uterine devices, contact lenses, etc.; (c) Extracorporeal devices designed to treat blood such as artificial kidneys, blood oxygenators, etc.; and (d) Biomaterials can also be taken to mean chemically inert, implantable materials designed to produce a continuous discharge of substances containing pharmacologically active molecules, such as contraceptive devices or ocular devices (for treating glaucoma). The two most important criteria for a biomaterial are those of biological compatibility and biological functionality. Techniques using ionizing radiation as an energy source provide an excellent tool for synthesizing or modifying the properties of plastics. The properties of polymers can be improved, new polymers can be synthesized without chemical additives (often the cause of incompatibility with tissue or blood) and without increased temperature, and polymerization can be induced in the solid state using deep-frozen monomers. Also, radiation-induced modifications in polymers can be applied to semi-finished or finished products. Examples are also given of marketed biomaterials that have been produced using radiation chemistry techniques

  19. Adhesive B-doped DLC films on biomedical alloys used for bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    The novel properties of the non-toxic diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have proven to be excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, they have poor adhesion strength to the alloys and biomaterials. The addition of a thin interfacial layer such as Si, Ti, TiN, Mo and Cu/Cr and/or adding additives such as Si ...

  20. Peptides and polypeptides as scaffolds for optoelectronics and biomaterials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charati, Manoj B.

    effects on peptide conformation. pi-orbital interactions at the molecular level were observed to be very sensitive to intermolecular distance and orientation of the chromophores attached to the alpha-helical peptide templates. When the methylstilbene or Oxa-PPV molecules were arranged on the same side of the helix with intermolecular spacing of 6A, the chromophores interacted strongly with each other forming excimers. Such interactions were absent when the molecules were arranged on the opposite side of the helix. These peptide-templated systems therefore offer enormous opportunities for the elucidation of complex photophysical phenomena that occur in relatively aggregated morphologies of conjugated species, but under dilute solution conditions in which the number of chromphores in the aggregate can be manipulated. Part 2. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible polypeptide elastomer. Lately, the significance of mechanical forces and biological cues involved in tissue remodeling are highly valued; thus the capacity of a biomaterial to present a fitting mechanical and biological environment for optimal tissue generation has become a key parameter for biomaterial design. In addition to having suitable mechanical properties, materials used for these applications need to be biologically active, i.e. trigger dynamic interactions with cells and stimulate explicit cell and tissue responses. Thus, we have designed a resilin-based modular biomaterial incorporating both mechanically and biologically active domains to sense and aptly respond to the bio-mechanical demand or changes in their environment. The use of resilin-like polypeptides offers access to a class of hydrophilic elastomers with excellent resilience and high frequency responsiveness, which can be used for encapsulating hydrophilic drugs like proteins for drug delivery, and provides hydrophilic extracellular matrix mimicking cell adhesive and enzyme degradable substrate for tissue engineering. Hence, we have

  1. Novel chemically modified bacterial cellulose nanocomposite as potential biomaterial for stem cell therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Acasigua, Gerson Arisoly; de Olyveira, Gabriel Molina; Manzine Costa, Ligia Maria; Braghirolli, Daikelly Iglesias; Medeiros Fossati, Anna Christina; Guastaldi, Antonio Carlos; Pranke, Patricia; Daltro, Gildásio de Cerqueira; Basmaji, Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has become established as a remarkably versatile biomaterial and can be used in a wide variety of applied scientific applications, especially for medical devices. In this work, the bacterial cellulose fermentation process is modified by the addition of hyaluronic acid and gelatin (1% w/w) to the culture medium before the bacteria is inoculated. Hyaluronic acid and gelatin influence in bacterial cellulose was analyzed using Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Adhesion and viability studies with human dental pulp stem cells using natural bacterial cellulose/hyaluronic acid as scaffolds for regenerative medicine are presented for the first time in this work. MTT viability assays show higher cell adhesion in bacterial cellulose/gelatin and bacterial cellulose/ hyaluronic acid scaffolds over time with differences due to fiber agglomeration in bacterial cellulose/gelatin. Confocal microscopy images showed that the cell were adhered and well distributed within the fibers in both types of scaffolds.

  2. Novel nanostructured biomaterials: implications for coronary stent thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagkiozaki, Varvara; Karagiannidis, Panagiotis G; Kalfagiannis, Nikolaos; Kavatzikidou, Paraskevi; Patsalas, Panagiotis; Georgiou, Despoina; Logothetidis, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanomedicine has the potential to revolutionize medicine and help clinicians to treat cardiovascular disease through the improvement of stents. Advanced nanomaterials and tools for monitoring cell–material interactions will aid in inhibiting stent thrombosis. Although titanium boron nitride (TiBN), titanium diboride, and carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films are emerging materials in the biomaterial field, the effect of their surface properties on platelet adhesion is relatively unexplored. Objective and methods In this study, novel nanomaterials made of amorphous carbon, CNTs, titanium diboride, and TiBN were grown by vacuum deposition techniques to assess their role as potential stent coatings. Platelet response towards the nanostructured surfaces of the samples was analyzed in line with their physicochemical properties. As the stent skeleton is formed mainly of stainless steel, this material was used as reference material. Platelet adhesion studies were carried out by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. A cell viability study was performed to assess the cytocompatibility of all thin film groups for 24 hours with a standard immortalized cell line. Results The nanotopographic features of material surface, stoichiometry, and wetting properties were found to be significant factors in dictating platelet behavior and cell viability. The TiBN films with higher nitrogen contents were less thrombogenic compared with the biased carbon films and control. The carbon hybridization in carbon films and hydrophilicity, which were strongly dependent on the deposition process and its parameters, affected the thrombogenicity potential. The hydrophobic CNT materials with high nanoroughness exhibited less hemocompatibility in comparison with the other classes of materials. All the thin film groups exhibited good cytocompatibility, with the surface roughness and surface free energy influencing the viability of cells. PMID:23269867

  3. Chitosan adhesive for laser tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, A.; Stoodley, M.; Avolio, A.; Foster, L. J. R.

    2006-02-01

    Background. Laser tissue repair usually relies on haemoderivate solders, based on serum albumin. These solders have intrinsic limitations that impair their widespread use, such as limited repair strength, high solubility, brittleness and viral transmission. Furthermore, the solder activation temperature (65-70 °C) can induce significant damage to tissue. In this study, a new laser-activated biomaterial for tissue repair was developed and tested in vitro and in vivo to overcome some of the shortcomings of traditional solders. Materials and Methods. Flexible and insoluble strips of chitosan adhesive (surface area ~34 mm2, thickness ~20 μm) were developed and bonded on sheep intestine with a laser fluence and irradiance of 52 +/- 2 J/cm2 and ~15 W/cm2 respectively. The temperature between tissue and adhesive was measured using small thermocouples. The strength of repaired tissue was tested by a calibrated tensiometer. The adhesive was also bonded in vivo to the sciatic nerve of rats to assess the thermal damage induced by the laser (fluence = 65 +/- 11 J/cm2, irradiance = 15 W/cm2) four days post-operatively. Results. Chitosan adhesives successfully repaired intestine tissue, achieving a repair strength of 0.50 +/- 0.15 N (shear stress = 14.7 +/- 4.7 KPa, n=30) at a temperature of 60-65 °C. The laser caused demyelination of axons at the operated site; nevertheless, the myelinated axons retained their normal morphology proximally and distally.

  4. Evaluation of Fibrin-Based Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Potential Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Gsib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs have gained great attention for a number of biomedical applications due to their improved properties compared to individual components alone. In this study, we investigated the capacity of newly-developed naturally-derived IPNs as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering. These IPNs combine the biologic properties of a fibrous fibrin network polymerized at the nanoscale and the mechanical stability of polyethylene oxide (PEO. First, we assessed their cytotoxicity in vitro on L929 fibroblasts. We further evaluated their biocompatibility ex vivo with a chick embryo organotypic culture model. Subcutaneous implantations of the matrices were subsequently conducted on nude mice to investigate their biocompatibility in vivo. Our preliminary data highlighted that our biomaterials were non-cytotoxic (viability above 90%. The organotypic culture showed that the IPN matrices induced higher cell adhesion (across all the explanted organ tissues and migration (skin, intestine than the control groups, suggesting the advantages of using a biomimetic, yet mechanically-reinforced IPN-based matrix. We observed no major inflammatory response up to 12 weeks post implantation. All together, these data suggest that these fibrin-based IPNs are promising biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  5. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H B; Zhao, X L; Zhang, X; Zhang, K B; Li, L C; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Lu, W W; Wang, D P; Huang, W H; Lin, K L; Chang, J

    2010-07-06

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid release of boron, but also induce the adhesion of osteoblast-like cells, SaOS-2, thus significantly increasing the cyto-compatibility of borate glass. The formation of multilayers of apatite with porous structure indicates that complete degradation is optimistic, and the spread of SaOS-2 covered by apatite to form a sandwich structure may induce bone-like tissue formation at earlier stages. Therefore, such novel strontium-incorporated borosilicate may act as a new generation of biomaterial for bone regeneration, which not only renders boron as a nutritious element for bone health, but also delivers strontium to stimulate formation of new bones.

  6. A Tubular Biomaterial Construct Exhibiting a Negative Poisson's Ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    Full Text Available Developing functional small-diameter vascular grafts is an important objective in tissue engineering research. In this study, we address the problem of compliance mismatch by designing and developing a 3D tubular construct that has a negative Poisson's ratio νxy (NPR. NPR constructs have the unique ability to expand transversely when pulled axially, thereby resulting in a highly-compliant tubular construct. In this work, we used projection stereolithography to 3D-print a planar NPR sheet composed of photosensitive poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate biomaterial. We used a step-lithography exposure and a stitch process to scale up the projection printing process, and used the cut-missing rib unit design to develop a centimeter-scale NPR sheet, which was rolled up to form a tubular construct. The constructs had Poisson's ratios of -0.6 ≤ νxy ≤ -0.1. The NPR construct also supports higher cellular adhesion than does the construct that has positive νxy. Our NPR design offers a significant advance in the development of highly-compliant vascular grafts.

  7. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  8. Composition and Humidity Response of the Black Widow Spider's Gumfoot Silk and its Implications on Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Zhang, Ci; Cool, Lydia Rose; Blackledge, Todd. A.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Humidity plays an important part in the performance of biomaterials such as pollen, gecko toe, wheat awns, bird feathers and dragline silk. Capture silk produced by web building spiders form an interesting class of humidity responsive biological glues. The adhesive properties of the widely studied `viscid silk' produced by orbweb-weaving spiders is highly humidity sensitive. On the other hand, relatively less is known about the dependence of composition and humidity response towards adhesion for `gumfoot' silk produced by cobweb-weaving spiders. In the present study, we investigate the gumfoot silk produced by Black Widow using adhesion mechanics, microscopy and spectroscopic methods. The results show the presence of hygroscopic salts, glycoproteins and previously known spider coating peptides in silk and their importance in the humidity response and adhesion. The current study elucidates the role of constituents of capture silk in its adhesion mechanism and offers insights to novel ways for fabricating bio-inspired adhesives.

  9. Novel biomaterial for transdermal application: in vitro and in vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, A S; Avari, J G

    2011-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate a novel film forming biomaterial for its potential application in the preparation of unilaminate transdermal adhesive matrix systems. The biomaterial, Damar Batu (DB), was tried alone and in combination with Eudragit RL100 as a matrixing agent in the preparation of transdermal patches. Developed transdermal patches of Diltiazem hydrochloride (DH) were evaluated for thickness uniformity, weight uniformity, folding endurance and drug content. USP dissolution apparatus V was used for in vitro drug release studies. Modified Franz diffusion cell used for permeation study using excised human cadaver skin. Total 6 formulations were developed and on the basis of in vitro drug release and in vitro skin permeation profile F5 composed of DB: Eudragit RL100 (60:40) and carrying 20 %w/w DH was selected as an optimized formulation for in vivo study. The in vivo study results showed that F5 achieved the Cmax of about 269.76 ± 1.52 ng/mL in 6 h and sustained the release of the drug till 24 h. The skin irritation study results proved that the novel biomaterial is non-sensitizing and non-irritating. Drug-polymer interaction study carried out to check the compatibility of drug and polymer showed the intactness of the drug in the formulation proving the compatibility of the polymer. It can be proposed from the outcome of the present study that by applying suitable adhesive layer and backing membrane, DB: Eudragit RL100 (60:40) transdermal patches can be of potential therapeutic use.

  10. Biocompatibility of Four Common Orthopedic Biomaterials Following a High-Salt Diet: An In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lecocq

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, salt consumption appears to be drastically above the recommended level in industrialized countries. The health consequences of this overconsumption are heavy since high-salt intake induces cardiovascular disease, kidney dysfunction, and stroke. Moreover, harmful interaction may also occur with orthopaedic devices because overconsumption of salt reinforces the corrosive aspect of biological tissues and favors bone resorption process. In the present study, we aimed to assess the in vivo effect of three weeks of a high-salt diet, associated (or not with two weeks of the neuro-myoelectrostimulation (NMES rehabilitation program on the biocompatibility of four biomaterials used in the manufacture of arthroplasty implants. Thus, two non-metallic (PEEK and Al2O3 and two metallic (Ti6Al4V and CrCo compounds were implanted in the rat tibial crest, and the implant-to-bone adhesion and cell viability of two surrounded muscles, the Flexor Digitorum (FD and Tibialis Anterior (TA, were assessed at the end of the experiment. Results indicated lower adhesion strength for the PEEK implant compared to other biomaterials. An effect of NMES and a high-salt diet was only identified for Al2O3 and Ti6Al4V implants, respectively. Moreover, compared to a normal diet, a high-salt diet induced a higher number of dead cells on both muscles for all biomaterials, which was further increased for PEEK, Al2O3, and CrCo materials with NMES application. Finally, except for Ti6Al4V, NMES induced a higher number of dead cells in the directly stimulated muscle (FD compared to the indirectly stimulated one (TA. This in vivo experiment highlights the potential harmful effect of a high-salt diet for people who have undergone arthroplasty, and a rehabilitation program based on NMES.

  11. New quantitative image analysis of staphylococcal biofilms on the surfaces of nontranslucent metallic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouichi; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Yonekura, Akihiko; Nishimura, Seisuke; Kajiyama, Shiro; Hirakata, Yoichi; Shindo, Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    Implant-related infection after orthopedic surgery is difficult to cure. One of the causes of infection is the bacterial biofilm that forms around biomaterials used during surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate bacterial biofilms extensively to resolve the problems of these postoperative infections. However, no established culture method or quantification system exists for bacterial biofilms grown on the surface of the metallic biomaterials used in orthopedics, which are nonradiolucent. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative method to evaluate the difference in resistance of stainless steel versus titanium to staphylococcal biofilms and the efficacy of antibiotics against biofilms. The bacterial strains used in this study were three Staphylococcus aureus stains: strain Seattle 1945 and two clinical strains cultured from postoperative infections. Staphylococcal biofilms were formed on stainless steel washers (SUS304) and titanium washers (pure titanium). They were stained with crystal violet and were examined with a digital microscope to calculate the bacterial coverage rate (BCR) by NIH imaging. The BCR of S. aureus biofilms formed on stainless steel and titanium washers increased over time. At 24, 48, and 72 h after cultivation, the amount of biofilm on the surface of the stainless steel washers was significantly greater or tended to be greater than that on the titanium. Cefazolin was applied to the obtained biofilms of two clinically isolated S. aureus strains. Cefazolin did not eradicate the biofilms but significantly reduced the biofilm of one strain. The newly developed quantitative method (static microtube culture and measurement system) was useful for assessing the amount of bacterial biofilms on the surface of nontranslucent biomaterial. We found that titanium may be more resistant to bacterial infection than stainless steel. To control implant-related severe infections, the biomaterials should be assessed from the viewpoint of

  12. Emerging antibacterial biomaterial strategies for the prevention of peri-implant inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgardner, Joel D; Adatrow, Pradeep; Haggard, Warren O; Norowski, P Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease due to bacteria and plaque formation on implant surfaces which can lead to bone resorption and loss of osseointegration. Biomaterial strategies to prevent or eliminate initial bacterial attachment, in favor of host tissue attachment may have a positive effect on decreasing peri-implantitis, particularly for at risk patient groups. This study provides a brief overview of some of the experimental biomaterial strategies aimed at suppressing or inhibiting bacterial colonization of implant surfaces in favor or host cells and tissues. These biomaterial strategies have different mechanisms of action from interfering with bacterial adhesion by modifying surface energies, immobilizing antimicrobials on implant surfaces, creating photocatalytic surfaces, as well as modifying surfaces to deliver antimicrobial agents either prophylactically or in response to bacterial challenge. This is not a comprehensive review, rather a review of studies that serve to illustrate many of the different approaches being investigated. While many of these strategies have demonstrated the potential to significantly reduce bacterial attachment on implant surfaces in vitro, it is unclear if these same reductions will be adequate clinically since even a few adhering bacteria may over time develop into inflammatory inducing biofilms or plaque. Also, data on the ability of the antibacterial modified biomaterials to support osseointegration and permuosal seal formation is still needed. Given the complex and multivariate causes of peri-implant disease, it is likely that combinations of these strategies (eg, antimicrobial surfaces and or delivery mechanisms coupled with methods to favor stable osseointegration and permucosal seal) will be most effective in developing implants resistant to peri-implant disease.

  13. Silicone containing biomaterials in cardiovascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, A.; Sartori, S.; Serafini, P.; Ferrando, P.; Mattu, C.; Milione, S.; Boccafoschi, F.; Ciardelli, G.

    2010-06-01

    A series of biostable polyurethane (PU) formulations, including a composite containing a biocompatible clay as filler, were prepared as new biomaterials for cardiovascular applications. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polytetramethylenoxide (PTMO) were selected as macrodiols because of their high hydrolysis resistance. 1,6-Diisocyanatohexane (HDI) and 1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol (CDM) were used as diisocyanate and chain extender, respectively. Chemical and mechanical characterizations of the obtained polymers highlight that they are promising materials for applications in the cardiovascular field.

  14. Fluidized bed gasification of select granular biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, P; Sampathrajan, A; Venkatachalam, P

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials can be converted into solid, liquid and gaseous fuels through thermochemical or biochemical conversion processes. Thermochemical conversion of granular biomaterials is difficult because of its physical nature and one of the suitable processes is fluidized bed gasification. In this study, coir pith, rice husk and saw dust were selected and synthetic gas was generated using a fluidized bed gasifier. Gas compositions of product gas were analyzed and the percentage of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide was in the range of 8.24-19.55 and 10.21-17.14, respectively. The effect of equivalence ratio (0.3, 0.4 and 0.5) and reaction time (at 10 min interval) on gas constituents was studied. The gas yield for coir pith, rice husk and sawdust were found to be in the range of 1.98-3.24, 1.79-2.81 and 2.18-3.70 Nm3 kg(-1), respectively. Models were developed to study the influence of biomaterial properties and operating conditions on molar concentration of gas constituents and energy output. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomaterial strategies for alleviation of myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Dan, Kai; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-01-01

    World Health Organization estimated that heart failure initiated by coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI) leads to 29 per cent of deaths worldwide. Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death in industrialized countries and is expected to become a global epidemic within the twenty-first century. MI, the main cause of heart failure, leads to a loss of cardiac tissue impairment of left ventricular function. The damaged left ventricle undergoes progressive ‘remodelling’ and chamber dilation, with myocyte slippage and fibroblast proliferation. Repair of diseased myocardium with in vitro-engineered cardiac muscle patch/injectable biopolymers with cells may become a viable option for heart failure patients. These events reflect an apparent lack of effective intrinsic mechanism for myocardial repair and regeneration. Motivated by the desire to develop minimally invasive procedures, the last 10 years observed growing efforts to develop injectable biomaterials with and without cells to treat cardiac failure. Biomaterials evaluated include alginate, fibrin, collagen, chitosan, self-assembling peptides, biopolymers and a range of synthetic hydrogels. The ultimate goal in therapeutic cardiac tissue engineering is to generate biocompatible, non-immunogenic heart muscle with morphological and functional properties similar to natural myocardium to repair MI. This review summarizes the properties of biomaterial substrates having sufficient mechanical stability, which stimulates the native collagen fibril structure for differentiating pluripotent stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21900319

  16. Trends in prosthetic biomaterials in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranjit Singh Bhasin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important criterion for the success of dental implants is the selection of a suitable implant biomaterial. To improve the biologic performance of an implant, it is necessary to select a material that does not elicit any negative biological response and at the same time maintains adequate function. It is mandatory for a dentist to have a comprehensive knowledge of various biomaterials used for dental implants. The material of choice for fabrication of the dental implant till date is titanium. With the advancements in the field of implants, zirconia seems to be propitious in the future. However, more advanced in vitro and in vivo studies are required before reaching any such conclusion. To increase the success of zirconia implants, care should be taken to reduce the incidence of mechanical failures. Such failures can be taken care of by having a thorough technical knowledge of implant designing and manufacturing defects. This article attempts to compare the advantages and disadvantages of various dental implant biomaterials. Focus is placed on the recent advances in this field with the recently introduced zirconia and its comparison to conventional titanium.

  17. Reconstituted Keratin Biomaterial with Enhanced Ductility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halleh Atri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the waste from protein fibres represents an important renewable source for a new generation of biomaterials and promising competitors for carbohydrate based biomaterials. Regenerated keratin biomaterials are biodegradable in vivo and in vitro, biocompatible, and support cell attachment and proliferation; however, their major drawback has been their weak mechanical properties such as ductility. The following study was conducted in an attempt to improve the ductility of reconstituted keratin films obtained from Australian merino wool fibres. Keratin was extracted from wool fibres according to an established protocol proposed by Yamauchi, and then dialyzed and desalted by multiple diafiltration wash cycles. The resulting keratin film was transparent, biodegradable, and, opposite to its predecessors, mechanically durable, possessing a Young modulus about 12.5 MPa with 35% extensibility. The polypeptide chains were found to rearrange themselves in the β-sheet state in this keratin film, which was shown to be semi-crystalline. This film, unlike its predecessors, did not support human cell proliferation. These properties of the diafiltered keratin film have led us to think that diafiltration resulted in producing a totally new keratin film, which is envisaged to find applications in various areas.

  18. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-05-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices. Failure of most biomaterials originates from the inability to predict and control the influence of their surface properties on biological phenomena, particularly protein adsorption, and cellular behaviour, which subsequently results in unfavourable host response. Here, we introduce a surface-proteomic screening approach using a label-free mass spectrometry technique to decipher the adsorption profile of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on different biomaterials, and correlate it with cellular behaviour. We demonstrated that the way a biomaterial selectively interacts with specific ECM proteins of a given tissue seems to determine the interactions between the cells of that tissue and biomaterials. Accordingly, this approach can

  19. Dual-functioning peptides discovered by phage display increase the magnitude and specificity of BMSC attachment to mineralized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraju, Harsha; Miller, Sharon J; Kohn, David H

    2017-07-01

    Design of biomaterials for cell-based therapies requires presentation of specific physical and chemical cues to cells, analogous to cues provided by native extracellular matrices (ECM). We previously identified a peptide sequence with high affinity towards apatite (VTKHLNQISQSY, VTK) using phage display. The aims of this study were to identify a human MSC-specific peptide sequence through phage display, combine it with the apatite-specific sequence, and verify the specificity of the combined dual-functioning peptide to both apatite and human bone marrow stromal cells. In this study, a combinatorial phage display identified the cell binding sequence (DPIYALSWSGMA, DPI) which was combined with the mineral binding sequence to generate the dual peptide DPI-VTK. DPI-VTK demonstrated significantly greater binding affinity (1/K D ) to apatite surfaces compared to VTK, phosphorylated VTK (VTK phos ), DPI-VTK phos , RGD-VTK, and peptide-free apatite surfaces (p biomaterial surfaces and subsequently increase cell proliferation and differentiation. These new peptides expand biomaterial design methodology for cell-based regeneration of bone defects. This strategy of combining cell and material binding phage display derived peptides is broadly applicable to a variety of systems requiring targeted adhesion of specific cell populations, and may be generalized to the engineering of any adhesion surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Components of the plasminogen activation system promote engraftment of porous polyethylene biomaterial via common and distinct effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christoph A; Hessenauer, Maximilian E T; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial.

  1. The development of peptide-based interfacial biomaterials for generating biological functionality on the surface of bioinert materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven R; Khoo, Xiaojuan; Huang, Xin; Walsh, Elisabeth B; Grinstaff, Mark W; Kenan, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials used in implants have traditionally been selected based on their mechanical properties, chemical stability, and biocompatibility. However, the durability and clinical efficacy of implantable biomedical devices remain limited in part due to the absence of appropriate biological interactions at the implant interface and the lack of integration into adjacent tissues. Herein, we describe a robust peptide-based coating technology capable of modifying the surface of existing biomaterials and medical devices through the non-covalent binding of modular biofunctional peptides. These peptides contain at least one material binding sequence and at least one biologically active sequence and thus are termed, "Interfacial Biomaterials" (IFBMs). IFBMs can simultaneously bind the biomaterial surface while endowing it with desired biological functionalities at the interface between the material and biological realms. We demonstrate the capabilities of model IFBMs to convert native polystyrene, a bioinert surface, into a bioactive surface that can support a range of cell activities. We further distinguish between simple cell attachment with insufficient integrin interactions, which in some cases can adversely impact downstream biology, versus biologically appropriate adhesion, cell spreading, and cell survival mediated by IFBMs. Moreover, we show that we can use the coating technology to create spatially resolved patterns of fluorophores and cells on substrates and that these patterns retain their borders in culture.

  2. Adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklaus, F.; Stemme, G.; Lu, J.-Q.; Gutmann, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Wafer bonding with intermediate polymer adhesives is an important fabrication technique for advanced microelectronic and microelectromechanical systems, such as three-dimensional integrated circuits, advanced packaging, and microfluidics. In adhesive wafer bonding, the polymer adhesive bears the forces involved to hold the surfaces together. The main advantages of adhesive wafer bonding include the insensitivity to surface topography, the low bonding temperatures, the compatibility with standard integrated circuit wafer processing, and the ability to join different types of wafers. Compared to alternative wafer bonding techniques, adhesive wafer bonding is simple, robust, and low cost. This article reviews the state-of-the-art polymer adhesive wafer bonding technologies, materials, and applications.

  3. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  4. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  5. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ahmad Khalili

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events.

  6. Current concepts of regenerative biomaterials in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Ahuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of any implant system is to achieve firm fixation to the bone and this could be influenced by biomechanical as well as biomaterial selection. An array of materials is used in the replacement of missing teeth through implantation. The appropriate selection of biomaterials directly influences the clinical success and longevity of implants. Thus the clinician needs to have adequate knowledge of the various biomaterials and their properties for their judicious selection and application in his/her clinical practice. The recent materials such as bioceramics and composite biomaterials that are under consideration and investigation have a promising future. For optimal performance, implant biomaterials should have suitable mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and structural biostability in the physiological environment. This article reviews the various implant biomaterials and their ease of use in implant dentistry.

  7. Dopaminergic enhancement of cellular adhesion in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Bai, Bing; Lee, Dong Joon; Diachina, Shannon; Li, Yina; Wong, Sing Wai; Wang, Zhengyan; Tseng, Henry C; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2017-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a well-known neurotransmitter and critical element in the mussel adhesive protein that has gained increasing attention for its role in cellular growth enhancement in biomaterials, including cellular adhesion improvement. As the mechanism underlying this remains unclear, the objective of this study was to explore the effects of DA on the adhesion properties of bone marrow derived rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) using an hydroxyapatite gelatin nanocomposite biomaterial and to test whether the effects are mediated through various endogenously expressed DA receptors. Primary rMSCs were pretreated with D1-like antagonist, D2-like antagonist, or a combination of these antagonists followed by treatment with 50 μM DA and cellular adhesion quantification at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 hours post DA addition. DA was found to increase rMSC adhesion and spreading at the 0.5 hour time-point and the dopaminergic effect on cell adhesion was partially blocked by DA antagonists. In addition, the D1-like and D2-like antagonists appeared to have a similar effect on rMSCs. Immunofluorescent staining indicated that the rMSC spreading area was significantly increased in the DA treated group versus the control group. Treatment of the D1-like DA antagonists with DA revealed that the actin filaments of rMSCs could not connect the membrane with the nucleus. In summary, DA was found to enhance early rMSC adhesion partially via DA receptor activation.

  8. Adhesive Elastomeric Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Haefa; Liu, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Sutures and staples commonly used to close surgical wounds tend to be much stiffer than the surrounding tissue, often resulting in external tissue damage. Surgical adhesives provide a promising alternative to these sutures and staples. Ideal surgical adhesives are biocompatible, able to set well and remain sticky in moist conditions, possess strong adhesive and cohesive properties, and exhibit mechanical properties that mimic those of the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, the adhesives avail...

  9. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  10. Biomaterials and bioengineering tomorrow’s healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sumrita; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials are being used for the healthcare applications from ancient times. But subsequent evolution has made them more versatile and has increased their utility. Biomaterials have revolutionized the areas like bioengineering and tissue engineering for the development of novel strategies to combat life threatening diseases. Together with biomaterials, stem cell technology is also being used to improve the existing healthcare facilities. These concepts and technologies are being used for the treatment of different diseases like cardiac failure, fractures, deep skin injuries, etc. Introduction of nanomaterials on the other hand is becoming a big hope for a better and an affordable healthcare. Technological advancements are underway for the development of continuous monitoring and regulating glucose levels by the implantation of sensor chips. Lab-on-a-chip technology is expected to modernize the diagnostics and make it more easy and regulated. Other area which can improve the tomorrow’s healthcare is drug delivery. Micro-needles have the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional needles and are being studied for the delivery of drugs at different location in human body. There is a huge advancement in the area of scaffold fabrication which has improved the potentiality of tissue engineering. Most emerging scaffolds for tissue engineering are hydrogels and cryogels. Dynamic hydrogels have huge application in tissue engineering and drug delivery. Furthermore, cryogels being supermacroporous allow the attachment and proliferation of most of the mammalian cell types and have shown application in tissue engineering and bioseparation. With further developments we expect these technologies to hit the market in near future which can immensely improve the healthcare facilities. PMID:23628868

  11. Adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells to biomimetic polymers: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotorbani, Behnaz Banimohamad; Alizadeh, Effat; Salehi, Roya; Barzegar, Abolfazl

    2017-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy due to the self-renewal, multi-potency, ethically approved state and suitability for autologous transplantation. However, key issue for isolation and manipulation of MSCs is adhesion in ex-vivo culture systems. Biomaterials engineered for mimicking natural extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions which support stem cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation represent a main area of research in tissue engineering. Some of them successfully enhanced cells adhesion and proliferation because of their biocompatibility, biomimetic texture, and chemistry. However, it is still in its infancy, therefore intensification and optimization of in vitro, in vivo, and preclinical studies is needed to clarify efficacies as well as applicability of those bioengineered constructs. The aim of this review is to discuss mechanisms related to the in-vitro adhesion of MSCs, surfaces biochemical, biophysical, and other factors (of cell's natural and artificial micro-environment) which could affect it and a review of previous research attempting for its bio-chemo-optimization. - Highlights: • The main materials utilized for fabrication of biomimetic polymers are presented. • MSCs cell-material adhesion mechanism and involved molecules are reviewed. • Surface modifications of polymers in terms of MSC adhesion improving are discussed.

  12. Hybrid laser technology and doped biomaterials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Trávníčková, Martina; Filová, Elena; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 417, Sep (2017), s. 73-83 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05864S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : hybrid PLD * Cr: DLC * Ti: DLC. comparison of properties * in vitro tests Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (FGU-C) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Biomaterials (as related to medical implants, devices, sensors) (FGU-C) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  13. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  14. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos

  15. Biomaterials and scaffolds in reparative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikof, Elliot L.; Matthew, Howard; Kohn, Joachim; Mikos, Antonios G.; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Yip, Christopher M.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Most approaches currently pursued or contemplated within the framework of reparative medicine, including cell-based therapies, artificial organs, and engineered living tissues, are dependent on our ability to synthesize or otherwise generate novel materials, fabricate or assemble materials into appropriate 2-D and 3-D forms, and precisely tailor material-related physical and biological properties so as to achieve a desired clinical response. This paper summarizes the scientific and technological opportunities within the fields of biomaterials science and molecular engineering that will likely establish new enabling technologies for cellular and molecular therapies directed at the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of diseased or damaged organs and tissues.

  16. Minimizing Skin Scarring through Biomaterial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra L. Moore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing continues to be a major burden to patients, though research in the field has expanded significantly. Due to an aging population and increasing comorbid conditions, the cost of chronic wounds is expected to increase for patients and the U.S. healthcare system alike. With this knowledge, the number of engineered products to facilitate wound healing has also increased dramatically, with some already in clinical use. In this review, the major biomaterials used to facilitate skin wound healing will be examined, with particular attention allocated to the science behind their development. Experimental therapies will also be evaluated.

  17. Adhesive coatings based on melanin-like nanoparticles for surgical membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Francesca; Travan, Andrea; Turco, Gianluca; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Marsich, Eleonora; Pasqua, Mattia; Paoletti, Sergio; Donati, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Adhesive coatings for implantable biomaterials can be designed to prevent material displacement from the site of implant. In this paper, a strategy based on the use of melanin-like nanoparticles (MNPs) for the development of adhesive coatings for polysaccharidic membranes was devised. MNPs were synthesized in vitro and characterized in terms of dimensions and surface potential, as a function of pH and ionic strength. The in vitro biocompatibility of MNPs was investigated on fibroblast cells, while the antimicrobial properties of MNPs in suspension were evaluated on E. coli and S. aureus cultures. The manufacturing of the adhesive coatings was carried out by spreading MNPs over the surface of polysaccharidic membranes; the adhesive properties of the nano-engineered coating to the target tissue (intestinal serosa) were studied in simulated physiological conditions. Overall, this study opens for novel approaches in the design of naturally inspired nanostructured adhesive systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental pulp pluripotent-like stem cells (DPPSC), a new stem cell population with chromosomal stability and osteogenic capacity for biomaterials evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Toldrà, Raquel; Martínez-Sarrà, Ester; Gil-Recio, Carlos; Carrasco, Miguel Ángel; Al Madhoun, Ashraf; Montori, Sheyla; Atari, Maher

    2017-04-21

    Biomaterials are widely used to regenerate or substitute bone tissue. In order to evaluate their potential use for clinical applications, these need to be tested and evaluated in vitro with cell culture models. Frequently, immortalized osteoblastic cell lines are used in these studies. However, their uncontrolled proliferation rate, phenotypic changes or aberrations in mitotic processes limits their use in long-term investigations. Recently, we described a new pluripotent-like subpopulation of dental pulp stem cells derived from the third molars (DPPSC) that shows genetic stability and shares some pluripotent characteristics with embryonic stem cells. In this study we aim to describe the use of DPPSC to test biomaterials, since we believe that the biomaterial cues will be more critical in order to enhance the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. The capacity of DPPSC to differentiate into osteogenic lineage was compared with human sarcoma osteogenic cell line (SAOS-2). Collagen and titanium were used to assess the cell behavior in commonly used biomaterials. The analyses were performed by flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase and mineralization stains, RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy, Western blot and enzymatic activity. Moreover, the genetic stability was evaluated and compared before and after differentiation by short-comparative genomic hybridization (sCGH). DPPSC showed excellent differentiation into osteogenic lineages expressing bone-related markers similar to SAOS-2. When cells were cultured on biomaterials, DPPSC showed higher initial adhesion levels. Nevertheless, their osteogenic differentiation showed similar trend among both cell types. Interestingly, only DPPSC maintained a normal chromosomal dosage before and after differentiation on 2D monolayer and on biomaterials. Taken together, these results promote the use of DPPSC as a new pluripotent-like cell model to evaluate the biocompatibility and the differentiation

  19. Biomaterial-Associated Infection: Locating the Finish Line in the Race for the Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Jutte, Paul C.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Grainger, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections occur on both permanent implants and temporary devices for restoration or support of human functions. Despite increasing use of biomaterials in an aging society, comparatively few biomaterials have been designed that effectively reduce the incidence of

  20. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  1. Applications of atomic force microscopy to the studies of biomaterials in biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiang

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a unique tool for the studies of nanoscale structures and interactions. In this dissertation, I applied AFM to study transitions among multiple states of biomaterials in three different microscopic biomolecular systems: MukB-dependent DNA condensation, holdfast adhesion, and virus elasticity. To elucidate the mechanism of MukB-dependent DNA condensation, I have studied the conformational changes of MukB proteins as indicators for the strength of interactions between MukB, DNA and other molecular factors, such as magnesium and ParC proteins, using high-resolution AFM imaging. To determine the physical origins of holdfast adhesion, I have investigated the dynamics of adhesive force development of the holdfast, employing AFM force spectroscopy. By measuring rupture forces between the holdfast and the substrate, I showed that the holdfast adhesion is strongly time-dependent and involves transformations at multiple time scales. Understanding the mechanisms of adhesion force development of the holdfast will be critical for future engineering of holdfasts properties for various applications. Finally, I have examined the elasticity of self-assembled hepatitis B virus-like particles (HBV VLPs) and brome mosaic virus (BMV) in response to changes of pH and salinity, using AFM nanoindentation. The distributions of elasticity were mapped on a single particle level and compared between empty, RNA- and gold-filled HBV VLPs. I found that a single HBV VLP showed heterogeneous distribution of elasticity and a two-step buckling transition, suggesting a discrete property of HBV capsids. For BMV, I have showed that viruses containing different RNA molecules can be distinguished by mechanical measurements, while they are indistinguishable by morphology. I also studied the effect of pH on the elastic behaviors of three-particle BMV and R3/4 BMV. This study can yield insights into RNA presentation/release mechanisms, and could help us to design novel drug

  2. Biomaterials and Magnetic fields for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstanty

    2003-01-01

    The field of biomaterials has emerged as an important topic in the purview of NASA s new vision of research activities in the Microgravity Research Division. Although this area has an extensive track record in the medical field as borne out by the routine use of polymeric sutures, implant devices, and prosthetics, novel applications such as tissue engineering, artificial heart valves and controlled drug delivery are beginning to be developed. Besides the medical field, biomaterials and bio-inspired technologies are finding use in a host of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as self-healing and self-assembling structures, biosensors, fuel systems etc. The field of magnetic fluid technology has several potential applications in medicine. One of the emerging fields is the area of controlled drug delivery, which has seen its evolution from the basic oral delivery system to pulmonary to transdermal to direct inoculations. In cancer treatment by chemotherapy for example, targeted and controlled drug delivery has received vast scrutiny and substantial research and development effort, due to the high potency of the drugs involved and the resulting requirement to keep the exposure of the drugs to surrounding healthy tissue to a minimum. The use of magnetic particles in conjunction with a static magnetic field allows smart targeting and retention of the particles at a desired site within the body with the material transport provided by blood perfusion. Once so located, the therapeutical aspect (radiation, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) of the treatment, now highly localized, can be implemented.

  3. Graphite Oxide to Graphene. Biomaterials to Bionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brianna C; Murray, Eoin; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-12-09

    The advent of implantable biomaterials has revolutionized medical treatment, allowing the development of the fields of tissue engineering and medical bionic devices (e.g., cochlea implants to restore hearing, vagus nerve stimulators to control Parkinson's disease, and cardiac pace makers). Similarly, future materials developments are likely to continue to drive development in treatment of disease and disability, or even enhancing human potential. The material requirements for implantable devices are stringent. In all cases they must be nontoxic and provide appropriate mechanical integrity for the application at hand. In the case of scaffolds for tissue regeneration, biodegradability in an appropriate time frame may be required, and for medical bionics electronic conductivity is essential. The emergence of graphene and graphene-family composites has resulted in materials and structures highly relevant to the expansion of the biomaterials inventory available for implantable medical devices. The rich chemistries available are able to ensure properties uncovered in the nanodomain are conveyed into the world of macroscopic devices. Here, the inherent properties of graphene, along with how graphene or structures containing it interface with living cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerves and cells, are reviewed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Corrosion resistance of PLGA-coated biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczenko, Janusz; Kajzer, Wojciech; Grygiel-Pradelok, Magdalena; Jaworska, Joanna; Jelonek, Katarzyna; Nowińska, Katarzyna; Gawliczek, Maria; Libera, Marcin; Marcinkowski, Andrzej; Kasperczyk, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of PLGA bioresorbable polymer coating on corrosion resistance of metal biomaterial. Polymer coating deposited by immersion method was applied. Corrosion resistance of metal biomaterials (stainless steel, Ti6Al4V, Ti6Al7Nb) coated with PLGA polymer, after 90 days exposure to Ringer's solution was tested. The amount of metal ions released to the solution was also investigated (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) method). The surface of the samples was observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Degradation of PLGA was monitored with the use of the 1H NMR spectroscopy and GPC (Gel Permeation Chromatography). The studies were carried out for non-sterilized (NS) and sterilized (S) samples. Application of the polymer coating causes a reduction of release of metal ions to the solution. Depending on metal substrate different course of destruction of polymer layer was observed. After 90 days of incubation in Ringer's solution polymer layer was highly degraded, however, the composition of copolymer (ratio of the comonomeric units in the chain) remained unchanged during the whole process, which suggests even degradation. The polymer layer reduced degradation kinetics of the metal substrate. Moreover, degradation process did not change surface morphology of metal substrate and did not disturb its integrity. The results obtained indicate that the applied polymer layer improves corrosion resistance of the alloys being investigated. Thus, the developed implants with bioresorbable coatings could be advantageous for medical applications.

  5. Plasma assisted surface treatments of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, L; Migliaresi, C; Lunelli, L; Viero, G; Dalla Serra, M; Speranza, G

    2017-10-01

    The biocompatibility of an implant depends upon the material it is composed of, in addition to the prosthetic device's morphology, mechanical and surface properties. Properties as porosity and pore size should allow, when required, cells penetration and proliferation. Stiffness and strength, that depend on the bulk characteristics of the material, should match the mechanical requirements of the prosthetic applications. Surface properties should allow integration in the surrounding tissues by activating proper communication pathways with the surrounding cells. Bulk and surface properties are not interconnected, and for instance a bone prosthesis could possess the necessary stiffness and strength for the application omitting out prerequisite surface properties essential for the osteointegration. In this case, surface treatment is mandatory and can be accomplished using various techniques such as applying coatings to the prosthesis, ion beams, chemical grafting or modification, low temperature plasma, or a combination of the aforementioned. Low temperature plasma-based techniques have gained increasing consensus for the surface modification of biomaterials for being effective and competitive compared to other ways to introduce surface functionalities. In this paper we review plasma processing techniques and describe potentialities and applications of plasma to tailor the interface of biomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  7. The Promotion of Human Neural Stem Cells Adhesion Using Bioinspired Poly(norepinephrine Nanoscale Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minah Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of versatile biomaterial interfaces that can facilitate cellular adhesion is crucial for elucidating the cellular processes that occur on biomaterial surfaces. Furthermore, biomaterial interfaces can provide physical or chemical cues that are capable of stimulating cellular behaviors by regulating intracellular signaling cascades. Herein, a method of creating a biomimetic functional biointerface was introduced to enhance human neural stem cell (hNSC adhesion. The hNSC-compatible biointerface was prepared by the oxidative polymerization of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which generates a nanoscale organic thin layer, termed poly(norepinephrine (pNE. Due to its adhesive property, pNE resulted in an adherent layer on various substrates, and pNE-coated biointerfaces provided a highly favorable microenvironment for hNSCs, with no observed cytotoxicity. Only a 2-hour incubation of hNSCs was required to firmly attach the stem cells, regardless of the type of substrate. Importantly, the adhesive properties of pNE interfaces led to micropatterns of cellular attachment, thereby demonstrating the ability of the interface to organize the stem cells. This highly facile surface-modification method using a biomimetic pNE thin layer can be applied to a number of suitable materials that were previously not compatible with hNSC technology.

  8. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan N. Christo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical “antigen.” In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a “combined” immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation.

  9. Repairing Femoral Fractures: A Model Lesson in Biomaterial Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakeeny, Jarred

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterial science is a rapidly growing field that has scientists and doctors searching for new ways to repair the body. A merger between medicine and engineering, biomaterials can be complex subject matter, and it can certainly capture the minds of middle school students. In the lesson described in this article, seventh graders generally learn…

  10. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Susan N.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical “antigen.” In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a “combined” immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation. PMID:26247017

  11. Innate Immunity and Biomaterials at the Nexus: Friends or Foes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Susan N; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial implants are an established part of medical practice, encompassing a broad range of devices that widely differ in function and structural composition. However, one common property amongst biomaterials is the induction of the foreign body response: an acute sterile inflammatory reaction which overlaps with tissue vascularisation and remodelling and ultimately fibrotic encapsulation of the biomaterial to prevent further interaction with host tissue. Severity and clinical manifestation of the biomaterial-induced foreign body response are different for each biomaterial, with cases of incompatibility often associated with loss of function. However, unravelling the mechanisms that progress to the formation of the fibrotic capsule highlights the tightly intertwined nature of immunological responses to a seemingly noncanonical "antigen." In this review, we detail the pathways associated with the foreign body response and describe possible mechanisms of immune involvement that can be targeted. We also discuss methods of modulating the immune response by altering the physiochemical surface properties of the biomaterial prior to implantation. Developments in these areas are reliant on reproducible and effective animal models and may allow a "combined" immunomodulatory approach of adapting surface properties of biomaterials, as well as treating key immune pathways to ultimately reduce the negative consequences of biomaterial implantation.

  12. Abdominal wall healing in incisional hernia using different biomaterials in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Letícia Gomes Aramayo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate abdominal wound healing using specific biomaterials in incisional hernias. METHODS: Incisional hernias were produced in 40 rabbits, after that they were reoperated with or without the use of meshes: PREMILENE® (PPL, ULTRAPRO® (UP, PROCEED® (PCD or repairing without mesh (TRANSPALB. After 30 days a macroscopic and microscopic study of the part withdrawn from the abdominal wall was performed. RESULTS: Macroscopic: adhesion Area: PPL> UP and PCD (p = 0.031. Vascularization: PPL> UP and PCD (p = 0.001. PPL groups (p = 0.032 and PCD (p PPL, UP and TRANSPALB (p = 0.010; eosinophils: PPL> UP, and TRANSPALB PCD (p = 0.010; granulation tissue: PPL and PCD> UP and TRANSPALB (p TRANSPALB (p UP (p = 0.009 and TRANSPALB (p TRANSPALB (p PCD and TRANSPALB (p <0.001. CONCLUSION: All types of meshes caused the formation of adhesions. The UP and PCD groups showed lower area and vascularization of the adhesions. The PPL and PCD groups showed higher meshes shrinkage and there was a predominance of acute inflammatory process in the PCD group.

  13. In situ photopolymerization of biomaterials by thiol-yne click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomba, Miguel; Oriol, Luis; Alcalá, Rafael; Sánchez, Carlos; Moros, María; Grazú, Valeria; Serrano, José Luis; De la Fuente, Jesús M

    2011-11-10

    The thiol-yne click chemistry reaction has been used for the in situ photocrosslinking of an aliphatic hyperbranched polyester. The biocompatibility of the resulting networks has been studied and marked cytotoxicity was not found for HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) tumoral cells and COS7 fibroblasts. The photoinduced thiol-yne process allows the generation of patterned structures with different geometries in films by DLW and these materials can be used as substrates for cell adhesion. The influence of the substrate geometry on cell adhesion has been studied by culturing cells onto these substrates and a preference for the photopatterned polymeric material can be seen in some of the structures by contrast phase microscopy. Actin and vinculin fluorescent staining revealed different adhesion behavior for HeLa cells and COS7 fibroblasts and this could be assigned to the different motility of cells. The thiol-yne photoreaction has proven to be an attractive approach for the preparation of micropatterned biomaterials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Polymeric Biomaterials: Diverse Functions Enabled by Advances in Macromolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingkai; Li, Linqing; Scott, Rebecca A; Kiick, Kristi L

    2017-01-24

    Biomaterials have been extensively used to leverage beneficial outcomes in various therapeutic applications, such as providing spatial and temporal control over the release of therapeutic agents in drug delivery as well as engineering functional tissues and promoting the healing process in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This perspective presents important milestones in the development of polymeric biomaterials with defined structures and properties. Contemporary studies of biomaterial design have been reviewed with focus on constructing materials with controlled structure, dynamic functionality, and biological complexity. Examples of these polymeric biomaterials enabled by advanced synthetic methodologies, dynamic chemistry/assembly strategies, and modulated cell-material interactions have been highlighted. As the field of polymeric biomaterials continues to evolve with increased sophistication, current challenges and future directions for the design and translation of these materials are also summarized.

  15. Combinational Effect of Cell Adhesion Biomolecules and Their Immobilized Polymer Property to Enhance Cell-Selective Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Kurimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surface immobilization of medical devices with bioactive molecules is one of the most widely used strategies to improve biocompatibility, the physicochemical properties of the biomaterials significantly impact the activity of the immobilized molecules. Herein we investigate the combinational effects of cell-selective biomolecules and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the polymeric substrate on selective adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs, fibroblasts (FBs, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. To control the polymeric substrate, biomolecules are immobilized on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm-grafted glass surfaces. By switching the molecular conformation of the biomolecule-immobilized polymers, the cell-selective adhesion performances are evaluated. In case of RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide-immobilized surfaces, all cell types adhere well regardless of the surface hydrophobicity. On the other hand, a tri-Arg-immobilized surface exhibits FB-selectivity when the surface is hydrophilic. Additionally, a tri-Ile-immobilized surface exhibits EC-selective cell adhesion when the surface is hydrophobic. We believe that the proposed concept, which is used to investigate the biomolecule-immobilized surface combination, is important to produce new biomaterials, which are highly demanded for medical implants and tissue engineering.

  16. Wildlife biomaterial banking in Africa for now and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Paul; Kotze, Antoinette

    2006-08-01

    The Wildlife Biological Resource Centre (wBRC) together with its partners in BioBank SA, have created a Biological Resource Bank (BRB) that is dedicated to the acquisition, processing, banking, using and provision of biomaterials to the scientific and conservation industry that are viable, diverse and representative of southern Africa's wildlife populations. Banked biomaterials include tissue such as muscle, kidney, fat, liver, embryos, fibroblast cultures, blood, sperm, hair, egg shells and other tissue, fluids and cells. Biomaterials are made available for research, biodiversity conservation and biotechnology development. Biomaterials are used in many disciplines, including genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and disease studies. Biomaterials from selected species are also useful for the detection and monitoring of Persistent Organic Pollutants and other potentially harmful substances found in the environment. Biomaterials are made available to third parties with prior consent from the biomaterials "owner" and only after the signing of a customised Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) or Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The training of staff from National and Provincial Game Reserves, Zoological Gardens, Animal Breeders and laboratories is carried out on a regular basis with the aim of securing good quality biomaterials. Sampling kits are made available to persons tasked with the collection of wildlife biomaterials. The Biobank SA consortium acts as an integrated resource centre linking partner collections. The consortium's operational arm, namely wBRC, is active in the development of relevant policy, regulations and legislation pertaining to biomaterials, including Access and Benefit Sharing systems. The main sponsor of the project is the Department of Science and Technology, National Government of South Africa.

  17. Study on MCP-1 related to inflammation induced by biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Tingting [Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University/Shanghai Biomaterials Research and Testing Center, Shanghai 200023 (China); Sun Jiao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai 200023 (China); Zhang Ping, E-mail: jiaosun59@yahoo.co [School of Life Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The study of inflammation is important for understanding the reaction between biomaterials and the human body, in particular, the interaction between biomaterials and immune system. In the current study, rat macrophages were induced by multiple biomaterials with different biocompatibilities, including polyvinyl chloride (PVC) containing 8% of organic tin, a positive control material with cellular toxicity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV-304), cultured with PRMI-1640, were detached from cells cultured with the supernatant of macrophages containing TNF-alpha and IL-1beta because of stimulation by biomaterials. The cells were then treated with different biomaterials. Then both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in macrophages were detected by ELISA. Levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured by RT-PCR. The results suggested that the expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta was elevated by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and American NPG alloy (p < 0.001). The level of MCP-1 cultured in supernatant of macrophages was higher than in PRMI-1640 with the same biomaterials. And the exposure to PTFE, PLGA and NPG resulted in the high expression of MCP-1 (p < 0.001) following cytokine stimulation. MCP-1 was also significantly expressed in beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and calcium phosphate cement samples (CPC) (p < 0.01). Thus, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and MCP-1 had played an important role in the immune reaction induced by biomaterials and there was a close relationship between the expression of cytokines and biomcompatibility of biomaterials. Furthermore, these data suggested that MCP-1 was regulated by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and activated by both cytokines and biomaterials. The data further suggested that the expression of MCP-1 could be used as a marker to indicate the degree of immune reaction induced by biomaterials.

  18. Engineered biomaterial and biophysical stimulation as combinatorial strategies to address prosthetic infection by pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Sunil Kumar; Basu, Bikramjit

    2017-10-01

    A plethora of antimicrobial strategies are being developed to address prosthetic infection. The currently available methods for implant infection treatment include the use of antibiotics and revision surgery. Among the bacterial strains, Staphylococcus species pose significant challenges particularly, with regard to hospital acquired infections. In order to combat such life threatening infectious diseases, researchers have developed implantable biomaterials incorporating nanoparticles, antimicrobial reinforcements, surface coatings, slippery/non-adhesive and contact killing surfaces. This review discusses a few of the biomaterial and biophysical antimicrobial strategies, which are in the developmental stage and actively being pursued by several research groups. The clinical efficacy of biophysical stimulation methods such as ultrasound, electric and magnetic field treatments against prosthetic infection depends critically on the stimulation protocol and parameters of the treatment modality. A common thread among the three biophysical stimulation methods is the mechanism of bactericidal action, which is centered on biophysical rupture of bacterial membranes, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and bacterial membrane depolarization evoked by the interference of essential ion-transport. Although the extent of antimicrobial effect, normally achieved through biophysical stimulation protocol is insufficient to warrant therapeutic application, a combination of antibiotic/ROS inducing agents and biophysical stimulation methods can elicit a clinically relevant reduction in viable bacterial numbers. In this review, we present a detailed account of both the biomaterial and biophysical approaches for achieving maximum bacterial inactivation. Summarizing, the biophysical stimulation methods in a combinatorial manner with material based strategies can be a more potent solution to control bacterial infections. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B

  19. Biomaterials and Bioactive Agents in Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rui M; Varanda, Pedro; Reis, Rui L; Duarte, Ana Rita C; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    Management of degenerative spine pathologies frequently leads to the need for spinal fusion (SF), where bone growth is induced toward stabilization of the interventioned spine. Autologous bone graft (ABG) remains the gold-standard inducer, whereas new bone graft substitutes attempt to achieve effective de novo bone formation and solid fusion. Limited fusion outcomes have driven motivation for more sophisticated and multidisciplinary solutions, involving new biomaterials and/or biologics, through innovative delivery platforms. The present review will analyze the most recent body of literature that is focused on new approaches for consistent bone fusion of spinal vertebrae, including the development of new biomaterials that pursue physical and chemical aptitudes; the delivery of growth factors (GF) to accelerate new bone formation; and the use of cells to improve functional bone development. Bone graft substitutes currently in clinical practice, such as demineralized bone matrix and ceramics, are still used as a starting point for the study of new bioactive agents. Polyesters such as polycaprolactone and polylactic acid arise as platforms for the development of composites, where a mineral element and cell/GF constitute the delivery system. Exciting fusion outcomes were obtained in several small and large animal models with these. On what regards bioactive agents, mesenchymal stem cells, preferentially derived from the bone marrow or adipose tissue, were studied in this context. Autologous and allogeneic approaches, as well as osteogenically differentiated cells, have been tested. These cell sources have further been genetically engineered for specific GF expression. Nevertheless, results on fusion efficacy with cells have been inconsistent. On the other hand, the delivery of GF (most commonly bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2]) has provided favorable outcomes. Complications related to burst release and dosing are still the target of research through the development

  20. Bacterial adhesion and growth on a polymer brush-coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, M Reza; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-10-01

    Biomaterials-related infections pose serious problems in implant surgery, despite the development of non-adhesive coatings. Non-adhesive coatings, like polymer brush-coatings, have so far only been investigated with respect to preventing initial bacterial adhesion, but never with respect to effects on kinetics of bacterial growth. Here, we compare adhesion and 20 h growth of three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) on pristine and brush-coated silicone rubber in a parallel plate flow chamber. Brush-coatings were made using a tri-block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polypropylene oxide (PPO). Brush-coatings prevented adhesion of staphylococci to below 5 x 10(5)cm(-2) after 30 min, which is a 10-fold reduction compared to pristine silicone rubber. Biofilms grew on both brush-coated and pristine silicone rubber, while the viability of biofilms on brush-coatings was higher than on pristine silicone rubber. However, biofilms on brush-coatings developed more slowly and detached almost fully by high fluid shear. Brush-coating remained non-adhesive after S. epidermidis biofilm formation and subsequent removal whereas a part of its functionality was lost after removal of S. aureus biofilms. Adhesion, growth and detachment of P. aeruginosa were not significantly different on brush-coatings as compared with pristine silicone rubber, although here too the viability of biofilms on brush-coatings was higher. We conclude that polymer brush-coatings strongly reduce initial adhesion of staphylococci and delay their biofilm growth. In addition, biofilms on brush-coatings are more viable and easily removed by the application of fluid shear.

  1. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  2. Cytocompatibility of medical biomaterials containing nickel by osteoblasts: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna

    2011-09-01

    The present review is based on a survey of 21 studies on the cytocompatibility of medical biomaterials containing nickel, as assessed by cell culture of human and animal osteoblasts or osteoblast-like cells. Among the biomaterials evaluated were stainless steel, NiTi alloys, pure Ni, Ti, and other pure metals. The materials were either commercially available, prepared by the authors, or implanted by various techniques to generate a protective layer of oxides, nitrides, acetylides. The observation that the layers significantly reduced the initial release of metal ions and increased cytocompatibility was confirmed in cell culture experiments. Physical and chemical characterization of the materials was performed. This included, e.g., surface characterization (roughness, wettability, corrosion behavior, quantity of released ions, microhardness, and characterization of passivation layer). Cytocompatibility tests of the materials were conducted in the cultures of human or animal osteoblasts and osteoblast-like cells. The following assays were carried out: cell proliferation and viability test, adhesion test, morphology (by fluorescent microscopy or SEM). Also phenotypic and genotypic markers were investigated. In the majority of works, it was found that the most cytocompatible materials were stainless steel and NiTi alloy. Pure Ni was rendered and less cytocompatible. All the papers confirmed that the consequence of the formation of protective layers was in significant increase of cytocompatibility of the materials. This indicates the possible further modifications of the manufacturing process (formation of the passivation layer).

  3. Aquatic proteins with repetitive motifs provide insights to bioengineering of novel biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Jung, Dooyup; Yang, Byeongseon; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-12-01

    Proteins with repetitive motifs play vital structural and adhesive functions in nature. Some repeat proteins in particular have adapted to harsh aquatic surroundings to support the survival and reproduction of organisms. Significant effort has been made to identify aquatic repeat proteins with attractive properties and functions to be used as novel biomaterials. Examples of such proteins include matrix proteins from pearl oysters, minicollagens from sea anemones, cement proteins from sandcastle worms, and byssal proteins from marine mussels. Here, several repetitive motifs from aquatic proteins are reviewed, and their characteristic properties are linked to practical uses in three aspects of aquatic life: defense, shelter, and attachment. Some repetitive motifs interact with minerals and consequently generate strong outer cover of shells, and some motifs relate with sticky nature, which contribute to organisms' habitation by adhering themselves in harsh aquatic environments. Other motifs, such as silk- or collagen-like motifs, are also involved in structural rigidity as shown in mussel's byssus and egg membrane. Thus, understanding aquatic repetitive motifs will provide clues about biomedical and biotechnological applications of engineered biomaterials in wet environments. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In vitro evaluation of decellularized ECM-derived surgical scaffold biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Kulig, Katherine M; Finkelstein, Eric B; Nicholson, Margaret F; Liu, Xiang-Hong; Goldman, Scott M; Vacanti, Joseph P; Grottkau, Brian E; Pomerantseva, Irina; Sundback, Cathryn A; Neville, Craig M

    2017-04-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) biomaterials are increasingly used in regenerative medicine for abdominal tissue repair. Emerging ECM biomaterials with greater compliance target surgical procedures like breast and craniofacial reconstruction to enhance aesthetic outcome. Clinical studies report improved outcomes with newly designed ECM scaffolds, but their comparative biological characteristics have received less attention. In this study, we investigated scaffolds derived from dermis (AlloDerm Regenerative Tissue Matrix), small intestinal submucosa (Surgisis 4-layer Tissue Graft and OASIS Wound Matrix), and mesothelium (Meso BioMatrix Surgical Mesh and Veritas Collagen Matrix) and evaluated biological properties that modulate cellular responses and recruitment. An assay panel was utilized to assess the ECM scaffold effects upon cells. Results of the material-conditioned media study demonstrated Meso BioMatrix and OASIS best supported cell proliferation. Meso BioMatrix promoted the greatest migration and chemotaxis signaling, followed by Veritas and OASIS; OASIS had superior suppression of cell apoptosis. The direct adhesion assay indicated that AlloDerm, Meso BioMatrix, Surgisis, and Veritas had sidedness that affected cell-material interactions. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, Meso BioMatrix and OASIS best supported cell infiltration. Among tested materials, Meso BioMatrix and OASIS demonstrated characteristics that facilitate scaffold incorporation, making them promising choices for many clinical applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 585-593, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Review for carrageenan-based pharmaceutical biomaterials: favourable physical features versus adverse biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhan, Xiudan; Wan, Jianbo; Wang, Yitao; Wang, Chunming

    2015-05-05

    Carrageenan (CRG) is a family of natural polysaccharides derived from seaweeds and has widely been used as food additives. In the past decade, owing to its attractive physicochemical properties, CRG has been developed into versatile biomaterials vehicles for drug delivery. Nevertheless, studies also emerged to reveal its adverse effects on the biological system. In this review, we critically appraise the latest literature (two thirds since 2008) on the development of CRG-based pharmaceutical vehicles and the perspective of using CRG for broader biomedical applications. We focus on how current strategies exploit the unique gelling mechanisms, strong water absorption and abundant functional groups of the three major CRG varieties. Notably, CRG-based matrices are demonstrated to increase drug loading and drug solubility, enabling release of orally administrated drugs in zero-order or in a significantly prolonged period. Other amazing features, such as pH-sensitivity and adhesive property, of CRG-based formulations are also introduced. Finally, we discuss the adverse influence of CRG on the human body and then suggest some future directions for the development of CRG-based biomaterials for broader applications in biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthetic polycations with controlled charge density and molecular weight as building blocks for biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberger, Rachelle M; Burke, Nicholas A D; Zhou, Christal; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-01-01

    A series of polycations prepared by RAFT copolymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride (APM) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide, with molecular weights of 15 and 40 kDa, and APM content of 10-75 mol%, were tested as building blocks for electrostatically assembled hydrogels such as those used for cell encapsulation. Complexation and distribution of these copolymers within anionic calcium alginate gels, as well as cytotoxicity, cell attachment, and cell proliferation on surfaces grafted with the copolymers were found to depend on composition and molecular weight. Copolymers with lower cationic charge density and lower molecular weight showed less cytotoxicity and cell adhesion, and were more mobile within alginate gels. These findings aid in designing improved polyelectrolyte complexes for use as biomaterials.

  8. Regenerative immunology: the immunological reaction to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravedi, Paolo; Farouk, Samira; Angeletti, Andrea; Edgar, Lauren; Tamburrini, Riccardo; Duisit, Jerome; Perin, Laura; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    Regenerative medicine promises to meet two of the most urgent needs of modern organ transplantation, namely immunosuppression-free transplantation and an inexhaustible source of organs. Ideally, bioengineered organs would be manufactured from a patient's own biomaterials-both cells and the supporting scaffolding materials in which cells would be embedded and allowed to mature to eventually regenerate the organ in question. While some groups are focusing on the feasibility of this approach, few are focusing on the immunogenicity of the scaffolds that are being developed for organ bioengineering purposes. This review will succinctly discuss progress in the understanding of immunological characteristics and behavior of different scaffolds currently under development, with emphasis on the extracellular matrix scaffolds obtained decellularized animal or human organs which seem to provide the ideal template for bioengineering purposes. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  9. Tribological characteristics of dental metal biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walczak Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a report of the examination of the tribological wear characteristics of certain dental metal biomaterials. In the study, tests were undertaken on the following materials: 316L steel, NiCrMo alloy, technically pure titanium (ASTM-grade 2 and Ti6Al4V ELI alloy (ASTM-grade 5. The tribological tests were performed in artificial saliva to determine the coefficient of friction and wear factor; the traces of wear were then ascertained through SEM. The significance of variations in the wear factor, was subsequently assessed by the U Mann-Whitney test. The resistance to wear in the ball-on-disc test under in vitro conditions was observed for the tested materials in the following order: NiCrMo>316L>Ti6Al4V>Ti grade 2.

  10. Chitosan dan Aplikasi Klinisnya Sebagai Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of new materials with both organic and inorganic structures is of great interest to obtain special material properties. Chitosan [2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucan] can be obtained by N-deacetylation of chitin. Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer in nature and the supporting material of crustaceans, insects, fungi etc. Chitosan is unique polysaccharide and has been widely used in various biomedical application due to its biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, non-immunogenic and non-carcinogenic character. In the past few years, chitosan and some of its modifications have been reported for use in biomedical applications such as artificial skin, wound dressing, anticoagulant, suture, drug delivery, vaccine carrier and dietary fibers. Recently, the use of chitosan and its derivatives has received much attention as temporary scaffolding to promotie mineralization or stimulate endochodral ossification. This article aims to give a broad overview of chitosan and its clinical applications as biomaterial.

  11. Pulmonary emboli from blood-biomaterial interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.E.; Ramberg, K.; McEnroe, C.S.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of surface thrombosis and subsequent embolization remains entrenched as a yet incompletely surmounted barrier to the development of truly satisfactory intravascular prosthetic devices. A baboon ex vivo shunt was used to determine the interaction of Indium-111 platelets and potential biomaterials. The uptake of Indium-111 platelets was monitored continuously by gamma camera scanning. Several of the materials tested demonstrated a saw-toothed pattern of platelet activity, with accumulation followed by rapid decline. Neither PTFE nor Dacron exhibited this pattern. Post shunt scans of the animals' chests showed discrete foci of platelet activity in the lungs, corresponding to each embolic event noted on the material's scan. In conclusion, the search for a smooth surface as a blood material interface may produce a material which accumulates and then sloughs significant platelet aggregates. It is crucial that these materials be subjected to vigorous testing to determine their safety prior to initiation of clinical trials

  12. Biomaterials for intervertebral disc regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Robert D; Setton, Lori A

    2017-06-01

    The intervertebral disc contributes to motion, weight bearing, and flexibility of the spine, but is susceptible to damage and morphological changes that contribute to pathology with age and injury. Engineering strategies that rely upon synthetic materials or composite implants that do not interface with the biological components of the disc have not met with widespread use or desirable outcomes in the treatment of intervertebral disc pathology. Here we review bioengineering advances to treat disc disorders, using cell-supplemented materials, or acellular, biologically based materials, that provide opportunity for cell-material interactions and remodeling in the treatment of intervertebral disc disorders. While a field still in early development, bioengineering-based strategies employing novel biomaterials are emerging as promising alternatives for clinical treatment of intervertebral disc disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomaterials in search of a meniscus substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, Jan J; van Tienen, Tony G; van Bochove, Bas; Grijpma, Dirk W; Buma, Pieter

    2014-04-01

    The menisci fulfill key biomechanical functions in the tibiofemoral (knee) joint. Unfortunately meniscal injuries are quite common and most often treated by (partial) meniscectomy. However, some patients experience enduring symptoms, and, more importantly, it leads to an increased risk for symptomatic osteoarthritis. Over the past decades, researchers have put effort in developing a meniscal substitute able to prevent osteoarthritis and treat enduring clinical symptoms. Grossly, two categories of substitutes are observed: First, a resorbable scaffold mimicking biomechanical function which slowly degrades while tissue regeneration and organization is promoted. Second, a non resorbable, permanent implant which mimics the biomechanical function of the native meniscus. Numerous biomaterials with different (material) properties have been used in order to provide such a substitute. Nevertheless, a clinically applicable cartilage protecting material is not yet emerged. In the current review we provide an overview, and discuss, these different materials and extract recommendations regarding material properties for future developmental research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  15. Extracellular matrix-based biomaterial scaffolds and the host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Joseph M; Grainger, David W

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) collectively represents a class of naturally derived proteinaceous biomaterials purified from harvested organs and tissues with increasing scientific focus and utility in tissue engineering and repair. This interest stems predominantly from the largely unproven concept that processed ECM biomaterials as natural tissue-derived matrices better integrate with host tissue than purely synthetic biomaterials. Nearly every tissue type has been decellularized and processed for re-use as tissue-derived ECM protein implants and scaffolds. To date, however, little consensus exists for defining ECM compositions or sources that best constitute decellularized biomaterials that might better heal, integrate with host tissues and avoid the foreign body response (FBR). Metrics used to assess ECM performance in biomaterial implants are arbitrary and contextually specific by convention. Few comparisons for in vivo host responses to ECM implants from different sources are published. This review discusses current ECM-derived biomaterials characterization methods including relationships between ECM material compositions from different sources, properties and host tissue response as implants. Relevant preclinical in vivo models are compared along with their associated advantages and limitations, and the current state of various metrics used to define material integration and biocompatibility are discussed. Commonly applied applications of these ECM-derived biomaterials as stand-alone implanted matrices and devices are compared with respect to host tissue responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A new approach to the rationale discovery of polymeric biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Joachim; Welsh, William J.; Knight, Doyle

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to illustrate both the need for new approaches to biomaterials discovery as well as the significant promise inherent in the use of combinatorial and computational design strategies. The key observation of this Leading Opinion Paper is that the biomaterials community has been slow to embrace advanced biomaterials discovery tools such as combinatorial methods, high throughput experimentation, and computational modeling in spite of the significant promise shown by these discovery tools in materials science, medicinal chemistry and the pharmaceutical industry. It seems that the complexity of living cells and their interactions with biomaterials has been a conceptual as well as a practical barrier to the use of advanced discovery tools in biomaterials science. However, with the continued increase in computer power, the goal of predicting the biological response of cells in contact with biomaterials surfaces is within reach. Once combinatorial synthesis, high throughput experimentation, and computational modeling are integrated into the biomaterials discovery process, a significant acceleration is possible in the pace of development of improved medical implants, tissue regeneration scaffolds, and gene/drug delivery systems. PMID:17644176

  17. The effect of different implant biomaterials on the behavior of canine bone marrow stromal cells during their differentiation into osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Şen, B H; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of different implant biomaterials on cultured canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) undergoing differentiation into osteoblasts (dBMSC). BMSC were isolated from canine humerus by marrow aspiration, cultured and differentiated on calcium phosphate scaffold (CPS), hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite in gel form and titanium mesh. We used the MTT method to determine the effects of osteogenic media on proliferation. The characteristics of dBMSC were assessed using alizarin red (AR), immunocytochemistry and osteoblastic markers including alkaline phosphatase/von Kossa (ALP/VK), osteocalcin (OC) and osteonectin (ON), and ELISA. The morphology of dBMSC on the biomaterials was investigated using inverted phase contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We detected expression of ALP/VK, AR, OC and ON by day 7 of culture; expression increased from day 14 until day 21. CPS supported the best adhesion, cell spreading, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. The effects of the biomaterials depended on their surface properties. Expression of osteoblastic markers showed that canine dBMSCs became functional osteoblasts. Tissue engineered stem cells can be useful clinically for autologous implants for treating bone wounds.

  18. Engineering Biomaterials to Integrate and Heal: The Biocompatibility Paradigm Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryers, James D.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on one of the major failure routes of implanted medical devices, the foreign body reaction (FBR)—that is, the phagocytic attack and encapsulation by the body of the so-called “biocompatible” biomaterials comprising the devices. We then review strategies currently under development that might lead to biomaterial constructs that will harmoniously heal and integrate into the body. We discuss in detail emerging strategies to inhibit the FBR by engineering biomaterials that elicit more biologically pertinent responses. PMID:22592568

  19. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  20. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O' Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  1. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  2. Instant acting adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  3. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  4. Polymer brush-coatings to prevent biomaterials associated infection : initial bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nejadnik, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    Biomateriaal geassocieerde infecties vormen één van de belangrijkste oorzaken voor het falen van implantaten, en dat in een tijdperk waarin het aantal patiënten dat een biomateriaal implantaat nodig heeft sterk toeneemt. De behandeling van een biomateriaal infectie bestaat meestal uit langdurig

  5. ADHESION FORCES BETWEEN E. COLI BACTERIA AND BIOMATERIAL SURFACES (R821268)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  7. Hydration behaviors of calcium silicate-based biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ling Lee

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Mineral oxides might not result in significant changes in the crystal phases or microstructures during the hydration of CS-based biomaterials, but these compounds affected the hydration behavior at the molecular level.

  8. Simplified process for preparation of schizophyllan solutions for biomaterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schizophyllan is a biopolymer commercially produced for pharmaceutical and cosmetics uses. However, schizophyllan also has potential biomaterial applications. Schizophyllan is conventionally produced from glucose and recovered by diafiltration and ultrafiltration to produce a highly purified product...

  9. Mechanical and biological properties of keratose biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Merrill, Michelle R; Richter, Jillian R; Hamzi, Rawad I; Greengauz-Roberts, Olga K; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2011-11-01

    The oxidized form of extractable human hair keratin proteins, commonly referred to as keratose, is gaining interest as a biomaterial for multiple tissue engineering studies including those directed toward peripheral nerve, spinal cord, skin, and bone regeneration. Unlike its disulfide cross-linked counterpart, kerateine, keratose does not possess a covalently cross-linked network structure and consequently displays substantially different characteristics. In order to understand its mode(s) of action and potential for clinical translatability, detailed characterization of the composition, physical properties, and biological responses of keratose biomaterials are needed. Keratose was obtained from end-cut human hair fibers by peracetic acid treatment, followed by base extraction, and subsequent dialysis. Analysis of lyophilized keratose powder determined that it contains 99% proteins by mass with amino acid content similar to human hair cortex. Metallic elements were also found in minute quantities. Protein oxidation led to disulfide bond cleavage and drastic reduction of free thiols due to conversion of sulfhydryl to sulfonic acid, chain fragmentation, and amino acid modifications. Mass spectrometry identified the major protein constituents as a heterogeneous mixture of 15 hair keratins (type I: K31-35 and K37-39, and type II: K81-86) with small amounts of epithelial keratins which exist in monomeric, dimeric, multimeric, and even degraded forms. Re-hydration with PBS enabled molecular assembly into an elastic solid-like hydrogel. Highly-porous scaffolds formed by lyophilization of the gel had the compression behavior of a cellular foam material and reverted back to gel upon wetting. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the EC50 for various cell lines were attained at 8-10 mg/mL keratose, indicating the non-toxic nature of the material. Implantation in mouse subcutaneous tissue pockets demonstrated that keratose resorption follows a rectangular hyperbolic regression

  10. Specific recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells using biomaterials as filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Matthew; Molenda, James; Murphy, William L

    2017-07-01

    Endogenous recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) is an emerging strategy to induce angiogenesis within a defect site, and multiple recent strategies have deployed soluble protein releasing biomaterials for this purpose. However, the way in which the design of biomaterials affects CAC recruitment and invasion are poorly understood. Here we used an enhanced-throughput cell invasion assay to systematically examine the effects of biomaterial design on CAC recruitment. The screens co-optimized hydrogel presentation of a stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) gradient, hydrogel degradability, and hydrogel stiffness for maximal CAC invasion. We also examined the specificity of this invasion by assessing dermal fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cell, and lymphocyte invasion individually and in co-culture with CACs to identify hydrogels specific to CAC invasion. These screens suggested a subset of MMP-degradable hydrogels presenting a specific range of SDF-1α gradient slopes that induced specific invasion of CACs, and we posit that the design parameters of this subset of hydrogels may serve as instructive templates for the future design of biomaterials to specifically recruit CACs. We also posit that this design concept may be applied more broadly in that it may be possible to utilize these specific subsets of biomaterials as "filters" to control which types of cell populations invade into and populate the biomaterial. The recruitment of specific cell types for cell-based therapies in vivo is of great interest to the regenerative medicine community. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs), CD133+ cells derived from the blood stream, are of particular interest for induction of angiogenesis in ischemic tissues, and recent studies utilizing soluble-factor releasing biomaterials to recruit these cells in vivo show great promise. However, these studies are largely "proof of concept" and are not systematic in nature. Thus, little is currently known about how biomaterial design

  11. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik Tappa; Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka

    2018-01-01

    The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and c...

  12. Novel antibacterial strategies to combat biomaterial-associated infection

    OpenAIRE

    Riool, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of medical devices has grown significantly over the last decades, and has become a major part of modern medicine and our daily life. The risk of infection is a significant problem with any inserted or implanted foreign body material, and is the number one cause of failure of implanted biomaterials. These so-called biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. This thesis describes the development and characterization...

  13. Advancing the field of 3D biomaterial printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-01-11

    3D biomaterial printing has emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology, promising to transform both research and medical therapeutics. Although there has been recent progress in the field, on-demand fabrication of functional and transplantable tissues and organs is still a distant reality. To advance to this point, there are two major technical challenges that must be overcome. The first is expanding upon the limited variety of available 3D printable biomaterials (biomaterial inks), which currently do not adequately represent the physical, chemical, and biological complexity and diversity of tissues and organs within the human body. Newly developed biomaterial inks and the resulting 3D printed constructs must meet numerous interdependent requirements, including those that lead to optimal printing, structural, and biological outcomes. The second challenge is developing and implementing comprehensive biomaterial ink and printed structure characterization combined with in vitro and in vivo tissue- and organ-specific evaluation. This perspective outlines considerations for addressing these technical hurdles that, once overcome, will facilitate rapid advancement of 3D biomaterial printing as an indispensable tool for both investigating complex tissue and organ morphogenesis and for developing functional devices for a variety of diagnostic and regenerative medicine applications.

  14. Adsorptive Removal of Metal Ions from Water using Functionalized Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Kanchanmala

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis and modification of cost-effective sorbents for removing heavy metals from water resources is an area of significance. It had been reported that materials with biological origins, such as agricultural and animal waste, are excellent alternatives to conventional adsorbents due to their higher affinity, capacity and selectivity towards metal ions. These properties of biomaterials help to reduce or detoxify metal ions concentration in contaminated water to acceptable regulatory standards. Synthesis of novel, efficient, cost effective, eco-friendly biomaterials for heavy metal adsorption from water is still an area of challenge. In this comprehensive review, acompilation of patents as well as published articles is carried out to outline the properties of different biomaterials based on their precursors along withdetailed description of biomaterial morphology and various surface modification approaches. A detailed study of the performance of adsorbents and the role of physical and chemical modification in terms of enhancing their potential for metal adsorption from water is compiled here. The factors affecting adsorption behavior i.e., capacity and affinity of e biomaterials is also compiled. This paper presents a concise review of reported studies on the synthesis and modification of biomaterials, their use for heavy metal removal from waters and future prospects of this technology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Applications of Biomaterials in Corneal Endothelial Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsung-Jen; Wang, I-Jong; Hu, Fung-Rong; Young, Tai-Horng

    2016-11-01

    When corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are diseased or injured, corneal endothelium can be surgically removed and tissue from a deceased donor can replace the original endothelium. Recent major innovations in corneal endothelial transplantation include replacement of diseased corneal endothelium with a thin lamellar posterior donor comprising a tissue-engineered endothelium carried or cultured on a thin substratum with an organized monolayer of cells. Repairing CECs is challenging because they have restricted proliferative ability in vivo. CECs can be cultivated in vitro and seeded successfully onto natural tissue materials or synthetic polymeric materials as grafts for transplantation. The optimal biomaterials for substrata of CEC growth are being investigated. Establishing a CEC culture system by tissue engineering might require multiple biomaterials to create a new scaffold that overcomes the disadvantages of single biomaterials. Chitosan and polycaprolactone are biodegradable biomaterials approved by the Food and Drug Administration that have superior biological, degradable, and mechanical properties for culturing substratum. We successfully hybridized chitosan and polycaprolactone into blended membranes, and demonstrated that CECs proliferated, developed normal morphology, and maintained their physiological phenotypes. The interaction between cells and biomaterials is important in tissue engineering of CECs. We are still optimizing culture methods for the maintenance and differentiation of CECs on biomaterials.

  16. Analysis of the Osteogenic Effects of Biomaterials Using Numerical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Hui-Lin; Luo, Zong-Ping

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development of an optimization algorithm for determining the effects of different properties of implanted biomaterials on bone growth, based on the finite element method and bone self-optimization theory. The rate of osteogenesis and the bone density distribution of the implanted biomaterials were quantitatively analyzed. Using the proposed algorithm, a femur with implanted biodegradable biomaterials was simulated, and the osteogenic effects of different materials were measured. Simulation experiments mainly considered variations in the elastic modulus (20-3000 MPa) and degradation period (10, 20, and 30 days) for the implanted biodegradable biomaterials. Based on our algorithm, the osteogenic effects of the materials were optimal when the elastic modulus was 1000 MPa and the degradation period was 20 days. The simulation results for the metaphyseal bone of the left femur were compared with micro-CT images from rats with defective femurs, which demonstrated the effectiveness of the algorithm. The proposed method was effective for optimization of the bone structure and is expected to have applications in matching appropriate bones and biomaterials. These results provide important insights into the development of implanted biomaterials for both clinical medicine and materials science.

  17. The pathology of the foreign body reaction against biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfleisch, R; Jung, F

    2017-03-01

    The healing process after implantation of biomaterials involves the interaction of many contributing factors. Besides their in vivo functionality, biomaterials also require characteristics that allow their integration into the designated tissue without eliciting an overshooting foreign body reaction (FBR). The targeted design of biomaterials with these features, thus, needs understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the FBR. Much effort has been put into research on the interaction of engineered materials and the host tissue. This elucidated many aspects of the five FBR phases, that is protein adsorption, acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body giant cell formation, and fibrous capsule formation. However, in practice, it is still difficult to predict the response against a newly designed biomaterial purely based on the knowledge of its physical-chemical surface features. This insufficient knowledge leads to a high number of factors potentially influencing the FBR, which have to be analyzed in complex animal experiments including appropriate data-based sample sizes. This review is focused on the current knowledge on the general mechanisms of the FBR against biomaterials and the influence of biomaterial surface topography and chemical and physical features on the quality and quantity of the reaction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 927-940, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Tuning cell adhesion on polymeric and nanocomposite surfaces: Role of topography versus superhydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangi, Sepideh [Department of Chemical Engineering, Shahrood Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 36155-163, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hejazi, Iman [Department of Polymer Engineering & Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyfi, Javad, E-mail: Jseyfi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Shahrood Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 36155-163, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hejazi, Ehsan [Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khonakdar, Hossein Ali [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 19585-466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davachi, Seyed Mohammad [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    Development of surface modification procedures which allow tuning the cell adhesion on the surface of biomaterials and devices is of great importance. In this study, the effects of different topographies and wettabilities on cell adhesion behavior of polymeric surfaces are investigated. To this end, an improved phase separation method was proposed to impart various wettabilities (hydrophobic and superhydrophobic) on polypropylene surfaces. Surface morphologies and compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Cell culture was conducted to evaluate the adhesion of 4T1 mouse mammary tumor cells. It was found that processing conditions such as drying temperature is highly influential in cell adhesion behavior due to the formation of an utterly different surface topography. It was concluded that surface topography plays a more significant role in cell adhesion behavior rather than superhydrophobicity since the nano-scale topography highly inhibited the cell adhesion as compared to the micro-scale topography. Such cell repellent behavior could be very useful in many biomedical devices such as those in drug delivery and blood contacting applications as well as biosensors. - Highlights: • A novel method is presented for fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces. • The presence of nanoparticles in non-solvent bath notably promoted phase separation. • Topography had a more notable impact on cell adhesion than superhydrophobicity. • Nano-scale topographical features highly impeded cell adhesion on polymer surfaces.

  19. Nanofibers and nanoparticles from the insect-capturing adhesive of the Sundew (Drosera for cell attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Mingjun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for naturally occurring nanocomposites with diverse properties for tissue engineering has been a major interest for biomaterial research. In this study, we investigated a nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite secreted from an insect-capturing plant, the Sundew, for cell attachment. The adhesive nanocomposite has demonstrated high biocompatibility and is ready to be used with minimal preparation. Results Atomic force microscopy (AFM conducted on the adhesive from three species of Sundew found that a network of nanofibers and nanoparticles with various sizes existed independent of the coated surface. AFM and light microscopy confirmed that the pattern of nanofibers corresponded to Alcian Blue staining for polysaccharide. Transmission electron microscopy identified a low abundance of nanoparticles in different pattern form AFM observations. In addition, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of Ca, Mg, and Cl, common components of biological salts. Study of the material properties of the adhesive yielded high viscoelasticity from the liquid adhesive, with reduced elasticity observed in the dried adhesive. The ability of PC12 neuron-like cells to attach and grow on the network of nanofibers created from the dried adhesive demonstrated the potential of this network to be used in tissue engineering, and other biomedical applications. Conclusions This discovery demonstrates how a naturally occurring nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite from the adhesive of Sundew can be used for tissue engineering, and opens the possibility for further examination of natural plant adhesives for biomedical applications.

  20. Modifying plants for biofuel and biomaterial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Agnelo; Lupoi, Jason S; Hoang, Nam V; Healey, Adam; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Henry, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    The productivity of plants as biofuel or biomaterial crops is established by both the yield of plant biomass per unit area of land and the efficiency of conversion of the biomass to biofuel. Higher yielding biofuel crops with increased conversion efficiencies allow production on a smaller land footprint minimizing competition with agriculture for food production and biodiversity conservation. Plants have traditionally been domesticated for food, fibre and feed applications. However, utilization for biofuels may require the breeding of novel phenotypes, or new species entirely. Genomics approaches support genetic selection strategies to deliver significant genetic improvement of plants as sources of biomass for biofuel manufacture. Genetic modification of plants provides a further range of options for improving the composition of biomass and for plant modifications to assist the fabrication of biofuels. The relative carbohydrate and lignin content influences the deconstruction of plant cell walls to biofuels. Key options for facilitating the deconstruction leading to higher monomeric sugar release from plants include increasing cellulose content, reducing cellulose crystallinity, and/or altering the amount or composition of noncellulosic polysaccharides or lignin. Modification of chemical linkages within and between these biomass components may improve the ease of deconstruction. Expression of enzymes in the plant may provide a cost-effective option for biochemical conversion to biofuel. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Biomaterial scaffolds for treating osteoporotic bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Healing fractures resulting from osteoporosis or cancer remains a significant clinical challenge. In these populations, healing is often impaired not only due to age and disease, but also by other therapeutic interventions such as radiation, steroids, and chemotherapy. Despite substantial improvements in the treatment of osteoporosis over the few decades, osteoporotic fractures are still a major clinical challenge in the elderly population due to impaired healing. Similar fractures with impaired healing are also prevalent in cancer patients, especially those with tumor growing in bone. Treatment options for cancer patients are further complicated by the fact that bone anabolic therapies are contraindicated in patients with tumors. Therefore, many patients undergo surgery to repair the fracture, and bone grafts are often used to stabilize orthopaedic implants and provide a scaffold for ingrowth of new bone. Both synthetic and naturally occurring biomaterials have been investigated as bone grafts for repair of osteoporotic fractures, including calcium phosphate bone cements, resorbable polymers, and allograft or autograft bone. In order to re-establish normal bone repair, bone grafts have been augmented with anabolic agents, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP2). These developing approaches to bone grafting are anticipated to improve the clinical management of osteoporotic and cancer-induced fractures. PMID:24458428

  2. Useful surface parameters for biomaterial discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Marina; Escuin, Tomas; Vinas, Miquel; Ascaso, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Topographical features of biomaterials' surfaces are determinant when addressing their application site. Unfortunately up to date there has not been an agreement regarding which surface parameters are more representative in discriminating between materials. Discs (n = 16) of different currently used materials for implant prostheses fabrication, such as cast cobalt-chrome, direct laser metal soldered (DLMS) cobalt-chrome, titanium grade V, zirconia (Y-TZP), E-glass fiber-reinforced composite and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) were manufactured. Nanoscale topographical surface roughness parameters generated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), microscale surface roughness parameters obtained by white light interferometry (WLI) and water angle values obtained by the sessile-water-drop method were analyzed in order to assess which parameter provides the best optimum surface characterization method. Correlations between nanoroughness, microroughness, and hydrophobicity data were performed to achieve the best parameters giving the highest discriminatory power. A subset of six parameters for surface characterization were proposed. AFM and WLI techniques gave complementary information. Wettability did not correlate with any of the nanoroughness parameters while it however showed a weak correlation with microroughness parameters. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Novel polyisobutylene (PIB)-based biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J.P. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    High molecular weight PIB (polyisobutylene) exhibits an outstanding combination of chemical-physical-mechanical properties for very little cost and consequently is extensively used in various large volume engineering applications, e.g., inner tubes. This presentation concerns novel PIB-based biomaterials whose synthesis became possible by the recent discovery of living carbocationic polymerizations: (1) Cyanoacrylate-capped PIB macromonomers and telechelics that polymerize upon exposure to biological fluids and thus lead to highly viscous liquids or networks. These materials may be of use as a replacement of diseased intervertebra discs (nucleus pulposa). (2) Three-arm star methacrylate-telechelic PIBs ((MA){sub 3}-PIB) that copolymerize with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and thus lead to impact- and fatigue-resistant PMMA or superior bone cements for prosthesis fixation. (3) {open_quotes}Smart{close_quotes} amphiphilic networks that change their conformation (morphology) and surface with the medium they are in contact with. These networks are synthesized by the copolymethacrylate (e.g., hydroxyethyl methacrylate).

  4. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Biomaterials, Tissues, and Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir A; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of additive manufacturing (AM), often referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, has initiated what some believe to be a manufacturing revolution, and has expedited the development of the field of biofabrication. Moreover, recent advances in AM have facilitated further development of patient-specific healthcare solutions. Customization of many healthcare products and services, such as implants, drug delivery devices, medical instruments, prosthetics, and in vitro models, would have been extremely challenging-if not impossible-without AM technologies. The current special issue of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering presents the latest trends in application of AM techniques to healthcare-related areas of research. As a prelude to this special issue, we review here the most important areas of biomedical research and clinical practice that have benefited from recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques. This editorial, therefore, aims to sketch the research landscape within which the other contributions of the special issue can be better understood and positioned. In what follows, we briefly review the application of additive manufacturing techniques in studies addressing biomaterials, (re)generation of tissues and organs, disease models, drug delivery systems, implants, medical instruments, prosthetics, orthotics, and AM objects used for medical visualization and communication.

  6. Biomaterials for nanoparticle vaccine delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahdev, Preety; Ochyl, Lukasz J; Moon, James J

    2014-10-01

    Subunit vaccination benefits from improved safety over attenuated or inactivated vaccines, but their limited capability to elicit long-lasting, concerted cellular and humoral immune responses is a major challenge. Recent studies have demonstrated that antigen delivery via nanoparticle formulations can significantly improve immunogenicity of vaccines due to either intrinsic immunostimulatory properties of the materials or by co-entrapment of molecular adjuvants such as Toll-like receptor agonists. These studies have collectively shown that nanoparticles designed to mimic biophysical and biochemical cues of pathogens offer new exciting opportunities to enhance activation of innate immunity and elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses with minimal cytotoxicity. In this review, we present key research advances that were made within the last 5 years in the field of nanoparticle vaccine delivery systems. In particular, we focus on the impact of biomaterials composition, size, and surface charge of nanoparticles on modulation of particle biodistribution, delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory molecules, trafficking and targeting of antigen presenting cells, and overall immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues. This review describes recent progresses in the design of nanoparticle vaccine delivery carriers, including liposomes, lipid-based particles, micelles and nanostructures composed of natural or synthetic polymers, and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles.

  7. Interplay of Structure and Dynamics in Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodnala, Preeti

    Study of structure and dynamic behavior is essential to understand molecular motions in biological systems. In this work, two biomaterials were studied to address membrane properties and protein diffusion. For the first project, we studied the structure of liposomes, artificial vesicles that are used for drug encapsulation and administration of pharmaceuticals or cellular nutrients. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to determine the structural properties of different liposomes composed of egg-PC and cholesterol bilayer. We examined the location of cholesterol by labelling cholesterol with bromine molecule and reveal that cholesterol is located one side of the leaflet adjusting itself to the curvature of a liposome. In my second project, we studied the dynamics of concentrated suspensions of alpha crystallin, one of the most abundant proteins in the human eye lens using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). An improved understanding of dynamics could point the way towards treatments presbyopia and cataract. The dynamics were measured at volume fraction close to the critical volume fraction for the glass transition, where the intermediate scattering function, ƒ(q,T) could be well fit using a double exponential decay. The measured relaxation is in reasonable agreement with published molecular dynamics simulations for the relaxation times of hard-sphere colloids.

  8. Adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis 1131 grown under subinhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and vancomycin to a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic substratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Moreno, A M; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; González-Martín, M L; Bruque, J M; Pérez-Giraldo, C

    2001-09-11

    The effect of two subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations of ampicillin and vancomycin during growth on the adhesion of Enterococcus faecalis 1131 to glass and silicone rubber was studied in a parallel plate flow chamber. Initial deposition rates and numbers of adhering bacteria after 4 h were higher on hydrophilic glass than on hydrophobic silicone rubber, regardless of growth conditions. The presence of 1/4 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ampicillin during growth reduced enterococcal adhesion to both substrata, but growth in the presence of 1/4 MIC vancomycin did not affect the adhesion of E. faecalis. Moreover, enterococcal adhesion increased after growth in the presence of 1/8 MIC vancomycin. The increased adhesion after growth in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of vancomycin may have strong implications for patients living with implanted biomaterials, as they may suffer adverse effects from use of this antibiotic, especially since bacteria once adhered are less sensitive to antibiotics.

  9. Antibacterial Efficacy of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles against Biofilms on Different Biomaterial Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Thukkaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm growth on the implant surface is the number one cause of the failure of the implants. Biofilms on implant surfaces are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to the protection offered by the exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune cells. Application of metals in nanoscale is considered to resolve biofilm formation. Here we studied the effect of iron-oxide nanoparticles over biofilm formation on different biomaterial surfaces and pluronic coated surfaces. Bacterial adhesion for 30 min showed significant reduction in bacterial adhesion on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Subsequently, bacteria were allowed to grow for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of iron-oxide nanoparticles. A significant reduction in biofilm growth was observed in the presence of the highest concentration of iron-oxide nanoparticles on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Therefore, combination of polymer brush coating and iron-oxide nanoparticles could show a significant reduction in biofilm formation.

  10. 3'-Hydroxy-4-methoxychalcone as a potential antibacterial coating on polymeric biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, P.M., E-mail: sivamedchem@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600036 (India); Iyer, Geetha, E-mail: geethu.v.iyer@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600036 (India); Natesan, Lavanya [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600036 (India); Doble, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshd@iitm.ac.in [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2010-08-01

    Antimicrobial property of chalcone coated high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polyurethane (PU) against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is reported here. The presence of chalcone on the surface was confirmed from fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Bacterial adhesion decreased considerably on all the coated surfaces. Bacterial adhesion was highest on PU surface (most hydrophobic) and lowest on HDPE (most hydrophilic) surface. Chalcone seems to damage the membrane of the bacteria as well as exhibit slimicidal activity. Reasonably good correlation was observed between the CFU (Colony Forming Units) ratio (it is defined as the ratio of CFU on coated surface to the chalcone uncoated surface) at the 24th hour against both hydrophobicity of the microorganism and roughness of the coated polymeric surfaces. Increasing roughness of the polymer and hydrophobicity of the microorganisms were positively and negatively correlated respectively with CFU ratio. Hence, the chalcone coated polymers can be used in the development of newer biomaterials.

  11. 3‧-Hydroxy-4-methoxychalcone as a potential antibacterial coating on polymeric biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, P. M.; Iyer, Geetha; Natesan, Lavanya; Doble, Mukesh

    2010-08-01

    Antimicrobial property of chalcone coated high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polyurethane (PU) against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is reported here. The presence of chalcone on the surface was confirmed from fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Bacterial adhesion decreased considerably on all the coated surfaces. Bacterial adhesion was highest on PU surface (most hydrophobic) and lowest on HDPE (most hydrophilic) surface. Chalcone seems to damage the membrane of the bacteria as well as exhibit slimicidal activity. Reasonably good correlation was observed between the CFU (Colony Forming Units) ratio (it is defined as the ratio of CFU on coated surface to the chalcone uncoated surface) at the 24th hour against both hydrophobicity of the microorganism and roughness of the coated polymeric surfaces. Increasing roughness of the polymer and hydrophobicity of the microorganisms were positively and negatively correlated respectively with CFU ratio. Hence, the chalcone coated polymers can be used in the development of newer biomaterials.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured CaSiO3 biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadale, Pramod N.; Kulal, Shivaji R.; Joshi, Meghanath G.; Jagtap, Pramod P.; Khetre, Sanjay M.; Bamane, Sambhaji R.

    2013-04-01

    Here we report a successful preparation of nanostructured calcium silicate by wet chemical approach. The synthesized sample was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. Thermal stability was investigated using thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Structural characterization of the sample was carried out by the X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) which confirmed its single phase hexagonal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the nanostructure of the ceramics while homogeneous grain distribution was revealed by scanning electron microscopy studies (SEM). The elemental analysis data obtained from energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) were in close agreement with the starting composition used for the synthesis. Superhydrophilic nature of CaSiO3 was investigated at room temperature by sessile drop technique. Effect of porous nanosized CaSiO3 on early adhesion and proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and cord blood mesenchymal stem (CBMSCs) cells was measured in vitro. MTT cytotoxicity test and cell adhesion test showed that the material had good biocompatibility and promoted cell viability and cell proliferation. It has been stated that the cell viability and proliferation are significantly affected by time and concentration of CaSiO3. These findings indicate that the CaSiO3 ceramics has good biocompatibility and that it is promising as a biomaterial.

  13. EB curable laminating adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Asao; Kobayashi, Masahide; Gotoh, Sakiko

    1992-01-01

    New developed solvent free EB curable laminating adhesives have two liquid components, A with hydroxy and acryloyl group, B with isocyanate and acryloyl group in a molecule. These EB laminating adhesives do not need any aging process, which is a big advantage, and are very suitable for environment, safety, and health because of no heating process and solvent free formulas. And we have made basic research about the relation of peel strength or heat seal strength versus Tg of cured film, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and so on. Basic specifications of the new developed adhesives are shown. (author)

  14. Competitive time- and density-dependent adhesion of staphylococci and osteoblasts on crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-based polymer coatings in co-culture flow chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, Isabel C. Saldarriaga; Busscher, Henk J.; Metzger, Steve W.; Grainger, David W.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    Biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) remain a serious clinical complication, often arising from an inability of host tissue-implant integration to out-compete bacterial adhesion and growth. A commercial polymer coating based on polyethylene glycol (PEG), available in both chemically inert and

  15. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  16. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  17. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  18. Proteins at the Biomaterial Electrolyte Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengvall, Pentti

    2005-03-01

    Proteins adsorb rapidly onto solid and polymeric surfaces because the association process is in the vast majority of cases energetically favourable, i.e. exothermic. The most common exceptions to this rule are hydrophilic interfaces with low net charge and high mobility, e.g. immobilized PEGs. Current research in the research area tries to understand and control unwanted and wanted adsorption by studying the adsorption kinetics, protein surface binding specificity, protein exchange at interfaces, and surface protein repulsion mechanisms. In blood plasma model systems humoral cascade reactions such as surface mediated coagulation and immune complement raise considerable interest due to the immediate association to blood compatibility, and in tissue applications the binding between surfaces and membrane receptors in cells and tissues. Thus, the understanding of interfacial events at the protein level is of large importance in applications such as blood and tissue contacting biomaterials, in vitro medical and biological diagnostics, food industry and in marine anti-fouling technology. Well described consequences of adsorption are a lowered system energy, increased system entropy, irreversible binding, conformational changes, specific surface/protein interactions, and in biomedical materials applications surface opsonization followed by cell-surface interactions and a host tissue response. This lecture will deal with some mechanisms known to be of importance for the adsorption processes, such as the influence of surface chemistry and surface energy, the composition of the protein solution, the Vroman effect, and residence time. Examples will be shown from ellipsometric experiments using different model surfaces in single/few protein solutions, and specific attention be given to blood serum and plasma experiments on coagulation and immune complement at interfaces.

  19. Acellular Endocardium as a Novel Biomaterial for the Intima of Tissue-Engineered Small-Caliber Vascular Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Guan, Xin; Wu, TianYi; Qiao, JianOu; Han, ZhaoQing; Wu, JinLong; Yu, XiaoWei; You, QingJun

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to investigate whether acellular endocardium can be used as a useful biomaterial for the intima of engineered small-caliber vascular grafts. Fresh endocardium was harvested from the swine left atrium and was decellularized by digestion with the decellularization solution of Triton X-100 and SDS containing DNase I and RNase A. Surface morphological characteristics and Young's modulus were evaluated. To analyze the effect of mechanical characteristics on cell adhesion, the decellularized endocardium was stiffened with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. Small-caliber vascular grafts were constructed using decellularized endocardium treated with or without glutaraldehyde as the intima. CD34+ cells were seeded onto the luminal surface of the vascular grafts and linked to bioreactors that simulate a pulsatile blood stream. Acellular endocardium had distinct surface morphological characteristics, which were quite different from those of other materials. The compliance of acellular endocardium was higher than that of other materials tested by Young's modulus. CD34+ cells formed a monolayer structure and adhered to the inner face of the acellular endocardium. The glutaraldehyde treatment stiffened the acellular endocardium but had little impact on the surface morphological characteristics or static adhesiveness of the cells. Data from the bioreactor study showed that the detachment of the cells from the surface of glutaraldehyde-treated acellular endocardium increased dramatically when the pressure was equal or higher than 40 mm Hg, while the cells on the untreated acellular endocardium remained well and formed confluent monolayers and tight junctions under the same pressure. Acellular endocardium has distinct structures and mechanical characteristics that are beneficial for CD34+ cell adhesion and retention under dynamic fluid perfusion. Thus, it can be used as a useful biomaterial for the construction of the intima of engineered small-caliber vascular grafts. Copyright © 2016

  20. Methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M. Richard

    Biomaterials play central roles in modern strategies of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Attempts to find tissue-engineered solutions to cure various injuries or diseases have led to an enormous increase in the number of polymeric biomaterials over the past decade. The breadth of new materials arises from the multiplicity of anatomical locations, cell types, and mode of application, which all place application-specific requirements on the biomaterial. Unfortunately, many of the currently available biodegradable polymers are limited in their versatility to meet the wide range of requirements for tissue engineering. Therefore, a methodology of biomaterial development, which is able to address a broad spectrum of requirements, would be beneficial to the biomaterial field. This work presents a methodology of citrate-based biomaterial design and application to meet the multifaceted needs of tissue engineering. We hypothesize that (1) citric acid, a non-toxic metabolic product of the body (Krebs Cycle), can be exploited as a universal multifunctional monomer and reacted with various diols to produce a new class of soft biodegradable elastomers with the flexibility to tune the material properties of the resulting material to meet a wide range of requirements; (2) the newly developed citrate-based polymers can be used as platform biomaterials for the design of novel tissue engineering scaffolding; and (3) microengineering approaches in the form thin scaffold sheets, microchannels, and a new porogen design can be used to generate complex cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions to mimic tissue complexity and architecture. To test these hypotheses, we first developed a methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development through the synthesis and characterization of a family of in situ crosslinkable and urethane-doped elastomers, which are synthesized using simple, cost-effective strategies and offer a variety methods to tailor the material properties to

  1. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm 2 . (paper)

  2. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  3. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Tappa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. With continuous research and progress in biomaterials used in 3D printing, there has been a rapid growth in applications of 3D printing in manufacturing customized implants, prostheses, drug delivery devices, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on the novel biomaterials used in variety of 3D printing technologies for clinical applications. Most common types of medical 3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling, extrusion based bioprinting, inkjet, and polyjet printing techniques, their clinical applications, different types of biomaterials currently used by researchers, and key limitations are discussed in detail.

  4. Characterization of Biomaterials by Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P. Hitchcock

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy techniques are emerging as useful tools to characterize potentially biocompatible materials and to probe protein interactions with model biomaterial surfaces. Simultaneous quantitative chemical analysis of the near surface region of the candidate biomaterial, and adsorbed proteins, peptides or other biological species can be obtained at high spatial resolution via scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM and X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM. Both techniques use near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectral contrast for chemical identification and quantitation. The capabilities of STXM and X-PEEM for the analysis of biomaterials are reviewed and illustrated by three recent studies: (1 characterization of hydrophobic surfaces, including adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg or human serum albumin (HSA to hydrophobic polymeric thin films, (2 studies of HSA adsorption to biodegradable or potentially biocompatible polymers, and (3 studies of biomaterials under fully hydrated conditions. Other recent applications of STXM and X-PEEM to biomaterials are also reviewed.

  5. Biomaterial-Based Implantable Devices for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Sue Anne; Danti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    This review article focuses on the current local therapies mediated by implanted macroscaled biomaterials available or proposed for fighting cancer and also highlights the upcoming research in this field. Several authoritative review articles have collected and discussed the state-of-the-art as well as the advancements in using biomaterial-based micro- and nano-particle systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy. On the other hand, implantable biomaterial devices are emerging as highly versatile therapeutic platforms, which deserve an increased attention by the healthcare scientific community, as they are able to offer innovative, more effective and creative strategies against tumors. This review summarizes the current approaches which exploit biomaterial-based devices as implantable tools for locally administrating drugs and describes their specific medical applications, which mainly target resected brain tumors or brain metastases for the inaccessibility of conventional chemotherapies. Moreover, a special focus in this review is given to innovative approaches, such as combined delivery therapies, as well as to alternative approaches, such as scaffolds for gene therapy, cancer immunotherapy and metastatic cell capture, the later as promising future trends in implantable biomaterials for cancer applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappa, Karthik; Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    2018-02-07

    The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. With continuous research and progress in biomaterials used in 3D printing, there has been a rapid growth in applications of 3D printing in manufacturing customized implants, prostheses, drug delivery devices, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on the novel biomaterials used in variety of 3D printing technologies for clinical applications. Most common types of medical 3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling, extrusion based bioprinting, inkjet, and polyjet printing techniques, their clinical applications, different types of biomaterials currently used by researchers, and key limitations are discussed in detail.

  7. Surface modification of biomaterials and biomedical devices using additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Robertson, Samuel Ford; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2018-01-15

    The demand for synthetic biomaterials in medical devices, pharmaceutical products and, tissue replacement applications are growing steadily due to aging population worldwide. The use for patient matched devices is also increasing due to availability and integration of new technologies. Applications of additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing (3DP) in biomaterials have also increased significantly over the past decade towards traditional as well as innovative next generation Class I, II and III devices. In this review, we have focused our attention towards the use of AM in surface modified biomaterials to enhance their in vitro and in vivo performances. Specifically, we have discussed the use of AM to deliberately modify the surfaces of different classes of biomaterials with spatial specificity in a single manufacturing process as well as commented on the future outlook towards surface modification using AM. It is widely understood that the success of implanted medical devices depends largely on favorable material-tissue interactions. Additive manufacturing has gained traction as a viable and unique approach to engineered biomaterials, for both bulk and surface properties that improve implant outcomes. This review explores how additive manufacturing techniques have been and can be used to augment the surfaces of biomedical devices for direct clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of biomaterials on endothelial cell thrombogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Alison P.; Sefton, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    Driven by tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, endothelial cells are being used in combination with biomaterials in a number of applications for the purpose of improving blood compatibility and host integration. Endothelialized vascular grafts are beginning to be used clinically with some success in some centers, while endothelial seeding is being explored as a means of creating a vasculature within engineered tissues. The underlying assumption of this strategy is that when cultured on artificial biomaterials, a confluent layer of endothelial cells maintain their non-thrombogenic phenotype. In this review the existing knowledge base of endothelial cell thrombogenicity cultured on a number of different biomaterials is summarized. The importance of selecting appropriate endpoint measures that are most reflective of overall surface thrombogenicity is the focus of this review. Endothelial cells inhibit thrombosis through three interconnected regulatory systems (1) the coagulation cascade (2) the cellular components of the blood such as leukocytes and platelets and (3) the complement cascade, and also through effects on fibrinolysis and vascular tone, the latter which influences blood flow. Thus, in order to demonstrate the thromobgenic benefit of seeding a biomaterial with EC, the conditions under which EC surfaces are more likely to exhibit lower thrombogenicity than unseeded biomaterial surfaces need to be consistent with the experimental context. The endpoints selected should be appropriate for the dominant thrombotic process that occurs under the given experimental conditions. PMID:17316788

  9. Teeth and bones: applications of surface science to dental materials and related biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. H.

    2001-05-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable upsurge in publications concerning the surface structure and chemistry of materials with biological or biomedical applications. Within the body, gas-solid interactions become relatively less significant and solid-liquid or solid-solid interfaces dominate, providing new challenges for the surface scientist. The current paper aims to provide a timely review of the use of surface analysis and modification techniques within the biomaterials field. A broad overview of applications in a number of related areas is given with particular attention focusing on those materials commonly encountered in dentistry and oral or maxillofacial implantology. Several specific issues of current interest are discussed. The interaction between synthetic and natural solids, both in the oral environment and elsewhere in the body is important in terms of adhesion, related stresses and strains and ultimately the longevity of a dental restoration, biomedical implant, or indeed the surrounding tissue. Exposure to body fluids, of course, can also affect stability, leading to the degradation or corrosion of materials within the body. Whilst this could potentially be harmful, e.g., if cytotoxic elements are released, it may alternatively provide a route to the preferential release of beneficial substances. Furthermore, in some cases, the controlled disintegration of a biomaterial is desirable, allowing the removal of an implant, e.g., without the need for further surgery. The presence of cells in the immediate bioenvironment additionally complicates the situation. A considerable amount of current research activity is targeted at the development of coatings or surface treatments to encourage tissue growth. If this is to be achieved by stimulating enhanced cell productivity, determination of the relationship between cell function and surface composition is essential.

  10. Prevention of Biomaterial Infection by Pre-Operative Incubation with Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tanoira, Ramón; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Eklund, Kari K; Han, Xia; Soininen, Antti; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Esteban, Jaime; Kinnari, Teemu J

    2017-04-01

    Cells of tissues and biofilm forming bacteria compete for the living space on the surface of an implant. We hypothesized the incubation of the implant (titanium, polydimethylsiloxane, and polystyrene surface) with human cells before implantation as a strategy to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. After 24 hours of incubation with human osteogenic sarcoma SaOS-2 cells (1 × 10 5 cells/mL), the materials were incubated for 4.5 hours or two days with Staphylococcus aureus in serial 1:10 dilutions of 10 8 colony-forming units/mL. The bacterial adherence and biofilm biomass on materials pre-incubated with SaOS-2 cells were compared with our previous results on materials incubated only with bacteria or in simultaneous co-culture of SaOS-2 cells and S. aureus. Fluorescent microscopy and crystal violet stain were used. The number of viable SaOS-2 and bacterial cells present was tested using colorimetric methods (MTT, LDH) and drop plate method, respectively. The pre-treatment with human cells was associated with a reduction of bacterial colonization of the biomaterial at 4.5 hours and 48 hours compared with the non-pre-treated materials. The presence of bacteria decreased the number of viable human cells on all materials. ( Supplementary Fig. 1 ; see online supplementary materials at www.liebertpub.com/sur ). These results suggest that the pre-operative incubation of prostheses with host cells could prevent infection of biomaterials.

  11. Anisotropic silk biomaterials containing cardiac extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2015-03-31

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g. disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g. cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 × 5 × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling.

  12. Bio-Functional Design, Application and Trends in Metallic Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Zhou, Changchun; Fan, Hongsong; Fan, Yujiang; Jiang, Qing; Song, Ping; Fan, Hongyuan; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Xingdong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction of metals as biomaterials has been known for a long time. In the early development, sufficient strength and suitable mechanical properties were the main considerations for metal implants. With the development of new generations of biomaterials, the concepts of bioactive and biodegradable materials were proposed. Biological function design is very import for metal implants in biomedical applications. Three crucial design criteria are summarized for developing metal implants: (1) mechanical properties that mimic the host tissues; (2) sufficient bioactivities to form bio-bonding between implants and surrounding tissues; and (3) a degradation rate that matches tissue regeneration and biodegradability. This article reviews the development of metal implants and their applications in biomedical engineering. Development trends and future perspectives of metallic biomaterials are also discussed. PMID:29271916

  13. Biomaterials mediated microRNA delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, M; Sainitya, R; Kalyanaraman, V; Dhivya, S; Selvamurugan, N

    2015-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to overcome the problems associated with traditional treatments for bone defects. A number of bioactive materials along with new techniques like porous scaffold implantation, gene delivery, 3D organ printing are now-a-days emerging for traditional bone grafts and metal implants. Studying the molecular mechanisms through which these biomaterials induce osteogenesis is an equally hot field. Biomaterials could determine the fate of a cell via microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and play an essential role for regulation of cell specific lineages including osteogenesis. Thus, this review focuses the recent trends on establishing a link of biomaterials with miRNAs and their delivery for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating polymeric biomaterial-environment interfaces by Langmuir monolayer techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Anne-Christin; Roch, Toralf; Schulz, Burkhard; Lendlein, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are of specific relevance in medical and pharmaceutical applications due to their wide range of tailorable properties and functionalities. The knowledge about interactions of biomaterials with their biological environment is of crucial importance for developing highly sophisticated medical devices. To achieve optimal in vivo performance, a description at the molecular level is required to gain better understanding about the surface of synthetic materials for tailoring their properties. This is still challenging and requires the comprehensive characterization of morphological structures, polymer chain arrangements and degradation behaviour. The review discusses selected aspects for evaluating polymeric biomaterial-environment interfaces by Langmuir monolayer methods as powerful techniques for studying interfacial properties, such as morphological and degradation processes. The combination of spectroscopic, microscopic and scattering methods with the Langmuir techniques adapted to polymers can substantially improve the understanding of their in vivo behaviour. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  16. Regeneration of damaged osteoporotic bone tissue with synthetic biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Nenad D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some cases in oral and maxillofacial surgery, bone regeneration is required in large quantities. One of these cases is osteoporosis. This paper aims to show the new approach to solving this problem of impaired healing of bone defects in the jaw, as well as in other bones, with the use of synthetic biomaterials whose properties resemble the natural bone. Latest development in this area present an effort to create local drug-delivery systems for BMPs and growth factors, direct delivery of MSCs, as well as scaffolds for osteoconduction and also to utilize nanotechnology to synthesize composite biomaterials, predominantly based on HAp and polymers, that would mimic the natural bone nanocomposite architecture. There is also a tendency to create injectable biomaterials for simplified application.

  17. DIFFERENTIAL FUNCTIONAL EFFECTS OF BIOMATERIALS ON DENDRITIC CELL MATURATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Babensee, Julia E.

    2012-01-01

    The immunological outcome of dendritic cell (DC) treatment with different biomaterials was assessed to demonstrate the range of DC phenotypes induced by biomaterials commonly used in combination products. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes, and treated with different biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA), or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a comprehensive cadre of phenotypic functional outcomes were assessed. Differential levels of functional changes of DC phenotype were observed depending on the type of biomaterial films used to treat DCs. Treatment of DCs with PLGA or chitosan films supported DC maturation with higher levels of DC allostimulatory capacity, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, HLA-DQ and CD44 expression as compared to iDCs, and endocytic ability at a level lower compared to iDCs. Alginate film induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from DCs at levels higher than iDCs,. Dendritic cells treated with HA film expressed lower levels of CD40, CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR as compared to iDCs. They also exhibited endocytic ability and CD44 expression at levels lower than iDCs, possibly due to an insolublized (cross-linked) form with high molecular weight HA. Interestingly, treatment of DCs with agarose film maintained a DC functional phenotype at levels similar to iDCs except for CD44 expression which was lower than expression levels for iDCs. Taken together, these results can provide selection criteria for biomaterials to be used in immunomodulating applications and can inform potential outcomes of biomaterials within combination products on associated immune responses as desired by the application. PMID:22705044

  18. Biomaterials approaches to treating implant-associated osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, Jason A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2016-03-01

    Orthopaedic devices are the most common surgical devices associated with implant-related infections and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the most common causative pathogen in chronic bone infections (osteomyelitis). Treatment of these chronic bone infections often involves combinations of antibiotics given systemically and locally to the affected site via a biomaterial spacer. The gold standard biomaterial for local antibiotic delivery against osteomyelitis, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement, bears many limitations. Such shortcomings include limited antibiotic release, incompatibility with many antimicrobial agents, and the need for follow-up surgeries to remove the non-biodegradable cement before surgical reconstruction of the lost bone. Therefore, extensive research pursuits are targeting alternative, biodegradable materials to replace PMMA in osteomyelitis applications. Herein, we provide an overview of the primary clinical treatment strategies and emerging biodegradable materials that may be employed for management of implant-related osteomyelitis. We performed a systematic review of experimental biomaterials systems that have been evaluated for treating established S. aureus osteomyelitis in an animal model. Many experimental biomaterials were not decisively more efficacious for infection management than PMMA when delivering the same antibiotic. However, alternative biomaterials have reduced the number of follow-up surgeries, enhanced the antimicrobial efficacy by delivering agents that are incompatible with PMMA, and regenerated bone in an infected defect. Understanding the advantages, limitations, and potential for clinical translation of each biomaterial, along with the conditions under which it was evaluated (e.g. animal model), is critical for surgeons and researchers to navigate the plethora of options for local antibiotic delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface modification of blood-contacting biomaterials by plasma-polymerized superhydrophobic films using hexamethyldisiloxane and tetrafluoromethane as precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Chaio-Ru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen District, Taichung City 40724, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wei [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Rd., Beitun District, Taichung City 40601, Taiwan (China); Chou, Chia-Man, E-mail: cmchou@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, No. 1650, Sec. 4, Taiwan Boulevard, Seatwen District, Taichung City 40705, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Beitou District, Taipei City 11221, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jen, E-mail: cjchung@seed.net.tw [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Rd., Beitun District, Taichung City 40601, Taiwan (China); He, Ju-Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen District, Taichung City 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Biomaterials modified by nanoparticle-containing plasma polymerized films. • A superhydrophoic film was obtained, and the properties of the coating were examined. • In vitro blood compatibility tests revealed neither platelet adhesion nor fibrinogen adsorption. • Surface modification technology of medical devices: non-cytotoxic and no blood clot formation. - Abstract: This paper proposes a plasma polymerization system that can be used to modify the surface of the widely used biomaterial, polyurethane (PU), by employing low-cost hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) as precursors; this system features a pulsed-dc power supply. Plasma-polymerized HMDSO/CF{sub 4} (pp-HC) with coexisting micro- and nanoscale morphology was obtained as a superhydrophobic coating material by controlling the HMDSO/CF{sub 4} (f{sub H}) monomer flow ratio. The developed surface modification technology can be applied to medical devices, because it is non-cytotoxic and has favorable hemocompatibility, and no blood clots form when the device surface direct contacts. Experimental results reveal that the obtained pp-HC films contained SiO{sub x} nanoparticles randomly dispersed on the micron-scale three-dimensional network film surface. The −CF functional group, −CF{sub 2} bonding, and SiO{sub x} were detected on the film surface. The maximal water contact angle of the pp-HC coating was 161.2°, apparently attributable to the synergistic effect of the coexisting micro- and nanoscale surface morphology featuring a low surface-energy layer. The superhydrophobic and antifouling characteristics of the coating were retained even after it was rubbed 20 times with a steel wool tester. Results of in vitro cytotoxicity, fibrinogen adsorption, and platelet adhesion tests revealed favorable myoblast cell proliferation and the virtual absence of fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion on the pp-HC coated specimens. These quantitative findings imply

  20. Surface modification of blood-contacting biomaterials by plasma-polymerized superhydrophobic films using hexamethyldisiloxane and tetrafluoromethane as precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Chaio-Ru; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chou, Chia-Man; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomaterials modified by nanoparticle-containing plasma polymerized films. • A superhydrophoic film was obtained, and the properties of the coating were examined. • In vitro blood compatibility tests revealed neither platelet adhesion nor fibrinogen adsorption. • Surface modification technology of medical devices: non-cytotoxic and no blood clot formation. - Abstract: This paper proposes a plasma polymerization system that can be used to modify the surface of the widely used biomaterial, polyurethane (PU), by employing low-cost hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetrafluoromethane (CF 4 ) as precursors; this system features a pulsed-dc power supply. Plasma-polymerized HMDSO/CF 4 (pp-HC) with coexisting micro- and nanoscale morphology was obtained as a superhydrophobic coating material by controlling the HMDSO/CF 4 (f H ) monomer flow ratio. The developed surface modification technology can be applied to medical devices, because it is non-cytotoxic and has favorable hemocompatibility, and no blood clots form when the device surface direct contacts. Experimental results reveal that the obtained pp-HC films contained SiO x nanoparticles randomly dispersed on the micron-scale three-dimensional network film surface. The −CF functional group, −CF 2 bonding, and SiO x were detected on the film surface. The maximal water contact angle of the pp-HC coating was 161.2°, apparently attributable to the synergistic effect of the coexisting micro- and nanoscale surface morphology featuring a low surface-energy layer. The superhydrophobic and antifouling characteristics of the coating were retained even after it was rubbed 20 times with a steel wool tester. Results of in vitro cytotoxicity, fibrinogen adsorption, and platelet adhesion tests revealed favorable myoblast cell proliferation and the virtual absence of fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion on the pp-HC coated specimens. These quantitative findings imply that the pp-HC coating can

  1. BIOMATERIAL IMPLANTS IN BONE FRACTURES PRODUCED IN RATS FIBULAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, Henrique Yassuhiro; Oda, Diogo Yochizumi; Pinheiro, Thiago Cerizza; Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues da

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in the regeneration of fractures experimentally induced in the fibulas of rats. Method: 15 rats were used. These were subjected to surgery to remove a fragment from the fibula. This site then received a graft consisting of a silicone tubes filled with hydroxyapatite and collagen. Results: Little bone neoformation occurred inside the tubes filled with the biomaterials. There was more neoformation in the tubes with collagen. Conclusion: The biomaterials used demonstrated biocompatibility and osteoconductive capacity that was capable of stimulating osteogenesis, even in bones with secondary mechanical and morphological functions such as the fibula of rats. PMID:27047813

  2. An Overview of Biomaterials in Periodontology and Implant Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dan Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Material is a crucial factor for the restoration of the tooth or periodontal structure in dentistry. Various biomaterials have been developed and clinically applied for improved periodontal tissue regeneration and osseointegration, especially in periodontology and dental implantology. Furthermore, the biomimetic approach has been the subject of active research in recent years. In this review, the most widely studied biomaterials (bone graft material, barrier membrane, and growth or differentiation factors and biomimetic approaches to obtain optimal tissue regeneration by making the environment almost similar to that of the extracellular matrix are discussed and specifically highlighted.

  3. Biomaterials and host versus graft response: A short review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd; Klobucar, Robert; Gradisnik, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials and biotechnology are increasing becoming an important area in modern medicine. The main aim in this area is the development of materials, which are biocompatible to normal tissue. Tissue-implant interactions with molecular, biological and cellular characteristics at the implant-tissue interface are important for the use and development of implants. Implantation may cause an inflammatory and immune response in tissue, foreign body reaction, systemic toxicity and imminent infection. Tissue-implant interactions determine the implant life-period. The aims of the study are to consider the biological response to implants. Biomaterials and host reactions to implants and their mechanisms are also briefly discussed. PMID:26894284

  4. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  5. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  6. Sustainable polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from waste aerobic granular sludge as a surface coating material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y. M.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Girbal-Neuhauser, E.; Adriaanse, M.; van Loosdrecht, M. C M

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from aerobic granular sludge as a coating material, the morphology, molecular weight distribution and chemical composition of the recovered biomaterial were investigated by atomic force microscopy, size exclusion

  7. Sustainable polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from waste aerobic granular sludge as a surface coating material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.M.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Girbal-Neuhauser, E.; Adriaanse, M.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from aerobic granular sludge as a coating material, the morphology, molecular weight distribution and chemical composition of the recovered biomaterial were investigated by atomic force microscopy, size exclusion

  8. Immune responses to implants - a review of the implications for the design of immunomodulatory biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Sandra; Rammelt, Stefan; Scharnweber, Dieter; Simon, Jan C

    2011-10-01

    A key for long-term survival and function of biomaterials is that they do not elicit a detrimental immune response. As biomaterials can have profound impacts on the host immune response the concept emerged to design biomaterials that are able to trigger desired immunological outcomes and thus support the healing process. However, engineering such biomaterials requires an in-depth understanding of the host inflammatory and wound healing response to implanted materials. One focus of this review is to outline the up-to-date knowledge on immune responses to biomaterials. Understanding the complex interactions of host response and material implants reveals the need for and also the potential of "immunomodulating" biomaterials. Based on this knowledge, we discuss strategies of triggering appropriate immune responses by functional biomaterials and highlight recent approaches of biomaterials that mimic the physiological extracellular matrix and modify cellular immune responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laser surface modification of silicone rubber to reduce platelet adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, M T; Mirzadeh, H

    2004-01-01

    To improve the blood compatibility, the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films were irradiated using a CO2-pulsed laser. Acrylamide (AAm) was grafted onto a pre-irradiated surface. The AAm-grafted and laser-treated films were characterized using different techniques. Platelet adhesion and activation onto the AAm-grafted PDMS, laser-treated (ungrafted) and unmodified PDMS film surfaces were compared. Data from in vitro assays indicated that the platelet adhesion was reduced on the AAm-grafted PDMS and laser treated PDMS films in comparison with the unmodified PDMS. The laser-irradiated sample showed the minimum platelet adhesion. It seems that laser irradiation onto a silicone rubber surface is a versatile technique to produce anti-thrombogenic surface for biomaterial applications.

  10. Irradiation of Polystyrene and Polypropylene to study NIH 3T3 fibroblasts adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeitman, C.R. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Grosso, M.F. del, E-mail: delgrosso@tandar.cnea.gov.a [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET (Argentina); Ibanez, I. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET (Argentina); Gerencia de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas de la Energia Nuclear, Dpto. de Radiobiologia, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Garcia Bermudez, G. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM (Argentina); Duran, H. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET (Argentina); Gerencia de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas de la Energia Nuclear, Dpto. de Radiobiologia, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM (Argentina); Chappa, V.C. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET (Argentina); Mazzei, R. [U.A. Tecnologicas y Agropecuarias, CNEA, Dpto. Ing. Quimica, UTN FRBA, Bs. As. (Argentina); Behar, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    When polymers are irradiated with heavy ions new chemical groups are created in a few microns of the material. The irradiation changed the polarity and wettability on the surface so that could enhance the biocompatibility of the modified polymer. The study of chemistry and nanoscale topography of the biomaterial is important in determining its potential applications in medicine and biotechnology, because their strong influence on cell function, adhesion and proliferation. In this study, thin films of Polystyrene and Polypropylene samples were modified by irradiation with low energy ion beams (30-150 keV) and swift heavy ions both with various fluences and energies. The changes were evaluated with different methods. Adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts onto unirradiated and irradiated surfaces has been studied by in vitro techniques. The correlations between physicochemical properties as a function of different irradiations parameters were compared with cell adhesion on the modified polymer surface.

  11. Irradiation of Polystyrene and Polypropylene to study NIH 3T3 fibroblasts adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbeitman, C.R.; Grosso, M.F. del; Ibanez, I.; Garcia Bermudez, G.; Duran, H.; Chappa, V.C.; Mazzei, R.; Behar, M.

    2010-01-01

    When polymers are irradiated with heavy ions new chemical groups are created in a few microns of the material. The irradiation changed the polarity and wettability on the surface so that could enhance the biocompatibility of the modified polymer. The study of chemistry and nanoscale topography of the biomaterial is important in determining its potential applications in medicine and biotechnology, because their strong influence on cell function, adhesion and proliferation. In this study, thin films of Polystyrene and Polypropylene samples were modified by irradiation with low energy ion beams (30-150 keV) and swift heavy ions both with various fluences and energies. The changes were evaluated with different methods. Adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts onto unirradiated and irradiated surfaces has been studied by in vitro techniques. The correlations between physicochemical properties as a function of different irradiations parameters were compared with cell adhesion on the modified polymer surface.

  12. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Priyatha, E-mail: priyatha.premnath@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tavangar, Amirhossein, E-mail: atavanga@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tan, Bo, E-mail: tanbo@ryerson.ca [Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan, E-mail: venkat@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Neuroblastoma Cells Adhesion on Hyaluronic Acid-Based Surface for Neural Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment of neuron cells plays a crucial role in regulating neural development and regeneration. Hyaluronic acid (HA biomaterial has been applied in a wide range of medical and biological fields and plays important roles in neural regeneration. PC12 cells have been reported to be capable of endogenous NGF synthesis and secretion. The purpose of this research was to assess the effect of HA biomaterial combining with PC12 cells conditioned media (PC12 CM in neural regeneration. Using SH-SY5Y cells as an experimental model, we found that supporting with PC12 CM enhanced HA function in SH-SY5Y cell proliferation and adhesion. Through RP-nano-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses, we identified increased expression of HSP60 and RanBP2 in SH-SY5Y cells grown on HA-modified surface with cotreatment of PC12 CM. Moreover, we also identified factors that were secreted from PC12 cells and may promote SH-SY5Y cell proliferation and adhesion. Here, we proposed a biomaterial surface enriched with neurotrophic factors for nerve regeneration application.

  14. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  15. Surface modification of biomaterials using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Tao; Qiao, Yuqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2012-01-01

    Although remarkable progress has been made on biomaterial research, the ideal biomaterial that satisfies all the technical requirements and biological functions is not available up to now. Surface modification seems to be a more economic and efficient way to adjust existing conventional biomaterials to meet the current and ever-evolving clinical needs. From an industrial perspective, plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an attractive method for biomaterials owing to it...

  16. Towards 4th generation biomaterials: a covalent hybrid polymer-ormoglass architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachot, N.; Mateos-Timoneda, M. A.; Planell, J. A.; Velders, A. H.; Lewandowska, M.; Engel, E.; Castaño, O.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed on its surface mimicking the structure of the ECM of bone. Here, polylactic acid electrospun fibers have been successfully and reproducibly coated with a bioactive organically modified glass (ormoglass, Si-Ca-P2 system) covalently. In comparison with the pure polymeric mats, the fibers obtained showed improved hydrophilicity and mechanical properties, bioactive ion release, exhibited a nanoroughness and enabled good cell adhesion and spreading after just one day of culture (rMSCs and rEPCs). The fibers were coated with different ormoglass compositions to tailor their surface properties (roughness, stiffness, and morphology) by modifying the experimental parameters. Knowing that cells modulate their behavior according to the exposed physical and chemical signals, the development of this instructive material is a valuable advance in the design of functional regenerative biomaterials.Hybrid materials are being extensively investigated with the aim of mimicking the ECM microenvironment to develop effective solutions for bone tissue engineering. However, the common drawbacks of a hybrid material are the lack of interactions between the scaffold's constituents and the masking of its bioactive phase. Conventional hybrids often degrade in a non-homogeneous manner and the biological response is far from optimal. We have developed a novel material with strong interactions between constituents. The bioactive phase is directly exposed

  17. Osteoblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation variations on chemically patterned nanocrystalline diamond films evaluated by live-cell imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, Antonín; Ukraintsev, Egor; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kalbáčová, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 5 (2017), s. 1469-1478 ISSN 1549-3296 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04790S; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-32497A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : live-cell imaging * osteoblasts * adhesion * proliferation * migration * patterned surface Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Biomaterials (as related to medical implants, devices, sensors) Impact factor: 3.076, year: 2016

  18. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  19. Osteoinductive biomaterials: current knowledge of properties, experimental models and biological mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barradas, A.M.C.; Yuan, Huipin; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    In the past thirty years, a number of biomaterials have shown the ability to induce bone formation when implanted at heterotopic sites, an ability known as osteoinduction. Such biomaterials – osteoinductive biomaterials – hold great potential for the development of new therapies in bone

  20. The Effect of Biomaterials Used for Tissue Regeneration Purposes on Polarization of Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S.A. ter Hoeve-Boersema (Simone); N. Grotenhuis (Nienke); Y. Bayon (Yves); J.F. Lange (Johan); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractActivation of macrophages is critical in the acute phase of wound healing after implantation of surgical biomaterials. To understand the response of macrophages, they are often cultured in vitro on biomaterials. Since a wide range of biomaterials is currently used in the clinics, we

  1. PRESERVATION OF THE CELL-BIOMATERIAL INTERFACE AT THE ULTRASTRUCTURAL LEVEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHAKENRAAD, JM; OOSTERBAAN, JA; BLAAUW, EH

    1991-01-01

    Studying the tissue-biomaterial interface at the ultrastructural level is not without problems. Dissolution of the biomaterial in one of the dehydration or embedding media causes holes and shatter during sectioning or dislodgement of the biomaterial. The fine tuning of the hardness of both

  2. an Adhesive Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems  TDDSs containing stimulants, termed as energetic substances, such as caffeine and pantothenic acid, were studied. Caffeine is a white crystalline substance and a stimulant to central nervous system. In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. Pantothenic acid, also recognized as vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin. For many animals, pantothenic acid is an essential nutrient. Animals require pantothenic acid to synthesize and metabolize proteins, carbohydrates and fats. For this purpose caffeine and pantothenic acid were  used  as  drug  components with  6.32%  and  1.12%  loadings,  in  different functional and non-functional acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs of 52.89%, respectively. Ethylene glycol as a chemical enhancer was used in all TDDSs with 39.67%. The effect of PSAs  type on  in vitro  release and adhesion properties  (peel strength and tack values from drug delivery devices were evaluated. It was found that TDDS containing -COOH functional PSA showed  the  lowest steady state fux. The adhesion properties of the samples were improved by addition of functional acrylic PSA in formulations.

  3. Platelet adhesion studies on dipyridamole coated polyurethane surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldenhoff Y. B.J.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of polyurethanes (PUs by covalent attachment of dipyridamole (Persantinregistered is known to reduce adherence of blood platelets upon exposure to human platelet rich plasma (PRP. This effect was investigated in further detail. First platelet adhesion under static conditions was studied with four different biomaterial surfaces: untreated PU, PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 1, PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 2, and PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 3. In PU immobilised with 1 dipyridamole is directly linked to the surface, in PU immobilised with 2 there is a short hydrophilic spacer chain in between the surface and the dipyridamole, while conjugate molecule 3 is merely the spacer chain. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to characterise platelet adhesion from human PRP under static conditions, and fluorescence imaging microscopy was used to study platelet adhesion from whole blood under flow. SEM experiments encompassed both density measurements and analysis of the morphology of adherent platelets. In the static experiments the surface immobilised with 2 showed the lowest platelet adherence. No difference between the three modified surfaces emerged from the flow experiments. The surfaces were also incubated with washed blood platelets and labeled with Oregon-Green Annexin V. No capture of Oregon-Green Annexin V was seen, implying that the adhered platelets did not expose any phosphatidyl serine at their exteriour surface.

  4. Tuning underwater adhesion with cation-π interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Wei, Wei; Schrader, Alex M.; Cristiani, Thomas R.; Dobbs, Howard A.; Idso, Matthew; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2017-05-01

    Cation-π interactions drive the self-assembly and cohesion of many biological molecules, including the adhesion proteins of several marine organisms. Although the origin of cation-π bonds in isolated pairs has been extensively studied, the energetics of cation-π-driven self-assembly in molecular films remains uncharted. Here we use nanoscale force measurements in combination with solid-state NMR spectroscopy to show that the cohesive properties of simple aromatic- and lysine-rich peptides rival those of the strong reversible intermolecular cohesion exhibited by adhesion proteins of marine mussel. In particular, we show that peptides incorporating the amino acid phenylalanine, a functional group that is conspicuously sparing in the sequences of mussel proteins, exhibit reversible adhesion interactions significantly exceeding that of analogous mussel-mimetic peptides. More broadly, we demonstrate that interfacial confinement fundamentally alters the energetics of cation-π-mediated assembly: an insight that should prove relevant for diverse areas, which range from rationalizing biological assembly to engineering peptide-based biomaterials.

  5. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the master. In 1950's, Collagen attracted Prof GN Ramachandran. He had a neighbor (CLRI) for whom collagen formed the substrate. He sought a sample of pure collagen from CLRI. This was provided.

  6. Gold nanoparticle-coated biomaterial as SERS micro-probes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report for the first time, on the utility of plant-based biomaterial as enhanced-Raman scattering probes. The bio-substrate used in this study are commonly found in plant extracts, and are cost-effective, mecha- nically robust, flexible and easily transportable. The probe was fabricated by coating the plant extract ...

  7. 3D microenvironment as essential element for osteoinduction by biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibovic, Pamela; Yuan, Huipin; van der Valk, Chantal M.; Meijer, Gert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.

    2005-01-01

    In order to unravel the mechanism of osteoinduction by biomaterials, in this study we investigated the influence of the specific surface area on osteoinductive properties of two types of calcium phosphate ceramics. Different surface areas of the ceramics were obtained by varying their sintering

  8. Biomaterials Influence Macrophage-Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interaction In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grotenhuis (Nienke); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); Y. Bayon (Yves); J.F. Lange (Johan); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macrophages and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important cells in wound healing. We hypothesized that the cross-talk between macrophages and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs) is biomaterial dependent, thereby influencing processes involved in wound healing. Materials and

  9. Evaluation of starch based cryogels as potential biomaterials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These macroporous cryogels were loaded with an antibiotic drug, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (Cfx), and evaluated for its in vitro delivery in a completely controlled manner thus exploring possibilities to use it as a biomaterial in burn or wound healing applications. The key advantage of the present system is that cryogels ...

  10. Standardization of incubation conditions for hemolysis testing of biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Blanton, John; van Oeveren, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Hemolysis testing is the most common method to determine the hemocompatibility properties of biomaterials. There is however no consensus on the procedures of hemolysis testing due to insufficient comparative studies on the quality of the red blood cells used and the experimental conditions of

  11. Some Biomaterials based on Collagen in Human Health care

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Some Biomaterials based on Collagen in Human Health care. Ophthalmology. Wound healing. Burn Dressing. Tumor Treatment. Tissue Engineered devices. for cardio-vascular functions; For managing chronic illnesses including diabetic ulcers and foot. Smart shoe.

  12. Clay-Enriched Silk Biomaterials for Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Llamas, Jabier Gallego; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Kadakia, Madhavi P.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of silk protein/clay composite biomaterials for bone tissue formation is described. Silk fibroin serves as an organic scaffolding material offering mechanical stability suitable for bone specific uses. Clay montmorillonite (Cloisite ® Na+) and sodium silicate are sources of osteoinductive silica-rich inorganic species, analogous to bioactive bioglass-like bone repair biomaterial systems. Different clay particle-silk composite biomaterial films were compared to silk films doped with sodium silicate as controls for support of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic culture. The cells adhered and proliferated on the silk/clay composites over two weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col I) osteogenic markers in the cells cultured on the silk/clay films in comparison to the controls. Early evidence for bone formation based on collagen deposition at the cell-biomaterial interface was also found, with more collagen observed for the silk films with higher contents of clay particles. The data suggest that the silk/clay composite systems may be useful for further study toward bone regenerative needs. PMID:21549864

  13. Logic of Biomaterial devices from CLRI for wound management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Logic of Biomaterial devices from CLRI for wound management. Designing of biodegradable scaffolds. Designing the scaffold. Host drugs and growth factors. Design controlled drug release only to the wound area (based on pH differentials). Smartness is built in ...

  14. Cell Physiology and Interactions of Biomaterials and Matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hunkeler, D.; Vaňková, Radomíra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 6 (2003), s. 193-197 ISSN 0032-3918 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 840.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Biomaterials * Cell physiology * Encapsulation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  15. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bobbert, F. S. L.; Lietaert, K.; Eftekhari, Ali Akbar

    2017-01-01

    types of triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) that mimic the properties of bone to an unprecedented level of multi-physics detail. Sixteen different types of porous biomaterials were rationally designed and fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) from a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The topology...

  16. A mesoporous silica biomaterial for dental biomimetic crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Hong-Ping; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Tang, Hsin-Yen; Yen, Wei-Ching; Lin, Po-Yen; Chang, Kei-Wen; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2014-12-23

    The loss of overlying enamel or cementum exposes dentinal tubules and increases the risk of several dental diseases, such as dentin hypersensitivity (causing sharp pain and anxiety), caries, and pulp inflammation. This paper presents a fast-reacting, more reliable and biocompatible biomaterial that effectively occludes exposed dentinal tubules by forming a biomimetic crystalline dentin barrier. To generate this biomaterial, a gelatin-templated mesoporous silica biomaterial (CaCO3@mesoporous silica, CCMS) containing nanosized calcium carbonate particles is mixed with 30% H3PO4 at a 1/1 molar ratio of Ca/P (denoted as CCMS-HP), which enables Ca2+ and PO4(3-)/HPO4(2-) ions to permeate the dentinal tubules and form dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), tricalcium phosphate (TCP) or hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals at a depth of approximately 40 μm (sub-μ-CT and nano-SEM/EDS examinations). In vitro biocompatibility tests (WST-1 and lactate dehydrogenase) and ALP assays show high cell viability and mineralization ability in a transwell dentin disc model treated with CCMS-HP (pcrystal growth (DCPD, TCP or HAp-like) and no pulp irritation after 70 days (pcrystals within dentinal tubules. These findings demonstrate that the mesoporous silica biomaterials presented here have great potential for serving as both a catalyst and carrier in the repair or regeneration of dental hard tissue.

  17. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  18. A Multidisciplined Teaching Reform of Biomaterials Course for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Feng; Pu, Fang; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Zhou, Gang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The biomaterials science has advanced in a high speed with global science and technology development during the recent decades, which experts predict to be more obvious in the near future with a more significant position for medicine and health care. Although the three traditional subjects, such as medical science, materials science and biology…

  19. Harnessing the potential of biomaterials for brain repair after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Anup; Payne, Samantha L.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2018-03-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease for which no clinical treatment exists to regenerate lost tissue. Strategies for brain repair in animal models of stroke include the delivery of drug or cell-based therapeutics; however, the complex anatomy and functional organization of the brain presents many challenges. Biomaterials may alleviate some of these challenges by providing a scaffold, localizing the therapy to the site of action, and/or modulating cues to brain cells. Here, the challenges associated with delivery of therapeutics to the brain and the biomaterial strategies used to overcome these challenges are described. For example, innovative hydrogel delivery systems have been designed to provide sustained trophic factor delivery for endogenous repair and to support transplanted cell survival and integration. Novel treatments, such as electrical stimulation of transplanted cells and the delivery of factors for the direct reprogramming of astrocytes into neurons, may be further enhanced by biomaterial delivery systems. Ultimately, improved clinical translation will be achieved by combining clinically relevant therapies with biomaterials strategies.

  20. Towards an in vitro model mimicking the foreign body response: tailoring the surface properties of biomaterials to modulate extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanik, Febriyani F R; Rothuizen, Tonia C; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Rotmans, Joris I; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-09-19

    Despite various studies to minimize host reaction following a biomaterial implantation, an appealing strategy in regenerative medicine is to actively use such an immune response to trigger and control tissue regeneration. We have developed an in vitro model to modulate the host response by tuning biomaterials' surface properties through surface modifications techniques as a new strategy for tissue regeneration applications. Results showed tunable surface topography, roughness, wettability, and chemistry by varying treatment type and exposure, allowing for the first time to correlate the effect of these surface properties on cell attachment, morphology, strength and proliferation, as well as proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6) and antiinflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, IL-10) secreted in medium, and protein expression of collagen and elastin. Surface microstructuring, derived from chloroform partial etching, increased surface roughness and oxygen content. This resulted in enhanced cell adhesion, strength and proliferation as well as a balance of soluble factors for optimum collagen and elastin synthesis for tissue regeneration. By linking surface parameters to cell activity, we could determine the fate of the regenerated tissue to create successful soft tissue-engineered replacement.

  1. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  2. Sundew-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogels Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Bian, Zehua; Petrosino, Jennifer; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yongzhong; Park, Ki Ho; Yue, Tao; Schmidt, Michael; Galster, Scott; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-27

    The potential to harness the unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sundew (Drosera) plant's adhesive hydrogels has long intrigued researchers searching for novel wound-healing applications. However, the ability to collect sufficient quantities of the sundew plant's adhesive hydrogels is problematic and has eclipsed their therapeutic promise. Inspired by these natural hydrogels, we asked if sundew-inspired adhesive hydrogels could overcome the drawbacks associated with natural sundew hydrogels and be used in combination with stem-cell-based therapy to enhance wound-healing therapeutics. Using a bioinspired approach, we synthesized adhesive hydrogels comprised of sodium alginate, gum arabic, and calcium ions to mimic the properties of the natural sundew-derived adhesive hydrogels. We then characterized and showed that these sundew-inspired hydrogels promote wound healing through their superior adhesive strength, nanostructure, and resistance to shearing when compared to other hydrogels in vitro. In vivo, sundew-inspired hydrogels promoted a "suturing" effect to wound sites, which was demonstrated by enhanced wound closure following topical application of the hydrogels. In combination with mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and compared to other therapeutic biomaterials, the sundew-inspired hydrogels demonstrated superior wound-healing capabilities. Collectively, our studies show that sundew-inspired hydrogels contain ideal properties that promote wound healing and suggest that sundew-inspired-ADSCs combination therapy is an efficacious approach for treating wounds without eliciting noticeable toxicity or inflammation.

  3. Cell adhesion and viability of human endothelial cells on electrospun polymer scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matschegewski Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The usage of electrospun polymer scaffolds is a promising approach for artificial heart valve design. This study aims at the evaluation of biological performance of nanofibrous polymer scaffolds poly(L-lactide PLLA L210, PLLA L214 and polyamide-6 fabricated by electrospinning via analyzing viability, adhesion and morphology of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926. Nanofibrous surface topography was shown to influence cell phenotype and cell viability according to the observation of diminished cell spreading accompanied with reduced cell viability on nonwovens. Among those, highest biocompatibility was assessed for PLLA L214, although being generally low when compared to the planar control surface. Electrospinning was demonstrated as an innovative technique for the fabrication of advanced biomaterials aiming at guided cellular behavior as well as the design of novel implant platforms. A better understanding of cell–biomaterial interactions is desired to further improve implant development.

  4. Surface modification of blood-contacting biomaterials by plasma-polymerized superhydrophobic films using hexamethyldisiloxane and tetrafluoromethane as precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chaio-Ru; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chou, Chia-Man; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a plasma polymerization system that can be used to modify the surface of the widely used biomaterial, polyurethane (PU), by employing low-cost hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4) as precursors; this system features a pulsed-dc power supply. Plasma-polymerized HMDSO/CF4 (pp-HC) with coexisting micro- and nanoscale morphology was obtained as a superhydrophobic coating material by controlling the HMDSO/CF4 (fH) monomer flow ratio. The developed surface modification technology can be applied to medical devices, because it is non-cytotoxic and has favorable hemocompatibility, and no blood clots form when the device surface direct contacts. Experimental results reveal that the obtained pp-HC films contained SiOx nanoparticles randomly dispersed on the micron-scale three-dimensional network film surface. The sbnd CF functional group, sbnd CF2 bonding, and SiOx were detected on the film surface. The maximal water contact angle of the pp-HC coating was 161.2°, apparently attributable to the synergistic effect of the coexisting micro- and nanoscale surface morphology featuring a low surface-energy layer. The superhydrophobic and antifouling characteristics of the coating were retained even after it was rubbed 20 times with a steel wool tester. Results of in vitro cytotoxicity, fibrinogen adsorption, and platelet adhesion tests revealed favorable myoblast cell proliferation and the virtual absence of fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion on the pp-HC coated specimens. These quantitative findings imply that the pp-HC coating can potentially prevent the formation of thrombi and provide an alternative means of modifying the surfaces of blood-contacting biomaterials.

  5. Biomaterials Approaches for Utilizing the Regenerative Potential of the Peripheral Nerve Injury Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Melissa Renee

    Clinically available treatments are insufficient to achieve full functional recovery in large (> 3cm) peripheral nerve injuries (PNI). The objectives in this thesis were 1) to study often overlooked elements of intrinsic PNI repair including release of inhibitory CSPGs and post-injury responses of inflammatory macrophages and dedifferentiated Schwann cells; 2) to create biomaterial scaf-folds featuring topographical and adhesive cues to enhance neurite outgrowth; and 3) to test the ability of those cues to direct macrophages and Schwann cells towards a pro-regenerative phe-notype. It is hypothesized that recapitulating the positive and negative cues of the PNI microenvi-ronment can better improve regeneration. The effect of a characteristic CSPG, Chondroitin Sul-fate A (CSA), was tested on neurite dynamics of dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using time lapse video microscopy. DRG growth was recorded on different ad-hesive substrates, including a novel, porcine-derived spinal cord matrix (SCM). The SCM signifi-cantly increased neurite extension, reduced neurite stalling, and mitigated CSA inhibition. Flow cytometry was used to measure changes in cell-substrate binding receptor expression in the neurons. Results showed a significant increase in Syndecan-3 receptor expression in neurons treated with CSA, suggesting a possible priming of the cells for regrowth. The CSA was success-fully immobilized within electrospun hyaluronic acid (HA) nanofibers using a methacrylation re-action. Blended electrospinning was used to create scaffolds featuring the CSA and SCM cues. Results showed significantly increased neurite outgrowth on scaffolds with the SCM and low levels of CSA. Higher incorporation of CSA maintained its inhibitory properties. Next the CSA, SCM, and HA fiber cues were tested for their effects on macrophage and Schwann cell pheno-type. It was hypothesized that one or more of the cues would accelerate the macrophages return to rest

  6. Milled non-mulberry silk fibroin microparticles as biomaterial for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Nandana; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Wang, Xungai; Devi, Dipali

    2015-11-01

    Silk fibroin has been widely employed in various forms as biomaterials for biomedical applications due to its superb biocompatibility and tunable degradation and mechanical properties. Herein, silk fibroin microparticles of non-mulberry silkworm species (Antheraea assamensis, Antheraea mylitta and Philosamia ricini) were fabricated via a top-down approach using a combination of wet-milling and spray drying techniques. Microparticles of mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori) were also utilized for comparative studies. The fabricated microparticles were physico-chemically characterized for size, stability, morphology, chemical composition and thermal properties. The silk fibroin microparticles of all species were porous (∼5μm in size) and showed nearly spherical morphology with rough surface as revealed from dynamic light scattering and microscopic studies. Non-mulberry silk microparticles maintained the typical silk-II structure with β-sheet secondary conformation with higher thermal stability. Additionally, non-mulberry silk fibroin microparticles supported enhanced cell adhesion, spreading and viability of mouse fibroblasts than mulberry silk fibroin microparticles (pcytotoxicity studies. Furthermore, in vitro drug release from the microparticles showed a significantly sustained release over 3 weeks. Taken together, this study demonstrates promising attributes of non-mulberry silk fibroin microparticles as a potential drug delivery vehicle/micro carrier for diverse biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  8. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  9. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  10. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzesiak, Jakub, E-mail: grzesiak.kuba@gmail.com [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Szarek, Dariusz [Department of Neurosurgery, Lower Silesia Specialist Hospital of T. Marciniak, Emergency Medicine Center, Traugutta 116, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Bednarz, Paulina [State Higher Vocational School in Tarnów, Mickiewicza 8, 33-100 Tarnów (Poland); Laska, Jadwiga [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology.

  11. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kono

    Full Text Available Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials.

  12. Bioinspired phospholipid polymer biomaterials for making high performance artificial organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ishihara

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel polymer biomaterials, which can be used in contact with blood, are prepared with strong inspiration from the surface structure of biomembrane. That is, the polymers with a phospholipid polar group in the side chain, 2-methacrylooyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC polymers were synthesized. The MPC polymers can inhibit surface-induced clot formation effectively, when they are in contact with blood even in the absence of an anticoagulant. This phenomenon was due to the reduction of plasma protein and suppression of denaturation of adsorbed proteins, that is the MPC polymers interact with blood components very mildly. As the molecular structure of the MPC polymer was easily designed by changing the monomer units and their composition, it could be applied to surface modification of artificial organs and biomedical devices for improving blood and tissue compatibility. Thus, the MPC polymers are useful polymer biomaterials for manufacturing high performance artificial organs and biomedical devices to provide safe medical treatments.

  13. Global gene expression analysis for evaluation and design of biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Hanagata, Taro Takemura and Takashi Minowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays has become a widespread technique in molecular biological research. In the biomaterials field, it is used to evaluate the biocompatibility or cellular toxicity of metals, polymers and ceramics. Studies in this field have extracted differentially expressed genes in the context of differences in cellular responses among multiple materials. Based on these genes, the effects of materials on cells at the molecular level have been examined. Expression data ranging from several to tens of thousands of genes can be obtained from DNA microarrays. For this reason, several tens or hundreds of differentially expressed genes are often present in different materials. In this review, we outline the principles of DNA microarrays, and provide an introduction to methods of extracting information which is useful for evaluating and designing biomaterials from comprehensive gene expression data.

  14. Freeze-Casting of Porous Biomaterials: Structure, Properties and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Deville

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The freeze-casting of porous materials has received a great deal of attention during the past few years. This simple process, where a material suspension is simply frozen and then sublimated, provides materials with unique porous architectures, where the porosity is almost a direct replica of the frozen solvent crystals. This review focuses on the recent results on the process and the derived porous structures with regards to the biomaterials applications. Of particular interest is the architecture of the materials and the versatility of the process, which can be readily controlled and applied to biomaterials applications. A careful control of the starting formulation and processing conditions is required to control the integrity of the structure and resulting properties. Further in vitro and in vivo investigations are required to validate the potential of this new class of porous materials.

  15. Diversification and enrichment of clinical biomaterials inspired by Darwinian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D W; Watson, G S; Watson, J A; Lee, D-J; Lee, J-M; Jung, H-S

    2016-09-15

    Regenerative medicine and biomaterials design are driven by biomimicry. There is the essential requirement to emulate human cell, tissue, organ and physiological complexity to ensure long-lasting clinical success. Biomimicry projects for biomaterials innovation can be re-invigorated with evolutionary insights and perspectives, since Darwinian evolution is the original dynamic process for biological organisation and complexity. Many existing human inspired regenerative biomaterials (defined as a nature generated, nature derived and nature mimicking structure, produced within a biological system, which can deputise for, or replace human tissues for which it closely matches) are without important elements of biological complexity such as, hierarchy and autonomous actions. It is possible to engineer these essential elements into clinical biomaterials via bioinspired implementation of concepts, processes and mechanisms played out during Darwinian evolution; mechanisms such as, directed, computational, accelerated evolutions and artificial selection contrived in the laboratory. These dynamos for innovation can be used during biomaterials fabrication, but also to choose optimal designs in the regeneration process. Further evolutionary information can help at the design stage; gleaned from the historical evolution of material adaptations compared across phylogenies to changes in their environment and habitats. Taken together, harnessing evolutionary mechanisms and evolutionary pathways, leading to ideal adaptations, will eventually provide a new class of Darwinian and evolutionary biomaterials. This will provide bioengineers with a more diversified and more efficient innovation tool for biomaterial design, synthesis and function than currently achieved with synthetic materials chemistry programmes and rational based materials design approach, which require reasoned logic. It will also inject further creativity, diversity and richness into the biomedical technologies that

  16. An introduction to biomaterial-based strategies for curbing autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jamal S; Allen, Riley P

    2016-05-01

    Recently, scientists have made significant progress in the development of immunotherapeutics that correct aberrant, autoimmune responses. Yet, concerns about the safety, efficacy, and wide scale applicability continue to hinder use of contemporary, immunology-based strategies. There is a clear need for therapies that finely control molecular and cellular elements of the immune system. Biomaterial engineers have taken up this challenge to develop therapeutics with selective spatial and temporal control of immune cells. In this review, we introduce the immunology of autoimmune disorders, survey the current therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases, and highlight the ongoing research efforts to engineer the immune system using biomaterials, for positive therapeutic outcomes in treatment of autoimmune disorders. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  17. Pharmaceutical and biomaterial engineering via electrohydrodynamic atomization technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Prina; Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Arshad, Muhammad S; Smith, Ashleigh; van der Merwe, Susanna M; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2017-01-01

    Complex micro- and nano-structures enable crucial developments in the healthcare remit (e.g., pharmaceutical and biomaterial sciences). In recent times, several technologies have been developed and explored to address key healthcare challenges (e.g., advanced chemotherapy, biomedical diagnostics and tissue regeneration). Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technologies are rapidly emerging as promising candidates to address these issues. The fundamental principle driving EHDA engineering relates to the action of an electric force (field) on flowing conducting medium (formulation) giving rise to a stable Taylor cone. Through careful optimization of process parameters, material properties and selection, nozzle and needle design, and collection substrate method, complex active micro- and nano-structures are engineered. This short review focuses on key selected recent and established advances in the field of pharmaceutical and biomaterial applications. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. APPLICATIONS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY IN DEVELOPMENT OF BIOMATERIALS: NANOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Berry, T.; Narayan, R.

    2010-11-29

    Biotechnology is the application of biological techniques to develop new tools and products for medicine and industry. Due to various properties including chemical stability, biocompatibility, and specific activity, e.g. antimicrobial properties, many new and novel materials are being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. Many of these materials are less than 100 nanometers in size. Nanotechnology is the engineering discipline encompassing designing, producing, testing, and using structures and devices less than 100 nanometers. One of the challenges associated with biomaterials is microbial contamination that can lead to infections. In recent work we have examined the functionalization of nanoporous biomaterials and antimicrobial activities of nanocrystalline diamond materials. In vitro testing has revealed little antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria and associated biofilm formation that enhances recalcitrance to antimicrobial agents including disinfectants and antibiotics. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies further demonstrated properties and characteristics of the material with regard to biofilm formation.

  19. Regenerative Therapies for Central Nervous System Diseases: a Biomaterials Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a limited capacity to spontaneously regenerate following traumatic injury or disease, requiring innovative strategies to promote tissue and functional repair. Tissue regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, have demonstrated promising results in experimental animal models, but have been difficult to translate clinically. The efficacy of cell therapy, which involves stem cell transplantation into the CNS to replace damaged tissue, has been limited due to low cell survival and integration upon transplantation, while delivery of therapeutic molecules to the CNS using conventional methods, such as oral and intravenous administration, have been limited by diffusion across the blood–brain/spinal cord-barrier. The use of biomaterials to promote graft survival and integration as well as localized and sustained delivery of biologics to CNS injury sites is actively being pursued. This review will highlight recent advances using biomaterials as cell- and drug-delivery vehicles for CNS repair. PMID:24002187

  20. Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles Bearing 8-Hydroxyquinoline Ligands as Multifunctional Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Valentina; Bellia, Francesco; Vecchio, Graziella

    2017-03-28

    Cyclodextrins are used as building blocks for the development of a host of polymeric biomaterials. The cyclodextrin polymers have found numerous applications as they exhibit unique features such as mechanical properties, stimuli responsiveness and drug loading ability. Notwithstanding the abundance of cyclodextrin polymers studied, metal-chelating polymers based on cyclodextrins have been poorly explored. Herein we report the synthesis and the characterization of the first metal-chelating β-cyclodextrin polymer bearing 8-hydroxyquinoline ligands. The metal ions (Cu 2+ or Zn 2+ ) can modulate the assembly of the polymer nanoparticles. Moreover, the protective activity of the new chelating polymer against self- and metal-induced Aβ aggregation and free radical species are significantly higher than those of the parent compounds. These synergistic effects suggest that the incorporation of hydroxyquinoline moieties into a soluble β-cyclodextrin polymer could represent a promising strategy to design multifunctional biomaterials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The role of biomaterials in the treatment of meniscal tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal O. Kean

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive investigations over the recent decades have established the anatomical, biomechanical and functional importance of the meniscus in the knee joint. As a functioning part of the joint, it serves to prevent the deterioration of articular cartilage and subsequent osteoarthritis. To this end, meniscus repair and regeneration is of particular interest from the biomaterial, bioengineering and orthopaedic research community. Even though meniscal research is previously of a considerable volume, the research community with evolving material science, biology and medical advances are all pushing toward emerging novel solutions and approaches to the successful treatment of meniscal difficulties. This review presents a tactical evaluation of the latest biomaterials, experiments to simulate meniscal tears and the state-of-the-art materials and strategies currently used to treat tears.

  2. Advances in Zirconia Toughened Alumina Biomaterials for Total Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Kocagöz, Sevi; Arnholt, Christina; Huet, Roland; Ueno, Masaru; Walter, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an up-to-date overview of zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) components used in total hip arthroplasties. The structure, mechanical properties, and available data regarding the clinical performance of ZTA are summarized. The advancements that have been made in understanding the in vivo performance of ZTA are investigated. This article concludes with a discussion of gaps in the literature related to ceramic biomaterials and avenues for future research. PMID:23746930

  3. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterial for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    the issues associated w ith the use of autografts, nerve gui dance conduits have been developed to bridge the gap between the trans ected nerve ends...Biomaterial Hydrogel" Western North Carolina Society for Neuroscience : Winston-Salem, NC 11/2011; North Carolina Tissue Engineering and Regenerative...Technology Applications for Combat Casualty Care: St. Pete Beach, FL 8/2010; Society for Neuroscience : San Diego, CA 11/2010; Tissue Engineering and

  4. CHARACTERISATION OF CASSAVA FIBRE FOR USE AS A BIOMATERIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Lois Larbie; Claude Fiifi Hayford; Elsie Effah Kaufmann

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the cytotoxicity of de-starched cassava fibre granules and fine powder using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and examine changes in the composition of Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) resulting from immersion of cassava fibre samples. The purpose of the study was to characterise cassavafibre for possible biomaterial applications. Preliminary results indicate insignificant cytotoxic effects on PBMCs with cassava sample concentrations of 0.1g/ml, 0.025g/ml...

  5. Biomaterials from beer manufacture waste for bone growth scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Martín-Luengo, María Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural wastes are a source of renewable raw materials (RRM), with structures that can be tailored for the use envisaged. Here, theyhave proved to be good replacement candidates for use as biomaterials for the growth of osteoblasts in bone replacement therapies. Their preparation is more cost effective than that of materials presentlyin use with the added bonus of converting a low-cost waste into a value-added product. Due to their origin these solids are ecomaterials.

  6. β-pyrophosphate: A potential biomaterial for dental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasiou, AD; Strafford, S; Posada-Estefan, O; Thomson, CL; Hussaein, SA; Edwards, TJ; Malinowski, M; Hondow, N; Metzger, NK; Brown, CTA; Routledge, MN; Brown, AP; Duggal, MS; Jha, A

    2017-01-01

    Tooth hypersensitivity is a growing problem affecting both the young and ageing population worldwide. Since an effective and permanent solution is not yet available, we propose a new methodology for the restoration of dental enamel using femtosecond lasers and novel calcium phosphate biomaterials. During this procedure the irradiated mineral transforms into a densified layer of acid resistant iron doped β-pyrophosphate, bonded with the surface of eroded enamel. Our aim therefore is to evaluat...

  7. β-pyrophosphate : a potential biomaterial for dental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasiou, A. D.; Strafford, S.; Posada-Estefan, O.; Thomson, C. L.; Hussaein, S. A.; Edwards, T. J.; Malinowski, M.; Hondow, N.; Metzger, N. K.; Brown, C. T. A.; Routledge, M. N.; Brown, A. P.; Duggal, M. S.; Jha, A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors acknowledge support from the sponsors of this work; the EPSRC LUMIN (EP/K020234/1) and EU-Marie-Curie-IAPP LUSTRE (324538) projects. Tooth hypersensitivity is a growing problem affecting both the young and ageing population worldwide. Since an effective and permanent solution is not yet available, we propose a new methodology for the restoration of dental enamel using femtosecond lasers and novel calcium phosphate biomaterials. During this procedure the irradiated mineral trans...

  8. In silico design of anti-atherogenic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel R; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Tomasini, Michael D; Abdelhamid, Dalia; Petersen, Latrisha K; Welsh, William J; Uhrich, Kathryn E; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2013-10-01

    Atherogenesis, the uncontrolled deposition of modified lipoproteins in inflamed arteries, serves as a focal trigger of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Polymeric biomaterials have been envisioned to counteract atherogenesis based on their ability to repress scavenger mediated uptake of oxidized lipoprotein (oxLDL) in macrophages. Following the conceptualization in our laboratories of a new library of amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs), assembled from sugar backbones, aliphatic chains and poly(ethylene glycol) tails, a more rational approach is necessary to parse the diverse features such as charge, hydrophobicity, sugar composition and stereochemistry. In this study, we advance a computational biomaterials design approach to screen and elucidate anti-atherogenic biomaterials with high efficacy. AMs were quantified in terms of not only 1D (molecular formula) and 2D (molecular connectivity) descriptors, but also new 3D (molecular geometry) descriptors of AMs modeled by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) followed by all-atom MD simulations. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for anti-atherogenic activity were then constructed by screening a total of 1164 descriptors against the corresponding, experimentally measured potency of AM inhibition of oxLDL uptake in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Five key descriptors were identified to provide a strong linear correlation between the predicted and observed anti-atherogenic activity values, and were then used to correctly forecast the efficacy of three newly designed AMs. Thus, a new ligand-based drug design framework was successfully adapted to computationally screen and design biomaterials with cardiovascular therapeutic properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioinspired phospholipid polymer biomaterials for making high performance artificial organs

    OpenAIRE

    K Ishihara

    2000-01-01

    Novel polymer biomaterials, which can be used in contact with blood, are prepared with strong inspiration from the surface structure of biomembrane. That is, the polymers with a phospholipid polar group in the side chain, 2-methacrylooyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymers were synthesized. The MPC polymers can inhibit surface-induced clot formation effectively, when they are in contact with blood even in the absence of an anticoagulant. This phenomenon was due to the reduction of plasma...

  10. Template assisted surface microstructuring of flowable dental composites and its effect on microbial adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Nadja; Maenz, Stefan; Sanz Beltrán, Vanesa; Völpel, Andrea; Heyder, Markus; Sigusch, Bernd W; Lüdecke, Claudia; Jandt, Klaus D

    2016-03-01

    Despite their various advantages, such as good esthetic properties, absence of mercury and adhesive bonding to teeth, modern dental composites still have some drawbacks, e.g., a relatively high rate of secondary caries on teeth filled with composite materials. Recent research suggests that microstructured biomaterials surfaces may reduce microbial adhesion to materials due to unfavorable physical material-microbe interactions. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to test the hypotheses that (i) different surface microstructures can be created on composites by a novel straightforward approach potentially suitable for clinical application and (ii) that these surface structures have a statistically significant effect on microbial adhesion properties. Six different dental composites were initially tested for their suitability for microstructuring by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) templates. Each composite was light-cured between a glass slide and a microstructured PDMS template. The nano-hybrid composite Grandio Flow was the only tested composite with satisfying structurability, and was therefore used for the bacterial adhesion tests. Composites samples were structured with four different microstructures (flat, cubes, linear trapezoid structures, flat pyramids) and incubated for 4h in centrifuged saliva. The bacterial adherence was then characterized by colony forming units (CFUs) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All four microstructures were successfully transferred from the PDMS templates to the composite Grandio Flow. The CFU-test as well as the quantitative analysis of the SEM images showed the lowest bacterial adhesion on the flat composite samples. The highest bacterial adhesion was observed on the composite samples with linear trapezoid structures, followed by flat pyramids and cubes. The microstructure of dental composite surfaces statistically significantly influenced the adhesion of oral bacteria. Modifying the composite surface structure may be

  11. Osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lijia; Shi, Yujun [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Ye, Feng [Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Bu, Hong, E-mail: hongbu@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Although osteoinduction mechanism of calcium phosphate (CP) ceramics is still unclear, several essential properties have been reported, such as chemical composition, pore size and porosity, etc. In this study, calcium phosphate powder (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, CaP, group 1), biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic powder (BCP, group 2), and intact BCP rods (group 3) were implanted into leg muscles of mice and dorsal muscles of rabbits. One month and three months after implantation, samples were harvested for biological and histological analysis. New bone tissues were observed in 10/10 samples in group 1, 3/10 samples in group 2, and 9/10 samples in group 3 at 3rd month in mice, but not in rabbits. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured with trace CaP and BCP powder, and osteogenic differentiation was observed at day 7. Our results suggested that chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation. - Highlights: ► Intrinsic osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials was observed implanted in muscles of mice. ► Biomaterials powder also has osteoinduction property. ► Osteogenic genes and protein could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blot in implanted biomaterials. ► Osteogenic phenomenon could be observed by electron microscopy. ► The chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation.

  12. Silicon: the evolution of its use in biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henstock, J R; Canham, L T; Anderson, S I

    2015-01-01

    In the 1970s, several studies revealed the requirement for silicon in bone development, while bioactive silicate glasses simultaneously pioneered the current era of bioactive materials. Considerable research has subsequently focused on the chemistry and biological function of silicon in bone, demonstrating that the element has at least two separate effects in the extracellular matrix: (i) interacting with glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans during their synthesis, and (ii) forming ionic substitutions in the crystal lattice structure of hydroxyapatite. In addition, the dissolution products of bioactive glass (predominantly silicic acids) have significant effects on the molecular biology of osteoblasts in vitro, regulating the expression of several genes including key osteoblastic markers, cell cycle regulators and extracellular matrix proteins. Researchers have sought to capitalize on these effects and have generated a diverse array of biomaterials, which include bioactive glasses, silicon-substituted hydroxyapatites and pure, porosified silicon, but all these materials share similarities in the mechanisms that result in their bioactivity. This review discusses the current data obtained from original research in biochemistry and biomaterials science supporting the role of silicon in bone, comparing both the biological function of the element and analysing the evolution of silicon-containing biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomaterial property-controlled stem cell fates for cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyi Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI affects more than 8 million people in the United States alone. Due to the insufficient regeneration capacity of the native myocardium, one widely studied approach is cardiac tissue engineering, in which cells are delivered with or without biomaterials and/or regulatory factors to fully regenerate the cardiac functions. Specifically, in vitro cardiac tissue engineering focuses on using biomaterials as a reservoir for cells to attach, as well as a carrier of various regulatory factors such as growth factors and peptides, providing high cell retention and a proper microenvironment for cells to migrate, grow and differentiate within the scaffolds before implantation. Many studies have shown that the full establishment of a functional cardiac tissue in vitro requires synergistic actions between the seeded cells, the tissue culture condition, and the biochemical and biophysical environment provided by the biomaterials-based scaffolds. Proper electrical stimulation and mechanical stretch during the in vitro culture can induce the ordered orientation and differentiation of the seeded cells. On the other hand, the various scaffolds biochemical and biophysical properties such as polymer composition, ligand concentration, biodegradability, scaffold topography and mechanical properties can also have a significant effect on the cellular processes.

  14. Biomaterials in Cardiovascular Research: Applications and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Kumar Jaganathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular biomaterials (CB dominate the category of biomaterials based on the demand and investments in this field. This review article classifies the CB into three major classes, namely, metals, polymers, and biological materials and collates the information about the CB. Blood compatibility is one of the major criteria which limit the use of biomaterials for cardiovascular application. Several key players are associated with blood compatibility and they are discussed in this paper. To enhance the compatibility of the CB, several surface modification strategies were in use currently. Some recent applications of surface modification technology on the materials for cardiovascular devices were also discussed for better understanding. Finally, the current trend of the CB, endothelization of the cardiac implants and utilization of induced human pluripotent stem cells (ihPSCs, is also presented in this review. The field of CB is growing constantly and many new investigators and researchers are developing interest in this domain. This review will serve as a one stop arrangement to quickly grasp the basic research in the field of CB.

  15. Designing protein-based biomaterials for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagner, Jennifer E; Kim, Wookhyun; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2014-04-01

    Biomaterials produced by nature have been honed through billions of years, evolving exquisitely precise structure-function relationships that scientists strive to emulate. Advances in genetic engineering have facilitated extensive investigations to determine how changes in even a single peptide within a protein sequence can produce biomaterials with unique thermal, mechanical and biological properties. Elastin, a naturally occurring protein polymer, serves as a model protein to determine the relationship between specific structural elements and desirable material characteristics. The modular, repetitive nature of the protein facilitates the formation of well-defined secondary structures with the ability to self-assemble into complex three-dimensional architectures on a variety of length scales. Furthermore, many opportunities exist to incorporate other protein-based motifs and inorganic materials into recombinant protein-based materials, extending the range and usefulness of these materials in potential biomedical applications. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) can be assembled into 3-D architectures with precise control over payload encapsulation, mechanical and thermal properties, as well as unique functionalization opportunities through both genetic and enzymatic means. An overview of current protein-based materials, their properties and uses in biomedicine will be provided, with a focus on the advantages of ELPs. Applications of these biomaterials as imaging and therapeutic delivery agents will be discussed. Finally, broader implications and future directions of these materials as diagnostic and therapeutic systems will be explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomaterials and Culture Technologies for Regenerative Therapy of Liver Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Roman A; Jung, Cho-Rok; Kim, Hae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative approach has emerged to substitute the current extracorporeal technologies for the treatment of diseased and damaged liver tissue. This is based on the use of biomaterials that modulate the responses of hepatic cells through the unique matrix properties tuned to recapitulate regenerative functions. Cells in liver preserve their phenotype or differentiate through the interactions with extracellular matrix molecules. Therefore, the intrinsic properties of the engineered biomaterials, such as stiffness and surface topography, need to be tailored to induce appropriate cellular functions. The matrix physical stimuli can be combined with biochemical cues, such as immobilized functional groups or the delivered actions of signaling molecules. Furthermore, the external modulation of cells, through cocultures with nonparenchymal cells (e.g., endothelial cells) that can signal bioactive molecules, is another promising avenue to regenerate liver tissue. This review disseminates the recent approaches of regenerating liver tissue, with a focus on the development of biomaterials and the related culture technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Engineering Biomaterial Properties for Central Nervous System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Christopher John

    Biomaterials offer unique properties that are intrinsic to the chemistry of the material itself or occur as a result of the fabrication process; iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic, which enables controlled heating in the presence of an alternating magnetic field, and a hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material provides minimally invasive placement of a fibrous, artificial extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. Utilization of these unique properties towards central nervous system disease and dysfunction requires a thorough definition of the properties in concert with full biological assessment. This enables development of material-specific features to elicit unique cellular responses. Iron oxide nanoparticles are first investigated for material-dependent, cortical neuron cytotoxicity in vitro and subsequently evaluated for alternating magnetic field stimulation induced hyperthermia, emulating the clinical application for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy in glioblastoma treatment. A hydrogel and electrospun fiber hybrid material is first applied to a rat brain to evaluate biomaterial interface astrocyte accumulation as a function of hybrid material composition. The hybrid material is then utilized towards increasing functional engraftment of dopaminergic progenitor neural stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, these two scenarios display the role of material property characterization in development of biomaterial strategies for central nervous system repair and regeneration.

  18. Bacterial Adhesion Forces with Substratum Surfaces and the Susceptibility of Biofilms to Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Muszanska, Agnieszka K.; Nejadnik, M. Reza; Chen, Yun; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms causing biomaterial-associated infection resist antibiotic treatment and usually necessitate the replacement of infected implants. Here we relate bacterial adhesion forces and the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms on uncoated and polymer brush-coated silicone rubber. Nine strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhered more weakly to brush-coated silicone rubber (−0.05 ± 0.03 to −0.51 ± 0.62 nN) than to uncoated silicone rubber (−1...

  19. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    glycerol is a well-known hygroscopic liquid and lubricant. In the Polymer Claw Progress Report -4- 9/24/12 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics...the Polymer Claw adhesive partially solidified, while commercial adhesives were completely liquid after one hour. However, the curing rate was...is not valid for partial liquid adhesives, we will only test at later times, noting the minimum time for which the glass slides break. The time to

  20. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  1. Insights into the Alteration of Osteoblast Mechanical Properties upon Adhesion on Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia G. Moutzouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion on substrates is accompanied by significant changes in shape and cytoskeleton organization, which affect subsequent cellular and tissue responses, determining the long-term success of an implant. Alterations in osteoblast stiffness upon adhesion on orthopaedic implants with different surface chemical composition and topography are, thus, of central interest in the field of bone implant research. This work aimed to study the mechanical response of osteoblasts upon adhesion on chitosan-coated glass surfaces and to investigate possible correlations with the level of adhesion, spreading, and cytoskeleton reorganization. Using the micropipette aspiration technique, the osteoblast elastic modulus was found higher on chitosan-coated than on uncoated control substrates, and it was found to increase in the course of spreading for both substrates. The cell-surface contact area was measured throughout several time points of adhesion to quantify cell spreading kinetics. Significant differences were found between chitosan and control surfaces regarding the response of cell spreading, while both groups displayed a sigmoidal kinetical behavior with an initially elevated spreading rate which stabilizes in the second hour of attachment. Actin filament structural changes were confirmed after observation with confocal microscope. Biomaterial surface modification can enhance osteoblast mechanical response and induce favorable structural organization for the implant integration.

  2. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  3. Interactions between biomaterials and the sclera: Implications on myopia progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, James

    Myopia prevalence has steadily climbed worldwide in recent decades with the most dramatic impact in East Asian countries. Treatments such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser surgery for the refractive error are widely available, but none cures the underlying cause. In progressive high myopia, invasive surgical procedures using a scleral buckle for mechanical support are performed since the patient is at risk of becoming blind. The treatment outcome is highly dependent on the surgeon's skills and the patient's myopia progression rate, with limited choices in buckling materials. This dissertation, in four main studies, represents efforts made to control high myopia progression through the exploration and development of biomaterials that influence scleral growth. First, mRNA expression levels of the chick scleral matrix metalloproteinases, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, and transforming growth factor-beta 2 were assessed for temporal and defocus power effects. The first study elucidated the roles that these factors play in scleral growth regulation and suggested potential motifs that can be incorporated in future biomaterials design. Second, poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) as injectable gels and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as solid strips were implanted in chicks to demonstrate the concept of posterior pole scleral reinforcements. This second study found that placing appropriate biomaterials at the posterior pole of the eye could directly influence scleral remodeling by interacting with the host cells. Both studies advanced the idea that scleral tissue remodeling could be potentially controlled by well-designed biomaterials. These findings led to the exploration of biomimetic hydrogels comprising enzymatically-degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) to determine their biocompatibility and effects on the chick posterior eye wall. This third study demonstrated the feasibility of stimulating scleral growth by applying biomimetic

  4. The role of biomaterial properties in peri-implant neovascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Andrew Lawrence

    An understanding of the interactions between orthopaedic and dental implant surfaces with the surrounding host tissue is critical in the design of next generation implants to improve osseointegration and clinical success rates. Critical to the process of osseointegration is the rapid establishment of a patent neovasculature in the peri-implant space to allow for the delivery of oxygen, nutrients, and progenitor cells. The central aim of this thesis is to understand how biomaterials regulate cellular and host tissue response to elicit a pro-angiogenic microenvironment at the implant/tissue interface. To address this question, the studies performed in this thesis aim to (1) determine whether biomaterial surface properties can modulate the production and secretion of pro-angiogenic growth factors by cells, (2) determine the role of integrin and VEGF-A signaling in the angiogenic response of cells to implant surface features, and (3) to determine whether neovascularization in response to an implanted biomaterial can be modulated in vivo. The results demonstrate that biomaterial surface microtopography and surface energy can increase the production of pro-angiogenic growth factors by osteoblasts and that these growth factors stimulate the differentiation of endothelial cells in a paracrine manner and the results suggest that signaling through specific integrin receptors affects the production of angiogenic growth factors by osteoblast-like cells. Further, using a novel in vivo model, the results demonstrate that a combination of a rough surface microtopography and high surface energy can improve bone-to-implant contact and neovascularization. The results of these studies also suggest that VEGF-A produced by osteoblast-like cells has both an autocrine and paracrine effect. VEGF-A silenced cells exhibited reduced production of both pro-angiogenic and osteogenic growth factors in response to surface microtopgraphy and surface energy, and conditioned media from VEGF

  5. Design strategies and applications of nacre-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Ethan Michael; Wang, Wei; Li, Caiyan; Guo, Jinshan; Ozbolat, Ibrahim Tarik; Rahn, Kevin Michael; Armstrong, April Dawn; Xia, Jingfen; Qian, Guoying; Yang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine relies heavily on materials capable of implantation without significant foreign body reactions and with the ability to promote tissue differentiation and regeneration. The field of bone tissue engineering in particular requires materials capable of providing enhanced mechanical properties and promoting osteogenic cell lineage commitment. While bone repair has long relied almost exclusively on inorganic, calcium phosphate ceramics such as hydroxyapatite and their composites or on non-degradable metals, the organically derived shell and pearl nacre generated by mollusks has emerged as a promising alternative. Nacre is a naturally occurring composite material composed of inorganic, calcium carbonate plates connected by a framework of organic molecules. Similar to mammalian bone, the highly organized microstructure of nacre endows the composite with superior mechanical properties while the organic phase contributes to significant bioactivity. Studies, both in vitro and in vivo, have demonstrated nacre's biocompatibility, biodegradability, and osteogenic potential, which are superior to pure inorganic minerals such as hydroxyapatite or non-degradable metals. Nacre can be used directly as a bulk implant or as part of a composite material when combined with polymers or other ceramics. While nacre has demonstrated its effectiveness in multiple cell culture and animal models, it remains a relatively underexplored biomaterial. This review introduces the formation, structure, and characteristics of nacre, and discusses the present and future uses of this biologically-derived material as a novel biomaterial for orthopedic and other tissue engineering applications. Mussel derived nacre, a biological composite composed of mineralized calcium carbonate platelets and interplatelet protein components, has recently gained interest as a potential alternative ceramic material in orthopedic biomaterials, combining the

  6. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  7. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Pulp Capping Biomaterials after Application of Three Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi-Ansari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA, Root MTA (RMTA and calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 subgroups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  8. Studies on the Adhesive Property of Snail Adhesive Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newar, Janu; Ghatak, Archana

    2015-11-10

    Many gastropod molluscs are known to secrete mucus which allow these animals to adhere to a substrate while foraging over it. While the mucus is known to provide strong adhesion to both dry and wet surfaces, including both horizontal and vertical ones, no systematic study has been carried out to understand the strength of such adhesion under different conditions. We report here results from preliminary studies on adhesion characteristics of the mucus of a snail found in eastern India, Macrochlamys indica. When perturbed, the snail was found to secrete its adhesive mucus, which was collected and subjected to regular adhesion tests. The hydrated mucus was used as such, and also as mixed with buffer of different pH. These experiments suggest that the mucus was slightly alkaline, and showed the maximum adhesion strength of 9 kPa when present in an alkaline buffer. Preliminary studies indicate that adhesive force is related to the ability of the mucus to incorporate water. In alkaline condition, the gel like mass that it forms, incorporate water from a wet surface and enable strong adhesion.

  9. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  10. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Frontiers in biomaterials the design, synthetic strategies and biocompatibility of polymer scaffolds for biomedical application

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Frontiers in Biomaterials: The Design, Synthetic Strategies and Biocompatibility of Polymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Application, Volume 1" highlights the importance of biomaterials and their interaction with biological system. The need for the development of biomaterials as scaffold for tissue regeneration is driven by the increasing demands for materials that mimic functions of extracellular matrices of body tissues.This ebook covers the latest challenges on the biocompatibility of scaffold overtime after implantation and discusses the requirement of innovative technologies and strategies f

  12. Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Sulfonated and Non-Modified Chitosan Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Civantos, Ana; Redondo, Juan Alfonso; Guzmán, Rodrigo; Pérez-Perrino, Mónica; Gallardo, Alberto; Ramos, Viviana; Aranaz, Inmaculada

    2017-05-01

    Three types of chitosan-based films have been prepared and evaluated: a non-modified chitosan film bearing cationizable aliphatic amines and two films made of N-sulfopropyl chitosan derivatives bearing both aliphatic amines and negative sulfonate groups at different ratios. Cell adhesion and proliferation on chitosan films of C2C12 pre-myoblastic cells and B16 cells as tumoral model have been tested. A differential cell behavior has been observed on chitosan films due to their different surface modification. B16 cells have shown lower vinculin expression when cultured on sulfonated chitosan films. This study shows how the interaction among cells and material surface can be modulated by physicochemical characteristics of the biomaterial surface, altering tumoral cell adhesion and proliferation processes.

  13. Laser induced forward transfer technique for the immobilization of biomaterials in biosensors applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Symeon; Chatzipetrou, Marianeza; Massaouti, Maria; Zergioti, Ioanna

    2017-02-01

    Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is a direct write technique, able to create micropatterns of biomaterials on sensing devices. In this conference we will present a new approach using LIFT for the printing and direct immobilization of biomaterials on a great variety of surfaces, for bio-sensor applications. The basic requirement for the fabrication of a biosensor is to stabilize a biomaterial that brings the physicochemical changes in close proximity to a transducer. In this direction, several immobilization methods such as covalent binding and crosslinking have been implemented. The presence of the additional functionalization steps in the biosensors fabrication, is among the main disadvantages of chemical immobilization methods. Our approach employs the LIFT technique for the direct immobilization of biomaterials, either by physical adsorption or by covalent bonding of the biomaterials. The physical adsorption of the biomaterials, occurs on hydrophobic or super-hydrophobic surfaces, due to the transition of the wetting properties of the surfaces upon the impact of the biomaterials with high velocity. The unique characteristic of LIFT technique to create high speed liquid jets, leads to the penetration of the biomaterial in the micro/nano roughness of the surface, resulting in their direct immobilization, without the need of any chemical functionalization layers. Moreover, we will also present the direct immobilization of biomaterials on Screen Printed Electrodes, for enzymatic biosensors, with a limit of detection (LOD) for catechol at 150 nM, and protein biosensors, used for the detection of herbicides, with an LOD of 8-10 nM.

  14. Fatigue performance of additively manufactured meta-biomaterials: The effects of topology and material type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S M; Hedayati, R; Li, Y; Lietaert, K; Tümer, N; Fatemi, A; Rans, C D; Pouran, B; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques enable fabrication of bone-mimicking meta-biomaterials with unprecedented combinations of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties. The mechanical performance of AM meta-biomaterials is a direct function of their topological design. It is, however, not clear to what extent the material type is important in determining the fatigue behavior of such biomaterials. We therefore aimed to determine the isolated and modulated effects of topological design and material type on the fatigue response of metallic meta-biomaterials fabricated with selective laser melting. Towards that end, we designed and additively manufactured Co-Cr meta-biomaterials with three types of repeating unit cells and three to four porosities per type of repeating unit cell. The AM meta-biomaterials were then mechanically tested to obtain their normalized S-N curves. The obtained S-N curves of Co-Cr meta-biomaterials were compared to those of meta-biomaterials with same topological designs but made from other materials, i.e. Ti-6Al-4V, tantalum, and pure titanium, available from our previous studies. We found the material type to be far more important than the topological design in determining the normalized fatigue strength of our AM metallic meta-biomaterials. This is the opposite of what we have found for the quasi-static mechanical properties of the same meta-biomaterials. The effects of material type, manufacturing imperfections, and topological design were different in the high and low cycle fatigue regions. That is likely because the cyclic response of meta-biomaterials depends not only on the static and fatigue strengths of the bulk material but also on other factors that may include strut roughness, distribution of the micro-pores created inside the struts during the AM process, and plasticity. Meta-biomaterials are a special class of metamaterials with unusual or unprecedented combinations of mechanical, physical (e.g. mass transport

  15. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...

  16. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  17. Controlling adhesive behavior during recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Jihui Guo; XinPing Wang; Steve Severtson; Mark Kroll; Mike Nowak

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives can be formulated to facilitate their removal by typical paper recycling unit operations. The investigations described in this paper are focused on determining fundamental properties that control particle size during pulping. While pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with high elastic moduli tend to survive pulping with larger particles, facestock and...

  18. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  19. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  20. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  1. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful....... In particular on the nature of the surprisingly small number of repetitive steps that are needed in order to obtain a single-layer slab. Two frameworks for exfoliation are investigated: parallel exfoliation involving repetitive simultaneous cleaving, the other, serial exfoliation, which involves the repetitive...... cleaving of a single chunk of graphite. For both cases, parallel and serial exfoliation, it is investigated how many generations of cleavages are needed. An approximate model with the probability distribution expressed as a simple closed form is presented and compared with the simulations....

  2. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P DLC-PDMS-h (0.671 ± 0.001 × 10(7)/cm(2) and 0.751 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2) vs. 1.055 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2), respectively). No significant differences were detected between other tested materials. Hence DLC-PTFE-h coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P DLC-PTFE-h films could be used as a biomaterial coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections.

  3. Biomaterials from beer manufacture waste for bone growth scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Luengo, M.A.; Yates, M.; Ramos Gomez, Milagros; Saez Rojo, E.; Martinez Serrano, Alberto; Gonzalez Gil, L.; Ruiz Hitzky, E.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural wastes are a source of renewable raw materials (RRM), with structures that can be tailored for the use envisaged. Here, they have proved to be good replacement candidates for use as biomaterials for the growth of osteoblasts in bone replacement therapies. Their preparation is more cost effective than that of materials presently in use with the added bonus of converting a low-cost waste into a value-added product. Due to their origin these solids are ecomaterials. In this study, s...

  4. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  5. Multifunctional biomaterial coatings: synthetic challenges and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Mareen; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2017-01-01

    A controlled interaction of materials with their surrounding biological environment is of great interest in many fields. Multifunctional coatings aim to provide simultaneous modulation of several biological signals. They can consist of various combinations of bioactive, and bioinert components as well as of reporter molecules to improve cell-material contacts, prevent infections or to analyze biochemical events on the surface. However, specific immobilization and particular assembly of various active molecules are challenging. Herein, an overview of multifunctional coatings for biomaterials is given, focusing on synthetic strategies and the biological benefits by displaying several motifs.

  6. Dosimetry by stimulated exoelectronic emission of apatites and dental biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakotomalala, R.

    1982-02-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of stimulated exoelectronic emission, the goal of which is the development of a dosimetry available in case of accidental irradiation. The first part is devoted to a review of the various theoretical models suggested by several authors on the exoemission phenomenon, and to the description of the experimental set up: counter and detector electronic circuits. The second part gives the experimental results obtained with the different products studied: fluorapatite, hydroxyapatite (considered to be the major constituent of bones and teeth), tricalcic phosphate and dental biomaterials: porcelain and some canal obturation substances [fr

  7. NASA's Needs for Biomaterials within the HEDS Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    The part to be played by materials scientists to further NASA's exploration missions cannot be underestimated. To quote Jerome Groopman (New Yorker, February 14, 2000), "The rocket science will be the easy part". The four main risks on the Critical Path Road Map during a three-year sojourn to Mars are osteoporosis, psychological problems, radiation induced cancer and acute medical trauma. NASA's microgravity materials science program has investigations in membrane fabrication, bone growth and materials for radiation protection. These programs will be reviewed in the context of the four main risks, as will other potential uses of biomaterials and applications of biomimetic processing.

  8. Effect on adhesion of a nanocapsules-loaded adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Genari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the in situ degree of conversion, contact angle, and immediate and long-term bond strengths of a commercial primer and an experimental adhesive containing indomethacin- and triclosan-loaded nanocapsules (NCs. The indomethacin- and triclosan-loaded NCs, which promote anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects through controlled release, were incorporated into the primer at a concentration of 2% and in the adhesive at concentrations of 1, 2, 5, and 10%. The in situ degree of conversion (DC, n=3 was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle of the primer and adhesive on the dentin surface (n = 3 was determined by an optical tensiometer. For the microtensile bond strength µTBS test (12 teeth per group, stick-shaped specimens were tested under tensile stress immediately after preparation and after storage in water for 1 year. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests with α=0.05. The use of the NC-loaded adhesive resulted in a higher in situ degree of conversion. The DC values varied from 75.07 ± 8.83% to 96.18 ± 0.87%. The use of NCs in only the adhesive up to a concentration of 5% had no influence on the bond strength. The contact angle of the primer remained the same with and without NCs. The use of both the primer and adhesive with NCs (for all concentrations resulted in a higher contact angle of the adhesive. The longitudinal μTBS was inversely proportional to the concentration of NCs in the adhesive system, exhibiting decreasing values for the groups with primer containing NCs and adhesives with increasing concentrations of NCs. Adhesives containing up to 5% of nanocapsules and primer with no NCs maintained the in situ degree of conversion, contact angle, and immediate and long-term bond strengths. Therefore, the NC-loaded adhesive can be an alternative method for combining the bond performance and therapeutic effects. The use of an

  9. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  10. Fabrication of Nanostructures on Implantable Biomaterials for Biocompatibility Enhancement and Infection Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Luting

    An implant or implantable medical device, which is used to replace or restore the function of traumatized or degenerated tissues or organs, or acts as a fraction of or the whole biological structure, has been used in many different parts of the body for various applications (such as orthopedics, cardiovascular stents, or drug delivery systems for medical treatment). The best performance of the vast majority of implants is achieved when the biomaterial used promotes some biological activity (such as bone regeneration) while minimizing undesirable activity (such as infection, one of the most common reasons for the failure of many implants). The surface of the implant, through its interactions with proteins, bacteria and tissue forming cells, plays a critical role in the success or failure of the implant. Therefore, in this study, we sought to employ various nanofabrication techniques for tailoring implant surfaces to minimize bacteria and promote mammalian cell functions without using drugs. Titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) are commonly used biomaterials in orthopedic implants. Further surface modification is needed to support osseointegration while inhibiting bacteria attachment. Herein, temperature controlled atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized to provide unique nanostructured TiO2 coatings on commercial Ti. In vitro bacteria experiments revealed that the nano-TiO2 coatings showed promising antimicrobial efficacy towards Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and antibiotic-resistant bacteria ( MRSA). Impressively, cell results indicated that this nano-TiO 2 coating stimulated osteoblast (or bone forming cell) adhesion and proliferation while suppressing undesirable fibroblast functions. The same procedure was performed on PEEK and also resulted in enhanced osteoblast functions and produced antimicrobial properties. In another study, to isolate the effect of surface chemistry on cell and bacteria activities, a

  11. Tuneable nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrate for improved cellular adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Ariana M; Toth, Tyler D; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a novel technique using a reverse potential electrospinning mode for fabricating nanoparticle-embedded composites that can be tailored to represent various fiber diameters, surface morphologies, and functional groups necessary for improved cellular adhesion. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun in both traditional positive (PP) and reverse potential (RP) electrical fields. The fibers were incorporated with 300nm polystyrene (PS) fluorescent particles, which contained carboxyl, amine groups, and surfactants. In the unconventional RP, the charged colloidal particles and surfactants were shown to have an exaggerated effect on Taylor cone morphology and fiber diameter caused by the changes in charge density and surface tension of the bulk solution. The RP mode was shown to lead to a decrease in fiber diameter from 1200±100nm (diameter±SE) for the nanofibers made with PCL alone to 440±80nm with the incorporation of colloidal particles, compared to the PP mode ranging from 530±90nm to 350±50nm, respectively. The nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrates were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and evaluated for cellular viability and adhesion for up to 5 days. Adhesion to the nanofibrous substrates was improved by 180±10% with the addition of carboxylated particles and by 480±60% with the functionalization of an RGD ligand compared to the PCL nanofibers. The novel approach of electrospinning in the RP mode with the addition of colloids in order to alter charge density and surface tension could be utilized towards many applications, one being implantable biomaterials and tissue engineered scaffolds as demonstrated in this work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Injectable silk-based biomaterials for cervical tissue augmentation: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joseph E; Partlow, Benjamin P; Berman, Alison M; House, Michael D; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    Cerclage therapy is an important treatment option for preterm birth prevention. Several patient populations benefit from cerclage therapy including patients with a classic history of cervical insufficiency; patients who present with advanced cervical dilation prior to viability; and patients with a history of preterm birth and cervical shortening. Although cerclage is an effective treatment option in some patients, it can be associated with limited efficacy and procedure complications. Development of an alternative to cerclage therapy would be an important clinical development. Here we report on an injectable, silk protein-based biomaterial for cervical tissue augmentation. The rationale for the development of an injectable biomaterial is to restore the native properties of cervical tissue. While cerclage provides support to the tissue, it does not address excessive tissue softening, which is a central feature of the pathogenesis of cervical insufficiency. Silk protein-based hydrogels, which are biocompatible and naturally degrade in vivo, are suggested as a platform for restoring the native properties of cervical tissue and improving cervical function. We sought to study the properties of an injectable, silk-based biomaterial for potential use as an alternative treatment for cervical insufficiency. These biomaterials were evaluated for mechanical tunability, biocompatibility, facile injection, and in vitro degradation. Silk protein solutions were cross-linked by an enzyme catalyzed reaction to form elastic biomaterials. Biomaterials were formulated to match the native physical properties of cervical tissue during pregnancy. The cell compatibility of the materials was assessed in vitro using cervical fibroblasts, and biodegradation was evaluated using concentrated protease solution. Tissue augmentation or bulking was demonstrated using human cervical tissue from nonpregnant hysterectomy specimens. Mechanical compression tests measured the tissue stiffness as a

  13. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  14. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  15. Titanium biomaterials with complex surfaces induced aberrant peripheral circadian rhythms in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nathaniel; McCarville, Kirstin; Morinaga, Kenzo; Mengatto, Cristiane M; Langfelder, Peter; Hokugo, Akishige; Tahara, Yu; Colwell, Christopher S; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms maintain a high level of homeostasis through internal feed-forward and -backward regulation by core molecules. In this study, we report the highly unusual peripheral circadian rhythm of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) induced by titanium-based biomaterials with complex surface modifications (Ti biomaterial) commonly used for dental and orthopedic implants. When cultured on Ti biomaterials, human BMSCs suppressed circadian PER1 expression patterns, while NPAS2 was uniquely upregulated. The Ti biomaterials, which reduced Per1 expression and upregulated Npas2, were further examined with BMSCs harvested from Per1::luc transgenic rats. Next, we addressed the regulatory relationship between Per1 and Npas2 using BMSCs from Npas2 knockout mice. The Npas2 knockout mutation did not rescue the Ti biomaterial-induced Per1 suppression and did not affect Per2, Per3, Bmal1 and Clock expression, suggesting that the Ti biomaterial-induced Npas2 overexpression was likely an independent phenomenon. Previously, vitamin D deficiency was reported to interfere with Ti biomaterial osseointegration. The present study demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation significantly increased Per1::luc expression in BMSCs, though the presence of Ti biomaterials only moderately affected the suppressed Per1::luc expression. Available in vivo microarray data from femurs exposed to Ti biomaterials in vitamin D-deficient rats were evaluated by weighted gene co-expression network analysis. A large co-expression network containing Npas2, Bmal1, and Vdr was observed to form with the Ti biomaterials, which was disintegrated by vitamin D deficiency. Thus, the aberrant BMSC peripheral circadian rhythm may be essential for the integration of Ti biomaterials into bone.

  16. Peptide-functionalized poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] brushes on dopamine-coated stainless steel for controlled cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Guillermo R; Agarwal, Rachit; Collard, David M; García, Andrés J

    2017-09-01

    The modification of the surface of surgical implants with cell adhesion ligands has emerged as a promising approach to improve biomaterial-host interactions. However, these approaches are limited by the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules and uncontrolled presentation of desired bioactive ligands on implant surfaces. This leads to sub-optimal integration with host tissue and delayed healing. Here we present a strategy to grow non-fouling polymer brushes of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate by atom transfer radical polymerization from dopamine-functionalized clinical grade 316 stainless steel. These brushes prevent non-specific adsorption of proteins and attachment of cells. Subsequently, the brushes can be modified with covalently tethered adhesive peptides that provide controlled cell adhesion. This approach may therefore have broad application to promote bone growth and improvements in osseointegration. Stainless steel (SS) implants are widely used clinically for orthopaedic, spinal, dental and cardiovascular applications. However, non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto implant surfaces results in sub-optimal integration with host tissue. To allow controlled cell-SS interactions, we have developed a strategy to grow non-fouling polymer brushes that prevent protein adsorption and cell adhesion and can be subsequently functionalized with adhesive peptides to direct cell adhesion and signaling. This approach has broad application to improve osseointegration onto stainless steel implants in bone repair. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternative biomaterials: natural, non-woven, fibroin-based silk nanofibers of weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Sineenat; Maensiri, Santi

    2010-06-01

    Silks of silkworms and spiders have been widely studied as biomaterials, however, none has been reported on silks produced by weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina). This study is the first to report on some properties of natural silk fibers of weaver ants and their potential application as a cell matrix. Weaver ant fibrous mat contained non-woven mesh of fibers with diameters ranging from 266 to 3056 nm. The average diameter of fibers was 766+/-326 nm. The thickness, mass, and apparent density of the fibrous mats were 39.0+/-9.8 microm, 0.8+/-0.1 mg/cm2, and 0.22+/-0.03 g/cm3, respectively. Freshly made fibrous mats by weaver ants were highly hydrophilic as determined by water contact angle analysis, whereas older ones were quite hydrophobic. TG-DTA analysis revealed a major weight loss peak from 260 up to about 330 degrees C, similar to the decomposition peak of Bombyx mori fibroin. FT-IR spectrum showed amide I, amide II, amide III, C-H and C-O peaks, which were attributed to random coil and beta-sheet conformation in the protein structure of the weaver ant fibers. The fibrous mat was slight toxic to the fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells (37.8% cell death), probably due to some toxic particles deposited on the fibers. Nevertheless, weaver ant fibrous mat served as a good matrix for cell adhesion. Results of this work provided evidence for the properties and a potential application of natural weaver ant fibers as an alternative, natural, fibroin-based matrix. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of human collagen biomaterials in the healing of colonic anastomoses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, D; Aprahamian, M; Tiollier, J; Sonzini, P; Marescaux, J

    1997-04-01

    To investigate the ability of human collagen biomaterials to secure colonic anastomoses in dogs and to evaluate the biocompatibility of anastomotic protection patches (APP). Experimental open study. Experimental research centre, France. 21 mongrel dogs randomised into three groups of 7 each. Standard transverse colonic end-to-end anastomoses were secured with two-layer oxidised collagen I + III sponge covered with thin crosslinked collagen IV film (APP 1) glued around the suture (n = 7); two-layer oxidised collagen I + III sponge covered with thin non-crosslinked collagen I + III film patch (APP 2) (n = 7); or sealed by fibrin sealant (n = 7), which acted as a controls. Gross examination, radiological control (barium enemas), and microscopic examination on day 35 postoperatively. Gross clinical and radiological examinations on day 35 showed normal wound healing in all but one dog in which the anastomoses had occluded by day 16. There was significantly less stricturing with the APP 2 patch (p < 0.05 compared with the controls). Microscopic examination showed complete absorption of the APP 2 patches as well as quicker mucosal and extracellular matrix repair than controls. The APP 1 patch gave the best healing of the muscular layer but did not reduce anastomosis stricturing, and was not totally absorbed. Collagen supporting devices do not alter healing of the large bowel. Encircling patches do not increase the number of adhesions or the rate of anastomotic stricturing and a thin fibrillar collagen I + III dense layer may even improve it. The speed of absorption of the patch depends on the type of dense collagen film. These results argue for a prospective clinical evaluation in humans.

  19. Morphogenesis and tissue engineering of bone and cartilage: inductive signals, stem cells, and biomimetic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, A H

    2000-08-01

    Morphogenesis is the developmental cascade of pattern formation, body plan establishment, and the architecture of mirror-image bilateral symmetry of many structures and asymmetry of some, culminating in the adult form. Tissue engineering is the emerging discipline of design and construction of spare parts for the human body to restore function based on principles of molecular developmental biology and morphogenesis governed by bioengineering. The three key ingredients for both morphogenesis and tissue engineering are inductive signals, responding stem cells, and the extracellular matrix. Among the many tissues in the human body, bone has considerable powers for regeneration and is a prototype model for tissue engineering based on morphogenesis. Implantation of demineralized bone matrix into subcutaneous sites results in local bone induction. This model mimics sequential limb morphogenesis and permitted the isolation of bone morphogens. Although it is traditional to study morphogenetic signals in embryos, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), the inductive signals for bone, were isolated from demineralized bone matrix from adults. BMPs and related cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (CDMPs) initiate, promote, and maintain chondrogenesis and osteogenesis and have actions beyond bone. The symbiosis of bone inductive and conductive strategies are critical for tissue engineering, and is in turn governed by the context and biomechanics. The context is the microenvironment, consisting of extracellular matrix, which can be duplicated by biomimetic biomaterials such as collagens, hydroxyapatite, proteoglycans, and cell adhesion proteins including fibronectins. Thus, the rules of architecture for tissue engineering are an imitation of the laws of developmental biology and morphogenesis, and thus may be universal for all tissues, including bones and joints.

  20. Tunable green graphene-silk biomaterials: Mechanism of protein-based nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Jyothirmayee Aravind, S S; Wu, Hao; Forys, Joseph; Venkataraman, Venkat; Ramanujachary, Kandalam; Hu, Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Green graphene materials prepared by photoreduction of graphite oxide were first time blended with aqueous-based silk fibroin proteins to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of silk biomaterials, and their nanocomposite interaction mechanism was illustrated. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the complete exfoliation of graphite oxide to graphene in presence of focused pulses of solar radiation. By varying the concentration of graphene (0.1wt% to 10wt%), a series of free standing graphene-silk films were prepared and were systematically characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation measurements. The homogeneity of graphene in silk as well as the thermal stability of the composite films was demonstrated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC). Surprisingly, silk composite film containing only 0.5wt% of graphene gives the highest Young's modulus of 1.65GPa (about 5.8 times higher than the pure silk's modulus), indicating a nano-composite to micro-composite transition of silk-graphene structure occurred around this mixing ratio. This finding provided an easy approach to improve the elastic modulus and other physical properties of silk materials by adding a tiny amount of graphene sheets. Fibroblast cells studies also proved that these graphene-silk materials can significantly improve cell adhesion, growth and proliferation. This protein nanocomposite study provided a useful model to understand how to manipulate the hydrophobic-hydrophobic and polar-polar interactions between high-surface-area inorganic nanomaterials and amphiphilic protein materials, which has many emerging applications in the material science and engineering, such as bio-device fabrication, drug storage and release, and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses as potential biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shidan; Wei, Qin; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Bingliang; Chen, You; Sun, Yanfei

    2015-01-01

    A new series of Fe80-x-yCrxMoyP13C7 (x = 10, y = 10; x = 20, y = 5; x = 2 0, y = 10, all in at.%) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with the maximum diameter of 6mm have been developed for biomedical implant application by the combination method of fluxing treatment and J-quenching technique. The corrosion performance of the present Fe-based BMGs is investigated in both Hank's solution (pH = 7.4) and artificial saliva solution (pH = 6.3) at 37 °C by electrochemical measurements. The result indicates that the corrosion resistance of the present Fe-based BMGs in the above two simulated body solutions is much better than that of biomedical 316 L stainless steel (316 L SS), and approaching that of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy (TC4). The concentrations of Fe, Ni and Cr ions released into the Hank's solution and artificial saliva solution from the present Fe-based BMGs after potentiodynamic polarization are significant lower than that released from 316 L SS. The biocompatibility of the present Fe-based BMGs is evaluated through the in vitro test of NIH3T3 cells culture in the present Fe-based BMG extraction media for 1, 3 and 5 days. The result indicates that the present Fe-based BMGs exhibit no cytotoxicity to NIH3T3 cells. And the test result of the cell adhesion and growth on the surface of the samples indicates that the present Fe-based BMGs exhibit the better cell viability compared with 316 L SS and TC4 biomedical alloys. The present Fe-based BMGs, especially Fe55Cr20Mo5P13C7 BMG, exhibit good glass formation ability, the high corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility, suggesting their promising potential as biomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  3. Development of collagen peptide-based biomaterials for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Gordillo, Victor

    The transition from in vitro to in vivo use of stem cells in regenerative medicine requires biomaterial scaffolds that can maintain stem cell viability and at the same time allow cell differentiation. We have previously reported the design of a collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that assembles into a mesh-like three-dimensional (3D) structure upon the addition of metal ions and its potential for the culture of human cells. The addition of a chelating solution, such as EDTA, results in disassembly of the 3D structure, demonstrating the flexibility in the assembly/disassembly process. In the second chapter of this dissertation, we report the design of CMPs that can be functionalized with His-tagged cargoes within the 3D scaffold, via metal coordination. We show that the addition of GFP-His8 and human epidermal growth factor (hEGF-His6) has minimal effect in the assembly process. Additionally, we show that the bound hEGF-His6 can be released gradually in vitro for 5 days and induces cell proliferation in an EGF-dependent cell line. Furthermore, we functionalized the CMPs with the cell adhesion sequence (RGDS) to promote cell differentiation of two human non-tumorigenic cells lines, MCF10A and 3522-S1. In the third chapter, we evaluated the possibility of using the collagen mimetic-peptide-based (CMP) scaffolds for cell encapsulation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). We show that hMSC encapsulated within the CMP scaffold are viable for up to 24 days post encapsulation. Moreover, hMSC at days 1, 4 and 8 days after encapsulation can be recovered from the scaffold and retain their stemness properties when analyzed for in vitro differentiation. We also demonstrate by real time PCR (RT-PCR) that genes important for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation are over-expressed in the absence of stimulating factors when the cells are encapsulated in the 3D scaffold at 8 and 24 days post encapsulation. Lastly, the incorporation of the cell adhesion

  4. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  5. Self assembling bioactive materials for cell adhesion in tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Julia J.

    This work involved the study of biodegradable and biocompatible materials that have the potential to modify tissue engineering scaffolds through self assembly, generating multiple layers that deliver bioactivity. Diblock biomaterials containing cholesteryl moieties and oligomers of lactic acid units were found to form single crystals when precipitated from hot ethanol and smectic liquid crystalline phases when cast as a film. Cell culture experiments on these films with 3T3 and 3T6 fibroblasts indicated that these ordered materials form surfaces with specific chemistries that favored cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation suggesting the potential of mediating human tissue repair. The author believes the cholesteryl moieties found on the surface play a key role in determining cell behavior. Cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid) diblock molecules were then functionalized with moieties including vitamin Bx, cholesterol, and the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. An unstable activated ester between indomethacin and the diblock molecule resulted in the release of indomethacin into the culture medium which inhibited the proliferation of 3T3 fibroblasts. Finally, a series of molecules were designed to incorporate dendrons based on amino acids at the termini of the diblock structures. It was determined that lysine, a basic amino acid, covalently coupled to cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid) can promote cell adhesion and spreading while negatively charged and zwitterionic 2nd generation dendrons based on aspartic acid do not. Incorporation of the well known arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence, which is found in many adhesive proteins, to the dendrons imparted integrin-mediated cell adhesion as evidenced by the formation of stress fibers. We also explored the capacity of integrin receptors to bind to ligands that are not the linear form of RGD, but have R, G, and D spatially positioned to mimic the linear RGD environments. For this purpose, the arms of the 2 nd generation

  6. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  7. Structural adhesives directory and databook

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jo

    1996-01-01

    A worldwide directory of commercially available adhesive products for use in a wide range of engineering disciplines. Along with product names and suppliers, basic property data are tabulated and cross-referenced. The book is subdivided according to class of adhesive, with introductions to each class followed by comparison tables and datasheets for each adhesive. The datasheets contain detailed information, from product codes to environmental properties and are therefore of interest across a broad readership. Standardized data will aid the user in cross-comparison between different manufacturers and in easily identifying the required information.

  8. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  9. Adhesion of laser deposited films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhovannik, E.V.; Nikolaev, I.N.; Utochkin, Yu.A.; Stavkin, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The method of thin solid films (Ni, Cu, Al, Pd, Si, InSb, Ta 2 O 5 ) formation on different substrates (Cu, Fe, Si, SiO 2 , Ta 2 O 5 , carbon, glass, mica, teflon) with higher adhesion strength (∼ 10 7 Pa) without preliminary treatment of substrate surface was discribed. The method is based on laser evaporation of solid in vacuum. Adhesion was measured by means of a direct pull technique using a pin soldered to buffer film evaporated by laser on the investigated film. Possible reasons for higher adhesion of films fabricated by laser deposition were discussed. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  10. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  11. Biomaterials for revascularization and immunomodulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Agnes E; Maldonado-Lasuncion, Ines; Oudega, Martin

    2018-01-23

    Spinal cord injury causes immediate damage to the nervous tissue accompanied by loss of motor and sensory function. The limited self-repair competence of injured nervous tissue underscores the need for reparative interventions to recover function after spinal cord injury. The vasculature of the spinal cord plays a crucial role in spinal cord injury and repair. Ruptured and sheared blood vessels in the injury epicenter and blood vessels with a breached blood-spinal cord barrier in the surrounding tissue cause bleeding and inflammation, which contribute to the overall tissue damage. The insufficient formation of new functional vasculature in and near the injury impedes endogenous tissue repair and limits the prospect of repair approaches. Limiting the loss of blood vessels, stabilizing the blood-spinal cord barrier, and promoting the formation of new blood vessels are therapeutic targets for spinal cord repair. Inflammation is an integral part of injury-mediated vascular damage, with deleterious and reparative consequences. Inflammation and the formation of new blood vessels are intricately interwoven. Biomaterials can be effectively used for promoting and guiding blood vessel formation or modulating the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury, thereby governing the extent of damage and the success of reparative interventions. This review deals with the vasculature after spinal cord injury, the reciprocal interactions between inflammation and blood vessel formation, and the potential of biomaterials to support revascularization and immunomodulation in damaged spinal cord nervous tissue. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Teaching technological innovation and entrepreneurship in polymeric biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Newell R

    2011-01-01

    A model for incorporating an entrepreneurship module has been developed in an upper-division and graduate-level engineering elective on Polymeric Biomaterials (27-311/42-311/27-711/42-711) at Carnegie Mellon University. A combination of lectures, assignments, and a team-based project were used to provide students with a framework for applying their technical skills in the development of new technologies and a basic understanding of the issues related to translational research and technology commercialization. The specific approach to the project established in the course, which represented 20% of the students' grades, and the grading rubric for each of the milestones are described along with suggestions for generalizing this approach to different applications of biomaterials or other engineering electives. Incorporating this model of entrepreneurship into electives teaches students course content within the framework of technological innovation and many of the concepts and tools need to practice it. For students with situational or individual interest in the project, it would also serve to deepen their understanding of the traditional course components as well as provide a foundation for integrating technological innovation and lifelong learning. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Self-Assembly for the Synthesis of Functional Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Ortony, Julia H; Stupp, Samuel I

    2013-02-01

    The use of self-assembly for the construction of functional biomaterials is a highly promising and exciting area of research, with great potential for the treatment of injury or disease. By using multiple noncovalent interactions, coded into the molecular design of the constituent components, self-assembly allows for the construction of complex, adaptable, and highly tunable materials with potent biological effects. This review describes some of the seminal advances in the use of self-assembly to make novel systems for regenerative medicine and biology. Materials based on peptides, proteins, DNA, or hybrids thereof have found application in the treatment of a wide range of injuries and diseases, and this review outlines the design principles and practical applications of these systems. Most of the examples covered focus on the synthesis of hydrogels for the scaffolding or transplantation of cells, with an emphasis on the biological, mechanical, and structural properties of the resulting materials. In addition, we will discuss the distinct advantages conferred by self-assembly (compared with traditional covalent materials), and present some of the challenges and opportunities for the next generation of self-assembled biomaterials.

  14. Programming cancer through phase-functionalized silicon based biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Applications of biomaterials in cancer therapy has been limited to drug delivery systems and markers in radiation therapy. In this article, we introduce the concept of phase-functionalization of silicon to preferentially select cancer cell populations for survival in a catalyst and additive free approach. Silicon is phase-functionalized by the interaction of ultrafast laser pulses, resulting in the formation of rare phases of SiO2 in conjunction with differing silicon crystal lattices. The degree of phase-functionalization is programmed to dictate the degree of repulsion of cancer cells. Unstable phases of silicon oxides are synthesized during phase-functionalization and remain stable at ambient conditions. This change in phase of silicon as well as formation of oxides contributes to changes in surface chemistry as well as surface energy. These material properties elicit in precise control of migration, cytoskeleton shape, direction and population. To the best of our knowledge, phase-functionalized silicon without any changes in topology or additive layers and its applications in cancer therapy has not been reported before. This unique programmable phase-functionalized silicon has the potential to change current trends in cancer research and generate focus on biomaterials as cancer repelling or potentially cancer killing surfaces. PMID:26043430

  15. Cleaning of biomaterial surfaces: protein removal by different solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Fabian; Grass, Simone; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scheibe, Christian; Müller-Renno, Christine; Davoudi, Neda; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The removal of biofilms or protein films from biomaterials is still a challenging task. In particular, for research investigations on real (applied) surfaces the reuse of samples is of high importance, because reuse allows the comparison of the same sample in different experiments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of different solvents (SDS, water, acetone, isopropanol, RIPA-buffer and Tween-20) on five different biomaterials (titanium, gold, PMMA (no acetone used), ceramic, and PTFE) with different wettability which were covered by layers of two different adsorbed proteins (BSA and lysozyme). The presence of a protein film after adsorption was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment of the surfaces with the different solvents, the residual proteins on the surface were determined by BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid assay). Data of the present study indicate that SDS is an effective solvent, but for several protein-substrate combinations it does not show the cleaning efficiency often mentioned in literature. RIPA-buffer and Tween-20 were more effective. They showed very low residual protein amounts after cleaning on all examined material surfaces and for both proteins, however, with small differences for the respective substrate-protein combinations. RIPA-buffer in combination with ultrasonication completely removed the protein layer as confirmed by TEM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Complement inhibition in biomaterial- and biosurface-induced thromboinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Huang, Shan; Nilsson, Bo; Teramura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic medicine today includes a vast number of procedures involving the use of biomaterials, transplantation of therapeutic cells or cell clusters, as well as of solid organs. These treatment modalities are obviously of great benefit to the patient, but also present a great challenge to the innate immune system, since they involve direct exposure of non-biological materials, cells of non-hematological origin as well as endothelial cells, damaged by ischemia-perfusion in solid organs to proteins and cells in the blood. The result of such an exposure may be an inappropriate activation of the complement and contact/kallikrein systems, which produce mediators capable of triggering the platelets and PMNs and monocytes, which can ultimately result in thrombotic and inflammatory (i.e., a thrombo-inflammatory) response to the treatment modality. In this concept review, we give an overview of the mechanisms of recognition within the innate immunity system, with the aim to identify suitable points for intervention. Finally, we discuss emerging and promising techniques for surface modification of biomaterials and cells with specific inhibitors in order to diminish thromboinflammation and improve clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Applications of carbon nanotubes-based biomaterials in biomedical nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizu, Stefania; Savadogo, Oumarou; Poulin, Philippe; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2006-07-01

    One of the facets of nanotechnology applications is the immense opportunities they offer for new developments in medicine and health sciences. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have particularly attracted attention for designing new monitoring systems for environment and living cells as well as nanosensors. Carbon nanotubes-based biomaterials are also employed as support for active prosthesis or functional matrices in reparation of parts of the human body. These nanostructures are studied as molecular-level building blocks for the complex and miniaturized medical device, and substrate for stimulation of cellular growth. The CNTs are cylindrical shaped with caged molecules which can act as nanoscale containers for molecular species, well required for biomolecular recognition and drug delivery systems. Endowed with very large aspect ratios, an excellent electrical conductivity and inertness along with mechanical robustness, nanotubes found enormous applications in molecular electronics and bioelectronics. The ballistic electrical behaviour of SWNTs conjugated with functionalization promotes a large variety of biosensors for individual molecules. Actuative response of CNTs is considered very promising feature for nanodevices, micro-robots and artificial muscles. An description of CNTs based biomaterials is attempted in this review, in order to point out their enormous potential for biomedical nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology.

  18. Engineering the hematopoietic stem cell niche: Frontiers in biomaterial science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Sun; Mahadik, Bhushan P.; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) play a crucial role in the generation of the body’s blood and immune cells. This process takes place primarily in the bone marrow in specialized ‘niche’ microenvironments, which provide signals responsible for maintaining a balance between HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and lineage specification required for life-long hematopoiesis. While our understanding of these signaling mechanisms continues to improve, our ability to engineer them in vitro for the expansion of clinically relevant HSC populations is still lacking. In this review, we focus on development of biomaterials-based culture platforms for in vitro study of interactions between HSCs and their local microenvironment. The tools and techniques used for both examining HSC-niche interactions as well as applying these findings towards controlled HSC expansion or directed differentiation in 2D and 3D platforms are discussed. These novel techniques hold the potential to push the existing boundaries of HSC cultures towards high-throughput, real-time, and single-cell level biomimetic approaches that enable a more nuanced understanding of HSC regulation and function. Their application in conjunction with innovative biomaterial platforms can pave the way for engineering artificial bone marrow niches for clinical applications as well as elucidating the pathology of blood-related cancers and disorders. PMID:26356030

  19. Comparing Soy Flour Wood Adhesives to Purified Soy Protein Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    While economics dictate that soy-based wood adhesives be made with soy flour, much of the recent literature on soy-based wood adhesives has involved using soy protein isolate. The obvious assumption is that the additional carbohydrates in the flour but not in the isolate only serve as inert diluents. Our studies have shown that the isolate can provide 10 times the wet...

  20. Tailoring of new polymeric biomaterials for the repair of medium-sized corneal perforations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, MJ; Blaauwgeers, HGT; Kuijer, R; Jongsma, FHM; de Brabander, J; Nuijts, RMMA; Koole, LH

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymeric biomaterials can be designed such that they become suitable for surgical closure of medium-sized perforations in the cornea, the transparent tissue in the front of the eye. Such a biomaterial must meet stringent requirements in terms of

  1. Tissue response to a new type of biomaterial implanted subcutaneously in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Christensen, Lise; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov

    2011-01-01

    A new type of resorbable biomaterial intended for pelvic reconstruction was tested with respect to tissue regeneration and biocompatibility in rats. The biomaterial consisted of methoxypolyethyleneglycol-poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (MPEG-PLGA). Implants were pure, enriched with extra...

  2. Application of poly(trimethylene carbonate) and calcium phosphate composite biomaterials in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni

    2017-01-01

    This thesis has been dedicated to explore the feasibilities of applying composite biomaterials to bone reconstruction in jawbones and skulls. The composite biomaterials used in our studies are composed of a polymer matrix and various calcium phosphate particles. The polymer matrix is made of a

  3. Fatigue performance of additively manufactured meta-biomaterials : The effects of topology and material type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.M.; Hedayati, R.; Li, Y; Lietaert, K.; Tümer, N.; Fatemi, A.; Rans, C.D.; Pouran, B.; Weinans, H.H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques enable fabrication of bone-mimicking meta-biomaterials with unprecedented combinations of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties. The mechanical performance of AM meta-biomaterials is a direct function of their topological design. It is,

  4. Rationally designed meta-implants: a combination of auxetic and conventional meta-biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolken, H.M.A.; Janbaz, S.; Leeflang, M.A.; Lietaert, K.; Weinans, H.H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Rationally designed meta-biomaterials present unprecedented combinations of mechanical, mass transport, and biological properties favorable for tissue regeneration. Here we introduce hybrid meta-biomaterials with rationally-distributed values of negative (auxetic) and positive Poisson’s ratios, and

  5. New Models for Patient-specific Evaluation of the Effect of Biomaterials on Macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Grotenhuis (Nienke)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBiomaterials are often used in many fields of medicine to restore or replace tissue. These biomaterials always elicit a reaction of the immune system, called the foreign body reaction, which can lead to complications in patients and failure of the device. Macrophages are key players

  6. Engaging Undergraduates in an Interdisciplinary Program: Developing a Biomaterial Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jia-chi; Kung, Shieh-shiuh; Sun, Yi-ming

    2009-01-01

    Yuan Ze University targeted Biomaterials Science and developed a curriculum related to Biotechnology, Biochemical Engineering, and Biomaterials for engineering students to cultivate talents for both engineering and biotechnology. After several years of operation, recruiting students has succeeded, and students are satisfied with the course design…

  7. Predicting biomaterial property-dendritic cell phenotype relationships from the multivariate analysis of responses to polymethacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Peng Meng; Pallassana, Narayanan; Bowden, Rebeca; Cunningham, Barry; Joy, Abraham; Kohn, Joachim; Babensee, Julia E

    2012-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in orchestrating the host responses to a wide variety of foreign antigens and are essential in maintaining immune tolerance. Distinct biomaterials have been shown to differentially affect the phenotype of DCs, which suggested that biomaterials may be used to modulate immune response toward the biologic component in combination products. The elucidation of biomaterial property-DC phenotype relationships is expected to inform rational design of immuno-modulatory biomaterials. In this study, DC response to a set of 12 polymethacrylates (pMAs) was assessed in terms of surface marker expression and cytokine profile. Principal component analysis (PCA) determined that surface carbon correlated with enhanced DC maturation, while surface oxygen was associated with an immature DC phenotype. Partial square linear regression, a multivariate modeling approach, was implemented and successfully predicted biomaterial-induced DC phenotype in terms of surface marker expression from biomaterial properties with R(prediction)(2) = 0.76. Furthermore, prediction of DC phenotype was effective based on only theoretical chemical composition of the bulk polymers with R(prediction)(2) = 0.80. These results demonstrated that immune cell response can be predicted from biomaterial properties, and computational models will expedite future biomaterial design and selection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Progress in the studies of methods for testing cytotoxicity of dental biomaterial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanbo; Zhang, Wenyun

    2009-06-01

    The favorable biocompatibility of dental biomaterial is very important, which guarantees the safety and effectiveness of its clinical application. The cytotoxicity test, as one of the biological evaluation screening tests, is known to be an important and frequently used method to evaluate biocompatibility of biomaterials. This text is devoted to an overview of the cytotoxicity test for dental materials.

  9. Western blotting as a method for studying cell-biomaterial interactions : The role of protein collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, T.G.; Klein, CL; Kirkpatrick, CJ

    2001-01-01

    Research of cell-biomaterial interactions is building on knowledge and methods available in cell and molecular biology. Western blotting is one of the options to characterize protein expression in cell populations. Method transfer to biomaterial model systems is not trivial because of the structure

  10. Predicting biomaterial property-dendritic cell phenotype relationships from the multivariate analysis of responses to polymethacrylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Peng Meng; Pallassana, Narayanan; Bowden, Rebeca; Cunningham, Barry; Joy, Abraham; Kohn, Joachim; Babensee, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in orchestrating the host responses to a wide variety of foreign antigens and are essential in maintaining immune tolerance. Distinct biomaterials have been shown to differentially affect the phenotype of DCs, which suggested that biomaterials may be used to modulate immune response towards the biologic component in combination products. The elucidation of biomaterial property-DC phenotype relationships is expected to inform rational design of immuno-modulatory biomaterials. In this study, DC response to a set of 12 polymethacrylates (pMAs) was assessed in terms of surface marker expression and cytokine profile. Principal component analysis (PCA) determined that surface carbon correlated with enhanced DC maturation, while surface oxygen was associated with an immature DC phenotype. Partial square linear regression, a multivariate modeling approach, was implemented and successfully predicted biomaterial-induced DC phenotype in terms of surface marker expression from biomaterial properties with R2prediction = 0.76. Furthermore, prediction of DC phenotype was effective based on only theoretical chemical composition of the bulk polymers with R2prediction = 0.80. These results demonstrated that immune cell response can be predicted from biomaterial properties, and computational models will expedite future biomaterial design and selection. PMID:22136715

  11. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  12. Enhanced Cellular Adhesion on Titanium by Silk Functionalized with titanium binding and RGD peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Guillaume; Blanchi, Thomas; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Calabrese, Rossella; Rossi, Claire; Vigneron, Pascale; Duval, Jean-Luc; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on titanium represents a challenge for implantable materials. In order to improve adhesion at the cell/material interface we used a new approach based on the molecular recognition of titanium by specific peptides. Silk fibroin protein was chemically grafted with titanium binding peptide (TiBP) to increase adsorption of these chimeric proteins to the metal surface. Quartz Crystal Microbalance was used to quantify the specific adsorption of TiBP-functionalized silk and an increase in protein deposition by more than 35% was demonstrated due to the presence of the binding peptide. A silk protein grafted with TiBP and fibronectin-derived RGD peptide was then prepared. The adherence of fibroblasts on the titanium surface modified with the multifunctional silk coating demonstrated an increase in the number of adhering cells by 60%. The improved adhesion was demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunocytochemical staining of focal contact points. Chick embryo organotypic culture also revealed strong adhesion of endothelial cells expanding on the multifunctional silk-peptide coating. These results demonstrated that silk functionalized with TiBP and RGD represents a promising approach to modify cell-biomaterial interfaces, opening new perspectives for implantable medical devices, especially when reendothelialization is required. PMID:22975628

  13. Silk-Based Injectable Biomaterial as an Alternative to Cervical Cerclage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Asha J.; Socrate, Simona; Burke, Kelly A.; Norwitz, Errol R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: New therapies to prevent preterm birth are needed. Our objective was to study an injectable biomaterial for human cervical tissue as an alternative to cervical cerclage. Study Design: Human cervical tissue specimens were obtained from premenopausal gynecological hysterectomies for benign indications. A 3-part biomaterial was formulated, consisting of silk protein solution blended with a 2-part polyethylene glycol gelation system. The solutions were injected into cervical tissue and the tissue was evaluated for mechanical properties, swelling, cytocompatibility, and histology. Results: The stiffness of cervical tissue more than doubled after injection (P = .02). Swelling properties of injected tissue were no different than native tissue controls. Cervical fibroblasts remained viable for at least 48 hours when cultured on the biomaterial. Conclusions: We report a silk-based, biocompatible, injectable biomaterial that increased the stiffness of cervical tissue compared to uninjected controls. Animal studies are needed to assess this biomaterial in vivo. PMID:23271162

  14. Silk-based injectable biomaterial as an alternative to cervical cerclage: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Asha J; Socrate, Simona; Burke, Kelly A; Norwitz, Errol R; Kaplan, David L; House, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    New therapies to prevent preterm birth are needed. Our objective was to study an injectable biomaterial for human cervical tissue as an alternative to cervical cerclage. Human cervical tissue specimens were obtained from premenopausal gynecological hysterectomies for benign indications. A 3-part biomaterial was formulated, consisting of silk protein solution blended with a 2-part polyethylene glycol gelation system. The solutions were injected into cervical tissue and the tissue was evaluated for mechanical properties, swelling, cytocompatibility, and histology. The stiffness of cervical tissue more than doubled after injection (P = .02). Swelling properties of injected tissue were no different than native tissue controls. Cervical fibroblasts remained viable for at least 48 hours when cultured on the biomaterial. We report a silk-based, biocompatible, injectable biomaterial that increased the stiffness of cervical tissue compared to uninjected controls. Animal studies are needed to assess this biomaterial in vivo.

  15. Albumin removal from human fibrinogen preparations for manufacturing human fibrin-based biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available two component human fibrin sealants are commonly used to manufacture human fibrin-based biomaterials. However, this method is costly and allows little room for further tuning of the biomaterial. Human fibrinogen solutions offer a more cost-effective and versatile alternative to manufacture human fibrin-based biomaterials. Yet, human fibrinogen is highly unstable and contains certain impurities like human albumin. Within the context of biomaterials and tissue engineering we offer a simple yet novel solution based on classical biochemical techniques to significantly reduce albumin in human fibrinogen solutions. This method can be used for various tissue engineering and biomedical applications as an initial step in the manufacturing of human fibrin-based biomaterials to optimise their regenerative application.

  16. Adhesive capsulitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Anthony

    2011-02-15

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often self-limited, but can persist for years and may never fully resolve. The diagnosis is usually clinical, although imaging can help rule out other conditions. The differential diagnosis includes acromioclavicular arthropathy, autoimmune disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), biceps tendinopathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, neoplasm, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear (with or without impingement), and subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis. Several treatment options are commonly used, but few have high-level evidence to support them. Because the condition is often self-limited, observation and reassurance may be considered; however, this may not be acceptable to many patients because of the painful and debilitating nature of the condition. Nonsurgical treatments include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), oral prednisone, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Home exercise regimens and physical therapy are often prescribed. Surgical treatments include manipulation of the joint under anesthesia and capsular release.

  17. Foreign material in postoperative adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Luijendijk; D.C.D. de Lange (Diederik); C.C. Wauters; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.J. Duron; J.L. Pailler; B.R. Camprodon; L. Holmdahl; H.J. van Geldorp; J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The authors determined the prevalence of foreign body granulomas in intra-abdominal adhesions in patients with a history of abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional, multicenter, multinational study, adult patients with a

  18. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    silicone substrata. For both materials, significant variation among maternal families in the proportion of barnacles producing a thick adhesive plaque was observed, which suggests the presence of genetic variation, or maternal environmental effects...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical...

  20. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  1. Hyperspectral chemical imaging reveals spatially varied degradation of polycarbonate urethane (PCU) biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ronan M; Lawless, Bernard M; Burton, Hanna E; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Gowen, Aoife A

    2018-04-04

    Hyperspectral chemical imaging (HCI) is an emerging technique which combines spectroscopy with imaging. Unlike traditional point spectroscopy, which is used in the majority of polymer biomaterial degradation studies, HCI enables the acquisition of spatially localised spectra across the surface of a material in an objective manner. Here, we demonstrate that attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infra-red (ATR-FTIR) HCI reveals spatial variation in the degradation of implantable polycarbonate urethane (PCU) biomaterials. It is also shown that HCI can detect possible defects in biomaterial formulation or specimen production; these spatially resolved images reveal regional or scattered spatial heterogeneity. Further, we demonstrate a map sampling method, which can be used in time-sensitive scenarios, allowing for the investigation of degradation across a larger component or component area. Unlike imaging, mapping does not produce a contiguous image, yet grants an insight into the spatial heterogeneity of the biomaterial across a larger area. These novel applications of HCI demonstrate its ability to assist in the detection of defective manufacturing components and lead to a deeper understanding of how a biomaterial's chemical structure changes due to implantation. Statement of Signifance The human body is an aggressive environment for implantable devices and their biomaterial components. Polycarbonate urethane (PCU) biomaterials in particular were investigated in this study. Traditionally one or a few points on the PCU surface are analysed using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. However the selection of acquisition points is susceptible to operator bias and critical information can be lost. This study utilises hyperspectral chemical imaging (HCI) to demonstrate that the degradation of a biomaterial varies spatially. Further, HCI revealed spatial variations of biomaterials that were not subjected to oxidative degradation leading to the possibility of HCI being used in the

  2. Phenotype and polarization of autologous T cells by biomaterial-treated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H; Babensee, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T-cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T-cell phenotype was investigated. In this study, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T-cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pretreat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T-cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper (Th) types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels as compared with DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared with that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T-cell responses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  4. DMPD: The interrelated role of fibronectin and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedmacrophage function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16978691 The interrelated role of fibronectin and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedm...(.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The interrelated role of fibronectin and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedm...and interleukin-1 in biomaterial-modulatedmacrophage function. Authors Schmidt DR, Kao WJ. Publication Bioma

  5. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  6. Prevention of retrosternal adhesion by novel biocompatible glue derived from food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitani, Tetsuya; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Tadashi; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2013-11-01

    Postoperative retrosternal adhesion increases the risk of cardiac injury during cardiac reoperation. We created a novel biodegradable glue called "Lydex" that is derived from food additives. The purpose of this study is to evaluate this new biomaterial's biocompatibility and its preventive effect on retrosternal adhesion. We performed a median sternotomy and anterior pericardiectomy on Japanese white rabbits, and then closed the chest (control, group 1; n = 12), implanted an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane (group 2; n = 12), or applied Lydex (group 3; n = 12) before closure. After 4 weeks, we evaluated macroscopic adhesion (each group; n = 6) and microscopic findings for fibrosis and macrophage infiltration (each group; n = 6). In group 3, the retrosternal adhesion score was significantly lower than in group 1 (P = .0022). There was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3. The fibrotic area ratio was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (P < .001 vs group 1; P < .001 vs group 2). In group 3, the macrophage count was significantly lower than in group 2 (P < .001) and almost equal to that in group 1. Our findings indicate that Lydex reduces retrosternal adhesion and attenuates the progression of fibrosis with excellent biocompatibility. Lydex is a next-generation substance for safer cardiac reoperation, with excellent capability for preventing adhesion, biocompatible and biodegradable properties, and lower potential for viral infections related to human plasma or other animal-derived products. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  8. Improved adhesion and growth of human osteoblast-like MG 63 cells on biomaterials modified with carbon nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Grausová, Ľubica; Vacík, Jiří; Franczek, A.; Blazewicz, S.; Kromka, Alexander; Vaněček, Milan; Švorčík, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 12 (2007), s. 2133-2140 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/0225; GA ČR GA202/05/2233; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : fullerenes * nanotubes * diamond film Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.788, year: 2007

  9. Adhesion-mediated signal transduction in human articular chondrocytes: the influence of biomaterial chemistry and tenascin-C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Tahir A.; de Jong, Ruben; Riesle, J.U.; Langer, Robert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2004-01-01

    Chondrocyte ‘dedifferentiation’ involves the switching of the cell phenotype to one that no longer secretes extracellular matrix found in normal cartilage and occurs frequently during chondrocyte expansion in culture. It is also characterized by the differential expression of receptors and

  10. A new biomaterial of nanofibers with the microalga Spirulina as scaffolds to cultivate with stem cells for use in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, D; Lersch, M; Rosa, A; Scher, C; Crestani, T; Morais, M G; Costa, J A V; Pranke, P

    2013-04-01

    The association of stem cells (SCs) with biomaterials promises to be the protagonist for future regenerative medicine in the treatment of tissue and organ lesions. Stem cells were cultivated in scaffolds constructed by the electrospinning technique, using poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA) associated or not with Spirulina biomass (PDLLA/Sp), which has bioactive components of interest for tissue engineering (TE). Physicochemical analyses were performed, such as morphology, fiber diameter, degradability, residual solvent, roughness, contact angle with water, among others. SCs adhesion, proliferation and scaffold cytotoxicity were also evaluated. Nanofibers without beads and with characteristics similar to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) in terms of mechanical and topographical properties were obtained. In biological tests it was found that SCs adhered more and had greater viability in the PDLLA/Sp molds, when compared with the PDLLA scaffolds. The scaffolds were shown to be atoxic for the SCs. It can be concluded that the scaffolds developed in this work have the characteristics to be a new biomaterial suitable for use in TE.

  11. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments - conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan; Mahadevan; Santhosh, S

    2015-04-01

    The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm) Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial.

  13. Piezoelectric smart biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jaicy; More, Namdev; Kalia, Kiran; Kapusetti, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    Tissues like bone and cartilage are remodeled dynamically for their functional requirements by signaling pathways. The signals are controlled by the cells and extracellular matrix and transmitted through an electrical and chemical synapse. Scaffold-based tissue engineering therapies largely disturb the natural signaling pathways, due to their rigidity towards signal conduction, despite their therapeutic advantages. Thus, there is a high need of smart biomaterials, which can conveniently generate and transfer the bioelectric signals analogous to native tissues for appropriate physiological functions. Piezoelectric materials can generate electrical signals in response to the applied stress. Furthermore, they can stimulate the signaling pathways and thereby enhance the tissue regeneration at the impaired site. The piezoelectric scaffolds can act as sensitive mechanoelectrical transduction systems. Hence, it is applicable to the regions, where mechanical loads are predominant. The present review is mainly concentrated on the mechanism related to the electrical stimulation in a biological system and the different piezoelectric materials suitable for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Clinical study on orofacial photonic hydration using phototherapy and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Grandi, Natália D. P.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Grecco, Clovis; Lopes, Luciana A.

    2015-06-01

    Skin hydration is important to prevent aging and dysfunction of orofacial system. Nowadays, it is known that cutaneous system is linked to muscle system, then every dentist need to treat healthy facial skin, as lips, keeping orofacial functions healthy. Thirty-two patients were treated using laser and led therapy single or associated to biomaterials (dermo-cosmetics) searching for the best protocol to promote skin hydration. Using a peace of equipment to measure electric impedance, percentage of water and oil from skin, before and after different treatments were analyzed. Statistic tests using 5% and 0.1% of significance were applied and results showed that light could improve hydration of epidermis layer of facial skin. Considering just light effect, using infrared laser followed by blue led system is more effective to hydration than just blue led system application. Considering dermo-cosmetic and light, the association between both presented the best result.

  15. Advances in Porous Biomaterials for Dental and Orthopaedic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt F. Schilling

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The connective hard tissues bone and teeth are highly porous on a micrometer scale, but show high values of compression strength at a relatively low weight. The fabrication of porous materials has been actively researched and different processes have been developed that vary in preparation complexity and also in the type of porous material that they produce. Methodologies are available for determination of pore properties. The purpose of the paper is to give an overview of these methods, the role of porosity in natural porous materials and the effect of pore properties on the living tissues. The minimum pore size required to allow the ingrowth of mineralized tissue seems to be in the order of 50 µm: larger pore sizes seem to improve speed and depth of penetration of mineralized tissues into the biomaterial, but on the other hand impair the mechanical properties. The optimal pore size is therefore dependent on the application and the used material.

  16. Patterning biomaterials for the spatiotemporal delivery of bioactive molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMinardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of tissue engineering is to promote the repair of functional tissues. For decades, the combined use of biomaterials, growth factors, and stem cells has been at the base of several regeneration strategies. Among these, biomimicry emerged as a robust strategy to efficiently address this clinical challenge. Biomimetic materials, able to recapitulate the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix, are the materials of choice, for their biocompatibility and higher rate of efficacy. In addition, it has become increasingly clear that restoring the complex biochemical environment of the target tissue is crucial for its regeneration. Towards this aim, the combination of scaffolds and growth factors is required. The advent of nanotechnology significantly impacted the field of tissue engineering by providing new ways to reproduce the complex spatial and temporal biochemical patterns of tissues. This review will present the most recent approaches to finely control the spatiotemporal release of bioactive molecules for various tissue engineering applications.

  17. Patterning Biomaterials for the Spatiotemporal Delivery of Bioactive Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Laura; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is to promote the repair of functional tissues. For decades, the combined use of biomaterials, growth factors (GFs), and stem cells has been the base of several regeneration strategies. Among these, biomimicry emerged as a robust strategy to efficiently address this clinical challenge. Biomimetic materials, able to recapitulate the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix, are the materials of choice, for their biocompatibility and higher rate of efficacy. In addition, it has become increasingly clear that restoring the complex biochemical environment of the target tissue is crucial for its regeneration. Toward this aim, the combination of scaffolds and GFs is required. The advent of nanotechnology significantly impacted the field of tissue engineering by providing new ways to reproduce the complex spatial and temporal biochemical patterns of tissues. This review will present the most recent approaches to finely control the spatiotemporal release of bioactive molecules for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:27313997

  18. Neural engineering from advanced biomaterials to 3D fabrication techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, David

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the principles of advanced 3D fabrication techniques, stem cells and biomaterials for neural engineering. Renowned contributors cover topics such as neural tissue regeneration, peripheral and central nervous system repair, brain-machine interfaces and in vitro nervous system modeling. Within these areas, focus remains on exciting and emerging technologies such as highly developed neuroprostheses and the communication channels between the brain and prostheses, enabling technologies that are beneficial for development of therapeutic interventions, advanced fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting, photolithography, microfluidics, and subtractive fabrication, and the engineering of implantable neural grafts. There is a strong focus on stem cells and 3D bioprinting technologies throughout the book, including working with embryonic, fetal, neonatal, and adult stem cells and a variety of sophisticated 3D bioprinting methods for neural engineering applications. There is also a strong focus on b...

  19. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmaev, E.Z. E-mail: kurmaev@ifmlrs.uran.ru; Werner, J.P.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbaian, S.; Bach, M.; Ching, W.-Y.; Motozaki, W.; Otsuka, T.; Matsuya, S.; Endo, K.; Neumann, M

    2004-07-01

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B{sub 12} and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B{sub 12} is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair {pi}-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon K{alpha} emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO{sub 3} like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack.

  20. Polysaccharide-based biomaterials with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Coma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active packaging is one of the responses to the recent food-borne microbial outbreaks and to the consumer’s demand for high quality food and for packaging that is more advanced and creative than what is currently offered. Moreover, with the recent increase in ecological awareness associated with the dramatic decrease in fossil resources, research has turned towards the elaboration of more natural materials. This paper provides a short review of biomaterials exhibiting antimicrobial and antioxidant properties for applications in food preservation. The two main concepts of active biopackaging materials are briefly introduced. The different polysaccharides potentially used in packaging materials are then presented associated with a brief overview of research works related to biopackaging, exhibiting notably antimicrobial or antioxidant properties. Finally, future trends such as the release-on-demand of bioactive agents are discussed.