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Sample records for adherent human polymorphonuclear

  1. Purification and partial characterization of the b-type cytochrome from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutter, R.; van Schaik, M. L.; van Zwieten, R.; Wever, R.; Roos, D.; Hamers, M. N.

    1985-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes contain an oxidase system that can be activated to produce superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide. A nonmitochondrial b cytochrome, functioning in the generation of these oxygen species, has been purified to apparent homogeneity from human polymorphonuclear

  2. Neisseria gonorrhoeae suppresses the oxidative burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Criss, Alison K.; Seifert, H. Steven

    2008-01-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) results in a potent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-driven inflammatory response, but the mechanisms by which Gc withstands PMN attack are poorly defined. Here we report that Gc can suppress the PMN oxidative burst, a central component of the PMN antimicrobial arsenal. Primary human PMNs remained viable after exposure to liquid-grown, exponential-phase, opacity-associated protein (Opa)-negative Gc of strains FA1090 and MS11 but did not g...

  3. Bacterial metabolism of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, T C; Muller, M; Sztelma, K

    1992-05-01

    Evidence for transcellular bacterial metabolism of phagocyte-derived arachidonic acid was sought by exposing human blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, prelabelled with [3H]arachidonic acid, to opsonized, stationary-phase Pseudomonas aeruginosa (bacteria-to-phagocyte ratio of 50:1) for 90 min at 37 degrees C. Control leukocytes were stimulated with the calcium ionophore A23187 (5 microM) for 5 min. Radiochromatograms of arachidonic acid metabolites, extracted from A23187-stimulated cultures and then separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, revealed leukotriene B4, its omega-oxidation products, and 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid. In contrast, two major metabolite peaks, distinct from known polymorphonuclear leukocyte arachidonic acid products by high-performance liquid chromatography or by thin-layer chromatography, were identified in cultures of P. aeruginosa with [3H]arachidonic acid-labelled polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Respective chromatographic characteristics of these novel products were identical to those of two major metabolite peaks produced by incubation of stationary-phase P. aeruginosa with [3H]arachidonic acid. Production of the metabolites was dependent upon pseudomonal viability. UV spectral data were consistent with a conjugated diene structure. Metabolism of arachidonic acid by P. aeruginosa was not influenced by the presence of catalase, superoxide dismutase, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, or ferrous ions but was inhibited by carbon monoxide, ketoconazole, and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane. Our data suggest that pseudomonal metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived arachidonic acid occurs during phagocytosis, probably by enzymatic epoxidation and hydroxylation via an oxygenase. By this means, potential proinflammatory effects of arachidonic acid or its metabolites may be modulated by P. aeruginosa at sites of infection in vivo.

  4. Comparison of adherent and non-adherent staphylococci in the induction of polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, U; Espersen, F; Kharazmi, A

    1995-01-01

    The ability to consume complement and activate neutrophils was investigated for staphylococci adherent to silicone surfaces and non-adherent staphylococci. Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC 14990 and Staphylococcus aureus strain E 2371 were used in this study. The bacteria were allowed...... to adhere to silicone catheter segments for 2 h at 37 degrees C. Complement consumption was measured by reduction in serum haemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells. The induction of chemiluminescence was measured after opsonization of the staphylococci in 20% AB-positive human serum for 60 min...... the spontaneous chemiluminescence by the neutrophils. Inter-strain variation was found, but all strains induced about the same low chemiluminescence when adherent to the catheter segments. The reduction in inflammatory response caused by adherence of staphylococci to catheter segments may interfere...

  5. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L.

    1990-01-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes

  6. Neisseria gonorrhoeae suppresses the oxidative burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Alison K; Seifert, H Steven

    2008-11-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) results in a potent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-driven inflammatory response, but the mechanisms by which Gc withstands PMN attack are poorly defined. Here we report that Gc can suppress the PMN oxidative burst, a central component of the PMN antimicrobial arsenal. Primary human PMNs remained viable after exposure to liquid-grown, exponential-phase, opacity-associated protein (Opa)-negative Gc of strains FA1090 and MS11 but did not generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), even after bacterial opsonization. Liquid-grown FA1090 Gc expressing OpaB, an Opa protein previously correlated with PMN ROS production, elicited a minor PMN oxidative burst. PMN ROS production in response to Opa(-) and OpaB+ Gc was markedly enhanced if bacteria were agar-grown or if liquid-grown bacteria were heat-killed. Liquid-grown Opa(-) Gc inhibited the PMN oxidative burst elicited by isogenic dead bacteria, formylated peptides or Staphylococcus aureus but did not inhibit PMN ROS production by OpaB+ Gc or phorbol esters. Suppression of the oxidative burst required Gc-PMN contact and bacterial protein synthesis but not phagocytosis. These results suggest that viable Gc directly inhibits PMN signalling pathways required for induction of the oxidative burst, which may contribute to gonococcal pathogenesis during inflammatory stages of gonorrhoeal disease.

  7. Histamine, dithiaden and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosáľ, R.; Drábiková, K.; Jančinová, V.; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, Suppl. 1 (2003), s. S19-S20 ISSN 1023-3830 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 198 Grant - others:VEGA SR(SK) 2/1012/21 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : dithiaden * histamine * polymorphonuclear leukocytes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.498, year: 2003

  8. Subcellular distribution of nitroblue tetrazolium reductase (NBT-R) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, R L

    1975-11-01

    Subcellular distribution study of cytoplasmic organelles was performed on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after homogenization in 0.34 molar sucrose by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the homogenate. The whole homogenate and each fraction was assayed for nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reductase with and without 1 mM potassium cyanide, and the distribution of this enzyme was compared to the distribution of lysozyme, peroxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and acid and alkaline phosphatase. Enzyme recovery was 97 per cent and ranged between 74 and 124 per cent. Latent activity of all enzymes except NBT-reductase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated by observing a four- to sixfold increase in activity after the addition of Triton-X 100. Maximal relative specific activity using either DPNH or without cyanide for NBT-reductase was found in the 100,000 x g differential centrifugation fraction and was concentrated in the less dense top fraction of the sucrose density gradient. The distribution pattern was similar to acid and alkaline phosphatase. In contrast, the maximal concentration of beta-glucuronidase and peroxidase was found in the heavier 7,200 x g granule fraction and in the more dense bottom fractions of the sucrose density gradient. Maximal lysozyme activity was concentrated in the 30,000 x g granule fraction and in the fractions located between the heaviest and lightest fractions of the sucrose density gradient. The lack of latent activity and the similarity of subcellular distribution of NBT-reductase to acid and alkaline phosphatase, two enzymes associated with microsomes and plasmalemal membranes in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), indicates that NBT-reductase is also a nonlysosomal enzyme located in microsomes or in plasmalemal membranes. These findings support the previously described histochemical observations that initial reduction of NBT to formazan occurs on the PMN plasmalemal surface membrane at

  9. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes. Preincubation of neutrophils with L. pneumophila sonicate did not affect phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes, whereas Listeria killing was significantly inhibited at sonicate concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/ml. The phenol phase of a phenol-water extraction, containing most...... of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), had no inhibitory effect on the listericidal activity of neutrophils. Killing of Listeria by monocytes was inhibited in a similar manner. The inhibitory activity was mainly recovered in the sonicate fraction above 100 kDa, suggesting that components organized in larger molecular complexes...... are most likely to represent the inhibitory factors. The inhibitory activity of L. pneumophila sonic extract appears to be related to inhibition of killing mechanisms since uptake of Listeria was not affected by the sonicate. Our observations indicate that as Legionella infection progresses, bacterial...

  11. In vitro phagocytosis of methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, N.; Tahir, R.; Abbas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacterium that causes a number of diseases such as abscesses, infective endocarditis, septic arthritis, etc. It is acquiring resistance against many antibiotics like methicillin; therefore its control is becoming increasingly difficult. Peripheral blood phagocytes particularly polymorphonuclear leucocytes play an important role in the protective mechanisms against these organisms. Phagocytes interact with bacteria and phagocytose these microorganisms to kill them. Phenotypically different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) were collected from various hospitals of Lahore, Pakistan. Fresh polymorphonuclaer leucocytes were obtained from healthy individuals by centrifugation using Ficol-Hypaque gradient combined with dextran sedimentation. Microbiological method was used for the determination of phagocytic index of phenotypic variants of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant difference was observed between the phagocytic index of both bacterial groups. MSSA group showed the Mean+-SD of 79.46%+-3.9 while MRSA group showed 72.35%+-2.5. Significant difference in phagocytic index indicates that it can be one of the mechanisms of MRSA to evade host immune system as compare to MSSA. (author)

  12. Effects of 60Co gamma radiation on defense function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Sumiko; Suzuki, Kazuo; Sakatani, Tatsuichiro; Brooks, G.T.; Fujikura, Toshio.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of radiation on defense function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were studied following irradiation with 60 Co γ radiation (30 - 3,000 rad) using PMN separated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. The migration distances for all three measures of chemotaxis to fMet-Leu-Phe (10 -8 M), chemokinesis induced by fMet-Leu-Phe, and random migration tended to decrease with increasing dose, showing 0.0054 μm/rad (p -5 M) in conjunction with cytochalasin B (CB, 5 μg/ml) there was a significant dose trend, showing the dose effects of decreasing 0.0022 % release/rad for BGL and 0.0030 % release/rad for LYZ with increasing dose. In superoxide anion (O 2 - ) production, a slight and marginally significant linear dose trend was found. These results suggest that the defense function of PMN is not so resistant to radiation as predicted from the fact that PMN in the peripheral blood are differentiated and mature. It is thought that radiation inflicts substantially harmful effects on the defense function of peripheral PMN. (author)

  13. Possible in vivo tolerance of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil to low-grade exercise-induced endotoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Camus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the question of whether translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the blood could be involved in the process of exercise-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN activation, 12 healthy male subjects who took part in a sprint triathlon (1.5 km river swim, 40 km bicycle race, 10 km road race were studied. While there was no detectable amount of endotoxin in the blood samples drawn at rest, exercise was followed by the appearance of circulating endotoxin molecules at the end of competition in four subjects, and after one and 24 h recovery in three and seven athletes, respectively. The concentrations of plasma granulocyte myeloperoxidase ([MPO], were significantly higher immediately after exercise and one hour later than baseline values (P<0.001. This variable returned to pre-race levels the day after exercise, despite the presence of detectable amounts of LPS, at that time, in seven athletes. The absence of significant correlation (r=0.26;P=0.383 and temporal association between [MPO]and plasma endotoxin levels led us to conclude that endotoxaemia was not involved in the process of exercise-induced PMN degranulation observed in our subjects.

  14. Genome-wide protective response used by group A Streptococcus to evade destruction by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyich, Jovanka M; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Braughton, Kevin R; Kobayashi, Scott D; Lei, Benfang; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Dorward, David W; Musser, James M; DeLeo, Frank R

    2003-02-18

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) evades polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) phagocytosis and killing to cause human disease, including pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating syndrome). We show that GAS genes differentially regulated during phagocytic interaction with human PMNs comprise a global pathogen-protective response to innate immunity. GAS prophage genes and genes involved in virulence, oxidative stress, cell wall biosynthesis, and gene regulation were up-regulated during PMN phagocytosis. Genes encoding novel secreted proteins were up-regulated, and the proteins were produced during human GAS infections. We discovered an essential role for the Ihk-Irr two-component regulatory system in evading PMN-mediated killing and promoting host-cell lysis, processes that would facilitate GAS pathogenesis. Importantly, the irr gene was highly expressed during human GAS pharyngitis. We conclude that a complex pathogen genetic program circumvents human innate immunity to promote disease. The gene regulatory program revealed by our studies identifies previously undescribed potential vaccine antigens and targets for therapeutic interventions designed to control GAS infections.

  15. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-01-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. [ 3 H]Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes

  16. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  17. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Lab., Rahway, NJ (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  18. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - Gi complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K d of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the α and β subunits of G i , respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects

  19. Identification of a second putative receptor of platelet activating factor on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    Due to multiple molecular species of platelet activating factor (PAF) and the existence of high affinity binding sites in a variety of cells and tissues, possible existence of PAF receptor subtypes has been suggested. This report shows differences between specific PAF receptors on human leukocytes and platelets. Human PMN leukocyte membranes showed high affinity binding sites for PAF with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 4.7 (+/- 1.4) x 10 -10 M. The maximal number (B/sub max/) of receptor sites was estimated to be 3.13 (+/- 1.4) x 10 -13 mol/mg protein. They compared the relative potencies of several PAF agonists and receptor antagonists between human platelet and human leukocyte membranes. One antagonist (Ono-6240) was found to be 8 times less potent at inhibiting the [ 3 H]PAF specific receptor binding to human leukocytes than to human platelets. Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and K + ions potentiated the [ 3 H]PAF specific binding in both systems. Na + ions inhibited the [ 3 H]PAF specific binding to human platelets but showed no effects in human leukocytes. K + ions decreased the Mg 2+ -potentiated [ 3 H]PAF binding in human leukocytes but showed no effects in human platelets. These results suggest that the PAF specific receptors in human leukocytes are different structurally and possibly functionally from the receptors identified in human platelets

  20. Superoxide radical-scavenging effects from polymorphonuclear leukocytes and toxicity in human cell lines of newly synthesized organic selenium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Koketsu, Mamoru; Kato, Masahiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2007-12-01

    Synthetic organic selenium compounds such as 2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one may show glutathione peroxidase-like antioxidant activity. Recently, we synthesized new organic selenium compounds that are thought to be effective antioxidants. To study their possible applications as antioxidants, we evaluated two selenoureas, N,N-dimethylselenourea and 1-selenocarbamoylpyrrolidine, and two tertiary selenoamides, N-(phenylselenocarbonyl)-piperidine and N,N-diethyl-4-chloroselenobenzamide, for their superoxide radical (O2-)-scavenging effects and toxicity. We measured (O2-)-scavenging effects in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) with a specific, sensitive and real-time kinetic chemiluminescence method. Furthermore, the toxicity of these compounds was measured in some human cell lines and PMNs using the tetrazolium method. Hydrogen peroxide was measured by a scopoletin method. Finally, translocation of an NADPH oxidase component, p47 phagocyte oxidase, to the cell membrane was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. N,N-Dimethylselenourea and 1-selenocarbamoylpyrrolidine effectively scavenged (O2-) released from 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated PMNs, and the 50% inhibitory concentrations were 6.8 +/- 2.2 and 6.5 +/- 2.5 microm, respectively. N-(Phenylselenocarbonyl)-piperidine and N,N-diethyl-4-chloroselenobenzamide also effectively scavenged (O2-) from PMNs, and the 50% inhibitory concentrations were 11.3 +/- 4.8 and 20.3 +/- 6.4 microm, respectively. Selenoureas showed very low toxicity in human cell lines and PMNs, even at high concentrations, whereas tertiary selenoamides were cytotoxic. These compounds did not produce significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide from 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated PMNs. None of the compounds significantly affected the translocation of p47 phagocyte oxidase. Selenoureas acted as effective antioxidants and showed low toxicity in some human cells. Thus, these compounds might be new

  1. The production of collagenase by adherent mononuclear cells cultured from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J S; Weiss, J; Ryhänen, L; Nies, K M; Rantala-Ryhänen, S; Uitto, J

    1984-12-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and the cells adherent to plastic substrata were cultured in serum-free media supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate. These cell cultures, which consisted predominantly of monocyte-macrophages as judged by nonspecific esterase staining, accumulated collagenase in the medium. This collagenase resembled other vertebrate collagenases in that it cleaved native triple-helical type I collagen at a locus 3/4-length away from the amino-terminal end of the molecule. The collagenase activity was inhibited by Na2EDTA, dithiothreitol, and fetal calf serum, while the addition of Ca++ or N-ethylmaleimide enhanced the enzyme activity. The accumulation of collagenase in the culture media was markedly enhanced by the incubation of cells with concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate. In the presence of cycloheximide, the levels of collagenase activity were markedly reduced, suggesting that active protein synthesis was required to express the enzyme activity. In additional experiments, monocytes were further purified by counterflow centrifugation-elutriation. The collagenase production was markedly increased in cultures enriched in monocyte-macrophages and devoid of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The accumulation of collagenase in monocyte cultures incubated for 48 hours in the presence of concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate was of the same order of magnitude as in parallel cultures containing the same number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and Plasmagel sedimentation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY Antibodies Induce Specific Bacterial Aggregation and Internalization in Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are essential cellular constituents in the innate host response, and their recruitment to the lungs and subsequent ubiquitous phagocytosis controls primary respiratory infection. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive pulmonary decline...... governed by a persistent, exaggerated inflammatory response dominated by PMNs. The principal contributor is chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection, which attracts and activates PMNs and thereby is responsible for the continuing inflammation. Strategies to prevent initial airway colonization...

  3. Insight into the molecular basis of pathogen abundance: group A Streptococcus inhibitor of complement inhibits bacterial adherence and internalization into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Nancy P; Ireland, Robin M; DeLeo, Frank R; Gowen, Brian B; Dorward, David W; Voyich, Jovanka M; Liu, Mengyao; Burns, Eugene H; Culnan, Derek M; Bretscher, Anthony; Musser, James M

    2002-05-28

    Streptococcal inhibitor of complement (Sic) is a secreted protein made predominantly by serotype M1 Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which contributes to persistence in the mammalian upper respiratory tract and epidemics of human disease. Unexpectedly, an isogenic sic-negative mutant adhered to human epithelial cells significantly better than the wild-type parental strain. Purified Sic inhibited the adherence of a sic negative serotype M1 mutant and of non-Sic-producing GAS strains to human epithelial cells. Sic was rapidly internalized by human epithelial cells, inducing cell flattening and loss of microvilli. Ezrin and moesin, human proteins that functionally link the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, were identified as Sic-binding proteins by affinity chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Sic colocalized with ezrin inside epithelial cells and bound to the F-actin-binding site region located in the carboxyl terminus of ezrin and moesin. Synthetic peptides corresponding to two regions of Sic had GAS adherence-inhibitory activity equivalent to mature Sic and inhibited binding of Sic to ezrin. In addition, the sic mutant was phagocytosed and killed by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes significantly better than the wild-type strain, and Sic colocalized with ezrin in discrete regions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The data suggest that binding of Sic to ezrin alters cellular processes critical for efficient GAS contact, internalization, and killing. Sic enhances bacterial survival by enabling the pathogen to avoid the intracellular environment. This process contributes to the abundance of M1 GAS in human infections and their ability to cause epidemics.

  4. Promotion of DNA strand breaks in cocultured mononuclear leukocytes by protein kinase C-dependent prooxidative interactions of benoxaprofen, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalb, G.; Beyers, A.D.; Anderson, R.; Nel, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    At concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and greater the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug benoxaprofen caused dose-related activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Benoxaprofen-mediated activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence by PMNL was increased by UV radiation and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by the selective protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. To identify the molecular mechanism of the prooxidative activity of benoxaprofen, the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug on the activity of purified protein kinase C in a cell-free system were investigated. Benoxaprofen caused a dose-related activation of protein kinase C by interaction with the binding site for the physiological activator phosphatidylserine, but could not replace diacylglycerol. When autologous mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) were cocultured with PMNL and benoxaprofen in combination, but not individually, the frequency of DNA strand breaks in MNL was markedly increased. UV radiation significantly potentiated damage to DNA mediated by benoxaprofen and PMNL. Inclusion of superoxide dismutase, H-7, and, to a much lesser extent, catalase during exposure of MNL to benoxaprofen-activated PMNL prevented oxidant damage to DNA. These results clearly demonstrate that potentially carcinogenic prooxidative interactions, which are unlikely to be detected by conventional assays of mutagenicity, may occur between phagocytes, UV radiation, and certain pharmacological agents

  5. Phorbol ester up-regulates capacities for nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase in Mono Mac 6 cells and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, O; Klemm, J; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-04-15

    The leukotrienes are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. It was demonstrated that the priming of leukocytes with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) leads to the increased formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products in parallel with the increased association of 5-LO with the nucleus and the activation of kinases that can phosphorylate 5-LO in vitro. Stimulation of the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6 with calcium ionophore gave low 5-LO product formation and no detectable redistribution of 5-LO. However, after priming of Mono Mac 6 cells with phorbol esters, ionophore led to the association of 45% to 75% of cellular 5-LO with the nuclear membrane, to 5-LO kinase activation, to enhanced release of arachidonate, and to substantial leukotriene synthesis. Similar results were obtained for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes stimulated with low-dose ionophore. In addition, for each cell type, PMA priming up-regulated leukotriene biosynthesis in the presence of exogenous arachidonic acid. A protein kinase inhibitor, calphostin C, reduced the association of 5-LO with the nucleus and 5-LO kinase activity, and the formation of 5-LO products was inhibited. These results suggest that PMA up-regulates leukotriene biosynthesis not only by increasing the release of endogenous arachidonate, but also by increasing the capacity for 5-LO phosphorylation and for the translocation of 5-LO to the nucleus in leukocytes.

  6. Ability of goat milk to modulate healthy human peripheral blood lymphomonocyte and polymorphonuclear cell function: in vitro effects and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirillo, F; Martemucci, G; D'Alessandro, A G; Panaro, M A; Cianciulli, A; Superbo, M; Jirillo, E; Magrone, T

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro effects of goat's milk from different sources (Jonica, Saanen, and Priska breeds plus a commercial preparation) on healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated in terms of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine release. According to the incubation time (24 h or 48 h) used all milks could induce release of NO from monocytes. In this context, however, in the presence of a commercial milk preparation inhibition of lypopolysaccharide (LPS)-induce NO generation was evident. Also polymorphonuclear cells stimulated with the various milks released detectable amounts of NO. In the case of Priska milk inhibition of LPS-mediated NO generation was observed. Despite a broad array of cytokines tested [Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-alpha, Transforming Growth Factor-beta and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor] only IL-10, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were released by PBMCs upon stimulation with various milks. Taken together, these data indicate that goat's milk for its capacity to produce NO may exert a cardioprotective and anti-atherogenic effect in consumers. Moreover, induction of proinflammatory (TNF-alpha and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines suggests the ability of this milk to maintain immune homeostasis in the immunocompromised host (e.g., aged people).

  7. Human severe sepsis cytokine mixture increases β2-integrin-dependent polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion to cerebral microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Chris; Deller, Brittany L; Fraser, Douglas D; Patterson, Eric K; Martin, Claudio M; Young, Bryan; Liaw, Patricia C; Yazdan-Ashoori, Payam; Ortiz, Angelica; Webb, Brian; Kilmer, Greg; Carter, David E; Cepinskas, Gediminas

    2015-04-07

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a state of acute brain dysfunction in response to a systemic infection. We propose that systemic inflammation during sepsis causes increased adhesion of leukocytes to the brain microvasculature, resulting in blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Thus, our objectives were to measure inflammatory analytes in plasma of severe sepsis patients to create an experimental cytokine mixture (CM), and to use this CM to investigate the activation and interactions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and human cerebrovascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) in vitro. The concentrations of 41 inflammatory analytes were quantified in plasma obtained from 20 severe sepsis patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls employing an antibody microarray. Two CMs were prepared to mimic severe sepsis (SSCM) and control (CCM), and these CMs were then used for PMN and hCMEC/D3 stimulation in vitro. PMN adhesion to hCMEC/D3 was assessed under conditions of flow (shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2)). Eight inflammatory analytes elevated in plasma obtained from severe sepsis patients were used to prepare SSCM and CCM. Stimulation of PMN with SSCM led to a marked increase in PMN adhesion to hCMEC/D3, as compared to CCM. PMN adhesion was abolished with neutralizing antibodies to either β2 (CD18), αL/β2 (CD11α/CD18; LFA-1) or αM/β2 (CD11β/CD18; Mac-1) integrins. In addition, immune-neutralization of the endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cell adhesion molecule, ICAM-1 (CD54) also suppressed PMN adhesion. Human SSCM up-regulates PMN pro-adhesive phenotype and promotes PMN adhesion to cerebrovascular endothelial cells through a β2-integrin-ICAM-1-dependent mechanism. PMN adhesion to the brain microvasculature may contribute to SAE.

  8. Isolation of human spontaneous killer lymphocytes by bacterial adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, R; De Boer, K P; Teodorescu, M

    1980-01-01

    Human lymphocyte subpopulations (B, T1, T2, T3, and T4 our denomination) have been identified previously by bacterial adherence and differences between them in mitogen responses and specific cytotoxic activity have been found. In this study another aspect has been investigated in order to find functions associated with these subpopulations, namely the spontaneous killing (SK) ability. Freshly isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were separated into adherent and non-adherent cells following centrifugation against various bact:rial monolayers. The PBL and the resulting subpopulations of PBL were tested alone or in combination as effector cells in a 4 hr cytotoxicity assay against human lymphoblastoid cel- lines of B or T cell origin. The T3 + T4 cells or T4 cells alone showed a significantly higher SK activity against both B and T target cell lines when compared with unseparated PBL, T1 + T2, or T3 cells alone. Whe Fc portion of IgG, contain the lymphocytes responsible for SK activity and that SK cells can be purified by negative selection using bacterial adherence. PMID:7389207

  9. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    OpenAIRE

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  10. Effect of stress doses of hydrocortisone on S-100B vs. interleukin-8 and polymorphonuclear elastase levels in human septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussack, Thomas; Briegel, Josef; Schelling, Gustav; Biberthaler, Peter; Jochum, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Stress doses of hydrocortisone are known to have immunomodulatory effects in patients with hyperdynamic septic shock. The prognosis correlates with the presence and severity of septic encephalopathy. However, neurological evaluation is influenced by the use of analgesia sedation during artificial ventilation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effect of stress doses of hydrocortisone during the initial phase of human septic shock on the serum values of the neurospecific protein S-100B in comparison to the inflammation markers interleukin (IL)-8 in serum and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase in plasma. A total of 24 consecutive patients, who met the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine criteria for septic shock, were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, single-center trial. The severity of illness at recruitment was graded using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II scoring systems. Multi-organ dysfunction syndrome was described by the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. All patients were prospectively randomized to receive either stress doses of hydrocortisone or placebo. Hydrocortisone was started in 12 patients with a loading dose of 100 mg and followed by a continuous infusion of 0.18 mg/kg/h for 6 days. Median S-100B serum levels of the hydrocortisone group decreased from 0.32 ng/mL at study entry to 0.07 ng/mL 6 days later without significant differences compared to the placebo group. Initial IL-8 serum levels were significantly higher in the hydrocortisone group up to 12 h after study entry, and significantly decreased from 715 to 17 pg/mL at the end of the observation period. Median PMN elastase plasma levels were not affected by hydrocortisone infusion. Patients with initial S-100B serum levels > 0.50 ng/mL revealed significantly higher SOFA scores up to 30 h, IL-8 serum levels up to 12 h, and PMN elastase plasma

  11. The effect of stainless steel, cobalt-chromium, titanium alloy, and titanium on the respiratory burst activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A; Tsukayama, D T; Wicklund, B H; Bechtold, J E; Merritt, K; Peterson, P K; Gustilo, R B

    1992-07-01

    Although infection is a serious complication associated with the use of orthopedic prosthetic implants, the impact of the metal used in these devices on host defense is poorly understood. The authors investigated the effect of stainless steel, titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy on the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), a vital component of bactericidal activity. In the presence of stainless steel powder or supernatants obtained from the incubation of stainless steel in buffer, superoxide production by PMN was significantly impaired. Titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-chrome alloy had no significant effect on superoxide production. Nickel and chromium, the only metal ions detectable in the stainless steel supernatant, did not impair superoxide production when tested at concentrations similar to those found in the supernatant. Inhibition of PMN superoxide production may play a role in the establishment and persistence of stainless steel device-related infections.

  12. Adherence of oral streptococci to keratinized and nonkeratinized human oral epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sklavounou, A; Germaine, G R

    1980-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus salivarius to adhere to keratinized versus nonkeratinized human oral epithelial cells was compared. S. mitis and S. salivarius exhibited significantly greater adherence to keratinized cells than to nonkeratinized cells. S. mutans and S. sanguis adhered equally well to either epithelial cell type. It is concluded that keratinization of epithelial cells may be a significant factor in the adherence...

  13. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  14. Metabolism of phospholipids by polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsbach, P.; Berg, J.W.O. van den; Bosch, H. van den; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1965-01-01

    By incubating homogenates of polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained from rabbit-peritoneal exudates with various 32P-labeled phosphoglycerides the following reactions were identified: Lecithin → Lysolecithin and fatty acid (1) Lysolecithin → Glycerylphosphorylcholine and fatty acid (2) Lysolecithin →

  15. Characterization of Influenza Virus-Induced Leukocyte Adherence to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    with other viruses. HL-60 cell adherence to endothelial cell virus type A, which did not infect human venous or bovine monolayers was modulated by...LEUCOCYTE ADHERENC:E TO [NDOTIIELIL (FS1% A. B reawsd on parainfluenza virus-infected airway epithelial Poiy-iiysine Codled IPLC) Wells PLC.Wells cells...an antibody against ICAN1- I has no significant effect PLC Wells Virus on parainfluenza -induced neutrophil adherence (58). In 25 *HSV-intected HUVEC

  16. The relationship between human dignity and medication adherence in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininasab, Seyedeh Somayeh; Azimi Lolaty, Hamideh; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Shafipour, Vida

    2017-01-01

    Medication adherence is a behavior that is influenced by several factors, and maintaining patients' dignity is an important issue that needs to be considered in the course of treatment . The present study aimed to determine the relationship between human dignity and medication adherence in patients with heart failure. This was a cross-sectional study. A total number of 300 patients with heart failure admitted to the Mazandaran Heart Center, Iran, participated in this study by census. Samples were selected based on inclusion criteria such as an HF diagnosis by a cardiologist for a minimum of 6 months, and taking at least one cardiac medication. Data were collected through demographic, clinical, human dignity, and medication adherence questionnaires over a period of three months in 2016. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Consents were obtained from patients and the medical center, and necessary explanations were given about the confidentiality of information prior to completing the questionnaires. The mean score of medication adherence was 5.82 suggesting low medication adherence among the patients, and the mean score of human dignity was 81.39. There was a negative relationship between medication adherence and threat to human dignity (r = - 0.6, P dignity and its dimensions. Based on the findings, an increase in patients' dignity can enhance medication adherence, which can theoretically improve patients' health and reduce frequent hospitalization.

  17. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2014-01-01

    adherence properties between MRSP and methicillin-susceptible (MSSP) strains. Four MRSP, including a human and a canine strain belonging to ST71 and two canine non-ST71 strains, and three genetically unrelated MSSP were tested on corneocytes collected from five dogs and six humans. All strains were fully......The recent worldwide spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is a reason for concern due to the typical multidrug resistance patterns displayed by some MRSP lineages such as sequence type (ST) 71. The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro....... pseudintermedius adherence to canine corneocytes was significantly higher compared to human corneocytes (p human origin adhered equally well to canine and human corneocytes, suggesting that MRSP ST71 may be able to adapt to human skin. The genetic basis of the enhanced...

  18. ADAM9 Is a Novel Product of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Hergrueter, Anja H; Polverino, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and a metalloproteinase domain (ADAM) 9 is known to be expressed by monocytes and macrophages. In this study, we report that ADAM9 is also a product of human and murine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). ADAM9 is not synthesized de novo by circulating PMNs. Rather, ADAM9 protein...... in the bleomycin-treated lung. Thus, ADAM9 is expressed in an inducible fashion on PMN surfaces where it degrades some ECM proteins, and it promotes alveolar-capillary barrier injury during ALI in mice....

  19. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel. *Corresponding author (Fax, 972-4-8542092; Email, erica@rambam.health.gov.il). Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals.

  20. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals. These two groups were further subdivided either according to age or to smoking habits. The experiments showed that ...

  1. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals. These two groups were further subdivided either according to age or to smoking habits. The experiments showed that ...

  2. International criminal tribunals and human rights law: Adherence and contextualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    Given their mandate to prosecute persons responsible for the most atrocious of human rights violations, International Criminal Tribunals (ICTs) are generally hailed as welcome enforcers of international human rights law: a new instrument in the toolkit of human rights protectors. However, ICTs

  3. A transcriptome analysis of the in vitro response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to polymorphonuclear leukocyte exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are a central part of the human innate immunity and they are dominating the response against bacterial infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. However, the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can evade destruction by PMNs and may thus cause...

  4. Adherence of human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to nano-structured titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorkhan, Marjan; Yücel-Lindberg, Tülay; Hall, Jan; Svensäter, Gunnel; Davies, Julia R

    2014-06-21

    A key element for long-term success of dental implants is integration of the implant surface with the surrounding host tissues. Modification of titanium implant surfaces can enhance osteoblast activity but their effects on soft-tissue cells are unclear. Adherence of human keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to control commercially pure titanium (CpTi) and two surfaces prepared by anodic oxidation was therefore investigated. Since implant abutments are exposed to a bacteria-rich environment in vivo, the effect of oral bacteria on keratinocyte adhesion was also evaluated. The surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of adhered cells and binding strength, as well as vitality of fibroblasts and keratinocytes were evaluated using confocal scanning laser microscopy after staining with Live/Dead Baclight. To evaluate the effect of bacteria on adherence and vitality, keratinocytes were co-cultured with a four-species streptococcal consortium. SEM analysis showed the two anodically oxidized surfaces to be nano-structured with differing degrees of pore-density. Over 24 hours, both fibroblasts and keratinocytes adhered well to the nano-structured surfaces, although to a somewhat lesser degree than to CpTi (range 42-89% of the levels on CpTi). The strength of keratinocyte adhesion was greater than that of the fibroblasts but no differences in adhesion strength could be observed between the two nano-structured surfaces and the CpTi. The consortium of commensal streptococci markedly reduced keratinocyte adherence on all the surfaces as well as compromising membrane integrity of the adhered cells. Both the vitality and level of adherence of soft-tissue cells to the nano-structured surfaces was similar to that on CpTi. Co-culture with streptococci reduced the number of keratinocytes on all the surfaces to approximately the same level and caused cell damage, suggesting that commensal bacteria could affect adherence of soft-tissue cells to

  5. Chinese herb-resistance and adherence to human uroepithelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The susceptibility profile of strains was determined by disk diffusion method. PCR systems were used to detect genes encoding papC, Aer, hly and cnf1. Isolated human urothelial cells were incubated in vitro and investigated with light microscope immunohistochemistry. Adhesion of E. coli to ...

  6. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  7. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the [ 3 H]thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% [SD]) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition

  8. SadA-Expressing Staphylococci in the Human Gut Show Increased Cell Adherence and Internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Luqman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A subgroup of biogenic amines, the so-called trace amines (TAs, are produced by mammals and bacteria and can act as neuromodulators. In the genus Staphylococcus, certain species are capable of producing TAs through the activity of staphylococcal aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (SadA. SadA decarboxylates aromatic amino acids to produce TAs, as well as dihydroxy phenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan to thus produce the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. SadA-expressing staphylococci were prevalent in the gut of most probands, where they are part of the human intestinal microflora. Furthermore, sadA-expressing staphylococci showed increased adherence to HT-29 cells and 2- to 3-fold increased internalization. Internalization and adherence was also increased in a sadA mutant in the presence of tryptamine. The α2-adrenergic receptor is required for enhanced adherence and internalization. Thus, staphylococci in the gut might contribute to gut activity and intestinal colonization. : Luqman et al. examine the sadA gene and argue that it contributes to TAs. They found that neuromodulator-producing staphylococci were present in the gut of most probands. The produced neuromodulators enhanced the adherence and internalization of staphylococci to cells in culture. Keywords: adherence, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, gut microbiota, internalization, neuromodulator, neurotransmitter, staphylococcus

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  7. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  8. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair eWalsham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC A/E lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  9. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Alistair D S; MacKenzie, Donald A; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  10. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  11. Brugia malayi microfilariae adhere to human vascular endothelial cells in a C3-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Hendrik Schroeder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Brugia malayi causes the human tropical disease, lymphatic filariasis. Microfilariae (Mf of this nematode live in the bloodstream and are ingested by a feeding mosquito vector. Interestingly, in a remarkable co-evolutionary adaptation, Mf appearance in the peripheral blood follows a circadian periodicity and reaches a peak when the mosquito is most likely to feed. For the remaining hours, the majority of Mf sequester in the lung capillaries. This circadian phenomenon has been widely reported and is likely to maximise parasite fitness and optimise transmission potential. However, the mechanism of Mf sequestration in the lungs remains largely unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that B. malayi Mf can, directly adhere to vascular endothelial cells under static conditions and under flow conditions, they can bind at high (but not low flow rates. High flow rates are more likely to be experienced diurnally. Furthermore, a non-periodic nematode adheres less efficiently to endothelial cells. Strikingly C3, the central component of complement, plays a crucial role in the adherence interaction. These novel results show that microfilariae have the ability to bind to endothelial cells, which may explain their sequestration in the lungs, and this binding is increased in the presence of inflammatory mediators.

  12. SadA-Expressing Staphylococci in the Human Gut Show Increased Cell Adherence and Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Arif; Nega, Mulugeta; Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Ebner, Patrick; Götz, Friedrich

    2018-01-09

    A subgroup of biogenic amines, the so-called trace amines (TAs), are produced by mammals and bacteria and can act as neuromodulators. In the genus Staphylococcus, certain species are capable of producing TAs through the activity of staphylococcal aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (SadA). SadA decarboxylates aromatic amino acids to produce TAs, as well as dihydroxy phenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan to thus produce the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. SadA-expressing staphylococci were prevalent in the gut of most probands, where they are part of the human intestinal microflora. Furthermore, sadA-expressing staphylococci showed increased adherence to HT-29 cells and 2- to 3-fold increased internalization. Internalization and adherence was also increased in a sadA mutant in the presence of tryptamine. The α2-adrenergic receptor is required for enhanced adherence and internalization. Thus, staphylococci in the gut might contribute to gut activity and intestinal colonization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid Necrotic Killing of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes Is Caused by Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Production of Rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. Ø.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Phipps, Richard Kerry

    2007-01-01

    a QS-regulated tolerance of biofilm bacteria to the antimicrobial properties of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The precise QS-regulated effect on the PMNs is, however, unknown. Incubation of human PMNs with supernatants from dense P. aeruginosa cultures showed that the QS-competent P. aeruginosa...

  14. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, N; Elena, M; Deulofeu, R; Chamorro, A

    1999-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) are involved in the pathogenesis of acute cerebral ischemia and atherosclerosis. Elastase is one of the proteolytic enzymes released by activated PMNL. We evaluated whether plasma levels of elastase-inhibitor complexes (EIC) are related to acute cerebral damage or with extension of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with stroke. Plasma levels of EIC were determined in 44 patients during acute and chronic phases of stroke. We recorded in all patients vascular risk factors, clinical severity on admission, infarct volume, and extension of carotid atherosclerosis using B-mode ultrasound exam. EIC levels were not different between acute and chronic phases of stroke. Eleven patients (25%) had increased values of EIC. On multiple regression analysis diabetes, dislipemia, and coronary disease were predictors of abnormal EIC levels. EIC levels were not related to neurological severity on admission, infarct volume, or carotid atherosclerosis. EIC levels in stroke patients are associated to the presence of vascular risk factors and may reflect cellular inflammatory aspects of chronic vessel disease. However, whether elastase contributes to the development of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with stroke remains unknown.

  15. Use of cereal fiber to facilitate adherence to a human caloric restriction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Das, Sai Krupa; Golden, Julie K; McCrory, Megan A; Rochon, James; DeLany, James P; Freed, Alicia M; Fuss, Paul J; Dallal, Gerard E; Saltzman, Edward; Roberts, Susan B

    2008-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates biological aging in animal models but there is little information on the feasibility and efficacy of CR regimens in humans. We examined the effects of consuming an insoluble cereal fiber supplement on ability to sustain CR over 1 year in healthy overweight adults. In 34 healthy overweight women and men (BMI 25-30 kg/m2, age 20-42 yr), a 30% CR regimen meeting national recommendations for dietary fiber was provided for 24 weeks, and for an additional 24 weeks subjects were counseled to prepare the same regimen at home. During 5-10 weeks of CR, subjects were randomized to consume an extra 20 g/day of dietary fiber from a high fiber cereal (+F) or to not consume additional fiber (-F). After this time, all subjects were encouraged to consume the extra fiber. Outcomes included adherence to the provided and self-prepared CR regimens (energy intake determined using doubly labeled water), changes in body weight, and self-reported satisfaction with the amount of consumed food. During 5-10 weeks of CR when all food was provided, both +F and -F groups were highly adherent to the CR regimen and there was no significant difference between groups in energy intake (p=0.51), weight change (p=0.96), or satisfaction with amount of provided food (p=0.08). During self-prepared CR from 25 to 48 weeks, mean adherence was lower than during the food-provided phase and there was a significant association between fiber intake and % CR (r=0.69, pfiber cereal intake may facilitate CR in humans self-selecting their own food; longer-term intervention studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with 3 H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P 0 C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP

  17. Use of human fat grafting in the prevention of perineural adherence: Experimental study in athymic mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cherubino

    Full Text Available Perineural adherences represent a problem after surgery involving peripheral neural system. Fat-grafting with adipose derived stem cells (ASCs with their pro-regenerative characteristics can be important to prevent the neural damage or to facilitate the neural regeneration. Our idea was to use the fat-grafting as an anti-adherence device and test its efficacy on a postsurgical scar animal model and comparing to an antiadhesive gel. 32 athymic mice were operated under magnification, we exposed both sciatic nerves. We randomly divided all sciatic nerves into four experimental groups: burning (1, burning + carboxy-methylcellulose and poly- ethylene oxide (CMC-PEO (2 + human adipose fat tissue (3, control group (4. Bio-mechanical evaluation was performed to measure the peak force required to pull out the nerve from the muscular bed.in the CMC-PEO group the peak pull out force was 0.37 Newton. In the fat grafted group we registered a peak pull out force of 0.35 N (t Student 0.913. In burning group the force necessary to tear the nerve apart was markedly superior (0.46 N. In control group, we reported the minimal strength (0.31 N to slide the nerve from the tissue. Histologically, in the group treated with fat-grating, a thinner scar layer was highlighted. Considering the results of this study we can support the efficacy in animal experimental model of fat graft as an anti-adherence device in peripheral nerve surgery.

  18. Modulation of Kingella kingae adherence to human epithelial cells by type IV Pili, capsule, and a novel trimeric autotransporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, Eric A; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; St Geme, Joseph W

    2012-10-23

    Kingella kingae is an emerging bacterial pathogen that is being recognized increasingly as an important etiology of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacteremia, especially in young children. Colonization of the posterior pharynx is a key step in the pathogenesis of K. kingae disease. Previous work established that type IV pili are necessary for K. kingae adherence to the respiratory epithelium. In this study, we set out to identify additional factors that influence K. kingae interactions with human epithelial cells. We found that genetic disruption of the gene encoding a predicted trimeric autotransporter protein called Knh (Kingella NhhA homolog) resulted in reduced adherence to human epithelial cells. In addition, we established that K. kingae elaborates a surface-associated polysaccharide capsule that requires a predicted ABC-type transporter export operon called ctrABCD for surface presentation. Furthermore, we discovered that the presence of a surface capsule interferes with Knh-mediated adherence to human epithelial cells by nonpiliated organisms and that maximal adherence in the presence of a capsule requires the predicted type IV pilus retraction machinery, PilT/PilU. On the basis of the data presented here, we propose a novel adherence mechanism that allows K. kingae to adhere efficiently to human epithelial cells while remaining encapsulated and more resistant to immune clearance. Kingella kingae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is being recognized increasingly as a cause of joint and bone infections in young children. The pathogenesis of disease due to K. kingae begins with bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract, and previous work established that surface hair-like fibers called type IV pili are necessary for K. kingae adherence to respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we set out to identify additional factors that influence K. kingae interactions with respiratory epithelial cells. We discovered a novel surface protein called

  19. Adhering maternal platelets can contribute to the cytokine and chemokine cocktail released by human first trimester villous placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschitz, A; Siwetz, M; Schlenke, P; Gauster, M

    2015-11-01

    Placental villous explant culture has been increasingly recognized as suitable model to study secretion of inflammatory and immune modulating factors by human placenta. Most of these factors likely derive from the syncytiotrophoblast, whereas extraplacental sources such as maternal peripheral blood cells are rarely considered. Due to their small size and absence of a nucleus, platelets adhering to perivillous fibrinoid of normal placenta are frequently ignored in routine immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrate adhering maternal platelets on first trimester placental villi after explant culture and point out that platelet-derived factors must be considered when analyzing the inflammatory secretion profile of human placenta. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human responses to Florida red tides: policy awareness and adherence to local fertilizer ordinances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kohler, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E; Scheller, Karen; Reich, Andrew; Hitchcock, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Ullmann, Steven; Hoagland, Porter

    2014-09-15

    To mitigate the damages of natural hazards, policy responses can be beneficial only if they are effective. Using a self-administered survey approach, this paper focuses on the adherence to local fertilizer ordinances (i.e., county or municipal rules regulating the application of fertilizer to private lawns or facilities such as golf courses) implemented in jurisdictions along the Southwest Florida coast in response to hazardous blooms of Florida red tides (Karenia brevis). These ordinances play a role in the context of evolving programs of water pollution control at federal, state, water basin, and local levels. With respect to policy effectiveness, while the strength of physical linkages is of critical importance, the extent to which humans affected are aware of and adhere to the relevant rules, is equally critical. We sought to understand the public's depth of understanding about the rationales for local fertilizer ordinances. Respondents in Sarasota, Florida, were asked about their fertilizer practices in an area that has experienced several major blooms of Florida red tides over the past two decades. A highly educated, older population of 305 residents and "snowbirds" reported relatively little knowledge about a local fertilizer ordinance, its purpose, or whether it would change the frequency, size, or duration of red tides. This finding held true even among subpopulations that were expected to have more interest in or to be more knowledgeable about harmful algal blooms. In the face of uncertain science and environmental outcomes, and with individual motivations at odds with evolving public policies, the effectiveness of local community efforts to decrease the impacts of red tides may be compromised. Targeted social-science research on human perceptions about the risks of Florida red tides and education about the rationales for potential policy responses are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Presence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders Is Associated With a Lower Adherence to Combined Antiretroviral Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Isabella; Wandeler, Gilles; Sehhat, Asemaneh; Bugnon, Olivier; Metral, Melanie; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Gutbrod, Klemens; Cavassini, Matthias; Schneider, Marie P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are defined according to their diagnostic degrees as follows: asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, mild neurocognitive disorder, and HIV-associated dementia. Because high adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is required to maintain viral suppression among HIV-infected patients, it is important to investigate the impact of HAND on medication adherence. Our study hypothesis was that patients with HAND had a lower medication adherence than patients who did not have HAND. Methods. This was an observational, exploratory, 2-center pilot study of patients who had a state-of-the-art neurocognitive assessment performed between January 2011 and June 2015 while also being followed at their respective adherence clinics. Adherence was measured with electronic monitors. Patients’ sociodemographic characteristics, HIV viral load, and CD4 counts were retrieved from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database. At each time t, adherence was computed as the proportion of patients taking medication as prescribed at that time. Results. We included 59 patients, with a median (Q1, Q3) age of 53 years (47–58) and 39 (66%) were male participants. Twenty-two patients (35%) had no neurocognitive deficits, 16 (27%) patients had HAND, and 21 (35%) patients had non-HAND (mostly depression). Implementation over 3 years showed a significant decline (50%) in medication adherence among patients diagnosed with HAND in comparison with patients who had a normal neuropsychological status or a non-HIV-related cognitive deficit (implementation stayed 90% during follow-up). Conclusions. Our findings support the hypothesis that HAND is associated with reduced cART adherence. PMID:28584853

  2. Roflumilast inhibits leukocyte-platelet interactions and prevents the prothrombotic functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, L; Amore, C; Di Santo, A; Dell'Elba, G; Piccoli, A; Martelli, N; Tenor, H; Beume, R; Evangelista, V

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: Thrombosis is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Roflumilast is a selective phosphodiesterase type-4 (PDE4) inhibitor approved for treatment of severe COPD. PDE4 blockade by roflumilast inhibits prothrombotic functions of neutrophils and monocytes. PDE4 inhibitors may reduce thrombotic risk in COPD as well as in other vascular diseases. Roflumilast, an oral selective phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitor, is approved for the treatment of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A recent meta-analysis of trials on COPD revealed that treatment with roflumilast was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of major cardiovascular events. The mechanisms of this effect remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that roflumilast N-oxide (RNO), the active metabolite of roflumilast, curbs the molecular mechanisms required for leukocyte-platelet (PLT) interactions and prevents the prothrombotic functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes (MNs). Using well-characterized in vitro models, we analysed the effects of RNO on: (i) PMN adhesiveness; (ii) the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs); and (iii) tissue factor expression in MNs. Key biochemical events underlying the inhibitory effects of RNO were defined. In PMNs, RNO prevented phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473, and Src family kinase (SFK)-mediated Pyk2 phosphorylation on Tyr579-580, while inducing protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of C-terminal Src kinase, the major negative regulator of SFKs. Modulation of these signaling pathways by RNO resulted in a significant impairment of PMN adhesion to activated PLTs or human umbilical vein endothelial cells, mainly mediated by inhibition of the adhesive function of Mac-1. Moreover RNO curbed SFK/PI3K-mediated NET release by PMNs adherent on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. In MNs interacting with activated PLTs, RNO curbed PI3K

  3. Streptococcus sanguinis as an opportunistic bacteria in human oral cavity: Adherence, colonization, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hening Tjaturina Pramesti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus sanguinis (formerly S. sanguis is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe,  nonmotile , normal  inhabitant of the human oral cavity, and  a member of  the viridans group of streptococci. Among the streptococcus, S. sanguinis is a  primary colonizer in the human tooth surface or it is recognize as a ‘pioneer’ by forming dental plaque. The aim of this paper is to review the role of Streptococcus sanguinis  in the adherence to and  invasion of  human tissues.  S. sanguinis  has been reported  that it is associated  with healthy  tooth  surfaces  but not with caries. S. sanguinis  tend to involved in an interspecies interactions with Streptococcus mutans, which is known as  competition/coexistence within dental biofilm.  In their colonization, this bacteria used enzyme sortase A (SrtA to cleave  LPXTG-containing proteins sequence and  anchored  the  cell wall, while virulence factors  in infective endocarditis  involved housekeeping functions such as cell wall synthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid synthesis, and the ability to survive under anaerobic conditions.

  4. Evaluation of antipathogenic activity and adherence properties of human Lactobacillus strains for vaginal formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdenelli, M C; Coman, M M; Cecchini, C; Silvi, S; Orpianesi, C; Cresci, A

    2014-05-01

    To test different Lactobacillus strains for their antipathogenic activity towards Candida strains and their adhesion properties for the preparation of vaginal ovules and douches to be used in vaginal candidiasis prevention. Five strains of lactobacilli were tested for their antimicrobial potential against different clinically isolated Candida strains. They were also screened for their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide and to coaggregate with pathogens. Adhesion properties of the five different Lactobacillus strains to HeLa cells and the presence of arcA gene were also assessed. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that all the five Lactobacillus strains tested possessed inhibitory action against the Candida strains using the radial streak method, but the effect is strain dependent. The same situation arises with regard to the ability of coaggregation that is present in all the strains into different degrees. Only Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®) and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502(®) were able to produce H2O2 and none of the strains possess arcA gene. The most adherent strains to HeLa cells were Lact. rhamnosus IMC 501(®), Lact. paracasei IMC 502(®) and also their combination SYNBIO(®). This latter was selected for the preparation of ovules and douches using different matrix. Witepsol(®) ovules have proved the best formulation in terms of probiotic viability. Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501(®), Lact. paracasei IMC 502(®) and SYNBIO(®) were able to produce H2O2, to coaggregate and to exert antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Candida strains and to strongly adhere to HeLa cells. All these properties together with those technological make these strains good candidates for the realization of formulations suitable for vaginal health. To develop new vaginal formulations taking into account the impact of probiotic strains on pathogens as well as the technological properties of the strains to validate their effectiveness in human health. © 2014 The

  5. Medication-adherence predictors among patients with tuberculosis or human immunodeficiency virus infection in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méda, Ziemlé Clément; Lin, Yu-Ting; Sombié, Issiaka; Maré, Daouda; Morisky, Donald E; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2014-06-01

    Adherence to treatment remains a key issue for tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) programs. The study objective was to identify potential determinants of medication adherence (MA) among patients with TB, HIV, or both. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients attending TB or HIV clinics were recruited in two main regions (Centre and Hauts-Bassins) of Burkina Faso from August to October 2010. Questionnaires were collected and simple and multiple step-wise linear regression models were used to identify predictors of MA. In total, 1043 patients (309 with TB, 553 with HIV, and 181 coinfected with both) participated in this study. For patients with TB, adjusted predictors of good MA were no alcohol use, ever been lost to follow-up, and awareness of disease transmission. For patients with HIV, adjusted predictors of good MA were less stigma, good knowledge about TB transmission, and awareness of disease transmission. For patients with dual infection, adjusted predictors of good MA was good attitude. Furthermore, adjusted predictors of poor MA for patients with TB or with dual infection were poor financial access to care and high number of persons sleeping in the household, respectively. This study provides information on MA in patients infected with TB, HIV, and those coinfected with TB and HIV. TB and HIV programs have to consider the environment of the patient and its characteristics, including stigma, attitude, status of loss to follow-up, TB knowledge, financial access to care, alcohol use, awareness of disease transmission, and number of persons sleeping in the household. These identified factors in this study need to be taken into account for a specific patient profile and during sensitization, project planning, and research stages. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. SIMULTANEOUS EXPRESSION AND REGULATION OF G-CSF AND IL-6 MESSENGER-RNA IN ADHERENT HUMAN MONOCYTES AND FIBROBLASTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VELLENGA, E; VANDERVINNE, B; DEWOLF, JTM; HALIE, MR

    The regulation of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA was studied in human adherent monocytes in response to the protein kinase C activator, oleolyl-acetylglycerol (OAG), the calcium-ionophore A23187 and the cyclic AMP elevating agents, dibutyryl c-AMP

  7. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

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  20. Contribution of the major and minor subunits to fimbria-mediated adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to human epithelial cells and erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, S. M.; van Alphen, L.; Mooi, F. R.; van Putten, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Fimbriae are colonization factors of the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae in that they mediate bacterial adherence to human eukaryotic cells. The contribution of the major (HifA) and putative minor (HifD and HifE) subunits of H. influenzae fimbriae to fimbria-specific adherence was studied by

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerance to tobramycin, hydrogen peroxide and polymorphonuclear leukocytes is quorum-sensing dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, P.O.; Burmolle, M.

    2005-01-01

    to otherwise lethal doses of antibiotics and are protected from bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). P. aeruginosa controls the expression of many of its virulence factors by means of a cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing (QS). In the present report it is demonstrated......The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the CF lungs by forming biofilm structures in the alveoli. In the biofilm mode of growth the bacteria are highly tolerant...

  2. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) expression on polymorphonuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To establish a foundation for further researches on the improvement of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) functions in dairy cow during perinatal period, the counting of PMN, as well as the mRNA and protein expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) on PMN was studied during this critical period.

  3. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) expression on polymorphonuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 5

    To establish a foundation for further researches on the improvement of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) functions in dairy cow during perinatal period, the counting of PMN, as well as the. mRNA and protein expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) on PMN was studied during this critical period.

  4. Short communication: A study of Lactobacillus isolates' adherence to and influence on membrane integrity of human Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Neethu M; Bunt, Craig R; McDowell, Arlene; Chiu, Jasper Z S; Hussain, Malik A

    2017-10-01

    The selection criteria of ideal probiotic bacteria are complex and involve many factors. One key criterion is based on the ability of the probiotic bacteria to adhere to the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the adherence and influence on membrane integrity of 2 selected lactobacilli isolates-Lactobacillus rhamnosus MI13 (dairy food origin) and L. plantarum RC2 (bovine rumen origin)-to Caco-2 cells in the presence and absence of Escherichia coli. The adhesion and influence on membrane integrity properties of the 2 Lactobacillus isolates were compared with Escherichia coli, a human commensal bacterium. From the adhesion studies, we concluded that the bovine rumen isolate exhibited better adherence to Caco-2 cells than the dairy food isolate. In contrast, the dairy food isolate better protected the Caco-2 monolayer from damage induced by ethanol. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sacha Inchi Oil (Plukenetia volubilis L.), effect on adherence of Staphylococus aureus to human skin explant and keratinocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Aspajo, German; Belkhelfa, Haouaria; Haddioui-Hbabi, Laïla; Bourdy, Geneviève; Deharo, Eric

    2015-08-02

    Plukenetia volubilis L. (Euphorbiaceae) is a domesticated vine distributed from the high-altitude Andean rain forest to the lowlands of the Peruvian Amazon. Oil from the cold-pressed seeds, sold under the commercial name of Sacha Inchi Oil (SIO) is actually much in favour because it contains a high percentage of omega 3 and omega 6, and is hence used as a dietary supplement. SIO is also used traditionally for skin care, in order to maintain skin softness, and for the treatment of wounds, insect bites and skin infections, in a tropical context where the skin is frequently damaged. This study was designed in order to verify whether the traditional use of SIO for skin care would have any impact on Staphylococcus aureus growth and skin adherence, as S. aureus is involved in many skin pathologies (impetigo, folliculitis, furuncles and subcutaneous abscesses) being one if the main pathogens that can be found on the skin. Therefore, our objective was to assess SIO bactericidal activity and interference with adherence to human skin explants and the keratinocyte cell line. Cytotoxicity on that cells was also determined. The activity of SIO was compared to coconut oil (CocO), which is widely used for skin care but has different unsaturated fatty acids contents. Laboratory testing with certified oil, determined antibacterial activity against radio labelled S. aureus. Cytotoxic effects were measured with XTT on keratinocyte cells and with neutral red on human skin explants; phenol was used as cytotoxic control. Adherence assays were carried out by mixing H3-labelled S. aureus bacteria with keratinocyte cells and human skin explants, incubated with oils 2h before (to determine the inhibition of adherence, assimilated to a preventive effect) or 2h after the contact of the biological material with S. aureus (to assess the detachment of the bacteria, assimilated to a curative effect). Residual radioactivity measured after washings made it possible to determine the adherence

  6. Deleterious effect of ultraviolet-B radiation on accessory function of human blood adherent mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, E.A.; Elmets, C.A.; Fujiwara, H.; Wallis, R.S.; Ellner, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) on accessory function of human blood adherent mononuclear cells (ADH) for antigen and mitogen-induced responses, and production by ADH of the amplifying cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) were examined. Responder lymphocytes were rendered accessory cell dependent by treatment of nonadherent cells with OKIal + complement. UV-B depressed accessory function of ADH in a dose-dependent manner. UV-B decreased accessory function of ADH for tetanus toxoid-induced responses and phytohaemagglutinin-induced responses. UV-B also decreased accessory activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells but not Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells for a PPD-reactive T cell line. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity of supernatants of ADH was assayed on C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes. Pretreatment of ADH with UV-B decreased lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-1 activity. Lysates of UV-B irradiated, LPS-stimulated ADH had no discernible IL-1 activity. Addition of IL-1 partially restored accessory activity of UV-B irradiated ADH for lymphocyte responses to TT. Exposure of ADH to TT or PHA for 30 min before irradiation blocked the inhibitory effect of UV-B on accessory activity. Thus, low doses of UV-B are deleterious to accessory function and to production of IL-1 by ADH. Interference with production of cytokines and with initial interactions of accessory cells with antigen and mitogen may be critical to the effects of UV-B on immunoregulatory function of ADH. (author)

  7. Human cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells reduce murine acute Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapka Miteva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs. They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-induced myocarditis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  8. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  9. Characterization of adherence of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae to human epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schilfgaarde, M.; van Ulsen, P.; Eijk, P.; Brand, M.; Stam, M.; Kouame, J.; van Alphen, L.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    The adherence of 58 nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates obtained from patients with otitis media or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obtained from the throats of healthy individuals to Chang and NCI-H292 epithelial cells was compared. Otitis media isolates, but not COPD

  10. Influenza A virus-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal otitis media.

    OpenAIRE

    Abramson, J S; Giebink, G S; Quie, P G

    1982-01-01

    The role of influenza A virus-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte and eustachian tube dysfunction in the pathogenesis of acute purulent otitis media was studied in chinchillas. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte function, middle ear pressure, and the incidence of pneumococcal otitis media were observed after intranasal inoculation with influenza A virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or both. Results showed that depressed negative middle ear pressure and polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemiluminescence and...

  11. Detection of adherence of Enterococcus faecalis in infected dentin of extracted human teeth using confocal laser scanning microscope: An In vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Siddharth Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to detect in vitro adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to the infected dentinal tubules of human extracted teeth using confocal laser scanning microscope. Subjects and Methods: Roots from human premolar teeth (n = 40 were infected with E. faecalis strain the American Type Culture Collection 29212 in brain heart infusion for 21 days. After the experimental period, specimens were divided into two groups, Group A (n = 20, Group B (n = 20, and Group A specimens were stained with fluorescein diacetate dye for the detection of viability and adherence Group B were stained with acridine orange dye for detection of metabolic activity and adherence. Samples were washed, thoroughly sectioned and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Computer-assisted determinants of fluorescence, bacterial viability, metabolic activity, and adherence were compared statistically. Results: E. faecalis was able to invade the dentinal tubules to a depth of 1–400 μm and adhere to 1–200 μm depth. Adherence (90% was significantly higher in 1–100 μm using fluorescein diacetate and acridine orange dye. Conclusion: Adherence of E. faecalis as evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscope was highest at the depth of 1–100 μm which may have an impact on the shaping and cleaning procedures on the root canal.

  12. Pregnancy enhances the sensitivity of glomerular ecto-adenosine triphosphate-diphosphohydrolase to products of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Bakker, WW; Baller, JFW; Schuiling, GA

    To test the hypothesis that pregnancy enhances the sensitivity of glomerular ecto-adenosine triphosphate-diphosphohydrolase to products of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes, cryostat-cut kidney sections of pregnant and cycling rats were exposed to activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and

  13. Adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to Human Epithelial Cells: The Role of Intimin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-28

    LAlFAS, but a few bacteria were aligned along the edges of some of the HEp-2 cells (data not Shown). An occasional OHSa bacterium was seen associated...strains with a K-12 strain. OHSa , and the positive control, EPEC E2348/69. Geometric mean values from quadruplicate samples are shown + 2 SO. 63 10...kinetics of EHEC strain 87-23 and E. coli K-12, OHSa , adherence toHEp-2 cells. Geometric mean values are shown + 2 SO for each time point. The initial

  14. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  15. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel).

  16. Stepwise, non-adherent differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to generate basal forebrain cholinergic neurons via hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Lucy A; Byrne, Meg L; Taylor, Hannah; Kerrigan, Talitha L; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Badger, Jennifer L; Barbuti, Peter A; Jo, Jihoon; Tyler, Sue J; Allen, Shelley J; Kunath, Tilo; Cho, Kwangwook; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2013-11-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (bfCNs) which provide innervation to the hippocampus and cortex, are required for memory and learning, and are primarily affected in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), resulting in related cognitive decline. Therefore generation of a source of bfCNs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is crucial for in vitro disease modeling and development of novel AD therapies. In addition, for the advancement of regenerative approaches there is a requirement for an accurate developmental model to study the neurogenesis and survival of this population. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of bfCNs, using a novel embryoid body (EB) based non-adherent differentiation (NAdD) protocol. We establish a specific basal forebrain neural stem cell (NSC) phenotype via expression of the basal forebrain transcription factors NKX2.1 and LHX8, as well as the general forebrain marker FOXG1. We present evidence that this lineage is achieved via recapitulation of embryonic events, with induction of intrinsic hedgehog signaling, through the use of a 3D non-adherent differentiation system. This is the first example of hPSC-derived basal forebrain-like NSCs, which are scalable via self-renewal in prolonged culture. Furthermore upon terminal differentiation these basal forebrain-like NSCs generate high numbers of cholinergic neurons expressing the specific markers ChAT, VACht and ISL1. These hPSC-derived bfCNs possess characteristics that are crucial in a model to study AD related cholinergic neuronal loss in the basal forebrain. Examples are expression of the therapeutic target p75(NTR), the release of acetylcholine, and demonstration of a mature, and functional electrophysiological profile. In conclusion, this work provides a renewable source of human functional bfCNs applicable for studying AD specifically in the cholinergic system, and also provides a model of the key embryonic events in human bfCN development. © 2013.

  17. Royal Jelly Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adherence and Reduces Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Susilowati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium and causes respiratory infection especially in elderly patients. Royal jelly has been used worldwide as a traditional remedy and as a nutrient; however, the effect against P. aeruginosa is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze antibacterial, antiadherent, and anti-inflammatory effects of royal jelly against P. aeruginosa. Wild-type strain PAO1 and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were used for antibacterial assay and antiadherent assay to abiotic surface and epithelial cells, which are pharynx (Detroit 562 and lung (NCI-H292 epithelial cells. In anti-inflammatory assay, epithelial cells were pretreated with royal jelly before bacterial exposure to investigate its inhibitory effect on interleukin (IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-3α/CCL20 overproduction. Although royal jelly did not have antibacterial activity at concentration of 50% w/v, antiadherent activity was confirmed on the abiotic surface and epithelial cells under concentration of 25%. Pretreatment with royal jelly significantly inhibited overproduction of IL-8 and CCL20 from both cells. These results demonstrated that royal jelly inhibits P. aeruginosa adherence and protects epithelial cells from excessive inflammatory responses against P. aeruginosa infection. Our findings suggested that royal jelly may be a useful supplement as complementary and alternative medicine for preventing respiratory infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  18. Dysfunction of Circulating Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and Monocytes in Ambulatory Cirrhotics Predicts Patient Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargenti, Konstantina; Johansson, Åsa; Bertilsson, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis represents a state of functional immune paresis with increased infection risk. Aims To investigate polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte and monocyte function in ambulatory cirrhotics, and their potential relation with cirrhosis etiology or patient outcome. Methods Consecutive...

  19. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes consume oxygen in sputum from chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Hansen, C. R.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most severe complication for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This infection is characterised by endobronchial mucoid biofilms surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs). The mucoid phenotype offers protectio...

  20. PHA-induced cytotoxicity of human lymphocytes against adherent hela-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huges-Law, G.; de Gast, G. C.; The, T. Hauw

    The conditions for a phytohaemagglutinin(PHA)-induced cytotoxicity test of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated. [3H]thymidine prelabelled HeLa cells were used as target cells. Stimulation with 10 μl PHA/ml during 24 h gave the best measure of lymphocyte cytotoxic capacity.

  1. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 μg/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function

  2. Formyl Met-Leu-Phe-Stimulated FPR1 Phosphorylation in Plate-Adherent Human Neutrophils: Enhanced Proteolysis but Lack of Inhibition by Platelet-Activating Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas J. Jesaitis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF is a model PAMP/DAMP driving human PMN to sites of injury/infection utilizing the GPCR, FPR1. We examined a microtiter plate format for measurement of FPR1 phosphorylation in adherent PMN at high densities and found that a new phosphosensitive FPR1 fragment, 25K-FPR1, accumulates in SDS-PAGE extracts. 25K-FPR1 is fully inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate PMN pretreatment but is not physiologic, as its formation failed to be significantly perturbed by ATP depletion, time and temperature of adherence, or adherence mechanism. 25K-FPR1 was minimized by extracting fMLF-exposed PMN in lithium dodecylsulfate at 4°C prior to reduction/alkylation. After exposure of adherent PMN to a 5 log range of PAF before or after fMLF, unlike in suspension PMN, no inhibition of fMLF-induced FPR1 phosphorylation was observed. However, PAF induced the release of 40% of PMN lactate dehydrogenase, implying significant cell lysis. We infer that PAF-induced inhibition of fMLF-dependent FPR1 phosphorylation observed in suspension PMN does not occur in the unlysed adherent PMN. We speculate that although the conditions of the assay may induce PAF-stimulated necrosis, the cell densities on the plates may approach levels observed in inflamed tissues and provide for an explanation of PAF’s divergent effects on FPR1 phosphorylation as well as PMN function.

  3. Differential effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in intact polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, R H; Knudsen, T; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    The effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes was studied and compared with the activity in mixed peritoneal leucocytes from rats. While there was maximal decrease in the pump activity (25-30%) of leucocytes from both rat...... and human by calcium 0.6 mM, a concentration of 0.1 mM caused a substantial decrease indicating a high sensitivity for extracellular calcium. In contrast, calcium had no effect on the pump activity in erythrocytes. The effect of calcium on the pump activity in leucocytes may be due to regulation...... of the influx of sodium across the plasma membrane, since in human leucocytes calcium had no effect on the pump activity if the cells were loaded with sodium....

  4. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil in brain parenchyma after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiurong; Sun, Guanghua; Zhang, Han; Ting, Shun-Ming; Song, Shen; Gonzales, Nicole; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) infiltration into brain parenchyma after cerebrovascular accidents is viewed as a key component of secondary brain injury. Interestingly, a recent study of ischemic stroke suggests that after ischemic stroke, PMNs do not enter brain parenchyma and as such may cause no harm to the brain. Thus, the present study was designed to determine PMNs' behavior after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Using the autologous blood injection model of ICH in rats and immunohistochemistry for PMNs and vascular components, we evaluated the temporal and spatial PMNs distribution in the ICH-affected brain. We found that, similar to ischemia, there is a robust increase in presence of PMNs in the ICH-injured tissue that lasts for at least 1 to 2 weeks. However, in contrast to what was suggested for ischemia, besides PMNs that stay in association with the vasculature, after ICH, we found abundance of intraparenchymal PMNs (with no obvious association with vessels) in the ICH core and hematoma border, especially between 1 and 7 days after the ictus. Interestingly, the increased presence of intraparenchymal PMNs after ICH coincided with the massive loss of microvascular integrity, suggesting vascular disruption as a potential cause of PMNs presence in the brain parenchyma. Our study indicates that in contrast to ischemic stroke, after ICH, PMNs target not only vascular compartment but also brain parenchyma in the affected brain. As such, it is possible that the pathogenic role and therapeutic implications of targeting PMNs after ICH could be different from these after ischemic stroke. Our work suggests the needs for more studies addressing the role of PMNs in ICH.

  5. A possible role for polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the defence against recrudescent herpes simplex virus infection in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Miller, C.

    1978-01-01

    A 51 Cr release assay has been used to demonstrate that human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) can damage herpes simplex infected target cells sensitized with antiviral antibody. Effective sensitizing antibodies were found in both serum and saliva of all those persons tested who were subject to recurrent cold sores. PMNL were much less effective as killer cells than peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but as they are the predominant inflammatory cell within the HSVl lesion they may be, quantitatively, more important. The cytotoxic effects of both PMNL and mononuclear cells were significantly reduced by prostaglandin El as well as by several drugs that were tested. It is suggested that antibody dependent PMNL-mediated cytotoxicity may play a role in the human host defences against recrudescent herpes simplex infection. (author)

  6. Evaluation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis of adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys using 51-chromium labeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Yo; Masuda, Kiyokazu; Kobayashi, Yohnosuke

    1987-01-01

    Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from heparinized venous blood of 8 adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) and 13 rhesus monkey neonates within 48 hours of birth were evaluated by using 51-chromium labeling method. PMNs were prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient and dextran sedimentation procedures and the final 51-chromium uptake was 3.21 ± 1.27 % to original count. PMN chemotaxis was succeeded by using two different chemotaxis filters (Nuclepore filter on top of Millipore filter) with incubation at 37 deg C for 90 min. The mean value of target: non target ratio (CPM in lower filter with chemoattractant/CPM in lower filter without chemoattractant) of 3.56 ± 2.49 from neonates showed no significant difference from that of 4.44 ± 1.24 from adults. Only about 30 % of neonates showed an impaired chemotaxis, but others showed similar chemotactic activity as adults. The results show that the 51-chromium labeling method is useful to assess neutrophil functions in rhesus monkey species and suggest that host defense mechanism of the rhesus monkey may differ from that of human in neonatal period. (author)

  7. [Development of approaches to enhancing of patient adherence to antivirus therapy in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaeva, V V; Kravchenko, A V; Pokrovskiĭ, V V

    2003-01-01

    To study approaches to enhancing adherence of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretrovirus therapy. 25 patients (including 3 females) aged 18 to 45 years receiving VAART (fortovasa + norvir + videx, and viramun) were examined. While treating the patients, group classes were conducted to enhance their adherence to the therapy, followed by individual consultations in order to consolidate the obtained effect. The adherence to the therapy was rated by the patients' self-reports. There was an increase in the activity and openness of those who attended group classes and positive changes in their self-assessment. Approaches to enhancing adherence and a model of school for HIV-infected individuals were developed. It has been shown that a combination of patients' awareness of different HIV-infection-associated problems with consulting allows treatment motivation to be increased.

  8. The role of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA-1 in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooldridge Karl G

    2010-11-01

    isogenic siaD gapA-1 double mutant. Conclusions Our data demonstrates that meningococcal GapA-1 is a constitutively-expressed, highly-conserved surface-exposed protein which is antibody-accessible only in the absence of capsule. Mutation of GapA-1 does not affect the in vitro growth rate of N. meningitidis, but significantly affects the ability of the organism to adhere to human epithelial and endothelial cells in a capsule-independent process suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of meningococcal infection.

  9. Mechanisms of innate immunity: cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes, antimicrobial action, translocation, role, and fate in antimicrobial phagocytosis. Progress report, March 1976--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitznagel, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: characterization of the III f granules of human neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN); studies on glycosidases using methylumbelliferyl derivatives of the sugars with spectrofluorometry; distribution of proteinases and cationic proteins in human PMN; comparison of granules of eosinophils with those of other PMN; identification of a cyanide-resistant NADPH oxidase in PMN; subcellular localization of superoxide dismutase in PMN; oxygen-independent antimicrobial activities of each granule class; the phagocytic and intraleukocytic killing capacity of PMN deprived of their specific granules with phorbol myristate acetate; and studies on the PMN of an infant with the Chediak Higashi syndrome. (HLW)

  10. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    of the skin showed a more polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs)-dominated inflammation in the group of mice with infected burn wound compared with the with burn wound group. In contrast, a higher degree of inflammation was observed in the burn wound group compared with the group of mice...... of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization...

  11. Anaerobic conditions promote expression of Sfp fimbriae and adherence of sorbitol-fermenting enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:NM to human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsken, Anne; Bielaszewska, Martina; Greune, Lilo; Schweppe, Christian H; Müthing, Johannes; Schmidt, Herbert; Schmidt, M Alexander; Karch, Helge; Zhang, Wenlan

    2008-02-01

    The sfp gene cluster, unique to sorbitol-fermenting (SF) enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:NM strains, encodes fimbriae that mediate mannose-resistant hemagglutination in laboratory E. coli strains but are not expressed in wild-type SF EHEC O157:NM strains under standard laboratory conditions. We investigated whether Sfp fimbriae are expressed under conditions that mimic the intestinal environment and whether they contribute to the adherence of SF EHEC O157:NM strains to human intestinal epithelial cells. The transcription of sfpA (encoding the major fimbrial subunit) was upregulated in all strains investigated, and all expressed SfpA and possessed fimbriae that reacted with an anti-SfpA antibody when the strains were grown on solid media under anaerobic conditions. Sfp expression was absent under aerobic conditions and in liquid media. Sfp upregulation under anaerobic conditions was significantly higher on blood agar and a medium simulating the colonic environment than on a medium simulating the ileal environment (P Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains correlates with increased adherence to Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains is induced under conditions resembling those of the natural site of infection and that Sfp fimbriae may contribute to the adherence of the organisms to human intestinal epithelium.

  12. Anaerobic Conditions Promote Expression of Sfp Fimbriae and Adherence of Sorbitol-Fermenting Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:NM to Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsken, Anne; Bielaszewska, Martina; Greune, Lilo; Schweppe, Christian H.; Müthing, Johannes; Schmidt, Herbert; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge; Zhang, Wenlan

    2008-01-01

    The sfp gene cluster, unique to sorbitol-fermenting (SF) enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:NM strains, encodes fimbriae that mediate mannose-resistant hemagglutination in laboratory E. coli strains but are not expressed in wild-type SF EHEC O157:NM strains under standard laboratory conditions. We investigated whether Sfp fimbriae are expressed under conditions that mimic the intestinal environment and whether they contribute to the adherence of SF EHEC O157:NM strains to human intestinal epithelial cells. The transcription of sfpA (encoding the major fimbrial subunit) was upregulated in all strains investigated, and all expressed SfpA and possessed fimbriae that reacted with an anti-SfpA antibody when the strains were grown on solid media under anaerobic conditions. Sfp expression was absent under aerobic conditions and in liquid media. Sfp upregulation under anaerobic conditions was significantly higher on blood agar and a medium simulating the colonic environment than on a medium simulating the ileal environment (P Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains correlates with increased adherence to Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains is induced under conditions resembling those of the natural site of infection and that Sfp fimbriae may contribute to the adherence of the organisms to human intestinal epithelium. PMID:18083855

  13. Psychological factors, beliefs about medication, and adherence of youth with human immunodeficiency virus in a multisite directly observed therapy pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Patricia A; Flynn, Patricia M; Belzer, Marvin; Britto, Paula; Hu, Chengcheng; Graham, Bobbie; Neely, Michael; McSherry, George D; Spector, Stephen A; Gaur, Aditya H

    2011-06-01

    This study examined psychological functioning and beliefs about medicine in adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a community-based directly observed therapy (DOT) pilot feasibility study. Participants were youth with behaviorally acquired HIV (n = 20; 65% female; median age, 21 years) with adherence problems, who received once-daily DOT. Youth were assessed at baseline, week 12 (post-DOT), and week 24 (follow-up). At baseline, 55% of youth reported having clinical depressive symptoms compared to 27% at week 12 with sustained improvements at week 24. At baseline, substance use was reported within the borderline clinical range (T(score) = 68), with clinical but statistically nonsignificant improvement (T(score) = 61) at week 12. Hopelessness scores reflected optimism for the future. Coping strategies showed significantly decreased cognitive avoidance (p = .02), emotional discharge (p = .004), and acceptance/resignation ("nothing I can do," p = .004), whereas positive reappraisal and seeking support emerged. With the exception of depressive symptoms, week 12 improvements were not sustained at week 24. DOT adherence was predicted by higher baseline depression (p = .05), beliefs about medicine (p = .006) and perceived threat of illness scores (p = .03). Youth with behaviorally acquired HIV and adherence problems who participated in a community-based DOT intervention reported clinically improved depressive symptoms, and temporarily reduced substance use and negative coping strategies. Depressive symptoms, beliefs about medicine, and viewing HIV as a potential threat predicted better DOT adherence. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dendritic cells take up and present antigens from viable and apoptotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alfaro

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8, for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1 and CD4 (OT-2 TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2(d mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2(d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2(b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2(d are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2(b. In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC.

  15. IgG Endopeptidase SeMac does not Inhibit Opsonophagocytosis of Streptococcus equi Subspecies equi by Horse Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyao; Lei, Benfang

    2010-01-01

    The secreted Mac protein made by group A Streptococcus (GAS) inhibits opsonophagocytosis of GAS by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). This protein also has the endopeptidase activity against human immunoglobulin G (IgG), and the Cys94, His262 and Asp284 are critical for the enzymatic activity. The horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subspecies equi produces a homologue of Mac (SeMac). SeMac was characterized to determine whether SeMac has IgG endopeptidase activity and inhibits opsonophagocytosis of S. equi by horse PMNs. The gene was cloned and recombinant SeMac was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Mice with experimental S. equi infection and horses with strangles caused by S. equi seroconverted to SeMac, indicating that SeMac is produced in vivo during infection. SeMac has endopeptidase activity against human IgG. However, the protein just cleaves a small fraction, which may be IgG1 only, of horse IgG. Replacement of Cys102 with Ser or His272 with Ala abolishes the enzymatic activity of SeMac, and the Asp294Ala mutation greatly decreases the enzymatic activity. SeMac does not inhibit opsonophagocytosis of S. equi by horse PMNs but opsonophagocytosis of GAS by human PMNs. Thus, SeMac is a cysteine endopeptidase with a limited activity against horse IgG and must have other function. PMID:20556207

  16. Inhibition of phagosome maturation and survival of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from Crohn's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, John; Valentine, John F; Naser, Saleh A

    2006-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is an intracellular pathogen that is known to parasitize macrophages. MAP is the known etiological agent of Johne's disease and implicated in the etiology of Crohn's disease. In this study, the survival of human-derived MAP isolate following phagocytosis was evaluated using murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC's) from six Crohn's disease patients. PMNC's from five healthy individuals and four ulcerative colitis patients, as well as Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, were included as controls (MOI 10:1). Maturation of the phagosome was determined by evaluating the presence of stage specific markers on the surface of the phagosomal membrane. The endosomal protein, transferrin receptor, and the lysosomal protein, Lamp-1, were then immunostained with Cy-5 conjugated secondary antibodies, and colocalization of bacteria with each marker was evaluated separately using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). In both models, colocalization of viable MAP and M. tuberculosis with the early endosomal marker occurred with a higher frequency than did association with the late lysosomal marker, as compared to live E. coli, and all dead bacterial species. Using differential live/dead staining and fluorescent microscopy, survival of M. tuberculosis and MAP was calculated to be 85% and 79%, respectively compared to only 14% for E. coli. Overall, MAP survival in murine macrophages and human PMNCs appears to mimic M. tuberculosis, suggesting the ability of this microorganism to resist phagolysosome fusion, by maintaining association with the early endosomes. The data supports MAP virulence in humans.

  17. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte dysfunction during short term metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia in type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, H; Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) ingestion of particles coated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli was compared to other PMN functions in seven patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during short-term controlled metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia...

  18. Microparticles from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus induce production of reactive oxygen species and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winberg, Line Kjær; Jacobsen, Søren; Nielsen, Claus H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The interaction of circulating microparticles (MPs) with immune cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is sparsely investigated. We examined the ability of MPs from SLE patients to induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  19. Generation of Storable Retinal Organoids and Retinal Pigmented Epithelium from Adherent Human iPS Cells in Xeno-Free and Feeder-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Sacha; Slembrouck, Amélie; Gagliardi, Giuliana; Chaffiol, Antoine; Terray, Angélique; Nanteau, Céline; Potey, Anais; Belle, Morgane; Rabesandratana, Oriane; Duebel, Jens; Orieux, Gael; Nandrot, Emeline F; Sahel, José-Alain; Goureau, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are potentially useful in regenerative therapies for retinal disease. For medical applications, therapeutic retinal cells, such as retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells or photoreceptor precursors, must be generated under completely defined conditions. To this purpose, we have developed a two-step xeno-free/feeder-free (XF/FF) culture system to efficiently differentiate hiPSCs into retinal cells. This simple method, relies only on adherent hiPSCs cultured in chemically defined media, bypassing embryoid body formation. In less than 1 month, adherent hiPSCs are able to generate self-forming neuroretinal-like structures containing retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Floating cultures of isolated structures enabled the differentiation of RPCs into all types of retinal cells in a sequential overlapping order, with the generation of transplantation-compatible CD73 + photoreceptor precursors in less than 100 days. Our XF/FF culture conditions allow the maintenance of both mature cones and rods in retinal organoids until 280 days with specific photoreceptor ultrastructures. Moreover, both hiPSC-derived retinal organoids and dissociated retinal cells can be easily cryopreserved while retaining their phenotypic characteristics and the preservation of CD73 + photoreceptor precursors. Concomitantly to neural retina, this process allows the generation of RPE cells that can be effortlessly amplified, passaged, and frozen while retaining a proper RPE phenotype. These results demonstrate that simple and efficient retinal differentiation of adherent hiPSCs can be accomplished in XF/FF conditions. This new method is amenable to the development of an in vitro GMP-compliant retinal cell manufacturing protocol allowing large-scale production and banking of hiPSC-derived retinal cells and tissues. Stem Cells 2017;35:1176-1188. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa recognizes and responds aggressively to the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P.O.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) play a central role in innate immunity, where they dominate the response to infections, in particular in the cystic fibrosis lung. PMNs are phagocytic cells that produce a wide range of antimicrobial agents aimed at killing invading bacteria. However...... rhamnolipids surround the biofilm bacteria and on contact eliminate incoming PMNs. Our data strengthen the view that cross-kingdom communication plays a key role in P. aeruginosa recognition and evasion of the host defence....

  1. Short-term garlic supplementation and highly active antiretroviral treatment adherence, CD4+ cell counts, and human immunodeficiency virus viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Cuiwei; Robison, Esther; Levine, Alexandra M; Gandhi, Monica; Schwartz, Rebecca; Weber, Kathleen M; Merenstein, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic's association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically. To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women. The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the studies visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit. Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS. The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research teams selection criteria and contributed 99 pairs of visits for the study. Among the women who used garlic

  2. Mechanisms of innate immunity. Cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes, antimicrobial action, translocation, role and fate in antimicrobial phagocytosis. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitznagel, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    Research includes: distribution of proteinases and cationic proteins in human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN); description of specific eosinophil granules of PMN with comparison with granules of human PMN; identification of a cyanide resistant NADPH oxidase in PMN and its cosedimentation characteristics; subcellular localization of superoxide dismutase in human PMN; oxygen dependent antimicrobial activities of each granule class; distribution and appearance of specific granule enzymes in circulating leukocytes and degranulation during phagocytosis; phagocytic and intraleukocytic killing capacity of PMN deprives of their specific granules with phorbol myristate acetate, a co-carcinogen; and the PMN of an infant with Chediak Higashi syndrome, the leukocytes from two young men with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood and the PMN of many leukemic patients. Eleven papers have resulted from these studies.

  3. Genetic characterisation of virulence genes associated with adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity in Campylobacter spp. isolated from commercial chickens and human clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Reddy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Virulence-associated genes have been recognised and detected in Campylobacter species. The majority of them have been proven to be associated with pathogenicity. This study aimed to detect the presence of virulence genes associated with pathogenicity and responsible for invasion, expression of adherence, colonisation and production of the cytolethal distending toxin (cdt in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Commercial chicken faecal samples were randomly sampled from chicken farms within the Durban metropolitan area in South Africa. Furthermore, human clinical Campylobacter spp. isolates were randomly sampled from a private pathology laboratory in South Africa. Out of a total of 100 chicken faecal samples, 78% (n = 78 were positive for Campylobacter growth on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate and from the random laboratory collection of 100 human clinical isolates, 83% (n = 83 demonstrated positive Campylobacter spp. growth following culturing methods. These samples were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes: cadF, hipO, asp, ciaB, dnaJ, pldA, cdtA, cdtB and cdtC. As expected, the cadF gene was present in 100% of poultry (n = 78 and human clinical isolates (n = 83. Campylobacter jejuni was the main species detected in both poultry and human clinical isolates, whilst C. coli were detected at a significantly lower percentage (p < 0.05. Eight per cent of the C. jejuni from human clinical isolates had all virulence genes that were investigated. Only one C. coli isolate demonstrated the presence of all the virulence genes investigated; however, the pldA virulence gene was detected in 100% of the C. coli isolates in poultry and a high percentage (71% in human clinical C. coli isolates as well. The detection of cdt genes was found at higher frequency in poultry than human clinical isolates. The high prevalence rates of virulence genes detected in poultry and human clinical isolates demonstrate their

  4. Rapid expansion of recycling stem cells in cultures of plastic-adherent cells from human bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, David C.; Class, Reiner; DiGirolamo, Carla M.; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2000-01-01

    Cultures of plastic-adherent cells from bone marrow have attracted interest because of their ability to support growth of hematopoietic stem cells, their multipotentiality for differentiation, and their possible use for cell and gene therapy. Here we found that the cells grew most rapidly when they were initially plated at low densities (1.5 or 3.0 cells/cm2) to generate single-cell derived colonies. The cultures displayed a lag phase of about 5 days, a log phase of rapid growth of about 5 days, and then a stationary phase. FACS analysis demonstrated that stationary cultures contained a major population of large and moderately granular cells and a minor population of small and agranular cells here referred to as recycling stem cells or RS-1 cells. During the lag phase, the RS-1 cells gave rise to a new population of small and densely granular cells (RS-2 cells). During the late log phase, the RS-2 cells decreased in number and regenerated the pool of RS-1 cells found in stationary cultures. In repeated passages in which the cells were plated at low density, they were amplified about 109-fold in 6 wk. The cells retained their ability to generate single-cell derived colonies and therefore apparently retained their multipotentiality for differentiation. PMID:10725391

  5. Effect of mechanical vs dilute ethanol epithelial removal on keratocyte apoptosis and polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurelik, G; Bilgihan, K; Sezer, C; Akyol, G; Hasanreisoglu, B

    2002-03-01

    To investigate keratocyte apoptosis and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell infiltration to the corneal stroma after mechanical epithelial scraping and chemical de-epithelialization with 18% ethanol solution. Twelve New Zealand Albino rabbits (24 eyes) were randomly divided into three groups. Group A was the control group with no epithelial removal. Group B underwent a 7.5-mm mechanical epithelial removal with a blunt spatula. Group C underwent 7.5-mm chemical de-epithelialization with 18% ethanol-balanced salt solution. Corneas were stained with terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay after 24 h. Only nuclear staining in keratocytes was counted. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte densities were also assessed by light microscopy. Mechanical de-epithelialization (group B) and chemical de-epithelialization with 18% ethanol (group C) showed no difference in keratocyte apoptosis compared with the control group. There was also no difference between groups B and C. Group B showed no difference in PMN leukocyte counts compared with the control group. But the number of PMN leukocytes observed in group C was significantly higher than those encountered in the corneas of the control group (P < 0.05) and group B (P < 0.05). Dilute alcohol induces more PMN cell infiltration when compared with mechanical de-epithelialization although there is no difference in the apoptosis rates.

  6. Lessons learned in reviewing processes supporting procedural adherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRobbie, H.; Fiset, J.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the importance of procedures and procedural adherence in reducing the risk of human error, assessing procedural adherence is a component of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory compliance program. This paper presents a model used during regulatory inspections of processes supporting procedural adherence. A checklist used to collect information during work observations is also described. Lessons learned during procedural adherence inspections are discussed. The procedural adherence review framework presented in this paper may also be useful for nuclear facilities as they carry out internal reviews of procedures and procedural adherence. (author)

  7. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health... potential solutions associated with the public health problem of prescription medication non-adherence in..., health care providers, and industry and private organizations in efforts to improve medication adherence...

  8. Patient adherence to three dose completion of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in a private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Rochelle F; Kuttab, Huda-Marie; Rihani, Rami S; Reutzel, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    The human papillomavirus quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) recombinant vaccine is effective in preventing cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer. Maximal protection is achieved with completion of all three recommended doses. A retrospective chart review was performed to (1) assess the current vaccine series completion rates in a private practice multispecialty suburban setting and (2) identify factors associated with failure to complete the vaccine series. Chi-square and independent samples t test were used for data analysis. A total of 4,117 patients out of 10,821 eligible patients received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine between October 1, 2006 and April 30, 2010. Overall, 69.5 % (n = 2,863) of patients who received one dose of the HPV vaccine completed all three doses in a valid time frame, representing 26.5 % of all eligible patients. Patients who completed the series were younger (16.8 vs. 18.2, p reactions were not identified as independent factors impacting completion rates. The results indicate that adolescents, patients visiting the pediatrics department and those without a prior STD diagnosis completed the vaccination series more frequently than adults managed in family medicine, internal medicine, and OB/GYN departments.

  9. Medical and sociodemographic factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination adherence among female survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosky, James L; Russell, Kathryn M; Simmons, Jessica L; Foster, Rebecca H; Peck, Kelly; Green, Daniel M; Hudson, Melissa M

    2015-09-01

    Among those 9-26 years of age, vaccination can prevent specific types of genital human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection and cause of cervical and other cancers. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of and factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation and completion among females surviving childhood cancer. One-hundred fourteen young adults and 230 mothers with daughters surviving childhood cancer completed surveys querying HPV vaccination history along with medical and sociodemographic factors potentially associated with vaccination outcomes. Vaccination rate differences by age necessitated analysis of outcomes by age group: 9-13 years (preadolescents), 14-17 years (adolescents), and 18-26 years (young adults). Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to identify factors associated with HPV vaccination outcomes. Overall, 34.6% (119/344) of survivors initiated and 20.9% (72/344) completed HPV vaccination. Preadolescents were least likely to have initiated vaccination (P vaccination initiation among young adults only (OR = 0.28; 95%CI, 0.10-0.76, P = 0.012). Physician recommendation (OR = 7.54; 95%CI, 1.19-47.69, P = 0.032; adolescent group) and greater treatment intensity (OR = 5.25; 95%CI, 1.00-27.61, P = 0.050; young adult group) were associated with vaccine completion, whereas being non-White was associated with decreased vaccination completion (OR = 0.17; 95%CI, 0.05-0.66, P = 0.010; adolescent group). A minority of youths surviving childhood cancer have initiated or completed HPV vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination among survivors are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Characterization of a distinct population of circulating human non-adherent endothelial forming cells and their recruitment via intercellular adhesion molecule-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Appleby

    Full Text Available Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38 together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31. These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8 or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14 which distinguishes them from 'early' endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs. Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis.

  11. Posttransplant Intramuscular Injection of PLX-R18 Mesenchymal-Like Adherent Stromal Cells Improves Human Hematopoietic Engraftment in A Murine Transplant Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leland Metheny

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Late-term complications of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT are numerous and include incomplete engraftment. One possible mechanism of incomplete engraftment after HCT is cytokine-mediated suppression or dysfunction of the bone marrow microenvironment. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs elaborate cytokines that nurture or stimulate the marrow microenvironment by several mechanisms. We hypothesize that the administration of exogenous MSCs may modulate the bone marrow milieu and improve peripheral blood count recovery in the setting of incomplete engraftment. In the current study, we demonstrated that posttransplant intramuscular administration of human placental derived mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells [PLacental eXpanded (PLX-R18] harvested from a three-dimensional in vitro culture system improved posttransplant engraftment of human immune compartment in an immune-deficient murine transplantation model. As measured by the percentage of CD45+ cell recovery, we observed improvement in the peripheral blood counts at weeks 6 (8.4 vs. 24.1%, p < 0.001 and 8 (7.3 vs. 13.1%, p < 0.05 and in the bone marrow at week 8 (28 vs. 40.0%, p < 0.01 in the PLX-R18 cohort. As measured by percentage of CD19+ cell recovery, there was improvement at weeks 6 (12.6 vs. 3.8% and 8 (10.1 vs. 4.1%. These results suggest that PLX-R18 may have a therapeutic role in improving incomplete engraftment after HCT.

  12. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  13. Interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and Leptospira species; innate responses in the natural bovine reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Wilson-Welder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and L. interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2 was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of

  14. Determination of phagocytosis of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulin, A.M.; Paape, M.J.; Weinland, B.T.

    1984-04-01

    A procedure for the measurement of phagocytosis by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was modified so that a larger number of samples could be compared in a single run, and smaller volumes of sample, PMN, and /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus could be used. Results were highly reproducible, with a coefficient of variation between duplicate determinations of less than or equal to 2%. Lysostaphin was prepared from the supernatant of S staphylolyticus and was compared with a commercially available preparation. Effects of lysostaphin on PMN and influence of incubation media on release of /sup 32/P from /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus by lysostaphin were examined.

  15. Effect of Streptolysin S on the Luminol-Amplified Chemiluminescence Response of Rabbit Polymorphonuclear Leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, B. A. D.; Birkbeck, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of purified streptolysin S (SLS) produced by Streptococcus pyogenes Group A on polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PML) was investigated. The activation of the oxidative metabolism was determined by chemiluminescence amplified with luminol. Purified SLS, at concentrations of between 8000 HU/ml and 256 HU/ml, when added directly to N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced rabbit PML, caused inhibition of the PML chemiluminescence response. PML without added FMLP (i.e. not induced), served as background controls, and gave no significant endogenous CL response compared to cells induced with FMLP, which served as positive controls. Inhibition of the chemiluminescence response could be the result of a lethal effect of SLS on PML or it could reflect a more specific effect of the toxin on the membrane-mediated chemiluminescent response. (author)

  16. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15

    trapping. • Human peripheral blood leukocytes capture and concentrate quinacrine. • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes do so with higher apparent affinity. • Polymorphonuclear are also more competent than lymphocytes for pinocytosis.

  17. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-01-01

    . • Human peripheral blood leukocytes capture and concentrate quinacrine. • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes do so with higher apparent affinity. • Polymorphonuclear are also more competent than lymphocytes for pinocytosis

  18. SERUM INHIBITION OF THE OXIDATIVE BURST IN HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. (R827354C003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. SERUM INHIBITION OF THE OXIDATIVE BURST IN HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. (R826781)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Comparative opsonic activity for Steptococcus mutans in oral fluids, and phagocytic activity of blood, crevicular, and salivary polymorphonuclear leucocytes in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C M

    1980-01-01

    The opsonic activity for Streptococcus mutans was assayed in serum, gingival crevicular fluid, parotid saliva and mixed saliva from rhesus monkeys immunized against dental caries with a vaccine of Streptococcus mutans in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. The phagocytic activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes from the blood and gingival crevice were compared, and the effects of gingival crevicular fluid and mixed saliva on blood polymorphonuclear leucocyte viability and phagocytic activity were assessed. Heat-stable opsonic activity was detected in sera, crevicular fluid, and mixed saliva of immunized animals. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes from the gingival crevice and saliva retained viability, although this was lower than in cells from blood. Exposure of blood polymorphonuclear leucocytes to crevicular fluid or mixed saliva for 30 min resulted in no loss of cell viability or phagocytic activity, but saliva was cytotoxic on prolonged exposure. These results support the hypothesis that the opsonization and phagocytosis of cariogenic bacteria might be a mechanism involved in the immunological protection against dental caries.

  1. Factors for incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapy including drug refill and clinic visits among older adults living with human immunodeficiency virus - cross-sectional study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Abbie; Ford, Nathan; El-Khatib, Ziad

    2018-03-01

    To assess adherence outcomes to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of recipients ≥50 years in Soweto, South Africa. This was a secondary data analysis for a cross-sectional study at two HIV clinics in Soweto. Data on ART adherence and covariates were gathered through structured interviews with HIV 878 persons living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving ART. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. PLHIV ≥50 years (n = 103) were more likely to miss clinic visits during the last six months than PLHIV aged 25-49 (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.10-4.18). PLHIV ≥50 years with no or primary-level education were less likely to have missed a clinic visit during the last six months than PLHIV with secondary- or tertiary-level education in the same age category (OR 0.3; 95%CI 0.1-1.1), as were PLHIV who did not disclose their status (OR 0.2; 95%CI 0-1.1). There was no evidence of increased risk for non-adherence to ART pills and drug refill visits among older PLHIV. Missing a clinic visit was more common among older PLHIV who were more financially vulnerable. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and identify new risk factors associated with ART adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Impaired Whole-Blood Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Migration as a Possible Predictive Marker for Infections in Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Glasner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Steroids, used in pretermpremature rupture of membranes (pPROM, to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality of the preterm neonate, impair the maternal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN-based immune system. In spite of combination with antibiotics, prenatal and postnatal bacterial infections of mother and child are frequent. This pilot study focuses on the influence of steroids in pPROM on maternal PMN functional capacity and subsequent infections.

  3. Blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocyte and monocyte/macrophage functions in naturally caprine arthritis encephalitis virus infection in dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruna Parapinski; Souza, Fernando Nogueira; Blagitz, Maiara Garcia; Batista, Camila Freitas; Bertagnon, Heloísa Godoi; Diniz, Soraia Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Haddad, João Paulo Amaral; Della Libera, Alice Maria Melville Paiva

    2017-06-01

    The exact influence of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection on blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) and monocyte/macrophages of goats remains unclear. Thus, the present study sought to explore the blood and milk PMNL and monocyte/macrophage functions in naturally CAEV-infected goats. The present study used 18 healthy Saanen goats that were segregated according to sera test outcomes into serologically CAEV negative (n=8; 14 halves) and positive (n=10; 14 halves) groups. All milk samples from mammary halves with milk bacteriologically positive outcomes, somatic cell count ≥2×10 6 cellsmL -1 , and abnormal secretions in the strip cup test were excluded. We evaluated the percentage of blood and milk PMNLs and monocyte/macrophages, the viability of PMNLs and monocyte/macrophages, the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the nonopsonized phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by flow cytometry. In the present study, a higher percentage of milk macrophages (CD14 + ) and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes undergoing late apoptosis or necrosis (Annexin-V + /Propidium iodide + ) was observed in CAEV-infected goats; we did not find any further alterations in blood and milk PMNL and monocyte/macrophage functions. Thus, regarding our results, the goats naturally infected with CAEV did not reveal pronounced dysfunctions in blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: January 17, 2018 Key ...

  5. Function of irradiated polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained by buffy-coat centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, J.G.; Abramson, J.S.; Ekstrand, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several studies suggest that transfusion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) may be beneficial in the treatment of septic neonatal patients. Because of expense, donor availability, and the technical effort involved in obtaining PMNs by intermittent or continuous flow leukapheresis, buffy coat centrifugation of whole blood has been suggested as an alternative source. An in vitro study was performed to determine whether PMNs collected by this method have adequate oxidative and migratory function measured by chemiluminescence (CL) and chemotaxis under agarose (CT), respectively. Whole blood samples from six adult volunteers were drawn into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine-one and stored at 4 degrees C for 0 to 48 hours. One-half of each sample was irradiated with 1500 rads. PMNs isolated from the buffy coat of these samples had greater than 80 percent normal CT and CL following 0 to 28 hours of storage in whole blood. Irradiation caused no depression in function. Units of whole blood yielded 1.11 +/- 0.40 X 10(9) PMNs per unit. This study indicates that transfusion of radiated PMNs obtained from stored whole blood that is less than 28 hours old is reasonable to use in studies involving PMN transfusions

  6. Study on defense function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in A-bomb survivors, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Sumiko; Suzuki, Kazuo; Imanaka, Fumio; Sakatani, Tatsuichiro; Fujikura, Toshio; Kuramoto, Atsushi.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents data on lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from 91 exposed persons and 105 non-exposed persons matched for age and sex. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and β-glucuronidase (BGL) activities in PMN supernatants and % release of released activity divided by total activity were determined. Superoxide anion production was stimulated with synthetic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalamine and/or cytochalasin B. There was a significant influence of exposure doses on MPO activity (p < 0.05), although this was of borderline significance in the % release. BGL activity was independent of exposure doses. Age did not influence MPO activity but influenced BGL activity only marginally. The two enzyme activities seemed to be age-dependent. Regarding superoxide anion production, there was no influence of exposure doses. However, there was a significant difference between the exposed and non-exposed groups in the superoxide anion production. Neither sex nor age had any effect on it. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Differential inhibition of polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment in vivo by dextran sulphate and fucoidan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Van Osselaer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The selectin-mediated rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial cells is a prerequisite step followed by firm adhesion and extravasation into the inflamed tissue. This initial contact can be suppressed by sulphated polysaccharides. We have studied the effect of sulphated polysaccharides on the ultimate polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN recruitment and plasma leakage in rabbit skin in response to intradermal injection of various inflammatory mediators. PMN infiltration evoked by various PMN chemoattractants (FMLP, C5a desArg, LTB4 and IL-8 was significantly inhibited after intravenous injection of dextran sulphate (25 mg/kg, heparin (2 × 90 mg/kg or fucoidan (1 mg/kg. PMN-dependent plasma leakage was equally well reduced by the different sulphated polymers. Vascular permeability induced by histamine or thrombin acting via a PMN-independent mechanism was not reduced. Fucoidan was the only polysaccharide able to suppress IL-1-induced PMN infiltration for 60–70%. Local administration of dextran sulphate had no effect on PMN-dependent plasma leakage. Differential inhibition of PMN recruitment was determined after injection of dextran sulphate or fucoidan depending on the type of insult. Therefore, these results suggest that different adhesion pathways are utilized during PMN recruitment in vivo in response to chemoattractants and IL-1.

  8. Thermodynamic determination of beta-hexosaminidase isoenzymes in mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocyte populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, J Antonio; Chabás, Amparo; Tutor, J Carlos

    2003-01-30

    Isoenzymes of beta-hexosaminidase (Hex) were determined in mononuclear (MN) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes, with a thermodynamic method using the chromogenic substrate sodio-3,3'-dichlorophenolsulfonphthaleinyl N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide. Imprecision was very satisfactory, and the results are very much in agreement with those obtained using the fluorogenic substrates 4-methylumbelliferyl N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide and 4-methylumbelliferyl N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide 6-sulfate. In 163 healthy individuals we found, for the proportion as a percentage of the Hex A isoenzyme, significantly higher values (P < 0.001) in PMN than in MN cells (71.56 +/- 0.30% vs. 54.28 +/- 0.24%), meaning that it would not appear advisable to use total leukocyte lysates for evaluating this variable. The method is fast, precise, and highly suitable for the biochemical diagnosis and heterozygote screening of GM2 gangliosidoses, and would be applicable in cases of thermolabile Hex B and for detecting the B1 variant. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A chemotactic role for prostaglandins released from polymorphonuclear leucocytes during phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, G A; McCall, E; Youlten, L J

    1975-01-01

    1. Prostaglandin E1 is chemotactic at concentrations down to 10 ng/ml for rabbit polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes. Prostaglandins E2 and F2alpha have little or no chemotactic effect at concentrations up to 10 mug/ml. 2. Washed PMN leucocytes produced a chemotactic agent during phagocytosis, but not in the presence of indomethacin (28 muM). 3. Phagocytosing PMN leucocytes produce up to ten times as much prostaglandin as do resting cells. Some of this is prostaglandin E1 as judged by thin layer chromatography and differential bioassay. This prostaglandin production by PMN leucocytes is abolished by indomethacin (28 muM). 4. Ultrasonicated suspensions of PMN leucocytes produced prostaglandin from arachidonic aicd. This synthesis is inhibited by indomethacin. 5. Homogenates of PMN leucocytes which have been pre-incubated withe bacteria for 30 min show more prostaglandin synthetase activity than homogenates from PMN leucocytes which have not been exposed to bacteria. 6. It is concluded that in some forms of inflammation, prostaglandin E1 may play a controlling role in cellular migration. 7. PMN leucocytes may contribute to the generation of prostaglandins found in some inflammatory lesions. PMID:1148497

  10. The immunoregulatory abilities of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the course of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ziaber

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN possess sufficient potential to affect both immune response and inflammation, however it has not been yet described in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. We have studied binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC- stained TNF-α by PMN, the expression of CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 molecules of β 2-integrines and the expression of CD10 (neutral endopeptidaseNEP and of CD13 (aminopeptidase N; APN antigens on PMN in three different groups of MS patients. The control group included neurological patients (OND with noninflammatory diseases. The obtained results have proved that during MS exacerbation and in the course of chronic progressive MS, PMN reveal several forms of preactivation, including significantly higher stained-TNF-α binding, higher expression of CD11b and CD18, as well as CD10 and CD13 antigens, in comparison with MS remission or OND. We suggest that the increased expression of these molecules on PMN of MS patients in exacerbation of the disease and to a lower degree in the course of CP-MS is a result of PMN priming, and directly prove the PMN involvement in the disease pathogenesis.

  11. Arachidonic acid 15-lipoxygenase from rabbit peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Partial purification and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumiya, S; Salmon, J A; Cottee, F H; Weatherley, B C; Flower, R J

    1981-09-25

    Arachidonic acid 15-lipoxygenase was purified from rabbit peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The enzyme was recovered in the cytosol fraction after sonication and purified about 250-fold by acetone precipitation, column chromatography on CM52, Sephadex G-150, and hydroxyapatite. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of arachidonic acid to 15-hydroperoxy-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HPETE), which then decomposed to a mixture of 15-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), 15-keto-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroxy-14,15-epoxy-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid, and 11,14,15-trihydroxy-5,8,12-eicosatrienoic acid. The enzyme was specific for oxygenation at carbon 15 of arachidonic acid. The apparent molecular weight of the enzyme was about 61,000 as measured by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme was sensitive to sulfhydryl-blocking reagents such as p-chloromercuribenzoic acid. The enzyme activity was inhibited by eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) or 3-amino-1-(m-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl)2-pyrazoline (BW755C), but not by indomethacin up to 200 micrograms/ml.

  12. The effects of polyanions on NBT Reductions hexose monophosphate shunt activity, and ultrastructure of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnetzki, B M; Cowan, D H; Belcher, R W

    1975-07-01

    Heparin causes enhanced nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's). To determine the mechanism of this stimulation, samples of 1 to 3 x 10(7) PMN's were incubated with various concentrations of heparin, chondroitin sulfate A (CSA), and chondroitin sulfate B (CSB), with and without NBT. The effect of the polyanions (PA) on PMN hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) activity was determined by the production of 14CO2 from glucose-1-14C by the leukocytes. NBT reduction was evaluated histochemically and spectrophotometrically at 515 mmu. Samples of PMN's in heparin and heparin-NBT mixtures were examined by electron microscopy after various incubation periods. Increased NBT reductions by PMN's was found when leukocytes were incubated with heparin, CSA, and CSB, but these compounds had no effect on the HMPS activity of PMN's unless NBT was added. Electron microscopy of samples that contained heparin-NBT revealed an insoluble complex that was phagocytosed by the leukocytes. The stimulation of PMN oxidative metabolism and NBT reduction that follows incubation with PA-NBT appears to be directly related to ingestion of this particulate complex by the leukocytes.

  13. A large mobility of hydrophilic molecules at the outmost layer controls the protein adsorption and adhering behavior with the actin fiber orientation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Seo, Ji-Hun; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yui, Nobuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion behaviors of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are interestingly affected by the mobility of hydrophilic chains on the material surfaces. Surfaces with different molecular mobilities were prepared using ABA-type block copolymers consisting polyrotaxane (PRX) or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) central block (A block), and amphiphilic anchoring B blocks of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB). Two different molecular mobilities of the PRX chains were designed by using normal α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) or α-CD whose hydroxyl groups were converted to methoxy groups in a given ratio to improve its molecular mobility (PRX-PMB and OMe-PRX-PMB). The surface mobility of these materials was assessed as the mobility factor (Mf), which is measured by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring system. HUVECs adhered on OMe-PRX-PMB surface much more than PRX-PMB and PMB-block-PEG-block-PMB (PEG-PMB) surfaces. These different HUVEC adhesions were correlated with the density of cell-binding site of adsorbed fibronectin. In addition, the alignment of the actin cytoskeleton of adhered HUVECs was strongly suppressed on the PEG-PMB, PRX-PMB, and OMe-PRX-PMB in response to the increased Mf value. Remarkably, the HUVECs adhered on the OMe-PRX-PMB surface with much less actin organization. We concluded that not only the cell adhesion but also the cellular function are regulated by the molecular mobility of the outmost material surfaces.

  14. [Effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on the function of alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophils in severe acute pancreatitis rats complicated with lung injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Min; Jin, Zhou-Xiang; Zhu, Shao-Jun

    2014-04-01

    To explore the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on the function of alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats complicated with lung injury (LI). Forty-eight adult SD rats were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., the sham-operation group, the SAP group, and the GBE treatment group, 16 in each group. The SAP model was successfully induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate solution into the biliopancreatic duct. Rats in the sham-operation group only received flipping of the duodenum. Those in the GBE treatment group received GBE intervention based on SAP model. Equal volume of normal saline was given to rats in the sham-operation group and the SAP group. Rats were sacrificed at 6 and 12 h after operation respectively. The lung tissue was sampled to evaluate the LI score. The wet/dry ratio (W/D) of lung tissues was detected. The activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured. Alveolar PMN was harvested by bronchoalveolar lavage. The content of neutrophil elastase (NE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). The percentage of CD11b/CD18 double positive PMN was detected using flow cytometry. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and NE protein in the lung tissue was detected by Western blot. Compared with the sham-operation group, significant pathologic lesion occurred in the lung tissue of rats in the SAP group; the pathologic LI score, lung tissue W/D ratio, MPO, and NE content in BALF significantly increased, the expression of ICAM-1 and NE in the lung tissue was obviously up-regulated, and the percentage of CD11b/CD18 double positive PMN significantly increased (P treatment group (P complicated with LI, resulting in the adherence of PMN to pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, and then activating PMN to release NE and aggravate LI. GBE could alleviate LI through down-regulating the expression ICAM-1 and CD11b/CD18

  15. Prepartal Energy Intake Alters Blood Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Transcriptome During the Peripartal Period in Holstein Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agrawal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the dairy industry, cow health and farmer profits depend on the balance between diet (ie, nutrient composition, daily intake and metabolism. This is especially true during the transition period, where dramatic physiological changes foster vulnerability to immunosuppression, negative energy balance, and clinical and subclinical disorders. Using an Agilent microarray platform, this study examined changes in the transcriptome of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs due to prepartal dietary intake. Holstein cows were fed a high-straw, control-energy diet (CON; NE L  = 1.34 Mcal/kg or overfed a moderate-energy diet (OVE; NE L  = 1.62 Mcal/kg during the dry period. Blood for PMNL isolation and metabolite analysis was collected at −14 and +7 days relative to parturition. At an analysis of variance false discovery rate <0.05, energy intake (OVE vs CON influenced 1806 genes. Dynamic Impact Approach bioinformatics analysis classified treatment effects on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, including activated oxidative phosphorylation and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids and inhibited RNA polymerase, proteasome, and toll-like receptor signaling pathway. This analysis indicates that processes critical for energy metabolism and cellular and immune function were affected with mixed results. However, overall interpretation of the transcriptome data agreed in part with literature documenting a potentially detrimental, chronic activation of PMNL in response to overfeeding. The widespread, transcriptome-level changes captured here confirm the importance of dietary energy adjustments around calving on the immune system.

  16. Enhanced expression of heat shock proteins in activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes in patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, N; Ogura, H; Tanaka, H; Koh, T; Nakamori, Y; Noborio, M; Shiozaki, T; Nishino, M; Kuwagata, Y; Shimazu, T; Sugimoto, H

    2001-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) in cells, as molecular chaperons, have been reported to regulate cell functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the HSP expression in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) from severe septic patients and the relation between the expression of HSPs and PMNL function. In blood samples from 21 patients with sepsis and serum C-reactive protein levels more than 10 mg/dL, we used flow cytometry to measure expressions of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90; oxidative activity; and levels of apoptosis in PMNLs during sepsis. In in vitro studies, we used cells from 14 healthy volunteers to examine the relation between the expression of HSP70 and PMNL function. Quercetin (30 microM), a suppressor of HSP, and sodium arsenite (100 microM), an inducer of HSP, were used to regulate the expression of HSP70 in PMNLs, and oxidative activity and apoptosis in these cells were measured. In patients with sepsis, the expressions of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 and oxidative activity in PMNLs were significantly increased. Apoptosis of these PMNLs was markedly inhibited. In the in vitro studies, administration of sodium arsenite enhanced the expression of HSP70, significantly increased oxidative activity, and inhibited apoptosis. Administration of quercetin before sodium arsenite prevented the expression of HSP70, the increase in oxidative activity, and the inhibition of apoptosis. Sepsis causes the enhanced expression of HSPs in activated PMNLs. In PMNLs with enhanced expression of HSP70, oxidative activity is increased and apoptosis is inhibited. The enhanced expression of HSPs may play a role in regulating PMNL function in patients with sepsis.

  17. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, H.H.; D'Amico, R.; Monfils, P.; Burchard, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions

  18. Bovine Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Cast Neutrophil Extracellular Traps against the Abortive Parasite Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagra-Blanco, Rodolfo; Silva, Liliana M. R.; Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Yang, Zhengtao; Li, Jianhua; Gärtner, Ulrich; Taubert, Anja; Zhang, Xichen; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum represents a relevant apicomplexan parasite causing severe reproductive disorders in cattle worldwide. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) generation was recently described as an efficient defense mechanism of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) acting against different parasites. In vitro interactions of bovine PMN with N. caninum were analyzed at different ratios and time spans. Extracellular DNA staining was used to illustrate the typical molecules of NETs [i.e., histones (H3), neutrophil elastase (NE), myeloperoxidase (MPO), pentraxin] via antibody-based immunofluorescence analyses. Functional inhibitor treatments were applied to reveal the role of several enzymes [NADPH oxidase (NOX), NE, MPO, PAD4], ATP-dependent P2Y2 receptor, store-operated Ca++entry (SOCE), CD11b receptor, ERK1/2- and p38 MAPK-mediated signaling pathway in tachyzoite-triggered NETosis. N. caninum tachyzoites triggered NETosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed NET structures being released by bovine PMN and entrapping tachyzoites. N. caninum-induced NET formation was found not to be NOX-, NE-, MPO-, PAD4-, ERK1/2-, and p38 MAP kinase-dependent process since inhibition of these enzymes led to a slight decrease of NET formation. CD11b was also identified as a neutrophil receptor being involved in NETosis. Furthermore, N. caninum-triggered NETosis depends on Ca++ influx as well as neutrophil metabolism since both the inhibition of SOCE and of P2Y2-mediated ATP uptake diminished NET formation. Host cell invasion assays indicated that PMN-derived NETosis hampered tachyzoites from active host cell invasion, thereby inhibiting further intracellular replication. NET formation represents an early and effective mechanism of response of the innate immune system, which might reduce initial infection rates during the acute phase of cattle neosporosis. PMID:28611772

  19. Leukotriene B5 is formed in human neutrophils after dietary supplementation with icosapentaenoic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, T; Fischer, S; Weber, P C

    1985-01-01

    Incorporation and conversion of icosapentaenoic acid (20:5, n - 3) by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied in volunteers (n = 6) ingesting a normal Western diet supplemented with icosapentaenoic acid (approximately equal to 4 g daily). Ingestion of icosapentaenoic acid leads to formation of biologically less active leukotriene B5 (LTB5) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) stimulated with ionophore A23187. LTB5 was identified on HPLC by UV absorption and by GC/MS and showed a b...

  20. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E Castañeda-Delgado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs cathelicidin (LL-37 and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1 in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals.

  1. The association between depression and adherence to antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-17

    Mar 17, 2011 ... Background: Depressive disorders are associated with poorer health outcomes in people living with human immunodeficiency virus infection and .... economical tool to assess adherence in resource-poor settings.25 ..... Willard S. Relationship of emotional intelligence and adherence to combination.

  2. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects.

  3. adherence to antiretroviral regimens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to macro- and microeconomic costs.' What soon became evident, however, was the vital importance of patient adherence with prescribed medication in order to garner the benefits that were so rapidly becoming available. As a result, much attention has recently been paid to this aspect of management. Both clinicians and ...

  4. Early polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation correlates with the development of posttraumatic cerebral edema in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoettle, R.J.; Kochanek, P.M.; Magargee, M.J.; Uhl, M.W.; Nemoto, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in the development of posttraumatic cerebral edema, we quantitatively assessed the time course and magnitude of PMN accumulation and its relationship to cerebral edema formation after cerebral trauma in 78 rats. 111 In-labeled PMN accumulation was measured in 26 rats in the first 8 h after right hemispheric percussive cerebral trauma or a sham control condition. 51 Cr-labeled erythrocyte accumulation was measured simultaneously in 22 rats to assess the contribution of expansion of blood volume to early posttraumatic PMN accumulation. Edema formation [right-left (R-L) hemispheric difference in percent brain water], R-L hemispheric labeled-PMN accumulation, and blood volume index-adjusted PMN accumulation were measured between 0-2 h and 4-8 h posttrauma. PMN accumulation was elevated markedly in the first 2 h posttrauma compared with values in sham controls (13.45 +/- 2.53 vs -0.03 +/- 0.31, p less than 0.01) but not when adjusted for blood volume index (BVI), suggesting that PMN accumulation in the first 2 h posttrauma was due to expansion of blood volume. Between 4 and 8 h posttrauma, however, both total (2.56 +/- 0.82 vs -0.29 +/- 0.52) and BVI-adjusted (8.78 +/- 3.97 vs -0.48 +/- 0.79) PMN accumulation were elevated (p less than 0.05) compared with sham. Brain edema and total PMN accumulation were significantly correlated at both 2 h and 8 h posttrauma (r2 = 0.77, p less than 0.001, and r2 = 0.69, p less than 0.002, respectively), but a significant correlation between edema and BVI-adjusted PMN accumulation was observed only at 8 h posttrauma (r2 = 0.96, p less than 0.001). These data show that PMN accumulation after traumatic brain injury occurs with an initial phase explained by an increase in blood volume in the first 2 h posttrauma followed by a subsequent acute inflammatory phase

  5. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The roles of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and type 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) in the regulation of the immune complex-elicited respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Antonsen, S; Matthiesen, S H

    1997-01-01

    The binding of immune complexes (IC) to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the consequent respiratory burst (RB) were investigated in whole blood cell preparations suspended in 75% human serum, using flow cytometry. Blockade of the complement receptor (CR)1 receptor sites for C3b on whole blood...... and inhibited the IC binding to PMN in a whole blood cell preparation, with or without mAb 3D9, by approximately 40% from 15-40 min while reducing their RB over 40 min to approximately one third. Blockade of CR1 on either erythrocytes (E) or leukocytes, before mixing the populations, revealed...... that the potentiation of the RB by mAb 3D9 was associated with abrogation of E-CR1 function, whereas blockade of leukocyte-CR1 had a diminishing effect. Exposure to IC at high concentrations induced release of both specific and azurophilic granule contents from PMN. The latter was CR3 dependent in that blockade...

  7. Tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages: a simple and efficient method for the generation and long-term cultivation as non-adherent cells in a serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Hurley, E L; Epstein, D A; Pauly, J L

    1992-01-01

    We report a simple and efficient culture procedure for the generation of tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages (MAC). In this method, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, isolated using a conventional Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient procedure, are cultured as a heterogenous leukocyte population in Teflon or other hydrophobic cultureware, in a commercially available serum-free culture medium (M-SFM) that has been formulated specifically for the cultivation and ex vivo stimulation of human monocytes and MAC, and in the absence of exogenous mitogens, antigens, cytokines or other stimulants. This procedure features a negative-selection technique that takes advantage of the differential survival of blood leukocytes. Using the prescribed in vitro conditions, lymphocytes survived relatively poorly, whereas monocytes differentiated in the absence of exogenous stimulants into mature tumour-cytolytic MAC. The MAC were present as non-adherent, single cells that expressed good viability (greater than 95%) for a prolonged period (greater than 60 days). When compared to conventional procedures for generating MAC, the prescribed technique is thought to offer several important advantages in that it: (a) eliminates the tedious and cumbersome monocyte isolation procedures, thus providing a significant savings not only in time and money but also in eliminating repetitive cell manipulations that have often been associated with damage to monocyte morphology and/or function; (b) reduces the loss of monocyte subsets that are not recovered during specific isolation procedures; (c) facilitates harvesting a single cell, non-adherent suspension of immunocompetent MAC suitable for various examinations including analyses defining MAC morphology, cytochemistry, phenotype and function; and (d) eliminates variability and artifacts associated with different sera that are utilised frequently as medium supplements. The utility of the prescribed method is illustrated by the

  8. Humanized In Vivo Model for Streptococcal Impetigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzino, Dominick A.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Bessen, Debra E.

    2000-01-01

    An in vivo model for group A streptococcal (GAS) impetigo was developed, whereby human neonatal foreskin engrafted onto SCID mice was superficially damaged and bacteria were topically applied. Severe infection, indicated by a purulent exudate, could be induced with as few as 1,000 CFU of a virulent strain. Early findings (48 h) showed a loss of stratum corneum and adherence of short chains of gram-positive cocci to the external surface of granular keratinocytes. This was followed by an increasing infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) of mouse origin, until a thick layer of pus covered an intact epidermis, with massive clumps of cocci accumulated at the outer rim of the pus layer. By 7 days postinoculation, the epidermis was heavily eroded; in some instances, the dermis contained pockets (ulcers) filled with cocci, similar to that observed for ecthyma. Importantly, virulent GAS underwent reproduction, resulting in a net increase in CFU of 20- to 14,000-fold. The majority of emm pattern D strains had a higher gross pathology score than emm pattern A, B, or C (A–C) strains, consistent with epidemiological findings that pattern D strains have a strong tendency to cause impetigo, whereas pattern A–C strains are more likely to cause pharyngitis. PMID:10768985

  9. Patient adherence with COPD therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Rand

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there are very few published studies on adherence to treatment regimens in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the evidence that exists suggests that, as with asthma therapy, adherence is poor. Patient beliefs about COPD, as well as their motivation and expectations about the likelihood of success of medical interventions, can influence adherence rates. Other critical factors include the patient's understanding of their illness and therapy, and the complexity of the prescribed treatment regimen. Incorrect inhaler technique is also a common failing. When prescribing in primary or specialist care, healthcare professionals should address adherence as a vital part of the patient consultation. Improved patient education may also increase adherence rates.

  10. Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative dental material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Lawaf

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. Materials and methods. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with different incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Student's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. Results. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes. However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. Conclusion. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer restorative material.

  11. Candida albicans Adherence to Glass Ionomer Restorative Dental Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the coloni-zation and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable infor-mation about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little infor-mation available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with differ-ent incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Stu-dent's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes). However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ion-omer restorative material.

  12. [An analysis of adherence to the "Recommendations for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults" in a penitentiary in Barcelona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Andrés; Gallego, Carlos; Blanco, Xosé Ramón; Puig, Arturo; Argüelles, María José; Moruno, Laura

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the adherence to the "Guidelines for the treatment of HIV-infected adults" among HIV-infected prison inmates. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010 in the Quatre Camins Prison (Barcelona, Spain). Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic variables were collected. We verified whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) met the Guidelines and analyzed the variables associated with compliance using bivariate and multivariate analysis. There were a total of 202 HIV infected prison inmates, 83.2% of whom were on ART. An undetectable viral load (VL) was observed in 80.4% of treated patients. The large majority (86.1%) met the guidelines, and 42.9% of non-compliance to guidelines was because the patients refused ART. More undetectable VL (P=.001; ORA: 4,30, 95%CI: 1,85 to 10.0) was found in those patients following the guidelines. Compliance with the guidelines is high, and is significantly associated with undetectable VL. We suggest evaluating the quality of prescriptions periodically, and to correct them if needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam AG; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of adherence-enhancing interventions. Our objective was to review evidence on predictors/correlates of adherence to ART, and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of their impact on adher...

  14. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Overexpression Initiates a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition and Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Cells following Expansion in Long Term Adherent Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Muir

    Full Text Available A replenishable source of insulin-producing cells has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Attempts to culture and expand pancreatic β-cells in vitro have resulted in their transition from insulin-producing epithelial cells to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs with high proliferative capacity but devoid of any hormone production. The aim of this study was to determine whether the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4, could induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET of the cultured cells. Islet-enriched pancreatic cells, allowed to dedifferentiate and expand in adherent cell culture, were transduced with an adenovirus containing KLF4 (Ad-Klf4. Cells were subsequently analysed for changes in cell morphology by light microscopy, and for the presence of epithelial and pancreatic markers by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT/PCR. Infection with Ad-Klf4 resulted in morphological changes, down-regulation of mesenchymal markers, and re-expression of both epithelial and pancreatic cell markers including insulin and transcription factors specific to β-cells. This effect was further enhanced by culturing cells in suspension. However, the effects of Ad-KLf4 were transient and this was shown to be due to increased apoptosis in Klf4-expressing cells. Klf4 has been recently identified as a pioneer factor with the ability to modulate the structure of chromatin and enhance reprogramming/transdifferentiation. Our results show that Klf4 may have a role in the redifferentiation of expanded pancreatic cells in culture, but before this can be achieved the off-target effects that result in increased apoptosis would need to be overcome.

  15. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  16. Combination of autoantibodies against different histone proteins influences complement-dependent phagocytosis of necrotic cell material by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lefort, Malin H; Tydén, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with autoantibody-coated engulfed necrotic cell material (NC) are frequently seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the roles of complement, different antihistone antibodies (anti-H ab), and oxidative burst in the phagocytosis of NC by PMN...

  17. The assessment of serum-mediated phagocytosis of necrotic material by polymorphonuclear leukocytes to diagnose and predict the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compagno, Michele; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum-mediated phagocytosis of antibody- and complement-opsonized necrotic cell material (NCM) by polymorphonuclear leukocytes can be quantified by using a flow cytometry-based assay. The phagocytosis of necrotic cell material (PNC) assay parallels the well-known lupus erythematosus c...

  18. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte dysfunction during short term metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia in type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, H; Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) ingestion of particles coated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli was compared to other PMN functions in seven patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during short-term controlled metabolic changes from normo- to hyperglycemia...... without ketoacidosis. Factors known to interfere with PMN functions were excluded. PMN ingestion of particles coated with both LPS and bovine serum albumin became reduced from normo- to hyperglycemia. PMN motility was impaired in IDDM, but did not seem to be affected by short-term changes in metabolic...... control. PMN metabolism did not change from normo-to hyperglycemia. Particle-uptake by diabetic PMN is impaired after short term hyperglycemia in the range normally occurring in diabetics in every-day life....

  19. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes restrict growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    of chronically infected CF patients. A novel, quantitative peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH)-based method was used to estimate the in vivo growth rates of P. aeruginosa directly in lung tissue samples from CF patients and the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in infected lungs...... in a mouse model. The growth rate of P. aeruginosa within CF lungs did not correlate with the dimensions of bacterial aggregates but showed an inverse correlation to the concentration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surrounding the bacteria. A growth-limiting effect on P. aeruginosa by PMNs was also...... PMNs slow the growth of the bacteria and render them less susceptible to antibiotic treatment while enabling them to persist by anaerobic respiration....

  20. Mixed-species RNAseq analysis of human lymphoma cells adhering to mouse stromal cells identifies a core gene set that is also differentially expressed in the lymph node microenvironment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Gustav; Henriksson, Johan; Sander, Birgitta; Wright, Anthony P

    2018-04-01

    A subset of hematologic cancer patients is refractory to treatment or suffers relapse, due in part to minimal residual disease, whereby some cancer cells survive treatment. Cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance is an important mechanism, whereby cancer cells receive survival signals via interaction with e.g. stromal cells. No genome-wide studies of in vitro systems have yet been performed to compare gene expression in different cell subsets within a co-culture and cells grown separately. Using RNA sequencing and species-specific read mapping, we compared transcript levels in human Jeko-1 mantle cell lymphoma cells stably adhered to mouse MS-5 stromal cells or in suspension within a co-culture or cultured separately as well as in stromal cells in co-culture or in separate culture. From 1050 differentially expressed transcripts in adherent mantle cell lymphoma cells, we identified 24 functional categories that together represent four main functional themes, anti-apoptosis, B-cell signaling, cell adhesion/migration and early mitosis. A comparison with previous mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia studies, of gene expression differences between lymph node and blood, identified 116 genes that are differentially expressed in all three studies. From these genes, we suggest a core set of genes ( CCL3, CCL4, DUSP4, ETV5, ICAM1, IL15RA, IL21R, IL4I1, MFSD2A, NFKB1, NFKBIE, SEMA7A, TMEM2 ) characteristic of cells undergoing cell-adhesion-mediated microenvironment signaling in mantle cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The model system developed and characterized here together with the core gene set will be useful for future studies of pathways that mediate increased cancer cell survival and drug resistance mechanisms. Copyright© 2018 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. Treatment Adherence in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite developments in treatment options there is no significant increase in treatment adherence ratios. Inadherence in psychiatric disorders is higher than the other diseases. Loss of insight, drugs' side effects, sociodemographic features, personality traits are major factors affecting the treatment adherence. Determining and overcoming these factors for each disorder will help to improve adherence and reduce the treatment costs and hospitalization. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(1: 85-93

  2. Dietary Fiber Intake is Associated with Increased Colonic Mucosal GPR43+ Polymorphonuclear Infiltration in Active Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingli; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zuo, Lugen; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 43/free fatty acid receptor 2 (GPR43/FFAR2) is essential for polymorphonuclear (PMN) recruitment. We investigated the expression of GPR43/FFAR2 in the colon from Crohn's disease patients and whether dietary fiber in enteral nutrition increases GPR43+ polymorphonuclear infiltration in mucosa. Segments of ascending colon and white blood cells from peripheral blood were obtained from 46 Crohn's disease patients and 10 colon cancer patients. The Crohn's disease patients were grouped by the activity of disease (active or remission) and enteral nutrition with or without dietary fiber. Histological feature, expression and location of GPR43/FFAR2 and level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and myeloperoxidase were assessed. The results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that the infiltration of immune cells, including GPR43+ PMN, was more severe in active Crohn's disease patients who consumed normal food or enteral nutrition with dietary fiber than in remission patients and colon cancer patients. This finding was supported by the results of GPR43 and myeloperoxidase expression. Active Crohn's disease (CD) patients who consumed enteral nutrition without dietary fiber exhibited severe immune cell infiltration similar to the other active CD patients, but GPR43+ PMNs were rarely observed. The level of TNF-α mRNA in active Crohn's disease patients was higher than those of the other patients. In conclusion, the use of dietary fiber in enteral nutrition by active Crohn's disease patients might increase GPR43+ PMNs infiltration in colon mucosa. This effect was not observed in Crohn's disease patients in remission.

  3. Dietary Fiber Intake is Associated with Increased Colonic Mucosal GPR43+ Polymorphonuclear Infiltration in Active Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingli; Zhu, Weiming; Gong, Jianfeng; Zuo, Lugen; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 43/free fatty acid receptor 2 (GPR43/FFAR2) is essential for polymorphonuclear (PMN) recruitment. We investigated the expression of GPR43/FFAR2 in the colon from Crohn’s disease patients and whether dietary fiber in enteral nutrition increases GPR43+ polymorphonuclear infiltration in mucosa. Segments of ascending colon and white blood cells from peripheral blood were obtained from 46 Crohn’s disease patients and 10 colon cancer patients. The Crohn’s disease patients were grouped by the activity of disease (active or remission) and enteral nutrition with or without dietary fiber. Histological feature, expression and location of GPR43/FFAR2 and level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and myeloperoxidase were assessed. The results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that the infiltration of immune cells, including GPR43+ PMN, was more severe in active Crohn’s disease patients who consumed normal food or enteral nutrition with dietary fiber than in remission patients and colon cancer patients. This finding was supported by the results of GPR43 and myeloperoxidase expression. Active Crohn’s disease (CD) patients who consumed enteral nutrition without dietary fiber exhibited severe immune cell infiltration similar to the other active CD patients, but GPR43+ PMNs were rarely observed. The level of TNF-α mRNA in active Crohn’s disease patients was higher than those of the other patients. In conclusion, the use of dietary fiber in enteral nutrition by active Crohn’s disease patients might increase GPR43+ PMNs infiltration in colon mucosa. This effect was not observed in Crohn’s disease patients in remission. PMID:26140540

  4. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  5. Reinforcing adherence to antihypertensive medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Alessi, Sheila M; Byrne, Shannon; White, William B

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated a reinforcement intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Twenty-nine participants were randomized to standard care or standard care plus financial reinforcement for 12 weeks. Participants in the reinforcement group received a cell phone to self-record videos of adherence, for which they earned rewards. These participants sent videos demonstrating on-time adherence 97.8% of the time. Pill count adherence differed significantly between the groups during treatment, with 98.8%±1.5% of pills taken during treatment in the reinforcement condition vs 92.6%±9.2% in standard care (PBenefits persisted throughout a 3-month follow-up, with 93.8%±9.3% vs 78.0%±18.5% of pills taken (Pphone technology and financial reinforcement holds potential to improve adherence. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-10-13

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis , permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218's effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  7. Phagocytosis of haemozoin (malarial pigment enhances metalloproteinase-9 activity in human adherent monocytes: Role of IL-1beta and 15-HETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giribaldi Giuliana

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown previously that human monocytes fed with haemozoin (HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs displayed increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 enzyme activity and protein/mRNA expression and increased TNF production, and showed higher matrix invasion ability. The present study utilized the same experimental model to analyse the effect of phagocytosis of: HZ, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ and trophozoites on production of IL-1beta and MMP-9 activity and expression. The second aim was to find out which component of HZ was responsible for the effects. Methods Native HZ freshly isolated from Plasmodium falciparum (Palo Alto strain, Mycoplasma-free, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ, trophozoites and control meals such as opsonized non-parasitized RBCs and inert latex particles, were fed to human monocytes. The production of IL-1beta by differently fed monocytes, in presence or absence of specific MMP-9 inhibitor or anti-hIL-1beta antibodies, was quantified in supernatants by ELISA. Expression of IL-1beta was analysed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. MMP-9 activity and protein expression were quantified by gelatin zymography and Western blotting. Results Monocytes fed with HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs generated increased amounts of IL-1beta and enhanced enzyme activity (in cell supernatants and protein/mRNA expression (in cell lysates of monocyte MMP-9. The latter appears to be causally related to enhanced IL-1beta production, as enhancement of both expression and enzyme activity were abrogated by anti-hIL-1beta Abs. Upregulation of IL-1beta and MMP-9 were absent in monocytes fed with beta-haematin or delipidized HZ, indicating a role for HZ-attached or HZ-generated lipid components. 15-HETE (15(S,R-hydroxy-6,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid a potent lipoperoxidation derivative generated by HZ from arachidonic acid via haem-catalysis was identified as one mediator

  8. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  9. Piracy of decay-accelerating factor (CD55) signal transduction by the diffusely adhering strain Escherichia coli C1845 promotes cytoskeletal F-actin rearrangements in cultured human intestinal INT407 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, I; Servin, A L; Bernet-Camard, M F

    1998-09-01

    Diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 (clinical isolate) harboring the fimbrial adhesin F1845 can infect cultured human differentiated intestinal epithelial cells; this process is followed by the disassembly of the actin network in the apical domain. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism by which DAEC C1845 promotes F-actin rearrangements. For this purpose, we used a human embryonic intestinal cell line (INT407) expressing the membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein-anchored decay-accelerating factor (DAF), the receptor of the F1845 adhesin. We show here that infection of INT407 cells by DAEC C1845 can provoke dramatic F-actin rearrangements without cell entry. Clustering of phosphotyrosines was observed, revealing that the DAEC C1845-DAF interaction involves the recruitment of signal transduction molecules. A pharmacological approach with a subset of inhibitors of signal transduction molecules was used to identify the cascade of signal transduction molecules that are coupled to the DAF, that are activated upon infection, and that promote the F-actin rearrangements. DAEC C1845-induced F-actin rearrangements can be blocked dose dependently by protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cgamma, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and Ca2+ inhibitors. F-actin rearrangements and blocking by inhibitors were observed after infection of the cells with two E. coli recombinants carrying the plasmids containing the fimbrial adhesin F1845 or the fimbrial hemagglutinin Dr, belonging to the same family of adhesins. These findings show that the DAEC Dr family of pathogens promotes alterations in the intestinal cell cytoskeleton by piracy of the DAF-GPI signal cascade without bacterial cell entry.

  10. First step in using molecular data for microbial food safety risk assessment; hazard identification of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by coupling genomic data with in vitro adherence to human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielaat, Annemarie; Boer, Martin P; Wijnands, Lucas M; van Hoek, Angela H A M; Bouw, El; Barker, Gary C; Teunis, Peter F M; Aarts, Henk J M; Franz, Eelco

    2015-11-20

    The potential for using whole genome sequencing (WGS) data in microbiological risk assessment (MRA) has been discussed on several occasions since the beginning of this century. Still, the proposed heuristic approaches have never been applied in a practical framework. This is due to the non-trivial problem of mapping microbial information consisting of thousands of loci onto a probabilistic scale for risks. The paradigm change for MRA involves translation of multidimensional microbial genotypic information to much reduced (integrated) phenotypic information and onwards to a single measure of human risk (i.e. probability of illness). In this paper a first approach in methodology development is described for the application of WGS data in MRA; this is supported by a practical example. That is, combining genetic data (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 with phenotypic data (in vitro adherence to epithelial cells as a proxy for virulence) leads to hazard identification in a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS). This application revealed practical implications when using SNP data for MRA. These can be summarized by considering the following main issues: optimum sample size for valid inference on population level, correction for population structure, quantification and calibration of results, reproducibility of the analysis, links with epidemiological data, anchoring and integration of results into a systems biology approach for the translation of molecular studies to human health risk. Future developments in genetic data analysis for MRA should aim at resolving the mapping problem of processing genetic sequences to come to a quantitative description of risk. The development of a clustering scheme focusing on biologically relevant information of the microbe involved would be a useful approach in molecular data reduction for risk assessment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Physiology of polymorphonuclear neutrophils Fisiología de los polimorfonucleares neutrófilos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana García de Olarte

    1991-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Phagocytic cells. particularly neutrophils. are a fundamental part of the host response against aggression by infectious as well as non-infectious agents. and they are Involved In the generation of tissue damage during Inflammatory response. Cell responses of neutrophils depend on a series of closely related events like adherence to and diapedesis through endothelial cells. migration toward the sites of inflammation. phagocytósis and destruction of opsonized particles. All these actions are performed through the perfect integration between the systems of cellular activation and microbicidal mechanisms. Both oxygen-dependent and independent. A large portion of the biochemical. molecular and genetic mechanisms that lead to the physiologic response of neutrophils has been elucidated which permits the identification and understanding of the pathogenesis of disorders affecting these cells.

    Las células fagocíticas, en particular los neutrófilos son una pieza fundamental en la respuesta del huésped contra la agresión por diversos agentes, Infecciosos O no y están Involucradas en la generación de daño tisular durante la inflamación. Las respuestas celulares de los PMN dependen de una serie de hechos íntimamente relacionados, como la adherencia al endotelio vascular, la diapedesis a través de las células endoteliales, la migración hacia los sitios de Inflamación y la fagocitosis y ulterior destrucción de las partículas opsonizadas. Todo esto se logra mediante la integración perfecta entre los sistemas de activación celular y los mecanismos microbicidas, dependientes O no del oxígeno. Se ha esclarecido una gran parte de los mecanismos bioquímicos, moleculares y genéticos que llevan a la respuesta fisiológica de los neutrófilos lo cual ha permitido Identificar y entender la patogénesis de

  12. Constitutively Opa-expressing and Opa-deficient neisseria gonorrhoeae strains differentially stimulate and survive exposure to human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Louise M; Criss, Alison K

    2013-07-01

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus [Gc]) opacity-associated (Opa) proteins mediate bacterial binding and internalization by human epithelial cells and neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]). Investigating the contribution of Opa proteins to gonococcal pathogenesis is complicated by high-frequency phase variation of the opa genes. We therefore engineered a derivative of Gc strain FA1090 in which all opa genes were deleted in frame, termed Opaless. Opaless Gc remained uniformly Opa negative (Opa(-)), whereas cultures of predominantly Opa(-) parental Gc and an intermediate lacking the "translucent" subset of opa genes (ΔopaBEGK) stochastically gave rise to Opa-positive (Opa(+)) bacterial colonies. Loss of Opa expression did not affect Gc growth. Opaless Gc survived exposure to primary human PMNs and suppressed the PMN oxidative burst akin to parental, Opa(-) bacteria. Notably, unopsonized Opaless Gc was internalized by adherent, chemokine-primed, primary human PMNs, by an actin-dependent process. When a non-phase-variable, in-frame allele of FA1090 opaD was reintroduced into Opaless Gc, the bacteria induced the PMN oxidative burst, and OpaD(+) Gc survived less well after exposure to PMNs compared to Opa(-) bacteria. These derivatives provide a robust system for assessing the role of Opa proteins in Gc biology.

  13. Silk screen based dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthan, Shweta; Gomes, James; Roychoudhury, Pradip K

    2014-08-01

    Spin-filters have been primarily used for producing therapeutic proteins from mammalian cells. However, disposability and/or high filter clogging of the existing spin-filter systems affect the process economy and productivity. Hence, to address these drawbacks a reusable dual spin-filter module for perfusion culture of adherent and non-adherent mammalian cells was designed. Two non-woven Bombyx mori silk layers were used as filter screen; the outer layer was conducive to cell attachment whilst the inner was non-conducive. Adherent cells can be cultured either in suspended mode using its inner single module or as monolayer of cells using its dual concentric module. We achieved 30 % higher urokinase productivity as compared to the stainless-steel spin-filter during perfusion experiments of adherent human kidney cells in suspended mode. This was due to the hydrophobic and negatively-charged silk screen that allows clog-free perfusion culture for prolonged periods.

  14. Effects of Acer okamotoanum sap on the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Yang, Mhan-Pyo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-02-01

    Sap is a plant fluid that primarily consists of water and small amounts of mineral elements, sugars, hormones and other nutrients. Acer mono (A. mono) is an endemic Korean mono maple which was recently suggested to have health benefits due to its abundant calcium and magnesium ion content. In the present study, we examined the effects of sap from Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) on the phagocytic response of mouse neutrophils in vivo and rat and canine neutrophils in vitro. We tested the regulation of phagocytic activity, oxidative burst activity (OBA) and the levels of filamentous polymeric actin (F-actin) in the absence and presence of dexamethasone (DEX) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that DEX primarily reduced OBA in the mouse neutrophils, and that this was reversed in the presence of the sap. By contrast, the phagocytic activity of the mouse cells was not regulated by either DEX or the sap. Rat and canine polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) responded in vitro to the sap in a similar manner by increasing OBA. However, regulation of phagocytic activity by the sap was different between the species. In canine PMNs, phagocytic activity was enhanced by the sap at a high dose, while it did not significantly modulate this activity in rat PMNs. These findings suggest that the sap of A. okamotoanum stimulates neutrophil activity in the mouse, rat and canine by increasing OBA in vivo and in vitro, and thus may have a potential antimicrobial effect in the PMNs of patients with infections.

  15. Recruitment of 99m-technetium- or 111-indium-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes in experimentally induced pyogranulomas in lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilloteau, L.; Pepin, M.; Pardon, P.; Le Pape, A. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Nouzilly (France))

    1990-10-01

    The recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) during the development of experimental pyogranulomas induced by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was followed in nine male lambs by scintigraphic examination. Autologous blood PMNs were labelled with 99m-technetium or 111-indium and were re-injected intravenously into infected lambs. The functional properties of the labelled cells were monitored (1) in vitro by measuring their phagocytic and bactericidal activity against C. pseudotuberculosis and their chemotaxis under agarose, and (2) in vivo by following scintigraphically their capacity to accumulate in an inflammatory focus induced by intradermal injection of latex beads coated with Salmonella abortus equi lipopolysaccharide. Following inoculation of corynebacteria into the right ear of lambs, radioactive foci were observed to be localized in the right ear and in the draining lymph nodes during the 4 days following inoculation. Histopathological examination performed 32 h after inoculation confirmed the intense accumulation of PMNs at these sites. With the exception of one animal, which presented visible foci in the neck 14 days postinoculation, no radioactive foci were observed during the later phases of experimental infection, despite the presence of multiple pyogranulomas which were confirmed by bacteriological examination after necropsy of the lambs. Histopathological examination of these lesions revealed layers of fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and macrophages surrounding a necrotic centre. The results of these studies suggest that the contribution of PMNs during the chronic phase of inflammation is considerably reduced in comparison with the acute inflammatory phase of the infectious process.

  16. Macrophage-Derived Protein S Facilitates Apoptotic Polymorphonuclear Cell Clearance by Resolution Phase Macrophages and Supports Their Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbroso, Delphine; Soboh, Soaad; Maimon, Avi; Schif-Zuck, Sagie; Ariel, Amiram; Burstyn-Cohen, Tal

    2018-01-01

    The complete resolution of inflammation requires the uptake of apoptotic polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) by local macrophages (efferocytosis) and the consequent reprogramming of the engulfing phagocytes to reparative and pro-resolving phenotypes. The tyrosine kinase receptors TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK (collectively named TAM) are fundamental mediators in regulating inflammatory responses and efferocytosis. Protein S (PROS1) is a ligand for all TAM receptors that mediates various aspects of their activity. However, the involvement of PROS1 in the resolution of inflammation is incompletely understood. Here, we report the upregulation of Pros1 in macrophages during the resolution of inflammation. Selective knockout of Pros1 in the myeloid lineage significantly downregulated macrophage pro-resolving properties. Hence, Pros1 -deficient macrophages engulfed fewer apoptotic PMN remnants in vivo , and exogenous PROS1 rescued impaired efferocytosis ex vivo . Moreover, Pros1 -deficient peritoneal macrophages secreted higher levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators TNFα and CCL3, while they secreted lower levels of the reparative/anti-inflammatory IL-10 following exposure to lipopolysaccharide in comparison to their WT counterparts. Moreover, Pros1 -deficient macrophages expressed less of the anti-inflammatory/pro-resolving enzymes arginase-1 and 12/15-lipoxygenase and produced less of the specialized pro-resolving mediator resolvin D1. Altogether, our results suggest that macrophage-derived PROS1 is an important effector molecule in regulating the efferocytosis, maturation, and reprogramming of resolution phase macrophages, and imply that PROS1 could provide a new therapeutic target for inflammatory and fibrotic disorders.

  17. Limited role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in a pregnant mouse model of secondary infection by Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, R; Buendía, A J; Sánchez, J; Del Río, L; Seva, J; Navarro, J A; Salinas, J

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the clearance of infection, and in the development of specific immunity against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) secondary infection. A pregnant mouse model depleted of neutrophils by the RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody was used. No clinical signs were observed in depleted or non-depleted mice after secondary infection and no significant differences were observed in the litter size between the infected and control groups. In PMN-depleted mice C. abortus was not detected in the materno-fetal unit but merely produced low, persistent levels of infection in spleen and liver. In the non-depleted mice the level of infection was significantly lower, being resolved during the first few days post-reinfection. In both infected mice groups the immune response in the liver was quickly established and was seen to be composed mainly of CD4(+)T lymphocytes and macrophages. A Th1 response characterized by the presence of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in serum was observed during early infection, with significantly higher levels in the non-depleted animals. Our results suggest that PMNs have little influence on the control of C. abortus secondary infection, although they are a first line of defense and may influence the early production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Effects of topical vitamin E on corneal superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities and polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, Ayse; Bilgihan, Kamil; Yis, Ozgür; Sezer, Cem; Akyol, Gülen; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2003-04-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) induces free radical formation and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell infiltration in the cornea. Vitamin E is a free radical scavenger and protects the cells from reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of topical vitamin E on corneal PMN cell infiltration and corneal antioxidant enzyme activities after PRK. We studied four groups, each consisting of seven eyes. Group 1 were control eyes. In group 2 the corneal epithelium was removed by a blunt spatula (epithelial scrape). In group 3, corneal photoablation (59 micro m, 5 dioptres) was performed after epithelial removal (traditional PRK). In group 4 we tested the effects of topical Vitamin E after traditional PRK. Corneal tissues were removed and studied with enzymatic analysis (measurement of corneal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities) and histologically. Stromal PMN leucocyte counts were significantly higher after mechanical epithelial removal and traditional PRK (p < 0.05). Corneal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities decreased significantly after mechanical epithelial removal and traditional PRK (p < 0.05). In group 4, treated with vitamin E, corneal superoxide dismutase activity did not differ significantly from that in the medically non-treated groups, nor did corneal PMN cell infiltration after traditional PRK. The reduction of corneal glutathione peroxidase activity after PRK was reduced significantly after topical vitamin E treatment. Topical vitamin E treatment may be useful for reducing the harmful effects of reactive oxygen radical after epithelial scraping and PRK in that it increases corneal glutathione peroxidase activity.

  19. Effects of dietary supplementation of Chinese medicinal herbs on polymorphonuclear neutrophil immune activity and small intestinal morphology in weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C W; Lee, T T; Shih, Y C; Yu, B

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary Chinese medicinal herbs (CMH) supplementation composed of Panax ginseng, Dioscoreaceae opposite, Atractylodes macrocephala, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Ziziphus jujube and Platycodon grandiflorum, on the performance, intestinal tract morphology and immune activity in weanling pigs. Two hundred and forty weaned pigs were assigned randomly to four dietary groups including the negative control (basal diet), 0.1% CMH, 0.3% CMH and 0.114% antibiotic (Chlortetracycline calcium Complex, Sulfathiazole and Procaine Penicillin G) supplementation groups for a 28-day feeding trial. Results indicated that both CMH supplementation groups had a better gain and feed/gain than control group (CT) during the first 2 weeks of the experimental period. The 0.3% CMH had a significant decrease in the diarrhoea score in first 10 days of experimental period when compared with other groups. The CMH supplementation groups had a higher villous height, increased lactobacilli counts in digesta of ileum and decreased coliform counts in colon compared with CT. The immune activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), including the respiratory burst and Salmonella-killing ability, were significantly enhanced in CMH supplementation groups at day 7 of experiment period. The CMH and antibiotic supplementations increased the nutrient digestibility such as dietary dry matter, crude protein and gross energy in weanling pigs. In conclusion, the dietary CMH supplementation improved intestinal morphology and immune activities of PMNs, thus giving rise to nutrient digestibility and reduce diarrhoea frequency in weanling pigs. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail Protein in Preventing a Protective Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Response during Bubonic Plague▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O.; Callison, Julie A.; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K.; Plano, Gregory V.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node. PMID:21969002

  1. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail protein in preventing a protective polymorphonuclear leukocyte response during bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O; Callison, Julie A; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K; Plano, Gregory V

    2011-12-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node.

  2. The migration of 111Indium-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the oral cavity in the rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scully, C.; Challacombe, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    The route of migration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) from blood to the oral cavity was examined in rhesus monkeys. PMNL were isolated from the peripheral blood of eleven rhesus monkeys by dextran sedimentation, radiolabelled with 111 Indium and administered intravenously. Sequential samples of crevicular fluid washings (CFW), mixed and parotid saliva and mucosal washings were taken after injection of the labelled PMNL and harvested on glass fibre discs. Highest numbers of labelled PMNL were detected in CFW. CEll-associated radioactivity was detected in CFW within 20 min of injection of labelled PMNL and reached a maximal level 1 hour after injection. PMNL were found in CFW from monkeys with clinically normal gingiva but the number of labelled PMNL in CFW increased with increasing gingival index. Significant number of PMNL migrated into mixed saliva within 30 min, and low numbers of PMNL were detected in mucosal washings and in parotid saliva after 30 min. The results indicate that the migration time of the PMNL from blood to the oral cavity is less than 30 min, irrespective of the gingival index, that the gingival crevice is the main route of entry of PMNL to the oral cavity and that the numbers of PMNL migrating to the crevice increase as the gingival index rises. (author)

  3. The effect of short-term oral treatment with omeprazole or pantoprazole on the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewska, Maja; Garley, Marzena; Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jabłońska, Ewa; Jamiołkowski, Jacek; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies report an increased risk of enteric infections in patients treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) play a key role in host response to bacterial infection. We evaluated the effect of omeprazole and pantoprazole treatment on the PMN function. Fifteen patients were treated with omeprazole 20 mg daily and 15 patients with pantoprazole 40 mg daily for 7 days. Treatment with omeprazole or pantoprazole had no effect on spontaneous nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test results. Significant increase in the percentage of phagocytes in the omeprazole group in stimulated NBT test (by 69%) was found. Treatment with omeprazole or pantoprazole had no effect on nitric oxide (NO) concentration in the PMN culture supernatant and serum, cyclic guanosine monophosphate concentration in the PMN culture supernatant and serum, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in PMNs. In conclusion, treatment with PPI has no effect on NO production and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in PMNs. Interestingly, short-term treatment with omeprazole but not with pantoprazole enhances PMN reactive oxygen species production.

  4. Faster activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in resistant mice during early innate response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, C; Kobayashi, O

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are crucial for the outcome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We compared PMNs and inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and blood from susceptible BALB/c and resistant C3H/HeN mice 1 and 2 days after intratracheal...... was decreased 1 day after bacterial challenge, whereas the expression was increased after 2 days of challenge on PMNs of C3H/HeN mice only. These changes were accompanied by a more severe lung inflammation in BALB/c mice and faster clearance of the bacteria in C3H/HeN mice. In conclusion, the rapid early...... bacterial clearance in the lungs of C3H/HeN mice could be explained by faster activation of the PMNs, as indicated by the higher up-regulation of CD11b. The severe lung inflammation in BALB/c mice may be caused by the early higher content of G-CSF in the sera mobilizing PMNs from the bone marrow...

  5. Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nischal K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has transformed HIV infection into a treatable, chronic condition. However, the need to continue treatment for decades rather than years, calls for a long-term perspective of ART. Adherence to the regimen is essential for successful treatment and sustained viral control. Studies have indicated that at least 95% adherence to ART regimens is optimal. It has been demonstrated that a 10% higher level of adherence results in a 21% reduction in disease progression. The various factors affecting success of ART are social aspects like motivation to begin therapy, ability to adhere to therapy, lifestyle pattern, financial support, family support, pros and cons of starting therapy and pharmacological aspects like tolerability of the regimen, availability of the drugs. Also, the regimen′s pill burden, dosing frequency, food requirements, convenience, toxicity and drug interaction profile compared with other regimens are to be considered before starting ART. The lack of trust between clinician and patient, active drug and alcohol use, active mental illness (e.g. depression, lack of patient education and inability of patients to identify their medications, lack of reliable access to primary medical care or medication are considered to be predictors of inadequate adherence. Interventions at various levels, viz. patient level, medication level, healthcare level and community level, boost adherence and overall outcome of ART.

  6. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla SD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Shakti D Shukla,1,* Rory L Fairbairn,1,* David A Gell,1 Roger D Latham,1 Sukhwinder S Sohal,1,2 Eugene H Walters,1 Ronan F O’Toole11Breathe Well Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells.Objective: To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae.Methods: Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE. PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken.Results: PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial

  7. Human placental eXpanded (PLX) mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells confer neuroprotection to nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells exposed to ischemia by secretion of IL-6 and VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiani, Adi; Zahavi, Efrat; Netzer, Nir; Ofir, Racheli; Pinzur, Lena; Raveh, Shani; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Yavin, Ephraim; Lazarovici, Philip

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are potent candidates in stroke therapy due to their ability to secrete protective anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of human placental mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells (PLX) using an established ischemic model of nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated pheochromocytoma PC12 cells exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reperfusion. Under optimal conditions, 2 × 10⁵ PLX cells, added in a trans-well system, conferred 30-60% neuroprotection to PC12 cells subjected to ischemic insult. PC12 cell death, measured by LDH release, was reduced by PLX cells or by conditioned medium derived from PLX cells exposed to ischemia, suggesting the active release of factorial components. Since neuroprotection is a prominent function of the cytokine IL-6 and the angiogenic factor VEGF165, we measured their secretion using selective ELISA of the cells under ischemic or normoxic conditions. IL-6 and VEGF165 secretion by co-culture of PC12 and PLX cells was significantly higher under ischemic compared to normoxic conditions. Exogenous supplementation of 10 ng/ml each of IL-6 and VEGF165 to insulted PC12 cells conferred neuroprotection, reminiscent of the neuroprotective effect of PLX cells or their conditioned medium. Growth factors as well as co-culture conditioned medium effects were reduced by 70% and 20% upon pretreatment with 240 ng/ml Semaxanib (anti VEGF165) and/or 400 ng/ml neutralizing anti IL-6 antibody, respectively. Therefore, PLX-induced neuroprotection in ischemic PC12 cells may be partially explained by IL-6 and VEGF165 secretion. These findings may also account for the therapeutic effects seen in clinical trials after treatment with these cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deacylated lipopolysaccharide inhibits neutrophil adherence to endothelium induced by lipopolysaccharide in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Selective deacylation of the nonhydroxylated fatty acids from S. typhimurium LPS by an acyloxyacyl hydrolase isolated from leukocytes reduces toxic activity of LPS in vivo. We examined the effect of deacylated LPS on neutrophil adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE). Pretreatment of HUVE with LPS (13 ng/ml for 4 h) produced a marked increase in the adherence of subsequently added neutrophils. In contrast, there was no increase in the adherence of neutrophils to HUVE pretre...

  9. Adherence and pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, J; Paulissen, L J

    1990-01-01

    Adherence of many pathogenic organisms to the host cells has been associated with the presence of fimbriae. The exact role of these organelles in the adherence and pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis is not well established. Utilizing hemagglutination tests, S. enteritidis was shown to possess type 1 and type 3 fimbriae. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the isolated fimbriae showed that type 1 and 3 fimbriae of S. enteritidis had subunit M.r of 17 and 22 kDa, respectively. In vitro adherence assays suggested that S. enteritidis utilized type 1 fimbriae to adhere to human buccal and mouse small intestine epithelial cells. In addition, antibody produced against type 1 and type 3 fimbriae protected the mice from infection with a lethal dose of S. enteritidis. These results suggest that type 1 and possibly type 3 fimbriae are involved in the adherence and pathogenesis of S. enteritidis. The data further suggest that they may have a role in the adherence and pathogenesis of the other enteric organisms.

  10. The effect of prebiotics on adherence of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Robert; Jakubec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotics are generally considered to promote the function or viability of probiotics via their fermentation, but their effect on the adherence of probiotics is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of 4 commercially available prebiotics [Orafti GR, Orafti P95, and Orafti Synergy (Beneo GmbH, Mannheim, Germany), and Vivinal (Friesland Foods Domo, Amersfoort, the Netherlands)] and 3 simple saccharides (glucose, galactose, and lactose) on the adherence of 5 probiotic type strains, 2 lactococci starter cultures, and 5 potential dairy probiotic strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms (Tábor, Czech Republic). Adherence was tested in microtiter plates on the following types of substrate: polystyrene alone and polystyrene coated with either porcine mucus or cocultures of the human colon cell lines Caco2 and HT29-MXT (1:9 ratio of HT29-MXT:Caco2). Adherence was evaluated as a change in fluorescence in the well of a microtiter plate. The most commonly observed effect (with a few exceptions) of prebiotics was decreased adherence of the tested strains observed on all types of substrate. The tested saccharides, which are part of the residual compounds of the used prebiotics, had a very similar effect-eliciting a decrease in adherence ability in the majority of the probiotic strains. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymatic Activities of Bovine Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Milk Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils during Intramammary Inflammation Caused by Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prin-Mathieu, C.; Le Roux, Y.; Faure, G. C.; Laurent, F.; Béné, M. C.; Moussaoui, F.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocytes are recruited from peripheral blood into milk as part of the inflammatory response to mastitis. However, excessive accumulation of inflammatory cells alters the quality of milk and the proteases produced by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and macrophages may lead to mammary tissue damage. To investigate PMN recruitment and the kinetics of their intracytoplasmic enzymes in inflammation, we generated mastitis in six cows by intramammary infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Clinical signs of acute mastitis were observed in all of the cows, and normal status was resumed by 316 h. Intracytoplasmic elastase, collagenase, and cathepsin activities were measured within live cells by flow cytometry in peripheral blood leukocytes and milk PMNs before and during the inflammatory process (at 10 time points between 4 and 316 h). The proportion of immature PMNs was appreciated by CD33 surface labeling measured in flow cytometry. Leukopenia was observed in the peripheral blood 4 h postinfusion, concomitant to an increase in somatic cell counts in milk. CD33+ PMNs were preferentially recruited from the peripheral blood to milk. Enzymatic activities were detected in PMNs, lymphocytes, and monocytes at levels depending on the cell type, sample nature, and time of collection. Milk PMNs had lower enzymatic activities than peripheral blood PMNs. This study showed that milk PMNs recruited during LPS-induced experimental mastitis have an immature phenotype and significantly lower enzymatic activities than peripheral blood PMNs. This suggests that CD33, an adhesion molecule, may be involved in the egress from blood to milk and that the enzymatic contents of PMNs are partly used during this process. PMID:12093678

  12. In Vivo Ultrastructural Analysis of the Intimate Relationship between Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and the Chlamydial Developmental Cycle ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Roger G.; Whittimore, Judy; Bowlin, Anne K.; Wyrick, Priscilla B.

    2011-01-01

    We utilized a recently developed model of intracervical infection with Chlamydia muridarum in the mouse to elicit a relatively synchronous infection during the initial developmental cycle in order to examine at the ultrastructural level the development of both the chlamydial inclusion and the onset of the inflammatory response. At 18 h after infection, only a few elementary bodies attached to cells were visible, as were an occasional intracellular intermediate body and reticulate body. By 24 h, inclusions had 2 to 5 reticulate bodies and were beginning to fuse. A few polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were already present in the epithelium in the vicinity of and directly adjacent to infected cells. By 30 h, the inclusions were larger and consisted solely of reticulate bodies, but by 36 to 42 h, they contained intermediate bodies and elementary bodies as well. Many PMNs were adjacent to or actually inside infected cells. Chlamydiae appeared to exit the cell either (i) through disintegration of the inclusion membrane and rupture of the cell, (ii) by dislodgement of the cell from the epithelium by PMNs, or (iii) by direct invasion of the infected cell by the PMNs. When PMNs were depleted, the number of released elementary bodies was significantly greater as determined both visually and by culture. Interestingly, depletion of PMNs revealed the presence of inclusions containing aberrant reticulate bodies, reminiscent of effects seen in vitro when chlamydiae are incubated with gamma interferon. In vivo evidence for the contact-dependent development hypothesis, a potential mechanism for triggering the conversion of reticulate bodies to elementary bodies, and for translocation of lipid droplets into the inclusion is also presented. PMID:21576327

  13. Evidence that polymorphonuclear neutrophils infiltrate into the developing corpus luteum and promote angiogenesis with interleukin-8 in the cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After ovulation in the cow, the corpus luteum (CL rapidly develops within a few days with angiogenesis and progesterone production. CL formation resembles an inflammatory response due to the influx of immune cells. Neutrophils play a role in host defense and inflammation, and secrete chemoattractants to stimulate angiogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that neutrophils infiltrate in the developing CL from just after ovulation and may play a role in angiogenesis of the CL. Methods and Results Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN were detected in CL tissue by Pas-staining, and interleukin-8 (IL-8, a neutrophil-specific chemoattractant was measured in supernatant of the CL tissue culture: considerable amounts of PMNs and the high level of IL-8 were observed during the early luteal phase (days 1-4 of the estrous cycle. PMNs and IL-8 were low levels in the mid and late luteal phases, but IL-8 was increased during luteal regression. The PMN migration in vitro was stimulated by the supernatant from the early CL but not from the mid CL, and this activity was inhibited by neutralizing with an anti-IL-8 antibody, indicating the major role of IL-8 in inducing active PMN migration in the early CL. Moreover, IL-8 stimulated proliferation of CL-derived endothelial cells (LECs, and both the supernatant of activated PMNs and IL-8 stimulated formation of capillary-like structures of LECs. Conclusion PMNs migrate into the early CL partially due to its major chemoattractant IL-8 produced at high levels in the CL, and PMNs is a potential regulator of angiogenesis together with IL-8 in developing CL in the cow.

  14. Evidence that polymorphonuclear neutrophils infiltrate into the developing corpus luteum and promote angiogenesis with interleukin-8 in the cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiemtaweeboon, Sineenard; Shirasuna, Koumei; Nitta, Akane; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Shimizu, Takashi; Miyamoto, Akio

    2011-06-08

    After ovulation in the cow, the corpus luteum (CL) rapidly develops within a few days with angiogenesis and progesterone production. CL formation resembles an inflammatory response due to the influx of immune cells. Neutrophils play a role in host defense and inflammation, and secrete chemoattractants to stimulate angiogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that neutrophils infiltrate in the developing CL from just after ovulation and may play a role in angiogenesis of the CL. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were detected in CL tissue by Pas-staining, and interleukin-8 (IL-8, a neutrophil-specific chemoattractant) was measured in supernatant of the CL tissue culture: considerable amounts of PMNs and the high level of IL-8 were observed during the early luteal phase (days 1-4 of the estrous cycle). PMNs and IL-8 were low levels in the mid and late luteal phases, but IL-8 was increased during luteal regression. The PMN migration in vitro was stimulated by the supernatant from the early CL but not from the mid CL, and this activity was inhibited by neutralizing with an anti-IL-8 antibody, indicating the major role of IL-8 in inducing active PMN migration in the early CL. Moreover, IL-8 stimulated proliferation of CL-derived endothelial cells (LECs), and both the supernatant of activated PMNs and IL-8 stimulated formation of capillary-like structures of LECs. PMNs migrate into the early CL partially due to its major chemoattractant IL-8 produced at high levels in the CL, and PMNs is a potential regulator of angiogenesis together with IL-8 in developing CL in the cow.

  15. Evaluation of L-selectin expression and assessment of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in bovine polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes around parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Erica; Paape, Max J; Wang, Yan; Capuco, Anthony V; Husheem, Michael; Wood, Larry; Burvenich, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Impaired polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocyte (PMN) function around parturition has been associated with increased clinical mastitis in dairy cows. Rolling and attachment of PMN to the endothelium is the first step in the recruitment process and is accomplished by interaction between L-selectin on PMN and its ligand on endothelial cells. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation is involved in the initiation of many PMN functions. The objective of this work was to determine changes in expression of L-selectin and tyrosine phosphorylation in the perinatal period. Eight clinically healthy Holstein cows were used as PMN donors at d-21, -14, -7,0 (calving), +1, +2, +7, +14, +28. Evaluation of L-selectin expression was carried out on activated and resting PMN. Anti-bovine L-selectin monoclonal antibody (MAB) and flow cytometric analysis were used to measure the percentage of PMN fluorescing and receptor expression (log mean fluorescent channel, LMFC). Activated and resting PMN showed similar trends in % PMN fluorescence and LM FC. The percentage of PMN fluorescing tended to decrease at parturition, followed by a significant increase at d +14 and +28 (P varied in intensity over time. The intensity of the 42-44 kDa band gradually increased from d -7, peaked at d +7 (P < 0.03), and steadily decreased to d +28 (P < 0.02). Antibody to activated mitogen protein kinase reacted with the 42-44 kDa band. Reduced PMN function during the periparturient period could be related to reduced L-selectin adhesion molecules on the cell surface, and to modulation in the phosphorylation of functionally important molecules.

  16. Enamel Matrix Derivative Promotes Superoxide Production and Chemotaxis, but Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase 8 Expression by Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karima, Mamdouh M.; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) is the predominant innate immune cell type activated in acute inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) on superoxide (O2−) generation, chemotaxis, and matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP 8) secretion by PMN in vitro to better understand the role of EMD in surgical wound healing. Methods PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers (N = 14). Superoxide generation was measured using a cytochrome-C reduction assay. Chemotaxis was measured in a modified Boyden chamber. MMP 8 secretion was analyzed by Western blotting. A relative density method was used to determine the percent of MMP 8 released from the PMN in relation to the total cellular MMP 8 content. Results O2− generation was significantly elevated when PMN were stimulated with EMD (200 μg/ml) (P<0.01). Secondary stimulation of PMN with 1 μM fMLP trigged earlier and more sustained O2− generation with EMD. EMD significantly increased PMN chemotactic activity (P<0.05). Combined stimulation with EMD plus formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) resulted in significantly higher chemotaxis compared to fMLP alone (P<0.05). Conversely, EMD did not induce MMP 8 secretion from PMN. MMP 8 secretion by PMN in response to fMLP or serum-opsonized zymosan (OZ) stimulation was significantly inhibited by EMD (P<0.05). Conclusion EMD has specific, differential actions on PMN that suggest potential for enhancement of wound healing; bacterial and tissue debris clearance (O2− generation and chemotaxis) and suppress tissue damage and degradation (MMP 8). Taken together, the data suggest that EMD enhances wound healing and reduces inflammation. PMID:22050547

  17. Abnormal directed migration of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes in rheumatoid arthritis. Potential role in increased susceptibility to bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Aglas

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients are at higher risks of bacterial infection than healthy subjects. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN are the first line of nonspecific cellular defence against these infections. We tested the hypothesis that abnormal directed migration of PMN may be one reason for the increased infection rate of RA patients. PMN migration was investigated in 68 peripheral blood samples of 15 RA patients compared with 64 samples of healthy controls in a novel whole blood in vitro membrane filter assay. The migration of PMNs from RA patients and controls was stimulated using the bacterial chemoattractant N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (fMLP. Unstimulated PMN migration of RA patients was increased compared with healthy controls as measured by the following parameters: (a absolute number of migrant PMNs (1954 ± 87 vs. 1238 ± 58 PMN/mm2, (b percentage of PMNs migrated into the filter (total migration index, TMI (28.6 ± 0.9 vs. 24.0 ± 0.8 %, (c the distance half the migrating PMNs had covered (distribution characteristic, DC (22.6 ± 1.1 vs. 16.1 ± 0.6 mm and (d the product of TMI and DC (neutrophil migratory activity, NMA (669.0 ± 45.0 vs. 389.0 ± 18.9. fMLP stimulated PMNs of RA patients showed defective migration compared to unstimulated samples as shown by (a a reduced number of migrant PMNs (1799 ± 93 PMN/mm2, (b lower TMI (26.1 ± 0.9 %, (c unremarkable altered distribution characteristic (22.9 ± 0.8 mm and (d significant reduced migratory activity (600.0 ± 30.0. Our data suggest that the high incidence of infections in RA patients may partly be caused by defective migratory activity of PMNs to bacterial chemoattractants as demonstrated by fMLP.

  18. Asthma and Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    -related hospitalizations could be attributed to poor adherence. Most studies have reported an increase in adherence following focused interventions, followed by an improvement in quality of life, symptoms, FEV1, and oral corticosteroid use. However, 2 studies found no difference in health-care utilization, one observed...... was found to be between 22 and 63%, with improvement up to and after an exacerbation. Poor adherence was associated with youth, being African-American, having mild asthma, care provider, whereas improved adherence was associated with being...... to improve adherence. A total of 19 studies met the inclusion criteria: 9 focusing on the level of adherence, 6 focusing on effects of poor adherence, and 7 focusing on interventions to improve adherence. Three of the studies focused on more than one of these end points. The mean level of adherence to ICS...

  19. Adherence with Preventive Medication in Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal adherence with preventive medication is common and often unrecognised as a cause of poor asthma control. A number of risk factors for nonadherence have emerged from well-conducted studies. Unfortunately, patient report a physician's estimation of adherence and knowledge of these risk factors may not assist in determining whether non-adherence is a significant factor. Electronic monitoring devices are likely to be more frequently used to remind patients to take medication, as a strategy to motivate patients to maintain adherence, and a tool to evaluate adherence in subjects with poor disease control. The aim of this paper is to review non-adherence with preventive medication in childhood asthma, its impact on asthma control, methods of evaluating non-adherence, risk factors for suboptimal adherence, and strategies to enhance adherence.

  20. Adherence of pilus- Opa+ gonococci to epithelial cells in vitro involves heparan sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae attaches to host epithelial cells via pili and opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins. Pilus- gonococci (Gc) of strain MS11 adhere to both human and nonhuman cells, but only when particular Opa proteins are expressed; OpaA+ variants adhere best, OpaC+ variants are next best, and the seven other Opa+ variants adhere poorly or not at all. The adherence of OpaA+ Gc to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is inhibited by heparin or heparan sulfate (HS), but not by cho...

  1. Adherence to Scientific Method while Advancing Exposure Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Lioy was simultaneously a staunch adherent to the scientific method and an innovator of new ways to conduct science, particularly related to human exposure. Current challenges to science and the application of the scientific method are presented as they relate the approaches...

  2. Antihypertensive Medications Adherence Among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stroke.[10] Hypertension among Nigerians is often associated with cluster of other cardiovascular risk factors, which often increase the cardiovascular risk of .... 65.7 [12.5] vs. 62.7 [11.5] years, respectively). Those with low adherence were also more likely to be using more antihypertensive medications than those with ...

  3. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies promote bacterial opsonization and augment the phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2016-01-01

    Moderation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as part of a critical defense against invading pathogens may offer a promising therapeutic approach to supplement the antibiotic eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in non-chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have...... observed that egg yolk antibodies (IgY) harvested from White leghorn chickens that target P. aeruginosa opsonize the pathogen and enhance the PMN-mediated respiratory burst and subsequent bacterial killing in vitro. The effects on PMN phagocytic activity were observed in different Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  4. Impact of an exercise program on adherence and fitness indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Roger; Gilleland, Diana

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to exercise is one of the most problematic health behaviors. This pilot study describes the impact of an exercise program on adherence to exercise and fitness indicators for overweight and obese adults enrolled in an insurance reimbursed exercise plan. Chart reviews were conducted retrospectively in a convenience sample of 77 subjects from a human performance lab (HPL) at a large southern university. Charts from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed for health history, fitness indicators (fitness level, weight, BMI, hip/waist ratio, % body fat, BP, HR, cholesterol), and adherence (number of exercise sessions/month). Exercise supervision was operationalized in two phases over 12 months: Phase I (3 months supervised exercise) and Phase II (9 months unsupervised exercise). Fifty-eight participants completed Phase I, and 8 completed Phase II. Six-nine percent of those completing Phase I visited the gym at least 8 times/month with significant (α=.05) improvement in all fitness indicators. Those visiting fitness level, weight, BMI, and % body fat. Twenty-four subjects continued into Phase II, with only eight completing Phase II. Of those eight, only one subject visited the HPL at least 8 times/month. Health history data including co-morbidities, symptoms, habits, perceived tension, job stress, and fitness level were not associated with adherence. Symptoms of swollen, stiff, painful joints, and swollen ankles and legs were associated with decreased adherence to exercise. Supervised exercise was positively related to adherence and improved fitness indicators. Adults with joint symptoms may require more support. Based on these pilot data, designing a study with a larger sample and the inclusion of barriers and facilitators for adherence to self-directed exercise would allow additional analysis. Innovative interventions are needed that mimic the supervised environment, shifting responsibility for the exercise plan from the supervisor to those exercising. Copyright © 2015

  5. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations and Seroconversion Rates in Hemodialysis Centers in Khartoum. ... Adherence of staff members to infection control recommendations was evaluated by direct observation. Results: ... A structured training program for HD staff members is urgently required.

  6. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; De Rycke, Leen; Boots, Anemieke M; Mielants, Herman; Veys, Eric M; De Keyser, Filip

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes and/or global disease activity in SpA. Synovial biopsies obtained from 99 SpA and 86 RA patients with active knee synovitis were analyzed for 15 histological and immunohistochemical markers. Correlations with swollen joint count, serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were analyzed using classical and multiparameter statistics. SpA synovitis was characterized by higher vascularity and infiltration with CD163+ macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and by lower values for lining-layer hyperplasia, lymphoid aggregates, CD1a+ cells, intracellular citrullinated proteins, and MHC-HC gp39 complexes than RA synovitis. Unsupervised clustering of the SpA samples based on synovial features identified two separate clusters that both contained different SpA subtypes but were significantly differentiated by concentration of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Global disease activity in SpA correlated significantly with lining-layer hyperplasia as well as with inflammatory infiltration with macrophages, especially the CD163+ subset, and with PMNs. Accordingly, supervised clustering using these synovial parameters identified a cluster of 20 SpA patients with significantly higher disease activity, and this finding was confirmed in an independent SpA cohort. However, multiparameter models based on synovial histopathology were relatively poor predictors of disease activity in individual patients. In conclusion, these data indicate that inflammatory infiltration of the synovium with CD163+ macrophages and PMNs as well as lining-layer hyperplasia reflect global disease activity in SpA, independently of the SpA subtype

  7. Adherence to the Treatment in Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Although medical treatments and drug industry develop day by day, there have been no changes in the treatment adherence ratios in the past years. To generate possible solutions, treatment adherence should be assessed in all clinical interviews and if patient is non-adherent this issue should be handled seriously. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 555-568

  8. Introducing the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2013-01-01

    resulting in reduced data quality and suboptimal treatment. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to introduce the Adherence Strategy Engineering Framework (ASEF) as a method for developing novel technology-based adherence strategies to assess and improve patient adherence levels in the unsupervised setting...

  9. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral medication adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication adherence is a complex behaviour with multiple determinants. Understanding the barriers and facilitators of adherence is invaluable for programme improvement, which assists the foundation of adherence intervention strategies. A qualitative study was conducted in six selected hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2008, ...

  10. Preliminary investigation of adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of HIV with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in declining morbidity and mortality rates from HIV-associated diseases, but concerns regarding access and adherence are growing. To determine the adherence level and the reasons for non-adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among ...

  11. Psychosocial and demographic predictors of adherence and non-adherence to health advice accompanying air quality warning systems: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antoni, Donatella; Smith, Louise; Auyeung, Vivian; Weinman, John

    2017-09-22

    Although evidence shows that poor air quality can harm human health, we have a limited understanding about the behavioural impact of air quality forecasts. Our aim was to understand to what extent air quality warning systems influence protective behaviours in the general public, and to identify the demographic and psychosocial factors associated with adherence and non-adherence to the health advice accompanying these warnings. In August 2016 literature was systematically reviewed to find studies assessing intended or actual adherence to health advice accompanying air quality warning systems, and encouraging people to reduce exposure to air pollution. Predictors of adherence to the health advice and/or self-reported reasons for adherence or non-adherence were also systematically reviewed. Studies were included only if they involved participants who were using or were aware of these warning systems. Studies investigating only protective behaviours due to subjective perception of bad air quality alone were excluded. The results were narratively synthesised and discussed within the COM-B theoretical framework. Twenty-one studies were included in the review: seventeen investigated actual adherence; three investigated intended adherence; one assessed both. Actual adherence to the advice to reduce or reschedule outdoor activities during poor air quality episodes ranged from 9.7% to 57% (Median = 31%), whereas adherence to a wider range of protective behaviours (e.g. avoiding busy roads, taking preventative medication) ranged from 17.7% to 98.1% (Median = 46%). Demographic factors did not consistently predict adherence. However, several psychosocial facilitators of adherence were identified. These include knowledge on where to check air quality indices, beliefs that one's symptoms were due to air pollution, perceived severity of air pollution, and receiving advice from health care professionals. Barriers to adherence included: lack of understanding of the indices

  12. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  13. Immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalić, Jelena; Veličković-Radovanović, Radmila; Mitić, Branka; Paunović, Goran; Cvetković, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    To assess the degree of immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant patients (KTPs) and to determine if there is a difference in the rate of adherence to tacrolimus (Tac), cyclosporine (CsA) and sirolimus (Sir). From a total of 63 KTPs treated at the Clinic of Nephrology, Clinical Centre Niš, Serbia, 60 participated in the study by responding to questionnaires. They were divided into the adherence group (n = 43) and the nonadherence group (n = 17) according to their degree of adherence which was measured using a validated survey form, the simplified medication adherence questionnaire. The KTP adherence to the different immunosuppressive regimens (Tac, CsA and Sir) was compared. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test. Adherence was observed in 43 (71.7%) patients, and only 17 (28.3%) did not follow the prescribed therapy. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the nonadherence group (38.52 ± 18.22 ml/min) than in the adherence group (52.43 ± 16.91 ml/min, p adherers and the nonadherers (6.30 ± 2.06 vs. 5.0 ± 1.52 ng/ml, p adherence. Nonadherence was associated with worse graft function and a lower Tac level. Knowledge about the degree of adherence could help the early identification of nonadherent patients and the development of strategies to improve this. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Treatment adherence with the easypod™ growth hormone electronic auto-injector and patient acceptance: survey results from 824 children and their parents

    OpenAIRE

    Bozzola, Mauro; Colle, Michel; Halldin-Stenlid, Maria; Larroque, Sylvain; Zignani, Monia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Accurately monitoring adherence to treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH) enables appropriate intervention in cases of poor adherence. The electronic r-hGH auto-injector, easypod™, automatically records the patient's adherence to treatment. This study evaluated adherence to treatment of children who started using the auto-injector and assessed opinions about the device. Methods A multicentre, multinational, observational 3-month survey in which children re...

  15. Improving adherence and clinical outcomes through an HIV pharmacist's interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Angela; Chen, David M; Chau, Fern M; Saberi, Parya

    2010-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive individuals who adhere to their antiretroviral (ARV) regimens are more likely to achieve suppressed HIV viral load and improved immunologic response; however, for most patients, medication adherence remains a challenge. Prior studies have shown that clinical pharmacists contribute to the management of HIV-infected patients; but due to variability in clinical responsibilities and study limitations, their value has not been fully realized. The objective of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes of an HIV clinical pharmacist's interventions at Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, who utilizes medication expertise to provide recommendations for ARV regimen changes. The pharmacist suggests new ARV regimens in order to attain virologic suppression, improve immunologic response, or minimize ARV adverse effects, while aiming to optimize patients' adherence by decreasing pill burden and/or dosing frequency. This retrospective study assessed the effectiveness of the pharmacist's interventions that occurred between 11 September 2006 and 30 September 2008 on pill burden, dosing frequency, and medication adherence. Additionally, CD4+ cell count and HIV viral load pre- and post-intervention were evaluated. Medication adherence was assessed utilizing electronic pharmacy refill records and calculated based on the formula: [(pills dispensed/pills prescribed per day)/days between refills] x 100. From a cohort of 75 patients, mean daily pill quantity and dosing frequency decreased from 7.2 pills/day and 2.0 times/day in the control phase to 5.4 pills/day and 1.5 times/day in the study phase, respectively ( p pill burden and dosing frequency, increasing medication adherence, and improving clinical outcomes.

  16. Does adherence therapy improve medication adherence among patients with schizophrenia? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Non-adherence to medication is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Adherence therapy aims to improve medication adherence of these patients by applying techniques of cognitive behavioural therapy, psycho-education, and motivational interviewing. Even though adherence therapy is frequently discussed and researched, its effectiveness is still uncertain. This paper aims to review the effectiveness of adherence therapy on the medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia. To this end, six electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized, controlled trials on adherence therapy from January 2002 to March 2013. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into the review. The findings suggest that adherence therapy does not improve patients' medication adherence in comparison to treatment as usual or a control intervention. However, all the studies reviewed showed high-adherence ratings at baseline. Thus, further well-designed studies that target adherence therapy to patients who are non-adherent to their medication are needed for a more profound understanding of its effectiveness. In addition, if adherence therapy is aimed not only at improving medication adherence, but also to reach an agreement whereby the patient's decision not to take his medication is accepted, the shared decision-making process needs to be assessed as well. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Childhood bullying and healthcare adherence in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Bohinc, R Jordan; Wiederman, Michael W

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between childhood bullying and healthcare adherence in adulthood has been rarely studied, but one published study suggests that being bullied in childhood is related to lower healthcare adherence among adolescents. This previous study examined few adherence variables and was limited to youths. In this study, we assessed five variables for childhood bullying as related to seven measures of healthcare adherence among a cohort of adult primary care outpatients. Using a cross-sectional, self-report survey methodology in a sample of 263 consecutive internal medicine outpatients, we examined five aspects of bullying and seven aspects of adherence with general healthcare. Being a victim of bullying, type of bullying (emotional, physical), number of years bullied and number of bullies each evidenced no statistical relationships with healthcare adherence. However, being a bully demonstrated several statistical relationships with healthcare adherence, indicating less adherence to instructions provided by healthcare professionals. Despite all of the deleterious psychological and physical effects of being bullied in childhood, there was no evidence that non-adherence with healthcare in adulthood is one of them. In contrast, bullies evidenced several areas of reduced healthcare adherence. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  19. Adherence of cysts and trophozoites of Acanthamoeba to unworn rigid gas permeable and soft contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Ramachandran, L; Rao, G N

    1995-10-01

    Contact lens related Acanthamoeba keratitis has been more often associated with the use of soft contact lenses than with the use of rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses. We studied the adherence of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites to unworn RGP (silicone acrylate and fluoropolymer) and low and high water content soft contact lenses marketed in India. A human corneal isolate of Acanthamoeba polyphaga suspended in saline (1 x 10(5) amoebae/mL) was used. Lens segments were exposed to A. polyphaga cysts or trophozoites with or without shaking. After exposure for zero to 7 hours, lenses were either washed or not washed and the adherence was determined using light microscopy and a hemocytometer (per square millimeter of the lens). Both cysts and trophozoites immediately adhered to all four types of lenses. Adhesion increased with an increase in exposure time. The number of adherent cysts and trophozoites was higher (P = 0.043-0.0003) in the unwashed group of lenses at all exposure times for all lenses. Among washed groups, adherence was greatest with RGP silicone acrylate and high water content soft lenses. Trophozoites of Acanthamoeba showed greater adherence to RGP lenses, whereas cysts showed greater adherence to high water content soft lenses. Shaking did not have a significant effect on adherence. Adhesion of Acanthamoeba to contact lenses may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  20. Factors affecting adherence to antiretroviral treatment in harari national regional state, eastern ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitiku, Habtamu; Abdosh, Tekabe; Teklemariam, Zelalem

    2013-01-01

    Background. The efficacy of antiretroviral treatment (ART) depends on strict adherence to the regimen, but many factors have been identified for nonadherence. Method. To identify the factors for non-adherence to ART, a cross-sectional study was conducted on people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and attending the ART service at Hiwot Fana and Jugal hospitals; it was done from October to December, 2010. Adherence was defined as taking 95% of the prescribed doses in the week before the survey. Data were collected using a standard interview questionnaire and were analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Result. Among the 239 study participants, the magnitude of adherence to ART in the week before interview was 87%. The main reasons for nonadherence were forgetting (47.2%), traveling (18.9%), and being busy doing other things (15.1%). There was not any independent predicator identified for adherence to ART. Conclusion. Compared to other similar studies in Ethiopia, in this study a high adherence rate was found. Forgetfulness was the most common reason for the nonadherence. Therefore, the ART counseling needs to give emphasis to using memory aids. In addition, a further study on adherence rate and its determinants with multiple adherence measurements is recommended.

  1. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Neziri, Burim

    2017-01-01

    Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Desi...

  2. Predictors of Vitamin Adherence After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Supreet; Santiago, Vincent A; Gougeon, Lorraine; Warwick, Katie; Okrainec, Allan; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin supplementation in bariatric aftercare is essential to prevent nutrient deficiencies; however, rates of vitamin adherence have been as low as 30 % 6 months post-surgery. Preliminary literature suggests non-adherence to prescribed treatments can be linked to demographic and psychological factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between these factors to vitamin adherence in post-bariatric surgery patients. A total of 92 bariatric patients were assessed 6 months post-surgery. Patients were administered a questionnaire collecting demographic information, psychological scores, and self-reported adherence. Nutrient deficiencies were analyzed through serum vitamin levels measured 3 and 6 months after surgery. Wilcoxon rank-sum and chi-square tests were used for analysis. Non-adherence was associated with male sex and full-time employment (p = 0.027, p = 0.015). There were no differences with respect to living situation, education level, or relationship type. Non-adherent patients did not have significantly higher scores for generalized anxiety, depressive symptoms, or avoidant behaviors. However, non-adherent patients displayed greater attachment anxiety than their adherent counterparts (p = 0.0186). Non-adherence was also associated with lower vitamin B12 levels 6 months post-surgery (p = 0.001). Male gender and full-time work have previously been shown to be associated with non-adherence. This is the first study to demonstrate that attachment anxiety is associated with poor multivitamin adherence in the post-surgical bariatric population. This result is concordant with recent literature that has demonstrated attachment anxiety is associated with poor adherence to dietary recommendations in bariatric patients 6 months postoperatively. Presurgical screening for attachment anxiety could facilitate early interventions to promote better bariatric aftercare in this group.

  3. Biofilm, adherence, and hydrophobicity as virulence factors in Malassezia furfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolella, Letizia; Leone, Claudia; Rojas, Florencia; Mussin, Javier; de Los Angeles Sosa, María; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    Malassezia species are natural inhabitants of the healthy skin. However, under certain conditions, they may cause or exacerbate several skin diseases. The ability of this fungus to colonize or infect is determined by complex interactions between the fungal cell and its virulence factors. This study aims to evaluate "in vitro" the hydrophobicity levels, the adherence on a plastic surface and the biofilm formation of 16 clinical isolates of Malassezia furfur. Cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH) levels were determined by two-phase system. The biofilm formation was determined by tetrazolium salt (XTT) reduction assay and by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Results showed many isolates were hydrophobic, adherent, and producers of biofilm on abiotic surfaces with different capacity. SEM observations confirmed an abundant extracellular matrix after 48 h of biofilm formation. About 63% of strains with high production of biofilm showed medium to high percentage of hydrophobicity and/or adherence. In addition, it has been demonstrated a correlation between hydrophobicity, adherence, and biofilm formation in about 60% of strains examined. These important virulence factors could be responsible of this yeast changing from a commensal to a pathogenic status. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Interaction between Salmonella typhimurium and phagocytic cells in pigs - Phagocytosis, oxidative burst and killing in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Lind, Peter

    1999-01-01

    with the exhaustion of oxidative burst in non-adherent monocytes were performed by prestimulation with PMA, heat-killed Salmonella or buffer. Prestimulation with PMA led to a strong reduction in oxidative burst induced by living opsonized Salmonella bacteria, whereas prestimulation with heat-killed bacteria gave rise......Interactions between Salmonella typhimurium and peripheral blood leucocytes from healthy, Salmonella-free pigs were investigated in vitro. Both granulocytes and monocytes phagocytized FITC-labelled heat-killed Salmonella bacteria as shown by flow cytometry. Phagocytosis in whole blood and isolated...... leucocytes was measured as acquired fluorescence in the leukocytes and was both time and dose related. Living, serum-opsonized Salmonella bacteria induced a dose-dependent oxidative burst in PMNs and monocytes as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LC). When opsonized in normal serum...

  5. Elevated Leukocyte Azurophilic Enzymes in Human Diabetic Ketoacidosis Plasma Degrade Cerebrovascular Endothelial Junctional Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Martin M H; Patterson, Eric K; Clarson, Cheril; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud; Stanimirovic, Danica B; Fraser, Douglas D

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis in children is associated with vasogenic cerebral edema, possibly due to the release of destructive polymorphonuclear neutrophil azurophilic enzymes. Our objectives were to measure plasma azurophilic enzyme levels in children with diabetic ketoacidosis, to correlate plasma azurophilic enzyme levels with diabetic ketoacidosis severity, and to determine whether azurophilic enzymes disrupt the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Prospective clinical and laboratory study. The Children's Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre. Pediatric type 1 diabetes patients; acute diabetic ketoacidosis or age-/sex-matched insulin-controlled. Acute diabetic ketoacidosis in children was associated with elevated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Plasma azurophilic enzymes were elevated in diabetic ketoacidosis patients, including human leukocyte elastase (p diabetic ketoacidosis was confirmed with buffy coat quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (p diabetic ketoacidosis severity (p = 0.002). Recombinant proteinase-3 applied to human brain microvascular endothelial cells degraded both the tight junction protein occludin (p diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with systemic polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and degranulation. Of all the polymorphonuclear neutrophil azurophilic enzymes examined, only proteinase-3 correlated with diabetic ketoacidosis severity and potently degraded the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Proteinase-3 might mediate vasogenic edema during diabetic ketoacidosis, and selective proteinase-3 antagonists may offer future vascular- and neuroprotection.

  6. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison Fiona; Manias, Elizabeth; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Crawford, Kimberley

    2014-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease, the relative shortage of kidney donors and the economic- and health-related costs of kidney transplant rejection make the prevention of adverse outcomes following transplantation a healthcare imperative. Although strict adherence to immunosuppressant medicine regimens is key to preventing kidney rejection, evidence suggests that adherence is sub-optimal. Strategies need to be developed to help recipients of kidney transplants adhere to their prescribed medicines. This review has found that a number of factors contribute to poor adherence, for example, attitudes towards medicine taking and forgetfulness. Few investigations have been conducted, however, on strategies to enhance medicine adherence in kidney transplant recipients. Strategies that may improve adherence include pharmacist-led interventions (incorporating counselling, medicine reviews and nephrologist liaison) and nurse-led interventions (involving collaboratively working with recipients to understand their routines and offering solutions to improve adherence). Strategies that have shown to have limited effectiveness include supplying medicines free of charge and providing feedback on a participant's medicine adherence without any educational or behavioural interventions. Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for people with end-stage kidney disease. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation increases the risk of rejection, kidney loss and costly treatments. Interventions are needed to help the transplant recipient take all their medicines as prescribed to improve general well-being, medicine safety and reduce healthcare costs. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  7. Predictors and correlates of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for chronic HIV infection: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Gisolf, Elizabeth H.; Reiss, Peter; Vervoort, Sigrid C.; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B.; Richter, Clemens; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a key predictor of the success of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, and is potentially amenable to intervention. Insight into predictors or correlates of non-adherence to ART may help guide targets for the development of

  8. The role of electronic assessment of adherence in the education and counseling of children taking growth hormone: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Fritz; Norgren, Svante; Horne, Rob; Gasteyger, Christoph

    There are numerous issues surrounding adherence in children taking recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH). New technologies capable of accurately recording/monitoring may highlight some of these issues, and have value in optimizing adherence levels through education and counseling. The intention of this review is to guide healthcare professionals (HCPs). PubMed, Google Scholar and citations in published papers were used to substantiate the views expressed by the authors. Both perceptional and practical factors influence the adherence levels of children taking rh-GH. Understanding such factors may help to identify the characteristics of ideal rh-GH devices and their potential impact on adherence. New technologies, such as electronic monitors, may facilitate patient-provider discussions on adherence, and help identify barriers that are amenable to change. Monitoring adherence may also help differentiate nonadherence from biological low response to rh-GH therapy. However, the medical, psychological, social and ethical aspects of electronic assessment require further investigation.

  9. Factors influencing adherence to routine iron supplementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anemia in pregnancy is a common problem especially in developing countries. and has been linked with feotal and maternal complications. Taking iron supplements could reduce anaemia in pregnancy but some pregnant women do not adhere to this. The study identified some factors associated with non adherence ...

  10. Medication adherence in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory condition with intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Medications are the cornerstone of treatment of IBD. However, patients often adhere to medication poorly. Adherence to medications is defined as the process by which patients take their medications as prescribed. Treatment non-adherence is a common problem among chronic diseases, averaging 50% in developed countries and is even poorer in developing countries. In this review, we will examine the adherence data in IBD which vary greatly depending on the study population, route of administration, and methods of adherence measurement used. We will also discuss the adverse clinical outcomes related to non-adherence to medical treatment including increased disease activity, flares, loss of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy, and so forth. There are many methods to measure medication adherence namely direct and indirect methods, each with their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we will explore different intervention strategies to improve adherence to medications.

  11. Determinants of Patient's Adherence to Hypertension Medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are effective in reducing high blood pressure and have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular illness.[7] It is further thought that patient's benefits to antihypertensive medication can be reduced because of low adherence,[8] whereas non-adherence can be unintentional. (such as forgetting) or can be ...

  12. Claustrophobia and adherence to CPAP treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasens, Eileen R; Pack, Allan I; Maislin, Greg; Dinges, David F; Weaver, Terri E

    2005-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of claustrophobia, an abnormal dread or fear of closed spaces, on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. The design was a secondary analysis of data from a prospective study of participants (N = 153) that completed 3 months of CPAP therapy from seven sleep disorders centers in the United States and Canada. A 15-item subscale adapted from the Fear and Avoidance Scale measured claustrophobic tendencies pre-CPAP treatment and again after 3 months. An overt monitor attached to the CPAP machines recorded mask-on CPAP adherence. There was a statistically significant difference in claustrophobia scores by adherence group ( or = 5 hours) and time period (pre-CPAP and after 3 months CPAP). Poor CPAP adherence (claustrophobia score > or = 25. Identification of persons with increased claustrophobia tendencies and targeted interventions may increase adherence.

  13. Medication adherence for patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Upkar; Vetter, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence has been studied for some time; however most research has focused on able-bodied patients or the elderly living independently. What has not been studied nearly as much is medication adherence for people with psychiatric or mental illnesses. In this paper, we present a framework that includes the specific challenges in medication adherence for patients with mental illness, algorithms and protocols for evaluating adherence, and some on-going work in developing effective solutions. The architectural framework and associated algorithms leverage the context-aware computing capabilities available on many mobile devices. The system is designed to be able to collect and offer situation-aware information on medication use and adherence for healthcare professionals and other designated persons.

  14. Aspirin inhibits human telomerase activation in unstable carotid plaques

    OpenAIRE

    LI, FANGMING; GUO, YI; JIANG, XIN; ZHONG, JIANXIN; LI, GUANDONG; SUN, SHENGGANG

    2013-01-01

    The activation of telomerase in unstable plaques is an important factor in atherosclerosis, and may be predictive of the risk of cerebrovascular diseases. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is a subunit of telomerase that is essential for telomerase activation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether aspirin inhibits the activation of telomerase and hTERT in unstable carotid plaques. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) derived from carotid plaques were isolated fr...

  15. Inactivation of the rhlA gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa prevents rhamnolipid production, disabling the protection against polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Many of the virulence factors produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are quorum-sensing (QS) regulated. Among these are rhamnolipids, which have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, e.g. monocyte-derived macrophages and ...

  16. Interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and Leptospira species; innate responses in the natural bovine reservoir host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and L. interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murin...

  17. Expert Involvement and Adherence to Medical Evidence in Medical Mobile Phone Apps: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Yousif; Bube, Sarah Hjartbro; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe; Skou Thomsen, Ann Sofia; Konge, Lars

    2015-07-27

    Both clinicians and patients use medical mobile phone apps. Anyone can publish medical apps, which leads to contents with variable quality that may have a serious impact on human lives. We herein provide an overview of the prevalence of expert involvement in app development and whether or not app contents adhere to current medical evidence. To systematically review studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and EMBASE), and included studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. Two authors performed data extraction independently. Qualitative analysis of the included studies was performed. Based on inclusion criteria, 52 studies were included in this review. These studies assessed a total of 6520 apps. Studies dealt with a variety of medical specialties and topics. As much as 28 studies assessed expert involvement, which was found in 9-67% of the assessed apps. Thirty studies (including 6 studies that also assessed expert involvement) assessed adherence of app content to current medical evidence. Thirteen studies found that 10-87% of the assessed apps adhered fully to the compared evidence (published studies, recommendations, and guidelines). Seventeen studies found that none of the assessed apps (n=2237) adhered fully to the compared evidence. Most medical mobile phone apps lack expert involvement and do not adhere to relevant medical evidence.

  18. Accountability: a missing construct in models of adherence behavior and in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussedik, Elias; Foy, Capri G; Masicampo, E J; Kammrath, Lara K; Anderson, Robert E; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-01-01

    Piano lessons, weekly laboratory meetings, and visits to health care providers have in common an accountability that encourages people to follow a specified course of action. The accountability inherent in the social interaction between a patient and a health care provider affects patients' motivation to adhere to treatment. Nevertheless, accountability is a concept not found in adherence models, and is rarely employed in typical medical practice, where patients may be prescribed a treatment and not seen again until a return appointment 8-12 weeks later. The purpose of this paper is to describe the concept of accountability and to incorporate accountability into an existing adherence model framework. Based on the Self-Determination Theory, accountability can be considered in a spectrum from a paternalistic use of duress to comply with instructions (controlled accountability) to patients' autonomous internal desire to please a respected health care provider (autonomous accountability), the latter expected to best enhance long-term adherence behavior. Existing adherence models were reviewed with a panel of experts, and an accountability construct was incorporated into a modified version of Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. Defining accountability and incorporating it into an adherence model will facilitate the development of measures of accountability as well as the testing and refinement of adherence interventions that make use of this critical determinant of human behavior.

  19. Age span challenges: adherence in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy

    2011-05-01

    To review published literature to determine what is known about adherence to oral antineoplastic agents in children with cancer, to identify adherence-related challenges, and to examine the implications of these challenges for clinical practice. Published literature identified through the MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases. Oral antineoplastic agents are frequently used in childhood cancer treatment; supportive care regimens for children with cancer also rely heavily on the administration of oral medications. Adherence in pediatric oncology is a complex process involving both parent and child, and requires knowledge and understanding of proper and safe home medication administration in the context of multiple developmental and behavioral concerns that may change over time. Nurses play an important role in adherence by providing patient and family education and psychosocial support targeted to the child's diagnosis, developmental stage, and specifics of the child's treatment regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Patient's Perspective: Adherence or Non-adherence to Asthma Controller Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Backer, V; Soes-Petersen, U

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Adherence with controller therapy poses a major challenge to the effective management of persistent asthma. The aim of this study was to explore the patient-related aspects of adherence among adult asthmatics. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: The participants (n = 509 adult asthmatics...... that controller therapy is effective (p controller therapy is common among adult asthmatics. The reasons for suboptimal adherence seem to be accessible through education of both...

  1. Bacterial adherence to polymethylmethacrylate posterior chamber IOLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Shalini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Bacterial adherence to intraocular lenses (IOLs has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of postoperative endophthalmitis. Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most common organism isolated. We studied the in-vitro adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis to Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA IOLs and the effect of duration of exposure to adherence. Methods: Two groups of 10 IOLs each were incubated in Staphylococcus epidermidis suspension for 2 minutes and 20 minutes respectively. Adhesion of bacterial cells was determined by counting the number of viable bacteria attached to IOLs. Results: The mean bacterial adherence with 2 minutes incubation was 12,889 ± 7,150 bacteria / IOL and with 20 minutes incubation was 84,226 ± 35,024 bacteria/IOL (P< 0.01. Conclusion: Our results show that Staphylococcus epidermidis adheres to PMMA IOLs in vitro and the degree of adherence is less for shorter duration of exposure. We conclude that viable bacteria irreversibly adherent to IOLs may play a role in the pathogenesis of postoperative endophthalmitis. Shorter duration of operative manipulation and exposure to contaminating sources may decrease the chances of postoperative endophthalmitis.

  2. Dirty Money: A Matter of Bacterial Survival, Adherence, and Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesekoop, Frank; Chen, Jing; Oldaker, Jenna; Besnard, Flavien; Smith, Reece; Leversha, William; Smith-Arnold, Cheralee; Worrall, Julie; Rufray, Emily; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao; Scannell, Amalia; Russell, Cryn

    2016-11-23

    In this study we report the underlying reasons to why bacteria are present on banknotes and coins. Despite the use of credit cards, mobile phone apps, near-field-communication systems, and cryptocurrencies such as bitcoins which are replacing the use of hard currencies, cash exchanges still make up a significant means of exchange for a wide range of purchases. The literature is awash with data that highlights that both coins and banknotes are frequently identified as fomites for a wide range of microorganisms. However, most of these publications fail to provide any insight into the extent to which bacteria adhere and persist on money. We treated the various currencies used in this study as microcosms, and the bacterial loading from human hands as the corresponding microbiome. We show that the substrate from which banknotes are produced have a significant influence on both the survival and adherence of bacteria to banknotes. Smooth, polymer surfaces provide a poor means of adherence and survival, while coarser and more fibrous surfaces provide strong bacterial adherence and an environment to survive on. Coins were found to be strongly inhibitory to bacteria with a relatively rapid decline in survival on almost all coin surfaces tested. The inhibitory influence of coins was demonstrated through the use of antimicrobial disks made from coins. Despite the toxic effects of coins on many bacteria, bacteria do have the ability to adapt to the presence of coins in their environment which goes some way to explain the persistent presence of low levels of bacteria on coins in circulation.

  3. The lack of BTK does not impair monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells functions in X-linked agammaglobulinemia under treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Monica Cavaliere

    Full Text Available The lack of BTK in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA patients does not affect monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN phenotype and functions. In this study, we show that XLA patients had an increased frequency of the intermediate monocytes subset and that BTK-deficient monocytes and PMN had a normal expression of receptors involved in the activation and cellular responses. We demonstrate that BTK is not required for migration, phagocytosis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS following engagement of FC gamma receptors (FcγR. XLA monocytes and PMN showed an efficient calcium (Ca2+-independent activation of oxidative burst, suggesting that oxidative burst is less dependent by Ca2+ mobilization. The phagocytosis was functional and it remained unaltered also after Ca2+ chelation, confirming the independence of phagocytosis on Ca2+ mobilization. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg infusion exerted an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing the frequency of pro-inflammatory monocytes. In monocytes, the IVIg reduce the oxidative burst and phagocytosis even if these functions remained efficient.

  4. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  5. The lack of BTK does not impair monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells functions in X-linked agammaglobulinemia under treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Filomena Monica; Prezzo, Alessandro; Bilotta, Caterina; Iacobini, Metello; Quinti, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    The lack of BTK in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) patients does not affect monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) phenotype and functions. In this study, we show that XLA patients had an increased frequency of the intermediate monocytes subset and that BTK-deficient monocytes and PMN had a normal expression of receptors involved in the activation and cellular responses. We demonstrate that BTK is not required for migration, phagocytosis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following engagement of FC gamma receptors (FcγR). XLA monocytes and PMN showed an efficient calcium (Ca2+)-independent activation of oxidative burst, suggesting that oxidative burst is less dependent by Ca2+ mobilization. The phagocytosis was functional and it remained unaltered also after Ca2+ chelation, confirming the independence of phagocytosis on Ca2+ mobilization. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) infusion exerted an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing the frequency of pro-inflammatory monocytes. In monocytes, the IVIg reduce the oxidative burst and phagocytosis even if these functions remained efficient.

  6. The Respiratory Pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis Targets Collagen for Maximal Adherence to Host Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory pathogen that causes acute otitis media in children and is associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The first step in M. catarrhalis colonization is adherence to the mucosa, epithelial cells, and extracellular matrix (ECM. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of M. catarrhalis interactions with collagens from various angles. Clinical isolates (n = 43 were tested for collagen binding, followed by a detailed analysis of protein-protein interactions using recombinantly expressed proteins. M. catarrhalis-dependent interactions with collagen produced by human lung fibroblasts and tracheal tissues were studied by utilizing confocal immunohistochemistry and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. A mouse smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD model was used to estimate the adherence of M. catarrhalis in vivo. We found that all M. catarrhalis clinical isolates tested adhered to fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III and network-forming collagens IV and VI. The trimeric autotransporter adhesins ubiquitous surface protein A2 (UspA2 and UspA2H were identified as major collagen-binding receptors. M. catarrhalis wild type adhered to human tracheal tissue and collagen-producing lung fibroblasts, whereas UspA2 and UspA2H deletion mutants did not. Moreover, in the COPD mouse model, bacteria devoid of UspA2 and UspA2H had a reduced level of adherence to the respiratory tract compared to the adherence of wild-type bacteria. Our data therefore suggest that the M. catarrhalis UspA2 and UspA2H-dependent interaction with collagens is highly critical for adherence in the host and, furthermore, may play an important role in the establishment of disease.

  7. Interventions to increase adherence to acne treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Tuchayi S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sara Moradi Tuchayi,1 Tiffany M Alexander,2 Anish Nadkarni,1 Steven R Feldman1,3,4 1Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 2Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC, 3Department of Public Health Sciences, 4Department of Pathology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Background: Adherence to acne medication is poor and is a major reason why treatment plans are ineffective. Recognizing solutions to nonadherence is critical. Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the hurdles associated with acne nonadherence and to provide mechanisms on how to ameliorate them. Methods: PubMed database was searched. Of the 419 search results, 29 articles were reviewed to identify hurdles to adherence and corresponding solutions. Results: Hurdles to primary nonadherence where the medication is not even started, include lack of knowledge, confusion about usage, weak physician–patient relationship, fear of adverse reactions, and cost. Secondary nonadherence hurdles where the medication is started but is not taken as directed include lack of results, complex regimens, side effects, busy lifestyle, forgetfulness, inconvenience, and psychiatric comorbidity. Solutions to these hurdles include treatment simplification, technology, and dynamic education. Limitations: Adherence is affected by numerous factors, but available literature analyzing acne adherence and interventions to improve adherence to treatment is limited. Conclusion: There are several hurdles in adhering to acne treatment. Recognition of these hurdles and finding appropriate solutions may be as important to treatment outcomes as choosing the right medication to prescribe. Keywords: acne vulgaris, adherence, pathogenesis, treatment, quality of life, prevalence, physician–patient relationship, lifestyle, clinic visit, disease severity

  8. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011. In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4 for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii added simultaneously with the cells or (iii one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings.

  9. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence: Knowledge and Experiences among Adolescents and Young Adults in Soweto, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hornschuh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV management of adolescents and young adults (AYAs is particularly pertinent to sub-Saharan Africa, where the pediatric HIV burden is marked. Antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence is a major challenge for AYAs. This qualitative study explored knowledge and experiences of adherence amongst AYAs attending treatment at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU, Soweto, South Africa. Four focus group discussions (FGDs and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs were conducted with HIV-infected 15–25-year-old ART recipients. Transcripts were coded thematically. Participants (n=26 were aged median 18.5 years, 59.1% female and 69.2% virally suppressed <400 cp/ml. Three main themes emerged during FGDs and IDIs: (i correct knowledge about how to be adherent, benefits, and nonadherence consequences, (ii social, personal, and medication-related barriers to adherence, and (iii reminder, concealment, and motivational strategies to optimize adherence. Interventions to improve AYA adherence could focus on practical strategies, including status disclosure and medication concealment.

  10. Treatment adherence in patients with headache: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Rachelle R; Ryan, Jamie L; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W; Aylward, Brandon S; Hommel, Kevin A

    2014-05-01

    To review and critically evaluate the extant research literature pertaining to adherence in youth and adults with headache and to provide recommendations for future research. This article provides the first systematic review of pediatric headache adherence and updates a previous review of treatment adherence in adults with headache. Systematic review of empirical literature. A literature search with no date restriction was conducted using PubMed and PsycINFO electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant articles. Adherence rates in adults with headache range considerably from 25% to 94% across treatment, assessment method, and definition of adherence utilized. Methods to assess adherence included retrospective prescription claims data, paper or electronic diaries, follow-up appointment attendance, written and verbal self-report of general adherence, verbal self-report of adherence over a specific amount of time via in person interview or telephone, validated adherence measures, adherence questionnaires without validation, and counselor ratings of homework. Each methodology and assessment tool demonstrated strengths and weaknesses. No studies have systematically examined medication adherence in children with headache, and the few available studies examining adherence to behavioral treatment have documented adherence rates ranging from 52% to 86%. Adherence research in adults with headache is growing, but studies demonstrate a number of methodological shortcomings. Adherence research in children with headache, and adherence intervention research in both adults and children, is scant. Future research should use objective measures of adherence, consider over-the-counter medications and medication overuse, examine demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates of adherence, assess adherence to botulinum toxin type A, and examine the efficacy of adherence interventions in individuals with headache. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  11. Treatment Adherence Intervention Studies in Dermatology and Guidance on How to Support Adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, S.R.; Vrijens, B.; Gieler, U.; Piaserico, S.; Puig, L.; Kerkhof, P. van de

    2017-01-01

    Adequate adherence to prescribed treatment regimens can help to break the cycle of treatment failure, disease progression and subsequent treatment escalation. Unfortunately, adherence in the treatment of skin disorders such as acne, atopic dermatitis/eczema and psoriasis is often inadequate. A

  12. Determinants of adherence to methylphenidate and the impact of poor adherence on maternal and family measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Susan S F; Shen, Hsin-Yi; Chou, Miao-Churn; Tang, Ching-Shu; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Gau, Churn-Shiouh

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to immediate-release methylphenidate (IR MPH) and maternal psychological distress, parenting style, parent- child relationship, and perceived family support. The sample consisted of 307 children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (271 boys and 36 girls), 6-17 years of age, who had been treated with IR MPH for the past 6 months. The measures included the Chinese Health Questionnaire, Parental Bonding Instrument, Family APGAR, and Home Behaviors of the Social Adjustment Inventory for Children and Adolescents. Reasons for poor adherence (n = 79; 25.7%) included forgetting medication (72.7%), the medication having no effect (20.0%), and refusing medication (12.7%). Increased age and three-times-daily administration were the major predictors for poor adherence to IR MPH. Poor adherence was associated with increased degree of maternal psychological distress, indifferent parenting, maternal overprotection/control, poor family support, decreased interaction with parents, and increased problems at home. Findings indicate that multiple daily dosing of MPH increases the likelihood of poor adherence, particularly in adolescents, and that poor adherence is associated with impaired maternal/family process. Once-daily administration of MPH is necessary to improve adherence and to decrease the possible exacerbation of tense parent-child relationships caused by poor drug adherence.

  13. Medication Adherence Apps: Review and Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imran; Ahmad, Niall Safir; Ali, Shahnaz; Ali, Shair; George, Anju; Saleem Danish, Hiba; Uppal, Encarl; Soo, James; Mobasheri, Mohammad H; King, Dominic; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2018-03-16

    Medication adherence is an expensive and damaging problem for patients and health care providers. Patients adhere to only 50% of drugs prescribed for chronic diseases in developed nations. Digital health has paved the way for innovative smartphone solutions to tackle this challenge. However, despite numerous apps available claiming to improve adherence, a thorough review of adherence apps has not been carried out to date. The aims of this study were to (1) review medication adherence apps available in app repositories in terms of their evidence base, medical professional involvement in development, and strategies used to facilitate behavior change and improve adherence and (2) provide a system of classification for these apps. In April 2015, relevant medication adherence apps were identified by searching the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store using a combination of relevant search terms. Data extracted included app store source, app price, documentation of health care professional (HCP) involvement during app development, and evidence base for each respective app. Free apps were downloaded to explore the strategies used to promote medication adherence. Testing involved a standardized medication regimen of three reminders over a 4-hour period. Nonadherence features designed to enhance user experience were also documented. The app repository search identified a total of 5881 apps. Of these, 805 fulfilled the inclusion criteria initially and were tested. Furthermore, 681 apps were further analyzed for data extraction. Of these, 420 apps were free for testing, 58 were inaccessible and 203 required payment. Of the 420 free apps, 57 apps were developed with HCP involvement and an evidence base was identified in only 4 apps. Of the paid apps, 9 apps had HCP involvement, 1 app had a documented evidence base, and 1 app had both. In addition, 18 inaccessible apps were produced with HCP involvement, whereas 2 apps had a documented evidence base. The 420 free apps were

  14. Equity in adherence to antiretroviral therapy among economically vulnerable adolescents living with HIV in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Jennings, Larissa; Ssewamala, Fred M; Nabunya, Proscovia; Mellins, Claude; McKay, Mary

    2016-03-01

    Studies from sub-Saharan Africa indicate that children made vulnerable by poverty have been disproportionately affected by HIV with many exposed via mother-to-child transmission. For youth living with HIV, adherence to life-saving treatment regimens are likely to be affected by the complex set of economic and social circumstances that challenge their families and also exacerbate health problems. Using baseline data from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) funded Suubi+Adherence study, we examined the extent to which individual and composite measures of equity predict self-reported adherence among Ugandan adolescents aged 10-16 (n = 702) living with HIV. Results showed that greater asset ownership, specifically familial possession of seven or more tangible assets, was associated with greater odds of self-reported adherence (OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.00-2.85). Our analyses also indicated that distance to the nearest health clinic impacts youth's adherence to an ARV regimen. Youth who reported living nearest to a clinic were significantly more likely to report optimal adherence (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.92-2.40). Moreover, applying the composite equity scores, we found that adolescents with greater economic advantage in ownership of household assets, financial savings, and caregiver employment had higher odds of adherence by a factor of 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07-2.70). These findings suggest that interventions addressing economic and social inequities may be beneficial to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake among economically vulnerable youth, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This is one of the first studies to address the question of equity in adherence to ART among economically vulnerable youth with HIV.

  15. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon ML

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Scanlon,1,2 Rachel C Vreeman1,21Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2USAID, Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH Partnership, Eldoret, KenyaAbstract: The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a

  16. Treatment adherence in patients living with HIV/AIDS assisted at a specialized facility in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyada, Simone; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Gatto, Renata Colturato Joaquim; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba

    2017-01-01

    In the 1990s, Brazil adopted a public policy that allowed for universal, free access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Since then, treatment adherence has become a new challenge for administrators of sexually transmitted disease/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (STD/AIDS) policies. This study quantified adherence to ART and verified whether there is an association between sociodemographic variables and clinical/laboratory data in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study with a quantitative approach that was conducted over 8 months. The target population contained patients who were assisted at the ambulatory care facility specialized in STD/AIDS of a medium-size city located in Northwest São Paulo. In order to verify the level of adherence to ART, a validated CEAT-VIH (Assessment of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Questionnaire) questionnaire was used. Sociodemographic aspects and clinical/laboratory data were obtained from the medical records. The results were analyzed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's coefficient. Herein, 109 patients were interviewed, 56% of whom were male. The age of the population ranged 18-74 years (mean 45.67 years). Adherence to ART was classified as insufficient in 80.7% of cases. There was an association between ART adherence and presence of symptoms and/or opportunistic infection (p=0.008) and economic status (p<0.001). Adherence to ART among HIV carriers cared for by the public health system is low. Patients who reported a favorable economic status and those without symptoms and/or opportunistic infection demonstrated greater treatment adherence than those who needed to take more than 3 pills a day.

  17. Treatment adherence in patients living with HIV/AIDS assisted at a specialized facility in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Miyada

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: In the 1990s, Brazil adopted a public policy that allowed for universal, free access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Since then, treatment adherence has become a new challenge for administrators of sexually transmitted disease/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (STD/AIDS policies. This study quantified adherence to ART and verified whether there is an association between sociodemographic variables and clinical/laboratory data in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study with a quantitative approach that was conducted over 8 months. The target population contained patients who were assisted at the ambulatory care facility specialized in STD/AIDS of a medium-size city located in Northwest São Paulo. In order to verify the level of adherence to ART, a validated CEAT-VIH (Assessment of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Questionnaire questionnaire was used. Sociodemographic aspects and clinical/laboratory data were obtained from the medical records. The results were analyzed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's coefficient. RESULTS Herein, 109 patients were interviewed, 56% of whom were male. The age of the population ranged 18-74 years (mean 45.67 years. Adherence to ART was classified as insufficient in 80.7% of cases. There was an association between ART adherence and presence of symptoms and/or opportunistic infection (p=0.008 and economic status (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to ART among HIV carriers cared for by the public health system is low. Patients who reported a favorable economic status and those without symptoms and/or opportunistic infection demonstrated greater treatment adherence than those who needed to take more than 3 pills a day.

  18. [Family adherence in serious mental disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Padilla, Ernesto; Obando Posada, Diana; Sarmiento Medina, Pedro

    2017-10-09

    Identify attitudes and behaviors that evidence and characterize family adherence to treatment in patients with severe mental disorder. Qualitative descriptive, from an interpretative social approach. Chia, Colombia, with professionals in the psychiatric and geriatric settings. Twelve professionals in psychiatry, nursing and psychology, with experience in care of patients with serious mental disorder and their families. Intentional sampling. Twelve semi-structured interviews were carried out. The analysis strategy was made from the procedures of constant comparison and open coding of the grounded theory. As validation strategies, triangulation was done between researchers and methods, as interviews and results survey. Two categories of family adherence were defined: family and treatment (treatment cooperation, knowledge about the disease and attention to the disease evolution), and family attitudes towards the patient (patient's care, patient's promotion of autonomy, and affective attachment with the patient). A third category showed aspects that diminished family adherence, such as lack or distortion of information regarding mental disorder, or family and patient endurance attitudes. Participants agree about the relevance of the construct named «family adherence», which describes the behaviors and attitudes of the family regarding the treatment of patients with severe mental disorder. Family adherence can be seen as active participation behavior, but also as a process of strengthening relationships, which can reduce the burden and suffering on family members, caregivers and patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of cultural and religious orientations on social support and its potential impact on medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatah, Ernieda; Lim, Kien Ping; Ali, Adliah Mohd; Mohamed Shah, Noraida; Islahudin, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Social support can positively influence patients' health outcomes through a number of mechanisms, such as increases in patients' adherence to medication. Although there have been studies on the influence of social support on medication adherence, these studies were conducted in Western settings, not in Asian settings where cultural and religious orientations may be different. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of cultural orientation and religiosity on social support and its relation to patients' medication adherence. This was a cross-sectional study of patients with chronic diseases in two tertiary hospitals in Selangor, Malaysia. Patients who agreed to participate in the study were asked to answer questions in the following areas: 1) perceived group and higher authority cultural orientations; 2) religiosity: organizational and non-organizational religious activities, and intrinsic religiosity; 3) perceived social support; and 4) self-reported medication adherence. Patients' medication adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regressions, and only variables with a P-value of social support (r=0.181, P=0.003; r=0.230, Pinfluence patients' adherence to medications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.05, P=0.002; OR 0.99, P=0.025; OR 1.19, P=0.038; and OR 9.08, Psocial support was not found to have significant influence on patients' medication adherence. Only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus) had significant influence on patients' adherence.

  20. Improving medication adherence in patients with hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Pottegård, Anton

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: and Purpose: In patients with hypertension, medication adherence is often suboptimal, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke. In a randomized trial, we investigated the effectiveness of a multifaceted pharmacist intervention in a hospital setting to improve...... medication adherence in hypertensive patients. Motivational interviewing was a key element of the intervention. METHODS: Patients (N=532) were recruited from 3 hospital outpatient clinics and randomized to usual care or a 6-month pharmacist intervention comprising collaborative care, medication review...... for persistence, blood pressure or hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted pharmacist intervention in a hospital setting led to a sustained improvement in medication adherence for patients with hypertension. The intervention had no significant impact on blood pressure and secondary clinical outcomes....

  1. Patient Adherence to Biologic Agents in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Der Yi; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low adherence to therapies in psoriasis decreases treatment outcomes and increases the total health care costs. In spite of the wide use of biologic agents, patients' adherence to these drugs has not been extensively investigated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure adherence...... to the biologic drugs in a population of patients treated for psoriasis vulgaris using the medication possession ratio (MPR) index and to survey patients' attitudes to the treatment. METHODS: This is a single-center study on 247 patients with psoriasis vulgaris treated with adalimumab (n = 113), etanercept (n...... = 39), and ustekinumab (n = 95). MPR calculation was calculated monthly based on the hospital records documenting the dispensing of biologics to the patients. Clinical data [Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), presence of psoriatic arthritis, concomitant...

  2. Enhanced diacylglycerol production by phospholipase D activation is responsible for abnormal increase in concanavalin A cap formation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from Chediak-Higashi syndrome (beige) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hirotake; Tanabe, Fuminori

    2014-07-01

    We previously reported that enhanced ceramide production induces calpain-mediated proteolysis of protein kinase C (PKC) in leukocytes from Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS). In the present study, we demonstrated that phospholipase D (PLD) inhibitors ameliorated abnormal increases in concanavalin A (Con A) cap formation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) from beige mouse, an animal model of CHS. PLD activity in PMNs from beige mice enhanced at 30 to 60s after Con A stimulation. In Con A-stimulated beige PMNs, both neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) and acidic sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) activities enhanced, and ceramide levels are also increased. We found that ceramide levels were reversed by the treatment of beige PMNs with propranolol which inhibits phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase. In addition, we showed that diacylgycerol (DAG) analogs enhance both N-SMase and A-SMase activities in PMNs from normal mice. We subsequently examined the association of CHS1 with PLD, and showed that expression of a truncated mutant of CHS1 in 293T cells induced abnormally rapid activation of PLD after phorbol ester stimulation. Moreover, we showed that specific inhibitors of 14-3-3 proteins, which interact with CHS1/LYST and bind PKC, did not affect abnormal increases in Con A cap formation in beige PMNs. These results suggest that the enhanced DAG production via the PLD pathway is associated with abnormal increases in Con A cap formation in beige PMNs, and that CHS1 may be involved in the regulation of PLD activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in healthy and osteoartheritic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, Abdurahman S.; Alballa, Sulaiman R.; Mustafa, Ali A.; Al-Tuwajiri, Ali S.; Al-Humayyad, M.S.; Al-Dalaan, Abdullah N.

    2004-01-01

    To ivestigate the effects of diclofenac alone or when combined with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in healthy and osteoartheritic (OA) patients. The study was carried out at the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, KIgdom of Saudi Arabia, over the period 1999 to 2000. 12 healthy controls and 12 osteoartheritic patients were recruited to the study. They were given diclofenac 50mg thricedaily orally, initially for 5 days then alpha-tocopherol at 200mg thrice daily orally, was added for another 5 days. Blood samples were drawn before the start of study and at 5 days following treatmentwith diclofenac alone and 10 days following treatment with diclophenac and alpha-tocopherol. Chemiluminescence (CL)reponse was measured for wohle blood and isolated (PMNs) on all samples. Diclofenac enhanced CL response of whole blood and PMNs of healthy controls when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OPZ). Cotreatment with alpha-tocopherol resulted in no appreciable change in the CL response of whole blood when stimulated with PMA or OPZ but a further significant enhancement of CL response of isolated PMNs when these cells were stimulated by either PMA or OPZ. In osteoartheritic patients, diclofenac alone and when combined with alpha-tocopherol showed no significant change in CL response of the whole blood.The CL response of PMNs from OA patients was decreased by diclofenac alone. However the inhibitory effect was not observed when alpha-tocopherol was used together with diclofenac. The effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol did not produce a consistent effect on the CL response of whole blood or isolated PMNs of healthy or osteoartheritic patients. (author)

  4. Differential expression of interleukin-8 by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of two closely related species, Ovis canadensis and Ovis aries, in response to Mannheimia haemolytica infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Caroline N; Foreyt, William J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2010-08-01

    The pneumonic lesions and mortality caused by Mannheimia haemolytica in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) are more severe than those in the related species, domestic sheep (DS; Ovis aries), under both natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin (Lkt) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are the most important virulence factors of this organism. One hallmark of pathogenesis of pneumonia is the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) into the lungs. Lkt-induced cytolysis of PMNs results in the release of cytotoxic compounds capable of damaging lung tissue. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent PMN chemoattractant. The objective of the present study was to determine if there is differential expression of IL-8 by the macrophages and PMNs of BHS and DS in response to M. haemolytica. Macrophages and PMNs of BHS and DS were stimulated with heat-killed M. haemolytica or LPS. IL-8 expression by the cells was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The PMNs of BHS expressed severalfold higher levels of IL-8 than those of DS upon stimulation. Lesional lung tissue of M. haemolytica-infected BHS contained significantly higher levels of IL-8 than nonlesional tissue. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of infected BHS also contained higher levels of IL-8 than that of infected DS. Depletion of IL-8 reduced migration of PMNs toward BAL fluid by approximately 50%, indicating that IL-8 is integral to PMN recruitment to the lung during M. haemolytica infection. Excessive production of IL-8, enhanced recruitment of PMNs, and PMN lysis by Lkt are likely responsible for the severity of the lung lesions in M. haemolytica-infected BHS.

  5. Flow cytometric method for enumeration and characterization of newly released polymorphonuclear leukocytes from the bone marrow using 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chih-Horng; Whalen, Beth A; Goto, Yukinobu; Hogg, James C; van Eeden, Stephan F

    2005-09-01

    Inflammation accelerates polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) release from the bone marrow, and these PMNs are implicated in inappropriate tissue injury. We have previously developed a method using 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to study PMN kinetics using an immunocytochemical grading system of PMN on cytospin slides. The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric method to quantify the number of positively stained PMN and grade the intensity of staining for the transit time calculation of PMN through the marrow. Dividing myeloid progenitors in the marrow of rabbits were labeled with a pulse dosage of intravenous BrdU. BrdU-labeled PMN (PMN(BrdU)) were detected in the circulation using a FITC-conjugated anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody. The PMN(BrdU) were assigned to five groups according to their FITC intensity, and the transit times of PMN at different stages of development in the marrow were calculated. Results were compared using parallel immunocytochemical analysis of the same samples. In control animals, PMN(BrdU) in the circulation peaked at 72 h after BrdU labeling with 36.0% of PMN labeled. In normal rabbits, the transit times of PMN through the mitotic pool (49.5 +/- 4.2 h) and maturation pool (65.5 +/- 3.1 h) correlated well with immunocytochemical analysis and previously published values. Using this method, we demonstrated that exposure to air pollution particles accelerates the release of PMN(BrdU) from the marrow. We conclude that a flow cytometric approach for identifying BrdU-labeled leukocytes provides an objective and accurate method for studying leukocyte kinetics and behavior.

  6. Computation of adherence to medication and visualization of medication histories in R with AdhereR: Towards transparent and reproducible use of electronic healthcare data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lelia Dima

    Full Text Available Adherence to medications is an important indicator of the quality of medication management and impacts on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness of healthcare delivery. Electronic healthcare data (EHD are increasingly used to estimate adherence in research and clinical practice, yet standardization and transparency of data processing are still a concern. Comprehensive and flexible open-source algorithms can facilitate the development of high-quality, consistent, and reproducible evidence in this field. Some EHD-based clinical decision support systems (CDSS include visualization of medication histories, but this is rarely integrated in adherence analyses and not easily accessible for data exploration or implementation in new clinical settings. We introduce AdhereR, a package for the widely used open-source statistical environment R, designed to support researchers in computing EHD-based adherence estimates and in visualizing individual medication histories and adherence patterns. AdhereR implements a set of functions that are consistent with current adherence guidelines, definitions and operationalizations. We illustrate the use of AdhereR with an example dataset of 2-year records of 100 patients and describe the various analysis choices possible and how they can be adapted to different health conditions and types of medications. The package is freely available for use and its implementation facilitates the integration of medication history visualizations in open-source CDSS platforms.

  7. Factors affecting medication adherence in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin HK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyekyung Jin,1 Yeonhee Kim,2 Sandy Jeong Rhie1,3 1College of Pharmacy, 2Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning, 3Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: Little is known about the functional health literacy (FHL associated with medication adherence in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to examine the FHL among older adults and identify influencing factors that can predict medication adherence. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. Participants (n=160 aged 65 years and older were selected from outpatient clinics of 3 tertiary care hospitals, 6 community pharmacies, and 2 senior centers between November 1 and 30, 2014. The participants’ FHL was measured using the Korean Functional Health Literacy Test, which consists of 15 items including 8 numeracy and 7 reading comprehension items. Medication adherence was measured by the Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale. Descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean score of the total FHL was 7.72±3.51 (range 0–15. The percentage of the total number of correct answers for the reading comprehension subtest and numeracy subtest were 48.1% and 54.4%, respectively. Among 160 participants, 52.5% showed low adherence to medication. The factors affecting medication adherence included the patient’s degree of satisfaction with the service (β=-0.215, P=0.022, sufficient explanation of medication counseling (β=-0.335, P=0.000, education level (β=-0.153, P=0.045, health-related problems (β=-0.239, P=0.004, and dosing frequency (β=0.189, P=0.018. Conclusion: In this study, we found medication adherence of elderly patients was associated with education level, health-related problems, dosing frequency, satisfaction with patient counseling, and explanation of medication, but no association was found with FHL. Pharmacists

  8. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  9. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-01-01

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10μg/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4μg/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated

  10. Extracellular acidic pH modulates oxygen-dependent cytotoxic responses mediated by polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffner, J R; Trevani, A S; Minnucci, F; Palermo, M S; Maugeri, N; Isturiz, M A

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the ability of human neutrophils and monocytes to display oxygen-dependent cytotoxic responses at pH 7.4 and 6.2. Our results show that cytotoxicity induced by immune complexes (IC), zymosan, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and concanavalin A (Con A) were markedly increased when they were carried out at pH 6.2 instead of pH 7.4. Cytotoxicity induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), on the contrary, was significantly decreased at pH 6.2. It is noteworthy that cytotoxic responses induced by IC, zymosan and Con A were also increased when, 2 h after effector cell stimulation at pH 6.2, cytotoxicity was measured at pH 7.4. Finally, when we examined possible mechanisms involved in the augmentation of cytotoxicity, we observed that the oxidative response of IC-stimulated neutrophils, measured as chemiluminescence emission, was not increased at pH 6.2, on the contrary, it was significantly decreased. The relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:8419078

  11. Adherence to Antiretrovirals Among US Women During and After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeguez, Arlene D.; Lindsey, Jane C.; Shannon, Maureen; Tuomala, Ruth E.; Cohn, Susan E.; Smith, Elizabeth; Stek, Alice; Buschur, Shelly; Cotter, Amanda; Bettica, Linda; Read, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Antiretrovirals (ARVs) are recommended for maternal health and to reduce HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission, but suboptimal adherence can counteract its benefits. Objectives To describe antepartum and postpartum adherence to ARV regimens and factors associated with adherence. Methods We assessed adherence rates among subjects enrolled in Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 1025 from August 2002 to July 2005 on tablet formulations with at least one self-report adherence assessment. Perfectly adherent subjects reported no missed doses 4 days before their study visit. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare antepartum with postpartum adherence rates and to identify factors associated with perfect adherence. Results Of 519 eligible subjects, 334/445 (75%) reported perfect adherence during pregnancy. This rate significantly decreased 6, 24, and 48 weeks postpartum [185/284 (65%), 76/118 (64%), and 42/64 (66%), respectively (P pregnancy (P pregnancy are needed. PMID:18614923

  12. Alcoholism treatment adherence: older age predicts better adherence and drinking outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslin, David W; Pettinati, Helen; Volpicelli, Joseph R

    2002-01-01

    Adherence to treatment has been demonstrated to be an important factor for remission from alcohol dependence. The authors compared therapy and medication adherence for treatment of alcohol dependence in older adults with adherence in younger adults. All subjects were participants in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy trial of naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence. All subjects received a medically-based psychosocial intervention focused on motivating patients to change and on adherence to treatment. The therapy is nonconfrontational and is delivered by a nurse-practitioner. Compared with younger adults, older adults had greater attendance at therapy sessions and greater adherence to the medication. Age-group was the only pretreatment factor associated with adherence. The greater adherence in older adults translated to less relapse than in younger adults. Treatment for alcohol dependence can be effective for older adults. Older adults appear to respond well to a medically-oriented program that is supportive and individualized. In fact, findings from this study suggest that older adults can be treated in mixed-age treatment settings when psychotherapeutic strategies are used that are age-appropriate and delivered on an individual basis.

  13. Adherence to infant-feeding choices by HIV-infected mothers at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study examined adherence to infant-feeding choices made by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected mothers at a Nigerian tertiary hospital prior to implementation of the “rapid advice” guideline, i.e. the revised World Health Organisation principles and recommendations on infant feeding in the ...

  14. Adherence to physiotherapy clinical guideline acute ankle injury and determinants of adherence: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wees, Philip J; Hendriks, Erik JM; Jansen, Mariette J; van Beers, Hans; de Bie, Rob A; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. In physiotherapy, insight in adherence to guidelines is limited. Knowledge of adherence is important to identify barriers and to enhance implementation. Purpose of this study is to investigate the ability to adherence to recommendations of the guideline Acute ankle injury, and to identify patient characteristics that determine adherence to the guideline. Methods Twenty-two physiotherapists collected data of 174 patients in a prospective cohort study, in which the course of treatment was systematically registered. Indicators were used to investigate adherence to recommendations. Patient characteristics were used to identify prognostic factors that may determine adherence to the guideline. Correlation between patient characteristics and adherence to outcome-indicators (treatment sessions, functioning of patient, accomplished goals) was calculated using univariate logistic regression. To calculate explained variance of combined patient characteristics, multivariate analysis was performed. Results Adherence to individual recommendations varied from 71% to 100%. In 99 patients (57%) the physiotherapists showed adherence to all indicators. Adherence to preset maximum of six treatment sessions for patients with severe ankle injury was 81% (132 patients). The odds to receive more than six sessions were statistically significant for three patient characteristics: females (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.41–10.72), recurrent sprain (OR: 6.90; 95%CI: 2.34 – 20.37), co-morbidity (OR: 25.92; 95% CI: 6.79 – 98.93). All factors together explained 40% of the variance. Inclusion of physiotherapist characteristics in the regression model showed that work-experience reduced the odds to receive more than six sessions (OR: 0.2; 95%CI: 0.06 – 0.77), and increased explained variance to 45%. Conclusion Adherence to the clinical guideline Acute ankle sprain showed that the guideline is

  15. Adherence to physiotherapy clinical guideline acute ankle injury and determinants of adherence: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Beers Hans

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality in health care. In physiotherapy, insight in adherence to guidelines is limited. Knowledge of adherence is important to identify barriers and to enhance implementation. Purpose of this study is to investigate the ability to adherence to recommendations of the guideline Acute ankle injury, and to identify patient characteristics that determine adherence to the guideline. Methods Twenty-two physiotherapists collected data of 174 patients in a prospective cohort study, in which the course of treatment was systematically registered. Indicators were used to investigate adherence to recommendations. Patient characteristics were used to identify prognostic factors that may determine adherence to the guideline. Correlation between patient characteristics and adherence to outcome-indicators (treatment sessions, functioning of patient, accomplished goals was calculated using univariate logistic regression. To calculate explained variance of combined patient characteristics, multivariate analysis was performed. Results Adherence to individual recommendations varied from 71% to 100%. In 99 patients (57% the physiotherapists showed adherence to all indicators. Adherence to preset maximum of six treatment sessions for patients with severe ankle injury was 81% (132 patients. The odds to receive more than six sessions were statistically significant for three patient characteristics: females (OR:3.89; 95%CI: 1.41–10.72, recurrent sprain (OR: 6.90; 95%CI: 2.34 – 20.37, co-morbidity (OR: 25.92; 95% CI: 6.79 – 98.93. All factors together explained 40% of the variance. Inclusion of physiotherapist characteristics in the regression model showed that work-experience reduced the odds to receive more than six sessions (OR: 0.2; 95%CI: 0.06 – 0.77, and increased explained variance to 45%. Conclusion Adherence to the clinical guideline Acute ankle sprain showed that the

  16. Patients with COPD have low adherence to inhaled medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Toettenborg, Sandra; Topp, Marie

    2014-01-01

    describe results of previous studies on prevalence of adherence to inhaled medicine in COPD, and define characteristics of the patients and treatment associated with degree of adherence. We conclude that health professionals should always consider non-adherence, strive to simplify regiments......Medicine adherence in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has not been studied in Denmark. Studies from other countries, however, unequivocally report low prevalence of patients who follow their doctor's advice and have sufficient adherence to inhaled medicine. In this review we......, and that there is an urgent need of studies aiming at improving adherence in patients with COPD....

  17. Impact of a pharmaceutical care program on clinical evolution and antiretroviral treatment adherence: a 5-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Arroyo MJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available María Jesús Hernández Arroyo,1 Salvador Enrique Cabrera Figueroa,2 Rosa Sepúlveda Correa,3 María de la Paz Valverde Merino,1 Alicia Iglesias Gómez,4 Alfonso Domínguez-Gil Hurlé5 On behalf of the Tormes Team 1Pharmacy Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 2Pharmacy Institute, University Austral of Chile, Valdivia, Chile; 3Department of Statistics, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 4Infectious Disease Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 5Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Background: Antiretroviral treatments (ART form the basis of adequate clinical control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and adherence plays a primary role in the grade and duration of the antiviral response. The objectives of this study are: (1 to determine the impact of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care program on improvement of ART adherence and on the immunovirological response of the patients; and (2 to detect possible correlations between different adherence evaluation measurements. Methods: A 60-month long retrospective study was conducted. Adherence measures used were: therapeutic drug monitoring, a simplified medication adherence questionnaire, and antiretroviral dispensation records (DR. The number of interviews and interventions related to adherence made for each patient in yearly periods was related to the changes in the adherence variable (measured with DR in these same yearly periods. The dates when the laboratory tests were drawn were grouped according to proximity with the study assessment periods (February–May, 2005–2010. Results: A total of 528 patients were included in the study. A significant relationship was observed between the simplified medication adherence questionnaire and DR over the 60-month study period (P < 0.01. Improvement was observed in the mean adherence level (P < 0.001, and there was a

  18. Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.R. Moosa. MB ChB, FCP, MD. Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch. Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape. The global population of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients.

  19. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaip Krasniqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB. To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188. Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker’s commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  20. Sociodemographic factors influencing adherence to antenatal iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sociodemographic factors influencing adherence to antenatal iron supplementation recommendations among pregnant women in Malawi: Analysis of data from ... Focusing on education interventions that target populations with low rates of iron supplement intake, including campaigns to increase the number of women who ...

  1. Barriers to adherence in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14 to 25 years and their parents. Conclusions: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents with CF and their parents experienced barriers to treatment adherence. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered lack...

  2. Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective There has been considerable debate about the extent to which social cognitive models of health behaviour apply in developing countries. The purpose of this paper was to determine the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) in predicting dietary and fluid adherence among a sample of ...

  3. Hypertension guideline adherence of private practitioners and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension remains a healthcare problem in South Africa. When prescribing evidence-based, cost-effective anti-hypertensive treatment, guideline adherence is essential. The Joint National Committee's Sixth Report (JNC VI) built its evidence-based review on the outcome of clinical trials. The objective of this ...

  4. Determinants of Patient's Adherence to Hypertension Medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    who perceived high susceptibility, severity, benefit had better adherence compared to moderate and low susceptibility, severity, and ... are effective in reducing high blood pressure and have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of ... status, lifestyle factors (meal habits, smoking, salt intake >5 g, oil consumption of <500 ...

  5. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona

    2017-01-01

    Setting The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients' adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188). Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker's commitments need to be addressed for improvement. PMID:29230326

  6. Telephone interventions for adherence to colpocytological examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Marques Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to test the effects of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone on adherence of women with inappropriate periodicity to colpocytological examination. Method: quasi-experimental study with a sample of 524 women, selected with the following inclusion criteria: be aged between 25 and 64 years, have initiated sexual activity, have inappropriate periodicity of examination and have mobile or landline phone. The women were divided into two groups for application of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone. It was used an intervention script according to the principles of Motivational Interviewing. Results: on comparing the results before and after the behavioral and educational interventions, it was found that there was a statistically significant change (p = 0.0283 with increase of knowledge of women who participated in the educational intervention. There was no change in the attitude of women of any of the groups and there was an increase of adherence to colpocytological examination in both groups (p < 0.0001, with greater adherence of women participating in the behavioral group (66.8%. Conclusion: the behavioral and educational interventions by phone were effective in the adherence of women to colpocytological examination, representing important strategies for permanent health education and promotion of care for the prevention of cervical cancer.

  7. Factors Associated With Poor Medication Adherence In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: 237 adult patients aged 18 and above with previous diagnosis of essential hypertension receiving out patient care in the University Teaching Hospital ... Multivariable analysis showed that; participants were more likely to be non-adherent by self-report if they had attained a primary level of education, had missed ...

  8. Patient Medication Knowledge Governing Adherence to Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty six (26) (39.0%) of patients used “preventer” medication, that is medication that prevents asthmatic attack on those who frequently suffer from asthma, and 5 (7%) never used it. Participants offered a number of reasons explaining their non-adherence, the most common 24 (58.5%) were those who forgot to take ...

  9. Adherence to traditional Indian customs surrounding birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Customs traditionally followed by Indian women during pregnancy, birth and early parenthood have been documented. An exploratory investigation of the extent to which some of these traditional beliefs, customs and practices are currently adhered to was undertaken by interviewing Indian mothers living in Johannesburg ...

  10. Adherence to Cooperative Principles among Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This study assessed agricultural cooperatives' level of adherence to cooperative guiding principles in Oyo ... structured questionnaire and analysed using chi square at 5% level of significance. The mean year of ..... The implication of this is that there would be an ineffective leadership which will have a negative impact on ...

  11. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... SUMMARY. Objectives: To evaluate available and desired sources and types of social-support among hypertensive and type-2- diabetes (T2D) patients. Associations of medication adherence and clinical outcome with access to most available social-support and medicine affordability were subsequently ...

  12. Patient Medication Knowledge Governing Adherence to Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samuel Olaleye

    (39.0%) of patients used “preventer” medication, that is medication that prevents asthmatic attack on those who frequently suffer from asthma, and 5 ..... terminology, incidence and conceptualisation. Facilitating treatment adherence. New York: Plenum Pr.pp. 19–39. Pain MCF. (2003) Delivering inhaled asthma therapy. Aust.

  13. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis...

  14. Determinants of patient's adherence to hypertension medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and Methods: A cross‑sectional study was conducted in a rural area of the Ardabil city in 2013. This study was ... Respondents with regular physical activity and nonsmokers were more adherent to hypertension medication when compared to respondents with sedentary lifestyle and smoking (P < 0.01). Based on ...

  15. SUPPORTING RAPE SURVIVORS IN ADHERING TO POST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-14

    Oct 14, 2008 ... affecting adherence to PEP in the aftermath of rape. A number of different approaches were attempted to recruit rape survivors. Letters explaining the study purpose and requesting assistance with recruiting victims were sent to organisations that provide counselling to rape survivors. One PEP site in the ...

  16. Antipsychotic medication non-adherence among schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... factors associated with antipsychotic medication non-adherence among schizophrenia patients .... treatment. Results. Socio-demographic characteristics of schizophrenia patients. Out of the total 423 recruited patients, 412 filled in the questionnaire ... involving chewing parts of the fresh green leaves.

  17. Adherence to traditional Indian customs surrounding birth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract CustOITlS traditionally followed by Indian women during pregnancy, birth and early parenthood have been docUITlented. An exploratory investiga- tion of the extent to which some of these tradi- tional beliefs, customs and practices are currently adhered to was undertaken by interviewing Indian. ITlothers living in ...

  18. Psychosocial influencers and mediators of treatment adherence in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Park, Ji Suk; Seo, Wha Sook

    2013-09-01

    This article is a report of the development and testing of the hypothetical model that illustrates relationships between treatment adherence and its psychosocial influencing factors and to elucidate the direct and indirect (mediating) effects of factors on treatment adherence. Poor adherence has been consistently reported in haemodialysis patients. Much research has showed various influencing factors of adherence, but these studies have failed to identify consistent influencing factors. This study was performed using a non-experimental, cross-sectional design. The study subjects were 150 end-stage renal failure patients on haemodialysis at a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. Data were collected over 10 months (June 2010-April 2011). The hypothetical model provided a good fit with data. Haemodialysis-related knowledge, perceived barrier to adherence, self-efficacy on adherence, and healthcare provider support had significant effects on adherence. Self-efficacy was found to mediate barrier-adherence and family support-adherence relationships. Self-efficacy in combination with barrier, family support, and healthcare provider support was found to mediate the depression-adherence relationship. Strategies aimed at the development of successful adherence interventions should focus on reducing perceived barriers and enhancing self-efficacy and knowledge. It can be suggested that efforts to improve the healthcare provider-patient relationship would enhance adherence. In depressive patients, strategies that promote self-efficacy and the support of family or healthcare providers could diminish the negative impact of depression on adherence. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F. [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Martínez-Castañón, G.A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.mx [Doctorado Institucional en Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Maestría en Ciencias Odontológicas en el Área de Odontología Integral Avanzada, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava S/N, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78290 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Téllez-Déctor, E.J. [Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Veracruzana campus Río Blanco, Mariano Abasolo S/N. Col. Centro. Río Blanco, Veracruz (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans.

  20. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L.F.; Martínez-Castañón, G.A.; Téllez-Déctor, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p < 0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller. Highlights: ► We examined how SNP can affect cellular adhesion from S. mutans. ► Several techniques were applied to analyzed S. mutans biofilm on enamel. ► All SNP sizes had an adhesion inhibition of S. mutans. ► Smaller SNP showed a better adhesion inhibition than larger SNP. ► Inhibition effect of SNP could be related with adhesion inhibition from S. mutans

  1. Determinants of Adherence to Living on Dialysis for Mexican Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley A. Wells

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores perceptions that affect adherence behaviors among Mexican Americans living with dialysis. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted with 15 Mexican Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD living on dialysis, 15 family members, and 6 health care personnel who provided care to them. Four themes emerged: (a positive influences to adherence, (b obstacles to adherence, (c daily activity losses, and (d fears about living with dialysis. From the findings, the perceptions given for non-adherence with the dialysis regimen ranged from denial of the condition, lack of pre-education, to cultural factors. Those given for adherence included prolonged life, family, and hope of getting a transplant. Health care providers were the reminder to adhere. Several cultural factors influenced their adherence perceptions. Strategies to enhance adherence behaviors should focus on knowledge about dialysis, use of the collective efficacy of the family, and the inclusion of cultural values.

  2. Enhanced adherence to HCV therapy with higher dose ribavirin formulation: final analyses from the ADHERE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, I; Stainbrook, T; Cecil, B; Kistler, K D

    2010-08-01

    Poor adherence to Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment is an important cause of treatment failure. Traditional ribavirin 200 mg (RBV) treatment is associated with a significant daily pill burden. RibaPak (RBP), available as 400 mg and 600 mg ribavirin tablets, offers simplified dosing at two pills daily. To examine whether improved adherence was associated with RBP vs. RBV. Accurate Dosing in Hepatitis C: Examining the RibaPak Experience (ADHERE) was a U.S., multi-centre, prospective registry capturing data on adherence with RBP vs. RBV in adults with HCV. Adherence was measured by the proportion of subjects remaining on treatment at weeks 4, 12 and 24; by pill counts; and by the proportion of subjects who took > or = 80% of their prescribed dose. A total of 503 patients (RBP = 346, RBV = 157) from 33 sites were included. A greater proportion of RBV vs. RBP subjects prematurely discontinued treatment. At 12 and 24 weeks, a greater proportion of RBP vs. RBV subjects took > or = 80% of their prescribed doses (P < 0.05). For patients who remained on treatment, the mean milligrams missed per day was significantly greater for RBV vs. RBP at 24 weeks. First line treatment with RBP may offer the best prospect for less discontinuation and improved treatment adherence.

  3. Strategies to improve HIV treatment adherence in developed countries: clinical management at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Maithe; McKinsey, David S

    2011-01-01

    REMARKABLE ADVANCES IN THE TREATMENT OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) DISEASE HAVE BEEN BLUNTED BY WIDESPREAD SUBOPTIMAL ADHERENCE (IE, NONADHERENCE), WHICH HAS EMERGED AS A MAJOR BARRIER TO ACHIEVING THE PRIMARY GOAL OF ANTIRETROVIRAL (ARV) THERAPY: suppression of HIV viral load. Nonsuppressed HIV viral load is associated with drug resistance, increased morbidity and mortality, and a higher risk of person-to-person HIV transmission. For HIV-infected individuals who are failing HIV treatment due to nonadherence, becoming adherent is a life-saving behavior change. However, overcoming nonadherence is one of the most daunting challenges in the successful management of HIV disease. The purpose of this paper is to provide clinicians with a better understanding of nonadherence to ARV treatment and to review the various factors that have been associated with either adherence or nonadherence. Strategies are presented that may help the nonadherent individual become ready to take HIV medications as prescribed.

  4. Expert Involvement and Adherence to Medical Evidence in Medical Mobile Phone Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Bube, Sarah Hjartbro; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both clinicians and patients use medical mobile phone apps. Anyone can publish medical apps, which leads to contents with variable quality that may have a serious impact on human lives. We herein provide an overview of the prevalence of expert involvement in app development and whether...... or not app contents adhere to current medical evidence. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. METHODS: We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and EMBASE......), and included studies evaluating expert involvement or adherence of app content to medical evidence in medical mobile phone apps. Two authors performed data extraction independently. Qualitative analysis of the included studies was performed. RESULTS: Based on inclusion criteria, 52 studies were included...

  5. Treatment adherence in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease: the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Denson, Lee A; Baldassano, Robert N; Hommel, Kevin A

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of factors impacting adolescents' ability to adhere to their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regimen is limited. The current study examines the collective impact of barriers to adherence and anxiety/depressive symptoms on adolescent adherence to the IBD regimen. Adolescents (n = 79) completed measures of barriers to adherence, adherence, and anxiety/depressive symptoms at one of two specialty pediatric IBD clinics. Most adolescents reported barriers to adherence and 1 in 8 reported borderline or clinically elevated levels of anxiety/depressive symptoms. Anxiety/depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between barriers to adherence and adherence. Post hoc probing revealed a significant, additive effect of higher anxiety/depressive symptoms in the barriers-adherence relationship, with adherence significantly lower among adolescents with higher barriers and higher anxiety/depressive symptoms. In order to optimize adherence in adolescents, interventions should target not only barriers to adherence but also any anxiety/depressive symptoms that may negatively impact efforts to adhere to recommended treatment.

  6. Effect of the level of maternal energy intake prepartum on immunometabolic markers, polymorphonuclear leukocyte function, and neutrophil gene network expression in neonatal Holstein heifer calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, J S; Trevisi, E; Ballou, M A; Bertoni, G; Drackley, J K; Loor, J J

    2013-06-01

    A conventional approach in dairy cow nutrition programs during late gestation is to feed moderate-energy diets. The effects of the maternal plane of nutrition on immune function and metabolism in newborn calves are largely unknown. Holstein cows (n=20) were fed a controlled-energy (CON) diet (1.24 Mcal/kg) for the entire dry period (~50 d) or the CON diet during the first 29 d of the dry period followed by a moderate-energy (OVE) diet (1.47 Mcal/kg) during the last 21 d prepartum. All calves were weighed at birth before first colostrum intake. Calves chosen for this study (n=6 per maternal diet) had blood samples harvested before colostrum feeding (d 0) and at 2 and 7 d of age. Blood samples were used to determine metabolites, acute-phase proteins, oxidative stress markers, hormones, phagocytic capacity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and monocytes, and total RNA was isolated from PMN. Calves from OVE dams weighed, on average, 5kg less at birth (44.0 vs. 48.6kg) than calves from CON dams. Blood glucose concentration in OVE calves had a more pronounced increase between 0 and 2 d than CON, at which point phagocytosis by PMN averaged 85% in OVE and 62% in CON. Compared with CON, calves from OVE had greater expression of TLR4, but lower expression of PPARA and PPARD at birth. Expression of PPARG and RXRA decreased between 0 and 2 d in both groups. Concentrations of leptin, cholesterol, ceruloplasmin, reactive oxygen metabolites, myeloperoxidase, retinol, tocopherol, IgG, and total protein, as well as expression of SOD2 and SELL increased markedly by 2 d in both groups; whereas, cortisol, albumin, acid-soluble protein, NEFA, insulin, as well as expression of IL6, TLR4, IL1R2, LTC4S, and ALOX5 decreased by 2 d. By 7 d of age, the concentration of haptoglobin was greater than precolostrum and was lower for OVE than CON calves. Our data provide evidence for a carry-over effect of maternal energy overfeeding during the last 3 wk before calving on some measurements of

  7. Medication adherence among transgender women living with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Baguso, Glenda N.; Gay, Caryl L.; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is linked to health outcomes among adults with HIV infection. Transgender women living with HIV (TWLWH) in the U.S. report suboptimal adherence to medications and are found to have difficulty integrating HIV medication into their daily routine, but few studies explore factors associated with medication adherence among transgender women. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine demographic and clinical factors related to self-reported medication adherence among transg...

  8. Comprehensive efforts to increase adherence to statin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vonbank, Alexander; Agewall, Stefan; Kjeldsen, Keld Per

    2017-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that statin therapy improves cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, statin adherence is far from optimal regarding initiation, execution and persistence of treatment over time.26 Poor adherence to statin therapy is associated with a significantly...... increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Evidence-based steps to improve adherence are available and should be taken in order to improve patient outcomes. Reinforcing statin adherence appears to have at least as strong beneficial effects as introducing a new drug....

  9. Medication adherence and its associated factors among diabetic patients at Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammed; Alemu, Tigestu; Sada, Oumer

    2017-12-04

    Diabetes is a global problem with devastating human, social and economic impact. Anti-diabetic medications play a major role in the glycemic control of patients with diabetes. However, inadequate adherence compromises safety and treatment effectiveness, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to anti-diabetic medications and associated factors among patient with diabetes mellitus receiving care at Zewditu Memorial Hospital. Among the total of 146 diabetic patients (mean age 46.5 ± 14.7), the level of adherence to anti diabetic medication was 54.8% (80) whilst 45.2% (66) of the participants were non adherent. Multiple logistic regression showed that knowledge of medication (AOR = 4.905, 95% CI 1.64-14.62, medication availability (AOR = 0.175, 95% CI 0.031-0.987) and education level (AOR = 13.65, 95% CI 1.45-128.456) were reasons for non-adherence.

  10. Adherence to HIV treatment guidelines for comorbid disease assessment and initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Mark; Hoy, Jennifer; Cunningham, Nicola; Roth, Norman; Bailey, Michael; Pierce, Anna; Watson, Jo; Carr, Andrew

    2012-04-15

    There are limited data on adherence to HIV treatment guidelines. We assessed adherence to US Department of Health and Human Services guidelines with Australian Commentary for adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Data were recorded regarding "when to start", "what to start" and pre-ART comorbid disease assessment for consecutive adults initiating ART at primary care and hospital clinics in Sydney and Melbourne from 2004 through 2008. Independent predictors of adherence to guidelines were calculated by stepwise logistic regression. For the 500 subjects (95.9% male, mean 40.2 years, median CD4 count 270 cells/μL) "when to start" adherence was 87.6%, and was less likely with initiation in a clinical trial [0.25 (95% CI: 0.13 to 0.49); P ART initiated in 2008 versus pre-2008 [OR: 2.69 (1.64 to 4.61); P = 0.0001]. Median comorbid disease assessment adherence was 56.8%, ranging from 25.6% for urinalysis to 99.2% for white blood cell count, and was more likely in patients with AIDS, and initiating ART in hospital or in a clinical trial. Hospital clinics were more likely to perform antiretroviral resistance testing (71.2% vs. 46.4%, P ART regimens (76.8% vs. 62.2%, P = 0.0002) but less likely to promote healthy diet and lifestyle (63.4% vs. 36.4%, P ART comorbid disease assessment requires greater attention.

  11. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related

  12. Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller therapy in chest clinics in a sub-Saharan African setting: a cross-sectional study. ... Background: Adherence to controller therapy in asthma is a major concern during the management of the disease. Objective: To determine the adherence rate and identify the ...

  13. Factors associated with non adherence to regulations on sale of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors associated with non adherence to regulations on sale of alcohol by alcohol outlets operators in Thika Municipality, Kiambu County. ... initiated to ensure members are informed and adhere to the policy. Setting up of an independent unit that will be mandated to enforcement and adherence of the 2010 alcoholic act.

  14. comparison of clinical and laboratory profile of haart adherent and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    HAART. Adherence was measured using an adapted adult AIDS clinical trial group (AACTG) with optimal adherence set at ≥95%. Clinical stage, anthropometry, CD4, total lymphocyte and haemoglobin were used to monitor clinical, immunological and haematological outcome of adherence. Result: The mean (SD) age of ...

  15. Evaluation of patients\\' adherence to chemotherapy for breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to establish the common reasons for non-adherence to drug treatment among breast cancer patients at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria over a ten-year period (Jan 1993 - Dec 2002). Patients\\' adherence and reasons for non-adherence to chemotherapy were ...

  16. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention. ... their treatment, while the group who were non-adherent presented with lower levels of adherence motivation and self-efficacy, difficulties in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and ...

  17. A Matter of Trust: Patient Barriers to Primary Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinski, J. M.; Kesselheim, A. S.; Frolkis, J. P.; Wescott, P.; Allen-Coleman, C.; Fischer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary medication adherence occurs when a patient properly fills the first prescription for a new medication. Primary adherence only occurs about three-quarters of the time for antihypertensive medications. We assessed patients' barriers to primary adherence and attributes of patient-provider discussions that might improve primary adherence…

  18. Patterns and obstacles to oral antidiabetic medications adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data concerning adherence to drugs was assessed using measure treatment adherence scale (MTA). Results: a total of 372 (55.59 % males and 44.41% females) patients with type-2 diabetes fulfilled the inclusion criteria and included in the study. Among the participants, 26.1% were found to have good adherence, 47.9% ...

  19. Medication adherence and direct treatment cost among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    53% non-adherence among diabetics in Malaysia; similar studies in ..... Associations between study participant drug adherence and other variables at LAUTECH. Teaching Hospital diabetes clinic. Adherence level. X2 df p-value. Monthly Income. 5.25. 2. 0..51. Sex .... sible use of their information for tax-related or other of-.

  20. Evaluation of Adherence to Diabetic Treatment in Northern Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine medication adherence and predictors of suboptimal adherence in patients with diabetes type 2, and to address the factors that are associated with treatment non-adherence in Northern Region of United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 200 type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

  1. Self-reported adherence to treatment: A study of socioeconomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Adherence to treatment is important and relevant in HIV treatment. Previous studies in sub Sahara Africa and south western Nigeria reported that psychiatric morbidity influence treatment adherence. The present study was to examine treatment adherence among the male and the female patients with HIV infection ...

  2. Determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated factors of adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment (ART), factors or variables that can discriminate between adherent and non-adherent patients on ART were selected. Simple structured questionnaire was employed. The study sample consisted of 145 HIV patients who received ART in the Shashemene ...

  3. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Gareth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which patients follow treatments as prescribed is pivotal to treatment success. An exceptionally high level (> 95% of HIV medication adherence is required to suppress viral replication and protect the immune system and a similarly high level (> 80% of adherence has also been suggested in order to benefit from prescribed exercise programmes. However, in clinical practice, adherence to both often falls below the desirable level. This project aims to investigate a wide range of psychological and personality factors that may lead to adherence/non-adherence to medical treatment and exercise programmes. Methods HIV positive patients who are referred to the physiotherapist-led 10-week exercise programme as part of the standard care are continuously recruited. Data on social cognitive variables (attitude, intention, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and outcome beliefs about the goal and specific behaviours, selected personality factors, perceived quality of life, physical activity, self-reported adherence and physical assessment are collected at baseline, at the end of the exercise programme and again 3 months later. The project incorporates objective measures of both exercise (attendance log and improvement in physical measures such as improved fitness level, weight loss, improved circumferential anthropometric measures and medication adherence (verified by non-invasive hair analysis. Discussion The novelty of this project comes from two key aspects, complemented with objective information on exercise and medication adherence. The project assesses beliefs about both the underlying goal such as following prescribed treatment; and about the specific behaviours such as undertaking the exercise or taking the medication, using both implicit and explicit assessments of patients’ beliefs and attitudes. We predict that i the way people think about the underlying goal of their treatments explains medication and exercise

  4. Associations between patients' adherence and GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind; Paulsen, Maja S; Christensen, Palle M

    2016-01-01

    statin treatment as important, how they managed non-adherence and whether non-adherence annoyed them. The Jackson Personality Inventory-revised was used to measure risk attitude. The GPs' responses were linked to register data on their patients' redeemed statin prescriptions. Mixed effect logistic......: To estimate associations between GPs' attitudes towards risk, statin therapy and management of non-adherence and their patients' adherence, and to identify subgroups of GPs with poor patient adherence. METHODS: All Danish GPs were invited to participate in an online survey. We asked whether they regarded.......77-0.96]. No other associations were found between patients' adherence and GPs' attitudes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that GPs' attitudes to risk, statin therapy or management of non-adherence are not significantly associated with their patients' adherence....

  5. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS in Latin America and the Caribbean: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jessica de Mattos; Torres, Thiago Silva; Coelho, Lara Esteves; Luz, Paula Mendes

    2018-01-01

    Optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy is closely related with suppression of the HIV viral load in plasma, slowing disease progression and decreasing HIV transmission rates. Despite its importance, the estimated proportion of people living with HIV in Latin America and the Caribbean with optimal adherence has not yet been reported in a meta-analysis. Moreover, little is known of the factors leading to poor adherence which may be setting-specific. We present a pooled estimate of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of people living with HIV in Latin America and Caribbean, report the methods used to measure adherence and describe the factors associated with poor adherence among the selected studies. We electronically searched published studies up to July 2016 on the PubMed, Web of Science and Virtual Health Library (Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Portal); considering the following databases: MEDLINE, LILACS, PAHO and IBECS. Two independent reviewers selected and extracted data on ART adherence and study characteristics. Pooled estimate of adherence was derived using a random-effects model. Risk of bias in individual studies was assessed independently by two investigators using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-randomized Studies (RoBANS). The meta-analysis included 53 studies published between 2005 and 2016, which analysed 22,603 people living with HIV in 25 Latin America and Caribbean countries. Overall adherence in Latin America and Caribbean was 70% (95% CI: 63-76; I 2  = 98%), similar to levels identified by studies conducted in high-income regions. Self-report was the most frequently used method to measure adherence. Subgroup analysis showed that adherence was higher for the shortest recall time frame used, as well as in countries with lower income level, Gross National Income (GNI) per capita and Human Development Index (HDI). Studies reported diverse adherence barriers, such as alcohol and substance misuse, depression

  6. Furthering patient adherence: A position paper of the international expert forum on patient adherence based on an internet forum discussion

    OpenAIRE

    van Dulmen, Sandra; Sluijs, Emmy; van Dijk, Liset; de Ridder, Denise; Heerdink, Rob; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background As the problem of patient non-adherence persists and a solution appears hard to be found, it continues to be important to look for new ways to further the issue. We recently conducted a meta-review of adherence intervention studies which yielded a preliminary agenda for future research, practice and theory development in patient adherence. The objective of the present project was to find out to what extent adherence experts consider this agenda relevant and feasible. Metho...

  7. Cancer Prevention Recommendations: Impact of Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresso, Karen Colbert; Hawk, Ernest

    2016-08-01

    To review the relationship between adherence to cancer prevention guidelines published by the American Cancer Society and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research and reductions in cancer incidence, cancer mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and overall mortality. Current cancer prevention guidelines published by the American Cancer Society and the American Institute for Cancer Research, journal articles published between 2004 and 2016, and internet resources. Evidence from a number of large observational studies indicates that following current cancer prevention recommendations in a comprehensive manner results in significant reductions in both cancer risk and cancer mortality, as well as in cardiovascular mortality and overall mortality. Nurses can take the lead in familiarizing patients and families with established cancer prevention recommendations and resources that may assist patients in implementing them comprehensively in their daily lives, as well as in discussing the substantial health benefits of adhering to the recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Walid F Gellad,3,4 Jivan Moaddeb,2,5 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 William Shrank,6 Bradi B Granger,7 Christopher B Granger,8 Troy Trygstad,9 Larry Z Liu,10 Hayden B Bosworth1,2,7,11 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6CVS Caremark Corporation; 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; 9North Carolina Community Care Networks, Raleigh, NC, USA; 10Pfizer, Inc., and Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Effective medications are a cornerstone of prevention and disease treatment, yet only about half of patients take their medications as prescribed, resulting in a common and costly public health challenge for the US healthcare system. Since poor medication adherence is a complex problem with many contributing causes, there is no one universal solution. This paper describes interventions that were not only effective in improving medication adherence among patients with diabetes, but were also potentially scalable (ie, easy to implement to a large population. We identify key characteristics that make these interventions effective and scalable. This information is intended to inform healthcare systems seeking proven, low resource, cost-effective solutions to improve medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, diabetes mellitus, chronic disease, dissemination research

  9. Can adherence to antihypertensive therapy be used to promote adherence to statin therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Chapman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard H Chapman1, Elise M Pelletier1, Paula J Smith1, Craig S Roberts21US Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Falls Church, VA, USA; 2Global Outcomes Research, Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USAObjective: To compare adherence with statin therapy in patients switching to single-pill amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium with patients adding a separate statin to their amlodipine regimen.Methods: We identified hypertensive patients prescribed amlodipine who switched to amlodipine/atorvastatin (switch or added a statin to their amlodipine regimen (add-on from July 2004 to June 2007. Propensity score matching (1 switch:3 add-on was applied based on ‘nearest neighbor’ approach. The primary adherence measure was patients with proportion of days covered (PDC ≥0.80 at 180 days; secondary measures included mean PDC and persistence. A sensitivity analysis was performed, accounting for total statin/amlodipine exposure.Results: Among 4556 matched patients (n = 1139 switch; n = 3417 add-on, mean age was 53.9 years and 52.1% were male. After 180 days, adherence with statin therapy was higher for the switch vs add-on cohort (50.8% vs 44.3%; P < 0.001. After adjusting for pre-index amlodipine adherence, the switch cohort was more likely to be adherent than the add-on cohort (odds ratio: 1.64 [95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 1.89]. Persistence was higher in the switch than the add-on cohort (127.6 vs 117 days; P < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients taking amlodipine who initiated statin therapy via single-pill amlodipine/atorvastatin were more likely to remain adherent to their statin than patients adding a separate statin to their antihypertensive regimen.Keywords: adherence, amlodipine, atorvastatin, cardiovascular disease, persistence, single-pill

  10. Constitutively Opa-Expressing and Opa-Deficient Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Differentially Stimulate and Survive Exposure to Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Louise M.; Criss, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus [Gc]) opacity-associated (Opa) proteins mediate bacterial binding and internalization by human epithelial cells and neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]). Investigating the contribution of Opa proteins to gonococcal pathogenesis is complicated by high-frequency phase variation of the opa genes. We therefore engineered a derivative of Gc strain FA1090 in which all opa genes were deleted in frame, termed Opaless. Opaless Gc remained uniforml...

  11. Assessing self-reported adherence to HIV therapy by questionnaire: the SERAD (Self-Reported Adherence) Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Moreno, J.A.; Fumaz, C.R.; Ferrer, M.J.; Tuldra, A.; Rovira, T.; Viladrich, C.; Bayes, R.; Burger, D.M.; Negredo, E.; Clotet, B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and RNA-HIV viral load outcomes has been extensively shown. Although there are different procedures for assessing treatment adherence, there is no ideal method. We present the SERAD (Self-Reported Adherence)

  12. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  13. Sharia Adherence Mosque Survey: Correlations between Sharia Adherence and Violent Dogma in U.S. Mosques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordechai Kedar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A random survey of 100 representative mosques in the U.S. was conducted to measure the correlation between Sharia adherence and dogma calling for violence against non-believers.  Of the 100 mosques surveyed, 51% had texts on site rated as severely advocating violence; 30% had texts rated as moderately advocating violence; and 19% had no violent texts at all.  Mosques that presented as Sharia adherent were more likely to feature violence-positive texts on site than were their non-Sharia-adherent counterparts.  In 84.5% of the mosques, the imam recommended studying violence-positive texts.  The leadership at Sharia-adherent mosques was more likely to recommend that a worshipper study violence-positive texts than leadership at non-Sharia-adherent mosques.  Fifty-eight percent of the mosques invited guest imams known to promote violent jihad.  The leadership of mosques that featured violence-positive literature was more likely to invite guest imams who were known to promote violent jihad than was the leadership of mosques that did not feature violence-positive literature on mosque premises.  

  14. Iron Chelation Adherence to Deferoxamine and Deferasirox in Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Vichinsky, Elliott; Haines, Dru; Pakbaz, Zahra; Mednick, Lauren; Sobota, Amy; Kwiatkowski, Janet; Thompson, Alexis A.; Porter, John; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J.; Olivieri, Nancy; Yamashita, Robert; Neufeld, Ellis J.

    2015-01-01

    The Thalassemia Clinical Research Network collected adherence information from 79 patients on deferoxamine and 186 on deferasirox from 2007 to 2009. Chelation adherence was defined as percent of doses administered in the last 4 weeks (patient report) out of those prescribed (chart review). Chelation history since 2002 was available for 97 patients currently on deferoxamine and 217 on deferasirox, with crude estimates of adherence from chart review. Self-reported adherence to both deferoxamine and deferasirox were quite high, with slightly higher adherence to the oral chelator (97 vs. 92%). Ninety percent of patients on deferasirox reported at least 90% adherence, compared with 75% of patients on deferoxamine. Adherence to both chelators was highest in children, followed by adolescents and older adults. Predictors of lower deferoxamine adherence were smoking in the past year, problems sticking themselves (adults only), problems wearing their pump, and fewer transfusions in the past year. Predictors of lower deferasirox adherence were bodily pain and depression. Switching chelators resulted in increased adherence, regardless of the direction of the switch, although switching from deferoxamine to deferasirox was far more common. As adherence to deferoxamine is higher than previously reported, it appears beneficial for patients to have a choice in chelators. PMID:21523808

  15. Pediatric psychologist use of adherence assessments and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Rohan, Jennifer M; Martin, Staci; Hommel, Kevin; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Loiselle, Kristin; Ambrosino, Jodie; Fredericks, Emily M

    2013-07-01

    To document current clinical practices for medical regimen adherence assessment and intervention in the field of pediatric psychology. 113 members of the Society of Pediatric Psychology completed an anonymous online survey that assessed use of adherence assessments and interventions in clinical practice, barriers and facilitators to their use, and preferred resources for obtaining information on adherence assessments and interventions. Respondents reported using a range of adherence assessment and intervention strategies, some of which are evidence-based. Barriers to implementing these clinical strategies included time constraints and lack of familiarity with available clinical tools. Respondents reported that education about effective clinical tools would facilitate their use of adherence assessments and interventions. Future research and clinical efforts in adherence should consider developing practical tools for clinical practice, making accessible resources to promote dissemination of these tools, and increase understanding of clinician implementation of adherence assessments and interventions.

  16. Family strategies for achieving medication adherence in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerski, Lisa; Perrazo, Lauren; Goebel, Jens; Pai, Ahna L H

    2011-01-01

    Although nonadherence is well documented and strategies for adherence have been shown to be critical to overcoming barriers and improving overall adherence rates, it is unknown how family strategy use is related to adherence in the pediatric renal transplant population. The aims of this study were to assess (a) the strategies used by adolescents with kidney transplants and their caregivers to adhere to the posttransplant oral medication regimen and (b) the relationship of these strategies to objective adherence rates. Semistructured interviews to assess self-management were administered to 17 adolescents (14-18 years) and 17 caregivers. Adherence to oral immunosuppressant medication, measured via electronic monitors, was determined also for a subset of 13 dyads. Common strategies endorsed by families included the following: making it part of the routine (88.2%), verbal reminders by caregiver (82.4%), caregiver verifying medication was taken (76.5%), placing medication in a convenient location (76.5%), and using a pillbox (70.6%). A greater number of family-endorsed strategies were correlated with higher levels of adherence. Of those strategies spontaneously endorsed, only caregiver reminders to take medication and caregiver verification that medications were taken were related significantly to higher adherence rates. The findings highlight the importance of identification and use of specific strategies to improve adherence rates of pediatric renal transplant recipients and emphasize the need for continued caregiver involvement in the promotion of adherence to the treatment regimen.

  17. Adherence to vitamin supplementation following adolescent bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani C; Zeller, Meg H; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Jenkins, Todd M; Inge, Thomas H

    2013-03-01

    Adolescents with extreme obesity, who have undergone bariatric surgery, must adhere to many lifestyle and nutritional recommendations, including multivitamin therapy. Little is known about multivitamin adherence following adolescent bariatric surgery. The present study aims to document self-reported and electronically-monitored adherence to multivitamins, determine convergence between self-report and electronic monitoring adherence for multivitamins, and identify barriers to multivitamin adherence for adolescents who have undergone bariatric surgery. The study used a prospective, longitudinal observational design to assess subjective (self-reported) and objective (electronic monitors) multivitamin adherence in a cohort of 41 adolescents (Mean age = 17.1 ± 1.5; range = 13-19) who have undergone bariatric surgery at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Mean adherence as derived from electronic monitoring for the entire 6-month study period was 29.8% ± 23.9. Self-reported adherence was significantly higher than electronically monitored adherence across both the 1 and 6-month assessment points (z = 4.5, P bariatric surgery, high rates of nonadherence to multivitamin therapy were observed in adolescents who had undergone bariatric surgery with forgetting and difficulty swallowing pills as reported barriers to adherence. These high rates of nonadherence to multivitamin therapy should be considered when devising treatment and family education pathways for adolescents considering weight loss surgery. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  18. Objective Assessment Method for RNAV STAR Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael; Matthews, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Flight crews and air traffic controllers have reported many safety concerns regarding area navigation standard terminal arrival routes (RNAV STARs). Specifically, optimized profile descents (OPDs). However, our information sources to quantify these issues are limited to subjective reporting and time consuming case-by-case investigations. This work is a preliminary study into the objective performance of instrument procedures and provides a framework to track procedural concepts and assess design specifications. We created a tool and analysis methods for gauging aircraft adherence as it relates to RNAV STARs. This information is vital for comprehensive understanding of how our air traffic behaves. In this study, we mined the performance of 24 major US airports over the preceding three years. Overlaying 4D radar track data onto RNAV STAR routes provided a comparison between aircraft flight paths and the waypoint positions and altitude restrictions. NASA Ames Supercomputing resources were utilized to perform the data mining and processing. We assessed STARs by lateral transition path (full-lateral), vertical restrictions (full-lateral/full-vertical), and skipped waypoints (skips). In addition, we graphed frequencies of aircraft altitudes relative to the altitude restrictions. Full-lateral adherence was always greater than Full-lateral/ full- vertical, as it is a subset, but the difference between the rates was not consistent. Full-lateral/full-vertical adherence medians of the 2016 procedures ranged from 0% in KDEN (Denver) to 21% in KMEM (Memphis). Waypoint skips ranged from 0% to nearly 100% for specific waypoints. Altitudes restrictions were sometimes missed by systematic amounts in 1,000 ft. increments from the restriction, creating multi-modal distributions. Other times, altitude misses looked to be more normally distributed around the restriction. This tool may aid in providing acceptability metrics as well as risk assessment information.

  19. Improving adherence and outcomes in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Renu Joshi, Disha Joshi, Pramil Cheriyath Department of Endocrinology, Pinnacle Health Hospitals, Harrisburg, PA, USA Objective: Nonadherence in diabetes is a problem leading to wasted resources and preventable deaths each year. Remedies for diminishing nonadherence are many but marginally effective, and outcomes remain suboptimal. Aim: The aim of this study was to test a new iOS “app”, PatientPartner. Derived from complexity theory, this novel technology has been extensively used in other fields; this is the first trial in a patient population. Methods: Physicians referred patients who were “severely non-adherent” with HbA1c levels >8. After consent and random assignment (n=107, subjects in the intervention group were immersed in the 12-min PatientPartner game, which assesses and trains subjects on parameters of thinking that are critical for good decision making in health care: information management, stress coping, and health strategies. The control group did not play PatientPartner. All subjects were called each week for 3 weeks and self-reported on their medication adherence, diet, and exercise. Baseline and 3-month post-intervention HbA1c levels were recorded for the intervention group.Results: Although the control group showed no difference on any measures at 3 weeks, the intervention group reported significant mean percentage improvements on all measures: medication adherence (57%, standard deviation [SD] 18%–96%, SD 9, diet (50%, SD 33%–75%, SD 28, and exercise (29%, SD 31%–43%, SD 33. At 3 months, the mean HbA1c levels in the intervention group were significantly lower (9.6 than baseline (10.7. Conclusion: Many programs to improve adherence have been proved to be expensive and marginally effective. Therefore, improvements from the single use of a 12-min-long “app” are noteworthy. This is the first ever randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate that an “app” can impact the gold standard biological marker, HbA1c

  20. Community health workers adherence to referral guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Background Many malaria-endemic countries have implemented national community health worker (CHW) programmes to serve remote populations that have poor access to malaria diagnosis and treatment. Despite mounting evidence of CHWs’ ability to adhere to malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs...... artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and recognize symptoms in children that required immediate referral to the nearest health centre. Intervention arm CHWs had additional training on how to conduct an RDT; CHWs in the control arm used a presumptive diagnosis for malaria using clinical signs...

  1. [Innovation of bisphosphonates for improvement of adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    Bisphosphonates are standard medicine for treatment of osteoporosis, and have been inovated to overcome complicated rules for their appropriate administration or their poor intestinal absorption. Not only weekly but also monthly oral bisphosphonates have been available. Furthermore, we are now allowed to choose intravenous administration of bisphosphonates for osteorporosis. Good persistance and adherence is another critical and essential issue to be solved to achive the aim of osteoprosis treatment with bisphosphonates. Variable formulations of bisphosphonate are now able to bring patients closer to a goal of reduction in fragile fracture due to osteoporosis.

  2. Development and Application of the Lincoln Adherence Instrument Record for Assessing Client Adherence to Advice in Dog Behavior Consultations and Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisanna Lamb

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to the advice of medical practitioners is critical to successful treatment outcomes and has been much researched in human health, but is less well studied in the veterinary and clinical animal behavior fields. Given that the management of behavior problems often requires substantial change in established client behavior, it is likely that adherence is a substantive issue affecting success. However, little is known about the relationships between relevant factors, and there is no established way of assessing these. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an instrument for coding factors likely to impinge on pet owner adherence to behavior advice and validate its utility through the identification of the factors appearing to relate most closely to a successful treatment outcome in a sample population from our clinic. Potential factors affecting adherence were identified from human health and animal behavior studies, and a survey instrument developed with items matched to these factors. Forty-two dog owners who had attended the University of Lincoln Animal Behavior Clinic over a 2-year period provided data used in the analysis. The assessment of treatment outcome success by clients and clinicians was correlated, but clinicians tended to overestimate success by half a point on a 5-point scale. Eleven items relating to adherence were found to correlate with client ratings of treatment success in a univariate analysis, with three of these remaining in an ordinal logistic regression model. These three related to trust in the advice given by the clinician, concern over distress caused to the pet in the longer term and the perceived recommendation of treatment measures that had failed. By further examining the relationship between all of these factors in a hierarchical cluster analysis, we were able to postulate ways in which we might be able to improve client adherence and thus treatment success. This provides a model for the

  3. Marginal Microleakage of Conventional Fissure Sealants and Self-Adhering Flowable Composite as Fissure Sealant in Permanent Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rahimian-Imam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Application of sealants is a safe and effective way to prevent occlusal caries in the posterior teeth. A successful sealant therapy depends on good isolation. Decreased steps of adhesive application may enable proper isolation and use of self-adhering flowable composites for sealant therapy. This study sought to compare the marginal microleakage of fissure sealants and self-adhering flowable composites in permanent teeth.Materials and Methods: This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 60 extracted human premolar teeth. The teeth were divided randomly into two groups of 30. In the first group, fissure sealant (Clinpro, 3M ESPE, USA was placed on the teeth. In the second group, self-adhering flowable composite (Vertise Flow, Kerr, USA was applied as the sealant. Then, both groups were immersed in 0.5% fuchsin dye solution for 24 hours. Sectioned samples were observed with a stereomicroscope for the extent of dye penetration. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 and the Mann-Whitney test (P<0.05.Results: Microleakage in the fissure sealant group was significantly higher than that in the self-adhering flowable composite group (P<0.001.Conclusion: Microleakage was less using self-adhering flowable composite compared to conventional fissure sealant; therefore, self-adhering flowable composite can be used as a suitable fissure sealant in permanent teeth.

  4. Influence of Spirituality and Religion on Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Adult HIV/AIDS Patients in Calabar, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agam Ebaji Ayuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a chronic medical illness such as Human Immune Deficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS may be the time when people turn to the Sacred through spirituality and religion. HIV is a chronic illness that requires strict adherence to medication regimens that may be influenced by spirituality/religion. This study was aimed at finding the association between spirituality/religion and adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in adult HIV/AIDS patients. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 370 patients. Adherence was measured using an adapted adult AIDS clinical trial group (AACTG and visual analogue scale (VAS tools. Spirituality was assessed using Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spirituality Expanded (FACIT-Sp-Ex scale, religiosity with Duke University Religion index (DUREL, and religious coping with Brief Religious Coping (RCOPE scale. Adherence rates were 86.2 and 43.8% using AACTG and VAS tools, respectively. Statistical significant correlation was found between spirituality and adherence to HAART (r = 0.265; p = 0.00. Also, significant correlation was found between positive religious coping and adherence (r = 0.15, p = 0.003. Odds ratio indicated that female respondents were 1.6 times more likely to be adherent, compared with males. Similarly, every unit rise in spirituality score yielded a 1.3 times increased likelihood of adherence to HAART on multiple logistic regression of adherence to HAART with relevant predictors. Both spirituality and positive religious coping have positive influence on optimal adherence. Therefore, the training of health care personnel to assess and provide spiritual care and involvement of chaplains/religious leaders is advocated for improved adherence.

  5. Accurate reporting of adherence to inhaled therapies in adults with cystic fibrosis: methods to calculate normative adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoo ZH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhe Hui Hoo,1,2 Rachael Curley,1,2 Michael J Campbell,1 Stephen J Walters,1 Daniel Hind,3 Martin J Wildman1,2 1School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR, University of Sheffield, 2Sheffield Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, 3Sheffield Clinical Trials Research Unit, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Preventative inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis will only be effective in maintaining lung health if used appropriately. An accurate adherence index should therefore reflect treatment effectiveness, but the standard method of reporting adherence, that is, as a percentage of the agreed regimen between clinicians and people with cystic fibrosis, does not account for the appropriateness of the treatment regimen. We describe two different indices of inhaled therapy adherence for adults with cystic fibrosis which take into account effectiveness, that is, “simple” and “sophisticated” normative adherence. Methods to calculate normative adherence: Denominator adjustment involves fixing a minimum appropriate value based on the recommended therapy given a person’s characteristics. For simple normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status. For sophisticated normative adherence, the denominator is determined by the person’s Pseudomonas status and history of pulmonary exacerbations over the previous year. Numerator adjustment involves capping the daily maximum inhaled therapy use at 100% so that medication overuse does not artificially inflate the adherence level. Three illustrative cases: Case A is an example of inhaled therapy under prescription based on Pseudomonas status resulting in lower simple normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence. Case B is an example of inhaled therapy under-prescription based on previous exacerbation history resulting in lower sophisticated normative adherence compared to unadjusted adherence and simple normative adherence

  6. Denial and acceptance coping styles and medication adherence in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldebot, Stephanie; de Mamani, Amy G Weisman

    2009-08-01

    Antipsychotics are often the first line of treatment for individuals with schizophrenia (). One challenge to effective treatment is lack of adherence to prescribed medication. Lower rates of adherence are associated with considerably higher rates of relapse and poorer course of illness. Therefore studying the characteristics that may be related to medication adherence is important. Coping styles may be one such factor. Individuals use a variety of coping mechanisms to manage and navigate difficult life events, including mental illness (). In the present study, 40 individuals with schizophrenia were assessed regarding their coping styles and medication adherence practices. As hypothesized, it was found that denial coping was inversely related to medication adherence. However, contrary to expectations, acceptance coping was not related to medication adherence. These findings suggest that targeting denial coping strategies in treatment may help foster more optimal strategies for managing schizophrenia.

  7. Case management and adherence to an online disease management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Lucy; Smith, Michael; Tannenbaum, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Non-adherence to treatment presents a significant obstacle to achieving favourable health outcomes. We have studied consumers' adherence to an online disease management system for depression, called Recovery Road. Recovery Road was implemented on a pilot basis for mental health care in Western Australia. Recovery Road was available for use by consumers and clinicians to augment usual treatment. One hundred and thirty consumers who had been diagnosed with major depression were enrolled. Consumers who used Recovery Road (n = 98) were provided with education, progress monitoring, e-consultation, e-diary and online evidenced-based therapy. Consumers received either standard, automated adherence reminders by email (n = 69), or case management, which included personalized email and telephone follow-up in response to non-adherence (n = 29). After the first eight sessions, the adherence was 84% in the case management group and 55% in the automatic reminders group. The results suggest that case management increases adherence to online disease management systems.

  8. Women's and men's exercise adherence after a cardiac event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolansky, Mary A; Stepanczuk, Beth; Charvat, Jacqueline M; Moore, Shirley M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine whether age affects women's and men's exercise adherence after a cardiac event. In a convenience sample of 248 adults ages 38 to 86 who had a cardiac event, exercise adherence (three exercise sessions per week) was compared between men and women in three age groups (younger than 60, 61 to 70, and older than 70). Exercise patterns were recorded by heart rate monitors worn during exercise. No differences were found in adherence between the age groups for women; older men were nonadherent sooner than younger men when controlling for fitness level, pain, comorbidity, self-efficacy, depressed mood, and social support. Exercise adherence after a cardiac event was higher for younger men compared with older men. For all age groups, less than 37% of the total sample adhered to a three-times-per-week exercise regimen after 1 year, suggesting that interventions to maintain exercise adherence are needed. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Adherence to dual method contraceptive use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipert, Jeffrey F.; Zhao, Qiuhong; Meints, Laura; Peipert, Benjamin J.; Redding, Colleen A.; Allsworth, Jenifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient characteristics associated with adherence to dual method contraceptive use are not known. Study Design Project PROTECT was a 24-month long randomized trial designed to promote the use of dual methods of contraception using an individualized computer-based intervention or enhanced standard care counseling intervention. We analyzed 463 women with follow-up data and examined sustained dual method use (reported at 2+ interviews). Results While 32% initiated dual method contraceptive use, only 9% reported sustained use. Education increased (RRadj = 4.42; 95%CI 1.19-16.42), substance abuse decreased (RRadj = 0.49; 95%CI 0.24-0.97), no contraceptive use at baseline decreased (RRadj = 0.32; 95%CI 0.11-0.92), and contraceptive stage of change increased (RRadj =5.04; 95%CI 1.09-23.4) adherence to dual method use. Conclusion To effectively prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) and unplanned pregnancies, dual method use must be consistent and sustained. Future interventions to promote dual method use should focus on high-risk groups and additional dual method combinations (e.g., barrier plus intrauterine devices or implants). PMID:21843690

  10. Gamification of Medication Adherence in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Izzat; Thomas, Rhys Huw

    2017-11-01

    Adherence to medication regimens is a crucial factor in seizure-freedom and well-being for people with epilepsy. In contrast, taking medication inconsistently increases the risk of not only seizures and their adverse effects, but drug side-effects and unnecessary modifications to treatment plans. Epilepsy is prevalent across all age groups and we have been slow to utilise both the technologies and psychologies derived from computer gaming. Gaming has broken through to the mainstream and is no longer the preserve of younger males, mirroring the adoption of smart-phones. 'Gamification' motivates users into engaging in an activity with a higher intensity and duration. Introducing gaming elements into a non-gaming context has the potential to transform routine tasks into more enjoyable and motivating experiences. This has been exploited by marketing executives, but also has clear uses in a healthcare setting too. We discuss how previously published frameworks could be employed to help people with epilepsy adhere to medication regimens to create a patient-focussed, modifiable and fun experience. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Proteins in Adherence and Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleastro, Mónica; Ménard, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most successful human pathogens, which colonizes the mucus layer of the gastric epithelium of more than 50% of the world’s population. This curved, microaerophilic, Gram-negative bacterium induces a chronic active gastritis, often asymptomatic, in all infected individuals. In some cases, this gastritis evolves to more severe diseases such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori has developed a unique set of factors, actively supporting its successful survival and persistence in its natural hostile ecological niche, the human stomach, throughout the individual’s life, unless treated. In the human stomach, the vast majority of H. pylori cells are motile in the mucus layer lining, but a small percentage adheres to the epithelial cell surfaces. Adherence to the gastric epithelium is important for the ability of H. pylori to cause disease because this intimate attachment facilitates: (1) colonization and persistence, by preventing the bacteria from being eliminated from the stomach, by mucus turnover and gastric peristalsis; (2) evasion from the human immune system and (3) efficient delivery of proteins into the gastric cell, such as the CagA oncoprotein. Therefore, bacteria with better adherence properties colonize the host at higher densities. H. pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial species known and is equipped with an extraordinarily large set of outer membrane proteins, whose role in the infection and persistence process will be discussed in this review, as well as the different receptor structures that have been so far described for mucosal adherence. PMID:24833057

  12. Fucoidans Disrupt Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to AGS Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Eng-Guan; Verbrugghe, Phebe; Perkins, Timothy T.; Tay, Chin-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidans are complex sulphated polysaccharides derived from abundant and edible marine algae. Helicobacter pylori is a stomach pathogen that persists in the hostile milieu of the human stomach unless treated with antibiotics. This study aims to provide preliminary data to determine, in vitro, if fucoidans can inhibit the growth of H. pylori and its ability to adhere to gastric epithelial cells (AGS). We analysed the activity of three different fucoidan preparations (Fucus A, Fucus B, and Und...

  13. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Proteins in Adherence and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelle Ménard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most successful human pathogens, which colonizes the mucus layer of the gastric epithelium of more than 50% of the world’s population. This curved, microaerophilic, Gram-negative bacterium induces a chronic active gastritis, often asymptomatic, in all infected individuals. In some cases, this gastritis evolves to more severe diseases such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori has developed a unique set of factors, actively supporting its successful survival and persistence in its natural hostile ecological niche, the human stomach, throughout the individual’s life, unless treated. In the human stomach, the vast majority of H. pylori cells are motile in the mucus layer lining, but a small percentage adheres to the epithelial cell surfaces. Adherence to the gastric epithelium is important for the ability of H. pylori to cause disease because this intimate attachment facilitates: (1 colonization and persistence, by preventing the bacteria from being eliminated from the stomach, by mucus turnover and gastric peristalsis; (2 evasion from the human immune system and (3 efficient delivery of proteins into the gastric cell, such as the CagA oncoprotein. Therefore, bacteria with better adherence properties colonize the host at higher densities. H. pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial species known and is equipped with an extraordinarily large set of outer membrane proteins, whose role in the infection and persistence process will be discussed in this review, as well as the different receptor structures that have been so far described for mucosal adherence.

  14. Candida albicans Adherence to Glass Ionomer Restorative Dental Material

    OpenAIRE

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investiga...

  15. Patient non-adherence: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Vidya; Mekoth, Nandakumar

    2017-04-18

    Purpose While interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) has been used in health psychology research, it has so far not been applied to seek deeper insights into the patients' experiences about treatment. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by using IPA to understand patient non-adherence. Design/methodology/approach In total, 18 patients with chronic conditions seeking healthcare services in Goa and Karnataka, India, were selected by using the snowball sampling method. In-depth interviews were conducted face to face. A semi-structured questionnaire developed by the researchers was used to collect the data. IPA was used to explore the themes to predict patient non-adherence. Findings The study results indicate that economic factors, health system related factors, social factors and psychological factors impact patient non-adherence. Patient non-adherence includes medication non-adherence and lifestyle modification non-adherence. Research limitations/implications Being cross sectional in design, the results may not be as appropriate as the results derived from a longitudinal study given that non-adherence occurs over time. Practical implications Patient non-adherence is a global health issue. Multidisciplinary approach to enhance patient adherence to treatment should form part of public healthcare policy. Social implications Exploring the factors influencing patient non-adherence will help the health-care industry stakeholders to reduce healthcare cost and improve patient's quality of life. Originality/value Although there is extensive quantitative research on the prevalence of non-adherence, qualitative research is limited. This paper addresses this gap by using IPA to understand patient non-adherence and its factors and dimensions.

  16. Alexithymia, Assertiveness and Psychosocial Functioning in HIV: Implications for Medication Adherence and Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Roger C; Ironson, Gail; Antoni, Michael; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Psychosocial function and adherence to antiretroviral regimen are key factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease management. Alexithymia (AL) is a trait deficit in the ability to identify and describe feelings, emotions and bodily sensations. A structural equation model was used to test whether high levels of AL indirectly relate to greater non-adherent behavior and HIV disease severity via psychosocial dysfunction. Blood draws for HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte, along with psychosocial surveys were collected from 439 HIV positive adults aged 18-73 years. The structural model supports significant paths from: (1) AL to non-active patient involvement, psychological distress, and lower social support, (2) psychological distress and non-active involvement to non-adherent behavior, and (3) non-adherence to greater HIV disease severity (CFI = .97, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). A second model confirmed the intermediary effect of greater patient assertiveness on the path from AL to social support and non-active patient involvement (CFI = .94, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). Altogether, AL is indirectly linked with HIV disease management through it's association with poor psychosocial function, however greater patient assertiveness buffers the negative impact of AL on relationship quality with healthcare providers and members of one's social support network.

  17. A fibronectin receptor on Candida albicans mediates adherence of the fungus to extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, S.A.; Smith, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Binding of fibronectin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, to Candida albicans was measured, and adherence of the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins, fibronectin, laminin, types I and IV collagen, and subendothelial ECM was studied. 125I-labeled fibronectin was inhibited from binding to the fungus by unlabeled human plasma fibronectin and by Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro (GRGESP), and Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP), but binding was not inhibited by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. Soluble fibronectin, RGD, GRGESP, and GRGDTP also inhibited fungal adherence to the individual immobilized ECM proteins in a complex pattern, but only soluble fibronectin (10(-7) M) inhibited fungal adherence to subendothelial ECM. Thus, C. albicans possesses at least one type of cell surface receptor for binding soluble fibronectin that can be inhibited with peptides. This receptor apparently is used to bind the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins and to subendothelial ECM and may play a role in the initiation of disseminated disease by bloodborne fungi by providing for adherence of the microorganisms to ECM proteins

  18. Inhibition of bacterial adherence to saliva-coated through plant lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Mara R T R; Napimoga, Marcelo H; Cogo, Karina; Gonçalves, Reginaldo B; Macedo, Maria L R; Freire, Maria G M; Groppo, Francisco C

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the ability of lectin from Talisia esculenta (TEL) and a protein from Labramia bojeri seeds (Labramin) to inhibit adherence of microorganisms and exert antimicrobial effects. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of these proteins were determined using 5 species of bacteria: Streptococcus mutans UA159, Streptococcus sobrinus 6715, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC10556, Streptococcus mitis ATCC903 and Streptococcus oralis PB182. In addition, an adherence assay was performed using these 5 bacterial species and sterile polystyrene microtiter plates coated with human saliva. Filtered protein solutions (6.25 to 100 mug/ml) were added to saliva-coated plates, and the plates were then incubated for 1 h at 37 degrees C. After incubation, the plates were washed, and a bacterial suspension (10(6 )CFU/ml) was then transferred to each plate, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C for 1 h (10% CO(2)). Adherence of bacteria to the acquired pellicle was visualized by staining with crystal violet, and absorbance was measured using a plate reader at 575 nm. Neither Labramin nor TEL, at any of the concentrations used, inhibited growth of any of the microorganisms. However, Labramin inhibited adherence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus. The present results indicate that Labramin is potentially useful as a biofilm-inhibiting drug.

  19. Muscular fitness, adherence to the Southern European Atlantic Diet and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis-Sobrinho, C; Abreu, S; Moreira, C; Lopes, L; García-Hermoso, A; Ramírez-Vélez, R; Correa-Bautista, J E; Mota, J; Santos, R

    2017-08-01

    Muscular fitness and an adherence to the Southern European Atlantic Diet (SEADiet) have been inversely associated with cardiometabolic risk. Our aim was to assess the independent and combined associations of muscular fitness and adherence to the SEADiet on cardiometabolic risk in adolescents. A total of 467 Portuguese adolescents (275 girls) participated in this cross-sectional study. Sum of the Z-Scores of Curl-Up and Push-Up tests was used to create a muscular fitness score. Adherence to SEADiet was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire. A cardiometabolic risk score was computed from sum of Z-score of triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol/HDL ratio, HOMA-IR and waist circumference. Adolescents with low muscular fitness and low adherence to the SEADiet had the poorest cardiovascular profile F (5, 452)  = 5.074 (p strategy to reduce clustered cardiometabolic risk in youth. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro modulation of the behavior of adhering macrophages by medications is biomaterial-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Lizette; Boersema, Geesien S A; Bayon, Yves; Lange, Johan F; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M

    2017-03-07

    After implantation of a biomaterial, an inflammatory response involving macrophages is induced. The behavior of macrophages depends on their phenotype, and by directing macrophage polarization unwanted effects may be avoided. In this study, the possibility to modulate the behavior of macrophages activated by biomaterials was assessed in an in vitro model. Primary human monocytes were seeded on polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene and polylactic acid yarns, and treated with medications frequently used by patients: rapamycin, dexamethasone, celecoxib or pravastatin. Modulation of the adhering macrophages with rapamycin resulted in a generally pro-inflammatory effect. Dexamethasone caused an overall anti-inflammatory effect on the macrophages cultured on either material, while celecoxib only affected macrophages adhering to polyethylene terephthalate and polylactic acid. Pravastatin increased the pro-inflammatory genes of macrophages cultured on polypropylene and polylactic acid. Pairwise comparison revealed that macrophages adhering to polylactic acid seemed to be more susceptible to phenotype modulation than when adhering to polypropylene or polyethylene terephthalate. The data show that macrophages activated by the biomaterials can be modulated, yet the degree of the modulatory capacity depends on the type of material. Combined, this model provides insights into the possibility of using a medication in combination with a biomaterial to direct macrophage behavior and thereby possibly avoid unwanted effects after implantation.

  1. Distinct mechanical behavior of HEK293 cells in adherent and suspended states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ali Haghparast

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical features of individual animal cells have been regarded as indicators of cell type and state. Previously, we investigated the surface mechanics of cancer and normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states using atomic force microscopy. Cancer cells possessed specific mechanical and actin cytoskeleton features that were distinct from normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states. In this paper, we report the unique mechanical and actin cytoskeletal features of human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Unlike normal stromal and cancer cells, the surface stiffness of adherent HEK293 cells was very low, but increased after cell detachment from the culture surface. Induced actin filament depolymerization revealed that the actin cytoskeleton was the underlying source of the stiffness in suspended HEK293 cells. The exclusive mechanical response of HEK293 cells to perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton resembled that of adherent cancer cells and suspended normal stromal cells. Thus, with respect to their special cell-surface mechanical features, HEK293 cells could be categorized into a new class distinct from normal stromal and cancer cells.

  2. Inhibition of bacterial adherence by cranberry juice: potential use for the treatment of urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, A E

    1984-05-01

    Cranberry juice has been widely used for the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections and is reputed to give symptomatic relief from these infections. Attempts to account for the potential benefit derived from the juice have focused on urine acidification and bacteriostasis. In this investigation it is demonstrated that cranberry juice is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence. A total of 77 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli were tested. Cranberry juice inhibited adherence by 75 per cent or more in over 60 per cent of the clinical isolates. Cranberry cocktail was also given to mice in the place of their normal water supply for a period of 14 days. Urine collected from these mice inhibited adherence of E. coli to uroepithelial cells by approximately 80 per cent. Antiadherence activity could also be detected in human urine. Fifteen of 22 subjects showed significant antiadherence activity in the urine 1 to 3 hours after drinking 15 ounces of cranberry cocktail. It is concluded that the reported benefits derived from the use of cranberry juice may be related to its ability to inhibit bacterial adherence.

  3. The effect of reminder systems on patients' adherence to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenerty SD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah D Fenerty1, Cameron West1, Scott A Davis1, Sebastian G Kaplan3, Steven R Feldman1,2,41Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, 4Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USABackground: Patient adherence is an important component of the treatment of chronic disease. An understanding of patient adherence and its modulating factors is necessary to correctly interpret treatment efficacy and barriers to therapeutic success.Purpose: This meta-analysis aims to systematically review published randomized controlled trials of reminder interventions to assist patient adherence to prescribed medications.Methods: A Medline search was performed for randomized controlled trials published between 1968 and June 2011, which studied the effect of reminder-based interventions on adherence to self-administered daily medications.Results: Eleven published randomized controlled trials were found between 1999 and 2009 which measured adherence to a daily medication in a group receiving reminder interventions compared to controls receiving no reminders. Medication adherence was measured as the number of doses taken compared to the number prescribed within a set period of time. Meta-analysis showed a statistically significant increase in adherence in groups receiving a reminder intervention compared to controls (66.61% versus 54.71%, 95% CI for mean: 0.8% to 22.4%. Self-reported and electronically monitored adherence rates did not significantly differ (68.04% versus 63.67%, P = 1.0. Eight of eleven studies showed a statistically significant increase in adherence for at least one of the reminder group arms compared to the control groups receiving no reminder intervention.Limitations: The data are limited by imperfect measures of adherence due to variability in data collection methods. It is also likely

  4. Impact of prescription size on statin adherence and cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehler Phillip S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapy with 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Co-enzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins improve outcomes in a broad spectrum of patients with hyperlipidemia. However, effective therapy requires ongoing medication adherence; restrictive pharmacy policies may represent a barrier to successful adherence, particularly among vulnerable patients. In this study we sought to assess the relationship between the quantity of statin dispensed by the pharmacy with patient adherence and total cholesterol. Methods We analyzed a cohort of 3,386 patients receiving more than one fill of statin medications through an integrated, inner-city health care system between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2002. Our measure of adherence was days of drug acquisition divided by days in the study for each patient, with adequate adherence defined as ≥ 80%. Log-binomial regression was used to determine the relative risk of various factors, including prescription size, on adherence. We also assessed the relationship between adherence and total cholesterol using multiple linear regression. Results After controlling for age, gender, race, co-payment, comorbidities, and insurance status, patients who obtained a majority of fills as 60-day supply compared with 30-day supply were more likely to be adherent to their statin medications (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.28–1.55, P Conclusion In a healthcare system serving predominantly indigent patients, the provision of a greater quantity of statin medication at each prescription fill contributes to improved adherence and greater drug effectiveness.

  5. Learning and adherence to baby massage after two teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Cláudia Marchetti; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Gonçalves, Lia Lopes; Machado, Thais Gaiad; Voos, Mariana Callil

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about learning/adherence after different baby massage teaching strategies. We compared the learning/adherence after two strategies. Twenty mothers from the group manual-course (GMC) and 20 from the group manual-orientations (GMO) received a booklet. GMC participated in a course during the third trimester. GMO received verbal instructions during the postpartum hospital stay. Multiple-choice and practical tests assessed learning (GMC: performing strokes on a doll; GMO: on the baby). Adherence was measured 3 months after childbirth. No differences were found between the groups in learning/adherence. Both teaching strategies showed similar and positive results. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to treatment guidelines, and mortality of patients with acute heart failure: Experience at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  7. Adherence in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: solutions for the system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Elizabeth A; Moss, Mary; Buchanan, Cindy L; Goebel, Jens

    2018-03-01

    Non-adherence remains a significant problem among pediatric (and adult) renal transplant recipients. Non-adherence among solid organ transplant recipients results in US$15-100 million annual costs. Estimates of non-adherence range from 30 to 70% among pediatric patients. Research demonstrates that a 10% decrement in adherence is associated with 8% higher hazard of graft failure and mortality. Focus has begun to shift from patient factors that impact adherence to the contributing healthcare and systems factors. The purpose of this review is to describe problems within the systems implicated in non-adherence and potential solutions that may be related to positive adherence outcomes. Systems issues include insurance and legal regulations, provider and care team barriers to optimal care, and difficulties with transitioning to adult care. Potential solutions include recognition of how systems can work together to improve patient outcomes through improvements in insurance programs, a multi-disciplinary care team approach, evidence-based medical management, pharmacy-based applications and interventions to simplify medication regimens, improved transition protocols, and telehealth/technology-based multi-component interventions. However, there remains a significant lack of reliability in the application of these potential solutions to systems issues that impact patient adherence. Future efforts should accordingly focus on these efforts, likely by leveraging quality improvement and related principles, and on the investigation of the efficacy of these interventions to improve adherence and graft outcomes.

  8. Adherence to treatment in men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Tiemensma, Jitske; Quinton, Richard; Pitteloud, Nelly; Morin, Diane

    2017-03-01

    Men with congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (CHH) typically require lifelong hormonal therapy, and discontinuing treatment can have negative health consequences. Little is known about adherence to treatment or the psychosocial impact of CHH. A sequential, multiple methods approach was used. A quantitative online survey assessed adherence to treatment, depressive symptoms and illness perceptions. Subsequently, qualitative focus groups explored patient-reported factors for adherence. Adult men with CHH on at least 1 year of treatment were recruited internationally. Adherence (Morisky medication adherence scale), depressive symptoms (Zung self-rating depression scale) and patient perception of CHH (revised illness perception questionnaire) were assessed in an online survey, and comparisons were made to reference groups. Patient focus group discussions were conducted and thematic analysis was employed to identify patient-reported factors for adherence. In total, 101 men on long-term treatment were included (mean age 37 ± 11 years). Forty three percent (43/101) exhibited low medication adherence and a significantly elevated prevalence of mild, moderate or severe depressive symptoms (27%, 17%, 20%, respectively, all P hypogonadism men are challenged to adhere to long-term treatment. Poor adherence may contribute to adverse effects on bone, sexual and psychological health. The psychosocial morbidity of CHH is significant and appears to be underappreciated by healthcare providers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Systematic Review of Insulin Adherence Measures in Patients with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolpe, Samuel; Kroes, Michel A; Webb, Neil; Wisniewski, Tami

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes care is associated with a considerable burden to the health care system in the United States, and measuring the quality of health care is an important development goal of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Diabetes is a priority disease within the National Quality Strategy and should therefore remain a focus in the measurement of health care quality. Despite the importance of measuring quality in diabetes care management, no quality measure is currently associated with adherence to insulin treatment, and measuring adherence to insulin is known to be complicated. To (a) identify methods to measure insulin adherence in patients with diabetes and (b) evaluate whether identified methods could be considered for testing as a quality measure. Systematic searches were conducted in the online electronic databases Embase, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library, supplemented with additional manual searches to identify publications on insulin adherence from the year 2000 onward. Identified citations were screened for relevance against predefined eligibility criteria, and methods to measure adherence to insulin were extracted from relevant studies into data extraction tables. Methods were critiqued on the feasibility for consideration as a quality measure. Seventy-eight publications met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Included studies reported various indirect methods to measure adherence to insulin, using prescription claims or self-report questionnaires. Commonly reported methods included the (adjusted) medication possession ratio, proportion of days covered, persistence, daily average consumption, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. All types of identified methods were associated with measuring challenges varying from accuracy of estimated adherence, complexity of data collection, absence of validated threshold for good adherence, and reliability of adherence outcomes. Without additional

  10. What the newspapers say about medication adherence: a content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the coverage of adherence to medicine by the UK and US newsprint media. Adherence to medicine is recognised as an important issue facing healthcare professionals and the newsprint media is a key source of health information, however, little is known about newspaper coverage of medication adherence. Methods A search of the newspaper database Nexis®UK from 2004–2011 was performed. Content analysis of newspaper articles which referenced medication adherence from the twelve highest circulating UK and US daily newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was carried out. A second researcher coded a 15% sample of newspaper articles to establish the inter-rater reliability of coding. Results Searches of newspaper coverage of medication adherence in the UK and US yielded 181 relevant articles for each country. There was a large increase in the number of scientific articles on medication adherence in PubMed® over the study period, however, this was not reflected in the frequency of newspaper articles published on medication adherence. UK newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report the benefits of adherence (p = 0.005), whereas US newspaper articles were significantly more likely to report adherence issues in the elderly population (p = 0.004) and adherence associated with diseases of the central nervous system (p = 0.046). The most commonly reported barriers to adherence were patient factors e.g. poor memory, beliefs and age, whereas, the most commonly reported facilitators to adherence were medication factors including simplified regimens, shorter treatment duration and combination tablets. HIV/AIDS was the single most frequently cited disease (reported in 20% of newspaper articles). Poor quality reporting of medication adherence was identified in 62% of newspaper articles. Conclusion Adherence is not well covered in the newspaper media despite a significant presence in the medical literature. The mass media have the

  11. Medication adherence in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriano, Liana Silveira; de França Fonteles, Marta Maria; de Fátima Menezes Azevedo, Maria; Beserra, Milena Pontes Portela; Romero, Nirla Rodrigues

    The aim of this study was to investigate pharmacological treatment adherence of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, attended in an outpatient pharmacy at a tertiary hospital in northeastern Brazil. The analysis of adherence was performed along with caregivers, through a structured questionnaire based on Morisky, Green and Levine, which enabled the categorization of adherence in "highest", "moderate" or "low" grades, and through evaluating medication dispensing registers, which classified the act of getting medications at the pharmacy as "regular" or "irregular". Drug Related Problems (DRP) were identified through the narrative of caregivers and classified according to the Second Granada Consensus. Then, a pharmaceutical orientation chart with information about the therapeutic regimen was applied, in order to function as a guide for issues that influenced adherence. A total of 43 patients was included, with a mean age of 11.12 years, and 65.1% (n=28) were female. Applying the questionnaire, it was found "highest" adherence in 46.5% (n=20) patients, "moderate" adherence in 48.8% (n=21), and "low" adherence in 4.7% (n=2). Through an analysis of the medication dispensing registers, a lower level of adherence was observed: only 25.6% (n=11) of the participants received "regularly" the medications. Twenty-six DRP was identified, and 84.6% (n=22) were classified as real. There were no significant associations between socio-demographic variables and adherence, although some caregivers have reported difficulty in accessing the medicines and in understanding the treatment. Our findings showed problems in the adherence process related to inattention, forgetfulness and irregularity in getting medicines, reinforcing the need for the development of strategies to facilitate a better understanding of treatment and to ensure adherence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and validation of a tuberculosis medication adherence scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxv Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medication adherence is critical in Tuberculosis (TB treatment success, but existing tools are inadequate in identifying non-adherents, reasons for non-adherence or interventions to improve adherence. This study intended to fill the gap by developing and validating a TB medication adherence scale (TBMAS. METHODS: An initial 41-item TBMAS was designed through review of literature, consultation from an 8-member clinical expert panel and a 15-patient focus group, and pilot-testing in 25 TB patients. The questionnaire was validated in 438 patients who visited 23 community health centers for TB treatment in Wuhan from September 1, 2010, to August 31, 2011, using pharmacy refill records in a 15-week period as external criteria for medication adherence. After removing redundant and cross-loading items, the internal consistency, reliability and validity of TBMAS in identifying non-adherents were examined. RESULTS: The final TBMAS included 30 items scored on a 5-point Likert scale, and these items were loaded in nine distinct factors that explained 65% of cumulative variance among respondents. Cronbach's alpha, test-retest reliability and split-half reliability were 0.87, 0.83, and 0.85, respectively. Convergent validity was supported by statistically significant associations between TBMAS scores and adherence measured by pharmacy refill records. Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis suggested a cut-off point at 113, with which TBMAS showed a positive predictive value of 65.5% and sensitivity of 82.9% in identifying non-adherents. CONCLUSION: TBMAS demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency, reliability and validity in identifying TB patients with poor adherence and potential causes for non-adherence.

  13. Development and validation of a tuberculosis medication adherence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaoxv; Tu, Xiaochen; Tong, Yeqing; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yunxia; Cao, Shiyi; Fan, Hong; Wang, Feng; Gong, Yanhong; Yin, Ping; Lu, Zuxun

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence is critical in Tuberculosis (TB) treatment success, but existing tools are inadequate in identifying non-adherents, reasons for non-adherence or interventions to improve adherence. This study intended to fill the gap by developing and validating a TB medication adherence scale (TBMAS). An initial 41-item TBMAS was designed through review of literature, consultation from an 8-member clinical expert panel and a 15-patient focus group, and pilot-testing in 25 TB patients. The questionnaire was validated in 438 patients who visited 23 community health centers for TB treatment in Wuhan from September 1, 2010, to August 31, 2011, using pharmacy refill records in a 15-week period as external criteria for medication adherence. After removing redundant and cross-loading items, the internal consistency, reliability and validity of TBMAS in identifying non-adherents were examined. The final TBMAS included 30 items scored on a 5-point Likert scale, and these items were loaded in nine distinct factors that explained 65% of cumulative variance among respondents. Cronbach's alpha, test-retest reliability and split-half reliability were 0.87, 0.83, and 0.85, respectively. Convergent validity was supported by statistically significant associations between TBMAS scores and adherence measured by pharmacy refill records. Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis suggested a cut-off point at 113, with which TBMAS showed a positive predictive value of 65.5% and sensitivity of 82.9% in identifying non-adherents. TBMAS demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency, reliability and validity in identifying TB patients with poor adherence and potential causes for non-adherence.

  14. Adherence and systemic reaction rates to allergy immunotherapy among veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenburg, Joseph T; Lieberman, Jay A; Pattanaik, Debendra

    2016-01-01

    Although allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is effective and safe, nonadherence is common. Limited data exist regarding adherence to AIT, factors that affect adherence, and systemic reactions associated with AIT among veteran populations. To evaluate adherence to AIT and the prevalence of reactions secondary to AIT among patients at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee. A retrospective chart review was performed of veterans who received AIT at a single Veterans Affairs facility. Age, race, sex, the total number of shots, travel distance, a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the number of severe adverse reactions were compared between the veterans who were adherent and veterans who were nonadherent. The overall adherence rate was 60.9%. Factors associated with adherence were a chart diagnosis of PTSD (29.3% [adherent group] versus 13.6% [nonadherent group]; p = 0.03) and home residence being a further distance from the facility (21.9 miles / 35.2 kilometers [adherent group] versus 18.0 miles / 28.9 kilometers [nonadherent group]; p = 0.03). Patients who were adherent received an average of more total injections compared with patients who were nonadherent. Age, sex, race, and history of systemic reactions during AIT displayed no statistically significant differences between the groups. There were a total of 20 systemic reactions, and the systemic reaction rate was 0.2% per AIT encounter and 0.1% per injection. AIT adherence and systemic reaction rates among veterans at our facility was comparable with similar studies. Adherence was associated with a chart diagnosis of PTSD and home residence that was further away from the clinic.

  15. Social Support and the Mediating Roles of Alcohol Use and Adherence Self-Efficacy on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence Among ART Recipients in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Jordaan, Esmé; Nkosi, Sebenzile; Morojele, Neo K

    2017-07-01

    We sought to (a) replicate and (b) extend (via the addition of alcohol use) Cha et al.'s cross-sectional multi-component model of ART adherence on the relationship between social support, depression, self-efficacy beliefs, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, among HIV patients in Tshwane, South Africa. Using purposive sampling, 304 male and female ART recipients were recruited. ART adherence was assessed using three manifest indicators: total adherence ratio, the CASE adherence index and 1-month adherence measure. Data were analysed using structural equation modeling. In our replicated model, social support had both direct and indirect relationships with ART adherence, and inclusion of alcohol use improved prediction of ART adherence. Direct and indirect effects of alcohol use on ART adherence emerged: adherence self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the latter path. Findings highlight the importance of integrating into ART promotion interventions, the reduction of alcohol use, provision of social support, and enhancement of adherence self-efficacy beliefs.

  16. Adherence with Drug Therapy in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Matsui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Available information suggests that nonadherence with medication is a common problem in pregnant women. Not taking prescribed drugs may have potentially negative consequences as patients may not achieve their therapeutic goal. In addition to the many factors that may influence medication-taking behaviour in the general population, unique challenges are encountered in pregnant women as both maternal health and fetal well-being must be considered. On the one hand, pregnant women may be motivated to keep their underlying disease under control, while, on the other hand, fear and anxiety regarding the potential harmful effects of their medication on their unborn child may result in poor adherence with needed medication. Providing evidence-based information, ideally preconceptually, regarding the effects of their medication during pregnancy may be important in avoiding misperceptions that lead to nonadherence.

  17. Adherence to anti-depressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The study of medicine taking is controversial as it often reveals a discrepancy between healthcare professionals' advice and patients' actual behaviour. Qualitative researchers have examined depressed people's adherence to prescriptions of antidepressants by exploring the meaning they impute...... semi-structured interviews with 16 people four times during the year following an admission to hospital for depression. Data were collected in 2008-2009 in the Region of Southern Denmark. The study was based on an interactionist conception of social career and data were analysed thematically. Findings...... indicated that participants were confronted with recurrent challenges related to being depressed and taking medicine, and they learned how to manage these challenges in a post-admission career with two distinct stages: the basic restitution stage and the frustrated search stage. Medicine-taking depended...

  18. Medication non-adherence and uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Margit; Lau, Sofie Rosenlund

    2017-01-01

    . This applied to information from both mass media and from general practitioners. There was no clear pattern of information seeking and statin non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The article point to the impact of information-seeking on the decision to take cholesterol-lowering medication. This included contributions...... discontinuation were analysed using multivariate logistical regression models. RESULTS: Experience of side effects and fear of side effects played an important role in the discontinuation of statin treatment. Feelings of uncertainty and confusion regarding information on statins predicted statin discontinuation...... from information disseminated by media outlets. Side effects and fear of side effects should be addressed in clinical practice. Health care professionals should pay attention to emotional aspects of how information is disseminated and perceived by statin users....

  19. Adherence to COPD guidelines in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Sørensen, Tina Brandt; Højmark, Torben Brunse

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The general practitioner (GP) is often the first healthcare contact for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AIMS: To determine whether participating in a standardised educational programme delivered in the GP's own practice is associated with adherence to COPD...... guidelines. METHODS: A nationwide register-based observational before and after study was undertaken with a control group of propensity-matched practices (follow-up period 6 months). COPD was defined as age 40+ years and at least two prescriptions for inhaled medication. The educational programme consisted...... were used to compare the rate of spirometry testing, preventive consultations, and influenza vaccinations provided to COPD patients and the rate of spirometry testing in non-COPD individuals, assumed to reflect diagnostic activity. RESULTS: Data for 102 participating GP practices were analysed...

  20. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of Haemophilus influenzae fimbrial genes establishes adherence to oropharyngeal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, S. M.; Mooi, F. R.; Sindhunata, M. G.; Maris, W. R.; van Alphen, L.

    1989-01-01

    In this report the first example of functional expression of a fimbrial gene cluster of a non-enteric human pathogen in Escherichia coli is described. This is shown for Haemophilus influenzae fimbriae which mediate adherence to oropharyngeal epithelial cells. A genomic library of H.influenzae type

  1. The Adherence Estimator: a brief, proximal screener for patient propensity to adhere to prescription medications for chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHorney, Colleen A

    2009-01-01

    To conceptualize, develop, and provide preliminary psychometric evidence for the Adherence Estimator--a brief, three-item proximal screener for the likelihood of non-adherence to prescription medications (medication non-fulfillment and non-persistence) for chronic disease. Qualitative focus groups with 140 healthcare consumers and two internet-based surveys of adults with chronic disease, comprising a total of 1772 respondents, who were self-reported medication adherers, non-persisters, and non-fulfillers. Psychometric tests were performed on over 150 items assessing 14 patient beliefs and skills hypothesized to be related to medication non-adherence along a proximal-distal continuum. Psychometric tests included, but were not limited to, known-groups discriminant validity at the scale and item level. The psychometric analyses sought to identify: (1) the specific multi-item scales that best differentiated self-reported adherers from self-reported non-adherers (non-fulfillers and non-persisters) and, (2) the single best item within each prioritized multi-item scale that best differentiated self-reported adherers from self-reported non-adherers (non-fulfillers and non-persisters). The two rounds of psychometric testing identified and cross-validated three proximal drivers of self-reported adherence: perceived concerns about medications, perceived need for medications, and perceived affordability of medications. One item from each domain was selected to include in the Adherence Estimator using a synthesis of psychometric results gleaned from classical and modern psychometric test theory. By simple summation of the weights assigned to the category responses of the three items, a total score is obtained that is immediately interpretable and completely transparent. Patients can be placed into one of three segments based on the total score--low, medium, and high risk for non-adherence. Sensitivity was 88%--of the non-adherers, 88% would be accurately classified as medium

  2. Epic Allies: Development of a Gaming App to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Young HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    OpenAIRE

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn Elizabeth; McNulty, Tobias; Soni, Karina; Knudtson, Kelly; Lemann, Alex; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects young men who have sex with men (YMSM). For HIV-positive individuals, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for achieving optimal health outcomes and reducing secondary transmission of HIV. However, YMSM often struggle with ART adherence. Novel mobile phone apps that incorporate game-based mechanics and social networking elements represent a promising intervention approach for im...

  3. The impact of using musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging and other influencing factors on medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar K

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kanta Kumar,1,2 Karim Raza,3,4 Paramjit Gill,1 Sheila Greenfield1 1Primary Care Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, 2Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, 3Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, University of Birmingham, 4Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK Background: Medication can ease symptoms and limit disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Despite this, nonadherence to medication is common in RA. We explored the determinants of high and low adherence to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs in patients with RA and provide suggestions on approaches to improving adherence to DMARDs.Methods: Patients with RA were identified from those who had previously participated in a questionnaire measuring levels of medication adherence. Twenty patients participated (ten high and ten low adherers, as determined by responses to the Medication Adherence Report Scale. In-depth individual semistructured interviews were undertaken until data saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a constant comparative method.Results: Four main themes related to adherence were identified: 1 symptom severity; 2 illness perception; 3 perceived benefits and risks of DMARDs; and 4 the quality and quantity of information about RA and DMARDs. In addition, patients’ suggestions about strategies to optimize adherence to DMARDs were captured and they fell within the following themes: 1 musculoskeletal ultrasound to explain the disease process and to provide objective feedback about the extent to which their disease activity is being effectively controlled; 2 better explanations of the consequences of poorly controlled RA; and 3 a good relationship with the health professional.Conclusion: Patients’ beliefs about medicines, perceptions about RA, and level of satisfaction with information about DMARDs influenced their adherence to DMARDs. The use

  4. Temporality and Patterns of ART Adherence in the Western Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an ethnographic study conducted over thirty months in South Africa's Western Cape Province ending in 2012, we explored ART adherence amongst almost 200 patients attending three clinics. This setting contained significant political, structural, economic and socio cultural barriers to the uptake of, and adherence to, ...

  5. Adherence of Sudanese Coronary Artery Disease Patients to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD), worldwide, is the most common type of heart disease. Adherence to the evidence-based medications for secondary prevention is associated with further improvement in the outcomes. Objectives: To identify level of adherence towards secondary prevention medications among ...

  6. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advances in the treatment of diabetes mellitus over ... assessed the prevalence of medication non-adherence leading to poor glycemic control. .... level of adherence to therapy and patients knowledge about diabetes. Inclusion criteria. • Patients 18 years and above diagnosed with Type 2. Diabetes. • Presence of ...

  7. Guidelines Adherence and Hypertension Control in an Outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    guidelines in hypertensive patients with diabetes and LVH. Significantly better hypertension control was seen in patients who were on ACE inhibitors and guidelines-adherent therapy. . Keywords: Guidelines, Adherence, Hypertension ... like other parts of the world, prevalence and poor control of hypertension is alarmingly.

  8. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-06-16

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface. 3 figs.

  9. Adherence-monitoring practices by private healthcare sector doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the use of patient self-reports and 18.3% reporting the use of pill counts. A total of 68.7% of the doctors indicated that their adherence monitoring was reliable, whilst 19.7% indicated that they did not test the reliability of their monitoring tools .The most common strategy used to improve adherence by their patients was ...

  10. Adherence-monitoring practices by private healthcare sector doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... the use of patient self-reports and 18.3% reporting the use of pill counts. A total of 68.7% of the doctors indicated that their adherence monitoring was reliable, whilst 19.7% indicated that they did not test the reliability of their monitoring tools .The most common strategy used to improve adherence by their ...

  11. 78 FR 34109 - ``Script Your Future'' Medication Adherence Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... fairs, and local events; (9) to provide counseling and education directly to consumers about adherence... the continuing support of a national effort to promote the importance of medication adherence to... effective national campaign begun in 2010 by the National Consumers League (NCL) called ``Script Your Future...

  12. Illness perceptions and medication adherence in adolescents with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They completed self-report questionnaires about their demographic and medical data, their illness perception using the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) and their medication adherence using the Medication Adherence Report Scale-5 (MARS5). The outcome of the analysis using the Pearson Product ...

  13. Are blood pressure values compatible with medication adherence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Are blood pressure values compatible with medication adherence in hypertensive patients? ... The patients with BP measurements completed the Medication Adherence Self‑Efficacy Scale‑Short Form 13 and the World Health Organization‑5 (WHO‑5) well‑being index. A Holter device was attached, and 24 h BP monitoring ...

  14. Using a treatment partner and text messaging to improve adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Poor adherence to medications, including psychotropic medications contributes to the burden of disease. Mental health service users (MHSU) may also not attend follow-up appointments at their health care facilities where they could discuss adherence with their health care provider. This paper reports on ...

  15. Reliability of assessment of adherence to an antimicrobial treatment guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, PGM; Gans, ROB; Panday, PVN; Degener, JE; Laseur, M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    Assessment procedures for adherence to a guideline must be reliable and credible. The aim of this study was to explore the reliability of assessment of adherence, taking account of the professional backgrounds of the observers. A secondary analysis explored the impact of case characteristics on

  16. Adherence of mentally stable patients to antipsychotic medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study indicated that participants shared same viewpoints related to aspects of adherence to antipsychotic treatment; the mentally stable patients have knowledge related to the causes of mental illness; poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment results from the health seeking behaviour of the patients.

  17. The role of theory in increasing adherence to prescribed practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirur, Ruth; Richardson, Julie; Wishart, Laurie; Hanna, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to apply theoretical frameworks to adherence behaviour and to guide the development of an intervention to increase adherence to prescribed home programmes. Delivering an effective intervention requires establishing one that is evidence based and of adequate dosage. Two-thirds of patients who receive home exercise prescriptions do not adhere to their home programme, which may contribute to their physiotherapy's being ineffective. The mediating concepts of self-efficacy (SE) and outcome expectations (OE) are common to the five relevant theories used to explain adherence to exercise: the health belief model, protection motivation theory, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behaviour, and social cognitive theory. Few intervention studies with any theoretical underpinning have examined adherence to exercise. Even fewer have been designed to affect and measure change in the theoretical mediators of SE and OE in patient populations. Physiotherapists must consider increasing adherence as a component of effective physiotherapy. Ongoing research is needed to increase our understanding of adherence to prescribed home programmes and to design interventions to affect theoretical mediators for increasing adherence.

  18. The impact of knowledge and attitudes on adherence to tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of knowledge and attitudes on adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a case-control study in a Moroccan region. ... on TB especially among non adherent patients. This finding justifies the need to incorporate patient?s education into current TB case management. Pan African Medical Journal 2012; 12:52 ...

  19. Patients' adherence to antiretroviral therapy at Antiretroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence is the most important factor influencing successful antiretroviral therapy. Long term success with antiretroviral therapy (ART) requires taking 95% of medication. Less than 95% adherence can result in less than optimal therapeutic response and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  20. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conclude with a bivariate model for understanding the adherence behaviours that influenced different patterns of ART adherence among the sample, and offer recommendations for HIV-prevention and treatment interventions in a mining workplace. Keywords: assessment methods, behaviour, HAART, HIV/AIDS, ...

  1. 14 CFR 1260.72 - Adherence to original budget estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adherence to original budget estimates... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Post-Award Requirements § 1260.72 Adherence to original budget estimates. (a) Although NASA assumes no responsibility for budget overruns, the recipient may spend grant funds without...

  2. Guidelines Adherence and Hypertension Control in an Outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate doctors' adherence to Malaysian Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) 2008 in established hypertensive patients with cardiovascular diseases and factors associated with guideline adherence and hypertension control in Pulau Pinang Hospital, Malaysia. Methods: Prescriptions written by 13 doctors for ...

  3. Roles of family dynamics on adherence to highly active antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been proven to be the only effective treatment for HIV/AIDS worldwide. Good adherence to HAART might require good family support. Objective: To determine the family dynamics and social support of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and its ...

  4. Adherence to rehabilitative programmes by patients living with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence to rehabilitative programmes by patients living with neurological conditions: A South African context. ... factors however were noted in this study. Information obtained from the study will assist health professionals to understand the patients' context and can inform rehabilitation programmes to support adherence.

  5. Roles of family dynamics on adherence to highly active antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    with PLWHA experiencing rejection even by their families; however with ... function test, Chest X-ray and blood chemistry. The .... PLWHA at LAUTECH teaching hospital Osogbo, Nigeria. Socio demographic characteristics. Good adherence. Poor adherence X2; df; p-value. (>95%). (< 95%). Age group. 20-29. 46 (95.8%).

  6. Predictors of medication non-adherence for vasculitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Susan L.; DeVellis, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to document whether demographic, clinical, regimen-related, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors predict medication non-adherence for vasculitis patients. A secondary purpose is to explore whether adherence varies by medication type and whether patients experienced drug-related side effects. Vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online baseline and 3-month follow-up surveys. Demographic (age, gender, education, race, marital status, and insurance status), clinical (perceived vasculitis severity, disease duration, vasculitis type, and relapse/remission status), regimen-related (experience of side effects), intrapersonal (depressive symptoms), and interpersonal (adherence-related support from family and friends) factors were measured at baseline. Medication non-adherence was assessed at follow-up using the Vasculitis Self-Management Survey medication adherence sub-scale (α=0.89). Variables that significantly correlated (pvasculitis medication types, patients who experienced side effects were less adherent than patients who did not experience side effects. Multiple factors are associated with medication non-adherence for vasculitis patients. Providers should discuss medication adherence and drug-related side effects with vasculitis patients. Providers may want to particularly target younger patients and patients with clinical signs of depression. PMID:23314654

  7. Adherence to antihypertensive medication and its correlates among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consistent control of blood pressure requires that patients with hypertension follow medication regimen and lifestyle modification. However, many patients fail to adhere to treatment recommendations resulting in less than optimal treatment. While most studies have focused on medication adherence and its associations ...

  8. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Elizabeth W.; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and of approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n = 25) in a diverse population of older adults with…

  9. Bacterial adherence: the role of serum and wound fluid | Yah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The BAP were achieved by exposing the pathogens to freshly excised wounds. The adhered bacteria were then eluded and quantified using log (CFU/cm2) on Mueller Hinton Agar per cm2 of tissue. The results indicated that wound fluid and serum has a remarkable bacterial adherence potential (BAP) when exposed to ...

  10. the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is better than cure' may therefore be applicable to the problem of non-adherence among patients on ART even more than in the management of chronic non- infectious diseases in which drug resistance is not an issue of concern. We therefore undertook an analysis of results from the adherence monitoring in our HIV care ...

  11. Insight into the development of non-adherent, absorbent dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, S; Anand, S C

    2002-05-01

    This study aimed to develop a variety of wound dressing materials, made from standard natural fibres, that have high absorption and non-adherent characteristics. A total of 21 dressings were made using knitted and crochet technologies and their absorbency was tested. Five non-adherent recipes were selected from a range of chemical formulations and the optimised non-adherent finishes were applied to the four best dressings. Their absorbency and non-adherent properties were evaluated. The study demonstrated that rib cotton (RC), rib viscose (RV), crochet cotton medium (CCM) and crochet viscose medium (CVM) dressings possess high absorption and that five finishing recipes, C + D, A + G, I, I + N and I + G, impart high absorption as well as non-adherent properties. The finish I + G is superior in imparting non-adherence to RV dressing, both in dry and moist conditions. This means that irrigation with water, saline or sodium citrate solution before removing the dressing from a wound is not needed. A number of novel knitted and crochet structures with enhanced absorbency have been designed for wound management using standard bleached fibres. Novel non-adherent finishes for the developed structures have been formulated for the developed dressings, and offer an alternative to existing non-adherent dressings.

  12. Barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to examine the associations between household economic factors and adherence. Our findings suggest that the role of economic status on adherence appears to be a function of the economic component. Debt and non-farming-related occupation were consistently associated ...

  13. Determinants of Optimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SITWALA COMPUTERS

    education on the benefits and risks of non-adherence, and ..... relied on public transport as their usual mode of transport to get to ... Mode of transport was not significantly associated with ART adherence. (p=0.201). A large proportion of the study participants (73%) reported to never have received at least one support visit.

  14. The Role of Theory in Increasing Adherence to Prescribed Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Julie; Wishart, Laurie; Hanna, Steven

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this article is to apply theoretical frameworks to adherence behaviour and to guide the development of an intervention to increase adherence to prescribed home programmes. Summary of Key Points: Delivering an effective intervention requires establishing one that is evidence based and of adequate dosage. Two-thirds of patients who receive home exercise prescriptions do not adhere to their home programme, which may contribute to their physiotherapy's being ineffective. The mediating concepts of self-efficacy (SE) and outcome expectations (OE) are common to the five relevant theories used to explain adherence to exercise: the health belief model, protection motivation theory, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behaviour, and social cognitive theory. Conclusion/Recommendations: Few intervention studies with any theoretical underpinning have examined adherence to exercise. Even fewer have been designed to affect and measure change in the theoretical mediators of SE and OE in patient populations. Physiotherapists must consider increasing adherence as a component of effective physiotherapy. Ongoing research is needed to increase our understanding of adherence to prescribed home programmes and to design interventions to affect theoretical mediators for increasing adherence. PMID:20190989

  15. Factors affecting first-month adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HAART adherence was positively associated with higher age among patients who possessed cell phones and among patients who provided a source of income in the urban setting, but not in the rural setting. Though long-term data from this cohort is required to fully evaluate the impact of non-adherence in the first month of ...

  16. Psychological distress and adherence to highly active anti-retroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mental health related risk factors for non-adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) have not been investigated in Uganda and yet adherence is critical to the success of the current scale up in the provision of HAART to HIV positive individuals in rural areas of Uganda. Objective: To determine ...

  17. Adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiros, Y. K.; Teklu, T.; Desalegn, F.; Tesfay, M.; Klinkenberg, E.; Mulugeta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) patients in Mekelle Zone, Tigray Region, in Ethiopia. To investigate adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. A cross-sectional study in health facilities providing anti-tuberculosis treatment was conducted. Adherence was measured in three ways: through self-reported missed doses,

  18. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies from a rural Uganda prospective clinical cohort. ... Journal Home > Vol 13, No 2 (2013) > ... should target specific personal barriers to ART adherence like: lack of family support, health and sexual life concerns, desire to have children and family instability.

  19. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... stages of HIV/AIDS. Adherence refers to the willingness and ability of patients to follow health-related advice, take medication as prescribed, attend scheduled appointments, and complete recommended investigations. Actual adherence to treatment in most chronic diseases varies between 33% and ...

  20. The relationship between perceived self-efficacy and adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceived self-efficacy and adherence to self-care activities in type 2 diabetic clients. Low adherence to diabetic self-care activities result in increased risks of developing chronic serious and life-threatening complications with increased morbidity ...

  1. Sublingual immunotherapy in youngsters : adherence in a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roder, E.; Berger, M. Y.; de Groot, H.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    2008-01-01

    Background Adherence is essential for effective treatment. Although several trials on the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in youngsters have been published, few contain data on medication intake. Objective We aimed to quantify adherence both to study protocol and medication intake as

  2. Adherence to HIV therapeutic drug monitoring guidelines in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luin, Matthijs; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Smit, Colette; Rigter, Irma M.; Franssen, Eric J. F.; Richter, Clemens; Kroon, Frank; de Wolf, Frank; Burger, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is recommended in several international HIV treatment guidelines. The adherence of clinicians to these recommendations is unknown. The authors evaluated the adherence to the Dutch TDM guideline of 2005. From the ATHENA cohort study, three scenarios were selected for

  3. Accountability: a missing construct in models of adherence behavior and in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussedik E

    2017-07-01

    as the testing and refinement of adherence interventions that make use of this critical determinant of human behavior. Keywords: autonomous accountability, controlled accountability, duress, health promotion, Self-Determination Theory, shame, Social Cognitive Theory, volition 

  4. Treatment adherence with the easypod™ growth hormone electronic auto-injector and patient acceptance: survey results from 824 children and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larroque Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurately monitoring adherence to treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH enables appropriate intervention in cases of poor adherence. The electronic r-hGH auto-injector, easypod™, automatically records the patient's adherence to treatment. This study evaluated adherence to treatment of children who started using the auto-injector and assessed opinions about the device. Methods A multicentre, multinational, observational 3-month survey in which children received r-hGH as part of their normal care. Physicians reviewed the recorded dose history and children (with or without parental assistance completed a questionnaire-based survey. Children missing ≤2 injections per month (92% of injections given were considered adherent to treatment. Adherence was compared between GH treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced children. Results Of 834 recruited participants, 824 were evaluated. The median (range age was 11 (1-18 years. From the recorded dose history, 87.5% of children were adherent to treatment over the 3-month period. Recorded adherence was higher in treatment-naïve (89.7%, n = 445/496 than in treatment-experienced children (81.7%, n = 152/186 [Fisher's exact test FI(X = 7.577; p = 0.0062]. According to self-reported data, 90.2% (607/673 of children were adherent over 3 months; 51.5% (421/817 missed ≥1 injection over this period (mainly due to forgetfulness. Concordance between reported and recorded adherence was 84.3%, with a trend towards self-reported adherence being higher than recorded adherence. Most children liked the auto-injector: over 80% gave the top two responses from five options for ease of use (720/779, speed (684/805 and comfort (716/804. Although 38.5% (300/780 of children reported pain on injection, over half of children (210/363 considered the pain to be less or much less than expected. Given the choice, 91.8% (732/797 of children/parents would continue using the device. Conclusions

  5. [Improving treatment adherence in kidney transplantation: a major challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michèle

    2014-06-01

    The kidney transplant recipient is faced not only with the perspective of taking immunosuppressive drugs lifelong, but also the possibility of other long-term treatments prescribed for preexisting conditions, complications, or side effects. Proper management, and most importantly patient adherence, can become a complex challenge. Here we recall current definitions and describe methods for measuring treatment adherence, followed by a discussion on the prevalence of non-adherence in kidney transplant recipients, its effect on graft survival, and factors predictive of non-adherence. Ways of improving adherence are examined, leading to the conviction that helping patients take their medications regularly would probably have a greater impact on graft survival than marketing a new immunosuppressive agent. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Fathers' involvement in preadolescents' diabetes adherence and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Rohan, Jennifer M; Carle, Adam C; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Drotar, Dennis

    2011-09-01

    To examine the relationship of paternal involvement in diabetes care with adherence and glycemic control. One hundred and thirty-six mothers and fathers of preadolescents (aged 9-12 years) with type 1 diabetes reported on paternal involvement. Adherence was measured by interview and blood glucose meter downloads. Mothers' and fathers' ratings of paternal involvement in diabetes care were compared. We evaluated three structural equation models linking paternal involvement with adherence and glycemic control. Mothers and fathers reported similar amounts of paternal involvement, yet mothers rated paternal involvement as more helpful. The data supported a model indicating links between more paternal involvement and higher HbA1c and between lower adherence and higher HbA1c. Mediation and moderation models were not supported. Although paternal involvement was not directly associated with treatment adherence, it was associated with poorer glycemic control. Some fathers may increase their involvement in response to suboptimal glycemic outcomes.

  7. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Niels; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine; Sørensen, Torben Egelund; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-12-01

    Music therapy is used in psychiatric treatment of severe psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression and personality disorder. To investigate adherence and predictors for adherence to music therapy treatment in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder. Demographic, psychiatric and therapeutic data were collected for 27 patients receiving music therapy treatment over a 1-year observation period and a 1-year follow-up period. Predictors for adherence to music therapeutic treatment were determined by means of regression analysis. Drop-out from treatment was low (11.5%) and none of the variables significantly predicted adherence. Lack of significance may be because of type 2 error. Patients with severe mental disorder may adhere to music therapy treatment.

  8. Factors related to adherence to treatment for systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to seek the evidence available in the literature regarding the factors related to adherence to treatment for systemic hypertension. It used the method of integrative review in the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, and LILACS, using the keywords: hypertension, compliance, non-compliance, adherence, non-adherence, patient compliance, in the period 2004 – 2008, and articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish, with the use of a validated instrument and content analysis. 28 studies were selected, 64.3% of which had level of evidence VI. The following were identified as factors related to adherence to treatment: treatment costs, educational activities, sex, physician-patient relationship, physiological and behavioral aspects, drug therapy, attending checkups and lifestyle. The use of combined strategies is suggested in order to increase the individuals’ adherence to the treatment. Gaps point to the valorization of dialogic relationships for integrated and more efficacious health practices.

  9. Adherence to internet-based mobile-supported stress management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarski, A C; Lehr, D.; Berking, M.

    2016-01-01

    of this study was to investigate the influence of different guidance formats (content-focused guidance, adherence-focused guidance, and administrative guidance) on adherence and to identify predictors of nonadherence in an Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (ie, GET.ON Stress......) for employees. Methods: The data from the groups who received the intervention were pooled from three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of the same Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (N=395). The RCTs only differed in terms of the guidance format...... (content-focused guidance vs waitlist control, adherence-focused guidance vs waitlist control, administrative guidance vs waitlist control). Adherence was defined by the number of completed treatment modules (0-7). An ANOVA was performed to compare the adherence rates from the different guidance formats...

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii and A. pittii clinical isolates lack adherence and cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Navascués-Lejarza, Teresa; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Navas, Jesús; Icardo, José Manuel; Acosta, Felix; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-09-01

    The molecular and genetic basis of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii virulence remains poorly understood, and there is still lack of knowledge in host cell response to these bacteria. In this study, we have used eleven clinical Acinetobacter strains (A. baumannii n = 5; A. pittii n = 6) to unravel bacterial adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity to human lung epithelial cells. Our results showed that adherence to epithelial cells by Acinetobacter strains is scarce and cellular invasion was not truly detected. In addition, all Acinetobacter strains failed to induce any cytotoxic effect on A549 cells. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Adherence monitoring in naltrexone pharmacotherapy trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Robert; Oslin, David W; Alexander, Mark; Forman, Robert

    2011-11-01

    The efficacy of naltrexone (Revia, Vivitrol) for the treatment of alcohol dependence exhibits a high degree of heterogeneity. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the extent to which variability in patient adherence to treatment contributed to the range of clinical responses observed during naltrexone treatment. A systematic review was conducted of efficacy trials of naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence to evaluate the level of adherence monitoring. Of 49 identified trials, 22 (49%) met the inclusion criteria of being randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that reported adherence. The "adherence-assurance score" of these trials was calculated as a function of the frequency with which "low," "moderate," or "high" confidence levels of adherence monitoring were used. Of these 22 randomized, controlled trials, only 3 (14%) met criteria for high levels of adherence assurance, 5 (23%) met medium adherenceassurance criteria, and 14 (64%) met low adherence criteria. Of the three high-assurance studies, one used direct supervision of thrice-weekly oral dosing of naltrexone, and two used extended-release injectable formulations of naltrexone administered once per month. The Spearman correlation between risk ratios for return to heavy drinking (for naltrexone vs. placebo) and the level of adherence assurance (low vs. medium vs. high) was significant (r = -.62, p = .025). These findings suggest that the modest effect sizes for naltrexone reported in systematic reviews and meta-analyses may be attributable, at least in part, to variability in naltrexone adherence rates. High-assurance adherence strategies should be standard practice in clinical trials of medications being evaluated for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  12. Does good medication adherence really save payers money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Bruce C; Dai, Mingliang; Xu, Jing; Loh, Feng-Hua E; S Dougherty, Julia

    2015-06-01

    Despite a growing consensus that better adherence with evidence-based medications can save payers money, assertions of cost offsets may be incomplete if they fail to consider additional drug costs and/or are biased by healthy adherer behaviors unobserved in typical medical claims-based analyses. The objective of this study was to determine whether controlling for healthy adherer bias (HAB) materially affected estimated medical cost offsets and additional drug spending associated with higher adherence. A total of 1273 Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes enrolled in Part D plans between 2006 and 2009. Using survey and claims data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, we measured medical and drug costs associated with good and poor adherence (proportion of days covered ≥ 80% and <80%, respectively) to oral antidiabetic drugs, ACE inhibitors/ARBs, and statins over 2 years. To test for HAB, we estimated pairs of regression models, one set containing variables typically controlled for in conventional claims analysis and a second set with survey-based variables selected to capture HAB effects. We found consistent evidence that controlling for HAB reduces estimated savings in medical costs from better adherence, and likewise, reduces estimates of additional adherence-related drug spending. For ACE inhibitors/ARBs we estimate that controlling for HAB reduced adherence-related medical cost offsets from $6389 to $4920 per person (P<0.05). Estimates of additional adherence-related drug costs were 26% and 14% lower in HAB-controlled models (P < 0.05). These results buttress the economic case for action by health care payers to improve medication adherence among insured persons with chronic disease. However, given the limitations of our research design, further research on larger samples with other disease states is clearly warranted.

  13. Non-adherence to eye care in people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, Ann P; Hark, Lisa; Pizzi, Laura T; Dai, Yang; Mayro, Eileen L; Storey, Philip P; Leiby, Benjamin E; Haller, Julia A

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate individual factors that impact adherence to eye care follow-up in patients with diabetes. A 4-year retrospective chart review was conducted for 1968 patients with diabetes over age 40 from an urban academic center. Data collected included demographics, insurance, visual acuity, smoking status, medications, dates of dilated fundus examinations (DFE), and reported hemoglobin A1C and blood glucose levels. The primary outcome was timely DFE follow-up adherence following the initial eye exam visit. Overall, 41.6% of patients adhered to initial follow-up eye care recommendations. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients with severe diabetic retinopathy (DR) were more adherent than patients with mild DR (OR 1.86). Other variables associated with increased adherence were visual impairment and reported A1C or blood glucose. Smoking was associated with decreased adherence. Ethnicity and insurance were also significantly associated with adherence. Longitudinal follow-up rates were influenced by additional factors, including ethnicity and neighborhood deprivation index. Patients with moderate to severe DR and/or visual impairment were more likely to adhere to timely DFE follow-up. This could relate to the presence of visual symptoms and/or other systemic manifestations of diabetes. Smokers were less likely to adhere to timely DFE follow-up. One hypothesis is patients who smoke have other symptomatic health problems which patients prioritize over asymptomatic ocular disorders. In order to reduce vision loss from DR, practitioners should be aware that patients with mild and moderate DR, patients with normal vision, and smokers are at greater risk for poor follow-up eye care adherence.

  14. Predictors of duloxetine adherence and persistence in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhanglin; Zhao, Yang; Novick, Diego; Faries, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to medication for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM) is predictive of lower overall health-care costs, and thus a lower burden on both patients and providers. The objectives of this study were to examine the predictors of adherence to and persistence with duloxetine therapy among commercially insured FM patients, and to identify subgroups of patients with high duloxetine persistence and adherence. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed medical and pharmacy records over 1 year for patients in the US aged 18-64 years with FM who initiated (no prior 90-day use) duloxetine treatment in 2008. Adherence to duloxetine was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR), with high adherence defined as MPR ≥ 0.8. Persistence was defined as the duration of therapy from the index date to the earliest of: the ending date of the last prescription, the date of the first gap of >15 days between prescriptions, or the end of the study period (12 months). Demographic and clinical predictors of adherence were examined via multiple logistic regression (MLR), and subgroups of duloxetine-persistent and -adherent patients were identified using classification and regression trees (CART). Among 4660 duloxetine patients, 33% achieved high adherence. Factors associated with high adherence from MLR included older age, North Central and Northeast regions, prior venlafaxine, pregabalin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), or other antidepressant use, or comorbid dyslipidemia or osteoarthritis (all P < 0.05). CART analysis revealed that patients with prior antidepressant use, aged ≥46, or prior osteoarthritis had higher MPR (all P < 0.05), and patients aged ≥45 with a history of SSRI, venlafaxine, or anticonvulsant use had longer duration of therapy (all P < 0.05). Patients with high adherence to and persistence with duloxetine were significantly older and had prior antidepressant use.

  15. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L.S. Cruz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate treatment adherence among perinatally-infected pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients followed in pediatric centers in Brazil. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. Medical records were reviewed and adherence scale, assessment of caregivers' quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substances use/abuse were assessed. Outcomes included self-reported 100% adherence in the last three days and HIV viral load (VL < 50 copies/mL. Statistical analyses included contingency tables and respective statistics, and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: 260 subjects were enrolled: 78% children and 22% adolescents; 93% of caregivers for the children and 77% of adolescents reported 100% adherence; 57% of children and 49% of adolescents had VL < 50 copies/mL. In the univariate analyses, HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection, lower caregiver scores for anxiety, and higher scores in physical and psychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF were associated with 100% adherence. Shorter intervals between pharmacy visits were associated with VL < 50 copies/mL (p ≤ 0.01. Multivariable regression demonstrated that caregivers who did not abuse alcohol/other drugs (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.27-0.89 and median interval between pharmacy visits < 33 days (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98 were independently associated with VL < 50 copies/mL; whereas lower caregiver scores for anxiety (OR = 2.57; 95% CI: 1.27-5.19 and children's HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection (OR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.12-4.50 were found to be independently associated with 100% adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers' quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less-than-optimal adherence.

  16. Viral suppression and adherence among HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy: results of a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Maria L S; Cardoso, Claudete A A; Darmont, Mariana Q; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D; D'Al Fabbro, Marcia M; Fonseca, Rosana; Bellido, Jaime G; Monteiro, Simone S; Bastos, Francisco I

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate treatment adherence among perinatally-infected pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients followed in pediatric centers in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional multicenter study. Medical records were reviewed and adherence scale, assessment of caregivers' quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), anxiety, depression, and alcohol/substances use/abuse were assessed. Outcomes included self-reported 100% adherence in the last three days and HIV viral load (VL)Statistical analyses included contingency tables and respective statistics, and multivariable logistic regression. 260 subjects were enrolled: 78% children and 22% adolescents; 93% of caregivers for the children and 77% of adolescents reported 100% adherence; 57% of children and 49% of adolescents had VLpsychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF were associated with 100% adherence. Shorter intervals between pharmacy visits were associated with VL<50 copies/mL (p ≤ 0.01). Multivariable regression demonstrated that caregivers who did not abuse alcohol/other drugs (OR=0.49; 95% CI: 0.27-0.89) and median interval between pharmacy visits<33 days (OR=0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.98) were independently associated with VL<50 copies/mL; whereas lower caregiver scores for anxiety (OR=2.57; 95% CI: 1.27-5.19) and children's HIV diagnosis for screening due to maternal infection (OR=2.25; 95% CI: 1.12-4.50) were found to be independently associated with 100% adherence. Pediatric HIV programs should perform routine assessment of caregivers' quality of life, and anxiety and depression symptoms. In this setting, pharmacy records are essential to help identify less-than-optimal adherence. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. System for integrated adherence monitoring: real-time non-adherence risk assessment in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Ahna L H; Rausch, Joseph; Tackett, Alayna; Marsolo, Keith; Drotar, Dennis; Goebel, Jens

    2012-06-01

    This study reports initial results of the development of the SIAM, a non-adherence risk assessment system for tacrolimus and sirolimus for the pediatric kidney transplant population. Forty-eight youths between 10 and 25 yr of age diagnosed with chronic kidney disease or a kidney transplant used an electronic pill bottle (EM; time stamps each bottle opening) to dispense their medication for at least 30 days or until their next clinic appointment. Youth also completed a self-report adherence measure, and standard deviations were calculated for the last four medication serum trough levels obtained for each patient. Estimation models were developed for each medication (i.e., SIAM(TACRO) and SIAM(SIRO) ) to assign weights to these clinically available adherence measures (self-report and trough levels) for the calculation of a non-adherence risk composite score. SIAM(TACRO) models included both self-report and tacrolimus trough levels and significantly predicted EM. For sirolimus, the model predictive of adherence as measured by EM consisted of the standard deviation of sirolimus trough levels only (SIAM(SIRO) ). Non-adherence risk can be effectively assessed using clinically available assessment tools. However, the best methods for using self-report and trough levels to predict non-adherence likely differ based on the medication for which adherence is being assessed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Furthering patient adherence: A position paper of the international expert forum on patient adherence based on an internet forum discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.; Dijk, Liset van; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Heerdink, R.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: As the problem of patient non-adherence persists and a solution appears hard to be found, it continues to be important to look for new ways to further the issue. We recently conducted a meta-review of adherence intervention studies which yielded a preliminary agenda for future

  19. Furthering patient adherence: a position paper of the international expert forum on patient adherence based on an internet forum discussion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Sluijs, E.; Dijk, L. van; Ridder, D. de; Heerdink, R.; Bensing, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the problem of patient non-adherence to treatment becomes ever greater and a solution appears hard to find, new ways have to be sought to tackle the issue. Given the weak theoretical underpinning of how to research the adherence problem, a fruitful step might be to find the most

  20. The influence of cultural and religious orientations on social support and its potential impact on medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatah E

    2015-04-01

    , only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus were found to significantly influence patients’ adherence to medications (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.05, P=0.002; OR 0.99, P=0.025; OR 1.19, P=0.038; and OR 9.08, P<0.05, respectively. Conclusion: When examining religious practice and cultural orientation, social support was not found to have significant influence on patients’ medication adherence. Only age, duration of treatment, organizational religious activity, and disease type (human immunodeficiency virus had significant influence on patients’ adherence. Keywords: group orientation, power distance, religiosity

  1. Gene Expression Profiles of Early Implant Adherent Cells in Smokers and Nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Cooper, Lyndon F; Nares, Salvador

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of smoking on the early molecular events involved in peri-implant healing at either a micro-roughened or a micro-roughened with superimposed nanofeatures surface implant in humans. Twenty-one subjects, 10 smokers and 11 nonsmokers received 4 mini-implants (2.2 × 5.0 mm; 2 of each surface). After 3 and 7 days, paired mini-implants were retrieved by reverse threading and RNA isolated from implant adherent cells. Whole genome microarrays were used interrogate the gene expression profiles. The study failed to identify differences in the gene expression profiles of implant adherent cells at this early stage of osseointegration (up to day 7) comparing smoker and nonsmoker individuals.

  2. Highly specific reasons for nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy: results from the German adherence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boretzki J

    2017-11-01

    strong association of physicians’ assessment with viral suppression. Logistic regression analysis showed that “reduced adherence” – defined as unstable or poor – was significantly associated with patients <30 years old, intravenous drug use, history of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, and psychiatric disorders (p<0.05. Univariate analyses showed that specific reasons, such as questioning the efficacy/dosing of ART, HIV stigma, interactive toxicity beliefs regarding alcohol and/or party drugs, and dissatisfaction with regimen complexity, correlated with unstable or poor adherence (p<0.05.Conclusion: Identification of factors associated with poor adherence helps in identifying patients with a higher risk for nonadherence. Reasons for nonadherence should be directly addressed in every patient, because they are common and constitute possible adherence intervention points. Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, HIV, antiretroviral therapy, ART, adherence, nonadherence, patients’ beliefs

  3. Influence of treatment complexity on adherence and incidence of blips in HIV/HCV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Cidoncha, Elena; González-Bueno, Javier; Almeida-González, Carmen Victoria; Morillo-Verdugo, Ramón

    2015-02-01

    The addition of antihepatitis C therapy to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients leads to an increase in the treatment complexity that may result in decreased adherence. Blips, defined as intermittent episodes of detectable low-level HIV viremia, may be an indication of poor adherence to HAART. To (a) determine the influence of adding anti-HCV therapy to HAART on complexity index, adherence, and incidence of blips and (b) determine complexity index and adherence in patient subgroups based on anti-HCV therapy. We conducted a prospective 2-center observational study. HIV/HCV coinfected patients under antiretroviral treatment who started anti-HCV bi-therapy or triple therapy between January 2011 and December 2013 were included. Patients were excluded if they were virologically uncontrolled (HIV viral load greater than 50 copies RNA/mL) or if they had changed antiretroviral treatment in the 6 months prior to the introduction of anti-HCV therapy. Data were collected before and after the addition of anti-HCV therapy to HAART. The main variables were complexity index, incidence of blips, and adherence. The complexity index was based on a score that utilized the number of pills per day, dosing schedule, dosage form, and any specific instructions linked to use of the drug. Blips were defined as a detectable HIV-RNA level ( greater than 50 copies/mL but no more than 1,000 copies/mL) occurring between 2 negative assays. Medication adherence was assessed using electronic pharmacy refill records. The threshold for optimal adherence was defined at 95% and above. Differences in the variables collected were assessed before and after the addition of anti-HCV therapy to HAART.R ESULTS: A total of 66 patients were included in the study. Based on the complexity index, the median value before and after the addition of anti-HCV therapy to HAART was 4.2 (interquartile range [IQR] = 3

  4. Optimizing adherence in HIV prevention product trials: Development and psychometric evaluation of simple tools for screening and adherence counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, Elizabeth E; Guthrie, Kate Morrow; Zissette, Seth; Fava, Joseph L; Gill, Katherine; Louw, Cheryl E; Kotze, Philip; Reddy, Krishnaveni; MacQueen, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    Low adherence in recent HIV prevention clinical trials highlights the need to better understand, measure, and support product use within clinical trials. Conventional self-reported adherence instruments within HIV prevention trials, often relying on single-item questions, have proven ineffective. While objective adherence measures are desirable, none currently exist that apply to both active and placebo arms. Scales are composed of multiple items in the form of questions or statements that, when combined, measure a more complex construct that may not be directly observable. When psychometrically validated, such measures may better assess the multiple factors contributing to adherence/non-adherence. This study aimed to develop and psychometrically evaluate tools to screen and monitor trial participants' adherence to HIV prevention products within the context of clinical trial research. Based on an extensive literature review and conceptual framework, we identified and refined 86 items assessing potential predictors of adherence and 48 items assessing adherence experience. A structured survey, including adherence items and other variables, was administered to former ASPIRE and Ring Study participants and similar non-trial participants (n = 709). We conducted exploratory factor analyses (EFA) to identify a reduced set of constructs and items that could be used at screening to predict potential adherence, and at follow-up to monitor and intervene on adherence. We examined associations with other variables to assess content and construct validity. The EFA of screener items resulted in a 6-factor solution with acceptable to very good internal reliability (α: .62-.84). Similar to our conceptual framework, factors represent trial-related commitment (Distrust of Research and Commitment to Research); alignment with trial requirements (Visit Adherence and Trial Incompatibility); Belief in Trial Benefits and Partner Disclosure. The EFA on monitoring items resulted in 4

  5. Telephone interventions for adherence to colpocytological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thais Marques; Nicolau, Ana Izabel Oliveira; Carvalho, Francisco Herlânio Costa; Vasconcelos, Camila Teixeira Moreira; Aquino, Priscila de Souza; Pinheiro, Ana Karina Bezerra

    2017-02-06

    to test the effects of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone on adherence of women with inappropriate periodicity to colpocytological examination. quasi-experimental study with a sample of 524 women, selected with the following inclusion criteria: be aged between 25 and 64 years, have initiated sexual activity, have inappropriate periodicity of examination and have mobile or landline phone. The women were divided into two groups for application of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone. It was used an intervention script according to the principles of Motivational Interviewing. on comparing the results before and after the behavioral and educational interventions, it was found that there was a statistically significant change (p = 0.0283) with increase of knowledge of women who participated in the educational intervention. There was no change in the attitude of women of any of the groups and there was an increase of adherence to colpocytological examination in both groups (p Entrevista Motivacional. ao comparar antes e depois das intervenções comportamental e educativa constatou-se que houve uma mudança estatisticamente significativa (p = 0,0283) no aumento do conhecimento das mulheres que participaram da intervenção educativa; não houve mudança comprovada na atitude das mulheres de nenhum dos grupos e houve um aumento da adesão ao exame colpocitológico nos dois grupos (p Entrevista Motivacional. al comparar antes y después de la intervención comportamental y educativa se constató que hubo un cambio estadísticamente significativo (p = 0,0283) en el aumento del conocimiento de las mujeres que participaron de la intervención educativa; no hubo cambio comprobado en la actitud de las mujeres de ninguno de los grupos y hubo un aumento de la adhesión al examen de citología vaginal en los dos grupos (p < 0,0001), con mayor adhesión de las mujeres que participaron del grupo comportamental (66,8%). las intervenciones

  6. What strategies do ulcerative colitis patients employ to facilitate adherence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawakami A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aki Kawakami,1,2 Makoto Tanaka,3 Makoto Naganuma,4 Shin Maeda,5 Reiko Kunisaki,1 Noriko Yamamoto-Mitani2 1Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Japan; 2Department of Gerontological Home Care and Long-term Care Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 3Ramathibodi School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Keio University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Gastroenterology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan Background: Overall, 30%–45% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC are non-adherent and have difficulties taking their medications; this non-adherence increases the risk of clinical relapse 1.4- to 5.5-fold. This study aimed to clarify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and determine whether the strategies had an impact on good adherence.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire and review of medical records. Patients diagnosed as having UC and attending one of the outpatient clinics of four urban hospitals from June 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled. A questionnaire was developed to identify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and then administered to patients with UC. Adherence to 5-aminosalicylic acid was calculated, and univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the strategies that were associated with good adherence.Results: The final analyses included 671 participants (mean age 40.2 years; 54.3% males. The valid response rate was 96.9%; 186 (27.7% participants were classified as non-adherent, the mean adherence rate being 86.1% (standard deviation [SD] 17.9. Seven strategies that patients employ to facilitate adherence were identified, the

  7. Aspergillus galactosaminogalactan mediates adherence to host constituents and conceals hyphal β-glucan from the immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice N Gravelat

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of invasive mold disease in humans. The mechanisms underlying the adherence of this mold to host cells and macromolecules have remained elusive. Using mutants with different adhesive properties and comparative transcriptomics, we discovered that the gene uge3, encoding a fungal epimerase, is required for adherence through mediating the synthesis of galactosaminogalactan. Galactosaminogalactan functions as the dominant adhesin of A. fumigatus and mediates adherence to plastic, fibronectin, and epithelial cells. In addition, galactosaminogalactan suppresses host inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, in part through masking cell wall β-glucans from recognition by dectin-1. Finally, galactosaminogalactan is essential for full virulence in two murine models of invasive aspergillosis. Collectively these data establish a role for galactosaminogalactan as a pivotal bifunctional virulence factor in the pathogenesis of invasive aspergillosis.

  8. Adherence to Biobehavioral Recommendations in Pediatric Migraine as Measured by Electronic Monitoring: The Adherence in Migraine (AIM) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diest, Ashley M. Kroon; Ramsey, Rachelle; Aylward, Brandon; Kroner, John W.; Sullivan, Stephanie M.; Nause, Katie; Allen, Janelle R.; Chamberlin, Leigh A.; Slater, Shalonda; Hommel, Kevin; LeCates, Susan L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew D.; Powers, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to examine treatment adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations among pediatric migraine patients using electronic monitoring systems. Background Nonadherence to medical treatment is a significant public health concern, and can result in poorer treatment outcomes, decreased cost-effectiveness of medical care, and increased morbidity. No studies have systematically examined adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations in adolescents with migraine outside of a clinical trial. Methods Participants included 56 adolescents ages 11 – 17 who were presenting for clinical care. All were diagnosed with migraine with or without aura or chronic migraine and had at least 4 headache days per month. Medication adherence was objectively measured using electronic monitoring systems (Medication Event Monitoring Systems technology) and daily, prospective self-report via personal electronic devices. Adherence to lifestyle recommendations of regular exercise, eating, and fluid intake were also assessed using daily self-report on personal electronic devices. Results Electronic monitoring indicates that adolescents adhere to their medication 75% of the time, which was significantly higher than self-reported rates of medication adherence (64%). Use of electronic monitoring of medication detected rates of adherence that were significantly higher for participants taking once daily medication (85%) versus participants taking twice daily medication (59%). Average reported adherence to lifestyle recommendations of consistent non-caffeinated fluid intake (M = 5 cups per day) was below recommended levels of a minimum of 8 cups per day. Participants on average also reported skipping 1 meal per week despite recommendations of consistently eating three meals per day. Conclusions Results suggest that intervention focused on adherence to preventive treatments (such as medication) and lifestyle recommendations may provide more

  9. Adherence to Biobehavioral Recommendations in Pediatric Migraine as Measured by Electronic Monitoring: The Adherence in Migraine (AIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M; Ramsey, Rachelle; Aylward, Brandon; Kroner, John W; Sullivan, Stephanie M; Nause, Katie; Allen, Janelle R; Chamberlin, Leigh A; Slater, Shalonda; Hommel, Kevin; LeCates, Susan L; Kabbouche, Marielle A; O'Brien, Hope L; Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine treatment adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations among pediatric migraine patients using electronic monitoring systems. Nonadherence to medical treatment is a significant public health concern, and can result in poorer treatment outcomes, decreased cost-effectiveness of medical care, and increased morbidity. No studies have systematically examined adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations in adolescents with migraine outside of a clinical trial. Participants included 56 adolescents ages 11-17 who were presenting for clinical care. All were diagnosed with migraine with or without aura or chronic migraine and had at least 4 headache days per month. Medication adherence was objectively measured using electronic monitoring systems (Medication Event Monitoring Systems technology) and daily, prospective self-report via personal electronic devices. Adherence to lifestyle recommendations of regular exercise, eating, and fluid intake were also assessed using daily self-report on personal electronic devices. Electronic monitoring indicates that adolescents adhere to their medication 75% of the time, which was significantly higher than self-reported rates of medication adherence (64%). Use of electronic monitoring of medication detected rates of adherence that were significantly higher for participants taking once daily medication (85%) versus participants taking twice daily medication (59%). Average reported adherence to lifestyle recommendations of consistent noncaffeinated fluid intake (M = 5 cups per day) was below recommended levels of a minimum of 8 cups per day. Participants on average also reported skipping 1 meal per week despite recommendations of consistently eating three meals per day. Results suggest that intervention focused on adherence to preventive treatments (such as medication) and lifestyle recommendations may provide more optimal outcomes for children and adolescents with

  10. Diminished Adherence and/or Ingestion of Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Monocyte-Derived Macrophages from Patients with Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaleta, J.; Arias, M.; Maya, J. R.; García, L. F.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction between the macrophage and Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by a variety of macrophage membrane-associated proteins. Complement receptors have been implicated in the adherence of M. tuberculosis to macrophages. In the present work, the adherence and/or ingestion of M. tuberculosis H37Rv to human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy controls was measured by microscopical examination, [3H]uracil incorporation, and CFU. The adherence and/or ingestion was enhanced by fresh serum and inhibited by heat inactivation, EDTA treatment, and anti-CR1 and anti-CR3 antibodies. Comparison of MDM from TB patients and healthy controls showed that the former exhibited a significantly decreased capacity to adhere and/or ingest M. tuberculosis, as determined by the number of CFU and 3H incorporation. The expression of CR1 (CD35) and CR3 (CD11b/CD18) on MDM from TB patients and healthy controls, as determined by flow cytometry, did not show significant differences. These results suggest that the lower ingestion of M. tuberculosis by MDM from TB patients is not due to defects in complement receptors, and therefore, there might be other molecules involved in the adherence and/or ingestion process that render MDM from TB patients ingest less mycobacteria than those from healthy controls. PMID:9729537

  11. What's in a setting?: Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to clinical guidelines for treating tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y; Leidig, Robynn; Shelley, Donna R

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is an important but underinvestigated feature of the work environment that can impact provider behavior, including adherence to clinical practice guidelines. There is substantial evidence that physician assistance to smokers can produce significant reductions in tobacco use. However, this evidence has not been well translated into practice, as only a small proportion of smokers receive recommended treatment during medical visits. This study examines organizational culture as a contextual feature of primary care clinics and its impact on adherence to evidence-based guidelines for treating tobacco use. Cross-sectional survey data were collected from 500 primary care providers in 60 community clinics located in New York City. Relationships between provider adherence to "5A" clinical guidelines, as recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service, and both provider and organizational covariates were described. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine the associations between clinic culture and provider treatment patterns. Providers in clinics with stronger "group/clan," "hierarchical," and "rational" culture types, as compared with a "developmental" culture, reported greater adherence to 5A guidelines (p organizational culture can influence provider adherence to cessation treatment guidelines, even when controlling for other factors known to affect practice patterns. Specifically, cultures that emphasize human resources and performance standards are conducive to integrating 5A guidelines into routine practice. Understanding the role of organizational culture enables healthcare managers and practitioners to be strategic when implementing, and also sustaining, use of evidence-based guidelines.

  12. Contractile network models for adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthardt Torres, P; Bischofs, I B; Schwarz, U S

    2012-01-01

    Cells sense the geometry and stiffness of their adhesive environment by active contractility. For strong adhesion to flat substrates, two-dimensional contractile network models can be used to understand how force is distributed throughout the cell. Here we compare the shape and force distribution for different variants of such network models. In contrast to Hookean networks, cable networks reflect the asymmetric response of biopolymers to tension versus compression. For passive networks, contractility is modeled by a reduced resting length of the mechanical links. In actively contracting networks, a constant force couple is introduced into each link in order to model contraction by molecular motors. If combined with fixed adhesion sites, all network models lead to invaginated cell shapes, but only actively contracting cable networks lead to the circular arc morphology typical for strongly adhering cells. In this case, shape and force distribution are determined by local rather than global determinants and thus are suited to endow the cell with a robust sense of its environment. We also discuss nonlinear and adaptive linker mechanics as well as the relation to tissue shape. © 2012 American Physical Society

  13. Limits to the adherence of oxide scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.; Manning, M.I.

    1989-10-01

    Fracture mechanics is used to identify criteria under which uniform oxide scales may be expected to fail due to rapidly applied strains. The most common failure mode occurs when the strain, ε, builds up in the scale until the strain energy density per unit area exceeds the fracture surface energy, γ, of the oxide. This produces spalling when ε > (2γ/hE) 1/2 , where h is the scale thickness and E is the oxide Youngs modulus. In thin scales, as the external strain is applied to the oxide via the metal substrate, it is clear that no further strain can be applied to the oxide if the substrate has itself been strained beyond yield. This gives rise to extended oxide adherence in which the oxide cracks and forms a series of islands but remains attached to the deformed metal. When the oxide thickness is less than its comminution limit, the flaw size necessary for brittle fracture exceeds the oxide thickness and the oxide yields in a ductile manner without cracking. The results are presented as maps of failure strain versus oxide thickness for various oxide systems such as Fe 3 O 4 , Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 and NiO. The observed cases of spalling are found to lie within the predicted regions. (author)

  14. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Inflammatory Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Julibert, Alicia; Bouzas, Cristina; Argelich, Emma; Llompart, Isabel; Pons, Antoni; Tur, Josep A

    2018-01-10

    The aim was to assess inflammatory markers among adults and adolescents in relation to the adherence to the Mediterranean diet. A random sample (219 males and 379 females) of the Balearic Islands population (12-65 years) was anthropometrically measured and provided a blood sample to determine biomarkers of inflammation. Dietary habits were assessed and the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern calculated. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased with age in both sexes. The adherence to the Mediterranean diet in adolescent males was 51.3% and 45.7% in adults, whereas in females 53.1% and 44.3%, respectively. In males, higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with higher levels of adiponectin and lower levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in adults, but not in young subjects. In females, higher adherence was associated with lower levels of leptin in the young group, PAI-1 in adults and hs-CRP in both groups. With increasing age in both sexes, metabolic syndrome increases, but the adherence to the Mediterranean diet decreases. Low adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP) is directly associated with a worse profile of plasmatic inflammation markers.

  15. Two character traits associated with adherence to long term therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, Gérard

    2012-10-01

    Adherence is defined as the adequacy between the behaviours of patients and their medical prescriptions. Adherence is a general behaviour, which can explain why patients in the placebo arm of randomised clinical trials have a lower mortality rate when they are adherent. We propose that this behaviour is related to two character traits: patience (capacity to give priority to the future) and, more provocatively, obedience. To support this claim, we bring arguments from the literature and from two published personal studies. We previously showed that type 2 diabetic patients who respond as non-adherers to a questionnaire on adherence to medication and to whom one proposes a fictitious monetary choice between receiving 500 euros today or waiting one year to receive 1500 euros never make the remote choice. We also showed that obese diabetic patients who declare that they do not fasten their seat belt when they are seated in the rear of a car are more often non-adherent concerning medication than those patients who claim that they follow this road safety recommendation. Thus, one of the roles of empowerment and patient education could be to encourage the patients, if they wish it, to replace passive adherence behaviours with conscious active choices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of documented medication non-adherence in physician notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchin, Alexander; Wheeler, Holly I; Labreche, Matthew; Chu, Julia T; Pendergrass, Merri L; Einbinder, Jonathan S; Einbinder, Jonathan Seth

    2008-11-06

    Medication non-adherence is common and the physicians awareness of it may be an important factor in clinical decision making. Few sources of data on physician awareness of medication non-adherence are available. We have designed an algorithm to identify documentation of medication non-adherence in the text of physician notes. The algorithm recognizes eight semantic classes of documentation of medication non-adherence. We evaluated the algorithm against manual ratings of 200 randomly selected notes of hypertensive patients. The algorithm detected 89% of the notes with documented medication non-adherence with specificity of 84.7% and positive predictive value of 80.2%. In a larger dataset of 1,000 documents, notes that documented medication non-adherence were more likely to report significantly elevated systolic (15.3% vs. 9.0%; p = 0.002) and diastolic (4.1% vs. 1.9%; p = 0.03) blood pressure. This novel clinically validated tool expands the range of information on medication non-adherence available to researchers.

  17. [Preservative-containing eye drops and adherence in ophthalmological practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzl, I; Kaercher, T

    2012-11-01

    Chronic eye diseases, such as glaucoma or dry eye syndrome, require long-term drug application to the eyes. Good adherence is required to achieve the therapeutic goal and patient needs and requirements have to be taken into account. This distinguishes adherence to drug therapy from the former compliance which implies only following medical instructions. Adherence is influenced by socioeconomic, health system-related, disease-related, treatment-related and patient-related factors. It can be measured by tedious procedures, such as electronic monitoring, self-assessment, drop counting and laboratory findings of systemic drug levels. Non-adherence is a growing medical problem worldwide. An increase in adherence means an increased degree of therapeutic safety for the patient and long-term cost savings for the individual as well as society. Non-adherence in chronic diseases, such as glaucoma and dry eye syndrome is increased by eye drops that cause side effects. Often these side effects are caused by agents such as the preservative benzalkonium chloride. To achieve a good adherence preservative-free eye drops are advised.

  18. Factors affecting adherence to a raw vegan diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Lilli B; Jacobson, Judith S

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence and identify predictors of adherence to a raw vegan diet (i.e., uncooked plant foods) following a stay at a raw vegan institute. In this cohort study of guests at a raw vegan institute, subjects completed written questionnaires upon arrival and 12 weeks later. Of 107 eligible guests, 84 participated. Mean age was 54 years, 23 were male, and 73 white. Fifty-one completed the 12-week follow-up. Eight (16%) reported their diet to be 80% raw vegan at baseline and 14 (28%) at follow-up. Based on a raw vegan dietary adherence score (range 0-42) created for this study, mean adherence (SD) increased from 15.1 (5.4) to 17.0 (5.8) over 12 weeks (p=0.03). Baseline predictors of adherence included: education (beta=0.95), severity of disease (beta=0.98), and self-efficacy to adhere (beta=0.72). Future interventions that evaluate this diet should address self-efficacy, an important, potentially remediable predictor of adherence.

  19. Adherence of fluid interfaces and colloidal aggregation in emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    This research thesis addresses some aspects of the behaviour of emulsions in which droplets are adhesive, and are thus characterised by their ability to stick to one another or on surfaces. The objective is also to identify various adhesive systems while describing their behaviour in order to start to build up a rationale of these phenomena. The author mainly focuses on the adherence of single layers of adsorbed surfactants: by inducing and controlling this adherence, it is possible to make the droplets stick. After a brief presentation of the wetting phenomenon and of the adherence of emulsion droplets, the author presents theoretical backgrounds of adherence, and describes the thermodynamics of liquid films. He presents the general approach which has been adopted to search for and control adherence phenomena in emulsions, and outlines challenges and difficulties related to the use of adhesive particles in industrial applications. A method of measurement of the contact angle between droplets of some tens of microns is described. In the next part, the author reports the characterisation of adherence properties of different emulsions: measurement of adherence energy with respect to some parameters by using contact angle measurements, study of mixed systems (mixtures of surfactants) to illustrate the applicability to industrial formulas. In a last part, the author reports measurements of film thickness between stuck droplets by using experiments of small angle neutron scattering [fr

  20. Enhanced Adherence in Patients Using an Automated Home Medication Dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Charles; Schweighardt, Anne; Conn, Kelly M; Nelson, Dallas; Barbano, Richard; Marshall, Frederick; Brown, Jack

    2017-07-24

    Many factors contribute to medication nonadherence including psychological and memory disorders, aging, and pill burden. The Automated Home Medication Dispenser (AHMD) is a medication management system intended to help solve unintentional medication nonadherence. The purpose of this study was to determine if use of the AHMD improved medication adherence. We conducted a 6-month prospective, feasibility study assessing use of the AHMD in 21 patient-caregiver dyads. Patients were referred by their physician because of poor medication adherence and included if they resided in Rochester, NY and on at least two medications in pill form. Pill counts were performed at baseline to assess previous adherence. Prospective medication adherence was assessed using AHMD recorded dosing information. A paired t-test was used to compare previous and prospective adherence. The mean age of patients was 75.1 years. Fifteen patients (71.4%) and eight caregivers (38.1%) were women; half (47.6%) of caregivers lived with the patient. The most common patient comorbidities were hypertension (76.2%) and memory disorder (61.9%). Mean adherence increased from 49.0% at baseline to 96.8% after 6 months of AHMD use (p < .001). In a cohort of unintentionally nonadherent patients, use of the AHMD for 6 months significantly improved medication adherence.